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Sample records for preoperative rectal cancer

  1. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, A.O.; Baumann, T.; Pache, G.; Langer, M.; Wiech, T.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate preoperative staging of rectal cancer is crucial for therapeutic decision making, as local tumor extent, nodal status, and patterns of metastatic spread are directly associated with different treatment strategies. Recently, treatment approaches have been widely standardized according to large studies and consensus guidelines. Introduced by Heald, total mesorectal excision (TME) is widely accepted as the surgical procedure of choice to remove the rectum together with its enveloping tissues and the mesorectal fascia. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy also plays a key role in the treatment of locally advanced stages, while the use of new drugs will lead to a further improvement in oncological outcome. Visualization of the circumferential resection margin is the hallmark of any preoperative imaging and a prerequisite for high-quality TME surgery. The aim of this article is to present an overview on current cross-sectional imaging with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging. Future perspectives in rectal cancer imaging are addressed. (orig.)

  2. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials.

  3. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy for advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujinaka, Toshimasa; Murotani, Masahiro; Iihara, Keisuke

    1997-01-01

    Preoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin was applied for advanced rectal cancer. Eligible criteria were as follows: no previous treatment, more than hemicircular occupation, T 3 or more, invasion to adjacent organs or lymph node metastasis on CT scan, tumor fixation by digital examination. Eleven patients were enrolled with this regimen consisting of 5-FU; 500 mg/day x 5/w x 4, CDDP; 10 mg/day x 5/w x 4 and radiation; 2 Gy x 5/w x 4. As a toxicity, grade 2 leukopenia in 2 cases, grade 2 GI symptoms in one case and radiation dermatitis was observed in 8 cases. As a local response, there were PR in 10 cases and NC in 1 case. Surgical resection was performed on 8 patients. Histological responses in the resected specimens were grade 2, 5 cases; grade 1b, 1 case; and grade 1a, 2 cases. Operative radicalities were grade A, 3 cases; grade B, 3 cases; and grade C, 2 cases. Preoperative chemoradiation is one of the effective options in multimodal treatment for advanced rectal cancer. (author)

  4. Clinical target volume for rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorchel, F.; Bossel, J.F.; Baron, M.H.; Goubard, O.; Bartholomot, B.; Mantion, G.; Pelissier, E.P.; Maingon, P.

    2001-01-01

    The total meso-rectal excision allows the marked increase of the local control rate in rectal cancer. Therefore, the meso-rectal space is the usual field for the spread of rectal cancer cells. It could therefore be considered as the clinical target volume in the preoperative plan by the radiation oncologist. We propose to identify the mesorectum on anatomical structures of a treatment-position CT scan. (authors)

  5. Lower rectal cancer. Preoperative staging with CT air enema technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Amane; Fujii, Shouichi; Iwata, Seiichirou

    2009-01-01

    Preoperative assessment of rectal cancer wall invasion is an important indication of the need for lateral side wall dissection. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy rates and clinical usefulness of air-enema CT in preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer. A total of 88 patients diagnosed with lower rectal cancer were examined with an air-enema CT preoperatively and had surgical resection performed. One group was T1-T2 while the other was T3-T4. Forty-two patients were T1-T2, and 46 patients were T3-T4. In univariate and multivariate analysis, irregularities of the rectal wall and spiculated appearance of the rectal wall were significant predictive factors in T3-T4. In patients with air-enema CT findings of rectal wall irregularities and speculated appearance, the accuracy rate for detecting T3-T4 was 85.2-86.45 percent. These results show that air-enema CT is useful for determining the preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer and indication of the need for lateral side wall dissection. (author)

  6. Preoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarashina, Hiromi; Saito, Norio; Nunomura, Masao; Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Koda, Keishi; Sano, Takahisa; Nakashima, Nobuyuki

    1992-01-01

    Eighty patients with rectal cancer received a total of 30.6 Gy to the whole pelvic cavity and then a 12 Gy boost (4 fractions) especially to the pelvis minor including tumor. Tumor reduction, as found on X-ray film, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasonography, CT and MRI, was proportional to histological outcome. Pathological effectiveness was reversely associated with tubular infiltration and extramural invasion. Definite cancer invasion into the adventitia, 2 mm or less from the surgical margin, and lymph node metastasis to group II were significantly responsive to irradiation. In these cases, local failure was also controlled by irradiation. The loco-regional occurrence rate was 6.0% in the irradiated group and 28.0% in the non-irradiated group; and the 5-year survival rate was 69.2% in the irradiated group and 56.0% in the non-irradiated group. It was also significantly higher in patients histopathologically judged as effective than the other patients. (N.K.)

  7. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer; Praeoperatives Staging des Rektumkarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A.O.; Baumann, T.; Pache, G.; Langer, M. [Abt. Roentgendiagnostik, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Wiech, T. [Inst. fuer Pathologie, Universitaetsklinik Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Accurate preoperative staging of rectal cancer is crucial for therapeutic decision making, as local tumor extent, nodal status, and patterns of metastatic spread are directly associated with different treatment strategies. Recently, treatment approaches have been widely standardized according to large studies and consensus guidelines. Introduced by Heald, total mesorectal excision (TME) is widely accepted as the surgical procedure of choice to remove the rectum together with its enveloping tissues and the mesorectal fascia. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy also plays a key role in the treatment of locally advanced stages, while the use of new drugs will lead to a further improvement in oncological outcome. Visualization of the circumferential resection margin is the hallmark of any preoperative imaging and a prerequisite for high-quality TME surgery. The aim of this article is to present an overview on current cross-sectional imaging with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging. Future perspectives in rectal cancer imaging are addressed. (orig.)

  8. Preoperative chemoradiation using oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun-Sang; Kim, Jae-Sung; Cho, Moon-June; Song, Kyu-Sang; Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Capecitabine (Xeloda) is a new orally administered fluoropyrimidine carbamate that was rationally designed to exert its effect by tumor-selective activation. We attempted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of preoperative chemoradiation using capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between July 1999 and March 2001, 45 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3/T4 or N+) were treated with preoperative chemoradiation. Radiation of 45 Gy/25 fractions was delivered to the pelvis, followed by a 5.4 Gy/3 fractions boost to the primary tumor. Chemotherapy was administered concurrent with radiotherapy and consisted of 2 cycles of 14-day oral capecitabine (1650 mg/m 2 /day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m 2 /day), each of which was followed by a 7-day rest period. Surgery was performed 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: Thirty-eight patients received definitive surgery. Primary tumor and node downstaging occurred in 63% and 90% of patients, respectively. The overall downstaging rate, including both primary tumor and nodes, was 84%. A pathologic complete response was achieved in 31% of patients. Twenty-one patients had tumors located initially 5 cm or less from the anal verge; among the 18 treated with surgery, 72% received sphincter-preserving surgery. No Grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities developed. Other Grade 3 toxicities were as follows: hand-foot syndrome (7%), fatigue (4%), diarrhea (4%), and radiation dermatitis (2%). Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that preoperative chemoradiation with capecitabine is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective neoadjuvant treatment modality for locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition, this preoperative treatment has a considerable downstaging effect on the tumor and can increase the possibility of sphincter preservation in distal rectal cancer

  9. Pre-operative radiochemotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Nan Sun; Qi-Chu Yang; Jian-Bin Hu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate results of pre-operative radiochemotherapy followed by surgery for 15 patients with locally advanced un-resectable rectal cancer.METHODS: 15 patients with advanced non-resectable rectal cancer were treated with pre-operative irriadiation of 40-46 Gy plus concomitant chemotherapy (5-FU+LV and 5′-DFuR) (RCS group). For comparison, 27 similar patients,treated by preoperative radiotherapy (40-50 Gy) plus surgery were served as control (RS group).RESULTS: No radiochemotherapy or radiotherapy was interrupted and then was delayed because of toxicities in both groups. The radical resectability rate was 73.3% in the RCS group and 37.0% (P=0.024) in RS group. Sphincter preservation rates were 26.6% and 3.7% respectively (P=0.028). Sphincter preservation rates of lower rectal cancer were 27.3 % and 0.0 % respectively (P=0.014). Response rates of RCS and RS groups were 46.7 % and 18.5 %(P=0.053). The tumor downstage rates were 8 (53.3%)and 9 (33.3%) in these groups (P=0.206). The 3-year overall survival rates were 66.7 % and 55.6% (P=0.485), and the disease free survival rates were 40.1% and 33.2%(P=0.663). The 3-year local recurrent rates were 26.7%and 48.1% (P=0.174). No obvious late effects were found in either groups.CONCLUSION: High resectability is possible following preoperative radiochemotherapy and can have more sphincters preserved. It is important to improve the quality of the patients′ life even without increasing the survival or local control rates. Preoperative radiotherapy with concomitant full course chemotherapy (5-Fu+LV and 5′-DFuR) is effective and safe.

  10. Pelvic lymphoscintigraphy: contribution to the preoperative staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jose Hyppolito da

    1996-01-01

    Preservation of the lower rectal sphincters has been the main concern of colorectal surgeons in an attempt to avoid colostomy. Various proposed procedures contradict the oncological principles of the operation's radicality, especially pelvic lymphadenectomy. Prior knowledge of this space is therefore, an important factor in choosing the operative technique: radical (amputation), or conservative. The introduction of ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have provided preoperative information about the anatomic nature of the region. The morphological and functional study supplied by lymphoscintigraphy of this space supplements the data furnished by the other imaging techniques. The objective of this prospective of this prospective study was threefold: to standardize lymphoscintigraphy, to differentiate patients with rectal cancer from those with other coloproctological diseases and to asses the lymphonodal involvement in the former by utilizing the anatomopathological and surgical correlation. The study included 60 patients with various coloproctological diseases seen on the Department of Gastroentorology, Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, from September 1990 to August 1993. Thirty were cases of rectal cancer and the remainder were other colorectal diseases. The method consisted of injecting 0.5 of a dextran solution market with radioactive technetium in the perineal region and obtaining images by a gamma camera. In the rectal cancer patients, the tracer progresses unilaterally or is absent; in the others, it is bilateral and symmetrical, although its progress may be slow. The statistical data demonstrated that in rectal cancer, lymphoscintigraphy asseses the nodal involvement approximaltely as that obtained by the sun of the anatomapathological and surgical findings. Based on the results, the following conclusioons were possible: lymphoscintigraphy is a standardized, painless and harmless test that can be

  11. Results of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for T4 rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Harunobu; Maeda, Koutarou; Masumori, Koji; Koide, Yoshikazu; Noro, Tomohito; Honda, Katsuyuki; Shiota, Miho; Matsuoka, Shinji; Toyama, Kunihiro

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed clinical records of 11 cases with preoperative chemoradiotherapy to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of chemoradiotherapy for T4 rectal cancer. The preoperative radiotherapy consisted of 40-50 Gy delivered in fractions of 1.8-2.0 Gy per day, five days per week. A treatment of 5-fluorouracil, 500 mg/body per day intravenously, or oral tegafur-uracil (UFT)-E (300 mg/m 2 ) with l-leucovorin (75 mg) per day, or oral S-1 (80 mg/m 2 ) per day five days per week, was given during radiotherapy. One patient died due to pelvic abscess in 63 days after chemoradiotherapy. Invasive findings to the adjacent organs identified by CT and MRI disappeared in 6 cases with complete or partial response 1 month after chemoradiotherapy. Curative surgery was performed in 7 patients. Although the adjacent organs were also removed during surgery in 7 patients, there was no histological invasion to the adjacent organs in 4 patients, and one patient had histological complete disappearance of tumor. Although complications after surgery were found in all of the patients, they were improved by conservative treatment. Two of 7 patients with curative surgery had recurrence, but the rest of them survived without recurrence. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy was expected to be an effective treatment to improve the resection rate and prognosis for T4 rectal cancer. However, it was thought that it was necessary to be careful about severe toxicity, such as pelvic abscess. (author)

  12. Clinicopathological studies on three preoperative combined treatments for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Yuji; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Iizuka, Ryouji; Hagiwara, Akeo; Sawai, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu; Takahashi, Toshio

    1995-01-01

    To prevent postoperative local recurrence of rectal cancer, we treated patients using preoperative hyperthermia (5-6 times), irradiation (total 30 Gy) and 5-fluorouracil suppository (2,000-2,500 mg). The subjects were 31 patients given combined treatments and 28 patients given surgery alone. The results were as follows: Histologically, therapeutic effects were recognized in 80.6% of patients receiving combined treatments. The mean distance from the adventitia to the site of cancer infiltration was 6.54 mm in the combined treatments group and 3.35 mm in the surgery alone group. The difference between the two was significant (p<0.05). The rate of local recurrence in the combined treatments group was less than that in the surgery alone group. No systemic side effects nor severe complications were observed during hospitalization in the combined treatments group. The survival rate of the combined treatments group was higher than that of the surgery alone group. It was considered that combined preoperative treatments for rectal cancer were beneficial to survival and local control. (author)

  13. Results of preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

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    Choi, Sang Gyu; Kim, Su Ssan; Bae, Hoon Sik [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    We performed a retrospective non-randomized clinical study of locally advanced rectal cancer, to evaluate the anal sphincter preservation rates, down staging rates and survival rates of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. From January 2002 to December 2005, patients with pathologically confirmed rectal cancer with clinical stage T2 or higher, or patients with lymph node metastasis were enrolled in this study. A preoperative staging work-up was conducted in 36 patients. All patients were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy, and curative resection was performed for 26 patients at Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital. Radiotherapy treatment planning was conducted with the use of planning CT for all patients. A total dose of 45.0 {approx} 52.2 Gy conventionally fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy was delivered to the whole pelvis. Chemotherapy was given at the first and fifth week of radiation therapy with continuous infusion i.v. 5-FU (Fluorouracil) and LV (Leucovorine). Surgical resection was performed 2 to 4 weeks after the completion of the chemoradiotherapy regimen. The complete resection rate with negative resection margin was 100% (26/26). However, a pathologically complete response was not seen after curative resection. Surgery was done by LAR (low anterior resection) in 23 patients and APR (abdomino-perineal resection) in 3 patients. The sphincter preservation rate was 88.5% (23/26), down staging of the tumor occurred in 12 patients (46.2%) and down-sizing of the tumor occurred in 19 patients (73%). Local recurrence after surgical resection developed in 1 patient, and distant metastasis developed in 3 patients. The local recurrence free survival rate, distant metastasis free survival rate, and progression free survival rate were 96.7%, 87% and 83.1%, respectively. Treatment related toxicity was minimal except for one grade 3, one grade 4 anemia, one grade 3 leukopenia, and one grade 3 ileus. Preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally

  14. Preoperative infusional chemoradiation therapy for stage T3 rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, T.A.; Skibber, J.M.; Ajani, J.A. [Univ. of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-15

    To evaluate preoperative infusional chemoradiation for patients with operable rectal cancer. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy using infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (300 mg/m{sup 2}/day) together with daily irradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) was administered to 77 patients with clinically Stage T3 rectal cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound confirmed the digital rectal exam in 63 patients. Surgery was performed approximately 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation therapy and included 25 abdominoperineal resections and 52 anal-sphincter-preserving procedures. Posttreatment tumor stages were T1-2, N0 in 35%, T3, N0 in 25%, and T1-3, N1 in 11%; 29% had no evidence of tumor. Local tumor control after chemoradiation was seen in 96% (74 out of 77); 2 patients had recurrent disease at the anastomosis site and were treated successfully with abdominoperineal resection. Overall, pelvic control was obtained in 99% (76 out of 77). The survival after chemoradiation was higher in patients without node involvement than in those having node involvement (p = n.s.). More patients with pathologic complete responses or only microscopic foci survived than did patients who had gross residual tumor (p = 0.07). The actuarial survival rate was 83% at 3 years; the median follow-up was 27 months, with a range of 3 to 68 months. Acute, perioperative, and late complications were not more numerous or more severe with chemoradiation therapy than with traditional radiation therapy (XRT) alone. Excellent treatment response allowed two-thirds of the patients to have an anal-sphincter-sparing procedure. Gross residual disease in the resected specimen indicates a poor prognosis, and therapies specifically targeting these patients may improve survival further. 22 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Effectiveness of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Masaomi; Mizuta, Minoru; Kaji, Mitsumasa

    2006-01-01

    To determine the pathologic effectiveness of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with advanced rectal carcinoma, we reviewed clinical records of 76 patients who received preoperative pelvic radiation +/- chemotherapy. Since 2 patients refused operation and 2 died before surgery, 72 patients underwent operation with a mean delay of 19.9 days after completion of irradiation. Pathologic tumor regression grade (Grade 0-3) was determined by the amount of viable tumor versus necrosis and fibrosis. Grade 0, 1a, 1b, 2, and 3 (pCR) were observed in 0%, 25.0%, 38.9%, 27.8% and 2.8% of patients, respectively. The pathologic response (PR) rate was 75.0% when PR was defined as greater than grade 1b (tumor regression more than 1/3). Downstaging was observed in 35.8% of patients, in which 5-year overall survival was significantly better than in patients without downstaging (90.0% vs. 50.1%, p<0.05). No correlation could be observed between PR and downstaging. CRT is a useful tool with a high PR rate in patients with advanced rectal cancer. More accurate and careful clinical staging is important to select adequate candidates for CRT. Multi-institutional clinical trials as well as standardizing the surgical procedure including lymph node (LN) dissection are required to validate the advantages of CRT for Japanese patients. (author)

  16. Cost-effectiveness of preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer: results from the Swedish Rectal Cancer Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlberg, Michael; Stenborg, Anna; Paahlman, Lars; Glimelius, Bengt

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The Swedish Rectal Cancer Trial (SRCT) demonstrated that a short-term regimen of high-dose fractionated preoperative radiotherapy (5 x 5 Gy) reduced the local recurrence rates and improved overall survival. This has had an impact on the primary treatment of rectal cancer. The current study investigated the cost-effectiveness of the new combined approach. Methods and Materials: After an 8-year follow-up, in-hospital and outpatient costs related to the treatment of rectal cancer and its complications were analyzed for 98 randomly allocated patients who participated in the SRCT from a single Swedish health care region. The costs were then related to the clinical data from the SRCT regarding complications, local and distant recurrences, and survival. Results: The total cost for a nonirradiated patient was US$30,080 compared with US$35,268 for an irradiated patient. The surgery-alone group had increased costs related to local recurrences, and the radiotherapy group had increased costs for irradiation and complications. With a survival benefit of 21 months (retrieved from the SRCT), the cost for a saved year was US$3654. Sensitivity analyses for different rates of local recurrences, the costs related to complications and less marked survival benefit showed that this figure could vary up to US$15,228. Conclusion: The cost for a life-year saved in these data was US$3654. This figure could reach US$15,228 in the most pessimistic setting of the sensitivity tests, a cost still comparable with other well-accepted medical interventions

  17. Preoperative concurrent chemo-radiation in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Kirscher, S.; Felix-Faure, C.; Chauvet, B.; Vincent, P.; Brewer, Y.; Reboul, F.

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate retrospectively treatment-related morbidity of concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy for rectal cancer. Between 1992 and 1995, 38 patients (median age: 60) were treated for locally advanced resectable rectal cancer. Median dose of radiotherapy was 45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks. Chemotherapy consisted of two courses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin administered during the first and the fifth weeks of radiotherapy. Median dose of 5-fluorouracil was 350 mg/m 2 /day, and median dose of leucovorin was 350 mg/m 2 /day, day 1 to day 5. Surgery was performed 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Before surgery, one patient died of febrile neutropenia and sepsis after two cycles of chemotherapy and 45 Gy. Main pre-operative grade 3-4 toxicities were respectively: neutropenia: 3% ; nausea/vomiting: 3%; diarrhea: 3%; proctitis: 5%; radiation dermatitis: 8%. Twenty-six patients underwent a low anterior resection and 11 an abdomino-perineal resection. A temporary colostomy was performed in 12 patients. Pathologic complete response rate was 27 %. There was one post-operative death due to thrombo-embolic disease. Major post-operative grade 3-4 complications were: pelvic infection: 14 %; abdominal infection : 5%; perineal sepsis: 8%; anastomotic dehiscence: 8%; cardiac failure: 5%. Delayed perineal wound healing was observed in six patients. No significant prognostic factor of post-operative complications has been observed. Median duration of hospitalization was 22 days. With a median follow-up of 24 months, 2-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 82 and 64%. Tolerance of preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy was acceptable. Ongoing controlled studies will assess the impact of this combined treatment on survival. (authors)

  18. Haemostatis activity in rectal cancer patients exposed to preoperative radiotherapy: a clinical prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Mogens T; Larsen, Torben B; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether markers of haemostasis activity increased during preoperative radiotherapy and whether postoperative marker levels were increased in irradiated rectal cancer patients when compared with nonirradiated rectal and colon cancer patients. In 45 rectal cancer patients, we measured...... plasma levels of prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2), thrombin-antithrombin complex, and D-dimer during radiotherapy. Postoperative levels of F1 + 2, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and D-dimer in irradiated patients were compared with postoperative levels in 123 nonirradiated colon and rectal cancer...... for activation of the haemostatic system during preoperative radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. Some evidence was provided for increased postoperative haemostatic activity among rectal cancer patients who received short-term high-intensity radiotherapy, when compared with patients who received long...

  19. Pelvic lymphoscintigraphy: contribution to the preoperative staging of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva José Hyppolito da

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Preservation of the anal sphincter in surgery for cancer of the distal rectum in an attempt to avoid colostomy has been a main concern of colorectal surgeons. Various proposed procedures contradict oncological principles, especially with respect to pelvic lymphadenectomy. Therefore, prior knowledge of pelvic lymph node involvement is an important factor in choosing the operative technique, i.e., radical or conservative resection. Introduction of ultrasound, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance have made preoperative study of the area possible. Nevertheless, these resources offer information of an anatomical nature only. Lymphoscintigraphy enables the morphological and functional evaluation of the pelvic area and contributes toward complementing the data obtained with the other imaging techniques. The objective of this prospective study is twofold: to standardize the lymphoscintigraphy technique and to use it to differentiate patients with rectal cancer from those with other coloproctologic diseases. CASUISTIC AND METHODS: Sixty patients with various coloproctologic diseases were studied prospectively. Ages ranged from 21 to 96 years (average, 51 and median, 55 years. Twenty-six patients were male and 34 were female. Thirty patients had carcinoma of the distal rectum as diagnosed by proctologic and anatomic-pathologic examinations, 20 patients had hemorrhoids, 5 had chagasic megacolon, 2 had diverticular disease, 2 had neoplasm of the right colon, and 1 had ulcerative colitis as diagnosed by proctologic exam and/or enema. The lymphoscintigraphy method consisted of injecting 0.25 mL of a dextran solution marked with radioactive technetium-99m into the right and left sides of the perianal region and obtaining images with a gamma camera. The results were analyzed statistically with a confidence level of 95% (P < .05 using the following statistical techniques: arithmetic and medium average, Fisher exact test, chi-square test

  20. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  1. International preoperative rectal cancer management: staging, neoadjuvant treatment, and impact of multidisciplinary teams.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Augestad, Knut M

    2010-11-01

    Little is known regarding variations in preoperative treatment and practice for rectal cancer (RC) on an international level, yet practice variation may result in differences in recurrence and survival rates.

  2. Decreased tumor cell proliferation as an indicator of the effect of preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adell, Gunnar; Zhang Hong; Jansson, Agneta; Sun Xiaofeng; Staal, Olle; Nordenskjoeld, Bo

    2001-01-01

    Background: Rectal cancer is a common malignancy, with significant local recurrence and death rates. Preoperative radiotherapy and refined surgical technique can improve local control rates and disease-free survival. Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the tumor growth fraction in rectal cancer measured with Ki-67 and the outcome, with and without short-term preoperative radiotherapy. Method: Ki-67 (MIB-1) immunohistochemistry was used to measure tumor cell proliferation in the preoperative biopsy and the surgical specimen. Materials: Specimens from 152 patients from the Southeast Swedish Health Care region were included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial 1987-1990. Results: Tumors with low proliferation treated with preoperative radiotherapy had a significantly reduced recurrence rate. The influence on death from rectal cancer was shown only in the univariate analysis. Preoperative radiotherapy of tumors with high proliferation did not significantly improve local control and disease-free survival. The interaction between Ki-67 status and the benefit of radiotherapy was significant for the reduced recurrence rate (p=0.03), with a trend toward improved disease-free survival (p=0.08). In the surgery-alone group, Ki-67 staining did not significantly correlate with local recurrence or survival rates. Conclusion: Many Ki-67 stained tumor cells in the preoperative biopsy predicts an increased treatment failure rate after preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer

  3. Intrarectal ultrasound accuracy in preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallone, G.; Della Vecchia, A.; Di Capua, V.; Rengo, C.; Spirito, M.; Romano, G.

    1988-01-01

    The capabilities were evaluated of endorectal ultrasound in assessing the local extension of rectal carcinomas. The study population consisted of 50 patients with histologically proven rectal cancer. A CT scan was also performed on 45 patients, and the results were then compared to post-operative histologic findings. Endorectal US allowed the correct staging of 39/45 tumors (86.6%), with 1 false positive (overstaging T1 as T2), and 5 false negatives (understaging 3xT3 as T2; 2xT4 as T3). CT allowed the correct staging of 37/45 tumors (82.2%), with 5 false positives (overstaging T1 as T2) and 3 false negatives (understaging T3 as T2). Our results prove endorectal US to be a reliable method for the local staging of rectal cancers, limited to mucosa, submucosa and muscular layers of the rectal wall (T1 and T2 tumors). CT does not allow proper evaluation of T1 and T2 tumors, but provides with a better assessment of tumors (T3 and T4). Both C and endorectal US should, therefore, be used as complementary diagnostic techniques for an accurate evaluation of the local extension of lower rectal cancers

  4. Analysis of clinical factors for pathological complete response after preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayiguli Hare; Palida Apizi; Iskandar Abulimiti; Zhang Jinrong; Tian Hanhan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical factors associated with pathological complete response (pCR) after preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 116 patients with rectal cancer, who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by radical surgery from January 2009 to December 2012. All patients received pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (50 Gy/25 fractions) with concurrent fluorouracil based chemotherapy and then underwent radical surgery 4-8 weeks later. The clinical factors associated with pCR or non-pCR were analyzed by Logistic regression. Results: Of the 116 patients, 20 (17.2%) achieved a pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The univariate analysis showed that percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor, preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, T stage, N stage, distance from the anal verge, degree of tumor differentiation, and maximum tumor diameter were associated with pCR or non-pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. The multivariate analysis revealed that percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor, preoperative serum CEA level,and T stage were predictive factors for pCR or non-pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Conclusions: Non-circumferential tumor (percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor <75 %), low CEA level, and early T stage before treatment may be associated with pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. (authors)

  5. Laparoscopic surgery for lower rectal cancer with neoadjuvant preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Keisaku; Okuda, Junji; Tanaka, Keitaro

    2012-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) is an accepted standard treatment for low rectal advanced cancer to improve the local control in western countries. Recently laparoscopy has been recognized as an excellent tool from a view point of its magnification. Therefore, we have performed many laparoscopic surgeries for locally advanced rectal cancer after NACRT, We evaluated our results in this study. We studied 100 patients underwent surgery for locally advanced low rectal cancer after NACRT. Rate of sphincter preserving surgery was 74%. Rate of laparoscopic surgery was 95%. Positive distal resection margins were not identified in all patients. Positive circumferencial resection margins were identified in only two patients. The pathological complete response rate was 15%. The rate of postoperative complications was 15%. Complications were as follows: wound infection (9%), pelvic abscess (2%), ileus (2%) and others (2%), however without mortality. Anastomotic leakage was not observed in all cases, even though we routinely created diverting stoma. Laparoscopic surgery for low rectal cancer after NACRT is considered to be a safe and feasible procedure. (author)

  6. A systematic approach to the interpretation of preoperative staging MRI for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Fiona G M; Swift, Robert I; Blomqvist, Lennart; Brown, Gina

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an aid to the systematic evaluation of MRI in staging rectal cancer. MRI has been shown to be an effective tool for the accurate preoperative staging of rectal cancer. In the Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Rectal Cancer European Equivalence Study (MERCURY), imaging workshops were held for participating radiologists to ensure standardization of scan acquisition techniques and interpretation of the images. In this article, we report how the information was obtained and give examples of the images and how they are interpreted, with the aim of providing a systematic approach to the reporting process.

  7. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy and colonic J-pouch anal anastomosis for lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Okigami, Masato; Kawamoto, Aya; Hiro, Junichiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Kobayashi, Minako; Tanaka, Koji; Miki, Chikao; Kusunoki, Masato

    2011-01-01

    We performed colonic J-pouch anal anastomosis in 61 patients with rectal cancer located <4 cm from the anal verge. Surgical and oncological results were evaluated in multimodality therapy for advanced rectal cancer. According to Wexner's score, 7% of patients were fully continent, 71% had acceptable function with minor continence problems, and 22% were incontinent. No patients required intermittent self-catheterization during follow-up. After a median follow-up of 49 months, there was only 1 case of local recurrence after surgery. Our surgical approach irrespective of internal sphincter resection produces satisfactory functional and oncological results in multimodality therapy using preoperative chemoradiotherapy for lower rectal cancer. (author)

  8. Assessing the effectiveness of a guideline recommendation for pre-operative radiochemotherapy in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchon-Walsh, Paula; Borras, Josep Maria; Espinas, Josep Alfons; Aliste, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To ascertain the degree of adherence to the guideline recommendation on pre-operative RT/ChT for stage-II and -III patients in Catalonian public hospitals, and its impact on local recurrence among rectal cancer patients. Methods: Data were derived from a multicentre retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent curative-intent surgery for primary rectal cancer at Catalonian public hospitals in 2005 and 2007. Results: The study covered 1229 patients with TNM stage-II or -III primary rectal cancer. Of these patients, 54.5% underwent pre-operative RT/ChT; 14.9% underwent post-operative RT (± chemotherapy); and 30.6% did not undergo any RT. The crude local recurrence rate at 2 years was 4.1% and the crude distant recurrence rate at 2 years was 6.5%. The results of the univariate analyses showed a local-recurrence hazard ratio of 1.84 for the group of patients that received no RT versus the group that received pre-operative RT/ChT (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This is the first population-based study in Catalonia to support the use of pre-operative RT/ChT in rectal cancer patients because, in line with the results of population-based studies reported from other countries, its application, compared to non-application of RT, was found to lead to a clear reduction in the probability of local recurrence.

  9. Preoperative radio-chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Forecasting the next steps through ongoing and forthcoming studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crehange, G.; Maingon, P.; Bosset, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Protracted preoperative radio-chemotherapy with a 5-FU-based scheme, or a short course of preoperative radiotherapy without chemotherapy, are the standard neo-adjuvant treatments for resectable stage II-III rectal cancer. Local failure rates are low and reproducible, between 6 and 15% when followed with a 'Total Meso-rectal Excision'. Nevertheless, the therapeutic strategy needs to be improved: distant metastatic recurrence rates remain stable around 30 to 35%, while both sphincter and sexual sequels are still significant. The aim of the present paper was to analyse the ongoing trials listed on the following search engines: the Institut National du Cancer in France, the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Health in the United States, and the major cooperative groups. Keywords for the search were: 'rectal cancer', 'preoperative radiotherapy', 'phase II-III', 'preoperative chemotherapy', 'adjuvant chemotherapy' and 'surgery'. Twenty-three trials were selected and classified in different groups, each of them addressing a question of strategy: (1) place of adjuvant chemotherapy; (2) optimization of preoperative radiotherapy; (3) evaluation of new radiosensitization protocols and/or neo-adjuvant chemotherapy; (4) optimization of techniques and timing of surgery; (5) place of radiotherapy for non resectable or metastatic tumors. (authors)

  10. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes predict efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Gang; Zhang Shanwen; Xu Bo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of tumor infiltrating lymphocyte(TIL) on prognosis of rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy. Methods: From Jan. 1999 to Oct. 2007,107 patients with rectal cancer were treated with preoperative radiotherapy of 30 Gy/10f/12 days. The relationships among TIL, pathologic regression and prognosis were analyzed. Results: Before radiotherapy, TIL in rectal cancer was 75 patients (70.1%) in grade 1,16 (15.0%) in grade 2 and 16 (15.0%) in grade 3; While after radiotherapy, it changed to 19 (17.7%) in grade 1,43 (40.2%) in grade 2,35 (32.7%) in grade 3 and 10 (9.3%) in grade 4. After radiotherapy, pathologic regression was 36 (33.6%) in grade 1,57 (53.3%) in grade 2 and 14 (13.1%) in grade 3. Univariate analysis showed that TIL both before and after radiotherapy was the significant prognostic factor for local pathologic regression (χ 2 =36.80, P 2 = 14.00, P 2 =24.00, P 2 =12.17, P 2 =8.05, P<0.01). Conclusions: For rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy, TIL before and after radiotherapy is significantly related with local pathologic regression, and TIL after radiotherapy is a prognostic factor. (authors)

  11. Sphincter preservation in distal CT2N0 rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserberg, Nir; Kundel, Yulia; Purim, Ofer; Keidar, Andrei; Kashtan, Hanoch; Sadot, Eran; Fenig, Eyal; Brenner, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is usually not indicated for cT2N0 rectal cancer. Abdominoperineal resection is the standard treatment for distal rectal tumors. The aim of the study was to evaluate the actual sphincter-preservation rate in patients with distal cT2N0 rectal cancer given neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Data were retrospectively collected for all patients who were diagnosed with distal cT2N0 rectal cancer at a tertiary medical center in 2000–2008 and received chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery (5–7 weeks later). Thirty-three patients (22 male) of median age 65 years (range, 32–88) were identified. Tumor distance from the anal verge ranged from 0 to 5 cm. R0 resection with sphincter preservation was accomplished in 22 patients (66%), with a 22% pathological complete response rate. Median follow-up time was 62 months (range 7–120). There were no local failures. Crude disease-free and overall survival were 82% and 86%, respectively. Factors associated with sphincter preservation were tumor location (OR = 0.58, p = 0.02, 95% CI = 0.37-0.91) and pathological downstaging (OR = 7.8, p = 0.02, 95% CI = 1.35-45.85). Chemoradiotherapy was well tolerated. High rates of sphincter preservation can be achieved after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for distal cT2N0 rectal cancer, with tolerable toxicity, without compromising oncological outcome

  12. Pathological response of locally advanced rectal cancer to preoperative chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensignor, T; Brouquet, A; Dariane, C; Thirot-Bidault, A; Lazure, T; Julié, C; Nordlinger, B; Penna, C; Benoist, S

    2015-06-01

    Pathological response to chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation is not well defined in rectal cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the objective pathological response to preoperative chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation in middle or low locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Between 2008 and 2013, 22 patients with middle or low LARC (T3/4 and/or N+ and circumferential resection margin rectal resection after preoperative chemotherapy. The pathological response of rectal tumour was analysed according to the Rödel tumour regression grading (TRG) system. Predictive factors of objective pathological response (TRG 2-4) were analysed. All patients underwent rectal surgery after a median of six cycles of preoperative chemotherapy. Of these, 20 (91%) had sphincter saving surgery and an R0 resection. Twelve (55%) patients had an objective pathological response (TRG 2-4), including one complete response. Poor response (TRG 0-1) to chemotherapy was noted in 10 (45%) patients. In univariate analyses, none of the factors examined was found to be predictive of an objective pathological response to chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 37.2 months, none of the 22 patients experienced local recurrence. Of the 19 patients with Stage IV rectal cancer, 15 (79%) had liver surgery with curative intent. Preoperative chemotherapy without pelvic irradiation is associated with objective pathological response and adequate local control in selected patients with LARC. Further prospective controlled studies will address the question of whether it can be used as a valuable alternative to radiochemotherapy in LARC. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. Prognostic significance of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) gene expression in rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saigusa, Susumu; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Kohei; Uchida, Keiichi; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Kusunoki, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Most cancer cells exhibit increased glycolysis. The elevated glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) expression has been reported to be associated with resistance to therapeutic agents and a poor prognosis. We wondered whether GLUT1 expression was associated with the clinical outcome in rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and whether glycolysis inhibition could represent a novel anticancer treatment. We obtained total RNA from residual cancer cells using microdissection from a total of 52 rectal cancer specimens from patients who underwent preoperative CRT. We performed transcriptional analyzes, and studied the association of the GLUT1 gene expression levels with the clinical outcomes. In addition, we examined each proliferative response of three selected colorectal cancer cell lines to a glycolysis inhibitor, 3-bromopyruvic acid (3-BrPA), with regard to their expression of the GLUT1 gene. An elevated GLUT1 gene expression was associated with a high postoperative stage, the presence of lymph node metastasis, and distant recurrence. Moreover, elevated GLUT1 gene expression independently predicted both the recurrence-free and overall survival. In the in vitro studies, we observed that 3-BrPA significantly suppressed the proliferation of colon cancer cells with high GLUT1 gene expression, compared with those with low expression. An elevated GLUT1 expression may be a useful predictor of distant recurrence and poor prognosis in rectal cancer patients after preoperative CRT. (author)

  14. Livin expression is an independent factor in rectal cancer patients with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Olsson, Birgit; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression significance of Livin in relation to radiotherapy (RT), clinicopathological and biological factors of rectal cancer patients. This study included 144 primary rectal cancer patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Tissue microarray samples from the excised primary rectal cancers, normal mucosa and lymph node metastases were immunostained with Livin antibody. The proliferation of colon cancer cell lines SW620 and RKO was assayed after Livin knock-down. The expression of Livin was significantly increased from adjacent (P = 0.051) or distant (P = 0.028) normal mucosa to primary tumors. 15.4% (2/13) and 39.7% (52/131) patients with Livin-negative and positive tumors died at 180 months after surgery, and the difference tended to be statistically significant (P = 0.091). In multivariate analyses, the difference achieved statistical significance, independent of TNM stage, local and distant recurrence, grade of differentiation, gender, and age (odds ratio = 5.09, 95% CI: 1.01-25.64, P = 0.048). The in vitro study indicated colon cancer cells with Livin knock-down exhibited decreased proliferation compared with controls after RT. The expression of Livin was was independently related to survival in rectal cancer patients, suggesting Livin as a useful prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients

  15. Expression of FXYD-3 is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Rectal Cancer Patients With Preoperative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loftas, Per; Onnesjoe, Sofia; Widegren, Emma; Adell, Gunnar; Kayed, Hany; Kleeff, Joerg; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Sun Xiaofeng

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: FXYD-3 (MAT-8) is overexpressed in several types of cancers; however, its clinical relevance in rectal cancers has not been studied. Therefore, we examined FXYD-3 expression in rectal cancers from the patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) to determine whether FXYD-3 was overexpressed in rectal cancers and correlated with RT, survival, and other clinicopathologic variables. Methods and Materials: The study included 140 rectal cancer patients who participated in a clinical trial of preoperative RT, 65 with and 75 without RT before surgery. FXYD-3 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 70) and adjacent (n = 101) normal mucosa, primary tumors (n = 140), and lymph node metastasis (n = 36). Results: In the whole cohort, strong FXYD-3 expression was correlated with infiltrative tumor growth (p = 0.02). In the RT group, strong FXYD-3 expression alone (p = 0 .02) or combined with phosphatase of regenerating liver was associated with an unfavorable prognosis (p = 0.02), independent of both TNM stage and tumor differentiation. In tumors with strong FXYD-3 expression, there was less tumor necrosis (p = 0.02) and a trend toward increased incidence of distant metastasis (p = 0.08) after RT. None of these effects was seen in the non-RT group. FXYD-3 expression in the primary tumors tended to be increased compared with normal mucosa regardless of RT. Conclusion: FXYD-3 expression was a prognostic factor independent of tumor stage and differentiation in patients receiving preoperative RT for rectal cancer.

  16. Outcomes of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Combined Chemotherapy with Radiotherapy Without Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supaadirek, Chunsri; Pesee, Montien; Thamronganantasakul, Komsan; Thalangsri, Pimsiree; Krusun, Srichai; Supakalin, Narudom

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the treatment outcomes of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) or combined chemotherapy together with radiotherapy (CMTRT) without surgery. A total of 84 patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma (stage II or III) between January 1st, 2003 and December 31st, 2013 were enrolled, 48 treated with preoperative CCRT (Gr.I) and 36 with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy (CMTRT) without surgery (Gr.II). The chemotherapeutic agents used concurrent with radiotherapy were either 5fluorouracil short infusion plus leucovorin and/or capecitabine or 5fluorouracil infusion alone. All patients received pelvic irradiation. There were 5 patients (10.4%) with a complete pathological response. The 3 yearoverall survival rates were 83.2% in Gr.I and 24.8 % in Gr.II (prectal cancer demonstrated that in preoperative CCRT a sphincter sparing procedure can be performed. The results of treatment with preoperative CCRT for locally advanced rectal cancer showed comparable rates of overall survival and sphincter sparing procedures as compared to previous studies.

  17. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Related to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxing Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to pre-CRT in patients of stage II/III rectal cancer. Materials and Methods. Questionnaires regarding the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of pre-CRT were mailed to 145 rectal cancer patients in II/III stage between January 2012 and December 2014, and 111 agreed to participate and returned completed questionnaires to the researcher. Logistic regression model was used to compare sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, and attitude with practice, respectively. Results. A total of 145 patients were approached for interview, of which 111 responded and 48.6% (54 had undergone pre-CRT. Only 31.5% of the participants knew that CRT is a treatment of rectal cancer and 39.6% were aware of the importance of CRT. However, the vast majority of participants (68.5% expressed a positive attitude toward rectal cancer. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that knowledge level (p=0.006 and attitudes (p=0.001 influence the actual practice significantly. Furthermore, age, gender, and income were potential predictors of practice (all p<0.05. Conclusion. This study shows that, despite the fact that participants had suboptimal level of knowledge on rectal cancer, their attitude is favorable to pre-CRT. Strengthening the professional health knowledge and realizing the importance of attitudes may deepen patients’ understanding of preoperative therapy.

  18. PET/CT and histopathologic response to preoperative chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, C.; Loft, A.; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using positron emission tomography/computer tomography to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. METHODS: The study included 30 patients with locally...... is not able to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer. There is an obvious need for other complementary methods especially with respect to the low sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computer tomography Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1...... advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with a combination of radiotherapy and concurrent Uftoral (uracil, tegafur) and leucovorine. All patients were evaluated by positron emission tomography/computer tomography scan seven weeks after end of chemoradiation, and the results were compared to histopathologic...

  19. PET/CT and Histopathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Charlotte; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne K

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using positron emission tomography/computer tomography to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. METHODS: The study included 30 patients with locally...... of chemoradiation is not able to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer. There is an obvious need for other complementary methods especially with respect to the low sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computer tomography....... advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with a combination of radiotherapy and concurrent Uftoral(R) (uracil, tegafur) and leucovorine. All patients were evaluated by positron emission tomography/computer tomography scan seven weeks after end of chemoradiation, and the results were compared...

  20. Endoscopic Criteria for Evaluating Tumor Stage after Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyung Su; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Byung Chang; Hong, Chang Won; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Park, Sung Chan; Kim, Min Ju; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2016-04-01

    Local excision may be an another option for selected patients with markedly down-staged rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT), and proper evaluation of post-CRT tumor stage (ypT) is essential prior to local excision of these tumors. This study was designed to determine the correlations between endoscopic findings and ypT of rectal cancer. In this study, 481 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgical resection between 2004 and 2013 at a single institution were evaluated retrospectively. Pathological good response (p-GR) was defined as ypT ≤ 1, and pathological minimal or no response (p-MR) as ypT ≥ 2. The patients were randomly classified according to two groups, a testing (n=193) and a validation (n=288) group. Endoscopic criteria were determined from endoscopic findings and ypT in the testing group and used in classifying patients in the validation group as achieving or not achieving p-GR. Based on findings in the testing group, the endoscopic criteria for p-GR included scarring, telangiectasia, and erythema, whereas criteria for p-MR included nodules, ulcers, strictures, and remnant tumors. In the validation group, the kappa statistic was 0.965 (p < 0.001), and the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.362, 0.963, 0.654, and 0.885, respectively. The endoscopic criteria presented are easily applicable for evaluation of ypT after preoperative CRT for rectal cancer. These criteria may be used for selection of patients for local excision of down-staged rectal tumors, because patients with p-MR could be easily ruled out.

  1. Prediction of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy and establishment of individualized therapy in advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Toshihiro; Iwata, Takashi; Hotchi, Masanori; Yoshikawa, Kozo; Higashijima, Jun; Nishi, Masaaki; Takasu, Chie; Eto, Shohei; Teraoku, Hiroki; Shimada, Mitsuo

    2015-10-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become the standard treatment for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. However, no specific biomarker has been identified to predict a response to preoperative CRT. The aim of the present study was to assess the gene expression patterns of patients with advanced rectal cancer to predict their responses to preoperative CRT. Fifty-nine rectal cancer patients were subjected to preoperative CRT. Patients were randomly assigned to receive CRT with tegafur/gimeracil/oteracil (S-1 group, n=30) or tegafur-uracil (UFT group, n=29). Gene expression changes were studied with cDNA and miRNA microarray. The association between gene expression and response to CRT was evaluated. cDNA microarray showed that 184 genes were significantly differentially expressed between the responders and the non‑responders in the S-1 group. Comparatively, 193 genes were significantly differentially expressed in the responders in the UFT group. TBX18 upregulation was common to both groups whereas BTNL8, LOC375010, ADH1B, HRASLS2, LOC284232, GCNT3 and ALDH1A2 were significantly differentially lower in both groups when compared with the non-responders. Using miRNA microarray, we found that 7 and 16 genes were significantly differentially expressed between the responders and non-responders in the S-1 and UFT groups, respectively. miR-223 was significantly higher in the responders in the S-1 group and tended to be higher in the responders in the UFT group. The present study identified several genes likely to be useful for establishing individualized therapies for patients with rectal cancer.

  2. Prognostic Role of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Level after Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients with Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jung Wook; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Seok Hyung; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2018-05-29

    The prognostic role of post-chemoradiotherapy (CRT) carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level is not clear. We evaluated the prognostic significance of post-CRT CEA level in patients with rectal cancer after preoperative CRT. We reviewed 659 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative CRT and total mesorectal excision for non-metastatic rectal cancer. Patients were categorized into two groups according to post-CRT serum CEA level: low CEA (level was 1.7 ng/mL (range, 0.1-207.0). A high post-CRT level was significantly associated with ypStage, ypT category, tumor regression grade, and pre-CRT CEA level. The 5-year overall survival rate of the 659 patients was 87.8% with a median follow-up period of 57.0 months (range, 1.4-176.4). When the post-CRT CEA groups were divided into groups according to pre-CRT CEA level, the 5-year overall survival rates were significantly different (P level was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that operation method, differentiation, perineural invasion, postoperative chemotherapy, tumor regression grade, and post-CRT CEA level were independent prognostic factors for overall survival. The level of serum CEA after preoperative CRT was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with rectal cancer.

  3. Use of sequential endorectal US to predict the tumor response of preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Dou, Lizhou; Zhang, Yueming; Jin, Jing; Wang, Guiqi; Xiao, Qin; Li, Yexiong; Wang, Xin; Ren, Hua; Fang, Hui; Wang, Weihu; Wang, Shulian; Liu, Yueping; Song, Yongwen

    2017-03-01

    Accurate prediction of the response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) potentially assists in the individualized selection of treatment. Endorectal US (ERUS) is widely used for the pretreatment staging of rectal cancer, but its use for preoperatively predicting the effects of CRT is not well evaluated because of the inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis induced by CRT. This study assessed the value of sequential ERUS in predicting the efficacy of preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Forty-one patients with clinical stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled prospectively. Radiotherapy was delivered to the pelvis with concurrent chemotherapy of capecitabine and oxaliplatin. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 to 8 weeks later. EUS measurements of primary tumor maximum diameter were performed before (ERUS1), during (ERUS2), and 6 to 8 weeks after (ERUS3) CRT, and the ratios of these were calculated. Correlations between ERUS values, tumor regression grade (TRG), T down-staging rate, and pathologic complete response (pCR) rate were assessed, and survival was analyzed. There was no significant correlation between ERUS2/ERUS1 and TRG. The value of ERUS3/ERUS1 correlated with pCR rate and TRG but not T down-staging rate. An ERUS3 value of 6.3 mm and ERUS3/ERUS1 of 52% were used as the cut-off for predicting pCR, and patients were divided into good and poor prognosis groups. Although not statistically significant, 3-year recurrence and survival rates of the good prognosis group were better than those of the poor prognosis group. Sequential ERUS may predict therapeutic efficacy of preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. (Clinical trial registration number: NCT01582750.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of PRL proteins at invasive margin of rectal cancers in relation to preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, Asa R.; Svanvik, Joar; Adell, Gunnar; Sun Xiaofeng

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: PRL-3 (phosphatase of regenerating liver) is involved in metastasis of colorectal cancer; however, its therapeutic implication in cancer patients has not been studied. We investigated the relationships of PRL expression to radiotherapy (RT) in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 36) and adjacent (n = 82) normal mucosa, primary tumor (n = 125), biopsy specimens (n = 96), and lymph node metastasis (n = 30) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Results: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was increased from the distant to adjacent mucosa and to the primary tumor (p < 0.05). PRL was highly expressed at the invasive margin in 28% of the primary tumors and 26% of the metastases. In the RT group, strong PRL expression at the invasive margin was related to distant recurrence (p 0.006) and poor survival (p = 0.01), but not in the non-RT group. The survival significance remained even after adjusting for Dukes' stage and differentiation (p = 0.02). Additional multivariate analyses showed that the correlation with prognostic significance of PRL differed between the RT and non-RT groups (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression (rather than PRL-3 alone) at the invasive margin predicted resistance to RT and unfavorable survival in rectal cancer patients with preoperative RT

  5. Significance of Cox-2 expression in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachkoria, Ketevan; Zhang Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Sun Xiaofeng

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has reduced local recurrence of rectal cancers, but the result is not satisfactory. Further biologic factors are needed to identify patients for more effective radiotherapy. Our aims were to investigate the relationship of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression to radiotherapy, and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers with or without radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cox-2 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distal normal mucosa (n = 28), in adjacent normal mucosa (n = 107), in primary cancer (n = 138), lymph node metastasis (n = 30), and biopsy (n = 85). The patients participated in a rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Results: Cox-2 expression was increased in primary tumor compared with normal mucosa (p < 0.0001), but there was no significant change between primary tumor and metastasis. Cox-2 positivity was or tended to be related to more p53 and Ki-67 expression, and less apoptosis (p ≤ 0.05). In Cox-2-negative cases of either biopsy (p = 0.01) or surgical samples (p = 0.02), radiotherapy was related to less frequency of local recurrence, but this was not the case in Cox-2-positive cases. Conclusion: Cox-2 expression seemed to be an early event involved in rectal cancer development. Radiotherapy might reduce a rate of local recurrence in the patients with Cox-2 weakly stained tumors, but not in those with Cox-2 strongly stained tumors

  6. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer: the MERCURY research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G; Daniels, I R

    2005-01-01

    The development of a surgical technique that removes the tumour and all local draining nodes in an intact package, namely total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery, has provided the impetus for a more selective approach to the administration of preoperative therapy. One of the most important factors that governs the success of TME surgery is the relationship of tumour to the circumferential resection margin (CRM). Tumour involves the CRM in up to 20% of patients undergoing TME surgery, and results in both poor survival and local recurrence. It is therefore clear that the importance of the decision regarding the use of pre-operative therapy lies with the relationship of the tumour to the mesorectal fascia. In addition, a high-spatial-resolution MRI technique will identify tumours exhibiting other poor prognostic features, namely, extramural spread >5 mm, extramural venous invasion by tumour, nodal involvement, and peritoneal infiltration. The potential benefits of a selective approach using MRI-based selection criteria are evident. That is, over 50% of patients can be treated successfully with primary surgery alone without significant risk of local recurrence or systemic failure. Of the remainder, potentially dramatic improvements may be achieved through the use of intensive and targeted preoperative therapy aimed not only at reducing the size of the primary tumour and rendering potentially irresectable tumour resectable with tumour-free circumferential margins, but also at enabling patients at high risk of systemic failure to benefit from intensive combined modality therapy aimed at eliminating micrometastatic disease.

  7. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavioli, Margherita; Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible

  8. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Related to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingxing; Lin, Ruifang; Li, Huifang; Su, Meng; Zhang, Wenyi; Deng, Xia; Zhang, Ping; Zou, Changlin

    2016-01-01

    Background . The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to pre-CRT in patients of stage II/III rectal cancer. Materials and Methods . Questionnaires regarding the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of pre-CRT were mailed to 145 rectal cancer patients in II/III stage between January 2012 and December 2014, and 111 agreed to participate and returned completed questionnaires to the researcher. Logistic regression model was used to compare sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, and attitude with practice, respectively. Results . A total of 145 patients were approached for interview, of which 111 responded and 48.6% (54) had undergone pre-CRT. Only 31.5% of the participants knew that CRT is a treatment of rectal cancer and 39.6% were aware of the importance of CRT. However, the vast majority of participants (68.5%) expressed a positive attitude toward rectal cancer. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that knowledge level ( p = 0.006) and attitudes ( p = 0.001) influence the actual practice significantly. Furthermore, age, gender, and income were potential predictors of practice (all p pre-CRT. Strengthening the professional health knowledge and realizing the importance of attitudes may deepen patients' understanding of preoperative therapy.

  9. Pre-operative imaging of rectal cancer and its impact on surgical performance and treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beets-Tan, R G H; Lettinga, T; Beets, G L

    2005-08-01

    To discuss the ability of pre-operative MRI to have a beneficial effect on surgical performance and treatment outcome in patients with rectal cancer. A description on how MRI can be used as a tool so select patients for differentiated neoadjuvant treatment, how it can be used as an anatomical road map for the resection of locally advanced cases, and how it can serve as a tool for quality assurance of both the surgical procedure and overall patient management. As an illustration the proportion of microscopically complete resections of the period 1993-1997, when there was no routine pre-operative imaging, is compared to that of the period 1998-2002, when pre-operative MR imaging was standardized. The proportion of R0 resections increased from 92.5 to 97% (p=0.08) and the proportion of resections with a lateral tumour free margin of >1mm increased from 84.4 to 92.1% (p=0.03). The incomplete resections in the first period were mainly due to inadequate surgical management of unsuspected advanced or bulky tumours, whereas in the second period insufficient consideration was given to extensive neoadjuvant treatment when the tumour was close to or invading the mesorectal fascia on MR. There are good indications that in our setting pre-operative MR imaging, along with other improvements in rectal cancer management, had a beneficial effect on patient outcome. Audit and discussion of the incomplete resections can lead to an improved operative and perioperative management.

  10. Preoperative concurrent chemo-radiation in rectal cancer; Radiochimiotherapie concomitante preoperatoire pour cancer du rectum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, C.; Kirscher, S.; Felix-Faure, C.; Chauvet, B.; Vincent, P.; Brewer, Y.; Reboul, F. [Clinique Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France)

    1998-05-01

    To evaluate retrospectively treatment-related morbidity of concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy for rectal cancer. Between 1992 and 1995, 38 patients (median age: 60) were treated for locally advanced resectable rectal cancer. Median dose of radiotherapy was 45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks. Chemotherapy consisted of two courses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin administered during the first and the fifth weeks of radiotherapy. Median dose of 5-fluorouracil was 350 mg/m{sup 2}/day, and median dose of leucovorin was 350 mg/m{sup 2}/day, day 1 to day 5. Surgery was performed 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Before surgery, one patient died of febrile neutropenia and sepsis after two cycles of chemotherapy and 45 Gy. Main pre-operative grade 3-4 toxicities were respectively: neutropenia: 3% ; nausea/vomiting: 3%; diarrhea: 3%; proctitis: 5%; radiation dermatitis: 8%. Twenty-six patients underwent a low anterior resection and 11 an abdomino-perineal resection. A temporary colostomy was performed in 12 patients. Pathologic complete response rate was 27 %. There was one post-operative death due to thrombo-embolic disease. Major post-operative grade 3-4 complications were: pelvic infection: 14 %; abdominal infection : 5%; perineal sepsis: 8%; anastomotic dehiscence: 8%; cardiac failure: 5%. Delayed perineal wound healing was observed in six patients. No significant prognostic factor of post-operative complications has been observed. Median duration of hospitalization was 22 days. With a median follow-up of 24 months, 2-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 82 and 64%. Tolerance of preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy was acceptable. Ongoing controlled studies will assess the impact of this combined treatment on survival. (authors)

  11. The preoperative reaction and decision-making process regarding colostomy surgery among Chinese rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-E; Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Zheng, Mei-Chun

    2017-06-01

    Patients with rectal cancer have issues in adjusting to their permanent colostomy after surgery, and support is required to help them resume normal life. However, few studies have explored the experience and factors that affect a patient's decision-making and maladjustment prior to colostomy surgery. The aim of this study was to explore the experience of rectal cancer patients who have to undergo colostomy surgery. A descriptive, qualitative design was used. We studied a purposive sample of 18 patients who had received a diagnosis of primary rectal cancer and were expecting permanent colostomy surgery. The thematic analysis approach was used to analyze the data collected using semi-structured, open-ended questions. The overriding theme that emerged was 'stoma dilemma: a hard decision-making process'. From this main theme, three themes were derived: the resistance stage, the hesitation stage, and the acquiescence stage. It is hard for preoperative rectal patients to choose to undergo stoma surgery or a sphincter-saving operation. From the initial stage of definitive diagnosis to the final consent to stoma surgery, most patients experience the resistance and hesitation stages before reaching the acquiescence stage. Arriving at a decision is a process that nurses can facilitate by eliminating unnecessary misunderstanding surrounding colostomy surgery and by fully respecting patients' right to choose at the various stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical significance of CT in the preoperative diagnosis of the staging of rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itano, Satoshi; Fuchimoto, Sadanori; Hamada, Fumihiro; Kimura, Takanobu; Iwagaki, Hiromi; Maeda, Tetsuya; Orita, Kunzo

    1987-01-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) in the preoperative clinical staging of rectal cancer was prospectively studied in 28 patients with macroscopically proven cancer. The CT studies were based on the previously established CT diagnostic criteria for wall invasion (S factor), lymph node metastases (N factor), and liver metastases (H factor). When macroscopic findings were used as the standard, the accuracy of CT was 61 % for S factor, 32 % for N factor, and 86 % for H factor. Using histological findings as the standard, the accuracy was 48 % for S factor and 16 % for N factor. Overall, CT had a high accuracy for H factor in all sites of cancer (75 % in the rectosigmoid, 86 % in the area above the peritoneal reflection, and 90 % in the area below the peritoneal reflection). For the other S and N factors, CT seemed to be of limited value in the preoperative diagnosis. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. Dose-response of acute urinary toxicity of long-course preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L.; Bentzen, Søren M.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-course preoperative chemoradiotherapy (chemo-RT) improves outcomes for rectal cancer patients, but acute side effects during treatment may cause considerable patient discomfort and may compromise treatment compliance. We developed a dose-response model for acute urinary toxicity...... based on a large, single-institution series. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In total 345 patients were treated with (chemo-)RT for primary rectal cancer from January 2007 to May 2012. Urinary toxicity during RT was scored prospectively using the CTCAE v 3.0 cystitis score (grade 0-5). Clinical variables...... and radiation dose to the bladder were related to graded toxicity using multivariate ordinal logistic regression. Three models were optimized, each containing all available clinical variables and one of three dose metrics: Mean dose (Dmean), equivalent uniform dose (EUD), or relative volume given x Gy or above...

  14. Clinicopathological studies on preoperative three combined treatments with hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Yuji

    1995-01-01

    To prevent local recurrence of rectal cancer postoperatively, we treated patients using preoperative hyperthermia (5-6 times), irradiation (total 30 Gy) and a 5-Fluorouracil suppository (2000-2500 mg). The subjects were 31 patients given combined preoperative treatments and 28 patients given surgery alone. The results were as follows: Histologically, therapeutic effects were recognized in 80.6% of the combined treatments group. The mean distance from the adventitia to the site of cancer infiltration was 6.44 mm in the combined treatments group and 3.35 mm in the surgery alone group. The difference between the two was significant (p<0.05). The combined treatments produced a reduced tumor infiltration into the anal side, and resulted in making a safe margin for anastomosis. The rate of local recurrence in the combined treatments group was less than that of the surgery alone group. No systematic side effects or severe complications were observed during hospitalization in the combined treatments group. The survival rate of the combined treatments group was higher than that of the surgery alone group. It was considered that combined preoperative treatments for rectal cancer is beneficial to expand indications of super low anterior resection. (author)

  15. Clinicopathological studies on preoperative three combined treatments with hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Yuji [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1995-08-01

    To prevent local recurrence of rectal cancer postoperatively, we treated patients using preoperative hyperthermia (5-6 times), irradiation (total 30 Gy) and a 5-Fluorouracil suppository (2000-2500 mg). The subjects were 31 patients given combined preoperative treatments and 28 patients given surgery alone. The results were as follows: Histologically, therapeutic effects were recognized in 80.6% of the combined treatments group. The mean distance from the adventitia to the site of cancer infiltration was 6.44 mm in the combined treatments group and 3.35 mm in the surgery alone group. The difference between the two was significant (p<0.05). The combined treatments produced a reduced tumor infiltration into the anal side, and resulted in making a safe margin for anastomosis. The rate of local recurrence in the combined treatments group was less than that of the surgery alone group. No systematic side effects or severe complications were observed during hospitalization in the combined treatments group. The survival rate of the combined treatments group was higher than that of the surgery alone group. It was considered that combined preoperative treatments for rectal cancer is beneficial to expand indications of super low anterior resection. (author).

  16. [The role of magnetic resonance imaging to select patients for preoperative treatment in rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödel, Claus; Sauer, Rolf; Fietkau, Rainer

    2009-08-01

    Traditionally, the decision to apply preoperative treatment for rectal cancer patients has been based on the T- and N-category. Recently, the radial distance of the tumor to the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has been identified as an important risk factor for local failure. By magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) this distance can be measured preoperatively with high reliability. Thus, selected groups have started to limit the indication for preoperative therapy to tumors extending to - or growing within 1 mm from - the mesorectal fascia (CRM+). Pros and cons of this selected approach for preoperative treatment and first clinical results are presented. Prerequisites are the availability of modern high-resolution thin-section MRI technology as well as strict quality control of MRI and surgical quality of total mesorectal excision (TME). By selecting patients with CRM-positive tumors on MRI for preoperative therapy, only approximately 35% patients will require preoperative radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). However, with histopathologic work-up of the resected specimen after primary surgery, the indication for postoperative RCT is given for a rather large percentage of patients, i.e., for pCRM+ (5-10%), intramesorectal or intramural excision (30-40%), pN+ (30-40%). Postoperative RCT, however, is significantly less effective and more toxic than preoperative RCT. A further point of concern is the assertion that patients, in whom a CRM-negative status is achieved by surgery alone, do not benefit from additional RT. Data of the Dutch TME trial and the British MRC (Medical Research Council) CR07 trial, however, suggest the reverse. To omit preoperative RT/RCT for CRM-negative tumors on MRI needs to be further investigated in prospective clinical trials. The German guidelines for the treatment of colorectal cancer 2008 continue to indicate preoperative RT/RCT based on the T- and N-category.

  17. The role of magnetic resonance imaging to select patients for preoperative treatment in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedel, Claus; Sauer, Rolf; Fietkau, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, the decision to apply preoperative treatment for rectal cancer patients has been based on the T- and N-category. Recently, the radial distance of the tumor to the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has been identified as an important risk factor for local failure. By magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) this distance can be measured preoperatively with high reliability. Thus, selected groups have started to limit the indication for preoperative therapy to tumors extending to - or growing within 1 mm from - the mesorectal fascia (CRM+). Methods: Pros and cons of this selected approach for preoperative treatment and first clinical results are presented. Prerequisites are the availability of modern high-resolution thin-section MRI technology as well as strict quality control of MRI and surgical quality of total mesorectal excision (TME). Results: By selecting patients with CRM-positive tumors on MRI for preoperative therapy, only approximately 35% patients will require preoperative radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). However, with histopathologic work-up of the resected specimen after primary surgery, the indication for postoperative RCT is given for a rather large percentage of patients, i.e., for pCRM+ (5-10%), intramesorectal or intramural excision (30-40%), pN+ (30-40%). Postoperative RCT, however, is significantly less effective and more toxic than preoperative RCT. A further point of concern is the assertion that patients, in whom a CRM-negative status is achieved by surgery alone, do not benefit from additional RT. Data of the Dutch TME trial and the British MRC (Medical Research Council) CR07 trial, however, suggest the reverse. Conclusion: To omit preoperative RT/RCT for CRM-negative tumors on MRI needs to be further investigated in prospective clinical trials. The German guidelines for the treatment of colorectal cancer 2008 continue to indicate preoperative RT/RCT based on the T- and N-category. (orig.)

  18. Effect of leukocyte alteration on treatment outcomes following preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Gyu; Park, Won; Choi, Doo Ho [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-09-15

    Hematotoxicity following anti-cancer treatment is known to be related to treatment efficacy in several malignancies. The purpose of this study was to examine the hematologic parameters related to the tumor response and survival in patients treated with curative surgery following preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. Four hundred eighteen patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CRT and curative surgery were analyzed, retrospectively. The main clinical factors and blood cell counts before and after CRT were investigated with respect to their relationships with tumor downstaging and patient survival. The post-CRT leukocyte count was significantly different between the tumor downstaging group and the nondownstaging group (median, 4740/uL vs. 5130/uL; p = 0.013). Multivariate analysis showed that histological grade, circumferential extent, and post-CRT leukocyte count were related to tumor downstaging. In addition, histological grade, post-CRT leukocyte count, and tumor downstaging were related to disease-free survival. The 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival in patients with post-CRT leukocyte count ≤3730/uL, which is the cut-off value derived from the receiver operation characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, were significantly higher than those with higher counts (88.0% vs. 71.6%, p = 0.001; 94.4% vs. 84.1%, p = 0.024). Post-CRT leukocyte count of ≤3730/uL could be regarded as a good prognostic factor for tumor response and survival in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative CRT.

  19. Predictors of pathologic complete response after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy of rectal cancer: A single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Cheol; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae; Kim, Mi Young; Oh, Young Ki; Baek, Sung Gyu

    2016-01-01

    To identify possible predictors of pathologic complete response (pCR) of rectal cancer after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). We conducted a retrospective review of 53 patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CCRT followed by radical surgery at a single center between January 2007 and December 2012. The median radiotherapy dose to the pelvis was 54.0 Gy (range, 45.0 to 63.0 Gy). Five-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy was administered via continuous infusion with leucovorin. The pCR rate was 20.8%. The downstaging rate was 66%. In univariate analyses, poor and undifferentiated tumors (p = 0.020) and an interval of ≥7 weeks from finishing CCRT to surgery (p = 0.040) were significantly associated with pCR, while female gender (p = 0.070), initial carcinoembryonic antigen concentration of <5.0 ng/dL (p = 0.100), and clinical stage T2 (p = 0.100) were marginally significant factors. In multivariate analysis, an interval of ≥7 weeks from finishing CCRT to surgery (odds ratio, 0.139; 95% confidence interval, 0.022 to 0.877; p = 0.036) was significantly associated with pCR, while stage T2 (odds ratio, 5.363; 95% confidence interval, 0.963 to 29.877; p = 0.055) was a marginally significant risk factor. We suggest that the interval from finishing CCRT to surgery is a predictor of pCR after preoperative CCRT in patients with rectal cancer. Stage T2 cancer may also be an important predictive factor. We hope to perform a robust study by collecting data during treatment to obtain more advanced results

  20. SPARCL1 Expression Increases With Preoperative Radiation Therapy and Predicts Better Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotti, Angeliki, E-mail: angkotti@yahoo.gr; Holmqvist, Annica; Albertsson, Maria; Sun, Xiao-Feng, E-mail: xiao-feng.sun@liu.se

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) is expressed in various normal tissues and many types of cancers. The function of SPARCL1 and its relationship to a patient's prognosis have been studied, whereas its relationship to radiation therapy (RT) is not known. Our aim was to investigate the expression of SPARCL1 in rectal cancer patients who participated in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Methods and Materials: The study included 136 rectal cancer patients who were randomized to undergo preoperative RT and surgery (n=63) or surgery alone (n=73). The expression levels of SPARCL1 in normal mucosa (n=29), primary tumor (n=136), and lymph node metastasis (n=35) were determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: Tumors with RT had stronger SPARCL1 expression than tumors without RT (P=.003). In the RT group, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival than weak expression in patients with stage III tumors, independent of sex, age, differentiation, and margin status (P=.022; RR = 18.128; 95% confidence interval, 1.512-217.413). No such relationship was found in the non-RT group (P=.224). Further analysis of interactions among SPARCL1 expression, RT, and survival showed statistical significance (P=.024). In patients with metastases who received RT, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival compared to weak expression (P=.041) but not in the non-RT group (P=.569). Conclusions: SPARCL1 expression increases with RT and is related to better prognosis in rectal cancer patients with RT but not in patients without RT. This result may help us to select the patients best suited for preoperative RT.

  1. Predictors of pathologic complete response after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy of rectal cancer: A single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Cheol [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae; Kim, Mi Young; Oh, Young Ki; Baek, Sung Gyu [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To identify possible predictors of pathologic complete response (pCR) of rectal cancer after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). We conducted a retrospective review of 53 patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CCRT followed by radical surgery at a single center between January 2007 and December 2012. The median radiotherapy dose to the pelvis was 54.0 Gy (range, 45.0 to 63.0 Gy). Five-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy was administered via continuous infusion with leucovorin. The pCR rate was 20.8%. The downstaging rate was 66%. In univariate analyses, poor and undifferentiated tumors (p = 0.020) and an interval of ≥7 weeks from finishing CCRT to surgery (p = 0.040) were significantly associated with pCR, while female gender (p = 0.070), initial carcinoembryonic antigen concentration of <5.0 ng/dL (p = 0.100), and clinical stage T2 (p = 0.100) were marginally significant factors. In multivariate analysis, an interval of ≥7 weeks from finishing CCRT to surgery (odds ratio, 0.139; 95% confidence interval, 0.022 to 0.877; p = 0.036) was significantly associated with pCR, while stage T2 (odds ratio, 5.363; 95% confidence interval, 0.963 to 29.877; p = 0.055) was a marginally significant risk factor. We suggest that the interval from finishing CCRT to surgery is a predictor of pCR after preoperative CCRT in patients with rectal cancer. Stage T2 cancer may also be an important predictive factor. We hope to perform a robust study by collecting data during treatment to obtain more advanced results.

  2. Outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer with invasion to the adjacent organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Harunobu; Koide, Yoshikazu; Shiota, Miho; Endo, Tomoyoshi; Matsuoka, Shinji; Hatta, Kouhei; Mizuno, Masahiro; Maeda, Koutarou; Toyama, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed the clinical records of 13 patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of CRT for T4b rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy consisted of 40-50 Gy delivered in fractions of 1.8-2.0 Gy per day, 5 days per week. Treatment with intravenous 5-fluorouracil, oral tegafur-uracil (UFT-E) with l-leucovorin, oral S-1, or intravenous irinotecan (CPT-11) with oral S-1 was administered during radiotherapy. At 63 days after CRT, 1 patient died because of pelvic abscess. Complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) was observed in 7 patients, 1 month after CRT. Curative surgery was performed in 9 patients. Among 10 patients who underwent surgery 70 days after CRT, 5 who showed PR 1 month after CRT underwent curative surgery; both urinary and anal function were preserved in 4 of these patients. Histological invasion to the adjacent organs was not observed in 6 patients, and 1 patient achieved histological CR. Of the 9 patients who underwent curative surgery, recurrence was observed in 2; however, the other patients survived without recurrence. Preoperative CRT was considered to be effective in improving the resection rate and prognosis in patients with T4b rectal cancer. However, careful attention should be paid to the severe toxicities associated with CRT, such as pelvic abscess. (author)

  3. A national cohort study of long-course preoperative radiotherapy in primary fixed rectal cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.; Jensen, L.H.; Altaf, R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Preoperative radiotherapy has been shown to enable a fixed rectal cancer to become resectable which in turn may result in long-time survival. In this study, we analysed the outcome of long-course preoperative radiotherapy in fixed rectal cancer in a national cohort including all Danish...... patients registered with primary inoperable rectal cancer and treated in the period May 2001 to December 2005. METHOD: The study was based on surgical and demographic data from a continuously updated and validated national database. In addition, retrospective data were retrieved from all departments...... of radiotherapy concerning technique of radiotherapy, dose and fractionation and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Outcome was determined by actuarial analysis of local control, disease-free survival and overall survival. RESULTS: A total of 258 patients with fixed rectal cancer received long-course radiotherapy...

  4. Influence of preoperative (hyperthermic) radiochemotherapy on manometric anal sphincter function in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzmann, J.; Huenerbein, M.; Slisow, W.; Rau, B.; Gellermann, J.; Wust, P.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) followed by curative surgery is a well-accepted therapeutic option in the treatment of advanced rectal cancer. Usually, the anal sphincter is located in the irradiation area of a preoperative RCT regime. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of preoperative RCT on anal sphincter function. Patients and methods: between 1994 and 2000, 102 patients with rectal cancer stage uT3/uT4 were analyzed. All patients underwent radiotherapy with 45 Gy (5 x 1.8 Gy) including two cycles of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin (folinic acid) chemotherapy. 46 patients were treated additionally with up to five sessions of locoregional hyperthermia. The sphincter function was analyzed by perfusion manometry before preoperative therapy and 4 weeks after pretreatment had been finished. For statistics, the Wilcoxon signed rank test and mann-whitney U-test were used (SPSS 9.0 for Windows trademark). Results: the mean value of all 102 patients showed a significant reduction of the mean maximum resting pressure from 97 to 89 mmHg (p = 0.02). For the mean maximal squeeze pressure no significant difference could be shown (178 vs. 176 mmHg). For patients with distal (≤ 7.5 cm from anal verge) tumors the difference was highly significant (92 vs. 79 mmHg). Locoregional hyperthermia had no additional influence on sphincter function. Conclusion: preoperative RCT impairs sphincter function especially in patients with distal tumors. In addition, RCT could have a negative influence on the continence of patients who received sphincter-preserving surgery. (orig.) [de

  5. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by local excision in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Seob; Park, Jin Hong; Ahn, Seung Do

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) followed by local excision (LE) is feasible approach in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer patients. Patients who received PCRT and LE because of clinical T2 rectal cancer within 7 cm from anal verge between January 2006 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. LE was performed in case of a good clinical response after PCRT. Patients' characteristics, treatment record, tumor recurrence, and treatment-related complications were reviewed at a median follow-up of 49 months. All patients received transanal excision or transanal minimally invasive surgery. Of 34 patients, 19 patients (55.9%) presented pathologic complete response (pCR). The 3-year local recurrence-free survival and disease free-survival were 100.0% and 97.1%, respectively. There was no recurrence among the patients with pCR. Except for 1 case of grade 4 enterovesical fistula, all other late complications were mild and self-limiting. PCRT followed by an LE might be feasible as an alternative to total mesorectal excision in good responders with clinical T2N0 distal rectal cancer

  6. Second harmonic generation for collagen I characterization in rectal cancer patients with and without preoperative radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blockhuys, Stéphanie; Agarwal, Nisha Rani; Hildesjö, Camilla; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2017-10-01

    Rectal cancer is treated with preoperative radiotherapy (RT) to downstage the tumor, reduce local recurrence, and improve patient survival. Still, the treatment outcome varies significantly and new biomarkers are desired. Collagen I (Col-I) is a potential biomarker, which can be visualized label-free by second harmonic generation (SHG). Here, we used SHG to identify Col-I changes induced by RT in surgical tissue, with the aim to evaluate the clinical significance of RT-induced Col-I changes. First, we established a procedure for quantitative evaluation of Col-I by SHG in CDX2-stained tissue sections. Next, we evaluated Col-I properties in material from 31 non-RT and 29 RT rectal cancer patients. We discovered that the Col-I intensity and anisotropy were higher in the tumor invasive margin than in the inner tumor and normal mucosa, and RT increased and decreased the intensity in inner tumor and normal mucosa, respectively. Furthermore, higher Col-I intensity in the inner tumor was related to increased distant recurrence in the non-RT group but to longer survival in the RT group. In conclusion, we present a new application of SHG for quantitative analysis of Col-I in surgical material, and the first data suggest Col-I intensity as a putative prognostic biomarker in rectal cancer.

  7. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by local excision in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Seob; Park, Jin Hong; Ahn, Seung Do [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-09-15

    To investigate whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) followed by local excision (LE) is feasible approach in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer patients. Patients who received PCRT and LE because of clinical T2 rectal cancer within 7 cm from anal verge between January 2006 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. LE was performed in case of a good clinical response after PCRT. Patients' characteristics, treatment record, tumor recurrence, and treatment-related complications were reviewed at a median follow-up of 49 months. All patients received transanal excision or transanal minimally invasive surgery. Of 34 patients, 19 patients (55.9%) presented pathologic complete response (pCR). The 3-year local recurrence-free survival and disease free-survival were 100.0% and 97.1%, respectively. There was no recurrence among the patients with pCR. Except for 1 case of grade 4 enterovesical fistula, all other late complications were mild and self-limiting. PCRT followed by an LE might be feasible as an alternative to total mesorectal excision in good responders with clinical T2N0 distal rectal cancer.

  8. Evaluation of preoperative radiation combined with chemotherapy for prevention of local recurrence of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarashina, Hiromi; Inoue, Ikuo; Saitoh, Norio

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective study of 44 patients with rectal cancer who received preoperative radiation (42.6 Gy) combined with chemotherapy and 37 who received resection alone (control group) was undertaken to evaluate the effect of preoperative radiation therapy on local recurrence of rectal cancer. The rate of local recurrence in the radiation group was reduced to 4.5% compared with that in the controls (18.9%). From a pathological point of view, factors that have a close association with recurrence, such as depth of invasion, ew (defined as the distance between the external surgical surface and the deepest site of invasion) and lymph nodal involvement, have been successfully changed after radiation therapy. It was also evident that the rate of recurrence in irradiated patients, depth of invasion of a 2 (defined as the invasion of cancer far beyond the muscle layer but without involvement of other organs) or ew less than 2 mm was significantly lower than in patients with the same pathological conditions in whom radiation was not used. However, especially in patients with remote lymph node metastasis, there was no difference in local recurrence rate between the two groups. From these findings, it was concluded that a careful follow up is necessary for patients with remote lymph node involvement even after radiation therapy. (author)

  9. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancers: a phase I-II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, Abdelkarim S.; Bieri, Sabine; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Soravia, Claudio; Gertsch, Philippe; Bernier, Jacques; Morel, Philippe; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity, pathologic response rates, type of surgery, and oncologic results in a prospective Phase I-II trial using pure hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) preoperatively in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1997 and April 2000, 50 patients with T3-T4 or N1 rectal cancers were treated preoperatively with 50 Gy (45 Gy to the pelvis and a 5-Gy tumor boost) in 40 fractions of 1.25 Gy during 4 weeks. The pretreatment tumor stage as determined by CT and endorectal ultrasonography (80% of patients) included 1 Stage T2 (2%), 45 T3 (90%), and 4 T4 (8%). Nodal involvement (N1) was documented in 26 patients (52%). Surgery was performed at a median interval of 45 days (range 26-114 days) after RT completion. Seventeen patients who presented with pT4 or pN1 and/or pM1 received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy postoperatively. Results: All patients completed the RT schedule as planned. Severe acute toxicities included two Grade 3 skin reactions (4%) that did not require a break. The other acute toxicities were Grade 2 or less (skin, diarrhea, urinary, rectal tenesmus, and fatigue). A complete pathologic response was observed in 7 patients (14%), and microscopic residual cancer was found in 10 (20%). Of the 20 patients presenting with tumor located ≤6 cm from the anal verge, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 14 (70%). At 3 years, the actuarial locoregional control rate was 90.5%, and the disease-free survival rate was 74.6%. At a median follow-up of 32 months, 4 patients (8%) presented with severe late complications (Grade 3-4) that might have been RT related (one rectovaginal fistula, two chronic perineal fistulas, and one bilateral ureteral stenosis). Conclusion: In locally advanced rectal cancer, preoperative hyperfractionated RT to a total dose of 50 Gy is feasible, with acceptable acute and late toxicity and an objective downstaging effect. In view of these results, this schedule might be used as a

  10. Comparison of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin and capecitabine in preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Duck-Woo; Chang, Hee Jin; Jeong, Jun Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Son, Seok-Hyun; Yun, Tak; Hong, Chang Won; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience with a bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL) vs. capecitabine in terms of radiologic and pathologic findings in preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: The study enrolled 278 patients scheduled for preoperative CRT using two protocols with different chemotherapeutic regimens. Pelvic radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) was delivered concurrently with FL (n = 145) or capecitabine (n = 133). Surgery was performed 6 weeks after CRT completion. Tumor responses to CRT were measured using both radiologic and pathologic examination. Magnetic resonance volumetry was performed at the initial workup and just before surgery after completion of preoperative CRT. Post-CRT pathology tests were used to determine tumor stage and regression. Results: Radiologic examination showed that tumor volume decreased by 68.2% ± 20.5% in the FL group and 68.3% ± 22.3% in the capecitabine group (p = 0.970). Postoperative pathologic T stage determination showed that downstaging occurred in 44.3% of FL and 49.9% of capecitabine patients (p = 0.571). The tumor regression grades after CRT were Grade 1 (minimal response) in 22.6% and 21.0%, Grade 2 (moderate response) in 53.2% and 50.0%, Grade 3 (near-complete response) in 12.9% and 12.9%, and Grade 4 (complete response) in 11.3% and 16.1% of the FL and capecitabine groups, respectively (p = 0.758). Conclusion: In the present study, the radiologic and pathologic findings did not reveal significant differences in short-term tumor responses between preoperative FL and capecitabine CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Long-term results and a prospective randomized trial are needed

  11. Expression of the p73 protein in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, Daniella; Gao Jingfang; Adell, Gunnar; Sun Xiaofeng

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate p73 expression in normal mucosa, primary tumor, and metastasis in relation to radiotherapy (RT) response and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: p73 was immunohistochemically examined on biopsies (unirradiated, n = 102), distant (from the large bowel, n = 82), and adjacent (adjacent to primary tumor, n = 89) normal mucosa samples, primary tumors (n = 131), and lymph node metastasis (n = 32) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Seventy-four patients received surgery alone and 57 received additional RT. Results: Cytoplasmic p73 was increased in the primary tumor compared with the distant or adjacent mucosa (p ≤ 0.0001). Nuclear (p = 0.02) and cytoplasmic (p = 0.003) p73 was higher in irradiated distant mucosa samples than in unirradiated ones, and nuclear p73 tended to be increased in irradiated primary tumors compared with unirradiated ones (p = 0.06). p73 was positively related to cyclooxygenase-2 expression in irradiated tumors (p = 0.03). p73-negative tumors tended to have a lower local recurrence after RT compared with unirradiated cases (p 0.06). Conclusions: Normal epithelial cells seem more sensitive to RT than tumor cells regarding p73 expression. Patients with p73-negative rectal tumors may have a lower risk of local recurrence after RT

  12. Perfusion MRI for the prediction of treatment response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Joon Seok; Baek, Song-Ee; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Suh, Jinsuk; Kim, Ki Whang; Kim, Daehong; Myoung, Sungmin; Choi, Junjeong; Shin, Sang Joon; Kim, Nam Kyu; Keum, Ki Chang

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of perfusion MRI as a potential biomarker for predicting response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer. Thirty-nine patients with primary rectal carcinoma who were scheduled for preoperative CRT were prospectively recruited. Perfusion MRI was performed with a 3.0-T MRI system in all patients before therapy, at the end of the 2nd week of therapy, and before surgery. The K trans (volume transfer constant) and V e (extracellular extravascular space fraction) were calculated. Before CRT, the mean tumour K trans in the downstaged group was significantly higher than that in the non-downstaged group (P = 0.0178), but there was no significant difference between tumour regression grade (TRG) responders and TRG non-responders (P = 0.1392). Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant differences for evolution of K trans values both between downstaged and non-downstaged groups (P = 0.0215) and between TRG responders and TRG non-responders (P = 0.0001). Regarding V e , no significant differences were observed both between downstaged and non-downstaged groups (P = 0.689) or between TRG responders and TRG non-responders (P = 0.887). Perfusion MRI of rectal cancer can be useful for assessing tumoural K trans changes by CRT. Tumours with high pre-CRT K trans values tended to respond favourably to CRT, particularly in terms of downstaging criteria. (orig.)

  13. Optimal time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Won Sik; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chang, Heung Moon; Ryu, Min Hee; Jang, Se Jin; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Capecitabine and its metabolites reach peak plasma concentrations 1 to 2 hours after a single oral administration, and concentrations rapidly decrease thereafter. We performed a retrospective analysis to find the optimal time interval between capecitabine administration and radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy was measured in patients who were treated with preoperative radiotherapy and concurrent capecitabine for rectal cancer. Patients were classified into the following groups. Group A1 included patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy, and Group B1 included all other patients. Group B1 was then subdivided into Group A2 (patients who took capecitabine 2 hours before radiotherapy) and Group B2. Group B2 was further divided into Group A3 and Group B3 with the same method. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 weeks after completion of chemoradiation and the pathologic response was evaluated. Results: A total of 200 patients were enrolled in this study. Pathologic examination showed that Group A1 had higher rates of complete regression of primary tumors in the rectum (23.5% vs. 9.6%, p = 0.01), good response (44.7% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.006), and lower T stages (p = 0.021) compared with Group B1; however, Groups A2 and A3 did not show any improvement compared with Groups B2 and B3. Multivariate analysis showed that increases in primary tumors in the rectum and good response were only significant when capecitabine was administered 1 hour before radiotherapy. Conclusion: In preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, the pathologic response could be improved by administering capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy

  14. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itabashi, Michiaki; Kameoka, Shingo; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Izumi, Kiminari; Miyazaki, Kaname; Hamano, Kyoichi; Kouno, Atsushi

    1991-01-01

    To clarify the usefulness and limitations of CT and MRI in preoperative assessment of the wall invasion of rectal cancer, we compared the results of CT and MRI with the histopathological findings, classifying tumors by the region and site in 34 patients with rectal cancer. Subjects were patients preoperatively examined by MRI and CT. Overall, the percent of cases with the extent of invasion accurately assessed by MRI was 88.2%, and that by CT was 64.7%. In all instances of wrong assessment, the extent of invasion was overestimated. The accurate assessment rate was significantly higher for MRI than for CT. After classification by the region, the accurate assessment rate at Rs was low as 50% for both MRI and CT because slices were not perpendicular to the tumor. The accurate assessment rate was 100% for MRI and 82% for CT at Ra, and respectively 94% and 59% at Rb. The majority of tumors at Ra or Rb centering on the lateral wall of the rectum were accurately assessed either by MRI or CT. With tumors at Ra or Rb (particularly Rb) centering on the anterior or posterior wall, CT frequently failed to identify the extent of invasion accurately, so that MRI seemed more suitable for these tumors. (author)

  15. Neorectal Irritability After Short-Term Preoperative Radiotherapy and Surgical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakx, Roel; Doeksen, Annemiek; Slors, J. Frederik M.; Bemelman, Willem A.; van Lanschot, J. Jan B.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E. E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Preoperative radiotherapy followed by rectal resection with total mesorectal excision (TME) and colo-anal anastomosis severely compromises anorectal function, which has been attributed to a decrease in neorectal capacity and neorectal compliance. However, to what extent altered motility

  16. Phase II Study of Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy With a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, Benedikt; Tournel, Koen; Everaert, Hendrik; Hoorens, Anne; Sermeus, Alexandra; Christian, Nicolas; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The addition of concomitant chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with cT3–4 rectal cancer. The combined treatment modality increases the complete response rate and local control (LC), but has no impact on survival or the incidence of distant metastases. In addition, it is associated with considerable toxicity. As an alternative strategy, we explored prospectively, preoperative helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Methods and Materials: A total of 108 patients were treated with intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art II system. A dose of 46 Gy, in daily fractions of 2 Gy, was delivered to the mesorectum and draining lymph nodes, without concomitant chemotherapy. Patients with an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm, based on magnetic resonance imaging, received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Acute and late side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: A total of 102 patients presented with cT3–4 tumors; 57 patients entered the boost group and 51 the no-boost group. One patient in the no-boost group developed a radio-hypersensitivity reaction, resulting in a complete tumor remission, a Grade 3 acute and Grade 5 late enteritis. No other Grade ≥3 acute toxicities occurred. With a median follow-up of 32 months, Grade ≥3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity were observed in 6% and 4% of the patients, respectively. The actuarial 2-year LC, progression-free survival and overall survival were 98%, 79%, and 93%. Conclusions: Preoperative helical tomotherapy displays a favorable acute toxicity profile in patients with cT3–4 rectal cancer. A SIB can be safely administered in patients with a narrow CRM and resulted in a promising LC.

  17. Diagnostic accuracy and prognostic impact of restaging by magnetic resonance imaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Soon Jin; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prognostic role of restaging rectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with preoperative CRT has not been established. The goal of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and prognostic role of radiological staging by rectal MRI after preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer. Methods: A total of 231 consecutive patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CRT and radical resection from January 2008 to December 2009 were prospectively enrolled. The diagnostic accuracy and prognostic significance of post-CRT radiological staging by MRI was evaluated. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of radiological diagnosis of good responders (ypTNM stage 0–I) were 32%, 90%, 65%, and 69%, respectively. The overall accuracy of MRI restating for good responders was 68%. The 5-year disease-free survival rates of patients with radiological and pathological TNM stage 0, stage I, and stage II–III were 100%, 94%, and 76%, respectively (P = 0.037), and 97%, 87%, and 73%, respectively (P = 0.007). On multivariate analysis, post-CRT radiological staging by MRI was an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival. Conclusion: Radiological staging by MRI after preoperative CRT may be an independent predictor of survival in patients with rectal cancer

  18. Barium enema and CT volumetry for predicting pathologic response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murono, Koji; Kawai, Kazushige; Tsuno, Nelson H; Ishihara, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2014-06-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy has been widely used for the prevention of local recurrence of locally advanced rectal cancer, and the effect of chemoradiotherapy is known to be associated with overall survival. We aimed to evaluate the association of the pathologic response grade with tumor recurrence rate after chemoradiotherapy, using radiographic analysis and the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors as the parameters. This study was conducted at a single tertiary care institution in Japan. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiotherapy. A total of 101 low rectal cancer patients receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy from July 2004 to August 2012 were enrolled. The tumor reduction rate was measured with the use of traditional Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, barium enema, and CT volumetry, and the correlation between the reduction rate and the pathologic response grade was examined. The tumor reduction rate assessed according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors showed no association with the pathologic response grade (p =0.61). In contrast, the radiographic response rate by both barium enema and CT volumetry strongly correlated with the pathologic response grade (p volumetry had a lower recurrence rate (p =0.03, p =0.03, p =0.0002, and p =0.001). The difference between high responders and low responders was especially prominent by barium enema and CT volumetry. The study is limited by its retrospective nature. Double-contrast barium enema and CT volumetry were superior to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors in evaluating the effect of chemoradiotherapy and predicting the likelihood of tumor recurrence.

  19. Tumor lymphocyte immune response to preoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer: The LYMPHOREC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirjolet, C; Charon-Barra, C; Ladoire, S; Arbez-Gindre, F; Bertaut, A; Ghiringhelli, F; Leroux, A; Peiffert, D; Borg, C; Bosset, J F; Créhange, G

    2018-01-01

    Introduction : Some studies have suggested that baseline tumor-infiltrating-lymphocytes (TILs), such as CD8+ and FoxP3+ T-cells, may be associated with a better prognosis in colorectal cancer. We sought to investigate modulation of the immune response by preoperative radiotherapy (preopRT) and its impact on survival in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Materials & Methods : We analyzed data for 237 patients with LARC who received RT. Density of TILS (CD8+ and FoxP3+) in intraepithelial (iTILs) and stromal compartments (sTILs) were evaluated from surgery pathological specimens and biopsies performed at baseline. The primary endpoint was to assess the impact of infiltration of the tumor or tumor site after preopRT on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints were the impact of dose fractionation scheme on TILs. Results : In univariate analysis, several factors significantly correlated (pguide physicians in adjuvant treatment decision-making.

  20. WRAP53 is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer- a study of Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Da-Wei; Adell, Gunnar; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Expression of WRAP53 protein has oncogenic properties and it is up regulated in several types of tumors. We examined expression of WRAP53 protein in rectal cancers and analyzed its relationship to the response to preoperative radiotherapy and patient survival. The WRAP53 protein was examined by immunohistochemistry in normal mucosa, primary tumors and lymph node metastases from 143 rectal cancer patients participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Frequency of WRAP53 protein expression was increased in primary rectal cancer compared to the normal mucosa (p < 0.05). In non-radiotherapy group positive WRAP53 in primary tumors (p = 0.03, RR, 3.73, 95% CI, 1.13-11.89) or metastases (p = 0.01, RR, 4.11, 95% CI, 1.25-13.14), was associated with poor prognosis independently of stages and differentiations. In radiotherapy group, positive WRAP53 in the metastasis correlated with better survival (p = 0.04). An interaction analysis showed that the correlations of WRAP53 with the prognostic significance with and without radiotherapy in the metastasis differed (p = 0.01). In the radiotherapy group, expression of WRAP53 in metastases gave a better outcome (p = 0.02, RR, 0.32, 95% CI, 0.13-0.84), and an interaction analysis showed significance between the two groups (p = 0.01). WRAP53 may be a new biomarker used to predict prognosis and to select suitable patients for preoperative radiotherapy

  1. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with oral doxifluridine plus low-dose oral leucovorin in unresectable primary rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jinsil; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Jin Sik; Suh, Chang Ok

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The use of oral chemotherapeutic agents in chemoradiotherapy provides several advantages. Doxifluridine, an oral 5-FU prodrug, has been shown to be effective in colorectal cancer. We attempted a Phase II trial of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with doxifluridine plus a low-dose oral leucovorin in unresectable primary rectal cancer patients. In this study, toxicity and efficacy were evaluated. Methods and Materials: There were 23 patients with primary unresectable rectal cancer in this trial, 21 of whom were available for analysis. The patients were treated with oral doxifluridine (900 mg/day) plus oral leucovorin (30 mg/day) from days 1 to 35, and pelvic radiation of 45 Gy over 5 weeks. Surgical resection was performed 5-6 weeks after the treatment. Results: Acute toxicity involved thrombocytopenia, nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, and skin reaction. All were in Grade 1/2, except diarrhea, which was not only the most frequent (7 patients, 33.3%), but also the only toxicity of Grade 3 (2 patients). The clinical tumor response was shown in 5 patients (23.8%) as a complete response and 13 patients (61.9%) as a partial response. A complete resection with negative resection margin was done in 18 patients (85.7%), in 2 of whom a pathologic complete response was shown (9.5%). The overall downstaging rate in the T- and N-stage groupings was 71.4% (15 patients). Conclusion: This study demonstrated the efficacy and low toxicity of chemoradiotherapy with doxifluridine. Currently, a Phase III randomized trial of chemoradiotherapy is ongoing at our institute to compare the therapeutic efficacy of oral 5-FU with respect to i.v. 5-FU in locally advanced and unresectable rectal cancer

  2. Pathologic complete response predicts long-term survival following preoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Neelofur R.; Nagle, Deborah A.; Topham, Allan

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The finding of a pathologic complete response (pCR) after preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for rectal cancer is frequently used as a surrogate endpoint for treatment outcome. In most reported series, the pCR rate ranges from 10 to 25%. An underlying assumption is that pCR relates to favorable long-term patient outcome; however, such results are rarely reported. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcome of patients having pCR's following preoperative RT and surgery for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: Between 1978 and 1993, 49 of 315 patients (16%) were found to have pCR's following 40 to 65 Gy of preoperative RT for rectal cancer (median RT dose 55.8 Gy). Six complete responders also received concurrent 5-FU chemotherapy with RT. Follow-up time ranged from 7 to 224 months (median 52 months). Actuarial overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and local control (LC) rates were calculated. Patient outcome was analyzed with respect to pretreatment clinical stage (mobile vs. tethered/fixed on digital exam), tumor level in the rectum as measured from the anorectal ring (0-3 cm vs. >3 cm), type of surgery (local excision, APR, or other), and use of concurrent chemotherapy vs. RT alone. Results: Prior to treatment, clinical stage tumor stage was 43% mobile ((21(49))) and 35% tethered/fixed ((17(49))). Twenty-two percent ((11(49))) did not have palpable tumor at presentation to our institution due to prior local excision of an invasive cancer. Tumor level in the rectum was 74% 0-3 cm, 16% >3 to 6 cm, and 10% > 6 cm. Surgical procedures were 12% APR, 24% LAR, 6% combined abdominal transsacral resection (CATS), 27% coloanal anastamosis, and 31% full thickness local excision. Overall, 2 of 49 patients (4%) developed a local tumor recurrence, and 4 of 49 (8%) developed distant metastases. The overall 5- and 10-year actuarial survival rates were 91% and 86%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year actuarial DFS rate was 85%, and the

  3. Preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer: comparison of three radiation dose and fractionation schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Shin Hyung; Kim, Jae Chul

    2016-01-01

    The standard radiation dose for patients with locally rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy is 45–50 Gy in 25–28 fractions. We aimed to assess whether a difference exists within this dose fractionation range. A retrospective analysis was performed to compare three dose fractionation schedules. Patients received 50 Gy in 25 fractions (group A), 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (group B), or 45 Gy in 25 fractions (group C) to the whole pelvis, as well as concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Radical resection was scheduled for 8 weeks after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Between September 2010 and August 2013, 175 patients were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy at our institution. Among those patients, 154 were eligible for analysis (55, 50, and 49 patients in groups A, B, and C, respectively). After the median follow-up period of 29 months (range, 5 to 48 months), no differences were found between the 3 groups regarding pathologic complete remission rate, tumor regression grade, treatment-related toxicity, 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, or overall survival. The circumferential resection margin width was a prognostic factor for 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, whereas ypN category was associated with distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. High tumor regression grading score was correlated with 2-year distant metastasis-free survival and disease-free survival in univariate analysis. Three different radiation dose fractionation schedules, within the dose range recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, had no impact on pathologic tumor regression and early clinical outcome for locally advanced rectal cancer

  4. Preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer: comparison of three radiation dose and fractionation schedules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Shin Hyung; Kim, Jae Chul [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The standard radiation dose for patients with locally rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy is 45–50 Gy in 25–28 fractions. We aimed to assess whether a difference exists within this dose fractionation range. A retrospective analysis was performed to compare three dose fractionation schedules. Patients received 50 Gy in 25 fractions (group A), 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (group B), or 45 Gy in 25 fractions (group C) to the whole pelvis, as well as concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Radical resection was scheduled for 8 weeks after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Between September 2010 and August 2013, 175 patients were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy at our institution. Among those patients, 154 were eligible for analysis (55, 50, and 49 patients in groups A, B, and C, respectively). After the median follow-up period of 29 months (range, 5 to 48 months), no differences were found between the 3 groups regarding pathologic complete remission rate, tumor regression grade, treatment-related toxicity, 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, or overall survival. The circumferential resection margin width was a prognostic factor for 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, whereas ypN category was associated with distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. High tumor regression grading score was correlated with 2-year distant metastasis-free survival and disease-free survival in univariate analysis. Three different radiation dose fractionation schedules, within the dose range recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, had no impact on pathologic tumor regression and early clinical outcome for locally advanced rectal cancer.

  5. Preoperative Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine, Bevacizumab, and Erlotinib for Rectal Cancer: A Phase 1 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Prajnan, E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eng, Cathy [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Chang, George J.; Skibber, John M.; You, Y. Nancy [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Maru, Dipen M. [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Clemons, Marilyn V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kopetz, Scott E.; Garrett, Christopher R.; Shureiqi, Imad [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The goal of this phase 1 trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib with preoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with clinical stage II to III rectal adenocarcinoma, within 12 cm from the anal verge, were treated in 4 escalating dose levels, using the continual reassessment method. Patients received preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks), erlotinib, and capecitabine. Capecitabine dose was increased from 650 mg/m{sup 2} to 825 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily on the days of radiation therapy; erlotinib dose was increased from 50 mg orally daily in weeks 1 to 3, to 50 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6, to 100 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6. Patients underwent surgery at least 9 weeks after the last dose of bevacizumab. Results: A total of 19 patients were enrolled, and 18 patients were considered evaluable. No patient had grade 4 acute toxicity, and 1 patient had grade 3 acute toxicity (hypertension). The MTD was not reached. All 18 evaluable patients underwent surgery, with low anterior resection in 7 (39%), proctectomy with coloanal anastomosis in 4 patients (22%), posterior pelvic exenteration in 1 (6%), and abdominoperineal resection in 6 (33%). Of the 18 patients, 8 (44%) had pathologic complete response, and 1 had complete response of the primary tumor with positive nodes. Three patients (17%) had grade 3 postoperative complications (ileus, small bowel obstruction, and infection). With a median follow-up of 34 months, 1 patient developed distant metastasis, and no patient had local recurrence or died. The 3-year disease-free survival was 94%. Conclusions: The combination of preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib was well tolerated. The pathologic complete response rate appears promising and may warrant further investigation.

  6. Preoperative treatment with capecitabine, cetuximab and radiotherapy for primary locally advanced rectal cancer : A phase II clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisterer, Wolfgang; de Vries, Alexander; Öfner, Dietmar; Rabl, Hans; Koplmüller, Renate; Greil, Richard; Tschmelitsch, Jöerg; Schmid, Rainer; Kapp, Karin; Lukas, Peter; Sedlmayer, Felix; Höfler, Gerald; Gnant, Michael; Thaler, Josef; Widder, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: To investigate the feasibility and safety of preoperative capecitabine, cetuximab and radiation in patients with MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, cT3/T4). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 31 patients with LARC were treated with cetuximab and capecitabine concomitantly with 45

  7. Autonomic nerve-sparing surgery with preoperative or intraoperative radiotherapy for advanced lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Norio; Ono, Masato; Sugifuji, Masanori; Kawashima, Kiyotaka; Arai, Tatsuo; Koda, Keishi; Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Oda, Kenji; Nakajima, Nobuyuki

    2000-01-01

    Autonomic-nerve-sparing surgery was performed for advanced lower rectal cancer, and the results in patients who had undergone preoperative irradiation plus chemotherapy (RCT group) and intraoperative irradiation (IORT group) were compared. The autonomic nerves of 76 of the 84 patients in the RCT group were conserved. The radiation dose was 42.6 Gy, and surgery was performed 2 weeks after the irradiation. Their curability was A. Urinary function was maintained. The results for sexual function were better in the cases in which the autonomic nerves were completely conserved. The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 84.1%. The local recurrence rate was 7.9% and was no higher after treatment by the conventional method. The autonomic nerves of all 61 patients in the IORT group, were conserved. Patients were irradiated with 15 Gy (5 MeV) to the pelvic nerve plexuses and peripheral region with a cone 4 cm in diameter. Irradiation depth was estimated to be approximately 15 mm. The results for urinary function and sexual function were equivalent to those in the RCT group. The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 79%. The local recurrence rate was 9.8%. The autonomic nerve conservation rate was increased in both groups but the results in terms of QOL, such as sexual function, were inadequate. Further development and improvement of treatment methods for advanced lower rectal cancer are needed. (K.H.)

  8. MRI after preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer; correlation with histopathology and the role of volumetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torkzad, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Lennart; Lindholm, Johan; Glimelius, Bengt; Martling, Anna; Cedermark, Bjoern

    2007-01-01

    The objective is to assess if tumor size after radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer can be assessed by a second magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), after radiotherapy prior to surgery and to correlate changes observed on MRI with findings at histopathology at surgery. Twenty-five patients with MRI before and after radiotherapy were included. Variables studied were changes in tumor size, T-staging and distance to the circumferential resection margin (CRM). RVs was measured as tumor volume at surgery (Vs) divided by tumor volume at the initial MRI (Vi) in percent. RVm was defined as the tumor volume at the second MRI (Vm) divided by Vi in percent. The ypT-stage was the same or more favorable than the initial MRI T-stage in 24 of 25 patients. The second MRI was not more accurately predictive than the initial MRI for ypT-staging or distance to CRM (p > 0.05). Vm correlated significantly to Vs, as did RVs to RVm, although the former was always smaller than the latter. Vm and RVm correlated well with ypT-stage (p < 0.001). Volumetry seems to correlate with ypT-stage after preoperative radiotherapy for resectable rectal cancer. The value of a second MRI after radiotherapy for assessment of distance to CRM and ypT-staging is, however, not apparent. (orig.)

  9. The clinical significance of CT in the preoperative diagnosis of colon and rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itano, Satoshi; Fuchimoto, Sadanori; Hamada, Fumihiro; Kimura, Takanobu; Orita, Kunzo

    1986-01-01

    The clinical significance of CT in the preoperative diagnosis of colon and rectal cancer was studied. Thirty four patients were investigated in this series. The diagnostic criteria of the CT examination were previously established in a study of wall invasion (S factor), lymph node metastasis (N factor), liver metastasis (H factor) and peritoneal dissemination (P factor). The CT diagnosis was done prospectively according to these criteria, and the CT diagnosis was compared with the macroscopic and histological diagnosis. The accuracy of the prospective diagnosis as to H, S, N and P factors was 79.4 %, 55.9 %, 41.2 % and 20.6 %, respectively. The diagnostic value of CT seemed to be acceptable as to the H factor, but limited to some extent to the S and N factors. (author)

  10. Clinicopathological outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy using S-1 plus Irinotecan for T4 lower rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beppu, Naohito; Yoshie, Hidenori; Kimura, Fumihiko; Aihara, Tsukasa; Doi, Hiroshi; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Matsubara, Nagahide; Tomita, Naohiro; Yanagi, Hidenori; Yamanaka, Naoki

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the clinicopathological outcomes of patients with T4 lower rectal cancer treated using preoperative chemoradiotherapy with S-1 plus Irinotecan. Between 2005 and 2011, 35 patients with T4M0 lower rectal cancer, diagnosed initially as T4a in 12 and as T4b in 23, were treated with 45 Gy of radiotherapy concomitantly with S-1 plus Irinotecan. The median follow-up period was 50.6 months (range 2-123 months). A total of 32 patients (91.4 %) completed the radiotherapy and 26 (74.3 %) completed the full chemotherapy regimen. Radical surgery was then performed in 33 (94.3 %) of the 35 patients after the exclusion of two patients, who had macroscopic residual disease. The pathological diagnosis was downstaged from T4a to ypT0-3 in all 12 of those patients (100 %) and from T4b to ypT0-4a in 20 of those 23 patients (87.0 %). The tumor regression grade of 1a/1b/2/3 (complete response) was 10/8/15/2, respectively. In terms of long-term survival, the 5-year local relapse-free survival rate was 74.8 % and the recurrence-free survival rate was 52.0 %. This regimen may result in favorable downstaging. Moreover, in this series, pathological evidence of involvement of adjacent organs was rare following preoperative chemoradiotherapy, in the patients with disease diagnosed as T4b at the initial staging.

  11. Preoperative Radiotherapy in Resectable Rectal Cancer: A Prospective Randomized Study of Two Different Approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EITTA, M.A.; EL- WAHIDI, G.F.; FOUDA, M.A.; ABO EL-NAGA, E.M.; GAD EL-HAK, N.

    2010-01-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy in resectable rectal cancer has a number of potential advantages, most importantly reducing local recurrence, increasing survival and down-staging effect. Purpose: This prospective study was designed to compare between two different approaches of preoperative radiotherapy, either short course or long course radiotherapy. The primary endpoint is to evaluate the local recurrence rate, overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS). The secondary endpoint is to evaluate down staging, treatment toxicity and ability to do sphincter sparing procedure (SSP), aiming at helping in the choice of the optimal treatment modality. Patients and Methods: This is a prospective randomized study of patients with resectable rectal cancer who presented to the department of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Mansoura University during the time period between June 2007 and September 2009. These patients received preoperative radiotherapy and were randomized into two arms: Arm 1, short course (SCRT) 25Gy/week/5 fractions followed by surgery within one week, and arm 2, long course preoperative radiotherapy (LCRT) 45Gy/5 weeks/25 fractions followed by surgery after 4-6 weeks. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given 4-6 weeks after surgery according to the postoperative pathology. Results: After a median follow-up of 18 months (range 6 to 28 months), we studied the patterns of recurrence. Three patients experienced local recurrence (LR), two out of 14 (14.2%) in arm 1 and one out of 15 patients (6.7%) in arm 2, (p=0.598). Three patients developed distant metastases [two in arm 1 (14.2%) and one in arm 2 (6.7%), p=0.598]. Two-year OS rate was 64±3% and 66±2%, (p= 0.389), and the 2-year DFS rate was 61±2% and 83±2% for arms 1 and 2, respectively (p=0.83). Tumor (T) downstaging was more achieved in LCRT arm with a statistically significant difference, but did not reach statistical significance in node (N) down-staging. SSP was more available in LCRT but with no

  12. A comparison of laparoscopic and open surgery following pre-operative chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Toru; Inomata, Masafumi; Hiratsuka, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Although pre-operative chemoradiation therapy for advanced lower rectal cancer is a controversial treatment modality, it is increasingly used in combination with surgery. Few studies have considered the combination of chemoradiation therapy followed by laparoscopic surgery for locally advanced lower rectal cancer; therefore, this study aimed to assess the usefulness of this therapeutic combination. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with locally advanced lower rectal cancer treated by pre-operative chemoradiation therapy and surgery from February 2002 to November 2012 at Oita University. We divided patients into an open surgery group and a laparoscopic surgery group and evaluated various parameters by univariate and multivariate analyses. In total, 33 patients were enrolled (open surgery group, n=14; laparoscopic surgery group, n=19). Univariate analysis revealed that compared with the open surgery group, operative time was significantly longer, whereas intra-operative blood loss and intra-operative blood transfusion requirements were significantly less in the laparoscopic surgery group. There were no significant differences in post-operative complication and recurrence rates between the two groups. According to multivariate analysis, operative time and intra-operative blood loss were significant predictors of outcome in the laparoscopic surgery group. This study suggests that laparoscopic surgery after chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced lower rectal cancer is a safe procedure. Further prospective investigation of the long-term oncological outcomes of laparoscopic surgery after chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced lower rectal cancer is required to confirm the advantages of laparoscopic surgery over open surgery. (author)

  13. Significance of endoscopic biopsy after preoperative irradiation therapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Sarashina, Hiromi; Saito, Norio; Nunomura, Masao; Kohda, Keishi; Nakajima, Nobuyuki (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-05-01

    To evaluate the utility of endoscopic biopsy before and after preoperative irradiation therapy for rectal cancer, we examined histologically both biopsy specimens and resected materials of forty-three patients. Two pieces of biopsy materials were taken both before and after irradiation therapy (total dose 42.6 Gy) from the marginal wall of the tumor, cavity and transitional mucosa, respectively. In biopsy specimens, according to the degree of degeneration of cancer cells, cases with remarkable changes of nucleus, nucleolus, and cytoplasm due to irradiation were classified into the severely degenerated group. According to the histological examinations of resected materials, twenty-four cases were under Grade 1b (Gr I), and nineteen cases were over Grade 2 (Gr II). The rates of cancer cells found in biopsy materials after irradiation were 91.7% in Gr I and were 47.4% in Gr II, respectively (p<0.01). Among the cases, 54.5% in Gr I and 100% in Gr II belonged to the severely degenerated group (p<0.05). Transitional mucosas were not greatly damaged by irradiation. As a result, the greater the irradiation effect was, the fewer cancer cells were found and the more degenerated cancer cells were found in biopsy specimens. But the rate of severely degenerated cells found in the biopsy specimens of little effect cases was high. So it was thought to be too difficult to predict the histological radiation effect of resected specimens from only biopsy specimens. (author).

  14. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy as a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong, E-mail: radiopiakim@hanmail.net [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Min Ju [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: In total, 430 primary LARC (cT3-4) patients who were treated with preoperative CRT and curative radical surgery between May 2002 and March 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. Pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest MR volumetry. Tumor volume reduction rate was determined using the equation TVRR (%) = (pre-CRT tumor volume - post-CRT tumor volume) Multiplication-Sign 100/pre-CRT tumor volume. The median follow-up period was 64 months (range, 27-99 months) for survivors. Endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: The median TVRR was 70.2% (mean, 64.7% {+-} 22.6%; range, 0-100%). Downstaging (ypT0-2N0M0) occurred in 183 patients (42.6%). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 77.7% and 86.3%, respectively. In the analysis that included pre-CRT and post-CRT tumor volumes and TVRR as continuous variables, only TVRR was an independent prognostic factor. Tumor volume reduction rate was categorized according to a cutoff value of 45% and included with clinicopathologic factors in the multivariate analysis; ypN status, circumferential resection margin, and TVRR were significant prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction rate was a significant prognostic factor in LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT. Tumor volume reduction rate data may be useful for tailoring surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy after preoperative CRT.

  15. An 80-gene set to predict response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer by principle component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Empuku, Shinichiro; Nakajima, Kentaro; Akagi, Tomonori; Kaneko, Kunihiko; Hijiya, Naoki; Etoh, Tsuyoshi; Shiraishi, Norio; Moriyama, Masatsugu; Inomata, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer not only improves the postoperative local control rate, but also induces downstaging. However, it has not been established how to individually select patients who receive effective preoperative CRT. The aim of this study was to identify a predictor of response to preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. This study is additional to our multicenter phase II study evaluating the safety and efficacy of preoperative CRT using oral fluorouracil (UMIN ID: 03396). From April, 2009 to August, 2011, 26 biopsy specimens obtained prior to CRT were analyzed by cyclopedic microarray analysis. Response to CRT was evaluated according to a histological grading system using surgically resected specimens. To decide on the number of genes for dividing into responder and non-responder groups, we statistically analyzed the data using a dimension reduction method, a principle component analysis. Of the 26 cases, 11 were responders and 15 non-responders. No significant difference was found in clinical background data between the two groups. We determined that the optimal number of genes for the prediction of response was 80 of 40,000 and the functions of these genes were analyzed. When comparing non-responders with responders, genes expressed at a high level functioned in alternative splicing, whereas those expressed at a low level functioned in the septin complex. Thus, an 80-gene expression set that predicts response to preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer was identified using a novel statistical method.

  16. Pretreatment clinical findings predict outcome for patients receiving preoperative radiation for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myerson, Robert J.; Singh, Anurag; Birnbaum, Elisa H.; Fry, Robert D.; Fleshman, James W.; Kodner, Ira J.; Lockett, Mary Ann; Picus, Joel; Walz, Bruce J.; Read, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    adverse clinical factors were present: 0 for none, 1 for one or two, 2 for three or four. This sorted outcome highly significantly (p≤0.002, Tarone Ware), with 5-year LC/FFR of 98%/85% (score 0), 90%/72% (score 1), and 74%/58% (score 2). The scoring system sorts the data for both subgroups of surgeons; however, there are substantial differences in LC on the basis of the surgeon's experience. For colorectal specialists (251 cases), the 5-year LC is 100%, 94%, and 78% for scores of 0, 1, and 2, respectively (p=0.004). For the more mixed group of nonspecialist surgeons (133 cases), LC is 98%, 80%, and 65% for scores of 0, 1, and 2 (p=0.008). In multivariate analysis, the clinical score and surgeon's background retained independent predictive value, even when pathologic stage was included. Conclusions: For many patients with rectal cancer, adjuvant treatment can be administered in a well-tolerated sequential fashion--moderate doses of preoperative radiation followed by surgery followed by postoperative chemotherapy to address the risk of occult metastatic disease. A clinical scoring system has been presented here that would suggest that the local control is excellent for lesions with a score of 0 or (if the surgeon is experienced) 1, and therefore sequential treatment could be considered. Cases with a clinical score of 2 should be strongly considered for protocols evaluating more aggressive preoperative treatment, such as combined modality preoperative treatment

  17. Clinical outcome in 520 consecutive Danish rectal cancer patients treated with short course preoperative radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L H; Altaf, R; Harling, H

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to analyse the results of preoperative short course radiotherapy in a consecutive, national cohort of patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: Through a validated, prospective national database we identified 520 Danish patients who presented with high-risk mobile...... tumours in the lower two thirds of the rectum and were referred for preoperative radiotherapy with 5 x 5 Gy. The inclusion period was 56 months. Radiotherapy data was retrospectively collected. RESULTS: Of the 520 patients, 514 completed radiotherapy and 506 had surgery. Surgery was considered curative...... in 439 patients. The 3-year local recurrence rate was 4.0% (95% CI 2.5-6.5%) and the distant recurrence rate at 3 years was 18.7% (95% CI 15.4-22.5%). The 5-year disease free survival rate was 40.2% (95% CI 27.0-53.1%) and overall survival 50.4% (95% CI 36.1-63.1%). Most tumours (61%) were classified...

  18. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelt, Ane L.; Pløen, John; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Bentzen, Søren M.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is part of the standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancers. Tumor regression at the time of operation is desirable, but not much is known about the relationship between radiation dose and tumor regression. In the present study we estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect of including clinical parameters in the model was examined. The radiation dose-response relationship for a specific grade of histopathologic tumor regression was parameterized in terms of the dose required for 50% response, D 50,i , and the normalized dose-response gradient, γ 50,i . Results: A highly significant dose-response relationship was found (P=.002). For complete response (TRG1), the dose-response parameters were D 50,TRG1 = 92.0 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI] 79.3-144.9 Gy), γ 50,TRG1 = 0.982 (CI 0.533-1.429), and for major response (TRG1-2) D 50,TRG1 and 2 = 72.1 Gy (CI 65.3-94.0 Gy), γ 50,TRG1 and 2 = 0.770 (CI 0.338-1.201). Tumor size and N category both had a significant effect on the dose-response relationships. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a significant dose-response relationship for tumor regression after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer for tumor dose levels in the range of 50.4-70 Gy, which is higher than the dose range usually considered.

  19. Sphincter-sparing surgery after preoperative radiotherapy for low rectal cancers: feasibility, oncological results, and quality of life outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, A.S.; Soravia, C.; Gertsch, P.; Bieri, S.; Sprangers, M.A.G.

    1999-01-01

    In cancers of the distal rectum, preoperative radiotherapy is often associated with low anterior resection. This study assesses the choice of surgical procedure, oncological results, and quality of life outcomes in a retrospective cohort of patients with low-lying rectal cancers. The results obtained reinforce the notion of the feasibility, in routine practice, of sphincter-sparing surgery after preoperative radiotherapy in a significant proportion of low rectal cancers. The oncological results seem to be unaffected by the choice of surgical procedure. However, with the possible exception of body image and sexual aspects in males, quality of life parameters were not necessarily better in the restorative surgery group. Prospective studies are mandatory to clarify the putative quality of life advantages of sphincter-conserving procedures in this context. (author)

  20. Results of Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for the Treatment of Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Mee Sun; Nam, Taek Keun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Nah, Byung Sik; Chung, Woong Ki; Kim, Young Jin; Ahn, Sung Ja; Song, Ju Young; Jeong, Jae Uk

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate anal sphincter preservation rates, survival rates, and prognostic factors in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Materials and Methods: One hundred fifty patients with pathologic confirmed rectal cancer and treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy between January 1999 and June 2007. Of the 150 patients, the 82 who completed the scheduled chemoradiotherapy, received definitive surgery at our hospital, and did not have distant metastasis upon initial diagnosis were enrolled in this study. The radiation dose delivered to the whole pelvis ranged from 41.4 to 46.0 Gy (median 44.0 Gy) using daily fractions of 1.8-2.0 Gy at 5 days per week and a boost dose to the primary tumor and high risk area up to a total of 43.2-54 Gy (median 50.4 Gy). Sixty patients (80.5%) received 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and cisplatin, while 16 patients (19.5%) were administered 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin every 4 weeks concurrently during radiotherapy. Surgery was performed for 3 to 45 weeks (median 7 weeks) after completion of chemoradiotherapy. Results: The sphincter preservation rates for all patients were 73.2% (60/82). Of the 48 patients whose tumor was located at less than 5 cm away from the anal verge, 31 (64.6%) underwent sphincter-saving surgery. Moreover, of the 34 patients whose tumor was located at greater than or equal to 5 cm away from the anal verge, 29 (85.3%) were able to preserve their anal sphincter. A pathologic complete response was achieved in 14.6% (12/82) of all patients. The downstaging rates were 42.7% (35/82) for the T stage, 75.5% (37/49) for the N stage, and 67.1% (55/82) for the overall stages. The median follow-up period was 38 months (range 11 -107 months). The overall 5-year survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control rates were 67.4%, 58.9% and 84.4%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival rates based on the pathologic stage were 100% for stage 0 (n=12), 59

  1. Five fractions of radiation therapy followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX chemotherapy as preoperative treatment for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myerson, Robert J; Tan, Benjamin; Hunt, Steven; Olsen, Jeffrey; Birnbaum, Elisa; Fleshman, James; Gao, Feng; Hall, Lannis; Kodner, Ira; Lockhart, A Craig; Mutch, Matthew; Naughton, Michael; Picus, Joel; Rigden, Caron; Safar, Bashar; Sorscher, Steven; Suresh, Rama; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Parikh, Parag

    2014-03-15

    Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Preoperative CT versus diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in patients with rectal cancer; a prospective randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Achiam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world and liver metastases are seen in up to 19% of patients with colorectal cancers. Detection of liver metastases is not only vital for sufficient treatment and survival, but also for a better estimation of prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of diffusion weighted MRI of the liver as part of a combined MR evaluation of patients with rectal cancers and compare it with the standard preoperative evaluation of the liver with CT.Methods. Consecutive patients diagnosed with rectal cancers were asked to participate in the study. Preoperative CT and diffusion weighted MR (DWMR were compared to contrast enhanced laparoscopic ultrasound (CELUS.Results. A total of 35 patients were included, 15 patients in Group-1 having the standard CT evaluation of the liver and 20 patients in Group-2 having the standard CT evaluation of the liver and DWMR of the liver. Compared with CELUS, the per-patient sensitivity/specificity was 50/100% for CT, and for DWMR: 100/94% and 100/100% for Reader 1 and 2, respectively. The per-lesion sensitivity of CT and DWMR were 17% and 89%, respectively compared with CELUS. Furthermore, one patient had non-resectable metastases after DWMR despite being diagnosed with resectable metastases after CT. Another patient was diagnosed with multiple liver metastases during CELUS, despite a negative CT-scan.Discussion. DWMR is feasible for preoperative evaluation of liver metastases. The current standard preoperative evaluation with CT-scan results in disadvantages like missed metastases and futile operations. We recommend that patients with rectal cancer, who are scheduled for MR of the rectum, should have a DWMR of the liver performed at the same time.

  3. Use of Molecular Imaging to Predict Clinical Outcome in Patients With Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konski, Andre; Li Tianyu; Sigurdson, Elin; Cohen, Steven J.; Small, William; Spies, Stewart; Yu, Jian Q.; Wahl, Andrew; Stryker, Steven; Meropol, Neal J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate changes in 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) (18-FDG-PET) uptake with response and disease-free survival with combined modality neoadjuvant therapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Charts were reviewed for consecutive patients with ultrasound-staged T3x to T4Nx or TxN1 rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent preoperative chemoradiation therapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC) or Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University with 18-FDG-PET scanning before and after combined-modality neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy . The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) was measured from the tumor before and 3 to 4 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy preoperatively. Logistic regression was used to analyze the association of pretreatment SUV, posttreatment SUV, and % SUV decrease on pathologic complete response (pCR), and a Cox model was fitted to analyze disease-free survival. Results: A total of 53 patients (FCCC, n = 41, RLCCC, n = 12) underwent pre- and postchemoradiation PET scanning between September 2000 and June 2006. The pCR rate was 31%. Univariate analysis revealed that % SUV decrease showed a marginally trend in predicting pCR (p = 0.08). In the multivariable analysis, posttreatment SUV was shown a predictor of pCR (p = 0.07), but the test results did not reach statistical significance. None of the investigated variables were predictive of disease-free survival. Conclusions: A trend was observed for % SUV decrease and posttreatment SUV predicting pCR in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation therapy. Further prospective study with a larger sample size is warranted to better characterize the role of 18-FDG-PET for response prediction in patients with rectal cancer.

  4. Long-Term Bone Marrow Suppression During Postoperative Chemotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Neil B.; Sidhu, Manpreet K.; Baby, Rekha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Moss, Rebecca A.; Nissenblatt, Michael J. [Division of Medical Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Chen, Ting [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Lu, Shou-En [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey (United States); Jabbour, Salma K., E-mail: jabbousk@cinj.rutgers.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To quantify ensuing bone marrow (BM) suppression during postoperative chemotherapy resulting from preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients treated with preoperative CRT followed by postoperative 5-Fluorouracil and oxaliplatin (OxF) chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. The pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was divided into ilium (IBM), lower pelvis (LPBM), and lumbosacrum (LSBM). Dose volume histograms (DVH) measured the mean doses and percentage of BM volume receiving between 5-40 Gy (i.e.: PBM-V5, LPBM-V5). The Wilcoxon signed rank tests evaluated the differences in absolute hematologic nadirs during neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant treatment. Logistic regressions evaluated the association between dosimetric parameters and ≥ grade 3 hematologic toxicity (HT3) and hematologic event (HE) defined as ≥ grade 2 HT and a dose reduction in OxF. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to determine optimal threshold values leading to HT3. Results: During OxF chemotherapy, 40.0% (n=14) and 48% (n=17) of rectal cancer patients experienced HT3 and HE, respectively. On multivariable logistic regression, increasing pelvic mean dose (PMD) and lower pelvis mean dose (LPMD) along with increasing PBM-V (25-40), LPBM-V25, and LPBM-V40 were significantly associated with HT3 and/or HE during postoperative chemotherapy. Exceeding ≥36.6 Gy to the PMD and ≥32.6 Gy to the LPMD strongly correlated with causing HT3 during postoperative chemotherapy. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant RT for rectal cancer has lasting effects on the pelvic BM, which are demonstrable during adjuvant OxF. Sparing of the BM during preoperative CRT can aid in reducing significant hematologic adverse events and aid in tolerance of postoperative chemotherapy.

  5. Long-Term Bone Marrow Suppression During Postoperative Chemotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Neil B; Sidhu, Manpreet K; Baby, Rekha; Moss, Rebecca A; Nissenblatt, Michael J; Chen, Ting; Lu, Shou-En; Jabbour, Salma K

    2016-04-01

    To quantify ensuing bone marrow (BM) suppression during postoperative chemotherapy resulting from preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) therapy for rectal cancer. We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients treated with preoperative CRT followed by postoperative 5-Fluorouracil and oxaliplatin (OxF) chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. The pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was divided into ilium (IBM), lower pelvis (LPBM), and lumbosacrum (LSBM). Dose volume histograms (DVH) measured the mean doses and percentage of BM volume receiving between 5-40 Gy (i.e.: PBM-V5, LPBM-V5). The Wilcoxon signed rank tests evaluated the differences in absolute hematologic nadirs during neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant treatment. Logistic regressions evaluated the association between dosimetric parameters and ≥ grade 3 hematologic toxicity (HT3) and hematologic event (HE) defined as ≥ grade 2 HT and a dose reduction in OxF. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to determine optimal threshold values leading to HT3. During OxF chemotherapy, 40.0% (n=14) and 48% (n=17) of rectal cancer patients experienced HT3 and HE, respectively. On multivariable logistic regression, increasing pelvic mean dose (PMD) and lower pelvis mean dose (LPMD) along with increasing PBM-V (25-40), LPBM-V25, and LPBM-V40 were significantly associated with HT3 and/or HE during postoperative chemotherapy. Exceeding ≥36.6 Gy to the PMD and ≥32.6 Gy to the LPMD strongly correlated with causing HT3 during postoperative chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant RT for rectal cancer has lasting effects on the pelvic BM, which are demonstrable during adjuvant OxF. Sparing of the BM during preoperative CRT can aid in reducing significant hematologic adverse events and aid in tolerance of postoperative chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiotherapy in addition to radical surgery in rectal cancer: evidence for a dose-response effect favoring preoperative treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glimelius, Bengt; Isacsson, Ulf; Jung, Bo; Paahlman, Lars

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the relationship between radiation dose and reduction in local recurrence rate after preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: All randomized trials initiated prior to 1988 comparing preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy with surgery alone or with each other were included. Local failure rates were available in 5626 randomized patients. The linear quadratic formula was used to compensate for different radiotherapy schedules. Results: For preoperative radiotherapy, a clear dose-response relationship could be established. For postoperative radiotherapy, the range of doses was narrow, and a dose-response relationship could not be demonstrated. At similar doses, preoperative radiotherapy appeared to be more efficient in reducing local failure rate than postoperative. The only trial comparing preoperative with postoperative radiotherapy confirms this notion. A 15-20 Gy higher dose may be required postoperatively than preoperatively to reach similar efficacy. Neither approach alone significantly influences survival, although it is likely that a small survival benefit may be seen after preoperative radiotherapy. Conclusions: The information from the entire randomized experience suggests that preoperative radiotherapy may be more dose efficient than postoperative radiotherapy

  7. Influence of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy on the Surgical Strategy According to the Clinical T Stage of Patients With Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Ja; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Seok; Park, Seong Ho; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the pathologic responses and changes to surgical strategies following preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) in rectal cancer patients according to their clinical T stage (cT). The use of PCRT has recently been extended to less advanced disease. The authors enrolled 650 patients with cT2 to 4 mid and low rectal cancer who received both PCRT and surgical resection. The rate of total regression and the proportion of local excision were compared according to the cT category. The 3-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) rate was compared using the log-rank test according to patient cT category, pathologic stage, and type of surgical treatment. Patients with cT2 were older (P = 0.001), predominately female (P = 0.028), and had low-lying rectal cancer (P = 0.008). Pathologic total regression was achieved most frequently in cT2 patients (54% of cT2 versus 17.6% of cT3 versus 8.2% of cT4; P rectal cancer, optimal surgical treatment may be achieved with the tailored use of PCRT. PMID:26717384

  8. Complete pathological response (ypT0N0M0) after preoperative chemotherapy alone for stage IV rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiken, Surennaidoo P; Toso, Christian; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Thomopoulos, Theodoros; Roth, Arnaud; Mentha, Gilles; Morel, Philippe; Gervaz, Pascal

    2014-01-17

    Complete pathological response occurs in 10-20% of patients with rectal cancer who are treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy prior to pelvic surgery. The possibility that complete pathological response of rectal cancer can also occur with neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone (without radiation) is an intriguing hypothesis. A 66-year old man presented an adenocarcinoma of the rectum with nine liver metastases (T3N1M1). He was included in a reverse treatment, aiming at first downsizing the liver metastases by chemotherapy, and subsequently performing the liver surgery prior to the rectum resection. The neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisted in a combination of oxaliplatin, 5-FU, irinotecan, leucovorin and bevacizumab (OCFL-B). After a right portal embolization, an extended right liver lobectomy was performed. On the final histopathological analysis, all lesions were fibrotic, devoid of any viable cancer cells. One month after liver surgery, the rectoscopic examination showed a near-total response of the primary rectal adenocarcinoma, which convinced the colorectal surgeon to perform the low anterior resection without preoperative radiation therapy. Macroscopically, a fibrous scar was observed at the level of the previously documented tumour, and the histological examination of the surgical specimen did not reveal any malignant cells in the rectal wall as well as in the mesorectum. All 15 resected lymph nodes were free of tumour, and the final tumour stage was ypT0N0M0. Clinical outcome was excellent, and the patient is currently alive 5 years after the first surgery without evidence of recurrence. The presented patient with stage IV rectal cancer and liver metastases was in a unique situation linked to its inclusion in a reversed treatment and the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone. The observed achievement of a complete pathological response after chemotherapy should promote the design of prospective randomized studies to evaluate the benefits of chemotherapy

  9. Nodal tumor response according to the count of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations during preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Jae Sung; Oh, Young Tae; Noh, O Kyu; Chun, Mi Son; Park, Jun Eun; Cho, Sung Ran [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the relationship between the circulating lymphocyte subpopulation counts during preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and tumor response in locally advanced rectal cancer. From August 2015 to June 2016, 10 patients treated with preoperative CRT followed by surgery were enrolled. Patients received conventional fractionated radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) with fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Surgical resection was performed at 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of preoperative CRT. The absolute blood lymphocyte subpopulation was obtained prior to and after 4 weeks of CRT. We analyzed the association between a tumor response and change in the lymphocyte subpopulation during CRT. Among 10 patients, 2 (20%) had evidence of pathologic complete response. In 8 patients with clinically node positive, 4 (50%) had nodal tumor response. All lymphocyte subpopulation counts at 4 weeks after CRT were significantly lower than those observed during pretreatment (p < 0.01). A high decrease in natural killer (NK) cell, count during CRT (baseline cell count - cell count at 4 weeks) was associated with node down staging (p = 0.034). Our results suggest that the change of lymphocyte subset to preoperative CRT may be a predictive factor for tumor response in rectal cancer.

  10. The correlation between aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 level and tumor shrinkage after preoperative chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhandyka Rafli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to determine the correlation between aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1 level and tumor shrinkage after chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. This is a retrospective study of 14 locally advanced rectal cancer patients with long course neoadjuvant chemoradiation. ALDH1A1 level was measured using ELISA from paraffin embedded tissue. Tumor shrinkage was measured from computed tomography (CT scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumor v1.1 (RECIST v1.1. The mean of ALDH1A1 level was 9.014 ± 3.3 pg/mL and the mean of tumor shrinkage was 7.89 ± 35.7%. Partial response proportion was 28.6%, stable disease proportion was 50% and progressive disease proportion was 21.4%. There was a significant strong negative correlation (r = –0.890, plt; 0.001 between ALDH1A1 and tumor shrinkage. In conclusion, tumor shrinkage in locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiation was influenced by ALDH1A1 level. Higher level of ALDH1A1 suggests decreased tumor shrinkage after preoperative chemoradiation.

  11. Preoperative radiochemotherapy in locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer: regional radiofrequency hyperthermia correlates with clinical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, B.; Wust, P.; Tilly, W.; Gellermann, J.; Harder, C.; Riess, H.; Budach, V.; Felix, R.; Schlag, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) is a widely used means of treatment for patients suffering from primary, locally advanced, or recurrent rectal cancer. We evaluated the efficacy of treatment due to additional application of regional hyperthermia (HRCT) to this conventional therapy regime in a Phase II study, employing the annular phased-array system BSD-2000 (SIGMA-60 applicator). The clinical results of the trial were encouraging. We investigated the relationship between a variety of thermal and clinical parameters in order to assess the adequacy of thermometry, the effectiveness of hyperthermia therapy, and its potential contribution to clinical endpoints. Methods and Materials: A preoperative combination of radiotherapy (1.8 Gy for 5 days a week, total dose 45 Gy applied over 5 weeks) and chemotherapy (low-dose 5-fluorouracil [5-FU] plus leucovorin in the first and fourth week) was administered to 37 patients with primary rectal cancer (PRC) and 18 patients with recurrent rectal cancer (RRC). Regional hyperthermia (RHT) was applied once a week prior to the daily irradiation fraction of 1.8 Gy. Temperatures were registered along rectal catheters using Bowman thermistors. Measurement points related to the tumor were specified after estimating the section of the catheter in near contact with the tumor. Three patients with local recurrence after abdominoperineal resection, had their catheters positioned transgluteally under CT guidance, where the section of the catheter related to the tumor was estimated from the CT scans. Index temperatures (especially T max , T 90 ) averaged over time, cumulative minutes (cum min) (here for T 90 > reference temperature 40.5 deg. C), and equivalent minutes (equ min) (with respect to 43 deg. C) were derived from repetitive temperature-position scans (5- to 10-min intervals) utilizing software specially developed for this purpose on a PC platform. Using the statistical software package SPSS a careful analysis was

  12. Five Fractions of Radiation Therapy Followed by 4 Cycles of FOLFOX Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myerson, Robert J.; Tan, Benjamin; Hunt, Steven; Olsen, Jeffrey; Birnbaum, Elisa; Fleshman, James; Gao, Feng; Hall, Lannis; Kodner, Ira; Lockhart, A. Craig; Mutch, Matthew; Naughton, Michael; Picus, Joel; Rigden, Caron; Safar, Bashar; Sorscher, Steven; Suresh, Rama; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Parikh, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT < cT) and preoperative grade 3+ gastrointestinal morbidity equal to or better than that of historical controls. Results: 76 evaluable cases included 7 cT4 and 69 cT3; 59 (78%) cN+, and 7 cM1. Grade 3 preoperative GI morbidity occurred in 7 cases (9%) (no grade 4 or 5). Sphincter-preserving surgery was performed on 57 (75%) patients. At surgery, 53 patients (70%) had ypT0-2 residual disease, including 21 (28%) ypT0 and 19 (25%) ypT0N0 (complete response); 24 (32%) were ypN+. At 30 months, local control for all evaluable cases and freedom from disease for M0 evaluable cases were, respectively, 95% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 89%-100%) and 87% (95% CI: 76%-98%). Cases were subanalyzed by whether disease met requirements for the recently activated PROSPECT trial for intermediate-risk rectal cancer. Thirty-eight patients met PROSPECT eligibility and achieved 16 ypT0 (42%), 15 ypT0N0 (39%), and 33 ypT0-2 (87

  13. Five Fractions of Radiation Therapy Followed by 4 Cycles of FOLFOX Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myerson, Robert J., E-mail: rmyerson@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Tan, Benjamin [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Hunt, Steven [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Olsen, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Birnbaum, Elisa; Fleshman, James [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Gao, Feng [Division of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Hall, Lannis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Kodner, Ira [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Lockhart, A. Craig [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Mutch, Matthew [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Naughton, Michael; Picus, Joel; Rigden, Caron [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Safar, Bashar [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Sorscher, Steven; Suresh, Rama; Wang-Gillam, Andrea [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Parikh, Parag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Background: Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT < cT) and preoperative grade 3+ gastrointestinal morbidity equal to or better than that of historical controls. Results: 76 evaluable cases included 7 cT4 and 69 cT3; 59 (78%) cN+, and 7 cM1. Grade 3 preoperative GI morbidity occurred in 7 cases (9%) (no grade 4 or 5). Sphincter-preserving surgery was performed on 57 (75%) patients. At surgery, 53 patients (70%) had ypT0-2 residual disease, including 21 (28%) ypT0 and 19 (25%) ypT0N0 (complete response); 24 (32%) were ypN+. At 30 months, local control for all evaluable cases and freedom from disease for M0 evaluable cases were, respectively, 95% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 89%-100%) and 87% (95% CI: 76%-98%). Cases were subanalyzed by whether disease met requirements for the recently activated PROSPECT trial for intermediate-risk rectal cancer. Thirty-eight patients met PROSPECT eligibility and achieved 16 ypT0 (42%), 15 ypT0N0 (39%), and 33 ypT0-2 (87

  14. Efficacy and short-term outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with intermittent oral tegafur-uracil plus leucovorin in Japanese rectal cancer patients: a single center experience retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Ryosuke; Inoue, Yuji; Ohki, Takeshi; Kaneko, Yuka; Maeda, Fumi; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2017-05-31

    Various types of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) have been established for rectal cancer; thus, Physicians will need to refine the selection of appropriate preoperative CRT for different patients since there are various treatment regimens. Oral tegafur-uracil (UFT) plus leucovorin (LV) is commonly used to treat rectal cancer in Japan. Oral chemotherapy offers patients many potential advantages. Since 2008, we have been performing preoperative CRT with intermittent oral UFT plus LV in locally advanced rectal cancer patients to prevent postoperative local recurrence. Here, in a retrospective analysis, we evaluated the efficacy and short-term outcomes of preoperative CRT with intermittent oral UFT plus LV. We analyzed data from 62 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, including 31 patients who underwent preoperative CRT between 2009 and 2013 (the CRT group) and 31 patients who were treated with surgery alone between 2001 and 2008 (the non-CRT group). Clinicopathologically, both groups included patients with rectal cancer at clinical tumor stages III-IV or clinical node stages 0-III. In the CRT group, curative operations were performed ≥8 weeks after CRT. Patients were concomitantly treated with 2 cycles of oral UFT (300 mg/m 2 /day, days 1-14 and 29-42) plus LV (75 mg/day, days 1-14 and 29-42) and 45 Gy of radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was repeated every 28 days, followed by a 2-week break. The completion rate of CRT was high at 94% (n = 29/31). The downstaging rate of CRT was 61% (n = 19/31). The pathological complete response rate was 6.5% (n = 2/31). Significant differences were observed in the 3-year local recurrence rate between the two groups (P rectal cancer. A further investigation of a diversification of preoperative CRT for Japanese rectal cancer patients is required.

  15. Correlation Between Preoperative Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels and Expression on Pancreatic and Rectal Cancer Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LSF Boogerd

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA–targeted imaging and therapeutic agents are being tested in clinical trials. If CEA overexpression in malignant tissue corresponds with elevated serum CEA, serum CEA could assist in selecting patients who may benefit from CEA-targeted agents. This study aims to assess the relationship between serum CEA and CEA expression in pancreatic (n = 20 and rectal cancer tissues (n = 35 using histopathology. According to local laboratory standards, a serum CEA >3 ng/mL was considered elevated. In pancreatic cancer patients a significant correlation between serum CEA and percentage of CEA-expressing tumor cells was observed ( P  = .04, ρ = .47. All 6 patients with homogeneous CEA expression in the tumor had a serum CEA >3 ng/mL. Most rectal cancer tissues (32/35 showed homogeneous CEA expression, independent of serum CEA levels. This study suggests that selection of pancreatic cancer patients for CEA-targeted agents via serum CEA appears adequate. For selection of rectal cancer patients, serum CEA levels are not informative.

  16. FDG-PET/CT Imaging for Staging and Target Volume Delineation in Preoperative Conformal Radiotherapy of Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassi, Maria Chiara; Turri, Lucia; Sacchetti, Gianmauro; Loi, Gianfranco; Cannillo, Barbara; La Mattina, Pierdaniele; Brambilla, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Krengli, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential impact of using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) on staging and target volume delineation for patients affected by rectal cancer and candidates for preoperative conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients diagnosed with rectal cancer T3-4 N0-1 M0-1 and candidates for preoperative radiotherapy underwent PET/CT simulation after injection of 5.18 MBq/kg of FDG. Clinical stage was reassessed on the basis of FDG-PET/CT findings. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and the clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated first on CT and then on PET/CT images. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were analyzed and compared with CT-GTV and CT-CTV, respectively. Results: In 4 of 25 cases (24%), PET/CT affected tumor staging or the treatment purpose. In 3 of 25 cases (12%) staged N0 M0, PET/CT showed FDG uptake in regional lymph nodes and in a case also in the liver. In a patient with a single liver metastasis PET/CT detected multiple lesions, changing the treatment intent from curative to palliative. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were significantly greater than the CT-GTV (p = 0.00013) and CT-CTV (p = 0.00002), respectively. The mean difference between PET/CT-GTV and CT-GTV was 25.4% and between PET/CT-CTV and CT-CTV was 4.1%. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT for preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer may lead to a change in staging and target volume delineation. Stage variation was observed in 12% of cases and a change of treatment intent in 4%. The GTV and CTV changed significantly, with a mean increase in size of 25% and 4%, respectively

  17. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate Measured by Magnetic Resonance Volumetry Correlated With Pathologic Tumor Response of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlates with the pathologic tumor response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 405 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3-T4) who had undergone preoperative CRT and radical proctectomy. The tumor volume was measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry before and after CRT but before surgery. We analyzed the correlation between the TVRR and the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and tumor regression grade (TRG). Downstaging was defined as ypStage 0-I (ypT0-T2N0M0), and the TRG proposed by Dworak et al. was used. Results: The mean TVRR was 65.0% ± 22.3%. Downstaging and complete regression occurred in 167 (41.2%) and 58 (14.3%) patients, respectively. The TVRRs according to ypT classification (ypT0-T2 vs. ypT3-T4), ypN classification (ypN0 vs. ypN1-N2), downstaging (ypStage 0-I vs. ypStage II-III), good regression (TRG 3-4 vs. TRG 1-2), and complete regression (TRG 4 vs. TRG 1-3) were all significantly different (p 80%), the rates of ypT0-T2, ypN0, downstaging, and good regression were all significantly greater for patients with a TVRR of ≥60%, as was the complete regression rate for patients with a TVRR >80% (p <.05). Conclusion: The TVRR measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlated significantly with the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and TRG after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer.

  18. Phase I dose escalating trial of hyperfractionated pre-operative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsas, Benjamin; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Lanciano, Rachelle; Scher, Richard M.; Weiner, Louis M.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Hoffman, John P.; Eisenberg, Burton L.; Cooper, Harry S.; Provins, Susan; Coia, Lawrence R.

    1998-01-01

    in 7. Four patients did not undergo a curative resection; three initially presented with metastases and one developed metastasis during the pre-operative regimen. Post-operative complications included pelvic or perineal abscess in two (on dose Levels I and II), and delayed wound healing in two (one of whom, on dose Level III, developed perineal wound dehiscence requiring surgical reconstruction). Of the 23 patients who had a curative resection, four manifested pathologic complete responses (17.4%). Thirteen of 23 patients (57%) had evidence of pathologic downstaging and only 1/23 patients (on dose Level I) had a positive resection margin. Of these 23 patients (with a minimum follow-up of 8 months), the patient with positive margins was the only one who developed a local failure (Fisher's Exact p = .04). The 3-year actuarial OS, DFS and LC rates are 82%, 72% and 96%, respectively. Twelve of 13 patients (92% at 3 years) ≥ 61 years vs. 5/10 patients (45% at 3 years) < 61 years remained disease-free (log-rank p = 0.017). Conclusion: This regimen of high dose pre-operative chemoradiation employing a hyperfractionated radiation boost is feasible and tolerable and results in significant downstaging in locally advanced rectal cancer. The vast majority of patients (96%) achieved negative margins, which appears to be a prerequisite for local control (p = 0.04). Older age (≥61 years) was a significant predictor for improved DFS. This regimen (at dose Level III, 61.8 Gy) is currently being tested in a Phase II setting

  19. Phase I dose escalating trial of hyperfractinated pre-operative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsas, Benjamin; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Lanciano, Rachelle M.; Scher, Richard M.; Weiner, Louis M.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Hoffman, John P.; Cooper, Harry S.; Provins, Susan; Coia, Lawrence R.

    1997-01-01

    ). CONCLUSION: This regimen of high dose pre-operative chemoradiation employing a hyperfractionated radiation boost is feasible and tolerable and results in significant downstaging in locally advanced rectal cancer. The vast majority of patients (96%) achieved negative margins, which appears to be a prerequisite for local control (p 2 04). This regimen (at dose Level III, 61.8 Gy) is currently being tested in a Phase II setting

  20. [Two Cases of Curative Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer after Preoperative Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Noboru; Shimizu, Yoshiaki; Kuboki, Satoshi; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Kato, Atsushi; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2015-11-01

    Reports of conversion in cases of locally advanced colorectal cancer have been increasing. Here, we present 2 cases in which curative resection of locally advanced rectal cancer accompanied by intestinal obstruction was achieved after establishing a stoma and administering chemotherapy. The first case was of a 46-year-old male patient diagnosed with upper rectal cancer and intestinal obstruction. Because of a high level of retroperitoneal invasion, after establishing a sigmoid colostomy, 13 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus Pmab were administered. Around 6 months after the initial surgery, low anterior resection for rectal cancer and surgery to close the stoma were performed. Fourteen days after curative resection, the patient was discharged from the hospital. The second case was of a 66-year-old male patient with a circumferential tumor extending from Rs to R, accompanied by right ureter infiltration and sub-intestinal obstruction. After establishing a sigmoid colostomy, 11 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus Pmab were administered. Five months after the initial surgery, anterior resection of the rectum and surgery to close the stoma were performed. Twenty days after curative resection, the patient was released from the hospital. No recurrences have been detected in either case.

  1. MR-guided simultaneous integrated boost in preoperative radiotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer following neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seierstad, Therese; Hole, Knut Hakon; Saelen, Erik; Ree, Anne Hansen; Flatmark, Kjersti; Malinen, Eirik

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) strategy in preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemotherapy using pre- and post-chemotherapy tumor volumes assessed by MRI. Materials and methods: Ten patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, receiving chemotherapy prior to radiotherapy, were included in this study. Pre- and post-chemotherapy MR tumor images were co-registered with CT images for IMRT planning. Three planning target volumes were defined: PTV risk , PTV pre c hemo and PTV post c hemo . For SIB, prescribed mean doses to the PTVs were 46, 50 and 58 Gy, respectively, given in 25 fractions. Organs at risk (OARs) were bladder and intestine. The novel three-volume SIB strategy was compared to a conventional two-volume SIB plan, in which PTV post c hemo was ignored, using dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD). Results: All patients showed tumor shrinkage following chemotherapy. For the novel SIB, population-based mean doses given to PTV risk , PTV pre c hemo and PTV post c hemo were 46.8 ± 0.3, 50.6 ± 0.4 and 58.1 ± 0.4 Gy, respectively. DVHs and gEUDs for PTV risk , PTV pre c hemo , bladder and intestine revealed minimal differences between the two SIB strategies. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction for rectal cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemotherapy allows for increased tumor dose using a SIB strategy without increased OAR toxicity.

  2. Acute small bowel toxicity and preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: Investigating dose-volume relationships and role for inverse planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tho, Lye Mun; Glegg, Martin; Paterson, Jennifer; Yap, Christina; MacLeod, Alice; McCabe, Marie; McDonald, Alexander C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The relationship between volume of irradiated small bowel (VSB) and acute toxicity in rectal cancer radiotherapy is poorly quantified, particularly in patients receiving concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Using treatment planning data, we studied a series of such patients. Methods and Materials: Details of 41 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were reviewed. All received 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, 3-4 fields three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with daily 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid during Weeks 1 and 5. Toxicity was assessed prospectively in a weekly clinic. Using computed tomography planning software, the VSB was determined at 5 Gy dose intervals (V 5 , V 1 , etc.). Eight patients with maximal VSB had dosimetry and radiobiological modeling outcomes compared between inverse and conformal three-dimensional planning. Results: VSB correlated strongly with diarrheal severity at every dose level (p 5 and V 15 . Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists between VSB and acute diarrhea at all dose levels during preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Our constructed model may be useful in predicting toxicity, and this has been derived without the confounding influence of surgical excision on bowel function. Inverse planning can reduce calculated dose to small bowel and late NTCP, and its clinical role warrants further investigation

  3. Temporal Patterns of Fatigue Predict Pathologic Response in Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Chul; Janjan, Nora A.; Mendoza, Tito R.; Lin, Edward H.; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Hundal, Mandeep; Zhang Yiqun; Delclos, Marc E.; Crane, Christopher H.; Das, Prajnan; Wang, Xin Shelley; Cleeland, Charles S.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether symptom burden before and during preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer predicts for pathologic tumor response. Methods and Materials: Fifty-four patients with T3/T4/N+ rectal cancers were treated on a Phase II trial using preoperative capecitabine and concomitant boost radiotherapy. Symptom burden was prospectively assessed before (baseline) and weekly during CRT by patient self-reported questionnaires, the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI), and Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI). Survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Symptom scores according to tumor downstaging (TDS) were compared using Student's t tests. Logistic regression was used to determine whether symptom burden levels predicted for TDS. Lowess curves were plotted for symptom burden across time. Results: Among 51 patients evaluated for pathologic response, 26 patients (51%) had TDS. Fatigue, pain, and drowsiness were the most common symptoms. All symptoms increased progressively during treatment. Patients with TDS had lower MDASI fatigue scores at baseline and at completion (Week 5) of CRT (p = 0.03 for both) and lower levels of BFI 'usual fatigue' at baseline. Conclusion: Lower levels of fatigue at baseline and completion of CRT were significant predictors of pathologic tumor response gauged by TDS, suggesting that symptom burden may be a surrogate for tumor burden. The relationship between symptom burden and circulating cytokines merits evaluation to characterize the molecular basis of this phenomenon.

  4. Risk of acute anastomotic leakage after preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devid Belalla

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the preoperative radiotherapy and its role in anastomotic leakage. Methods: A total of 327 patients who had an anterior resection (AR in elective surgery for a rectal carcinoma were selected and operated in our clinic of surgery during the period from 2003 to 2015. Among them, 135 patients had a low anterior resection (LAR and the other 192 had an AR. This is a retrospective study. Chi-squared test was used to evaluate statistical differences and the P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 126 patients had radiotherapy before surgery, and 50 of them had a LAR. In the other 201 patients, surgery was the first treatment modality, and 83 of them had a LAR. We had an overall anastomotic leakage of 7.95% or 26% patients. Anastomotic leakage was found in 14 patients with LAR, 9 of which had radiotherapy before surgery. From the 12 patients with AR who had an anastomotic leakage, 6 of them had radiotherapy before surgery. Conclusions: Radiotherapy may affect anastomotic healing and increase the risk of leakage. This risk is higher in low anterior anastomoses where a protective stoma may be considered. A better evaluation and support for patients with preoperative radiotherapy is needed in order to diminish the concomitant risk factors as much as possible.

  5. Phase II study of preoperative radiation plus concurrent daily tegafur-uracil (UFT) with leucovorin for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellier, Patrice; Burtin, Pascal; Campion, Loïc; Boisdron-Celle, Michèle; Morel, Alain; Berger, Virginie; Gamelin, Erick; Leduc, Bernard; Martin, Laurent; Vié, Brigitte; Chevelle, Christian; Vendrely, Véronique; Salemkour, Augustin; Carrie, Christian; Calais, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Considerable variation in intravenous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) metabolism can occur due to the wide range of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) enzyme activity, which can affect both tolerability and efficacy. The oral fluoropyrimidine tegafur-uracil (UFT) is an effective, well-tolerated and convenient alternative to intravenous 5-FU. We undertook this study in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of UFT with leucovorin (LV) and preoperative radiotherapy and to evaluate the utility and limitations of multicenter staging using pre- and post-chemoradiotherapy ultrasound. We also performed a validated pretherapy assessment of DPD activity and assessed its potential influence on the tolerability of UFT treatment. This phase II study assessed preoperative UFT with LV and radiotherapy in 85 patients with locally advanced T3 rectal cancer. Patients with potentially resectable tumors received UFT (300 mg/m/ 2 /day), LV (75 mg/day), and pelvic radiotherapy (1.8 Gy/day, 45 Gy total) 5 days/week for 5 weeks then surgery 4-6 weeks later. The primary endpoints included tumor downstaging and the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Most adverse events were mild to moderate in nature. Preoperative grade 3/4 adverse events included diarrhea (n = 18, 21%) and nausea/vomiting (n = 5, 6%). Two patients heterozygous for dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene (DPYD) experienced early grade 4 neutropenia (variant IVS14+1G > A) and diarrhea (variant 2846A > T). Pretreatment ultrasound TNM staging was compared with postchemoradiotherapy pathology TN staging and a significant shift towards earlier TNM stages was observed (p < 0.001). The overall downstaging rate was 42% for primary tumors and 44% for lymph nodes. The pCR rate was 8%. The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound for staging was poor. Anal sphincter function was preserved in 55 patients (65%). Overall and recurrence-free survival at 3 years was 86.1% and 66

  6. HLA class I expression and its alteration by preoperative hyperthermo-chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiro Sato

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Enhancing immunologic responses, including human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I expression on tumor cells and recognition and elimination of tumor cells by tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL, is considered a novel concept of radiotherapy. The present study examined patients who underwent preoperative hyperthermo-chemoradiotherapy (HCRT for locally advanced rectal cancer to assess the correlation between HLA class I expression and clinical outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-eight patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma who received preoperative HCRT were enrolled. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range, 33-85 years and 4, 18, and 56 patients had clinical stage I, II and III disease, respectively. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues excised before and after HCRT were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis with an anti-HLA class I-A, B, C antibody. HLA class I expression was graded according to tumor cell positivity. RESULTS: In pre-HCRT, the number of specimens categorized as Grade 0 and 1 were 19 (24% and 58 (74%, respectively. Only 1 patient (1% showed Grade 2 expression. However, 6 (8%, 27 (35%, 7 (9%, and 12 (15% post-HCRT specimens were graded as Grade 0, 1, 2, and 3, respectively. There was a significant increase in HLA class I expression in post-HCRT specimens (p<0.01. However, neither pre- nor post-HCRT HLA class I expression affected overall survival and distant metastasis-free survival in clinical stage III patients. Univariate analysis revealed that Post-HCRT HLA class I expression showed a significant negative relationship with LC (p<0.05. Nevertheless, multivariate analysis showed that there was no correlation between HLA class I expression and clinical outcome. CONCLUSION: HCRT increased HLA class I expression in rectal cancer patients. However, multivariate analysis failed to show any correlation between the level of HLA class I expression and prognosis.

  7. Adoption of Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer From 2000 to 2006: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Patterns-of-Care Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, Raymond H.; McCarthy, Ellen P.; Das, Prajnan; Hong, Theodore S.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Hoffman, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The German rectal study determined that preoperative radiation therapy (RT) as a component of combined-modality therapy decreased local tumor recurrence, increased sphincter preservation, and decreased treatment toxicity compared with postoperative RT for rectal cancer. We evaluated the use of preoperative RT after the presentation of the landmark German rectal study results and examined the impact of tumor and sociodemographic factors on receiving preoperative RT. Methods and Materials: In total, 20,982 patients who underwent surgical resection for T3-T4 and/or node-positive rectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed from 2000 through 2006 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results tumor registries. We analyzed trends in preoperative RT use before and after publication of the findings from the German rectal study. We also performed multivariate logistic regression to identify factors associated with receiving preoperative RT. Results: Among those treated with RT, the proportion of patients treated with preoperative RT increased from 33.3% in 2000 to 63.8% in 2006. After adjustment for age; gender; race/ethnicity; marital status; Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry; county-level education; T stage; N stage; tumor size; and tumor grade, there was a significant association between later year of diagnosis and an increase in preoperative RT use (adjusted odds ratio, 1.26/y increase; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-1.29). When we compared the years before and after publication of the German rectal study (2000-2003 vs. 2004-2006), patients were more likely to receive preoperative RT than postoperative RT in 2004-2006 (adjusted odds ratio, 2.35; 95% confidence interval, 2.13-2.59). On multivariate analysis, patients who were older, who were female, and who resided in counties with lower educational levels had significantly decreased odds of receiving preoperative RT. Conclusions: After the publication of the landmark German rectal

  8. The clinicopathologic relevance and prognostic value of tumor deposits and the applicability of N1c category in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Li; Qiu, Miao-Zhen; Zhou, Yi-Xin; He, Ming-Ming; Luo, Hui-Yan; Wang, Feng-Hua; Zhang, Dong-Sheng; Li, Yu-Hong; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2016-11-15

    The clinicopathologic relevance and prognostic value of tumor deposits in colorectal cancer has been widely demonstrated. However, there are still debates in the prognostic value of tumor deposits and the applicability of N1c category in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy. In this study, rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy followed by resection of primary tumors registered in Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database from 2010-2012 were analyzed. There were 4,813 cases eligible for this study, and tumor deposits were found in 514 (10.7%) cases. The presence of tumor deposits was significantly associated with some aggressive characteristics, including poorer tumor differentiation, more advanced ypT category, ypN category and ypTNM stage, distant metastasis, elevated carcinoembryonic antigen, higher positive rates of circumferential resection margin and perineural invasion (all P < = 0.001). Tumor deposit was also an independent negative prognostic factor for cancer-specific survival in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy (adjusted HR and 95% CI: 2.25 (1.51 - 3.35)). N1c category had significant worse survival compared with N0 category (adjusted HR and 95% CI: 2.41 (1.24 - 4.69)). In conclusion, tumor deposit was a significant and independent prognostic factor, and the N1c category by the 7th edition of AJCC/TNM staging system was applicable in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy.

  9. Clinical implication of negative conversion of predicted circumferential resection margin status after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nam Kwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Medical Center, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chul Yong, E-mail: kcyro@korea.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Medical Center, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Je; Yang, Dae Sik; Yoon, Won Sup [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Medical Center, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Hahn; Kim, Jin [Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Korea University Medical Center, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Objective: To evaluate the prognostic implication of the negative conversion of predicted circumferential resection margin status before surgery in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer with predicted circumferential resection margin involvement. Methods: Thirty-eight patients (28 men, 10 women; median age, 61 years; age range, 39–80 years) with locally advanced rectal cancer with predicted circumferential resection margin involvement who underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by radical surgery were analyzed. Involvement of the circumferential resection margin was predicted on the basis of pre- and post-chemoradiotherapy magnetic resonance imaging. The primary endpoints were 3-year local recurrence-free survival and overall survival. Results: The median follow-up time was 41.1 months (range, 13.9–85.2 months). The negative conversion rate of predicted circumferential resection margin status after preoperative chemoradiotherapy was 65.8%. Patients who experienced negative conversion of predicted circumferential resection margin status had a significantly higher 3-year local recurrence-free survival rate (100.0% vs. 76.9%; P = 0.013), disease-free survival rate (91.7% vs. 59.3%; P = 0.023), and overall survival rate (96.0% vs. 73.8%; P = 0.016) than those who had persistent circumferential resection margin involvement. Conclusions: The negative conversion of the predicted circumferential resection margin status as predicted by magnetic resonance imaging will assist in individual risk stratification as a predictive factor for treatment response and survival before surgery. These findings may help physicians determine whether to administer more intense adjuvant chemotherapy or change the surgical plan for patients displaying resistance to preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

  10. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Young; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seok Ah; Lee, Keun Seok; Yun, Tak; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Choi, Hyo Seong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Chang, Hee Jin; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid- to lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of an initial dose of cetuximab of 400 mg/m 2 1 week before radiotherapy, and then cetuximab 250 mg/m 2 /week, irinotecan 40 mg/m 2 /week for 5 consecutive weeks and capecitabine 1,650 mg/m 2 /day for 5 days a week (weekdays only) from the first day during radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 ± 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were evaluated as study endpoints, and an additional KRAS mutation analysis was performed. Results: In total, 39 patients completed their planned preoperative chemoradiation and underwent R0 resection. The pathologic complete response rate was 23.1% (9/39), and 3 patients (7.7%) showed near total regression of tumor. The 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 80.0% and 94.7%, respectively. Grade 3/4 toxicities included leukopenia (4, 10.3%), neutropenia (2, 5.1%), anemia (1, 2.6%), diarrhea (2, 5.1%), fatigue (1, 2.6%), skin rash (1, 2.6%), and ileus (1, 2.6%). KRAS mutations were found in 5 (13.2%) of 38 patients who had available tissue for testing. Clinical outcomes were not significantly correlated with KRAS mutation status. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine was active and well tolerated. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor for pathologic response in this study.

  11. Prediction of pathologic staging with magnetic resonance imaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer: pooled analysis of KROG 10-01 and 11-02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Lee, Myung Ah; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Oh, Jae Hwan; Park, Sung Chan; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Park, Hee Chul; Kim, Hee Cheol; Nam, Taek-Keun; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jung, Ji-Han; Oh, Seong Taek

    2014-10-01

    The reported overall accuracy of MRI in predicting the pathologic stage of nonirradiated rectal cancer is high. However, the role of MRI in restaging rectal tumors after neoadjuvant CRT is contentious. Thus, we evaluate the accuracy of restaging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for rectal cancer patients who receive preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We analyzed 150 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (T3-4N0-2) who had received preoperative CRT. Pre-CRT MRI was performed for local tumor and nodal staging. All patients underwent restaging MRI followed by total mesorectal excision after the end of radiotherapy. The primary endpoint of the present study was to estimate the accuracy of post-CRT MRI as compared with pathologic staging. Pathologic T classification matched the post-CRT MRI findings in 97 (64.7%) of 150 patients. 36 (24.0%) of 150 patients were overstaged in T classification, and the concordance degree was moderate (k=0.33, prectal cancer patients who received preoperative CRT. The diagnostic accuracy of restaging MRI is relatively high in rectal cancer patients who achieved clinical downstaging after CRT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Preoperative radiotherapy for resectable rectal cancer: improved local control is prognostic for distant metastasis occurrence and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlotecki, Robert A.; Mendenhall, William M.; Copeland, Edward M.; Vauthey, Jean-Nicholas; Marsh, Robert D.; McCarley, Dean L.; Million, Rodney R.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate the effect of preoperative external beam radiotherapy (RT) on local control (LC), distant metastasis (DM), survival, and perioperative complications in a 15-year single-institution experience. Disease and treatment variables potentially prognostic for local-regional control and survival were evaluated, and the importance of LC as a determinant of DM and survival was also examined. Materials and Methods: Two hundred ten patients with potentially resectable cancers of the rectum were treated with preoperative external beam RT at a single institution between 1975 and 1990. Excluded were patients with 'fixed' unresectable tumors and those treated with palliative intent only. All patients were treated with megavoltage RT to minimum tumor doses of 30 Gy using multiple-field techniques. Preoperative chemotherapy was not used. Surgical resection was performed 3-5 weeks after completion of RT. Abdominoperineal resection was performed in 175 cases, low anterior resection in 25 cases, and other surgical procedures in 10 cases. Pathologic tumor staging was by the Astler-Coller modification of the Dukes system. Minimum follow-up was 5 years. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method, with univariate and multivariate analysis of disease and treatment variables for prognostic significance. Results: No treatment-specific variables were predictive for LC, DM, absolute survival, or cause-specific survival. Disease-specific variables prognostic for LC were deep tumor infiltration or 'tethering' on digital rectal exam and Dukes pathologic stage. Ten-year LC rates were 91% for freely mobile tumors vs. 82% for tethered lesions (p=.009). LC rates for Dukes A, B, and C stage tumors were 100%, 91%, and 73%, respectively (p=.02). Variables prognostic for DM were tumor length, annular involvement, LC, and Dukes pathologic stage. Absolute survival at 5 and 10 years was 57% and 36%, respectively. Variables prognostic for absolute survival were

  13. Impact of short-term preoperative radiotherapy on health-related quality of life and sexual functioning in primary rectal cancer : Report of a multicenter randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnen, CAM; van de Velde, CJH; Putter, H; van den Brink, M; Maas, CP; Martijn, H; Rutten, HJ; Wiggers, T; Kranenbarg, EK; Leer, JWH; Stiggelbout, AM

    2005-01-01

    Background Few prospective studies have been performed about the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) or total mesorectal excision (TME) on health-related quality of life (HRQL) and sexual functioning in patients with resectable rectal cancer. This report describes the HRQL and sexual

  14. Impact of short-term preoperative radiotherapy on health-related quality of life and sexual functioning in primary rectal cancer: report of a multicenter randomized trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnen, C.A.; Velde, C.J. van de; Putter, H.; Brink, M.; Maas, C.P.; Martijn, H.; Rutten, H.J.; Wiggers, T.; Kranenbarg, E.K.; Leer, J.W.H.; Stiggelbout, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few prospective studies have been performed about the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) or total mesorectal excision (TME) on health-related quality of life (HRQL) and sexual functioning in patients with resectable rectal cancer. This report describes the HRQL and sexual

  15. Acute side effects and complications after short-term preoperative radiotherapy combined with total mesorectal excision in primary rectal cancer: report of a multicenter randomized trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnen, C.A.; Kapiteijn, E.; Veld, C.J.H. van de; Martijn, H.; Steup, W.H.; Wiggers, T.; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E.; Leer, J.W.H.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery in the treatment of rectal cancer has been shown to result in a reduction in the number of local recurrences in retrospective studies. Reports on improved local control after preoperative, hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) have led to the

  16. Acute side effects and complications after short-term preoperative radiotherapy combined with total mesorectal excision in primary rectal cancer : Report of a multicenter randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnen, CAM; Kapiteijn, E; van de Velde, CJH; Martijn, H; Steup, WH; Wiggers, T; Kranenbarg, EK; Leer, JWH

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery in the treatment of rectal cancer has been shown to result in a reduction in the number of local recurrences in retrospective studies. Reports on improved local control after preoperative, hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) have led to the

  17. Clinical results and toxicity for short-course preoperative radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision in rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra; Debus, Jürgen; Hoehle, Frieder; Ulrich, Alexis; Muenter, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Short-course preoperative radiotherapy (SCPRT) is an alternative method to chemoirradiation for patients with Stage II and III rectal cancer when no downsizing is needed, but there is still widespread reluctance to use this method because of fear of side effects from high-fraction doses. This paper reports on a single institution patient cohort of operated rectal cancer patients after SCPRT, evaluated for chronic adverse effects, local control, progression-free survival and overall survival. Altogether, 257 patients were treated with SCPRT and surgery including total mesorectal excision (92% total mesorectal excision = TME) between 2002 and 2009. Local control and survival were analyzed. Chronic adverse effects for 154 patients without local relapse were evaluated according to the NCI–CTCAE version 4.0 classification, with a median follow-up of 48 months. We found a 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) of 71%. The 5-year estimated local control (LC) rate was 94%. A positive resection margin was found in 4% of the patients and was significantly correlated with decreased DFS, OS and LC. Chronic adverse effects were reported by 58% of the patients, of which 10% were Grade 3 toxicities. The most frequent Grade 2 toxicity was stool incontinence (13%). Sexual dysfunction was found in 36% of the patients (31% Grade 1 or 2, and only 5% Grade 3). SCPRT combined with TME produced excellent LC rates together with a low rate of high-grade chronic adverse effects. (author)

  18. Preoperative irradiation and surgery for recurrent rectal cancer. Will intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) be of additional benefit? A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiig, Johan Nicolay; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Poulsen, Jan Peter; Olsen, Dag Rune; Giercksky, Karl-Erik

    2002-01-01

    Background: The therapeutic gain of surgery for recurrent rectal cancer is not clear, particularly with regard to the addition of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Methods: Patients (107) with isolated pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer received preoperative external radiotherapy of 46-50 in 2 Gy fractions. At surgery 59 patients had IORT 12-18 Gy. Survival and local recurrence was analysed with regard to surgical resection stages and IORT. Results: Patients (44) had R0- and 39 R1-resections, 24 R2-resections or exploratory laparotomy. IORT was given most often after R1-resections, least in R0-patients. Estimated 5-year survival was overall around 30%, around 60% in the R0-, around 25% for R1- and 0% in R2-patients. Local recurrence was around 30% in the R0- and around 65% in R1-stage patients. R0-/R1-stage patients survived statistically significantly longer than the R2-group otherwise there was no statistical significant difference between IORT and non-IORT groups in any R-stages regarding overall survival or local recurrence. Conclusions: Macroscopic removal of the recurrence improves survival. Whether R0- is better than R1-resections is not clear. The effect of IORT is not a major one. IORT need be evaluated in randomised controlled trials

  19. Effectiveness of gene expression profiling for response prediction of rectal cancer to preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojima, Eiki; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Miki, Chikao; Kusunoki, Masato; Mori, Masaki

    2007-01-01

    Our aim was to determine whether the expression levels of specific genes could predict clinical radiosensitivity in human colorectal cancer. Radioresistant colorectal cancer cell lines were established by repeated X-ray exposure (total, 100 Gy), and the gene expressions of the parent and radioresistant cell lines were compared in a microarray analysis. To verify the microarray data, we carried out a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis of identified genes in clinical samples from 30 irradiated rectal cancer patients. A comparison of the intensity data for the parent and three radioresistant cell lines revealed 17 upregulated and 142 downregulated genes in all radioresistant cell lines. Next, we focused on two upregulated genes, PTMA (prothymosin α) and EIF5a2 (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A), in the radioresistant cell lines. In clinical samples, the expression of PTMA was significantly higher in the minor effect group than in the major effect group (P=0.004), but there were no significant differences in EIF5a2 expression between the two groups. We identified radiation-related genes in colorectal cancer and demonstrated that PTMA may play an important role in radiosensitivity. Our findings suggest that PTMA may be a novel marker for predicting the effectiveness of radiotherapy in clinical cases. (author)

  20. Sphincter preservation in rectal cancer with preoperative radiation therapy and coloanal anastomosis: long term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagman, Raquel; Minsky, Bruce D.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Guillem, Jose G.; Paty, Philip P.

    1998-01-01

    Background: To determine if preoperative radiation therapy allows sphincter preservation in the treatment of rectal cancer. Methods: Thirty six patients with the diagnosis of invasive, resectable, primary adenocarcinoma of the rectum limited to the pelvis were enrolled on a Phase I/II trial of preoperative radiation therapy plus low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. By preoperative assessment, all patients had invasive tumors (5,T 2; 31,T 3 ) involving the distal half of the rectum and clinically required an abdominoperineal resection. The median tumor size was 3.8 cm [range: 1.5-7 cm] and the median distance from the anal verge was 4 cm [range: 3-7 cm]. The whole pelvis received 46.80 Gy followed by a 3.60 Gy boost to the primary tumor bed. The median follow-up was 56 months [range: 4-121 months]. Results: Of the 35 patients who underwent resection, 5 (14%) had a complete pathologic response and 27 (77%) were able to successfully undergo a low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. The incidence of local failure was crude: 17% and 5-year actuarial: 21%. The 5-year actuarial survival was 64%. Analysis of sphincter function using a previously published scale was performed at the time of last follow-up in the 27 patients who underwent a low anterior resection/coloanal anastomosis. Function was good or excellent in 85%. The median number of bowel movements/day was 2 (range: 0-8). Conclusions: Our data suggest that preoperative radiation therapy allows sphincter preservation in 77% of selected patients who would otherwise require an abdominoperineal resection, and 85% have good to excellent sphincter function. Given the moderate local failure rate, we now routinely use preoperative combined modality therapy plus postoperative chemotherapy for patients with clinical T 3 disease

  1. Sphincter Preservation After Short-term Preoperative Radiotherapy for Low Rectal Cancer - Presentation of Own Data and a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujko, Krzysztof; Nowacki, Marek P.; Oldzki, Janusz; Sopyo, Rafa; Skoczylas, Jerzy; Chwaliski, Maciej [The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Inst. of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2001-07-01

    This report is based on a series of 108 patients with clinically staged T2 (9), T3 (94) and T4 (5) rectal cancer treated with preoperative irradiation with 25 Gy, 5 Gy per fraction given for one week. In 77% of patients, the tumour was located within 7 cm of the anal verge and in 15% the anal canal was involved. Surgery was usually undertaken during the week after irradiation. For low tumours, total mesorectal excision was performed, and for middle and upper cancers, the whole circumference of the mesorectum was excised at least 2 cm below the lower pole of a tumour. Tumour was resected in 103 patients, and sphincter-preserving surgery was performed in 73% of them. In the subgroup where the tumour was located higher than 4 cm from the anal verge, sphincter-preserving surgery was performed in 95%. The follow-up period ranged from 10 to 49 months, with a median of 25 months. Local recurrences were observed in 4% of patients. Anorectal dysfunction caused impairment of social life in 40% of patients and 18% admitted that their quality of life was seriously affected - however, none of them stated that they would have preferred a colostomy. These preliminary data suggest that following high dose per fraction short-term preoperative radiotherapy a high rate of sphincter-preserving surgery can be reached, with acceptable anorectal function and an acceptable rate of local failure and late complications. The results of our own data and literature review indicate the need for a randomized clinical trial comparing high dose per fraction preoperative radiotherapy with immediate surgery with conventional preoperative radiochemotherapy with delayed surgery.

  2. Pre-operative combined 5-FU, low dose leucovorin, and sequential radiation therapy for unresectable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, B.D.; Cohen, A.M.; Kemeny, N.; Enker, W.E.; Kelsen, D.P.; Schwartz, G.; Saltz, L.; Dougherty, J.; Frankel, J.; Wiseberg, J.

    1993-01-01

    The authors performed a Phase 1 trial to determine the maximum tolerated dose of combined pre-operative radiation (5040 cGy) and 2 cycles (bolus daily x 5) of 5-FU and low dose LV (20 mg/m2), followed by surgery and 10 cycles of post-operative LV/5-FU in patients with unresectable primary or recurrent rectal cancer. Twelve patients were entered. The initial dose of 5-FU was 325 mg/m2. 5-FU was to be escalated while the LV remained constant at 20 mg/m2. Chemotherapy began on day 1 and radiation on day 8. The post-operative chemotherapy was not dose escalated; 5-FU: 425 mg/m2 and LV: 20 mg/m2. The median follow-up was 14 months (7--16 months). Following pre-operative therapy, the resectability rate with negative margins was 91% and the pathologic complete response rate was 9%. For the combined modality segment (preoperative) the incidence of any grade 3+ toxicity was diarrhea: 17%, dysuria: 8%, mucositis: 8%, and erythema: 8%. The median nadir counts were WBC: 3.1, HGB: 8.8, and PLT: 153000. The maximum tolerated dose of 5-FU for pre-operative combined LV/5-FU/RT was 325 mg/m2 with no escalation possible. Therefore, the recommended dose was less than 325 mg/m2. Since adequate doses of 5-FU to treat systemic disease could not be delivered until at least 3 months (cycle 3) following the start of therapy, the authors do not recommend that this 5-FU, low dose LV, and sequential radiation therapy regimen be used as presently designed. However, given the 91% resectability rate they remain encouraged with this approach. 31 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  3. Epigenetic Regulation of KLHL34 Predictive of Pathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Ye J. [Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan W. [Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Roh, Seon A. [Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Dong H. [Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong L.; Kim, Seon Y. [Medical Genomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong S., E-mail: yongsung@kribb.re.kr [Medical Genomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin C., E-mail: jckim@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Innovative Cancer Research and Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Prediction of individual responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is urgently needed in patients with poorly responsive locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: Candidate methylation genes associated with radiosensitivity were identified using a 3-step process. In the first step, genome-wide screening of methylation genes was performed in correlation with histopathologic tumor regression grade in 45 patients with LARC. In the second step, the methylation status of selected sites was analyzed by pyrosequencing in 67 LARC patients, including 24 patients analyzed in the first step. Finally, colorectal cancer cell clones with stable KLHL34 knockdown were generated and tested for cellular sensitivity to radiation. Results: Genome-wide screening identified 7 hypermethylated CpG sites (DZIP1 cg24107021, DZIP1 cg26886381, ZEB1 cg04430381, DKK3 cg041006961, STL cg00991794, KLHL34 cg01828474, and ARHGAP6 cg07828380) associated with preoperative CRT responses. Radiosensitivity in patients with hypermethylated KLHL34 cg14232291 was confirmed by pyrosequencing in additional cohorts. Knockdown of KLHL34 significantly reduced colony formation (KLHL34 sh#1: 20.1%, P=.0001 and KLHL34 sh#2: 15.8%, P=.0002), increased the cytotoxicity (KLHL34 sh#1: 14.8%, P=.019 and KLHL34 sh#2: 17.9%, P=.007) in LoVo cells, and increased radiation-induced caspase-3 activity and the sub-G1 population of cells. Conclusions: The methylation status of KLHL34 cg14232291 may be a predictive candidate of sensitivity to preoperative CRT, although further validation is needed in large cohorts using various cell types.

  4. Epigenetic Regulation of KLHL34 Predictive of Pathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Ye J.; Kim, Chan W.; Roh, Seon A.; Cho, Dong H.; Park, Jong L.; Kim, Seon Y.; Kim, Jong H.; Choi, Eun K.; Kim, Yong S.; Kim, Jin C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Prediction of individual responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is urgently needed in patients with poorly responsive locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: Candidate methylation genes associated with radiosensitivity were identified using a 3-step process. In the first step, genome-wide screening of methylation genes was performed in correlation with histopathologic tumor regression grade in 45 patients with LARC. In the second step, the methylation status of selected sites was analyzed by pyrosequencing in 67 LARC patients, including 24 patients analyzed in the first step. Finally, colorectal cancer cell clones with stable KLHL34 knockdown were generated and tested for cellular sensitivity to radiation. Results: Genome-wide screening identified 7 hypermethylated CpG sites (DZIP1 cg24107021, DZIP1 cg26886381, ZEB1 cg04430381, DKK3 cg041006961, STL cg00991794, KLHL34 cg01828474, and ARHGAP6 cg07828380) associated with preoperative CRT responses. Radiosensitivity in patients with hypermethylated KLHL34 cg14232291 was confirmed by pyrosequencing in additional cohorts. Knockdown of KLHL34 significantly reduced colony formation (KLHL34 sh#1: 20.1%, P=.0001 and KLHL34 sh#2: 15.8%, P=.0002), increased the cytotoxicity (KLHL34 sh#1: 14.8%, P=.019 and KLHL34 sh#2: 17.9%, P=.007) in LoVo cells, and increased radiation-induced caspase-3 activity and the sub-G1 population of cells. Conclusions: The methylation status of KLHL34 cg14232291 may be a predictive candidate of sensitivity to preoperative CRT, although further validation is needed in large cohorts using various cell types

  5. Effect of preoperative treatment strategies on the outcome of patients with clinical T3, non-metastasized rectal cancer: A comparison between Dutch and Canadian expert centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breugom, A J; Vermeer, T A; van den Broek, C B M; Vuong, T; Bastiaannet, E; Azoulay, L; Dekkers, O M; Niazi, T; van den Berg, H A; Rutten, H J T; van de Velde, C J H

    2015-08-01

    High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) appears to be associated with less treatment-related toxicity compared with external beam radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. The present study compared the effect of preoperative treatment strategies on overall survival, cancer-specific deaths, and local recurrences between a Dutch and Canadian expert center with different preoperative treatment strategies. We included 145 Dutch and 141 Canadian patients with cT3, non-metastasized rectal cancer. All patients from Canada were preoperatively treated with HDRBT. The preoperative treatment strategy for Dutch patients consisted of either no preoperative treatment, short-course radiotherapy, or chemoradiotherapy. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) comparing overall survival. We adjusted for age, cN stage, (y)pT stage, comorbidity, and type of surgery. Primary endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were cancer-specific deaths and local recurrences. Five-year overall survival was 70.9% (95% CI 62.6%-77.7%) in Dutch patients compared with 86.9% (80.1%-91.6%) in Canadian patients, resulting in an adjusted HR of 0.70 (95% CI 0.39-1.26; p = 0.233). Of 145 Dutch patients, 6.9% (95% CI 2.8%-11.0%) had a local recurrence and 17.9% (95% CI 11.7%-24.2%) patients died of rectal cancer, compared with 4.3% (95% CI 0.9%-7.5%) local recurrences and 10.6% (95% CI 5.5%-15.7%) rectal cancer deaths out of 141 Canadian patients. We did not detect statistically significant differences in overall survival between a Dutch and Canadian expert center with different treatment strategies. This finding needs to be further investigated in a randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Phase II trial of preoperative radiochemotherapy with concurrent bevacizumab, capecitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellas, Kathrin; Dunst, Jürgen; Höhler, Thomas; Reese, Thomas; Würschmidt, Florian; Engel, Erik; Rödel, Claus; Wagner, Wolfgang; Richter, Michael; Arnold, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) with 5-FU or capecitabine is the standard of care for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Preoperative RCT achieves pathological complete response rates (pCR) of 10-15%. We conducted a single arm phase II study to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of addition of bevacizumab and oxaliplatin to preoperative standard RCT with capecitabine. Eligible patients had LARC (cT3-4; N0/1/2, M0/1) and were treated with preoperative RCT prior to planned surgery. Patients received conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions) and simultaneous chemotherapy with capecitabine 825 mg/m 2 bid (d1-14, d22-35) and oxaliplatin 50 mg/m 2 (d1, d8, d22, d29). Bevacizumab 5 mg/kg was added on days 1, 15, and 29. The primary study objective was the pCR rate. 70 patients with LARC (cT3-4; N0/1, M0/1), ECOG < 2, were enrolled at 6 sites from 07/2008 through 02/2010 (median age 61 years [range 39–89], 68% male). At initial diagnosis, 84% of patients had clinical stage T3, 62% of patients had nodal involvement and 83% of patients were M0. Mean tumor distance from anal verge was 5.92 cm (± 3.68). 58 patients received the complete RCT (full dose RT and full dose of all chemotherapy). During preoperative treatment, grade 3 or 4 toxicities were experienced by 6 and 2 patients, respectively: grade 4 diarrhea and nausea in one patient (1.4%), respectively, grade 3 diarrhea in 2 patients (3%), grade 3 obstipation, anal abscess, anaphylactic reaction, leucopenia and neutropenia in one patient (1.4%), respectively. In total, 30 patients (46%) developed postoperative complications of any grade including one gastrointestinal perforation in one patient (2%), wound-healing problems in 7 patients (11%) and bleedings in 2 patients (3%). pCR was observed in 12/69 (17.4%) patients. Pathological downstaging (ypT < cT and ypN ≤ cN) was achieved in 31 of 69 patients (44.9%). All of the 66 operated patients had a R0 resection

  7. Pelvic lymphoscintigraphy: contribution to the preoperative staging of rectal cancer; Linfocintilografia pelvica. Contribuicao ao estadiamento pre-operatorio do cancer retal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jose Hyppolito da

    1996-12-31

    Preservation of the lower rectal sphincters has been the main concern of colorectal surgeons in an attempt to avoid colostomy. Various proposed procedures contradict the oncological principles of the operation`s radicality, especially pelvic lymphadenectomy. Prior knowledge of this space is therefore, an important factor in choosing the operative technique: radical (amputation), or conservative. The introduction of ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have provided preoperative information about the anatomic nature of the region. The morphological and functional study supplied by lymphoscintigraphy of this space supplements the data furnished by the other imaging techniques. The objective of this prospective of this prospective study was threefold: to standardize lymphoscintigraphy, to differentiate patients with rectal cancer from those with other coloproctological diseases and to asses the lymphonodal involvement in the former by utilizing the anatomopathological and surgical correlation. The study included 60 patients with various coloproctological diseases seen on the Department of Gastroentorology, Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, from September 1990 to August 1993. Thirty were cases of rectal cancer and the remainder were other colorectal diseases. The method consisted of injecting 0.5 of a dextran solution market with radioactive technetium in the perineal region and obtaining images by a gamma camera. In the rectal cancer patients, the tracer progresses unilaterally or is absent; in the others, it is bilateral and symmetrical, although its progress may be slow. The statistical data demonstrated that in rectal cancer, lymphoscintigraphy asseses the nodal involvement approximaltely as that obtained by the sun of the anatomapathological and surgical findings. Based on the results, the following conclusioons were possible: lymphoscintigraphy is a standardized, painless and harmless test that can be

  8. Pelvic lymphoscintigraphy: contribution to the preoperative staging of rectal cancer; Linfocintilografia pelvica. Contribuicao ao estadiamento pre-operatorio do cancer retal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jose Hyppolito da

    1997-12-31

    Preservation of the lower rectal sphincters has been the main concern of colorectal surgeons in an attempt to avoid colostomy. Various proposed procedures contradict the oncological principles of the operation`s radicality, especially pelvic lymphadenectomy. Prior knowledge of this space is therefore, an important factor in choosing the operative technique: radical (amputation), or conservative. The introduction of ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have provided preoperative information about the anatomic nature of the region. The morphological and functional study supplied by lymphoscintigraphy of this space supplements the data furnished by the other imaging techniques. The objective of this prospective of this prospective study was threefold: to standardize lymphoscintigraphy, to differentiate patients with rectal cancer from those with other coloproctological diseases and to asses the lymphonodal involvement in the former by utilizing the anatomopathological and surgical correlation. The study included 60 patients with various coloproctological diseases seen on the Department of Gastroentorology, Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, from September 1990 to August 1993. Thirty were cases of rectal cancer and the remainder were other colorectal diseases. The method consisted of injecting 0.5 of a dextran solution market with radioactive technetium in the perineal region and obtaining images by a gamma camera. In the rectal cancer patients, the tracer progresses unilaterally or is absent; in the others, it is bilateral and symmetrical, although its progress may be slow. The statistical data demonstrated that in rectal cancer, lymphoscintigraphy asseses the nodal involvement approximaltely as that obtained by the sun of the anatomapathological and surgical findings. Based on the results, the following conclusioons were possible: lymphoscintigraphy is a standardized, painless and harmless test that can be

  9. Elevated platelet count as predictor of recurrence in rectal cancer patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Mikio; Kawamoto, Aya; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Jyunichiro; Saigusa, Susumu; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-02-01

    The impact of systemic inflammatory response (SIR) on prognostic and predictive outcome in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has not been fully investigated. This retrospective study enrolled 89 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and for whom platelet (PLT) counts and SIR status [neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR)] were available. Both clinical values of PLT and SIR status in rectal cancer patients were investigated. Elevated PLT, NLR, PLR, and pathologic TNM stage III [ypN(+)] were associated with significantly poor overall survival (OS). Elevated PLT, NLR, and ypN(+) were shown to independently predict OS. Elevated PLT and ypN(+) significantly predicted poor disease-free survival (DFS). Elevated PLT was identified as the only independent predictor of DFS. PLT counts are a promising pre-CRT biomarker for predicting recurrence and poor prognosis in rectal cancer.

  10. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin for locally advanced rectal cancer: long-term results of a phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Luying; Cao, Caineng; Zhu, Yuan; Li, Dechuan; Feng, Haiyang; Luo, Jialin; Tang, Zhongzhu; Liu, Peng; Lu, Ke; Ju, Haixing; Zhang, Na

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to report long-term results of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated by neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin. From February 2002 to November 2006, a total of 58 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were recruited. Secondary endpoints included the cumulative incidence of local and distant recurrences, disease-free survival, and overall survival. The median follow-up time was 138 months (109-151 months). The cumulative incidence of local recurrence at 10 years was 12.1%. The cumulative incidence of distant recurrence at 10 years was 53.4%. The overall survival in the intention-to-treat population was 39.5% at 10 years. Disease-free survival in the intention-to-treat population was 41.8% at 10 years. Univariate analysis revealed that pathologic complete response was associated with local recurrence, distant recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival (p rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy and total mesorectal excision. Pathologic complete response is an independent prognostic factor for locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

  11. Apoptosis, proliferation, Bax, Bcl-2 and p53 status prior to and after preoperative radiochemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannapfel, Andrea; Nuesslein, Siegfried; Fietkau, Rainer; Katalinic, Alexander; Koeckerling, Ferdinand; Wittekind, Christian

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between apoptotic cell death, proliferative activity, and the expression of apoptosis regulating proteins in rectal cancer prior to and after radiochemotherapy. Materials and Methods: In 32 patients dispositioned to receive preoperative radiochemotherapy for locally advanced rectal carcinoma, pretherapy biopsies and the final resected specimen after radiochemotherapy were available for analyses. Apoptotic cells were identified and quantified using in situ end labeling (ISEL) technique. The expression of the bax protein was assessed immunohistochemically. Additionally, double immunostaining was performed for apoptotic cells and bax expression. The proliferative activity was determined by immunohistochemical assessment of the Ki67 (MIB-1) and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). p53- and bcl-2 expression was analyzed immunohistochemically. A clinical-to-pathologic downstaging after radiochemotherapy was achieved in 25 of 32 patients (78%). During follow-up, tumor recurrence was observed in six cases. In one case, no residual tumor was detected after radiochemotherapy. Results: After radiochemotherapy, the apoptotic index increased significantly in almost every case examined. In contrast, the proliferative activity was significantly decreased in resected specimens as compared to biopsies. Bax immunostaining was detected in 12/31 (39%) biopsies and in 26/31 (84%) resected specimens. In the resected specimen, significantly more apoptotic cells that were bax-positive were found than in biopsies. Bcl-2 immunostaining occurred in 15/31 biopsies and 12/31 resected specimens, respectively. Tumors that were immunohistochemically negative for p53 (20/31 [65%]) generally exhibited a higher apoptotic index and a high expression level of bax than p53-positive tumors (11/31 [35%]). However, we did not find any correlation between the (pre- and post-therapeutic) rate of apoptosis or the level of bax expression and the degree of

  12. Prospective trial of preoperative concomitant boost radiotherapy with continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janjan, Nora A.; Crane, Christopher N.; Feig, Barry W.; Cleary, Karen; Dubrow, Ronelle; Curley, Steven A.; Ellis, Lee M.; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Lenzi, Renato; Lynch, Patrick; Wolff, Robert; Brown, Thomas; Pazdur, Richard; Abbruzzese, James; Hoff, Paulo M.; Allen, Pamela; Brown, Barry; Skibber, John

    2000-01-01

    Rationale: To evaluate the response to a concomitant boost given during standard chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Concomitant boost radiotherapy was administered preoperatively to 45 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer in a prospective trial. Treatment consisted of 45 Gy to the pelvis with 18 mV photons at 1.8 Gy/fraction using a 3-field belly board technique with continuous infusion 5FU chemotherapy (300mg/m 2 ) 5 days per week. The boost was given during the last week of therapy with a 6-hour inter-fraction interval to the tumor plus a 2-3 cm margin. The boost dose equaled 7.5 Gy/5 fractions (1.5 Gy/fraction); a total dose of 52.5 Gy/5 weeks was given to the primary tumor. Pretreatment tumor stage, determined by endorectal ultrasound and CT scan, included 29 with T3N0 [64%], 11 T3N1, 1 T3Nx, 2 T4N0, 1 T4N3, and 1 with TxN1 disease. Mean distance from the anal verge was 5 cm (range 0-13 cm). Median age was 55 years (range 33-77 years). The population consisted of 34 males and 11 females. Median time of follow-up is 8 months (range 1-24 months). Results: Sphincter preservation (SP) has been accomplished in 33 of 42 (79%) patients resected to date. Three patients did not undergo resection because of the development of metastatic disease in the interim between the completion of chemoradiation (CTX/XRT) and preoperative evaluation. The surgical procedures included proctectomy and coloanal anastomosis (n = 16), low anterior resection (n = 13), transanal resection (n = 4). Tumor down-staging was pathologically confirmed in 36 of the 42 (86%) resected patients, and 13 (31%) achieved a pathologic CR. Among the 28 tumors (67%) located <6 cm from the anal verge, SP was accomplished in 21 cases (75%). Although perioperative morbidity was higher, toxicity rates during CTX/XRT were comparable to that seen with conventional fractionation. Compared to our contemporary experience with conventional CTX/XRT (45Gy; 1.8 Gy per

  13. Analysis of motion of the rectum during preoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy for rectal cancer using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Takenaka, Ryousuke; Sakumi, Akira; Haga, Akihiro; Otomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to quantify the inter-fractional motion of the rectum and the rectal and bladder volumes using CBCT scans taken during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. Also, assessment was made for a better margin for simultaneous integrated boost - intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) for rectal cancer. There were 32 patients in this study undergoing preoperative CRT for rectal cancer. Each rectum and bladder was contoured on all planning CTs and CBCTs (day 1, 7, 13, 19, 25). The target volume was configured by adding margins (0, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 15 mm) to the rectum on planning CT. The respective percentage of rectal volume that exceeds the target volume was calculated for each of these margins. The percentage of bladder volume that exceeds the bladder volume in the planning CT and motion of the center of gravity of rectum were also analyzed. Planning CTs and series of each 5 CBCTs for 32 patients were analyzed in this study. The rectal volume tended to shrink week after week. The mean values (± SD) in the 32 series per patient of the percentage of rectum on the CBCTs exceeding target volume in which the margins of 0, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 15 mm were added to the rectum on planning CT were 20.7 ± 12.5%, 7.2 ± 8.3%, 3.9 ± 5.9%, 2.1 ± 3.9%, 0.7 ± 1.8%, and 0.1 ± 0.3%, respectively. No association was seen between the percentage of changes of bladder volume and motion of rectal centroid. In this study, we estimated the motion of the rectum using planning CT and CBCT. Ten to fifteen mm is a sufficient margin for the rectum during SIB-IMRT for rectal cancer in the supine position

  14. The prognostic value of lymph node metastases and tumour regression grade in rectal cancer patients treated with long-course preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindebjerg, J; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Ploen, J

    2009-01-01

    to the tumour regression grade system and lymph node status in the surgical specimen was assessed. The prognostic value of clinico-pathological parameters was analysed using univariate analysis and Kaplan-Meier methods for comparison of groups. RESULTS: All patients responded to treatment and 47% had a major......OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of tumour regression and the post-treatment lymph node status on the prognosis of rectal cancer treated by preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. METHOD: One hundred and thirty-five patients with locally advanced T3.......01). CONCLUSION: The combined assessment of lymph-node status and tumour response has strong prognostic value in locally advanced rectal cancer patient treated with preoperative long-course chemoradiation....

  15. S-1-Based versus capecitabine-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer: a matched-pair analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Su

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to compare the efficacy and safety of S-1-based and capecitabine-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy regimens in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer through a retrospective matched-pair analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between Jan 2010 and Mar 2014, 24 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received preoperative radiotherapy concurrently with S-1 were individually matched with 24 contemporary patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received preoperative radiotherapy concurrently with capecitabine according to clinical stage (as determined by pelvic magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography and age (within five years. All these patients performed mesorectal excision 4-8 weeks after the completion of chemoradiotherapy. RESULTS: The tumor volume reduction rates were 55.9±15.1% in the S-1 group and 53.8±16.0% in the capecitabine group (p = 0.619. The overall downstaging, including both T downstaging and N downstaging, occurred in 83.3% of the S-1 group and 70.8% of the capecitabine group (p = 0.508. The significant tumor regression, including regression grade I and II, occurred in 33.3% of S-1 patients and 25.0% of capecitabine patients (p = 0.754. In the two groups, Grade 4 adverse events were not observed and Grade 3 consisted of only two cases of diarrhea, and no patient suffered hematologic adverse event of Grade 2 or higher. However, the incidence of diarrhea (62.5% vs 33.3%, p = 0.014 and hand-foot syndrome (29.2% vs 0%, p = 0.016 were higher in capecitabine group. Other adverse events did not differ significantly between two groups. CONCLUSIONS: The two preoperative chemoradiotherapy regimens were effective and safe for patients of locally advanced rectal cancer, but regimen with S-1 exhibited a lower incidence of adverse events.

  16. A Phase II study of preoperative radiotherapy and concomitant weekly irinotecan in combination with protracted venous infusion 5-fluorouracil, for resectable locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Matilde; Dotor, Emma; Rivera, Fernando; Sanchez-Rovira, Pedro; Vega-Villegas, Maria Eugenia; Cervantes, Andres; Garcia, Jose Luis; Gallen, Manel; Aranda, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with irinotecan (CPT-11) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with resectable rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with resectable T3-T4 rectal cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 2 weekly) and 5-FU (225 mg/m 2 /day continuous infusion, 5 days/week) were concurrently administered with radiation therapy (RT) (45 Gy, 1.8 Gy/day, 5 days/week), during 5 weeks. Results: A total of 74 patients were enrolled: mean age, 59 years (20-74 years; SD, 11.7). Planned treatment was delivered to most patients (median relative dose intensity for both drugs was 100%). Grade 3/4 lymphocytopenia occurred in 35 patients (47%), neutropenia in 5 (7%), and anemia in 2 (3%). Main Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities were diarrhea (14%), asthenia (9%), rectal mucositis (8%), and abdominal pain (8%). Of the 73 resected specimens, 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.8-23.7) had a pathologic complete response and 49.3% (95% CI, 37.4-61.3) were downstaged. Additionally, 66.7% (95% CI, 51.1-80.0) of patients with ultrasound staged N1/N2 disease had no pathologic evidence of nodal involvement after CRT. Conclusions: This preoperative CRT schedule has been shown to be effective and feasible in a large population of patients with resectable rectal cancer

  17. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy versus postoperative chemoradiotherapy for stage II–III resectable rectal cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jin Ho [Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Uk [Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyeon Min [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Um, Jun Won [University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is better than postoperative CRT in oncologic outcome and toxicity is contentious in prospective randomized clinical trials. We systematically analyze and compare the treatment result, toxicity, and sphincter preservation rate between preoperative CRT and postoperative CRT in stage II–III rectal cancer. We searched Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library from 1990 to 2014 for relevant trials. Only phase III randomized studies performing CRT and curative surgery were selected and the data were extracted. Meta-analysis was used to pool oncologic outcome and toxicity data across studies. Three randomized phase III trials were finally identified. The meta-analysis results showed significantly lower 5-year locoregional recurrence rate in the preoperative-CRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.41–0.84; p = 0.004). The 5-year distant recurrence rate (p = 0.55), relapse-free survival (p = 0.14), and overall survival (p = 0.22) showed no significant difference between two groups. Acute toxicity was significantly lower in the preoperativeCRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between two groups in perioperative and chronic complications (p = 0.53). The sphincter-saving rate was not significantly different between two groups (p = 0.24). The conversion rate from abdominoperineal resection to low anterior resection in low rectal cancer was significantly higher in the preoperative-CRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (p < 0.001). As compared to postoperative CRT, preoperative CRT improves only locoregional control, not distant control and survival, with similar chronic toxicity and sphincter preservation rate in rectal cancer patients.

  18. Phase 1 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Temozolomide and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

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    Jeong, Jae Ho; Hong, Yong Sang [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yangsoon; Kim, Jihun [Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Kyu-pyo; Kim, Sun Young [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-hong; Kim, Jong Hoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, In Ja; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Won, E-mail: twkimmd@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) with capecitabine is a standard treatment strategy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Temozolomide improves the survival of patients with glioblastoma with hypermethylated O{sup 6}-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT); MGMT hypermethylation is one of the colorectal carcinogenesis pathways. We aimed to determine the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and recommended dose (RD) of temolozomide in combination with capecitabine-based preoperative CRT for LARC. Methods and Materials: Radiation therapy was delivered with 45 Gy/25 daily fractions with coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy/3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy comprised fixed and escalated doses of capecitabine and temozolomide, respectively. The MGMT hypermethylation was evaluated in pretreatment tumor samples. This trial is registered with (ClinicalTrials.gov) with the number (NCT01781403). Results: Twenty-two patients with LARC of cT3-4N0 or cT{sub any}N1-2 were accrued. Dose level 3 was chosen as the RD because DLT was noticeably absent in 10 patients treated up to dose level 3. An additional 12 patients were recruited in this group. Grade III adverse events were noted, and pathologic complete response (pCR) was observed in 7 patients (31.8%); MGMT hypermethylation was detected in 16. The pCR rate was 37.5% and 16.7% in the hypermethylated and unmethylated MGMT groups, respectively (P=.616). Conclusions: There was a tendency toward higher pCR rates in patients with hypermethylated MGMT. Future randomized studies are therefore warranted.

  19. Preoperative radiotherapy and local excision of rectal cancer with immediate radical re-operation for poor responders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujko, Krzysztof; Richter, Piotr; Kolodziejczyk, Milena; Nowacki, Marek P.; Kulig, Jan; Popiela, Tadeusz; Gach, Tomasz; Oledzki, Janusz; Sopylo, Rafal; Meissner, Wiktor; Wierzbicki, Ryszard; Polkowski, Wojciech; Kowalska, Teresa; Stryczynska, Grazyna; Paprota, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report an early analysis of prospective study exploring preoperative radiotherapy and local excision in rectal cancer. Materials and methods: Mucosa at tumour edges was tattooed. Patients with cT1-3N0 tumour <3-4 cm were treated with either 5 x 5 Gy + 4 Gy boost (N = 31) or chemoradiation (50.4 Gy + 5.4 Gy boost, 1.8 Gy per fraction + 5-fluorouracyl and leucovorin; N = 13). Thirteen patients from the short-course group were unfit for chemotherapy. The interval from radiation to full-thickness local excision was 6 weeks. The protocol called for conversion to a transabdominal surgery in case of ypT2-3 disease or positive margin. Results: The postoperative complications requiring hospitalization were recorded in 9% of patients. The rate of pathological complete response was 41%. The rate of patients requiring conversion was 34%; however, 18% actually underwent conversion and the remaining 16% refused or were unfit. During the 14 months of median follow-up, local recurrence was detected in 7% of patients and all underwent salvage surgery. Of 19 patients in whom initially anterior resection was likely, 16% had abdominoperineal resection performed for a conversion or as a rescue procedure. Conclusion: Our study suggests that the short-course radiation prior to local excision is a treatment option for high-risk patients.

  20. Comparison of preoperative short-course radiotherapy and long-course radiochemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, M.; Saur, G.; Wehner, D.; Sweeney, R.A.; Flentje, M.; Thalheimer, A.; Germer, C.T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this work was to perform a single institution comparison between preoperative short-course radiotherapy (SC-RT) and long-course radiochemotherapy (LC-RCHT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: A total of 225 patients with clinical stage UICC II-III rectal cancer were treated with SC-RT (29 Gy in 10 twice daily fractions followed by immediate surgery; n = 108) or LC-RCHT (54 Gy in 28 fractions with simultaneous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) ± oxaliplatin chemotherapy followed by delayed surgery; n = 117). All patients in the LC-RCHT cohort and patients in the SC-RT with pathological UICC stage ≥ II received adjuvant chemotherapy. Before 2004, the standard of care was SC-RT with LC-RCHT reserved for patients where downstaging was considered as required for sphincter preservation or curative resection. In the later period, SC-RT was practiced only for patients unfit for radiochemotherapy. Results: Patients in the LC-RCHT cohort had a significantly higher proportion of cT4 tumors, clinical node positivity, and lower tumor location. The 5-year local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were 91% and 66% without differences between the SC-RT and LC-RCHT groups. Acute toxicity was increased during LC-RCHT (grade ≥ II 1% vs. 33%) and there were no differences in postoperative complications. Severe late toxicity grade ≥ III was increased after SC-RT (12% vs. 3%). Of patients aged > 80 years, 7 of 7 patients and 4 of 9 patients received curative surgery after SC-RT and LC-RCHT, respectively. Conclusion: Despite the fact that patients with worse prognostic factors were treated with LC-RCHT, there were no significant differences in LC and OS between the SC-RT and LC-RCHT group. Age > 80 years was identified as a significant risk factor for LC-RCHT and these patients could be treated preferably with SC-RT. (orig.)

  1. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, CEA ratio, and treatment outcome of rectal cancer patients receiving pre-operative chemoradiation and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kai-Lin; Chang, Shih-Ching; Chu, Lee-Shing; Wang, Ling-Wei; Yang, Shung-Haur; Liang, Wen-Yih; Kuo, Ying-Ju; Lin, Jen-Kou; Lin, Tzu-Chen; Chen, Wei-Shone; Jiang, Jeng-Kae; Wang, Huann-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    To investigate serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients receiving pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Between 2000 and 2009, 138 patients with advanced rectal cancer receiving CRT before surgery at our hospital were retrospectively classified into 3 groups: pre-CRT CEA <6 ng/ml (group L; n = 87); pre-CRT CEA ≥ 6 ng/ml and post-CRT CEA <6 ng/ml (group H-L; n = 32); and both pre- and post-CRT CEA ≥ 6 ng/ml (group H-H; n = 19). CEA ratio (defined as post-CRT CEA divided by pre-CRT CEA), post-CRT CEA level and other factors were reviewed for prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) was better in groups L (69.0%) and H-L (74.5%) than in group H-H (44.9%) (p = 0.024). Pathologic complete response was observed in 19.5%, 21.9% and 5.3% of groups L, H-L and H-H respectively (p = 0.281). Multivariate analysis showed that ypN stage and pCR were independent prognostic factors for DFS and that post-CRT CEA level was independently predictive of pCR. As a whole, post-CRT CEA <2.61 ng/ml predicted pCR (sensitivity 76.0%; specificity 58.4%). For those with pre-CRT CEA ≥6 ng/ml, post-CRT CEA and CEA ratio both predicted pCR (sensitivity 87.5%, specificity 76.7%). In patients with pre-CRT serum CEA ≥6 ng/ml, those with “normalized” CEA levels after CRT may have similar DFS to those with “normal” (<6 ng/ml) pre-CRT values. Post-CRT CEA level is a predictor for pCR, especially in those with pre-CRT CEA ≥6 ng/ml

  2. Continuous Effect of Radial Resection Margin on Recurrence and Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients Who Receive Preoperative Chemoradiation and Curative Surgery: A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, SooYoon; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Joo Hwan; Nam, Taek Keun; Jeong, Songmi; Jang, Hong Seok; Song, Jin Ho; Lee, Jeong Won; Bae, Jung Min; Lee, Jong Hoon

    2017-07-01

    To elucidate the proper length and prognostic value of resection margins in rectal cancer patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by curative total mesorectal excision (TME). A total of 1476 rectal cancer patients staging cT3-4N0-2M0 were analyzed. All patients received radiation dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. Total mesorectal excision was performed 4 to 8 weeks after radiation therapy. The recurrence-free survival (RFS) at 5 years showed a significant difference between 3 groups: patients with circumferential resection margin (CRM) ≤1 mm, CRM 1.1 to 5 mm, and CRM >5 mm (46.2% vs 68.6% vs 77.5%, P5 mm. Distal resection margin (≤5 vs >5 mm) did not show any significant difference in cumulative incidence of locoregional recurrence (P=.310) and distant metastasis (P=.926). Rectal cancer patients with CRM ≤1 mm are a high-risk group, with the lowest RFS. Patients with CRM 1.1 to 5 mm may be at intermediate risk, with moderately increased distant recurrence. Distal resection margin was not significantly associated with RFS in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant CRT and total mesorectal excision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision: a Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) randomized phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breugom, A J; van Gijn, W; Muller, E W; Berglund, Å; van den Broek, C B M; Fokstuen, T; Gelderblom, H; Kapiteijn, E; Leer, J W H; Marijnen, C A M; Martijn, H; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E; Nagtegaal, I D; Påhlman, L; Punt, C J A; Putter, H; Roodvoets, A G H; Rutten, H J T; Steup, W H; Glimelius, B; van de Velde, C J H

    2015-04-01

    The discussion on the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated according to current guidelines is still ongoing. A multicentre, randomized phase III trial, PROCTOR-SCRIPT, was conducted to compare adjuvant chemotherapy with observation for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision (TME). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial recruited patients from 52 hospitals. Patients with histologically proven stage II or III rectal adenocarcinoma were randomly assigned (1:1) to observation or adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME. Radiotherapy consisted of 5 × 5 Gy. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of 25 × 1.8-2 Gy combined with 5-FU-based chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of 5-FU/LV (PROCTOR) or eight courses capecitabine (SCRIPT). Randomization was based on permuted blocks of six, stratified according to centre, residual tumour, time between last irradiation and surgery, and preoperative treatment. The primary end point was overall survival. Of 470 enrolled patients, 437 were eligible. The trial closed prematurely because of slow patient accrual. Patients were randomly assigned to observation (n = 221) or adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 216). After a median follow-up of 5.0 years, 5-year overall survival was 79.2% in the observation group and 80.4% in the chemotherapy group [hazard ratio (HR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62-1.39; P = 0.73]. The HR for disease-free survival was 0.80 (95% CI 0.60-1.07; P = 0.13). Five-year cumulative incidence for locoregional recurrences was 7.8% in both groups. Five-year cumulative incidence for distant recurrences was 38.5% and 34.7%, respectively (P = 0.39). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial could not demonstrate a significant benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidine monotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME on overall survival, disease-free survival, and recurrence rate. However, this trial did not complete

  4. Pretreatment HIF-1α and GLUT-1 expressions do not correlate with outcome after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Birgitte Mayland; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Lindebjerg, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) expressions as predictors of response and survival after chemoradiotherapy in pretreatment biopsy specimens from patients with rectal cancer.......The aim of the present study was to investigate hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) expressions as predictors of response and survival after chemoradiotherapy in pretreatment biopsy specimens from patients with rectal cancer....

  5. The correlation between the levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 in plasma and tumour response and survival after preoperative radiochemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblak, Irena; Velenik, Vaneja; Anderluh, Franc; Mozina, Barbara; Ocvirk, Janja

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse whether the level of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) 1 is associated with the tumour response and survival to preoperative radiochemotherapy in rectal cancer patients. Ninety-two patients with histologically confirmed non-metastatic rectal cancer of clinical stage I– III were treated with preoperative radiochemotherapy, surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. Plasma TIMP-1 concentrations were measured prior to the start of the treatment with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Median follow-up time was 68 months (range: 3–93 months) while in survivors it was 80 months (range: 68–93 months). The 5-year locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) rates for all patients were 80.2%, 56.4%, 63.7% and 52.2%, respectively. The median TIMP-1 level was 185 ng/mL (range: 22–523 ng/mL) and the mean level (±standard deviation) was 192 (±87) ng/mL. Serum TIMP-1 levels were found to be significantly increased in patients with preoperative CRP>12 mg/L and in those who died from rectal cancer or had cT4 tumours. No correlation was established for age, gender, carcinoembriogenic antigene (CEA) level, platelets count, histopathological grade, response to preoperative therapy, resectability and disease reappearance. On univariate analysis, various parameters favourably influenced one or more survival endpoints: TIMP-1 <170 ng/mL, CRP <12 mg/L, platelets count <290 10E9/L, CEA <3.4mg/L, age <69 years, male gender, early stage disease (cN0 and/or cT2–3), radical surgery (R0) and response to preoperative radiochemotherapy. In multivariate model, LRC was favourably influenced by N-downstage, DFS by lower CRP and N-downstage, DSS by lower CRP and N-downstage and OS by lower TIMP-1 level, lower CRP and N-downstage. Although we did not find any association between pretreatment serum TIMP-1 levels and primary tumour response to preoperative

  6. Intravenous 5-fluorouracil versus oral doxifluridine as preoperative concurrent chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer. Prospective randomized trails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nam-Kyu; Min, Jin-Sik; Park, Jea-Kun; Yun, Seong-Hyun; Sung, Jin-Sil; Jung, Hyun-Chul; Roh, Jae-Kyung

    2001-01-01

    Preoperative radiation treatment with concomitant intravenous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is known to be effective in shrinking and downstaging of tumors. However, chemotherapy has often been limited by its toxicity and poor patient compliance. Oral 5-FU is known to have several advantages over conventional intravenous 5-FU infusion such as lower toxicity and higher quality of life without compromising the efficacy of the treatment. The aim of this study was to compare intravenous 5-FU with oral doxifluridine with respect to tumor response, toxicity and quality of life. Twenty-eight patients with rectal cancer, staged as over T3N1 or T4 by transrectal ultrasonography between July 1997 and December 1998, were included in this study. Intravenous 5-FU (450 mg/m 2 ) and leucovorin (20 mg/m 2 ) were given for five consecutive days during the first and fifth weeks of radiation therapy (50.4 Gy) (n=14). Oral doxifluridine (700 mg/m 2 /day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m 2 ) were given daily during radiation treatment (n=14). Quality of life was scored according to 22 activity items (good, >77; fair, >58; poor, <57). Surgical resection was performed 4 weeks after completion of concurrent chemoradiation treatment. Tumor response was classified into CR (complete remission), PR (partial response; 50% diminution of tumor volume or downstaging) and NR (no response). Tumor response was CR 3/14 (21.4%), PR 7/14 (50%) and NR 4/14 (28.6%) in the IV arm versus CR 2/14 (14.2%), PR 6/14 (42.9%) and NR 6/14 (42.9%) in the Oral arm (p=0.16, 0.23, 0.24), respectively. The quality of life was poor (36.4% versus 33.3%), fair and good (63.6% versus 66.7%) between the IV arm and Oral arm, respectively. Gastrointestinal toxicity was 2/14 (14.3%) in the IV arm versus 5/14 (35.7%) in the Oral arm, respectively. Stomatitis was only observed in the IV arm (1/14, 7.1%). Hematological toxicity was 3/14 (21.4%) in the IV arm versus 4/14 (28.5%) in the Oral arm, respectively. Systemic recurrence

  7. Quality of life, anorectal and sexual functions after preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer: Report of a randomised trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak, Lucyna; Bujko, Krzysztof; Nowacki, Marek P.; Kepka, Lucyna; Oledzki, Janusz; Rutkowski, Andrzej; Szmeja, Jacek; Kladny, Jozef; Dymecki, Dariusz; Wieczorek, Andrzej; Pawlak, Mariusz; Lesniak, Tadeusz; Kowalska, Teresa; Richter, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients (N = 316) with resectable cT3-4 low-lying and mid-rectal cancer were randomised to receive either preoperative 5 x 5 Gy irradiation with subsequent surgery performed within 7 days or chemoradiation (50.4, 1.8 Gy per fraction plus boluses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin) followed by surgery after 4-6 weeks. No differences were found in sphincter preservation, survival, local control and late complications. Early complications were less frequent in the short-course group. The aim of this report is to find out whether large doses per fraction of short-course schedule result in more severe anorectal and sexual dysfunction and quality of life (QoL) impairment. Materials and method: Patients who were free of disease were asked to answer the QLQ-C30 and those without stoma were, additionally, asked to fill in a questionnaire of anorectal (19 items) and sexual function (1 item). Results: Two hundred and twenty-two patients (86% response rate) completed the QLQ-C30 and 118 (86% response rate) the anorectal-sexual function questionnaire. The median time from surgery to filling in the QLQ-C30 questionnaire was 12 months, and to filling in the anorectal-sexual function questionnaire - 13 months. We did not find significant differences between the randomised groups regarding QoL and the anorectal and sexual functions. Approximately two-thirds of patients had anorectal function impairment. Approximately 20% of patients stated that this considerably influenced their QoL. Conclusions: QoL and the anorectal and sexual functioning did not differ in patients receiving short-course radiotherapy, as compared to those receiving chemoradiation

  8. Preoperative 5-FU, low-dose leucovorin, and radiation therapy for locally advanced and unresectable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, Bruce D.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Enker, Warren E.; Saltz, Leonard; Guillem, Jose G.; Paty, Philip B.; Kelsen, David P.; Kemeny, Nancy; Ilson, David; Bass, Joanne; Conti, John

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We report the local control and survival of two Phase I dose escalation trials of combined preoperative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), low-dose leucovorin (LV), and radiation therapy followed by postoperative LV/5-FU for the treatment of patients with locally advanced and unresectable rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 36 patients (30 primary and 6 recurrent) received two monthly cycles of LV/5-FU (bolus daily x 5). Radiation therapy (50.40 Gy) began on day 1 in the 25 patients who received concurrent treatment and on day 8 in the 11 patients who received sequential treatment. Postoperatively, patients received a median of four monthly cycles of LV/5-FU. Results: The resectability rate with negative margins was 97%. The complete response rate was 11% pathologic and 14% clinical for a total of 25%. The 4-year actuarial disease-free survival was 67% and the overall survival was 76%. The crude local failure rate was 14% and the 4-year actuarial local failure rate was 30%. Crude local failure was lower in the four patients who had a pathologic complete response (0%) compared with those who either did not have a pathologic complete response (16%) or who had a clinical complete response (20%). Conclusion: Our preliminary data with the low-dose LV regimen reveal encouraging downstaging, local control, and survival rates. Additional follow-up is needed to determine the 5-year results. The benefit of downstaging on local control is greatest in patients who achieve a pathologic complete response

  9. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, A. L.; Ploen, J.; Vogelius, I. R.

    2013-01-01

    estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination...... of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect...... of including clinical parameters in the model was examined. The radiation dose-response relationship for a specific grade of histopathologic tumor regression was parameterized in terms of the dose required for 50% response, D-50,D-i, and the normalized dose-response gradient, gamma(50,i). Results: A highly...

  10. Preoperative staging and treatment options in T1 rectal adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Endreseth, Birger H; Isaksen, Vidar

    2009-01-01

    . Results. Local treatment of T1 cancers combined with close follow-up, early salvage surgery or later radical resection of local recurrences or with chemo-radiation may lead to fewer severe complications and comparable, or even better, long-term survival. Accurate preoperative staging and careful selection...... of patients for local or non-operative treatment are mandatory. As preoperative staging, at present, is not sufficiently accurate, strategies for completion, salvage or rescue surgery is important, and must be accepted by the patient before local treatment for cure is initiated. Recommendations......Background. Major rectal resection for T1 rectal cancer offers more than 95% cancer specific five-year survival to patients surviving the first 30 days after surgery. A significant further improvement by development of the surgical technique may not be possible. Improvements in the total survival...

  11. Long-term quality of life in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative (chemo)-radiotherapy within a randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiv, M.; Puyraveau, M.; Mercier, M.; Bosset, J.F.; Puyraveau, M.; Mineur, L.; Calais, G.; Maingon, P.; Bardet, E.; Mercier, M.; Bosset, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Few studies have evaluated the quality of life (QoL) of patients with rectal cancer. This report describes the quality of life of French patients who entered the 22921 EORTC trial that investigated the role and place of chemotherapy (CT) added to preoperative radiotherapy (preop-RT). Patients and Methods: Patients without recurrences were evaluated with EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR38 questionnaires, after a median time of 4.6 years from randomization. Results: All the scores of QLQ-C30 functions were high, from 78 up to 88, with those of global health quality of life scale (GHQL) status being 73. The mean scores of symptoms were low except for diarrhea. For QLQ-CR38, the mean scores for 'body image' and 'future perspective' were high at 79.6 and 69.7 respectively. The scores for 'sexual functioning' and 'enjoyment' were low. Men had more sexual problems than females (62.5 vs 25 mean scores respectively). Chemotherapy was associated with more diarrhea complaints, lower 'role', lower 'social functioning' and lower global health quality of life scale. Conclusion: The overall quality of life of patients with rectal cancer is quite good 4.6 years after the beginning preoperative treatments. However, adding chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy has a negative effect on diarrhea complaints and some quality of life dimensions. (authors)

  12. Tafazzin protein expression is associated with tumorigenesis and radiation response in rectal cancer: a study of Swedish clinical trial on preoperative radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surajit Pathak

    Full Text Available Tafazzin (TAZ, a transmembrane protein contributes in mitochondrial structural and functional modifications through cardiolipin remodeling. TAZ mutations are associated with several diseases, but studies on the role of TAZ protein in carcinogenesis and radiotherapy (RT response is lacking. Therefore we investigated the TAZ expression in rectal cancer, and its correlation with RT, clinicopathological and biological variables in the patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT.140 rectal cancer patients were included in this study, of which 65 received RT before surgery and the rest underwent surgery alone. TAZ expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in primary cancer, distant, adjacent normal mucosa and lymph node metastasis. In-silico protein-protein interaction analysis was performed to study the predictive functional interaction of TAZ with other oncoproteins.TAZ showed stronger expression in primary cancer and lymph node metastasis compared to distant or adjacent normal mucosa in both non-RT and RT patients. Strong TAZ expression was significantly higher in stages I-III and non-mucinious cancer of non-RT patients. In RT patients, strong TAZ expression in biopsy was related to distant recurrence, independent of gender, age, stages and grade (p = 0.043, HR, 6.160, 95% CI, 1.063-35.704. In silico protein-protein interaction study demonstrated that TAZ was positively related to oncoproteins, Livin, MAC30 and FXYD-3.Strong expression of TAZ protein seems to be related to rectal cancer development and RT response, it can be a predictive biomarker of distant recurrence in patients with preoperative RT.

  13. Preoperative Short-Course Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy Followed by Delayed Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Phase 2 Multicenter Study (KROG 10-01)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jae Hwan [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong, E-mail: radiopiakim@hanmail.net [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sun Young; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Min Ju; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun-Gi [Department of Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myung Ah [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Taek-Keun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwang-Ju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase 2 multicenter trial was performed to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative short-course concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiation therapy of 25 Gy in 5 fractions was delivered over 5 consecutive days using helical tomotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered on the same 5 days with intravenous bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day). After 4 to 8 weeks, total mesorectal excision was performed. The primary endpoint was the pathologic downstaging (ypStage 0-I) rate, and secondary endpoints included tumor regression grade, tumor volume reduction rate, and toxicity. Results: Seventy-one patients completed the planned preoperative CRT and surgery. Downstaging occurred in 20 (28.2%) patients, including 1 (1.4%) with a pathologic complete response. Favorable tumor regression (grade 4-3) was observed in 4 (5.6%) patients, and the mean tumor volume reduction rate was 62.5 ± 21.3%. Severe (grade ≥3) treatment toxicities were reported in 27 (38%) patients from CRT until 3 months after surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative short-course concurrent CRT followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer demonstrated poor pathologic responses compared with conventional long-course CRT, and it yielded considerable toxicities despite the use of an advanced radiation therapy technique.

  14. T2-weighted signal intensity-selected volumetry for prediction of pathological complete response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungwon; Han, Kyunghwa; Seo, Nieun; Kim, Hye Jin; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Koom, Woong Sub; Ahn, Joong Bae; Lim, Joon Seok

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of signal intensity (SI)-selected volumetry findings in T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a potential biomarker for predicting pathological complete response (pCR) to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer. Forty consecutive patients with pCR after preoperative CRT were compared with 80 age- and sex-matched non-pCR patients in a case-control study. SI-selected tumor volume was measured on post-CRT T2-weighted MRI, which included voxels of the treated tumor exceeding the SI (obturator internus muscle SI + [ischiorectal fossa fat SI - obturator internus muscle SI] × 0.2). Three blinded readers independently rated five-point pCR confidence scores and compared the diagnostic outcome with SI-selected volumetry findings. The SI-selected volumetry protocol was validated in 30 additional rectal cancer patients. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of SI-selected volumetry for pCR prediction was 0.831, with an optimal cutoff value of 649.6 mm 3 (sensitivity 0.850, specificity 0.725). The AUC of the SI-selected tumor volume was significantly greater than the pooled AUC of readers (0.707, p volumetry in post-CRT T2-weighted MRI can help predict pCR after preoperative CRT in patients with rectal cancer. • Fibrosis and viable tumor MRI signal intensities (SIs) are difficult to distinguish. • T2 SI-selected volumetry yields high diagnostic performance for assessing pathological complete response. • T2 SI-selected volumetry is significantly more accurate than readers and non-SI-selected volumetry. • Post-chemoradiation therapy T2-weighted MRI SI-selected volumetry facilitates prediction of pathological complete response.

  15. Preoperative Capecitabine and Pelvic Radiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer-Is it Equivalent to 5-FU Infusion Plus Leucovorin and Radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Alexander K.; Wong, Alfred O.; Jenken, Daryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this retrospective case-matching study was to compare the treatment outcomes and acute toxicity of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) with capecitabine vs. preoperative RT with intermittent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) infusion, leucovorin, and mitomycin C in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We matched 34 patients who were treated with preoperative concurrent capecitabine and 50 Gy of RT by their clinical T stage (T3 or T4) and the tumor location (≤7 cm or >7 cm from the anal verge) with another 68 patients who were treated with preoperative intermittent 5-FU infusion, leucovorin, mitomycin C, and 50 Gy of RT for a comparison of the pathologic tumor response, local control, distant failure, and survival rates. Results: The pathologic complete response rate was 21% with capecitabine and 18% with 5-FU and leucovorin (p = 0.72). The rate of T downstaging after chemoradiation was 59% for both groups. The rate of sphincter-sparing resection was 38% after capecitabine plus RT and 43% after 5-FU plus RT (p = 0.67). At 3 years, there was no significant difference in the local control rate (93% for capecitabine and 92% for 5-FU and leucovorin), relapse-free rate (74% for capecitabine and 73% for 5-FU and leucovorin), or disease-specific survival rate (86% for capecitabine and 77% for 5-FU and leucovorin). The acute toxicity profile was comparable, with little Grade 3 and 4 toxicity. Conclusions: When administered with concurrent preoperative RT, both capecitabine and intermittent 5-FU infusion with leucovorin modulation provided comparable pathologic tumor response, local control, relapse-free survival, and disease-specific survival rates in rectal cancer.

  16. Effect of preoperative injection of carbon nanoparticle suspension on the outcomes of selected patients with mid-low rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing-Mao; Liang, Jian-Wei; Wang, Zheng; Kou, Jian-tao; Zhou, Zhi-Xiang

    2016-04-04

    Carbon nanoparticles show significant lymphatic tropism and can be used to identify lymph nodes surrounding mid-low rectal tumors. In this study, we analyzed the effect of trans anal injection of a carbon nanoparticle suspension on the outcomes of patients with mid-low rectal cancer who underwent laparoscopic resection. We collected the data of 87 patients with mid-low rectal cancer who underwent laparoscopic resection between November 2014 and March 2015 at Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College. For 35 patients in the experimental group, the carbon nanoparticle suspension was injected transanally into the submucosa of the rectum around the tumor 30 min before the operation; 52 patients in the control group underwent the operation directly without the injection of carbon nanoparticle suspension. We then compared the operation outcomes between the two groups. In the experimental group, the rate of incomplete mesorectal excision was lower than that in the control group, but no significant difference was found (2.9% vs. 7.7%, P = 0.342). The distance between the tumor and the circumferential resection margin was 5.8 ± 1.4 mm in the experimental group and 4.8 ± 1.1 mm in the control group (P = 0.001). The mean number of lymph nodes removed was 28.2 ± 9.4 in the experimental group and 22.7 ± 7.3 in the control group (P = 0.003); the mean number of lymph nodes smaller than 5 mm in diameter was 10.1 ± 7.5 and 4.5 ± 3.7, respectively (P rectal cancer; it also improved the accuracy of pathologic staging. Moreover, for selected patients, this technique narrowed the scope of lateral lymph node dissection.

  17. Prognostic role of acellular mucin pools in patients with rectal cancer after pathological complete response to preoperative chemoradiation: systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, A.B.H.

    2017-01-01

    The prognostic implication of acellular mucin pools (AMP) in rectal cancer is controversial. There is no Level-I evidence regarding their prognostic impact. This systematic review was performed to determine the impact of AMP on survival in patients with rectal cancer, who demonstrate pathological complete response (PCR) to preoperative chemoradiation (CRT). A systematic literature review was performed by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE database. For overall survival, the overall random effect model favored mucin negative tumors (HR=2, 95% CI=0.8-4.8) with heterogeneity (I-squared=0, p=0.6). However, the pooled analysis was not significant due to small sample. For disease-free survival, four studies showed HR >1; however, the pooled random effect model indicated little difference in risk (HR=1.06, 95% CI=0.4-2.4) with heterogeneity (I-squared=49.5%, p=0.07). No definite prognostic role of AMP in rectal cancer patients with PCR was found. These results, however, should be interpreted with caution. (author)

  18. Preoperative radio-chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Forecasting the next steps through ongoing and forthcoming studies; Chimioradiotherapie preoperatoire des cancers du rectum: ce que laissent presager les etudes en cours et a venir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crehange, G.; Maingon, P. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, 21000 Dijon (France); Bosset, J.F. [Service d' oncologie radiotherapie, CHU Jean-Minjoz, boulevard Flemming, 25000 Besancon (France)

    2011-10-15

    Protracted preoperative radio-chemotherapy with a 5-FU-based scheme, or a short course of preoperative radiotherapy without chemotherapy, are the standard neo-adjuvant treatments for resectable stage II-III rectal cancer. Local failure rates are low and reproducible, between 6 and 15% when followed with a 'Total Meso-rectal Excision'. Nevertheless, the therapeutic strategy needs to be improved: distant metastatic recurrence rates remain stable around 30 to 35%, while both sphincter and sexual sequels are still significant. The aim of the present paper was to analyse the ongoing trials listed on the following search engines: the Institut National du Cancer in France, the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Health in the United States, and the major cooperative groups. Keywords for the search were: 'rectal cancer', 'preoperative radiotherapy', 'phase II-III', 'preoperative chemotherapy', 'adjuvant chemotherapy' and 'surgery'. Twenty-three trials were selected and classified in different groups, each of them addressing a question of strategy: (1) place of adjuvant chemotherapy; (2) optimization of preoperative radiotherapy; (3) evaluation of new radiosensitization protocols and/or neo-adjuvant chemotherapy; (4) optimization of techniques and timing of surgery; (5) place of radiotherapy for non resectable or metastatic tumors. (authors)

  19. Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braendengen, Morten, E-mail: mortbrae@medisin.uio.no [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Tveit, Kjell Magne [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Bruheim, Kjersti [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Cvancarova, Milada [Department of Clinical Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Berglund, Ake [Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25 {+-} 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

  20. Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brændengen, Morten; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Bruheim, Kjersti; Cvancarova, Milada; Berglund, Åke; Glimelius, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy × 25 ± 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

  1. Severe myositis of the hip flexors after pre-operative chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florczynski, Matthew M.; Sanatani, Michael S.; Mai, Lauren; Fisher, Barbara; Moulin, Dwight E.; Cao, Jeffrey; Louie, Alexander V.; Pope, Janet E.; Leung, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The use of neoadjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma has been shown to reduce disease recurrence when combined with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. We report a case of a patient who developed a debilitating bilateral myopathy of the hip flexors after successful treatment for rectal cancer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such complication from radiation therapy reported in a patient with colorectal cancer. The disproportionate severity of our patient’s myopathy relative to the dose of radiation used also makes this case unique among reports of neuromuscular complications from radiation therapy. The patient is a 65-year-old male with node negative, high-grade adenocarcinoma of the rectum penetrating through the distal rectal wall. He underwent neoadjuvant concurrent pelvic radiation therapy and capecitabine-based chemotherapy, followed by abdominoperineal resection and post-operative FOLFOX chemotherapy. Five months post-completion of pelvic radiotherapy and 2 months after the completion of adjuvant chemotherapy, he presented with bilateral weakness of the iliopsoas muscles and severe pain radiating to the groin. The patient improved with 40 mg/d of prednisone, which was gradually tapered to 2 mg/d over 6 months, with substantial recovery of muscle strength and elimination of pain. The timing, presentation and response of our patient’s symptoms to corticosteroids are most consistent with a radiation recall reaction. Radiation recall is a phenomenon whereby previously irradiated tissue becomes vulnerable to toxicity by subsequent systemic therapy and is rarely associated with myopathies. Radiation recall should be considered a potential complication of neoadjuvant radiation therapy for rectal cancer, and for ongoing research into the optimization of treatment for these patients. Severe myopathies caused by radiation recall may be fully reversible with corticosteroid treatment

  2. Severe myositis of the hip flexors after pre-operative chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florczynski, Matthew M; Sanatani, Michael S; Mai, Lauren; Fisher, Barbara; Moulin, Dwight E; Cao, Jeffrey; Louie, Alexander V; Pope, Janet E; Leung, Eric

    2016-03-22

    The use of neoadjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma has been shown to reduce disease recurrence when combined with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. We report a case of a patient who developed a debilitating bilateral myopathy of the hip flexors after successful treatment for rectal cancer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such complication from radiation therapy reported in a patient with colorectal cancer. The disproportionate severity of our patient's myopathy relative to the dose of radiation used also makes this case unique among reports of neuromuscular complications from radiation therapy. The patient is a 65-year-old male with node negative, high-grade adenocarcinoma of the rectum penetrating through the distal rectal wall. He underwent neoadjuvant concurrent pelvic radiation therapy and capecitabine-based chemotherapy, followed by abdominoperineal resection and post-operative FOLFOX chemotherapy. Five months post-completion of pelvic radiotherapy and 2 months after the completion of adjuvant chemotherapy, he presented with bilateral weakness of the iliopsoas muscles and severe pain radiating to the groin. The patient improved with 40 mg/d of prednisone, which was gradually tapered to 2 mg/d over 6 months, with substantial recovery of muscle strength and elimination of pain. The timing, presentation and response of our patient's symptoms to corticosteroids are most consistent with a radiation recall reaction. Radiation recall is a phenomenon whereby previously irradiated tissue becomes vulnerable to toxicity by subsequent systemic therapy and is rarely associated with myopathies. Radiation recall should be considered a potential complication of neoadjuvant radiation therapy for rectal cancer, and for ongoing research into the optimization of treatment for these patients. Severe myopathies caused by radiation recall may be fully reversible with corticosteroid treatment.

  3. Radiological imaging of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Lincender-Cvijetić

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the possibilities of diagnosing abdominal imaging in patients with rectal cancer, detecting lesions and assessing the stage of the lesions, in order to select the appropriate therapy. Before the introduction of imaging technologies, the diagnosis of colorectal pathology was based on conventional methods of inspecting intestines with a barium enema, with either a single or double contrast barium enema. Following the development of endoscopic methods and the wide use of colonoscopy, colonoscopy became the method of choice for diagnosing colorectal diseases. The improvement of Computerized Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, gave us new possibilities for diagnosing colorectal cancer. For rectal cancer, trans-rectal US (TRUS or endo-anal US (EAUS have a significant role. For staging rectal cancer, the Multi Slice Computed Tomography (MSCT is not the method of choice, but Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is preferred when it comes to monitoring the rectum. Therole of the MRI in the T staging of rectal cancer is crucial in preoperative assessment of: thickness – the width of the tumor, the extramural invasion, the circumference of resection margin (CRM, andthe assessment of the inclusion of mesorectal fascia. For successful execution of surgical techniques, good diagnostic imaging of the cancer is necessary in order to have a low level of recurrence. According to medical studies, the sensitivity of FDG-PET in diagnosing metastatic nodals is low, but for now it is not recommended in routine diagnosis of metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

  4. Pharmacogenetic Study in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy: Polymorphisms in Thymidylate Synthase, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, GSTP1, and DNA Repair Genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Páez, David; Salazar, Juliana; Paré, Laia; Pertriz, Lourdes; Targarona, Eduardo; Rio, Elisabeth del; Barnadas, Agusti; Marcuello, Eugenio; Baiget, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Several studies have been performed to evaluate the usefulness of neoadjuvant treatment using oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidines for locally advanced rectal cancer. However, preoperative biomarkers of outcome are lacking. We studied the polymorphisms in thymidylate synthase, epidermal growth factor receptor, glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1), and several DNA repair genes to evaluate their usefulness as pharmacogenetic markers in a cohort of 128 rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Blood samples were obtained from 128 patients with Stage II-III rectal cancer. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood nucleated cells, and the genotypes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and automated sequencing techniques or using a 48.48 dynamic array on the BioMark system. The germline polymorphisms studied were thymidylate synthase, (VNTR/5′UTR, 2R G>C single nucleotide polymorphism [SNP], 3R G>C SNP), epidermal growth factor receptor (Arg497Lys), GSTP1 (Ile105val), excision repair cross-complementing 1 (Asn118Asn, 8092C>A, 19716G>C), X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (Arg194Trp, Arg280His, Arg399Gln), and xeroderma pigmentosum group D (Lys751Gln). The pathologic response, pathologic regression, progression-free survival, and overall survival were evaluated according to each genotype. Results: The ∗3/∗3 thymidylate synthase genotype was associated with a greater response rate (pathologic complete remission and microfoci residual tumor, 59% in ∗3/∗3 vs. 35% in ∗2/∗2 and ∗2/∗3; p = .013). For the thymidylate synthase genotype, the median progression-free survival was 103 months for the ∗3/∗3 patients and 84 months for the ∗2/∗2 and ∗2/∗3 patients (p = .039). For XRCC1 Arg399Gln SNP, the median progression-free survival was 101 months for the G/G, 78 months for the G/A, and 31 months for the A/A patients (p = .048). Conclusions: The thymidylate

  5. Pharmacogenetic Study in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy: Polymorphisms in Thymidylate Synthase, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, GSTP1, and DNA Repair Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paez, David, E-mail: dpaez@santpau.cat [Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Salazar, Juliana; Pare, Laia [Centre for Biomedical Network Research on Rare Diseases, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Genetics, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Pertriz, Lourdes [Department of Radiotherapy, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Targarona, Eduardo [Department of Surgery, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Rio, Elisabeth del [Centre for Biomedical Network Research on Rare Diseases, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Genetics, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Barnadas, Agusti; Marcuello, Eugenio [Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Baiget, Montserrat [Centre for Biomedical Network Research on Rare Diseases, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Genetics, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Several studies have been performed to evaluate the usefulness of neoadjuvant treatment using oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidines for locally advanced rectal cancer. However, preoperative biomarkers of outcome are lacking. We studied the polymorphisms in thymidylate synthase, epidermal growth factor receptor, glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1), and several DNA repair genes to evaluate their usefulness as pharmacogenetic markers in a cohort of 128 rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Blood samples were obtained from 128 patients with Stage II-III rectal cancer. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood nucleated cells, and the genotypes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and automated sequencing techniques or using a 48.48 dynamic array on the BioMark system. The germline polymorphisms studied were thymidylate synthase, (VNTR/5 Prime UTR, 2R G>C single nucleotide polymorphism [SNP], 3R G>C SNP), epidermal growth factor receptor (Arg497Lys), GSTP1 (Ile105val), excision repair cross-complementing 1 (Asn118Asn, 8092C>A, 19716G>C), X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (Arg194Trp, Arg280His, Arg399Gln), and xeroderma pigmentosum group D (Lys751Gln). The pathologic response, pathologic regression, progression-free survival, and overall survival were evaluated according to each genotype. Results: The Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 thymidylate synthase genotype was associated with a greater response rate (pathologic complete remission and microfoci residual tumor, 59% in Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 vs. 35% in Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 2 and Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 3; p = .013). For the thymidylate synthase genotype, the median progression-free survival was 103 months for the Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 patients and 84 months for the Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 2 and Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk

  6. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Irinotecan and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Jeong, Jun Yong; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Jae-Gahb; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer has shown benefit over postoperative CRT; however, a standard CRT regimen has yet to be defined. We performed a prospective concurrent CRT Phase II study with irinotecan and capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to investigate the efficacy and safety of this regimen. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid-to-lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8-Gy daily fractions for a total of 45 Gy in 25 fractions, followed by a coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of 40 mg/m 2 of irinotecan per week for 5 consecutive weeks and 1,650 mg/m 2 of capecitabine per day for 5 days per week (weekdays only) from the first day of radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 ± 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were included for the study endpoints. Results: In total, 48 patients were enrolled; 33 (68.7%) were men and 15 (31.3%) were women, and the median age was 59 years (range, 32-72 years). The pathologic complete response rate was 25.0% (11 of 44; 95% confidence interval, 12.2-37.8) and 8 patients (18.2% [8 of 44]) showed near-total tumor regression. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 75.0% and 93.6%, respectively. Grade 3 toxicities included leukopenia (3 [6.3%]), neutropenia (1 [2.1%]), infection (1 [2.1%]), alanine aminotransferase elevation (1 [2.1%]), and diarrhea (1 [2.1%]). There was no Grade 4 toxicity or treatment-related death. Conclusions: Preoperative CRT with irinotecan and capecitabine with treatment-free weekends showed very mild toxicity profiles and promising results in terms of survival.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging-detected extramural venous invasion in rectal cancer before and after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Diagnostic performance and prognostic significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sun [Chung-Ang University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung-Ang University, College of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); National Cancer Centre, Department of Radiology, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Ju; Hur, Bo Yun [National Cancer Centre, Department of Radiology, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Chan; Hyun, Jong Hee; Chang, Hee Jin; Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Dae Yong; Oh, Jae Hwan [National Cancer Centre, Centre for Colorectal Cancer, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Young [National Cancer Centre, Centre for Colorectal Cancer, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Centre, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-02-15

    We evaluated the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in terms of identifying extramural venous invasion (EMVI) in rectal cancer patients with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and its prognostic significance. During 2008-2010, 200 patients underwent surgery following preoperative CRT for rectal cancer. Two radiologists independently reviewed all pre- and post-CRT MRI retrospectively. We investigated diagnostic performance of pre-CRT MR-EMVI (MR-EMVI) and post-CRT MR-EMVI (yMR-EMVI), based on pathological EMVI as the standard of reference. We assessed correlation between MRI findings and patients' prognosis, such as disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Additionally, subgroup analysis in MR- or yMR-EMVI-positive patients was performed to confirm the significance of the severity of EMVI in MRI on patient's prognosis. The sensitivity and specificity of yMR-EMVI were 76.19% and 79.75% (area under the curve: 0.830), respectively. In univariate analysis, yMR-EMVI was the only significant MRI factor in DFS (P = 0.027). The mean DFS for yMR-EMVI (+) patients was significantly less than for yMR-EMVI (-) patients: 57.56 months versus 72.46 months. yMR-EMVI demonstrated good diagnostic performance. yMR-EMVI was the only significant EMVI-related MRI factor that correlated with patients' DFS in univariate analysis; however, it was not significant in multivariate analysis. (orig.)

  8. Two-week course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by delayed surgery for rectal cancer: A phase II multi-institutional clinical trial (KROG 11-02)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jun-Gi; Oh, Seong Taek; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Young Suk; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jang, Hong Seok

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a two-week schedule of radiotherapy with oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and materials: Eighty patients with rectal cancer located in the mid to low rectum, staged cT3-4N0-2M0, were prospectively enrolled. They underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy and delayed surgery 6–8 weeks after the completion of radiation therapy. A radiation dose of 33 Gy in 10 fractions was delivered to the pelvis for 2 weeks. One cycle of oral capecitabine was administered at a dose of 1650 mg/m 2 /day during radiotherapy. Tumor response and toxicity were the study endpoints. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (number, (NCT01431599)). Results: All included patients underwent total mesorectal excisions including 12 cases of robot assisted surgery and 50 cases of laparoscopic surgery. Of the 80 patients, 27 (33.8%) achieved downstaging (ypT0-2N0) of a rectal tumor and 11 (13.8%) had a pathologically complete response (ypCR). Downstaging rates were 45% for T classification and 65% for N classification. Sphincter saving was achieved in 73 (91.3%) of the 80 patients. Of the 80 patients, 3 (3.8%) experienced grade 3 hematologic toxicity, and 2 (2.5%) had grade 3 postoperative complications such as ileus and wound dehiscence. There was no grade 4 toxicity. Conclusion: A two-week schedule of radiotherapy with oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer patients showed low toxicity profiles and promising results in terms of tumor response

  9. Two-week course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by delayed surgery for rectal cancer: a phase II multi-institutional clinical trial (KROG 11-02).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jun-Gi; Oh, Seong Taek; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Young Suk; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jang, Hong Seok

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a two-week schedule of radiotherapy with oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer. Eighty patients with rectal cancer located in the mid to low rectum, staged cT3-4N0-2M0, were prospectively enrolled. They underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy and delayed surgery 6-8 weeks after the completion of radiation therapy. A radiation dose of 33 Gy in 10 fractions was delivered to the pelvis for 2 weeks. One cycle of oral capecitabine was administered at a dose of 1650 mg/m(2)/day during radiotherapy. Tumor response and toxicity were the study endpoints. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (number, NCT01431599). All included patients underwent total mesorectal excisions including 12 cases of robot assisted surgery and 50 cases of laparoscopic surgery. Of the 80 patients, 27 (33.8%) achieved downstaging (ypT0-2N0) of a rectal tumor and 11 (13.8%) had a pathologically complete response (ypCR). Downstaging rates were 45% for T classification and 65% for N classification. Sphincter saving was achieved in 73 (91.3%) of the 80 patients. Of the 80 patients, 3 (3.8%) experienced grade 3 hematologic toxicity, and 2 (2.5%) had grade 3 postoperative complications such as ileus and wound dehiscence. There was no grade 4 toxicity. A two-week schedule of radiotherapy with oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer patients showed low toxicity profiles and promising results in terms of tumor response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. CT diagnosis of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Hiroshi; Hachisuka, Kitao; Yamaguchi, Akihiro

    1986-01-01

    Preoperative diagnosis of the depth of invasion and lymph node metastasis of rectal cancer were studied using the findings of computed tomography (CT). Of one hundred and four cases operated on for rectal cancer over a period of 32 months, thirty five cases were examined by CT with the use of olive oil enema and contrast enhancement using a 60 % Conray drip infusion with reference to the histological findings. For direct invasion into the wall, the diagnoses by CT were coincident with microscopic findings in 75 % of cancers of the rectosigmoid, in 75 % of the upper rectum and in 84 % of the lower rectum. Of all cases, 28 (80 %) were diagnosed correctly. As to local lymph node metastasis, 74 % of all diagnoses by CT corresponded with the histological diagnosis. Moreover, seventeen cases were evaluated for lateral lymph node metastasis, and the diagnostic accuracy by CT was 88 %. In conclusion, preoperative CT evaluation of the extension into the rectal wall and lymph node metastasis in rectal cancer was considesed useful. (author)

  11. KRAS Mutation Status and Clinical Outcome of Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of 2 Phase II Trials

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    Kim, Sun Young; Shim, Eun Kyung [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Hyun Yang [Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Ji Yeon [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yong Sang [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Won [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jee Hyun [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Im, Seock-Ah [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyung Hae [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hee Jin, E-mail: heejincmd@yahoo.com [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Division of Translational and Clinical Research I, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cetuximab-containing chemotherapy is known to be effective for KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer; however, it is not clear whether cetuximab-based preoperative chemoradiation confers an additional benefit compared with chemoradiation without cetuximab in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation status with direct sequencing and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression status with immunohistochemistry in tumor samples of 82 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were enrolled in the IRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine; n=44) or the ERBIRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine plus cetuximab; n=38). Both trials were similarly designed except for the administration of cetuximab; radiation therapy was administered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions and irinotecan and capecitabine were given at doses of 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly and 1650 mg/m{sup 2}/day, respectively, for 5 days per week. In the ERBIRIX trial, cetuximab was additionally given with a loading dose of 400 mg/m{sup 2} on 1 week before radiation, and 250 mg/m{sup 2} weekly thereafter. Results: Baseline characteristics before chemoradiation were similar between the 2 trial cohorts. A KRAS mutation in codon 12, 13, and 61 was noted in 15 (34%) patients in the IRIX cohort and 5 (13%) in the ERBIRIX cohort (P=.028). Among 62 KRAS wild-type cancer patients, major pathologic response rate, disease-free survival and pathologic stage did not differ significantly between the 2 cohorts. No mutations were detected in BRAF exon 11 and 15, PIK3CA exon 9 and 20, or EGFR exon 18-24 in any of the 82 patients, and PTEN and EGFR expression were not predictive of clinical outcome. Conclusions: In patients with KRAS wild-type locally advanced rectal cancer, the addition of cetuximab to the chemoradiation with

  12. KRAS Mutation Status and Clinical Outcome of Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of 2 Phase II Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Young; Shim, Eun Kyung; Yeo, Hyun Yang; Baek, Ji Yeon; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seock-Ah; Jung, Kyung Hae; Chang, Hee Jin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cetuximab-containing chemotherapy is known to be effective for KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer; however, it is not clear whether cetuximab-based preoperative chemoradiation confers an additional benefit compared with chemoradiation without cetuximab in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation status with direct sequencing and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression status with immunohistochemistry in tumor samples of 82 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were enrolled in the IRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine; n=44) or the ERBIRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine plus cetuximab; n=38). Both trials were similarly designed except for the administration of cetuximab; radiation therapy was administered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions and irinotecan and capecitabine were given at doses of 40 mg/m 2 weekly and 1650 mg/m 2 /day, respectively, for 5 days per week. In the ERBIRIX trial, cetuximab was additionally given with a loading dose of 400 mg/m 2 on 1 week before radiation, and 250 mg/m 2 weekly thereafter. Results: Baseline characteristics before chemoradiation were similar between the 2 trial cohorts. A KRAS mutation in codon 12, 13, and 61 was noted in 15 (34%) patients in the IRIX cohort and 5 (13%) in the ERBIRIX cohort (P=.028). Among 62 KRAS wild-type cancer patients, major pathologic response rate, disease-free survival and pathologic stage did not differ significantly between the 2 cohorts. No mutations were detected in BRAF exon 11 and 15, PIK3CA exon 9 and 20, or EGFR exon 18-24 in any of the 82 patients, and PTEN and EGFR expression were not predictive of clinical outcome. Conclusions: In patients with KRAS wild-type locally advanced rectal cancer, the addition of cetuximab to the chemoradiation with irinotecan plus

  13. Impact of Preoperative Radiotherapy on General and Disease-Specific Health Status of Rectal Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thong, Melissa S.Y.; Mols, Floortje; Lemmens, Valery E.P.P.; Rutten, Harm J.T.; Roukema, Jan A.; Martijn, Hendrik; Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To date, few studies have evaluated the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (pRT) on long-term health status of rectal cancer survivors. Using a population-based sample, we assessed the impact of pRT on general and disease-specific health status of rectal cancer survivors up to 10 years postdiagnosis. The health status of older (≥75 years old at diagnosis) pRT survivors was also compared with that of younger survivors. Methods and Materials: Survivors identified from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry treated with surgery only (SU) or with pRT between 1998 and 2007 were included. Survivors completed the Short Form-36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Colorectal 38 (EORTC QLQ-CR38) questionnaire. The SF-36 and EORTC QLQ-CR38 (sexuality subscale) scores of the survivors were compared to an age- and sex-matched Dutch normal population. Results: A total of 340 survivors (response, 85%; pRT survivors, 71%) were analyzed. Overall, survivors had similar general health status. Both short-term (<5 years) and long-term (≥5 years) pRT survivors had significantly poorer body image and more problems with gastrointestinal function, male sexual dysfunction, and defecation than SU survivors. Survivors had comparable general health status but greater sexual dysfunction than the normal population. Older pRT survivors had general and disease-specific health status comparable to that of younger pRT survivors. Conclusions: For better survivorship care, rectal cancer survivors could benefit from increased clinical and psychological focus on the possible long-term morbidity of treatment and its effects on health status.

  14. Approach to Rectal Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence C. Chua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rectal cancer is a distinct subset of colorectal cancer where specialized disease-specific management of the primary tumor is required. There have been significant developments in rectal cancer surgery at all stages of disease in particular the introduction of local excision strategies for preinvasive and early cancers, standardized total mesorectal excision for resectable cancers incorporating preoperative short- or long-course chemoradiation to the multimodality sequencing of treatment. Laparoscopic surgery is also increasingly being adopted as the standard rectal cancer surgery approach following expertise of colorectal surgeons in minimally invasive surgery gained from laparoscopic colon resections. In locally advanced and metastatic disease, combining chemoradiation with radical surgery may achieve total eradication of disease and disease control in the pelvis. Evidence for resection of metastases to the liver and lung have been extensively reported in the literature. The role of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for peritoneal metastases is showing promise in achieving locoregional control of peritoneal dissemination. This paper summarizes the recent developments in approaches to rectal cancer surgery at all these time points of the disease natural history.

  15. The expression of epidermal growth factor receptor results in a worse prognosis for patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy: a multicenter, retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giralt, Jordi; Heras, Manuel de las; Cerezo, Laura; Eraso, Aranzazu; Hermosilla, Edurado; Velez, Dolores; Lujan, Juan; Espin, Eloi; Rossello, Jose; Majo, Joaquin; Benavente, Sergi; Armengol, Manel; Torres, I. de

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is observed in 50-70% of colorectal carcinoma and is associated with poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of EGFR status before radiotherapy in a group of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy. Patients and methods: Eighty-seven patients were studied retrospectively. Treatment consisted of pelvic radiotherapy, in 50 patients with concomitant chemotherapy and surgical resection. Immunohistochemistry for EGFR was determined at the preradiation biopsy and in the resected specimens. Immunohistochemical analysis for EGFR expression was evaluated according to extension and staining intensity. We defined positive staining (EGFR positive), when extension was 5% or more. Results: A total of 52 of 87 tumors showed EGFR positive status at biopsy (60%) and EGFR expression was associated neither with clinical tumor stage nor with clinical nodal stage. EGFR positive expression was linked to a lack of pathologic complete response to preoperative radiotherapy (P=0.006). Disease-free survival was lower among patients with EGFR positive status before radiotherapy (P=0.003). In a multivariate analysis EGFR expression at biopsy was a statistically significant predictor of disease-free survival, RR=2.88 (1.1-7.8), P=0.036. Conclusions: EGFR is expressed in a significant number of rectal tumors. EGFR-positive expression before radiotherapy is an indicator for poor response and low disease-free survival

  16. Capecitabine and oxaliplatin in the preoperative multimodality treatment of rectal cancer: surgical end points from National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project trial R-04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Michael J; Colangelo, Linda H; Beart, Robert W; Petrelli, Nicholas J; Allegra, Carmen J; Sharif, Saima; Pitot, Henry C; Shields, Anthony F; Landry, Jerome C; Ryan, David P; Parda, David S; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Arora, Amit; Evans, Lisa S; Bahary, Nathan; Soori, Gamini S; Eakle, Janice; Robertson, John M; Moore, Dennis F; Mullane, Michael R; Marchello, Benjamin T; Ward, Patrick J; Wozniak, Timothy F; Roh, Mark S; Yothers, Greg; Wolmark, Norman

    2014-06-20

    The optimal chemotherapy regimen administered concurrently with preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for patients with rectal cancer is unknown. National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project trial R-04 compared four chemotherapy regimens administered concomitantly with RT. Patients with clinical stage II or III rectal cancer who were undergoing preoperative RT (45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks plus a boost of 5.4 Gy to 10.8 Gy in three to six daily fractions) were randomly assigned to one of the following chemotherapy regimens: continuous intravenous infusional fluorouracil (CVI FU; 225 mg/m(2), 5 days per week), with or without intravenous oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2) once per week for 5 weeks) or oral capecitabine (825 mg/m(2) twice per day, 5 days per week), with or without oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2) once per week for 5 weeks). Before random assignment, the surgeon indicated whether the patient was eligible for sphincter-sparing surgery based on clinical staging. The surgical end points were complete pathologic response (pCR), sphincter-sparing surgery, and surgical downstaging (conversion to sphincter-sparing surgery). From September 2004 to August 2010, 1,608 patients were randomly assigned. No significant differences in the rates of pCR, sphincter-sparing surgery, or surgical downstaging were identified between the CVI FU and capecitabine regimens or between the two regimens with or without oxaliplatin. Patients treated with oxaliplatin experienced significantly more grade 3 or 4 diarrhea (P < .001). Administering capecitabine with preoperative RT achieved similar rates of pCR, sphincter-sparing surgery, and surgical downstaging compared with CVI FU. Adding oxaliplatin did not improve surgical outcomes but added significant toxicity. The definitive analysis of local tumor control, disease-free survival, and overall survival will be performed when the protocol-specified number of events has occurred. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Treatment of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kococik, Z.; Kococik, M.

    2007-01-01

    The suggested classifications of locally recurrent rectal cancer are based on the presence of symptoms and the degree of tumour fixation to the pelvic wall, or, otherwise, account for factor T in the TMN system. Although the results of rectal cancer treatment have improved, which may be attributed to total meso rectal excision and application of perioperative radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy, the ratio of cases of locally recurrent rectal cancer still amount from several to over a dozen percent. Among the available diagnostic methods for detecting locally recurrent rectal cancer after anterior rectal resection, endorectal sonography is of special importance. In the estimation of prognostic factors the lack of vascular invasion in recurrent cancer and the long period between the treatment of primary rectal cancer and the development of recurrence are a sign of good prognosis, while pain prior to recurrence treatment and male sex diminish the chances for cure. Locally recurrent rectal cancer impairs the patient's quality of life in all measurable aspects, but even after complete recovery we observe severe disturbances of sexual activity in most patients, and a number of patients require hygiene pads or suffer from chronic pain. Local recurrence of rectal cancer is more commonly qualified for excision after surgical treatment only, than after preoperative radiotherapy. The probability of total recurrent rectal cancer excision increases when the patient is younger, the primary tumours was less advanced and the first operation was sphincter-sparing surgery. Progress in the surgical treatment of recurrent rectal cancer was brought on by the introduction of the composite musculocutaneous flap to compensate the loss of perineal tissue. The application of intraoperative radiotherapy improves treatment results of recurrent rectal cancer, however at the cost of more frequent, serious postoperative complications and intense pain. In inoperable cases high dose regional

  18. Preoperative chemoradiation with capecitabine, irinotecan and cetuximab in rectal cancer: significance of pre-treatment and post-resection RAS mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollins, Simon; West, Nick; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Myint, Arthur Sun; Saunders, Mark; Susnerwala, Shabbir; Quirke, Phil; Essapen, Sharadah; Samuel, Leslie; Sizer, Bruce; Worlding, Jane; Southward, Katie; Hemmings, Gemma; Tinkler-Hundal, Emma; Taylor, Morag; Bottomley, Daniel; Chambers, Philip; Lawrie, Emma; Lopes, Andre; Beare, Sandy

    2017-10-24

    The influence of EGFR pathway mutations on cetuximab-containing rectal cancer preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) is uncertain. In a prospective phase II trial (EXCITE), patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined non-metastatic rectal adenocarinoma threatening/involving the surgical resection plane received pelvic radiotherapy with concurrent capecitabine, irinotecan and cetuximab. Resection was recommended 8 weeks later. The primary endpoint was histopathologically clear (R0) resection margin. Pre-planned retrospective DNA pyrosequencing (PS) and next generation sequencing (NGS) of KRAS, NRAS, PIK3CA and BRAF was performed on the pre-treatment biopsy and resected specimen. Eighty-two patients were recruited and 76 underwent surgery, with R0 resection in 67 (82%, 90%CI: 73-88%) (four patients with clinical complete response declined surgery). Twenty-four patients (30%) had an excellent clinical or pathological response (ECPR). Using NGS 24 (46%) of 52 matched biopsies/resections were discrepant: ten patients (19%) gained 13 new resection mutations compared to biopsy (12 KRAS, one PIK3CA) and 18 (35%) lost 22 mutations (15 KRAS, 7 PIK3CA). Tumours only ever testing RAS wild-type had significantly greater ECPR than tumours with either biopsy or resection RAS mutations (14/29 [48%] vs 10/51 [20%], P=0.008), with a trend towards increased overall survival (HR 0.23, 95% CI 0.05-1.03, P=0.055). This regimen was feasible and the primary study endpoint was met. For the first time using pre-operative rectal CRT, emergence of clinically important new resection mutations is described, likely reflecting intratumoural heterogeneity manifesting either as treatment-driven selective clonal expansion or a geographical biopsy sampling miss.

  19. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-02-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified. © 2013 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, In Ja [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong [Center for Colorectal Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Cheol [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam Kyu [Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeong-Rok [Department of Surgery, Chonnam National University Hwansun Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung-Bum [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Bungdang Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Gyu-Seog [Division of Colorectal Cancer Center, Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Young [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon-Hahn [Department of Surgery, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seung Taek [Department of Surgery, Seoul St. Mary Hospital, Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young [Center for Colorectal Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woo Yong [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Bok [Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Chang Sik, E-mail: csyu@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Objective: To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. Patients and Methods: A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (−). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. Results: A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (−), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Conclusions: Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits.

  1. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Ja; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Kang, Sung-Bum; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Seon-Hahn; Oh, Seung Taek; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Lee, Woo Yong; Lee, Jung Bok; Yu, Chang Sik

    2015-07-01

    To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (-). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (-), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Phase I and II trial on infusional 5-fluorouracil and gefitinib in combination with preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer: 10-years median follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antonietta Gambacorta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the long term survival of the addition of gefitinib to chemoradiotherapy (CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC. Methods and materials: This previously published multicentre, open-label, phase I-II study, enrolled patients (pts with LARC to receive CRT with concurrent 5-fluorouracil continuous intravenous infusion and a dose escalation of orally administered gefitinib, followed 6–8 weeks later by surgery. An intra-operative radiotherapy boost of 10 Gy was planned. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administrated in ypN1-2 pts. After a median f/u of >10 years, we analyzed Local Control (LC, Metastasis Free Survival (MFS, Disease Free Survival (DFS, Disease Specific Survival (DSS and Overall Survival (OS. Predictive endpoints of clinical outcomes were tested by univariate and multivariate analysis. Variables analyzed included: age, gefitinib dose and interruptions, adjuvant CT, surgery type, ypT, ypN, and TRG grade. We have also analyzed late toxicity according to CTCAEv4. Results: Of the 41 initially enrolled pts, 39 were evaluable (27M, 12F. With a median f/u of 133 months, LC, MFS, DFS, OS and DSS at 5 years were 84%; 71%; 64%; 87% and 92%, respectively. The OS and DSS at 10 years were 61,5% and 76%, respectively. Grade 3-4 late toxicity occurred in 38% of pts: sexual (28,2% and gastrointestinal toxicities (10,2%. Conclusion: Long term outcomes and late toxicity were similar to previously reported series. The addition of gefitinib did not improve outcomes in LARC. Gefitinib is not recommended for rectal cancer patients who received 5-FU based preoperative CRT. Further studies may identify if gefitinib is beneficial in selected group of patients. Keywords: Rectal cancer, Gefitinib, Log term follow-up, Chemoradiotherapy

  3. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, In Ja; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Kang, Sung-Bum; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Seon-Hahn; Oh, Seung Taek; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Lee, Woo Yong; Lee, Jung Bok; Yu, Chang Sik

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. Patients and Methods: A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (−). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. Results: A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (−), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Conclusions: Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits

  4. Usefulness of magnetic resonance volumetric evaluation in predicting response to preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients with resectable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Chang, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung-yong; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Dae Hyun; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Seok; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We performed magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry before and after neoadjuvant chemoradiation for evaluating response to therapy in T3 and T4 rectal cancer. To investigate the utility of MR volumetry for predicting the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation, we compared results from MR volumetry before chemoradiation with those after chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: A total 112 patients with T3 or T4 rectal cancer who successfully underwent MR volumetry and completed neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by radical resection for cure were identified. MR volumetries were performed before and after chemoradiation. We compared pre- and postchemoradiation tumor volume and % volume reduction rates of patients whose tumors were down-staged with those of patients that were not down-staged. The same analyses were also performed between those patients having a complete histologic regression and those with residual disease in the operative specimen. We assessed the difference of % volume reduction rate according to Dworak's rectal cancer regression grades. Results: Fifty-seven patients (50.9%) demonstrated a tumor down-staging after chemoradiation therapy. Both pre- and posttreatment MR tumor volumes were significantly less in patients whose tumors were down-staged than in patients that were not down-staged (p = 0.04, 0.031), and % volume reduction rates were significantly higher in patients whose tumors were down-staged (p = 0.024). Sixteen patients (14.3%) showed pathologically complete tumor regression. The differences of MR tumor volumes before and after chemoradiation and % volume reduction rates were not significantly different between patients having a complete histologic regression and those with residual disease (p = 0.688, 0.451, and 0.480). The differences of % volume reduction rates according to Dworak's grades were statistically significant (p = 0.03). Conclusion: The MR volumetric examinations before and after chemoradiation demonstrated the

  5. Novel Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers Predictive of Pathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin C.; Ha, Ye J.; Roh, Seon A.; Cho, Dong H.; Choi, Eun Y.; Kim, Tae W.; Kim, Jong H.; Kang, Tae W.; Kim, Seon Y.; Kim, Yong S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Studies aimed at predicting individual responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) are urgently needed, especially considering the risks associated with poorly responsive patients. Methods and Materials: A 3-step strategy for the determination of CRT sensitivity is proposed based on (1) the screening of a human genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in correlation with histopathologic tumor regression grade (TRG); (2) clinical association analysis of 113 patients treated with preoperative CRT; and (3) a cell-based functional assay for biological validation. Results: Genome-wide screening identified 9 SNPs associated with preoperative CRT responses. Positive responses (TRG 1-3) were obtained more frequently in patients carrying the reference allele (C) of the SNP CORO2A rs1985859 than in those with the substitution allele (T) (P=.01). Downregulation of CORO2A was significantly associated with reduced early apoptosis by 27% (P=.048) and 39% (P=.023) in RKO and COLO320DM colorectal cancer cells, respectively, as determined by flow cytometry. Reduced radiosensitivity was confirmed by colony-forming assays in the 2 colorectal cancer cells (P=.034 and .015, respectively). The SNP FAM101A rs7955740 was not associated with radiosensitivity in the clinical association analysis. However, downregulation of FAM101A significantly reduced early apoptosis by 29% in RKO cells (P=.047), and it enhanced colony formation in RKO cells (P=.001) and COLO320DM cells (P=.002). Conclusion: CRT-sensitive SNP markers were identified using a novel 3-step process. The candidate marker CORO2A rs1985859 and the putative marker FAM101A rs7955740 may be of value for the prediction of radiosensitivity to preoperative CRT, although further validation is needed in large cohorts

  6. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P < 0.01). There was no difference in OS for either primary or recurrent rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified

  7. Which benefits and harms of preoperative radiotherapy should be addressed? A Delphi consensus study among rectal cancer patients and radiation oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunneman, Marleen; Pieterse, Arwen H.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: We previously found considerable variation in information provision on preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) in rectal cancer. Our aims were to reach consensus among patients and oncologists on which benefits/harms of PRT should be addressed during the consultation, and to assess congruence with daily clinical practice. Materials and methods: A four-round Delphi-study was conducted with two expert panels: (1) 31 treated rectal cancer patients and (2) 35 radiation oncologists. Thirty-seven possible benefits/harms were shown. Participants indicated whether addressing the benefit/harm was (1) essential, (2) desired, (3) not necessary, or (4) to be avoided. Consensus was assumed when ⩾80% of the panel agreed. Results were compared to 81 audio-taped consultations. Results: The panels reached consensus that six topics should be addressed in all patients (local control, survival, long term altered defecation pattern and faecal incontinence, perineal wound healing problems, advice to avoid pregnancy), three in male patients (erectile dysfunction, ejaculation disorder, infertility), and four in female patients (vaginal dryness, pain during intercourse, menopause, infertility). On average, less than half of these topics were addressed in daily clinical practice. Conclusions: This study showed substantial overlap between benefits/harms that patients and oncologists consider important to address during the consultation, and at the same time poor congruence with daily clinical practice

  8. Effect of time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy on local recurrence-free survival in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Jang, Se Jin; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Sik [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The concentration of capecitabine peaks at 1–2 hours after administration. We therefore assumed that proper timing of capecitabine administration and radiotherapy would maximize radiosensitization and influence survival among patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 223 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent preoperative chemoradiation, followed by surgery from January 2002 to May 2006. All patients underwent pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy/25 fractions) and received capecitabine twice daily at 12-hour intervals (1,650 mg/m2/day). Patients were divided into two groups according to the time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy. Patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy were classified as Group A (n = 109); all others were classified as Group B (n = 114). The median follow-up period was 72 months (range, 7 to 149 months). Although Group A had a significantly higher rate of good responses (44% vs. 25%; p = 0.005), the 5-year local recurrence-free survival rates of 93% in Group A and 97% in Group B did not differ significantly (p = 0.519). The 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were also comparable between the groups. Despite the better pathological response in Group A, the time interval between capecitabine and radiotherapy administration did not have a significant effect on survivals. Further evaluations are needed to clarify the interaction of these treatment modalities.

  9. Preoperative intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost in locally advanced rectal cancer: Report on late toxicity and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, Benedikt; Platteaux, Nele; Van den Begin, Robbe; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The addition of chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy has been established as the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. As an alternative strategy, we explored intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT–IGRT) with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in a prospective phase II study. Here, we report outcome and late toxicity after a median follow-up of 54 months. Methods and materials: A total of 108 patients were treated preoperatively with IMRT–IGRT, delivering a dose of 46 Gy in fractions of 2 Gy. Patients (n = 57) displaying an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm based on magnetic resonance imaging received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Results: The absolute incidence of grade ⩾3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity was 9% and 4%, respectively, with a 13% rate of any grade ⩾3 late toxicity. The actuarial 5-year local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 97%, 57%, and 68%. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection and pN2 disease were associated with significantly impaired OS. Conclusions: The use of preoperative IMRT–IGRT with a SIB resulted in a high 5-year LC rate and non-negligible late toxicity

  10. National and international guidelines for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liv Bjerre Juul; Wille-Jørgensen, P

    2014-01-01

    , this might not be the case between guidelines. No formal evaluation of the contrasting guidance has been reported. METHOD: A systematic search for national and international guidelines on rectal cancer was performed. Eleven guidelines were identified for further analysis. RESULTS: There was no consensus...... concerning the definition of rectal cancer. Ten of the 11 guidelines use the TNM staging system and there was general agreement regarding the recommendation of MRI and CT in rectal cancer. There was consensus concerning a multidisciplinary approach, preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and total mesorectal...

  11. SU-E-T-311: Dosimetric Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans for Preoperative Radiotherapy Rectal Cancer Using Flattening Filter-Free and Flattening Filter Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W; Zhang, J; Lu, J; Chen, C [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference of volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT) for preoperative radiotherapy rectal cancer using 6MV X-ray flattening filter free(FFF) and flattening filter(FF) modes. Methods: FF-VMAT and FFF-VMAT plans were designed to 15 rectal cancer patients with preoperative radiotherapy by planning treatment system(Eclipse 10.0),respectively. Dose prescription was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. All plans were normalized to 50 Gy to 95% of PTV. The Dose Volume Histogram (DVH), target and risk organ doses, conformity indexes (CI), homogeneity indexes (HI), low dose volume of normal tissue(BP), monitor units(MU) and treatment time (TT) were compared between the two kinds of plans. Results: FF-VMAT provided the lower Dmean, V105, HI, and higher CI as compared with FFF-VMAT. The small intestine of D5, Bladder of D5, Dmean, V40, V50, L-femoral head of V40, R-femoral head of Dmean were lower in FF-VMAT than in FFF-VMAT. FF-VMAT had higher BP of V5, but no significantly different of V10, V15, V20, V30 as compared with FFF-VMAT. FF-VMAT reduceed the monitor units(MU) by 21%(P<0.05), as well as the treatment time(TT) was no significantly different(P>0.05), as compared with FFF-VMAT. Conclusion: The plan qualities of FF and FFF VMAT plans were comparable and both clinically acceptable. FF-VMAT as compared with FFF-VMAT, showing better target coverage, some of OARs sparing, the MUs of FFF-VMAT were higher than FF-VMAT, yet were delivered within the same time. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  12. Rectal cancer: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  13. Down stage and long term results of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced lower rectal cancer: a cooperative clinical trial of 6 institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiandong; Wang Qi; Du Tonghai; Cai Youhong; Cao Xiude; Guo Xueheng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the down stage effect and long-term results of preoperative chemora-diotherapy for locally advanced lower rectal adenocarcinoma. Methods: From Jan. 1989 to Jul 1999, 103 patients suffering from lower rectal carcinoma were treated. Criteria entry: 1. Distance between anal verge and centre of tumor 4-8 cm(median 6.2 cm), 2. Uncertainty in decision of preservation of anus before admission, 3. Lesion belonged to locally advanced type, 4. definitive pathology, clinical stage and presence of objective observation of tumor extent, 5. Performance status proposed by Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 0-2, 6. Age 2 , calcium folinate 200 mg/ session, iv, totally 5 day). Operation was done 29-58 days (median 38 days) after completion of chemoradiotherapy. Surgery: 53 patients received the anal preserving operation of anterior resection; 50 patients were treated by Mile's operation. Postoperation chemotherapy- a total of 34 patients received postoperative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for liver or bony metastasis. 88.3% of patients had complete data of follow-up. Results: The 5-year survival rate, disease-free survival rate for group A and group B were 64.2% and 43.7%, 52.8% and 31.6%, respectively, (P 0.05), 25.5% and 48.5% (P<0.05), respectively. The preoperative clinical stages were: T2 10, T3 31 and T4 12. The postoperative pathological stages were: T0N0 7, T1N0 10, T2N0 14, T3N0 13, T4N0 3, T2N1 5 and T3N11. The pathological response rate after surgery in Group A was 13.2%. All patients in Group A were able to retain the sphincter though 29.3% had various degrees of malfunctions in bowel movement and/or urination. The difference incurred by postoperative chemotherapy/or radiotherapy was insignificant. Conclusions: Showing obvious down stage effect, the preoperative chemoradiotherapy can improve the 5-year survival and disease-free survival, and offer more chance to preserve the sphincter function in locally advanced lower rectal cancer

  14. Pathologic Nodal Classification Is the Most Discriminating Prognostic Factor for Disease-Free Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Curative Resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Dae Yong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We retrospectively evaluated the effects of clinical and pathologic factors on disease-free survival (DFS) with the aim of identifying the most discriminating factor predicting DFS in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and curative resection. Methods and Materials: The study involved 420 patients who underwent preoperative CRT and curative resection between August 2001 and October 2006. Gender, age, distance from the anal verge, histologic type, histologic grade, pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, cT, cN, cStage, circumferential resection margin, type of surgery, preoperative chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, ypT, ypN, ypStage, and tumor regression grade (TRG) were analyzed to identify prognostic factors associated with DFS. To compare the discriminatory prognostic ability of four tumor response-related pathologic factors (ypT, ypN, ypStage, and TRG), the Akaike information criteria were calculated. Results: The 5-year DFS rate was 75.4%. On univariate analysis, distance from the anal verge, histologic type, histologic grade, pretreatment CEA level, cT, circumferential resection margin, type of surgery, preoperative chemotherapeutic regimen, ypT, ypN, ypStage, and TRG were significantly associated with DFS. Multivariate analysis showed that the four parameters ypT, ypN, ypStage, and TRG were, consistently, significant prognostic factors for DFS. The ypN showed the lowest Akaike information criteria value for DFS, followed by ypStage, ypT, and TRG, in that order. Conclusion: In our study, ypT, ypN, ypStage, and TRG were important prognostic factors for DFS, and ypN was the most discriminating factor.

  15. Local radiological staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, V.; Halligan, S.; Bartram, C.I.

    2004-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a common malignancy with a highly variable outcome. Local recurrence is dependent upon tumour stage and surgical technique. The role of pre-operative imaging is to determine which patients may be safely managed by surgery alone and which need additional therapy in order to facilitate surgery and improve outcome. This decision depends on the distinction between those with early and advanced disease. While trans-rectal ultrasound has traditionally been used to answer this question, a role for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly argued. This review will focus on the treatment options for rectal cancer and the clinical questions that subsequently arise for the radiologist to answer

  16. MRI in local staging of rectal cancer: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapan, Ümit; Özbayrak, Mustafa; Tatlı, Servet

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative imaging for staging of rectal cancer has become an important aspect of current approach to rectal cancer management, because it helps to select suitable patients for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and determine the appropriate surgical technique. Imaging modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play an important role in assessing the depth of tumor penetration, lymph node involvement, mesorectal fascia and anal sphincter invasion, and presence of distant metastatic diseases. Currently, there is no consensus on a preferred imaging technique for preoperative staging of rectal cancer. However, high-resolution phased-array MRI is recommended as a standard imaging modality for preoperative local staging of rectal cancer, with excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability, and absence of ionizing radiation. This review will mainly focus on the role of MRI in preoperative local staging of rectal cancer and discuss recent advancements in MRI technique such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. PMID:25010367

  17. Staging of rectal cancer by transrectal US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bo Whan; Ryu, Sie Tae; Park, Ki Soon; Lee, Yul; Chung, Soo Young

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of preoperative staging of rectal cancer by transrectal US(7.5MHz linear array transducer), 17 cases with primary rectal cancer who were examined by transrectal US and histopathologically proven, were analyzed. We correlated the sonographic features of the depth of rectal wall invasion, perirectal fat infiltration and perirectal lymph node metastasis with histopathologic findings. The tumor staging was analyzed according to the TNM classification. The depth of rectal wall invasion was in accordance with histopathologic findings in 15 of 17 cases (accuracy:88.2%). The sensitivity and specificity of transrectal US in predicting perirectal lymph node metastasis were 20% and 75%, respectively (accuracy : 58.8%). The sensitivity and specificity in predicting perirectal fat infiltration were 92.9% and 100%, respectively (accuracy : 94%). Perirectal fat infiltration and depth of rectal wall invasion were preoperatively diagnosed with relatively high accuracy, while perirectal lymph node metastasis with low accuracy. In conclusion, transrectal US is a useful imaging modality for preoperative staging of rectal cancer

  18. Preoperative high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging can identify good prognosis stage I, II, and III rectal cancer best managed by surgery alone: a prospective, multicenter, European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Fiona G M; Quirke, Philip; Heald, Richard J; Moran, Brendan; Blomqvist, Lennart; Swift, Ian; Sebag-Montefiore, David J; Tekkis, Paris; Brown, Gina

    2011-04-01

    To assess local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-predicted good prognosis tumors treated by surgery alone. The MERCURY study reported that high-resolution MRI can accurately stage rectal cancer. The routine policy in most centers involved in the MERCURY study was primary surgery alone in MRI-predicted stage II or less and in MRI "good prognosis" stage III with selective avoidance of neoadjuvant therapy. Data were collected prospectively on all patients included in the MERCURY study who were staged as MRI-defined "good" prognosis tumors. "Good" prognosis included MRI-predicted safe circumferential resection margins, with MRI-predicted T2/T3a/T3b (less than 5 mm spread from muscularis propria), regardless of MRI N stage. None received preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence were calculated. Of 374 patients followed up in the MERCURY study, 122 (33%) were defined as "good prognosis" stage III or less on MRI. Overall and disease-free survival for all patients with MRI "good prognosis" stage I, II and III disease at 5 years was 68% and 85%, respectively. The local recurrence rate for this series of patients predicted to have a good prognosis tumor on MRI was 3%. The preoperative identification of good prognosis tumors using MRI will allow stratification of patients and better targeting of preoperative therapy. This study confirms the ability of MRI to select patients who are likely to have a good outcome with primary surgery alone.

  19. Preoperative Radiotherapy of Advanced Rectal Cancer With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With or Without Cetuximab: A Pooled Analysis of Three Prospective Phase I-II Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Christian; Arnold, Dirk; Dellas, Kathrin; Liersch, Torsten; Hipp, Matthias; Fietkau, Rainer; Sauer, Rolf; Hinke, Axel; Roedel, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A pooled analysis of three prospective trials of preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) for rectal cancer by using oxaliplatin and capecitabine with or without cetuximab was performed to evaluate the impact of additional cetuximab on pathologic complete response (pCR) rates and tumor regression (TRG) grades. Methods and Materials: Of 202 patients, 172 patients met the inclusion criteria (primary tumor stage II/III, M0). All patients received concurrent RCT, and 46 patients received additional cetuximab therapy. A correlation of pretreatment clinicopathologic factors and cetuximab treatment with early pCR rates (TRG > 50%) was performed with univariate and multivariate analyses. Toxicity data were recorded for all patients. Results: Of 172 patients, 24 (14%) patients achieved a pCR, and 84 of 172 (71%) patients showed a TRG of >50% in the surgical specimen assessment after preoperative treatment. Age, gender, and T/N stages, as well as localization of the tumor, were not associated with pCR or good TRG. The pCR rate was 16% after preoperative RCT alone and 9% with concurrent cetuximab therapy (p = 0.32). A significantly reduced TRG of >50% was found after RCT with cetuximab compared to RCT alone (p = 0.0035). This was validated by a multivariate analysis with all available clinical factors (p = 0.0037). Acute toxicity and surgical complications were not increased with additional cetuximab. Conclusions: Triple therapy with RCT and cetuximab seems to be feasible, with no unexpected toxicity. Early response assessment (TRG), however, suggests subadditive interaction. A longer follow-up (and finally randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates.

  20. Early FDG PET response assessment of preoperative radiochemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer: correlation with long-term outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avallone, Antonio; Casaretti, Rossana; Montano, Massimo; Silvestro, Lucrezia; Aloj, Luigi; Caraco, Corradina; Di Gennaro, Francesca; Lastoria, Secondo; Delrio, Paolo; Pecori, Biagio; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Scott, Nigel; Budillon, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to prospectively evaluate the prognostic value of previously defined [ 18 F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) criteria of early metabolic response in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) after long-term follow-up. Forty-two patients with poor prognosis LARC underwent three biweekly courses of chemotherapy with oxaliplatin, raltitrexed and 5-fluorouracil modulated by levofolinic acid during pelvic radiotherapy. FDG PET studies were performed before and 12 days after the beginning of the chemoradiotherapy (CRT) treatment. Total mesorectal excision (TME) was carried out 8 weeks after completion of CRT. A previously identified cutoff value of ≥52 % reduction of the baseline mean FDG standardized uptake value (SUV mean ) was applied to differentiate metabolic responders from non-responders and correlated to tumour regression grade (TRG) and survival. Twenty-two metabolic responders showed complete (TRG1) or subtotal tumour regression (TRG2) and demonstrated a statistically significantly higher 5-year relapse-free survival (RFS) compared with the 20 non-responders (86 vs 55 %, p =.014) who showed TRG3 and TRG4 pathologic responses. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that early ∇SUV mean was the only pre-surgical parameter correlated to the likelihood of recurrence (p =.05). This study is the first prospective long-term evaluation demonstrating that FDG PET is not only an early predictor of pathologic response but is also a valuable prognostic tool. Our results indicate the potential of FDG PET for optimizing multidisciplinary management of patients with LARC. (orig.)

  1. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin and Cetuximab in Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokas, Emmanouil, E-mail: emmanouil.fokas@kgu.de [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Conradi, Lena [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Weiss, Christian [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Sprenger, Thilo [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Middel, Peter [Institute for Pathology, University Medical Center, Göttingen (Germany); Rau, Tillman [Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Dellas, Kathrin [Department of Radiotherapy, Lübeck University (Germany); Kitz, Julia [Institute for Pathology, University Medical Center, Göttingen (Germany); Rödel, Franz [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Sauer, Rolf [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Erlangen (Germany); Rüschoff, Josef [Targos Molecular Pathology, Kassel (Germany); Beissbarth, Tim [Department of Medical Statistics, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Arnold, Dirk [Tumor Biology Center Freiburg, University of Freiburg (Germany); Ghadimi, B. Michael [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Rödel, Claus [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Liersch, Torsten [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the addition of cetuximab to chemoradiation therapy failed to improve complete response rates (pCR) in rectal cancer. Here we report the long-term results of the cetuximab added to preoperative radiation therapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CET-CAPOX-RT) phase 1/2 study that evaluated preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The median follow-up was 63 months (range, 5-73 months). Sixty patients were enrolled; 3 patients were excluded due to protocol violation, and 4 died before surgery. Total mesorectal excision was performed in 53 patients, in 85% (n=45) with curative intention (M0-status). Secondary end points including overall survival (OS) disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were calculated. The prognostic value of KRAS mutation status was also assessed. Results: Histopathological examination confirmed ypUICC stages 0 (n=4; pCR), I (n=17), II (n=10), III (n=14), and IV (n=8). For patients who underwent surgery (n=53), OS at 1, 3, and 5 years was 88.7%, 83%, and 75.5%, respectively, whereas CSS rates were 94.1%, 88.1%, and 78.1%, respectively. In the 45 patients who were treated with curative intent (M0), the OS rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 91.1%, 88.9%, and 86.7%, respectively; whereas CSS rates were 97.6%, 95.2%, and 90.3%, respectively; and DFS rates were 90.7%, 88.3%, and 88.3%, respectively. We did not find any locoregional failure in patients with M0-status (n=45). Chronic toxicity was rare. KRAS mutations, as detected in 33.3%, showed no correlation with the clinicopathological parameters nor significance for either OS (P=.112), CSS (P=.264), or DFS (P=.565). Conclusions: Taken together, chemoradiation therapy combined with cetuximab is safe, feasible, and offers excellent survival rates. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor. Importantly, lack of improvement in pCR rate did not

  2. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin and Cetuximab in Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Conradi, Lena; Weiss, Christian; Sprenger, Thilo; Middel, Peter; Rau, Tillman; Dellas, Kathrin; Kitz, Julia; Rödel, Franz; Sauer, Rolf; Rüschoff, Josef; Beissbarth, Tim; Arnold, Dirk; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Rödel, Claus; Liersch, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the addition of cetuximab to chemoradiation therapy failed to improve complete response rates (pCR) in rectal cancer. Here we report the long-term results of the cetuximab added to preoperative radiation therapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CET-CAPOX-RT) phase 1/2 study that evaluated preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The median follow-up was 63 months (range, 5-73 months). Sixty patients were enrolled; 3 patients were excluded due to protocol violation, and 4 died before surgery. Total mesorectal excision was performed in 53 patients, in 85% (n=45) with curative intention (M0-status). Secondary end points including overall survival (OS) disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were calculated. The prognostic value of KRAS mutation status was also assessed. Results: Histopathological examination confirmed ypUICC stages 0 (n=4; pCR), I (n=17), II (n=10), III (n=14), and IV (n=8). For patients who underwent surgery (n=53), OS at 1, 3, and 5 years was 88.7%, 83%, and 75.5%, respectively, whereas CSS rates were 94.1%, 88.1%, and 78.1%, respectively. In the 45 patients who were treated with curative intent (M0), the OS rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 91.1%, 88.9%, and 86.7%, respectively; whereas CSS rates were 97.6%, 95.2%, and 90.3%, respectively; and DFS rates were 90.7%, 88.3%, and 88.3%, respectively. We did not find any locoregional failure in patients with M0-status (n=45). Chronic toxicity was rare. KRAS mutations, as detected in 33.3%, showed no correlation with the clinicopathological parameters nor significance for either OS (P=.112), CSS (P=.264), or DFS (P=.565). Conclusions: Taken together, chemoradiation therapy combined with cetuximab is safe, feasible, and offers excellent survival rates. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor. Importantly, lack of improvement in pCR rate did not

  3. Prognostic impact of the lymph node metastatic ratio on 5-year survival of patients with rectal cancer not submitted to preoperative chemoradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Luiz Jacomo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Lymph node metastases are a major prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. Inadequate lymph node resection is related to shorter survival. The lymph nodes ratio (LNR has been used as a prognostic factor in patients with colon cancer. Few studies have evaluated the impact of LNR on the 5-year survival of patients with rectal cancer. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of LNR on the survival of patients with rectal cancer not submitted to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. METHODS: Ninety patients with rectal cancer excluding colon tumors, synchronous tumors, hereditary colorectal cancer and those undergoing preoperative chemoradiation. The patients were divided into three groups according t Metástases linfonodais representam um dos principais fatores prognósticos no câncer colorretal. A ressecção linfonodal inadequada relaciona-se à menor sobrevida. A proporção entre linfonodos metastáticos (PLM vem sendo utilizada como fator prognóstico em doentes com câncer de cólon. Poucos estudos avaliaram o impacto da PLM na sobrevida de doentes com câncer retal. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o impacto da PLM na sobrevida de doentes com câncer de reto não submetidos à quimioradioterapia pré-operatória. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos 90 doentes com adenocarcinoma retal excluindo-se tumores de cólon, tumores sincrônicos, câncer colorretal hereditário e aqueles submetidos a tratamento radioquimioterápico pré-operatório. Os doentes foram divididos em três grupos segundo a PLM: PLM-0, sem linfonodos comprometidos; PLM-1, 1 a 20% dos linfonodos comprometidos; e PLM-2, mais de 21% dos linfonodos comprometidos. A identificação do ponto de corte da amostra selecionada foi obtida a partir da curva de características de operação do receptor (curva ROC. A sobrevida foi avaliada pelo teste de Kaplan-Meier, a diferença entre os grupos pelo teste de Cox-Mantel e a correlação entre as variáveis pelo teste de Pearson, adotando-se um nível de significância de 5

  4. The ultrastructure of tumor cells in patients with rectal cancer after pre-operative irradiation and intra-operative cryotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyinnik, Yu.O.; Kotenko, O.Je.; Nevzorov, V.P.; Chyibyisov, L.P.

    2000-01-01

    Electronic microscopy of the tumor cells was performed to confirm the efficacy of combined pre-operative gamma-therapy and intraoperative cryotherapy (CT). Pre-operative irradiation at the dose of 20 Gy accompanied by intra-operative cryotherapy caused the changes in the ultrastructure, the depth and degree of which allow to consider them destructive and irreversible

  5. High-Resolution MRI in Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieguez, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution MRI is the best method of assessing the relation of the rectal tumor with the potential circumferential resection margin (CRM). Therefore it is currently considered the method of choice for local staging of rectal cancer. The primary surgery of rectal cancer is total mesorectal excision (TME), which plane of dissection is formed by the mesorectal fascia surrounding mesorectal fat and rectum. This fascia will determine the circumferential margin of resection. At the same time, high resolution MRI allows adequate pre-operative identification of important prognostic risk factors, improving the selection and indication of therapy for each patient. This information includes, besides the circumferential margin of resection, tumor and lymph node staging, extramural vascular invasion and the description of lower rectal tumors. All these should be described in detail in the report, being part of the discussion in the multidisciplinary team, the place where the decisions involving the patient with rectal cancer will take place. The aim of this study is to provide the information necessary to understand the use of high resolution MRI in the identification of prognostic risk factors in rectal cancer. The technical requirements and standardized report for this study will be describe, as well as the anatomical landmarks of importance for the total mesorectal excision (TME), as we have said is the surgery of choice for rectal cancer. (authors) [es

  6. Clinical study of suppository delivery of 5-fluorouracil and pathological effects on metastatic lymph nodes caused by preoperative combined treatment with radiation, intraluminal hyperthermia and 5-fluorouracil suppository in rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Takaaki [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    Preoperative combined treatment with radiation, intraluminal hyperthermia, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) suppository has been reported effective in shrinking locally advanced rectal cancers and facilitating subsequent surgery. Suppository and intravenous 5-FU administration were compared with respect to tissue concentrations in rectal cancer cases. Just before the operation patients received 100 mg of 5-FU via suppository or intravenously. Portal and systemic blood, tumor tissue, normal mucosa and muscle layer separately at 5, 10, 15 cm in the oral direction from the tumor and the pararectal lymph node were harvested for high-performance liquid chromatography determination of 5-FU concentrations. Rectal 5-FU concentrations were significantly higher in the suppository cases compared with the intravenously administrated ones. Suppository distributed more 5-FU at pararectal lymph nodes than intravenous injection. This fact revealed 5-FU suppositories to be a useful drug delivery system for rectal cancer. The pathological effects on metastatic lymph nodes caused by combined treatment were evaluated in 22 cases. Normal lymph nodes showed congestion only. Fibrotic and necrotic changes were characteristic of damaged metastatic areas. In 6 cases (27.3%), no metastatic cells were detected on fibrotically changed areas. The down staging of the lymph node metastatic factor was carried out by preoperative combined treatment. High concentrations of 5-FU at mucosa could suggest the usefulness of 5-FU suppository administration just before operation for prevention of suture-line implantation. (author)

  7. Clinical study of suppository delivery of 5-fluorouracil and pathological effects on metastatic lymph nodes caused by preoperative combined treatment with radiation, intraluminal hyperthermia and 5-fluorouracil suppository in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Takaaki

    1997-01-01

    Preoperative combined treatment with radiation, intraluminal hyperthermia, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) suppository has been reported effective in shrinking locally advanced rectal cancers and facilitating subsequent surgery. Suppository and intravenous 5-FU administration were compared with respect to tissue concentrations in rectal cancer cases. Just before the operation patients received 100 mg of 5-FU via suppository or intravenously. Portal and systemic blood, tumor tissue, normal mucosa and muscle layer separately at 5, 10, 15 cm in the oral direction from the tumor and the pararectal lymph node were harvested for high-performance liquid chromatography determination of 5-FU concentrations. Rectal 5-FU concentrations were significantly higher in the suppository cases compared with the intravenously administrated ones. Suppository distributed more 5-FU at pararectal lymph nodes than intravenous injection. This fact revealed 5-FU suppositories to be a useful drug delivery system for rectal cancer. The pathological effects on metastatic lymph nodes caused by combined treatment were evaluated in 22 cases. Normal lymph nodes showed congestion only. Fibrotic and necrotic changes were characteristic of damaged metastatic areas. In 6 cases (27.3%), no metastatic cells were detected on fibrotically changed areas. The down staging of the lymph node metastatic factor was carried out by preoperative combined treatment. High concentrations of 5-FU at mucosa could suggest the usefulness of 5-FU suppository administration just before operation for prevention of suture-line implantation. (author)

  8. Simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Bong Kyung; Kang, Min Kyul; Kim, Jae Chul [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Young; Choi, Gyu Seog; Kim, Jong Gwang; Kang, Byung Woog; Kim, Hye Jin; Park, Soo Yeun [Kyungpook National University Chilgok Hospital, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) for preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), by comparing with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Patients who were treated with PCRT for LARC from 2015 January to 2016 December were retrospectively enrolled. Total doses of 45 Gy to 50.4 Gy with 3D-CRT or SIB-IMRT were administered concomitantly with 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin or capecitabine. Surgery was performed 8 weeks after PCRT. Between PCRT and surgery, one cycle of additional chemotherapy was administered. Pathologic tumor responses were compared between SIB-IMRT and 3D-CRT groups. Acute gastrointestinal, genitourinary, hematologic, and skin toxicities were compared between the two groups based on the RTOG toxicity criteria. SIB-IMRT was used in 53 patients, and 3D-CRT in 41 patients. After PCRT, no significant differences were noted in tumor responses, pathologic complete response (9% vs. 7%; p = 1.000), pathologic tumor regression Grade 3 or higher (85% vs. 71%; p = 0.096), and R0 resection (87% vs. 85%; p = 0.843). Grade 2 genitourinary toxicities were significantly lesser in the SIB-IMRT group (8% vs. 24%; p = 0.023), but gastrointestinal toxicities were not different across the two groups. SIB-IMRT showed lower GU toxicity and similar tumor responses when compared with 3D-CRT in PCRT for LARC.

  9. Phase I Trial of Preoperative Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy with Incorporated Boost and Oral Capecitabine in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, Gary M.; Meropol, Neal J.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Hoffman, John; Callahan, Elaine; Price, Robert; Cheng, Jonathan; Cohen, Steve; Lewis, Nancy; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Rogatko, Andre; Konski, Andre

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of preoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and an incorporated boost with concurrent capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The eligibility criteria included adenocarcinoma of the rectum, T3-T4 and/or N1-N2 disease, performance status 0 or 1, and age ≥18 years. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost were used to treat the whole pelvis to 45 Gy and the gross tumor volume plus 2 cm to 55 Gy in 25 treatments within 5 weeks. The study was designed to escalate the dose to the gross tumor volume in 5-Gy increments in 3-patient cohorts. Capecitabine was given orally 825 mg/m 2 twice daily for 7 days each week during RT. The primary endpoint was the maximal tolerated radiation dose, and the secondary endpoints were the pathologic response and quality of life. Results: Eight patients completed RT at the initial dose level of 55 Gy. The study was discontinued because of toxicity-six Grade 3 toxicities occurred in 3 (38%) of 8 patients. All patients went on to definitive surgical resection, and no patient had a pathologically complete response. Conclusion: This regimen, using hypofractionated RT with an incorporated boost, had unacceptable toxicity despite using standard doses of capecitabine and IMRT. Additional research is needed to determine whether IMRT is able to reduce the side effects during and after pelvic RT with conventional dose fractionation

  10. The evaluation of the long term survival and functions in the autonomic nerve-sparing operation with pre-operative radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Norio; Sarashina, Hiromi; Nunomura, Masao; Koda, Keiji; Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Soda, Hiroaki; Ozaki, Kazuyoshi; Sugaya, Yoshiki; Nakajima, Nobuyuki

    1997-01-01

    One hundred and ninety five patients have been received autonomic nerve-sparing operations for rectal cancer in our department since 1984. These patients were classified into two groups, those with preoperative irradiation (irradiated group) and those with surgery alone. The survival rates and the local recurrence rates for these patients were compared, and post-operative urinary and male sexual functions were discussed. The overall cumulative five-year and nine-year survival rates were 80.3% and 66.5%, whereas those in the irradiated group were 84.0% and 77.7%, and those in the surgery alone group were 74.6% and 62.9%. Local recurrence rates were 9.6% all, 5.6% in the irradiated groups, and 11.9% in the surgery alone group. Maintenance of urinary function was successful in almost all patients with bilateral and unilateral pelvic nerve plexus. But the sexual function in males especially ejaculation was preserved in only 54.5% of the patients with bilateral hypogastric nerve and pelvic plexus, and in only 14.3% of the patients with unilateral saving. There was no significant deference in the outcome of the two group, but there was a tendency to obtain the better survival and to decrease the local recurrence in the irradiated group. It was difficult to preserve the sexual function by the nerve-sparing operation with lymphadevectomy. (author)

  11. Quality of Life Outcomes From a Phase 2 Trial of Short-Course Radiation Therapy Followed by FOLFOX Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khwaja, Shariq S.; Roy, Amit; Markovina, Stephanie; Dewees, Todd A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Hunt, Steven [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Tan, Benjamin [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Myerson, Robert J.; Olsen, Jeffrey R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: pparikh@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase 2 trial of short-course (SC) radiation therapy (RT) with 25 Gy over 5 fractions, followed by 4 cycles of 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin (mFOLFOX6) before surgery was recently completed at our institution. We present here the patient-reported quality of life (QOL) outcomes from this trial. Methods and Materials: Eighty patients with cT3/T4, any N, any M rectal adenocarcinoma planned for resection were enrolled between 2009 and 2012. The QOL data were obtained prospectively using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Colon (FACT-C) questionnaire before RT, before surgery, and 1 year after surgery. The previously validated minimally importance difference (MID) method was used to measure clinically significant QOL changes in FACT-C scores for each patient across time points. We examined the role of ostomy on QOL. We also compared QOL with disease outcomes and physician-reported toxicity. Results: The FACT-C questionnaire was completed by 97% of patients before RT, 85% immediately before surgery, and 62% 1 year after surgery. There was no statistically significant change in mean FACT-C scores from before treatment to after treatment. The majority of patients had either no change or an increase in QOL 1 year after treatment using the MID method. There were significant changes in QOL between patients with ostomy versus no ostomy 1 year after treatment for functional well-being (FWB) (14.81 vs 20.52, P=.018) and the colorectal cancer subscale (CCS) using the MID method (P=.004). Patients without ostomy reported stable changes in bowel control 1 year after surgery. There was no statistically significant correlation between QOL and disease recurrence, pathologic complete response, pathologic T stage downstaging, or acute/late toxicity. Conclusions: SC-RT and sequential mFOLFOX6 as preoperative therapy for rectal cancer results in stable patient-reported QOL outcomes 1 year after treatment. These findings in conjunction

  12. Quality of Life Outcomes From a Phase 2 Trial of Short-Course Radiation Therapy Followed by FOLFOX Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khwaja, Shariq S.; Roy, Amit; Markovina, Stephanie; Dewees, Todd A.; Hunt, Steven; Tan, Benjamin; Myerson, Robert J.; Olsen, Jeffrey R.; Parikh, Parag J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase 2 trial of short-course (SC) radiation therapy (RT) with 25 Gy over 5 fractions, followed by 4 cycles of 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin (mFOLFOX6) before surgery was recently completed at our institution. We present here the patient-reported quality of life (QOL) outcomes from this trial. Methods and Materials: Eighty patients with cT3/T4, any N, any M rectal adenocarcinoma planned for resection were enrolled between 2009 and 2012. The QOL data were obtained prospectively using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Colon (FACT-C) questionnaire before RT, before surgery, and 1 year after surgery. The previously validated minimally importance difference (MID) method was used to measure clinically significant QOL changes in FACT-C scores for each patient across time points. We examined the role of ostomy on QOL. We also compared QOL with disease outcomes and physician-reported toxicity. Results: The FACT-C questionnaire was completed by 97% of patients before RT, 85% immediately before surgery, and 62% 1 year after surgery. There was no statistically significant change in mean FACT-C scores from before treatment to after treatment. The majority of patients had either no change or an increase in QOL 1 year after treatment using the MID method. There were significant changes in QOL between patients with ostomy versus no ostomy 1 year after treatment for functional well-being (FWB) (14.81 vs 20.52, P=.018) and the colorectal cancer subscale (CCS) using the MID method (P=.004). Patients without ostomy reported stable changes in bowel control 1 year after surgery. There was no statistically significant correlation between QOL and disease recurrence, pathologic complete response, pathologic T stage downstaging, or acute/late toxicity. Conclusions: SC-RT and sequential mFOLFOX6 as preoperative therapy for rectal cancer results in stable patient-reported QOL outcomes 1 year after treatment. These findings in conjunction

  13. Value of intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferenschild, Floris T. J.; Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J. M. E.; Graveland, Wilfried J.; Marinelli, Andreas W. K. S.; van der Sijp, Joost R.; Wiggers, Theo; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to analyze the results of a multimodality treatment using preoperative radiotherapy, followed by surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: Between 1987 and 2002, 123 patients with initial unresectable

  14. Prostatic sarcoma after treatment of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Andrew G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between radiation exposure for treatment of cancer and occurrence of a second primary cancer at the irradiated site is well known. This phenomenon is however rare in prostate. Case presentation A 75-year-old farmer was treated for rectal cancer with preoperative 45 Gy of radiotherapy and abdominoperineal resection. Four years later he developed symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction and acute urinary retention. He underwent a transurethral resection of the prostate. Histological examination of the removed prostate tissue and immunohistochemistry revealed it to be a poorly differentiated sarcoma. Conclusion We believe this to be the first reported case of radiation-induced sarcoma following radiotherapy treatment for rectal cancer. Since radiotherapy plays a pivotal role in the contemporary treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma, it is relevant to be aware of the potential long-term carcinogenic complications of radiotherapy of the pelvis.

  15. Neoadjuvant therapy in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Valle, A.; Roldán, G.; Suárez, L.; Rodríguez, R.; Quarneti, A.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Rectal cancer causes about 500 deaths a year in our country. Radio chemotherapy (RTCT) is part of the treatment of rectal tumors especially in stages II and III. The indication for neoadjuvant aims to preserve the sphincter at low tumors and potentially make initially unresectable tumors resectable. Objective: To analyze the indications, treatment, toxicity and development of adenocarcinoma patients receiving treatment rectum preoperative R T ± Q T. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 31 records of patients rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant in Oncology Services Hospital and Central Clinical Hospital of the Armed Forces between 1994 and , 2003. Results: Men / Women: 1.3. Median age 64 years. Eight patients (30%) endorectal ultrasound as preoperative staging were performed. patients matched 20 (65%) stage II, 6 (19%) stage III, 5 (16%) stage IV with potentially resectable liver metastases. The median dose of R T was 50 Gy (35.8-63 Gy) with a median duration was 5 weeks (4-12). One patient (3%) received exclusive R T. Plans Q T used: 5-F U in I / C 52%, 5-F U bolus and 42% leucovorin and 5-F U bolus 3%. Surgery was achieved with sphincter preservation in 7/31 cases (23%). The most common toxicity was diarrhea and radiodermatitis were the cause of discontinuation in 4 patients. Control hematologic weekly was 38% during the RTCT. Responses were achieved Full 5% partial 39%, 17% and stabilization lesion progression 39%. Discussion: The lack of information recorded in the medical records hindered the Analysis of this work. 70% of stage II and III patients were incompletely staged (30% endorectal ultrasound) and controls during treatment were suboptimal. Only 23% of patients achieved sphincter preservation, lower than the figures reported in the literature (65-

  16. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Randomized Trial Comparing Oral Uracil and Tegafur and Oral Leucovorin Vs. Intravenous 5-Fluorouracil and Leucovorin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre, Alejandro de la; Garcia-Berrocal, Maria Isabel; Arias, Fernando; Marino, Alfonso; Valcarcel, Francisco; Magallon, Rosa; Regueiro, Carlos A.; Romero, Jesus; Zapata, Irma; Fuente, Cristina de la; Fernandez-Lizarbe, Eva; Vergara, Gloria; Belinchon, Belen; Veiras, Maria; Moleron, Rafael; Millan, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a randomized trial, 5-fluorouracil (FU) plus leucovorin (LV) (FU+LV) vs. oral uracil and tegafur (UFT) plus LV (UFT+LV) given concomitantly with preoperative irradiation in patients with cT3-4 or N+ rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 155 patients were entered onto the trial. Patients received pelvic radiotherapy (4500-5,040 cGy in 5 to 6 weeks) and chemotherapy consisting of two 5-day courses of 20 mg/m 2 /d LV and 350 mg/m 2 /d FU in the first and fifth weeks of radiotherapy (77 patients) or one course of 25 mg/d oral LV and 300 mg/m 2 /d UFT for 4 weeks beginning in the second week of radiotherapy (78 patients). The primary endpoints were pathologic complete response (pCR) and resectability rate. Secondary endpoints included downstaging rate, toxicity, and survival. Results: Grade 3-5 acute hematologic toxicity occurred only with FU+LV (leukopenia 9%; p = 0.02). There were no differences in resectability rates (92.1% vs. 93.4%; p = 0.82). The pCR rate was 13.2% in both arms. Tumor downstaging was more frequent with UFT+LV (59.2% vs. 43.3%; p = 0.04). Three-year overall survival was 87% with FU+LV and 74% with UFT+LV (p = 0.37). The 3-year cumulative incidences of local recurrence were 7.5% and 8.9%, respectively (p = 0.619; relative risk, 1.46; 95% confidence interval 0.32-6.55). Conclusion: Although this study lacked statistical power to exclude clinically significant differences between both groups, the outcome of patients treated with UFT+LV did not differ significantly from that of patients treated with FU+LV, and hematologic toxicity was significantly lower in the experimental arm

  17. Preoperative evaluation of the depth of anal canal invasion in very low rectal cancer by magnetic resonance imaging and surgical indications for intersphincteric resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamba, Yoshiko; Itabashi, Michio; Kameoka, Shingo

    2012-01-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the depth of anal canal invasion (DACI), and determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of the conjoined longitudinal muscle (CLM) can be used to identify the surgical indication for intersphincteric resection. Sixty-six patients with T1 (n=2), T2 (n=20), T3 (n=39), and T4 (n=5) lower rectal cancer were included. Depth of anal canal invasion was defined as extension of the tumor to the anal canal. The outline of the CLM on MRI was assessed as clear, unclear, or absent (indicating invasion). A comparison of overall T-stage and DACI of 22 pT1-pT2 tumors revealed that none had a higher T-stage within the anal canal, and 16 of 39 pT3 tumors had only pT0-pT2 invasion within the anal canal. The CLM was clear in 30 cases of T0-T2 DACI, unclear in 5 cases of T0-T2 DACI, and 3 cases of T3-T4 DACI, and showed invasion in 3 cases of T2 DACI and 25 cases of T3-T4 DACI. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of using a clear CLM outline for determining T0-T2 DACI was 78.9, 91.9, 100, and 77.8%, respectively. Preoperative evaluation of DACI was compatible with the surgical indications. A clear CLM accurately indicates T0-T2 DACI. (author)

  18. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  19. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokelaar RF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available RF Kokelaar, MD Evans, M Davies, DA Harris, J Beynon Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singleton Hospital, Swansea, UK Abstract: Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer. Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0 resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. Keywords: rectal cancer, exenteration, pelvic sidewall, sacrectomy

  20. Long-Term Follow-Up of Preoperative Pelvic Radiation Therapy and Concomitant Boost Irradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Multi-Institutional Phase II Study (KROG 04-01)

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    Lee, Jong Hoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Go-Yang (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Taek-Keun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Hwa-Sun (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sei-Chul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Doo Seok [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Daehang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Chang, Hee Jin [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Go-Yang (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae-Uk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Hwa-Sun (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok, E-mail: hsjang11@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To perform a prospective phase II study to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative pelvic radiation therapy and concomitant small-field boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks in locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, mid-to-lower rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled. They had received preoperative chemoradiation therapy and total mesorectal excision. Pelvic radiation therapy of 43.2 Gy in 24 fractions plus concomitant boost radiation therapy of 7.2 Gy in 12 fractions was delivered to the pelvis and tumor bed for 5 weeks. Two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin were administered for 3 days in the first and fifth week of radiation therapy. The pathologic response, survival outcome, and treatment toxicity were evaluated for the study endpoints. Results: Of 69 patients, 8 (11.6%) had a pathologically complete response. Downstaging rates were 40.5% for T classification and 68.1% for N classification. At the median follow-up of 69 months, 36 patients have been followed up for more than 5 years. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival rates were 66.0% and 75.3%, respectively. Higher pathologic T (P = .045) and N (P = .032) classification were significant adverse prognostic factors for DFS, and high-grade histology was an adverse prognostic factor for both DFS (P = .025) and overall survival (P = .031) on the multivariate analysis. Fifteen patients (21.7%) experienced grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity, and 7 patients (10.1%) had long-term toxicity. Conclusion: Preoperative pelvic radiation therapy with concomitant boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks showed acceptable acute and long-term toxicities. However, the benefit of concomitant small-field boost irradiation for 5 weeks in rectal cancer patients was not demonstrated beyond conventional irradiation for 6 weeks in terms of tumor response and

  1. Long-term quality of life in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative (chemo)-radiotherapy within a randomized trial; Evaluation a long terme de la qualite de vie de patients atteints de cancer rectal apras (chimio) radiotherapie dans un essai controle

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    Tiv, M.; Puyraveau, M.; Mercier, M.; Bosset, J.F. [EA3181, Besancon University Hospital, University of Franche-Comte, 25 - Besancon (France); Puyraveau, M. [Clinical Research Management Unit, Besancon University Hospital, 25 - Besancon (France); Mineur, L. [Department of Radiation Therapy, Clinic Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France); Calais, G. [Department of Radiation Therapy, University Francois-Rabelais, 37 - Tours (France); Maingon, P. [Department of Radiation Therapy, Cancer Center Dijon, 21 - Dijon (France); Bardet, E. [Department of Radiation Therapy, centre Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes-Saint-Herblain (France); Mercier, M.; Bosset, J.F. [Department of Radiation Therapy, Besancon University Hospital, 25 - Besancon (France)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Few studies have evaluated the quality of life (QoL) of patients with rectal cancer. This report describes the quality of life of French patients who entered the 22921 EORTC trial that investigated the role and place of chemotherapy (CT) added to preoperative radiotherapy (preop-RT). Patients and Methods: Patients without recurrences were evaluated with EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR38 questionnaires, after a median time of 4.6 years from randomization. Results: All the scores of QLQ-C30 functions were high, from 78 up to 88, with those of global health quality of life scale (GHQL) status being 73. The mean scores of symptoms were low except for diarrhea. For QLQ-CR38, the mean scores for 'body image' and 'future perspective' were high at 79.6 and 69.7 respectively. The scores for 'sexual functioning' and 'enjoyment' were low. Men had more sexual problems than females (62.5 vs 25 mean scores respectively). Chemotherapy was associated with more diarrhea complaints, lower 'role', lower 'social functioning' and lower global health quality of life scale. Conclusion: The overall quality of life of patients with rectal cancer is quite good 4.6 years after the beginning preoperative treatments. However, adding chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy has a negative effect on diarrhea complaints and some quality of life dimensions. (authors)

  2. Acute Toxicity and Tumor Response in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Shortening of the Overall Treatment Time Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Simultaneous Integrated Boost: A Phase 2 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    But-Hadzic, Jasna, E-mail: jbut@onko-i.si [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Anderluh, Franc [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Brecelj, Erik; Edhemovic, Ibrahim [Division of Surgery, Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Secerov-Ermenc, Ajra; Hudej, Rihard; Jeromen, Ana [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kozelj, Miran; Krebs, Bojan [Division of Surgery, University Medical Centre Maribor, Maribor (Slovenia); Oblak, Irena [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Omejc, Mirko [Division of Surgery, University Medical Centre Lubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vogrin, Andrej [Division of Diagnostics, Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Velenik, Vaneja [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-12-01

    Background and Purpose: This phase 2 study investigated the efficacy and safety of preoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB) without dose escalation, concomitant with standard capecitabine chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2014 and March 2015, 51 patients with operable stage II-III rectal adenocarcinoma received preoperative IMRT with pelvic dose of 41.8 Gy and simultaneously delivered 46.2 Gy to T2/3 and 48.4 Gy to T4 tumor in 22 fractions, concomitant with capecitabine, 825 mg/m{sup 2}/12 hours, including weekends. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR). Results: Fifty patients completed preoperative treatment according to the protocol, and 47 underwent surgical resection. The sphincter preservation rate for the low rectal tumors was 62%, and the resection margins were free in all but 1 patient. Decrease in tumor and nodal stage was observed in 32 (68%) and 39 (83%) patients, respectively, with pCR achieved in 12 (25.5%) patients. There were only 2 G ≥ 3 acute toxicities, with infectious enterocolitis in 1 patient and dermatitis over the sacral area caused by the bolus effect of the treatment table in the second patient. Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT-SIB without dose escalation is well tolerated, with a low acute toxicity profile, and can achieve a high rate of pCR and downstaging.

  3. Irradiation of low rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardiet, J.M.; Coquard, R.; Romestaing, P.; Fric, D.; Baron, M.H.; Rocher, F.P.; Sentenac, I.; Gerard, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The low rectal cancers are treated by anorectal amputation and pose the problem of the sphincter conservation. Some authors extend the clinical definition to developed injuries until 12 cm from the anal margin. The rectal cancer is a frequent tumour which remains serious. When the tumour is low, the treatment consists in an anorectal amputation with a permanent colostomy. The radical non preserving surgery is the usual treatment of these injuries. Until 1960 the rectal adenocarcinoma was considered as a radioresistant tumour because of the impossibility to deliver an enough dose to the tumour by external radiotherapy. But other studies showed that those lesions were radiosensitive and often radiocurable. The medical treatments haven't yet demonstrated their efficiency in the treatment of the rectal cancer. We'll study the radiotherapy in the treatment of the low rectal cancer, solely radiotherapy, radiosurgical associations. 32 refs., 5 tabs

  4. Importance of Preoperative Rectal Ultrasound and CT in Rectal Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnellyova, T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The reason of high mortality of colorectal carcinoma is above all the fact, that majority of diseases are detected in progressive stage. Radical change in this unfavorable mortality rate can be achieved only by targeted search for early stages of the disease. Early diagnostics consists in rectoscopy and colonoscopy. Regarding X-ray methods it is X-ray irigography. Regarding CT examinations it is CT irigography, virtual colonoscopy. Another examination can be USG examination of abdomen and endo sonographic examination of rectum. Materials and methods: In the period from June 2006 to December 2010, in 60 patients out of the total number 106 examined patients, tumorous affection of rectum CT examination of pelvis and abdomen separately or pelvisand abdomen at one session was made in 3186 patients. In 115 patients we discovered malign tumorous illness of colon. Metastatic affection in the form of distant metastases was proven n 63 patients. 403 patients had CT irigography examination. In 77 out of them we diagnosed colon carcinoma. CT colonoscopy did not discover in our group of 30 patients examined the presence of colon carcinoma. Results: In the group of 60 patients who were diagnosed rectal carcinoma, in 29 patients expansive infiltrative affection was evaluated in endorectal sonography, histologically confirmed in 28 patients - 96,5 %, expansive affection in 41 patients with histological verification in 100 %. With CT we diagnosed 52 expansive tumorous processes, histologically confirmed in 47 patients - 90,38 %. In 63 patients expansive infiltrative process was evaluated, histologically confirmed in 52 patients 82,53 %. In total of 115 examinations there was conformance with histological examination in 99 patients - 86,08 %. In CT irigography we diagnosed colon tumour in 77 patients. Expansive growth was evaluated in 40 patients, histologically confirmed in 37 patients - 92,5 %. Expansive infiltrative expansion was evaluated in 37 patients, with

  5. Feasibility of an Adaptive Strategy in Preoperative Radiochemotherapy for Rectal Cancer With Image-Guided Tomotherapy: Boosting the Dose to the Shrinking Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passoni, Paolo; Fiorino, Claudio; Slim, Najla; Ronzoni, Monica; Ricci, Vincenzo; Di Palo, Saverio; De Nardi, Paola; Orsenigo, Elena; Tamburini, Andrea; De Cobelli, Francesco; Losio, Claudio; Iacovelli, Nicola A.; Broggi, Sara; Staudacher, Carlo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of preoperative adaptive radiochemotherapy by delivering a concomitant boost to the residual tumor during the last 6 fractions of treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with T3/T4N0 or N+ rectal cancer were enrolled. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of oxaliplatin 100 mg/m 2 on days −14, 0, and +14, and 5-fluorouracil 200 mg/m 2 /d from day −14 to the end of radiation therapy (day 0 is the start of radiation therapy). Radiation therapy consisted of 41.4 Gy in 18 fractions (2.3 Gy per fraction) with Tomotherapy to the tumor and regional lymph nodes (planning target volume, PTV) defined on simulation CT and MRI. After 9 fractions simulation CT and MRI were repeated for the planning of the adaptive phase: PTV adapt was generated by adding a 5-mm margin to the residual tumor. In the last 6 fractions a boost of 3.0 Gy per fraction (in total 45.6 Gy in 18 fractions) was delivered to PTV adapt while concomitantly delivering 2.3 Gy per fraction to PTV outside PTV adapt . Results: Three patients experienced grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity; 2 of 3 showed toxicity before the adaptive phase. Full dose of radiation therapy, oxaliplatin, and 5-fluorouracil was delivered in 96%, 96%, and 88% of patients, respectively. Two patients with clinical complete response (cCR) refused surgery and were still cCR at 17 and 29 months. For the remaining 23 resected patients, 15 of 23 (65%) showed tumor regression grade 3 response, and 7 of 23 (30%) had pathologic complete response; 8 (35%) and 12 (52%) tumor regression grade 3 patients had ≤5% and 10% residual viable cells, respectively. Conclusions: An adaptive boost strategy is feasible, with an acceptable grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity rate and a very encouraging tumor response rate. The results suggest that there should still be room for further dose escalation of the residual tumor with the aim of increasing pathologic complete response and/or cCR rates

  6. Adjuvant treatment for resected rectal cancer: impact of standard and intensified postoperative chemotherapy on disease-free survival in patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiation-a propensity score-matched analysis of an observational database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlipp, Benjamin; Ptok, Henry; Benedix, Frank; Otto, Ronny; Popp, Felix; Ridwelski, Karsten; Gastinger, Ingo; Benckert, Christoph; Lippert, Hans; Bruns, Christiane

    2016-12-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy for resected rectal cancer is widely used. However, studies on adjuvant treatment following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and total mesorectal excision (TME) have yielded conflicting results. Recent studies have focused on adding oxaliplatin to both preoperative and postoperative therapy, making it difficult to assess the impact of adjuvant oxaliplatin alone. This study was aimed at determining the impact of (i) any adjuvant treatment and (ii) oxaliplatin-containing adjuvant treatment on disease-free survival in CRT-pretreated, R0-resected rectal cancer patients. Patients undergoing R0 TME following 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-only-based CRT between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010, were selected from a nationwide registry. After propensity score matching (PSM), comparison of disease-free survival (DFS) using Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank test was performed in (i) patients receiving no vs. any adjuvant treatment and (ii) patients treated with adjuvant 5FU/capecitabine without vs. with oxaliplatin. Out of 1497 patients, 520 matched pairs were generated for analysis of no vs. any adjuvant treatment. Mean DFS was significantly prolonged with adjuvant treatment (81.8 ± 2.06 vs. 70.1 ± 3.02 months, p rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant CRT and TME surgery under routine conditions, adjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved DFS. No benefit was observed for the addition of oxaliplatin to adjuvant chemotherapy in this setting.

  7. Locally advanced rectal cancer: diffusion-weighted MR tumour volumetry and the apparent diffusion coefficient for evaluating complete remission after preoperative chemoradiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Hong Il; Kim, Ah Young; Park, Seong Ho; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Yu, Chang Sik

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate DW MR tumour volumetry and post-CRT ADC in rectal cancer as predicting factors of CR using high b values to eliminate perfusion effects. One hundred rectal cancer patients who underwent 1.5-T rectal MR and DW imaging using three b factors (0, 150, and 1,000 s/mm 2 ) were enrolled. The tumour volumes of T2-weighted MR and DW images and pre- and post-CRT ADC 150-1000 were measured. The diagnostic accuracy of post-CRT ADC, T2-weighted MR, and DW tumour volumetry was compared using ROC analysis. DW MR tumour volumetry was superior to T2-weighted MR volumetry comparing the CR and non-CR groups (P z = 0.910) was superior to that of T2-weighed MR tumour volumetry (A z = 0.792) and post-CRT ADC (A z = 0.705) in determining CR (P = 0.015). Using a cutoff value for the tumour volume reduction rate of more than 86.8 % on DW MR images, the sensitivity and specificity for predicting CR were 91.4 % and 80 %, respectively. DW MR tumour volumetry after CRT showed significant superiority in predicting CR compared with T2-weighted MR images and post-CRT ADC. (orig.)

  8. Locally advanced rectal cancer: diffusion-weighted MR tumour volumetry and the apparent diffusion coefficient for evaluating complete remission after preoperative chemoradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Hong Il; Kim, Ah Young; Yu, Chang Sik; Park, Seong Ho; Ha, Hyun Kwon

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate DW MR tumour volumetry and post-CRT ADC in rectal cancer as predicting factors of CR using high b values to eliminate perfusion effects. One hundred rectal cancer patients who underwent 1.5-T rectal MR and DW imaging using three b factors (0, 150, and 1,000 s/mm(2)) were enrolled. The tumour volumes of T2-weighted MR and DW images and pre- and post-CRT ADC150-1000 were measured. The diagnostic accuracy of post-CRT ADC, T2-weighted MR, and DW tumour volumetry was compared using ROC analysis. DW MR tumour volumetry was superior to T2-weighted MR volumetry comparing the CR and non-CR groups (P volumetry (Az = 0.910) was superior to that of T2-weighed MR tumour volumetry (Az = 0.792) and post-CRT ADC (Az = 0.705) in determining CR (P = 0.015). Using a cutoff value for the tumour volume reduction rate of more than 86.8 % on DW MR images, the sensitivity and specificity for predicting CR were 91.4 % and 80 %, respectively. DW MR tumour volumetry after CRT showed significant superiority in predicting CR compared with T2-weighted MR images and post-CRT ADC.

  9. Radiation therapy for operable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar, G.V.; Semikoz, N.G.; Bashejev, V.Kh.; Borota, O.V.; Bondarenko, M.V.; Kiyashko, O.Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a review of the literature on modern tendencies of radiation therapy application to treatment of operable rectal cancer. Many randomized control studies compared the efficacy of combination of radiation therapy (pre-operative or post-operative) and surgery versus surgery only demonstrating various results. Meta-analysis of the data on efficacy of combination of radiation therapy and standard surgery revealed 22 randomized control studies (14 with pre-operative radiation therapy and 8 with post-operative radiation therapy) with total number of 8507 patients (Colorectal Cancer Collaborative Group, 2000). The use of combination treatment reduced the number of isolated locoregional relapses both with pre-operative (22.5 - 12.5 %; p < 0.00001) and post-operative radiation therapy (25.8 - 16.7 %; p - 0.00001). The influence on total survival was not significant (62 % vs. 63 %; p - 0.06).

  10. Adjuvant Chemotherapy Seemed Not to Have Survival Benefit in Rectal Cancer Patients with ypTis-2N0 After Preoperative Radiotherapy and Surgery from a Population-Based Propensity Score Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiang; Li, Ya-Qi; Li, Qing-Guo; Ma, Yan-Lei; Peng, Jun-Jie; Cai, San-Jun

    2018-04-19

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is currently offered routinely, as standard, after radical resection for patients with rectal cancer receiving neo-adjuvant chemoradiation. However, the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with ypTis-2N0M0 has not been documented to the same extent, and the survival benefit remained controversial. The purpose of this work was to determine the role of chemotherapy in patients with ypTis-2N0M0 classification. Data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database ( n  = 4,217). A propensity score model was utilized to balance baseline covariates. Of the 4,217 included patients, 335 with ypTis-2N0M0 did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There were comparable cancer-specific survivals (CSS) between those undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy or not (log-rank test = 0.136, p  = .712) in the overall sample. After propensity score matching, the cancer-specific survival did not differ between the chemotherapy and observation groups (log-rank test = 0.089, p  = .765). Additionally, the Cox model did not demonstrate adjuvant chemotherapy as the prognostic factor, with hazard ratio = 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.69-1.32) for CSS. Furthermore, the 10-year cumulative CSS was 78.7% and 79.4% between the chemotherapy and observation groups, indicating no significance, and no impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on survival was observed in different subgroups stratified by T stage, histological grade, histology, lymph nodes, and tumor size. Patients with ypTis-2N0 rectal cancer did not benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative radiology and radical surgery in this cohort study. These results provided new insight into the routine use of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer with completed neo-adjuvant radiotherapy and curative surgery. Inconsistent recommendations for patients with rectal cancer receiving neo-adjuvant chemoradiation are offered by clinical guidelines. Adjuvant

  11. Accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-operative staging of rectal adenocarcinoma: Experience from a regional Australian cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rohen; Ung, Kim Ann; Mathlum, Maitham

    2013-12-01

    Selection of the optimal treatment pathway in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma relies on accurate locoregional staging. This study aims to assess the accuracy of staging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and in particular, its accuracy in differentiating patients with early stage disease from those with more advanced disease who benefit from a different treatment approach. Patients who were staged with MRI and received surgery as the first line of treatment for biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the rectum were identified. Comparison was made between the clinical stage on MRI and the pathological stage of the surgical specimen. The sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of MRI was assessed. In all, 58 eligible patients were identified. In 31% of patients, the extent of disease was underrepresented on preoperative MRI. Sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of anorectal MRI in detecting stage II/III disease status in this cohort was 59, 71 and 62%, respectively. MRI underestimated the pathological stage in many patients in this series who may have benefited from the addition of neoadjuvant radiotherapy to their management. This study supports further refinement of preoperative staging and demonstrates that impressive results from highly controlled settings may be difficult to reproduce in community practice. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Oxaliplatin, fluorouracil, and leucovorin versus fluorouracil and leucovorin as adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (ADORE): an open-label, multicentre, phase 2, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yong Sang; Nam, Byung-Ho; Kim, Kyu-Pyo; Kim, Jeong Eun; Park, Seong Joon; Park, Young Suk; Park, Joon Oh; Kim, Sun Young; Kim, Tae-You; Kim, Jee Hyun; Ahn, Joong Bae; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Jong Hoon; Park, Jin-Hong; Park, Hee Chul; Jung, Kyung Hae; Kim, Tae Won

    2014-10-01

    The role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer is controversial, especially when used after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy, including fluorouracil and leucovorin, has been widely used; however, the addition of oxaliplatin to fluorouracil and leucovorin (FOLFOX), a standard adjuvant regimen for colon cancer, has not been tested in rectal cancer. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of adjuvant fluorouracil and leucovorin with that of FOLFOX in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. In this open-label, multicentre, phase 2, randomised trial, patients with postoperative pathological stage II (ypT3-4N0) or III (ypTanyN1-2) rectal cancer after preoperative fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy and total mesorectal excision were recruited and randomly assigned (1:1) via a web-based software platform to receive adjuvant chemotherapy with either four cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin (fluorouracil 380 mg/m(2) and leucovorin 20 mg/m(2) on days 1-5, every 4 weeks) or eight cycles of FOLFOX (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m(2), leucovorin 200 mg/m(2), and fluorouracil bolus 400 mg/m(2) on day 1, and fluorouracil infusion 2400 mg/m(2) for 46 h, every 2 weeks). Stratification factors were pathological stage (II vs III) and centre. Neither patients nor investigators were masked to group assignment. The primary endpoint was 3-year disease-free survival, analysed by intention to treat. This study is fully enrolled, is in long-term follow-up, and is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00807911. Between Nov 19, 2008, and June 12, 2012, 321 patients were randomly assigned to fluorouracil and leucovorin (n=161) and FOLFOX (n=160). 141 (95%) of 149 patients in the fluorouracil plus leucovorin group and 141 (97%) of 146 in the FOLFOX group completed all planned cycles of adjuvant treatment. Median follow-up was 38·2 months (IQR 26·4-50·6). 3-year disease

  13. Locally advanced rectal cancer: diffusion-weighted MR tumour volumetry and the apparent diffusion coefficient for evaluating complete remission after preoperative chemoradiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Hong Il [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hallym University Medical Center, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Department of Radiology, Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ah Young; Park, Seong Ho; Ha, Hyun Kwon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Chang Sik [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To evaluate DW MR tumour volumetry and post-CRT ADC in rectal cancer as predicting factors of CR using high b values to eliminate perfusion effects. One hundred rectal cancer patients who underwent 1.5-T rectal MR and DW imaging using three b factors (0, 150, and 1,000 s/mm{sup 2}) were enrolled. The tumour volumes of T2-weighted MR and DW images and pre- and post-CRT ADC{sub 150-1000} were measured. The diagnostic accuracy of post-CRT ADC, T2-weighted MR, and DW tumour volumetry was compared using ROC analysis. DW MR tumour volumetry was superior to T2-weighted MR volumetry comparing the CR and non-CR groups (P < 0.001). Post-CRT ADC showed a significant difference between the CR and non-CR groups (P = 0.001). The accuracy of DW tumour volumetry (A{sub z} = 0.910) was superior to that of T2-weighed MR tumour volumetry (A{sub z} = 0.792) and post-CRT ADC (A{sub z} = 0.705) in determining CR (P = 0.015). Using a cutoff value for the tumour volume reduction rate of more than 86.8 % on DW MR images, the sensitivity and specificity for predicting CR were 91.4 % and 80 %, respectively. DW MR tumour volumetry after CRT showed significant superiority in predicting CR compared with T2-weighted MR images and post-CRT ADC. (orig.)

  14. Clinical and endorectal ultrasound staging of circumferential rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.; Farmer, K.C.; Chapple, K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Circumferential rectal cancers present at a more advanced stage than those located in a single quadrant. Although accurate staging is an important aspect of the preoperative management of the patient with a rectal cancer, the clinical and radiological staging of this subgroup of rectal cancer patients has been poorly studied. All patients with a rectal cancer were assessed clinically (by digital rectal examination and rigid sigmoidoscopy) before the radiological assessment by endorectal ultrasound (ERUS). Data collected included tumour height (distance from anal verge in centimetre) and tumour type (circumferential or non-circumferential). Radiological tumour staging was with the TNM system. Fifty-nine subjects (33 men, 26 women; median age 65 years (range 38-86 years)) were identified with a circumferential rectal cancer. Mean height of the cancer was 8 - 0.4 cm (standard error of the mean; range 2-13 cm). Forty-two cancers were palpable, and 17 cancers were impalpable. All cancers assessed clinically as circumferential were confirmed as circumferential on ERUS scanning. Tumour stage as assessed by ERUS was either T3 (n = 57) or T4 (n = 2). Nodal status was NO (n = 29) and N1 (n = 30). All rectal cancers assessed as circumferential on clinical examination have an ERUS stage of T3 or greater.

  15. Gene expression levels of gamma-glutamyl hydrolase in tumor tissues may be a useful biomarker for the proper use of S-1 and tegafur-uracil/leucovorin in preoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadahiro, Sotaro; Suzuki, T; Tanaka, A; Okada, K; Saito, G; Miyakita, H; Ogimi, T; Nagase, H

    2017-06-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy is the standard of care for rectal cancer. The effect of additional chemotherapy during the period between the completion of radiotherapy and surgery remains unclear. Predictive factors for CRT may differ between combination chemotherapy with S-1 and with tegafur-uracil/leucovorin (UFT/LV). The subjects were 54 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received preoperative CRT with S-1 or UFT/LV. The pathological tumor response was assessed according to the tumor regression grade (TRG). The expression levels of 18 CRT-related genes were determined using RT-PCR assay. A pathological response (TRG 1-2) was observed in 23 patients (42.6%). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis for pathological response, the overall expression levels of four genes, HIF1A, MTHFD1, GGH and TYMS, were significant, and the accuracy rate of the predictive model was 83.3%. The effects of the gene expression levels of GGH on the response differed significantly according to the treatment regimen. The total pathological response rate of both high-GGH patients in the S-1 group and low-GGH patients in the UFT/LV group was 58.3%. Additional treatment with 5-FU-based chemotherapy during the interval between radiotherapy and surgery is not beneficial in patients who have received 5-FU-based CRT. The expression levels of four genes, HIF1A, MTHFD1, GGH and TYMS, in tumor tissues can predict the response to preoperative CRT including either S-1 or UFT/LV. In particular, the gene expression level of GGH in tumor tissues may be a useful biomarker for the appropriate use of S-1 and UFT/LV in CRT.

  16. Repeat CT assessed CTV variation and PTV margins for short- and long-course pre-operative RT of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Swellengrebel, Maurits; Hollmann, Birgit; Jong, Rianne de; Marijnen, Corrie; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Triest, Baukelien van; Herk, Marcel van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the inter-fraction shape variation of the CTV in rectal-cancer patients treated with 5 × 5 (SCRT) and 25 × 2 Gy (LCRT) and derive PTV margins. Methods and materials: Thirty-three SCRT with daily repeat CT scans and 30 LCRT patients with daily scans during the first week followed by weekly scans were included. The CTV was delineated on all scans and local shape variation was calculated with respect to the planning CT. Margin estimation was done using the local shape variation to assure 95% minimum dose for at least 90% of patients. Results: Using 482 CT scans, systematic and random CTV shape variation was heterogeneous, ranging from 0.2 cm close to bony structures up to 1.0 cm SD at the upper-anterior CTV region. A significant reduction in rectal volume during LCRT resulted in an average 0.5 cm posterior shift of the upper-anterior CTV. Required margins ranged from 0.7 cm close to bony structures up to 3.1 and 2.3 cm in the upper-anterior region for SCRT and LCRT, respectively. Conclusions: Heterogeneous shape variation demands anisotropic PTV margins. Required margins were substantially larger in the anterior direction compared to current clinical margins. These larger margins were, however, based on strict delineated CTVs, resulting in smaller PTVs compared to current practice.

  17. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, W. Warren; Blackstock, A. William; Herman, Joseph; Konski, Andre A.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Poggi, Matthew M.; Regine, William F.; Cosman, Bard C.; Saltz, Leonard; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer was updated by the Expert Panel on Radiation Oncology-Rectal/Anal Cancer, based on a literature review completed in 2007

  18. Tumor Volume Changes Assessed by Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Volumetry in Rectal Cancer Patients After Preoperative Chemoradiation: The Impact of the Volume Reduction Ratio on the Prediction of Pathologic Complete Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Young Chul; Kim, Hyunki; Kim, Young Wan; Hur, Hyuk; Kim, Jin Soo; Min, Byung Soh; Kim, Hogeun; Lim, Joon Seok; Seong, Jinsil; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between tumor volume changes assessed by three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry and the histopathologic tumor response in rectal cancer patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 84 patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by radical surgery were prospectively enrolled in the study. The post-treatment tumor volume and tumor volume reduction ratio (% decrease ratio), as shown by 3D MR volumetry, were compared with the histopathologic response, as shown by T and N downstaging and the tumor regression grade (TRG). Results: There were no significant differences in the post-treatment tumor volume and the volume reduction ratio shown by 3D MR volumetry with respect to T and N downstaging and the tumor regression grade. In a multivariate analysis, the tumor volume reduction ratio was not significantly associated with T and N downstaging. The volume reduction ratio (>75%, p = 0.01) and the pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level (≤3 ng/ml, p = 0.01), but not the post-treatment volume shown by 3D MR (≤ 5ml), were, however, significantly associated with an increased pathologic complete response rate. Conclusion: More than 75% of the tumor volume reduction ratios were significantly associated with a high pathologic complete response rate. Therefore, limited treatment options such as local excision or simple observation might be considered after preoperative CRT in this patient population.

  19. Progress in the surgery of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Schiessel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of rectal cancer has been improved a great deal within the last 20 years. Major progress has been made in the preoperative evaluation by introducing MRI- imaging as a basis for the further management. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy has been shown to be effective in downstaging of advanced tumours. The surgical technique has been improved in many respects.- Total mesorectal excision has reduced local recurrences, sphincter saving techniques such as low anterior resection and intersphincteric resection reduced the need for a permanent stoma to 10%-20%. Recently the introduction of minimal invasive techniques and the application of robotic systems have reduced the surgical trauma.

  20. Stages of Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  1. Interobserver agreement of radiologists assessing the response of rectal cancers to preoperative chemoradiation using the MRI tumour regression grading (mrTRG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, M.R.S.; Gormly, K.L.; Bhoday, J.; Balyansikova, S.; Battersby, N.J.; Chand, M.; Rao, S.; Tekkis, P.; Abulafi, A.M.; Brown, G.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tumour regression grading (mrTRG) scale can be taught effectively resulting in a clinically reasonable interobserver agreement (>0.4; moderate to near perfect agreement). Materials and methods: This study examines the interobserver agreement of mrTRG, between 35 radiologists and a central reviewer. Two workshops were organised for radiologists to assess regression of rectal cancers on MRI staging scans. A range of mrTRGs on 12 patient scans were used for assessment. Results: Kappa agreement ranged from 0.14–0.82 with a median value of 0.57 (95% CI: 0.37–0.77) indicating good overall agreement. Eight (26%) radiologists had very good/near perfect agreement (κ>0.8). Six (19%) radiologists had good agreement (0.8≥κ>0.6) and a further 12 (39%) had moderate agreement (0.6≥κ>0.4). Five (16%) radiologists had a fair agreement (0.4≥κ>0.2) and two had poor agreement (0.2>κ). There was a tendency towards good agreement (skewness: 0.92). In 65.9% and 90% of cases the radiologists were able to correctly highlight good and poor responders, respectively. Conclusions: The assessment of the response of rectal cancers to chemoradiation therapy may be performed effectively using mrTRG. Radiologists can be taught the mrTRG scale. Even with minimal training, good agreement with the central reviewer along with effective differentiation between good and intermediate/poor responders can be achieved. Focus should be on facilitating the identification of good responders. It is predicted that with more intensive interactive case-based learning a κ>0.8 is likely to be achieved. Testing and retesting is recommended. - Highlights: • Inter-observer agreement of radiologists was assessed using MRI rectal tumour regression scale. • Kappa agreement had a median value of 0.57 (95% CI: 0.37–0.77) indicating an overall good agreement. • In 65.9% and 90% of cases the radiologists were able to correctly highlight

  2. Molecular Genetic Changes Associated With Colorectal Carcinogenesis Are Not Prognostic for Tumor Regression Following Preoperative Chemoradiation of Rectal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zauber, N. Peter; Marotta, Steven P.; Berman, Errol; Grann, Alison; Rao, Maithili; Komati, Naga; Ribiero, Kezia; Bishop, D. Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for many patients with rectal cancer. The therapy may have toxicity and delays definitive surgery. It would therefore be desirable to identify those cancers that will not regress with preoperative therapy. We assessed a series of rectal cancers for the molecular changes of loss of heterozygosity of the APC and DCC genes, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability, changes that have clearly been associated with rectal carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: Diagnostic colonoscopic biopsies from 53 patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and radiation were assayed using polymerase chain reaction techniques followed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Regression of the primary tumor was evaluated using the surgically removed specimen. Results: Twenty-three lesions (45%) were found to have a high degree of regression. None of the molecular changes were useful as indicators of regression. Conclusions: Recognized molecular changes critical for rectal carcinogenesis including APC and DCC loss of heterozygosity, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability are not useful as indicators of tumor regression following chemoradiation for rectal carcinoma.

  3. Can histopathologic assessment of circumferential margin after preoperative pelvic chemoradiotherapy for T3-T4 rectal cancer predict for 3-year disease-free survival?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mawdsley, Suzannah; Glynne-Jones, Rob; Grainger, Juliet; Richman, Paul; Makris, Andreas; Harrison, Mark; Ashford, Richard; Harrison, Richard A.; Osborne, Melanie; Livingstone, Jeremy I.; MacDonald, Peter; Mitchell, Ian C.; Meyrick-Thomas, John; Northover, John; Windsor, Alastair; Novell, Richard; Wallace, Marina

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study set out to determine the impact of a positive circumferential resection margin (CRM) (R1-R2) and pathologic downstaging on local recurrence and survival in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 150 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were treated with long-course neoadjuvant CRT using low-dose folinic acid and 5-fluorouracil. CRT was followed 6-12 weeks later by surgical excision. The CRM rate and incidence, site, and pattern of local and systemic recurrences were recorded. The median follow-up was 25 months. Results: The overall median survival was 37 months, with a 5-year overall survival rate of 34%. Of the 150 patients, 122 underwent curative resection; 12% had a complete pathologic response, and downstaging to pT1-T2 occurred in an additional 16%. A negative CRM (R0) was achieved in 65% overall (98 of 150). Local recurrence occurred in 10% of those with R0 resection and 62% of those with R1-R2 resections. Distant metastases occurred in 29% of those with R0 resections and 75% of those with R1-R2 resections. The 3-year disease-free and 3-year overall survival rate was 9% and 25% and 52% and 64%, respectively, for patients with and without a histologically positive CRM. Conclusion: After 5-fluorouracil-based CRT, a positive CRM predicted for a high risk of subsequent local recurrence and a 3-year disease-free survival rate of only 9%. For this reason, the CRM should be considered a major prognostic factor and should be validated in future trials as an early alternative clinical endpoint

  4. The use of FDG-PET/CT and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for response prediction before, during and after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, Maarten; Roels, Sarah; Haustermans, Karin; Deroose, Christophe; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Keyzer, Frederik de; Penninckx, Freddy; Sagaert, Xavier; Cutsem, Eric van

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the use of FDG-PET/CT before, during and after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) before CRT for the prediction of pathological response (pCR) in rectal cancer patients. Material and methods. Twenty-two rectal cancer patients treated with long course CRT were included. An FDG-PET/CT was performed prior to the start of CRT, after 10 to 12 fractions of CRT and five weeks after the end of CRT. The tumor was delineated using a gradient based delineation method and the maximal standardized uptake values (SUV max ) were calculated. A DW-MRI was performed before start of CRT. Mean apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were determined. The ΔSUV max during and after CRT and the initial ADC values were correlated to the histopathological findings after total mesorectal excision (TME). Results. ΔSUV max during and after CRT significantly correlated with the pathological response to treatment (during CRT: ΔSUV max = 59% ± 12% for pCR vs. 25% ± 27% if no pCR, p=0.0036; post-CRT: 90% ± 11 for pCR vs. 63% ± 22 if no pCR p=0.013). ROC curve analysis revealed an optimal threshold for ΔSUV max of 40% during CRT and 76% after CRT. The initial ADC value was also significantly correlated with pCR (0.94 ± 0.12 x 10-3 mm 2 /s for pCR vs. 1.2 ± 0.24 x 10-3 mm 2 /s, p=0.002) and ROC curve analysis revealed an optimal threshold of 1.06 x 10-3 mm 2 /s. Combining the provided ΔSUV max thresholds during and after CRT increased specificity of the prediction (sensitivity 100% and specificity 94%). The combination of the thresholds for the initial ADC value and the ΔSUV max during CRT increased specificity of the prediction to a similar level (sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 94%). Conclusions. The combination of the different time points and the different imaging modalities increased the specificity of the response assessment both during and after CRT.

  5. MRI and Diffusion-weighted MRI Volumetry for Identification of Complete Tumor Responders After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Rectal Cancer: A Bi-institutional Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambregts, Doenja M J; Rao, Sheng-Xiang; Sassen, Sander; Martens, Milou H; Heijnen, Luc A; Buijsen, Jeroen; Sosef, Meindert; Beets, Geerard L; Vliegen, Roy A; Beets-Tan, Regina G H

    2015-12-01

    Retrospective single-center studies have shown that diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is promising for identification of patients with rectal cancer with a complete tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), using certain volumetric thresholds. This study aims to validate the diagnostic value of these volume thresholds in a larger, independent, and bi-institutional patient cohort. A total of 112 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (2 centers) treated with a long course of CRT were enrolled. Patients underwent standard T2W-magnetic resonance imaging and DWI, both pre- and post-CRT. Two experienced readers independently determined pre-CRT and post-CRT tumor volumes (cm) on T2W-magnetic resonance image and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance image by means of freehand tumor delineation. Tumor volume reduction rates (Δvolume) were calculated. Previously determined T2W and DWI threshold values for prevolume, postvolume, and Δvolume were tested to "prospectively" assess their respective diagnostic value in discriminating patients with a complete tumor response from patients with residual tumor. Twenty patients had a complete response. Using the average measurements between the 2 readers, areas under the curve for the pre-/post-/Δvolumes was 0.73/0.82/0.78 for T2W-magnetic resonance imaging and 0.77/0.92/0.86 for DWI, respectively. For T2W-volumetry, sensitivity and specificity using the predefined volume thresholds were 55% and 74% for pre-, 60% and 89% for post-, and 60% and 86% for Δvolume. For DWI volumetry, sensitivity and specificity were 65% and 76% for pre-, 70% and 98% for post-, and 70% and 93% for Δvolume. Previously established DWI volume thresholds can be reproduced with good results. Post-CRT DWI volumetry offers the best results for the detection of patients with a complete response after CRT with an area under the curve of 0.92, sensitivity of 70%, and specificity of 98%.

  6. Conservative management of anal and rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, J.P.; Romestaing, P.; Montbarbon, X.

    1989-01-01

    The role of irradiation in the management of anal and rectal cancer has changed during the past ten years. In small epidermoid carcinomas of the anal canal (T1 T2) irradiation is in most departments considered the primary treatment, giving a 5-year survival rate of between 60 and 80% with good sphincter preservation. Even in larger tumors, irradiation can still offer some chance of cure without colostomy. Surgery remains the basic treatment of rectal cancer but irradiation is used in association with surgery in many cases. Radiotherapy is of value in the conservative management of cancer of the rectum in three situations: In small polypoid cancers contact X-ray therapy can give local control in about 90%. In cancers of the middle rectum, preoperative external irradiation may increase the chances of restorative surgery and reduce the risk of local relapse. In inoperable patients, external radiotherapy and/or intracavitary irradiation may cure some patients with infiltrating tumors (T2 T3) without colostomy. (orig.)

  7. Problems and personal preferences in the therapy of rectal and anal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangabashyam, N.

    1985-01-01

    The three modalities of treatment for rectal cancer are radiotherapy chemotherapy and surgery. The problems in the therapy of rectal and anal cancers are discussed. For maximum benefit a combination of pre-operative irradiation and chemotherapy followed by surgery and if needed continued post-operative irradiation therapy is recommended. (author)

  8. A phase II study of preoperative mFOLFOX6 with short-course radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and liver-only metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Shin, Sang Joon; Cho, Min Soo; Ahn, Joong Bae; Jung, Minkyu; Kim, Tae Il; Park, Young Suk; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Nam Kyu; Koom, Woong Sub

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of upfront mFOLFOX6 followed by short-course radiotherapy (SCRT) and surgery in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and liver-only metastases. This single-arm phase II study involved 32 patients. mFOLFOX6 was administered for four cycles followed by SCRT and another four cycles of mFOLFOX6. Surgery was performed 4-6 weeks after the last chemotherapy cycle. The primary endpoint was complete (R0) resection rate. Secondary endpoints were response rate, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and complication rates. Surgical resection of the rectum and liver was performed in 25 patients (78%) and R0 resection was achieved in 20 patients (63%). Local tumor downstaging was observed in 54% of patients. Median OS and PFS were 38 and 9 months, respectively. One patient discontinued treatment due to toxicity and no treatment-related deaths occurred. Patients who progressed after 4 cycles of mFOLFOX6 were less likely to receive resection. This regimen was safe and effective in inducing local tumor response and achieving R0 resection in this patient population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  10. Preliminary results of pre-operative 5-FU, low dose leucovorin (LV), and concurrent radiation therapy (RT) for resectable T3 rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grann, Alison; Minsky, Bruce D.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Saltz, Leonard; Kelsen, David P.; Kemeny, Nancy; Ilson, David; Guillem, Jose G.; Paty, Philip B.; Bass, Joanne

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: We report the downstaging, acute toxicity, and preliminary local control and survival of pre-op 5-FU, low dose LV, and concurrent RT followed by post-op LV/5-FU for pts with clinically resectable, T3 rectal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 32 pts (M:26, F:6) were prospectively treated from 12/91-8/95. Eligibility criteria included adequate hematologic indicies, primary adenocarcinoma limited to the pelvis, and T3 disease confirmed by transrectal ultrasound. Twenty five pts were considered clinically to require an APR on initial (pre-treatment) assessment by their operating surgeon. The median age was 56 (range: 24-80), and the median distance from the anal verge was 5.0cm (range: 3-9cm). Pts received 2 monthly cycles (bolus daily X 5) of LV (20mg/m2) and 5-FU (325mg/m2), beginning concurrently with day 1 of RT, followed by surgery 4-5 weeks later. RT included 4680 cGy to the pelvis followed by a boost to 5040 cGy. Post-operatively, pts received a median of 2 monthly cycles (range: 0-10 cycles) of LV (20 mg/m2) and 5-FU (425mg/m2). A toxicity assessment was performed at each visit using the NCI toxicity criteria modified for gastrointestinal toxicity. The median follow-up was 12 months (range: 3-48 months). All 32 patients were included in the analysis of toxicity, sphincter preservation, and downstaging. Analysis of patterns of failure and survival was limited to the 15 pts who had a minimum follow-up of 1yr or developed failure prior to 1 yr. For this subset the median follow-up was 24 months (range: 3-48 months). RESULTS: During the pre-op segment, individual grade 3+ acute toxicities were; diarrhea: 16%, bowel movements: 16%, leukopenia: 12%. The incidence of total toxicity was 25% ((8(32))). The median nadir counts were; WBC: 2.9 (range: 1.7-5.6), HGB: 12.4 (range: 7.1-15.0), and PLT (X1000): 161 (range: 113-237). The pathologic complete response rate was 9% ((3(32))). An additional 13% ((4(32))) had negative lymph nodes and 1-2 microscopic

  11. NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0822: A Phase 2 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@mgh.harvard.edu [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Garofalo, Michael C. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Bendell, Johanna [Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Berger, Adam C. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E. [North Main Radiation Oncology, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Anne, Pramila Rani [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Perera, Francisco [London Regional Cancer Program/Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Lee, R. Jeffrey [Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Nowlan, Adam [Piedmont Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); DeNittis, Albert [Main Line Community Clinical Oncology Program, Wynnewood, Pennsylvania (United States); Crane, Christopher [University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in cT3-4 rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with localized, nonmetastatic T3 or T4 rectal cancer <12 cm from the anal verge were enrolled in a prospective, multi-institutional, single-arm study of preoperative chemoradiation. Patients received 45 Gy with IMRT in 25 fractions, followed by a 3-dimensional conformal boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions with concurrent capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX). Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Patients were recommended to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy after surgery. The primary endpoint of the study was acute grade 2 to 5 GI toxicity. Seventy-one patients provided 80% probability to detect at least a 12% reduction in the specified GI toxicity with the treatment of CAPOX and IMRT, at a significance level of .10 (1-sided). Results: Seventy-nine patients were accrued, of whom 68 were evaluable. Sixty-one patients (89.7%) had cT3 disease, and 37 (54.4%) had cN (+) disease. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 42 of 68 patients. Fifty-eight patients had target contours drawn per protocol, 5 patients with acceptable variation, and 5 patients with unacceptable variations. Thirty-five patients (51.5%) experienced grade ≥2 GI toxicity, 12 patients (17.6%) experienced grade 3 or 4 diarrhea, and pCR was achieved in 10 patients (14.7%). With a median follow-up time of 3.98 years, the 4-year rate of locoregional failure was 7.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0%-13.7%). The 4-year rates of OS and DFS were 82.9% (95% CI: 70.1%-90.6%) and 60.6% (95% CI: 47.5%-71.4%), respectively. Conclusion: The use of IMRT in neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer did not reduce the rate of GI toxicity.

  12. Prospective, Multicenter Validation Study of Magnetic Resonance Volumetry for Response Assessment After Preoperative Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer: Can the Results in the Literature be Reproduced?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Milou H., E-mail: mh.martens@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Heeswijk, Miriam M. van [Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Broek, Joris J. van den [Department of Surgery, Medical Center Alkmaar, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Rao, Sheng-Xiang [Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Vandecaveye, Vincent [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Vliegen, Roy A. [Department of Radiology, Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen (Netherlands); Schreurs, Wilhelmina H. [Department of Surgery, Medical Center Alkmaar, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J. [Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To review the available literature on tumor size/volume measurements on magnetic resonance imaging for response assessment after chemoradiotherapy, and validate these cut-offs in an independent multicenter patient cohort. Methods and Materials: The study included 2 parts. (1) Review of the literature: articles were included that assessed the accuracy of tumor size/volume measurements on magnetic resonance imaging for tumor response assessment. Size/volume cut-offs were extracted; (2) Multicenter validation: extracted cut-offs from the literature were tested in a multicenter cohort (n=146). Accuracies were calculated and compared with reported results from the literature. Results: The review included 14 articles, in which 3 different measurement methods were assessed: (1) tumor length; (2) 3-dimensonial tumor size; and (3) whole volume. Study outcomes consisted of (1) complete response (ypT0) versus residual tumor; (2) tumor regression grade 1 to 2 versus 3 to 5; and (3) T-downstaging (ypTrectal cancer response assessment with selected cut-off values. Measurements of tumor length or 3-dimensional tumor size are not helpful. Magnetic resonance volumetry is mainly accurate to assess a complete tumor response (ypT0) after chemoradiation therapy (accuracies up to 80%).

  13. Rectal cancer: involved circumferential resection margin - a root cause analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, H; Collantes, E C; Rashid, S H; Wong, L S; Baragwanath, P

    2009-06-01

    An involved circumferential resection margin (CRM) following surgery for rectal cancer is the strongest predictor of local recurrence and may represent a failure of the multidisciplinary team (MDT) process. The study analyses the causes of positive CRM in patients undergoing elective surgery for rectal cancer with respect to the decision-making process of the MDT, preoperative rectal cancer staging and surgical technique. From March 2002 to September 2005, data were collected prospectively on all patients undergoing elective rectal cancer surgery with curative intent. The data on all patients identified with positive CRM were analysed. Of 158 patients (male:female = 2.2:1) who underwent potentially curative surgery, 16 (10%) patients had a positive CRM on postoperative histology. Four were due to failure of the pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging scans to predict an involved margin, two with an equivocal CRM on MRI did not have preoperative radiotherapy, one had an inaccurate assessment of the site of primary tumour and in one intra-operative difficulty was encountered. No failure of staging or surgery was identified in the remaining eight of the 16 patients. Abdominoperineal resection (APR) was associated with a 26% positive CRM, compared with 5% for anterior resection. No single consistent cause was found for a positive CRM. The current MDT process and/or surgical technique may be inadequate for low rectal tumours requiring APR.

  14. Oxaliplatin added to fluorouracil-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer (the German CAO/ARO/AIO-04 study): final results of the multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödel, Claus; Graeven, Ullrich; Fietkau, Rainer; Hohenberger, Werner; Hothorn, Torsten; Arnold, Dirk; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Ghadimi, Michael; Wolff, Hendrik A; Lang-Welzenbach, Marga; Raab, Hans-Rudolf; Wittekind, Christian; Ströbel, Philipp; Staib, Ludger; Wilhelm, Martin; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G; Hoffmanns, Hans; Lindemann, Fritz; Schlenska-Lange, Anke; Folprecht, Gunnar; Sauer, Rolf; Liersch, Torsten

    2015-08-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with infusional fluorouracil, total mesorectal excision surgery, and postoperative chemotherapy with fluorouracil was established by the German CAO/ARO/AIO-94 trial as a standard combined modality treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Here we compare the previously established regimen with an investigational regimen in which oxaliplatin was added to both preoperative chemoradiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy. In this multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 study we randomly assigned patients with rectal adenocarcinoma, clinically staged as cT3-4 or any node-positive disease, to two groups: a control group receiving standard fluorouracil-based combined modality treatment, consisting of preoperative radiotherapy of 50·4 Gy in 28 fractions plus infusional fluorouracil (1000 mg/m(2) on days 1-5 and 29-33), followed by surgery and four cycles of bolus fluorouracil (500 mg/m(2) on days 1-5 and 29); or to an investigational group receiving preoperative radiotherapy of 50·4 Gy in 28 fractions plus infusional fluorouracil (250 mg/m(2) on days 1-14 and 22-35) and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, 22, and 29), followed by surgery and eight cycles of oxaliplatin (100 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 15), leucovorin (400 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 15), and infusional fluorouracil (2400 mg/m(2) on days 1-2 and 15-16). Randomisation was done with computer-generated block-randomisation codes stratified by centre, clinical T category (cT1-3 vs cT4), and clinical N category (cN0 vs cN1-2) without masking. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival, defined as the time between randomisation and non-radical surgery of the primary tumour (R2 resection), locoregional recurrence after R0/1 resection, metastatic disease or progression, or death from any cause, whichever occurred first. Survival and cumulative incidence of recurrence analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle; toxicity analyses included all patients treated. Enrolment of

  15. Rectal cancer: assessment of complete response to preoperative combined radiation therapy with chemotherapy--conventional MR volumetry versus diffusion-weighted MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curvo-Semedo, Luís; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique; Thywissen, Thomas; Mehsen, Rana T; Lammering, Guido; Beets, Geerard L; Caseiro-Alves, Filipe; Beets-Tan, Regina G H

    2011-09-01

    To determine diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for assessment of complete tumor response (CR) after combined radiation therapy with chemotherapy (CRT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) by means of volumetric signal intensity measurements and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements and to compare the performance of DW imaging with that of T2-weighted MR volumetry. A retrospective analysis of 50 patients with LARC, for whom clinical and imaging data were retrieved from a previous imaging study approved by the local institutional ethical committee and for which all patients provided informed consent, was conducted. Patients underwent pre- and post-CRT standard T2-weighted MR and DW MR. Two independent readers placed free-hand regions of interest (ROIs) in each tumor-containing section on both data sets to determine pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes and tumor volume reduction rates (volume). ROIs were copied to an ADC map to calculate tumor ADCs. Histopathologic findings were the standard of reference. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to compare performance of T2-weighted and DW MR volumetry and ADC. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate interobserver variability and the correlation between T2-weighted and DW MR volumetry. Areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) for identification of a CR that was based on pre-CRT volume, post-CRT volume, and volume, respectively, were 0.57, 0.70, and 0.84 for T2-weighted MR versus 0.63, 0.93, and 0.92 for DW MR volumetry (P = .15, .02, .42). Pre- and post-CRT ADC and ADC AUCs were 0.55, 0.54, and 0.51, respectively. Interobserver agreement was excellent for all pre-CRT measurements (ICC, 0.91-0.96) versus good (ICC, 0.61-0.79) for post-CRT measurements. ICC between T2-weighted and DW MR volumetry was excellent (0.97) for pre-CRT measurements versus fair (0.25) for post-CRT measurements. Post-CRT DW MR

  16. Rectal cancer surgery: volume-outcome analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Emmeline

    2010-12-01

    There is strong evidence supporting the importance of the volume-outcome relationship with respect to lung and pancreatic cancers. This relationship for rectal cancer surgery however remains unclear. We review the currently available literature to assess the evidence base for volume outcome in relation to rectal cancer surgery.

  17. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  18. Perioperative Colonic Evaluation in Patients with Rectal Cancer; MR Colonography Versus Standard Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Michael Patrick; Løgager, Vibeke; Lund Rasmussen, Vera

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Preoperative colonic evaluation is often inadequate because of cancer stenosis making a full conventional colonoscopy (CC) impossible. In several studies, cancer stenosis has been shown in up to 16%-34% of patients with colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study...... was to prospectively evaluate the completion rate of preoperative colonic evaluation and the quality of perioperative colonic evaluation using magnetic resonance colonography (MRC) in patients with rectal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer were randomized to either group A: standard...... preoperative diagnostic work-up or group B: preoperative MR diagnostic work-up (standard preoperative diagnostic work-up + MRC). A complete and adequate perioperative clean-colon evaluation (PCE) was defined as either a complete preoperative colonic evaluation or a complete colonic evaluation within 3 months...

  19. Multimodal imaging evaluation in staging of rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Suk Hee; Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung-Keun

    2014-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a common cancer and a major cause of mortality in Western countries. Accurate staging is essential for determining the optimal treatment strategies and planning appropriate surgical procedures to control rectal cancer. Endorectal ultrasonography (EUS) is suitable for assessing the extent of tumor invasion, particularly in early-stage or superficial rectal cancer cases. In advanced cases with distant metastases, computed tomography (CT) is the primary approach used to evaluate the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often used to assess preoperative staging and the circumferential resection margin involvement, which assists in evaluating a patient’s risk of recurrence and their optimal therapeutic strategy. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT may be useful in detecting occult synchronous tumors or metastases at the time of initial presentation. Restaging after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) remains a challenge with all modalities because it is difficult to reliably differentiate between the tumor mass and other radiation-induced changes in the images. EUS does not appear to have a useful role in post-therapeutic response assessments. Although CT is most commonly used to evaluate treatment responses, its utility for identifying and following-up metastatic lesions is limited. Preoperative high-resolution MRI in combination with diffusion-weighted imaging, and/or PET-CT could provide valuable prognostic information for rectal cancer patients with locally advanced disease receiving preoperative CRT. Based on these results, we conclude that a combination of multimodal imaging methods should be used to precisely assess the restaging of rectal cancer following CRT. PMID:24764662

  20. Is rectal MRI beneficial for determining the location of rectal cancer with respect to the peritoneal reflection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Eun Joo; Ryu, Chun Geun; Kim, Gangmi; Kim, Su Ran; Nam, Sang Eun; Park, Hee Sun; Kim, Young Jun; Hwang, Dae-Yong

    2012-01-01

    An objective method for determining the location of the cancer with respect to peritoneal reflection would be helpful to decide the treatment modality for rectal cancer. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of rectal MRI to determine spatial relations between the peritoneal reflection and rectal cancer and to compare these with operative findings. Patients that underwent a rectal cancer operation after a rectal MRI check between November 2008 and June 2010 were considered for the study. The patients that received preoperative concurrent chemoradiation or trans-anal local excision were excluded. Fifty-four patients constituted the study cohort. By comparing surgical and radiologic findings, the accuracy for predicting tumour location in relation to the peritoneal reflection by rectal MRI in all patients was 90.7%. In terms of tumour location in relation to peritoneal reflection, the accuracy of rectal MRI was 93.5% in patients with a tumour located above the peritoneal reflection, 90.0% in patients with a tumour located on the peritoneal reflection, and 84.6% in patients with a tumour located below the peritoneal reflection (p=0.061). When the cohort was subdivided by gender, body mass index (BMI), operative findings, or tumour size, no significant difference was observed among subgroups. Rectal MRI could be a useful tool for evaluating the relation between rectal cancer and peritoneal reflection especially when tumour size is less than 8cm. Rectal MRI can provide information regarding the location of rectal cancer in relation to the peritoneal reflection for treatment planning purposes

  1. Colon and rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldombide, L.; Cordoba, A.

    2010-01-01

    This study is about the diagnosis, therapy and monitoring of colon cancer. The techniques used are the endoscopy with biopsy in the pre and post operative colon surgery, abdominal ultrasound, chest X-ray studies of hemogram as well as liver and renal function

  2. Acute toxicity of chemoradiation for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedel, C.; Fietkau, R.; Keilholz, L.; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Kessler, H.; Martus, P.; Sauer, R.

    1997-01-01

    Between 1987 and 1995, 120 patients with rectal cancer (73 patients with primary tumor, 47 with recurrent disease) received chemoradiation for rectal cancer. Fifty-six patients received preoperative chemoradiation, 64 patients were treated postoperatively. Radiation was given by 4-field box technique with 6 to 10 MV-photons. Daily fraction size was 1.8 Gy, total dose 50.4 Gy (range: 41,4 to 56 Gy) ± 5.4 Gy (range: 3.6 to 19.8 Gy) local boost in selected cases, specified to the ICRU reference point. During the first and fifth week of radiation 5-FU at a dose of 1000 m 2 /d for 120 hours was administered by continuous infusion. Toxicity was recorded following (modified) WHO-criteria. Results: Acute grade 3 toxicity occurred mainly as diarrhea (33%), perineal skin reaction (37%), and leukopenia (10%). Extension of the treatment volume including paraaortic lymph nodes (L3) led to a significant increase of grade 3-diarrhea (68% vs. 25%, p = 0.0003) and grade 3-leukopenia (18% vs. 8%, p 0.03). After abdominoperineal resection less patients suffered from grade 3-diarrhea (8% vs. 47% after sphincter preserving procedures, p = 0.0006), whereas severe perineal erythema occurred more frequently (56% vs. 29%, p 0.02). Women had significantly more toxic side effects (grade 3-diarrhea: 39% vs. 16% in men, p = 0,04; grade 2 to 3-nausea/emesis: 21% vs 8% in men, p 0.018; grade 2 to 3-leukopenia 53% vs. 31% in men, p = 0.02). After preoperative chemoradiation a significant reduction of grade 3-diarrhea (11% vs 29%, p 0.03) and grade 3-erythema (16% vs. 41%, p = 0.04) was noted. (orig./AJ) [de

  3. Improvements in 5-year outcomes of stage II/III rectal cancer relative to colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Daniel J; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline; Hay, John; Phang, P Terry; Fitzgerald, Catherine; Kennecke, Hagen

    2013-12-01

    Stage for stage, rectal cancer has historically been associated with inferior survival compared with colon cancer. Randomized trials of rectal cancer have generally demonstrated improvements in locoregional relapse but not survival. We compared therapy and outcomes of colon versus rectal cancer in 2 time cohorts to determine if relative improvements have occurred. Patients with resected stage II/III colorectal cancer referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency in 1989/1990 and 2001/2002 were identified. The higher of clinical or pathologic stage was used for patients receiving preoperative chemoradiation. Disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) were compared for rectal and colon cancer between the 2 cohorts. Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. A total of 1427 patients were included, with 375 from 1989/1990 and 1052 from 2001/2002. Between 1989/1990 and 2001/2002 there were significant increases in the use of perioperative chemotherapy for both rectal and colon cancer (Prectal cancer. DSS significantly improved for rectal (Pcolon cancer (P=0.069). Five-year OS was significantly inferior for rectal versus colon cancer in 1989/1990 (46.1% vs. 57.2%, P=0.023) and was similar to that of colon cancer in 2001/2002 (63.7% vs. 66.2%, P=0.454). Advances in locoregional and systemic therapy significantly improved survival among patients with rectal cancer. DSS and OS are now similar between colon and rectal cancer for both stage II and III disease.

  4. Endocavitary radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schild, Steven E.; Martenson, James A.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This analysis was performed to evaluate the results of endocavitary radiotherapy (RT) administered for early rectal cancer at our institution. Methods and Materials: Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed to determine the results of endocavitary RT regarding survival, local control, and complications. Between 1987 and 1994, 25 patients were treated with endocavitary RT for early rectal cancer. Twenty had early, low grade tumors and met the criteria for treatment with curative intent. Five had more advanced, high grade, or multiple recurrent tumors and were treated with palliative intent. The tumors were treated to between 20 and 155 Gy in one to four fractions with 50 KV x-rays given through a specialized proctoscope. Patients were followed for 5 to 84 months (median = 55 months) after therapy. Local control and survival were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control was achieved in 18 of the 20 patients treated with curative intent and 4 of 5 treated with palliative intent. For those patients treated with curative intent, the 5-year local control rate was 89% and the 5-year survival rate was 76%. The most significant toxicity was ulceration that occurred in 5 of the 25 patients. The ulcers were asymptomatic in three cases and associated with bleeding in one case. The fifth patient had pain. One ulcer was biopsied, resulting in perforation that was treated with an abdominal perineal resection (APR). There was no tumor found upon pathologic evaluation. Conclusions: Endocavitary RT can be used to treat patients with early, low-grade rectal cancers and will yield a high level of disease control and a low risk of serious complications. Major advantages of this treatment technique are that it requires neither general anesthesia nor hospitalization

  5. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Ibn Majdoub, Karim; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100,000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis.

  6. Neorectal hyposensitivity after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregendahl, Sidse; Emmertsen, Katrine Jøssing; Fassov, Janne; Krogh, Klaus; Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans; Laurberg, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer has a detrimental effect on long-term anorectal function and quality of life, additional to that observed after rectal resection. The exact physiological mechanisms for the excess impairment remain unknown. We aimed to investigate neorectal and anal sphincter properties in patients treated with neoadjuvant therapy (NT) prior to total mesorectal excision (TME). Material and methods: Sixteen patients (NT+ patients) were examined by multimodal neorectal stimulation and standard anorectal physiological testing. Data were compared to the results of 23 patients, who underwent TME without NT (NT− patients). Results: NT+ patients had elevated sensory thresholds to heat (median temperature, 60 vs. 55 °C; p 2 O; p = 0.05). Conclusions: Pelvic radiotherapy causes neorectal hyposensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli in patients receiving NT prior to TME surgery for rectal cancer, possibly due to impaired afferent nerve function

  7. A multidisciplinary treatment strategy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, F.; Yanagi, Hidenori; Atono, R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the therapeutic effects and adverse events of preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer in different radiation doses and fractions. A total of 142 consecutive patients with locally advanced (cT3-4 and/or cN1-2) adenocarcinoma of the rectum were treated with preoperative CRT and were operated radically. 121 patients with resectable cT3 or N1-2 rectal adenocarcinoma were assigned to receive pelvic radiation with single fractions of 2.5 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 25 Gy (Short CRT). Surgery was undergone within two weeks. 21 patients with clinical unresectable or marginally resectable cT4 rectal cancer were assigned to receive preoperative pelvic radiation therapy 45 to 50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy per day. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of neoadjuvant therapy (Long CRT). We examined retrospectively the preoperative therapeutic effect and adverse event of Short CRT and Long CRT. Short CRT; Overall R0 resection rate was 98%. Anus preserving rate was 95%. pCR rate was 5%. Median follow-up was 62 months. The actuarial 5-year-local-control rate was 94%. Overall survival for 5 years was 92%. Long neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NCRT); Overall R0 resection rate was 90%. Anus preserving rate was 86%. pCR rate was 24%. Median follow-up was 60 months. The actuarial 5-year-local-control rate was 88%. Overall survival rate for 5 years was 88%. Radiation related adverse event such as pelvic infection and skin trouble was significantly higher in the long CRT group. Local control in primarily resectable rectal cancer after short chemoradiation was excellent. Long chemoradiation for unresectable or marginal cT4 rectum cancer was higher response ratio, but induced more radiation related adverse event than short course CRT. (author)

  8. Progress in Rectal Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceelen, Wim P.

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic improvement in local control of rectal cancer observed during the last decades is to be attributed to attention to surgical technique and to the introduction of neoadjuvant therapy regimens. Nevertheless, systemic relapse remains frequent and is currently insufficiently addressed. Intensification of neoadjuvant therapy by incorporating chemotherapy with or without targeted agents before the start of (chemo)radiation or during the waiting period to surgery may present an opportunity to improve overall survival. An increasing number of patients can nowadays undergo sphincter preserving surgery. In selected patients, local excision or even a “wait and see” approach may be feasible following active neoadjuvant therapy. Molecular and genetic biomarkers as well as innovative imaging techniques may in the future allow better selection of patients for this treatment option. Controversy persists concerning the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy after neoadjuvant regimens. The currently available evidence suggests that in complete pathological responders long-term outcome is excellent and adjuvant therapy may be omitted. The results of ongoing trials will help to establish the ideal tailored approach in resectable rectal cancer. PMID:22970381

  9. Evidences in multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bari, B.; Bosset, J.F.; Gerard, J.P.; Maingon, P.; Valentini, V.

    2012-01-01

    In the last 10 years, a number of important European randomized published studies investigated the optimal management of rectal cancer. In order to define an evidence-based approach of the clinical practice based, an international consensus conference was organized in Italy under the endorsement of European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO) and European Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO). The aim of this article is to present highlights of multidisciplinary rectal cancer management and to compare the conclusions of the international conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) with the new National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. (authors)

  10. ENDOSCOPIC TECHNOLOGIES IN EARLY RECTAL CANCER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Samsonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Total mesorectal excision is the “golden standard” of surgical treatment for rectal cancer. Development of endoscopic technologies allowed to implement the benefits of minimally invasive surgery in early rectal cancer treatment, decrease morbidity and mortality, improve functional outcome and quality of life. Oncological safety of this method is still a subject for discussion due to lack of lymph node harvest. Endoscopic operations for early rectal cancer are being actively implemented in daily practice, but lack of experience does not allow to include this method in national clinical prac-tice guidelines.

  11. The Rectal Cancer Female Sexuality Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyø, Anne; Emmertsen, Katrine J; Laurberg, Søren

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sexual dysfunction and impaired quality of life is a potential side effect to rectal cancer treatment. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a simple scoring system intended to evaluate sexual function in women treated for rectal cancer. DESIGN......: This is a population-based cross-sectional study. SETTINGS: Female patients diagnosed with rectal cancer between 2001 and 2014 were identified by using the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's database. Participants filled in the validated Sexual Function Vaginal Changes questionnaire. Women declared to be sexually active...... in the validation group. PATIENTS: Female patients with rectal cancer above the age of 18 who underwent abdominoperineal resection, Hartmann procedure, or total/partial mesorectal excision were selected. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measured was the quality of life that was negatively affected because...

  12. Meat and colo-rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M J

    1999-05-01

    In early epidemiological studies of diet and cancer the stress was on the search for causal factors. Population (ecological) studies tended to show a strong correlation between meat intake, particularly red meat, and the risk of colo-rectal cancer. They also tended to show meat to be strongly inversely correlated with cancers of the stomach and oesophagus and liver. Early case-control studies tended to support the postulated role for red meat in colo-rectal carcinogenesis, although more recent case-control studies, particularly those from Europe, have tended to show no relationship. The cohort studies in general failed to detect any relationship between meat intake and colo-rectal cancer risk. The available evidence points to the intake of protective factors such as vegetables and whole-grain cereals being the main determinants of colo-rectal cancer risk, with meat intake only coincidentally related.

  13. Radiotherapy for early rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    A literature review of 10 series using electrocoagulation, fulguration, or local excision demonstrates that about 70% of all patients had tumors smaller than 3 cm and the remainder had tumors measuring between 4 cm and 7 cm. Although primary tumor size in rectal cancer has little prognostic value per se, it is obviously important when determining the appropriateness of local therapy. Selecting patients for local therapy based on tumor size alone seems reasonable, since the recurrence and survival rates for the patients are similar to those achieved with radical surgery. Since patients treated with local excision alone have predominantly T1 or T2 tumors, a comparison with the data of others illustrates the prognostic utility of the degree of bowel penetration and shows five-year survival rates of 71% to 76% for patients with limited disease. In this chapter, the author describes an additional group of patients who also did well following postoperative radiotherapy after conservative surgical treatment

  14. Technological advances in radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes the available evidence for the use of modern radiotherapy techniques for chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, with specific focus on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. RECENT FINDINGS: The dosimetric...

  15. Rectal Cancer Survivors' Participation in Productive Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbrook, Mark C; Grant, Marcia; Wendel, Christopher; Bulkley, Joanna E; Mcmullen, Carmit K; Altschuler, Andrea; Temple, Larissa Kf; Herrinton, Lisa J; Krouse, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    Rectal cancer and its treatment impair survivors' productivity. To assess determinants of market and nonmarket employment, job search, volunteering, and homemaking among survivors five years or longer after diagnosis. We mailed questionnaires to 1063 survivors who were members of Kaiser Permanente (Northern California, Northwest) during 2010 and 2011. Productive activities, functional health status, and bowel management at the time of the survey. Response rate was 60.5% (577/953). Higher comorbidity burdens were associated with lower productivity for men and women rectal cancer survivors. Productive survivors were younger and had lower disease stage and age at diagnosis, higher household income and educational attainment, and fewer comorbidity burdens and workplace adjustments than did nonproductive survivors (p < 0.05 each; 2-sided). Productive rectal cancer survivors were evenly split by sex. Staying productive is associated with better mental health for rectal cancer survivors. Rectal cancer survivors with multiple chronic conditions, higher disease stage, lower productive activities, and older age need better access to medical care and closer monitoring of the quality of their care, including self-care. To capture the full extent of the involvement of survivors in all types of productive activities, research should routinely include measures of employment, searching for employment, homemaking, and volunteering. Counting market and nonmarket productive activities is innovative and recognizes the continuum of contributions survivors make to families and society. Health care systems should routinely monitor rectal cancer survivors' medical care access, comorbidities, health-related quality of life, and productive activities.

  16. Health-related Quality of Life after complex rectal surgery for primary advanced rectal cancer and locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Henriette Vind

    2013-01-01

    postoperative morbidity, Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL) is an important issue. The overall aim of this thesis was therefore to evaluate HRQoL in patients with PARC and LRRC treated with COMP-RCS and curative intent. In study I a review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of HRQo......Advances in the treatment of rectal cancer, have made it possible to perform complex rectal cancer surgery (COMP-RCS) with curative intent in patients with primary advanced rectal caner (PARC) and local recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Due to the complexity of the treatment and its high...... in the study was 164 (86%) patients treated with standard rectal cancer surgery (STAN-RCS). The Danish version showed satisfactory psychometric properties for the scales concerning body image, sexual functioning, male sexual problems and defecations problems. Reduced psychometric properties were found...

  17. FXYD-3 expression in relation to local recurrence of rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loftas, Per; Arbman, Gunnar; Sun, Xiao Feng; Hallbook, Olof [Dept. of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoping University, Norrkoping (Sweden); Edler, David [Dept. of Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Syk, Erik [Dept. of Surgery, Ersta Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-03-15

    In a previous study, the transmembrane protein FXYD-3 was suggested as a biomarker for a lower survival rate and reduced radiosensitivity in rectal cancer patients receiving preoperative radiotherapy. The purpose of preoperative irradiation in rectal cancer is to reduce local recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of FXYD-3 as a biomarker for increased risk for local recurrence of rectal cancer. FXYD-3 expression was immunohistochemically examined in surgical specimens from a cohort of patients with rectal cancer who developed local recurrence (n = 48). The cohort was compared to a matched control group without recurrence (n = 81). Weak FXYD-3 expression was found in 106/129 (82%) of the rectal tumors and strong expression in 23/129 (18%). There was no difference in the expression of FXYD-3 between the patients with local recurrence and the control group. Furthermore there was no difference in FXYD-3 expression and time to diagnosis of local recurrence between patients who received preoperative radiotherapy and those without. Previous findings indicated that FXYD-3 expression may be used as a marker of decreased sensitivity to radiotherapy or even overall survival. We were unable to confirm this in a cohort of rectal cancer patients who developed local recurrence.

  18. FXYD-3 expression in relation to local recurrence of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loftas, Per; Arbman, Gunnar; Sun, Xiao Feng; Hallbook, Olof; Edler, David; Syk, Erik

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, the transmembrane protein FXYD-3 was suggested as a biomarker for a lower survival rate and reduced radiosensitivity in rectal cancer patients receiving preoperative radiotherapy. The purpose of preoperative irradiation in rectal cancer is to reduce local recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of FXYD-3 as a biomarker for increased risk for local recurrence of rectal cancer. FXYD-3 expression was immunohistochemically examined in surgical specimens from a cohort of patients with rectal cancer who developed local recurrence (n = 48). The cohort was compared to a matched control group without recurrence (n = 81). Weak FXYD-3 expression was found in 106/129 (82%) of the rectal tumors and strong expression in 23/129 (18%). There was no difference in the expression of FXYD-3 between the patients with local recurrence and the control group. Furthermore there was no difference in FXYD-3 expression and time to diagnosis of local recurrence between patients who received preoperative radiotherapy and those without. Previous findings indicated that FXYD-3 expression may be used as a marker of decreased sensitivity to radiotherapy or even overall survival. We were unable to confirm this in a cohort of rectal cancer patients who developed local recurrence

  19. Improved survival after rectal cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, S; Harling, H; Iversen, L H

    2010-01-01

    Objective In 1995, an analysis showed an inferior prognosis after rectal cancer in Denmark compared with the other Scandinavian countries. The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) was established with the aim of improving the prognosis, and in this study we present a survival analysis of patients...... treated from 1994 to 2006. Method The study was based on the National Rectal Cancer Registry and the National Colorectal Cancer Database, supplemented with data from the Central Population Registry. The analysis included actuarial overall and relative survival. Results A total of 10 632 patients were...

  20. Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer – The impact of MRI on incidence and imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturludóttir, Margrét; Martling, Anna; Carlsson, Stefan; Blomqvist, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Prostate and rectal cancers are two of the most common cancers in male. •Synchronous diagnosis of prostate and rectal cancer is a rare identity. •Strong increase in the synchronous diagnosis likely due to improved diagnostic methods. •Pre-treatment MRI for rectal cancer has led to increased synchronous diagnosis. -- Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the incidence of synchronous diagnosis of rectal and prostate cancer and to identify how the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for preoperative staging of rectal cancer has affected the incidence. Methods: Regional data from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry and the Regional Cancer Registry in Stockholm-Gotland area (two million inhabitants) between the years 1995–2011 were used. Patients were included when the rectal cancer was diagnosed prior to the prostate cancer. Medical records and pre-treatment MRI were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Of 29,849 patients diagnosed with either disease, synchronous diagnosis was made in 29 patients (0.1%). Two patients were diagnosed in the years 1995–1999, seven patients between the years 2000–2005 and 20 patients between the years 2006–2011. The most common presentation, for the prostate cancer was incidental finding during staging for rectal cancer, n = 20, and of those led MRI to the diagnosis in 14 cases. At retrospective review, all patients had focal lesions in the prostate on MRI and patients with higher suspicion of malignancy on MRI had more locally advanced disease. Conclusion: Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer are a rare entity, but a strong increase in synchronous diagnosis is seen which may be attributed to improved diagnostic methods, including the use of pre-treatment MRI in routine work-up for rectal cancer

  1. Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer – The impact of MRI on incidence and imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturludóttir, Margrét, E-mail: margret.sturludottir@karolinska.se [Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Martling, Anna, E-mail: anna.martling@ki.se [Center of Surgical Gastroenterology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Solna (Sweden); Carlsson, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.carlsson@ki.se [Department of Urology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Solna (Sweden); Blomqvist, Lennart, E-mail: lennart.k.blomqvist@ki.se [Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Solna (Sweden); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Solna (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Prostate and rectal cancers are two of the most common cancers in male. •Synchronous diagnosis of prostate and rectal cancer is a rare identity. •Strong increase in the synchronous diagnosis likely due to improved diagnostic methods. •Pre-treatment MRI for rectal cancer has led to increased synchronous diagnosis. -- Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the incidence of synchronous diagnosis of rectal and prostate cancer and to identify how the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for preoperative staging of rectal cancer has affected the incidence. Methods: Regional data from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry and the Regional Cancer Registry in Stockholm-Gotland area (two million inhabitants) between the years 1995–2011 were used. Patients were included when the rectal cancer was diagnosed prior to the prostate cancer. Medical records and pre-treatment MRI were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Of 29,849 patients diagnosed with either disease, synchronous diagnosis was made in 29 patients (0.1%). Two patients were diagnosed in the years 1995–1999, seven patients between the years 2000–2005 and 20 patients between the years 2006–2011. The most common presentation, for the prostate cancer was incidental finding during staging for rectal cancer, n = 20, and of those led MRI to the diagnosis in 14 cases. At retrospective review, all patients had focal lesions in the prostate on MRI and patients with higher suspicion of malignancy on MRI had more locally advanced disease. Conclusion: Synchronous rectal and prostate cancer are a rare entity, but a strong increase in synchronous diagnosis is seen which may be attributed to improved diagnostic methods, including the use of pre-treatment MRI in routine work-up for rectal cancer.

  2. Rectal and colon cancer : Not just a different anatomic site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamas, K.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.; de Vries, E. G. E.; van Vugt, M. A. T. M.; Beets-Tan, R. G.; van Etten, B.; de Groot, D. J. A.; Hospers, G. A. P.

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total

  3. A Systematic Overview of Radiation Therapy Effects in Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glimelius, Bengt; Groenberg, Henrik; Jaerhult, Johannes; Wallgren, Arne; Cavallin-Staahl, Eva

    2003-01-01

    A systematic review of radiation therapy trials in several tumour types was performed by The Swedish Council of Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). The procedures for evaluation of the scientific literature are described separately. This synthesis of the literature on radiation therapy for rectal cancer is based on data from 42 randomized trials and 3 meta-analyses. Moreover, data from 36 prospective studies, 7 retrospective studies and 17 other articles were used. A total of 131 scientific articles are included, involving 25,351 patients. The results were compared with those of a similar overview from 1996 including 15,042 patients. The conclusions reached can be summarized thus: The results after rectal cancer surgery have improved during the past decade. It is likely that local failure rates after 5 years of follow-up at hospitals adopting the TME-concept (TME=total mesorectal excision) have decreased from about 28% to 10-15%. Preoperative radiotherapy at biological effective doses above 30 Gy decreases the relative risk of a local failure by more than half (50-70%). Postoperative radiotherapy decreases the risk by 30-40% at doses that generally are higher than those used preoperatively. There is strong evidence that preoperative radiotherapy is more effective than postoperative. There is moderate evidence that preoperative radiotherapy significantly decreases the local failure rate (from 8% to 2% after 2 years) also with TME. There is strong evidence that preoperative radiotherapy improves survival (by about 10%). There is no evidence that postoperative radiotherapy improves survival. There is some indication that survival is prolonged when postoperative radiotherapy is combined with concomitant chemotherapy. Preoperative radiotherapy at adequate doses can be given with low acute toxicity. Higher, and unacceptable acute toxicity has been seen in some preoperative radiotherapy trials using suboptimal techniques. Postoperative radiotherapy can also be

  4. Magnetic resonance in the diagnosing of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perczynski, W.; Walecki, J.; Schier, J.F.; Salamon, Z.

    1994-01-01

    MR has not yet come into widespread use for the staging of rectal cancer. However use of MR imaging in diagnosis of rectal cancer gains clinical acceptance. Use contrast media enables exact staging of rectal cancer. MR multiplaner and noninvasive imaging with excellent spatial and contrast resolution has rising popularity in diagnosis of rectal cancer, especially in cases where it is impossible to insert endorectal US-probe because of stenosis. (author)

  5. General Information about Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  7. UFT (tegafur-uracil) in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casado, E; Pfeiffer, P; Feliu, J

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major achievements in the treatment of localised rectal cancer include the development of total mesorectal excision and the perioperative administration of radiotherapy in combination with continuous infusion (CI) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). This multimodal approach has resulted in extended...... and abstracts relating to clinical studies of UFT in the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Pre- and postoperative studies carried out in patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent disease were included. RESULTS: The combination of UFT and radiotherapy was effective and well tolerated...

  8. Review on adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer - why do treatment guidelines differ so much?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Laurids Ø; Qvortrup, Camilla; Pfeiffer, Per

    2015-01-01

    /oxaliplatin. METHODS: A review of the literature was made identifying 24 randomized controlled trials on adjuvant treatment of rectal cancer based on about 10 000 patients. The trials were subdivided into a number of clinically relevant subgroups. RESULTS: As regards patients treated with preoperative (chemo...... chemotherapy for patients already treated with preoperative (chemo) radiotherapy. For patients not treated preoperatively, several studies support the use of single agent 5-FU chemotherapy. Treatment guidelines seem to differ according to if preoperative chemoradiation is considered of importance for use...

  9. GLUT-1 expression and response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brophy, Sarah

    2009-12-15

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is used in locally advanced rectal cancer to reduce local recurrence and improve operability, however a proportion of tumors do not undergo significant regression. Identification of predictive markers of response to chemoradiotherapy would improve patient selection and may allow response modification by targeting of specific pathways. The aim of this study was to determine whether expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) and p53 in pretreatment rectal cancer biopsies was predictive of tumor response to chemoradiotherapy. Immunohistochemical staining for GLUT-1 and p53 was performed on 69 pretreatment biopsies and compared to tumor response in the resected specimen as determined by the tumor regression grade (TRG) scoring system. GLUT-1 expression was significantly associated with reduced response to chemoradiotherapy and increasing GLUT expression correlated with poorer response (p=0.02). GLUT-1 negative tumors had a 70% probability of good response (TRG3\\/4) compared to a 31% probability of good response in GLUT-1 positive tumors. GLUT-1 may be a useful predictive marker of response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

  10. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary.

  11. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary

  12. MRI and endosonography in preoperative staging of advanced rectal carcinomas after hypothermoradiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, R.J.; Pegios, W.; Huenerbein, M.; Vogl, T.J.; Hidajat, N.; Gellermann, J.; Wust, P.; Rau, B.; Schlag, P.; Felix, R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of staging of endorectal sonography (ES) and body coil MRI after preoperative hyperthermoradiochemotherapy in patients with advanced rectal cancer. Methods: Prospective analysis of MRI and ES in 30 patients after hyperthermoradiochemotherapy and correlation with histopathological patterns. Results: T-staging by MRI was correct in 47% and by ES in 53% of the cases. Despite similar accuracy of staging in T 0 - and T 1 -tumours, we found different accuracies concerning T 2 -tumour staging about 63% versus 73% (MRI/ES), concerning perirectal infiltration 70% for both techniques, concerning invasion of adjacent organs 90% versus 87%, and concerning lymph node metastases without respect to the N-stage 63% versus 63%. Conclusion: Both imaging modalities provide useful information for operation planning despite limited accuracy after hyperthermoradiochemotherapy. The body coil MRI does not seem to be severely inferior to ES in posttherapeutic staging, despite better contour line imaging by ES. With respect to the determination of invasion of other organs, MRI seems to be more useful. (orig.) [de

  13. Local resection of early rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Qvist, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the National Danish screening programme for colorectal cancer will result in the detection of more early rectal cancers (ERC), which may be considered for local excision. For the low risk≤T1 cancer, the oncological outcome at local excision in smaller patient series has shown......, where rescue surgery may be considered. The establishment of a regional or national clinical database is necessary to improve the local treatment of ERC....

  14. Predictive Biomarkers of Radiation Sensitivity in Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tut, Thein Ga

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world. Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the United States, and parts of Europe have the highest incidence rates of CRC. China, India, South America and parts of Africa have the lowest risk of CRC. CRC is the second most common cancer in both sexes in Australia. Even though the death rates from CRC involving the colon have diminished, those arising from the rectum have revealed no improvement. The greatest obstacle in attaining a complete surgical resection of large rectal cancers is the close anatomical relation to surrounding structures, as opposed to the free serosal surfaces enfolding the colon. To assist complete resection, pre-operative radiotherapy (DXT) can be applied, but the efficacy of ionising radiation (IR) is extremely variable between individual tumours. Reliable predictive marker/s that enable patient stratification in the application of this otherwise toxic therapy is still not available. Current therapeutic management of rectal cancer can be improved with the availability of better predictive and prognostic biomarkers. Proteins such as Plk1, gammaH2AX and MMR proteins (MSH2, MSH6, MLH1 and PMS2), involved in DNA damage response (DDR) pathway may be possible biomarkers for radiation response prediction and prognostication of rectal cancer. Serine/threonine protein kinase Plk1 is overexpressed in most of cancers including CRC. Plk1 functional activity is essential in the restoration of DNA damage following IR, which causes DNA double strand break (DSB). The earliest manifestation of this reparative process is histone H2AX phosphorylation at serine 139, leading to gammaH2AX. Colorectal normal mucosa showed the lowest level of gammaH2AX with gradually increasing levels in early adenoma and then in advanced malignant colorectal tissues, leading to the possibility that gammaH2AX may be a prospective biomarker in rectal cancer management. There are numerous publications regarding DNA mismatch

  15. Female urogenital dysfunction following total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Ashraf

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of Total Mesorectal Excision (TME on sexual function in the male is well documented. However, there is little literature in female patients. The aim of this study was to review the pelvic autonomic nervous anatomy in the female and to perform a retrospective audit of urinary and sexual function in women following surgery for rectal cancer where TME had been performed. Urogenital dysfunction was assessed through interview and questionnaire. Method Twenty-three questionnaires, eighteen returned, were sent to women with a mean age 65.5 yrs (range 34–86. All had undergone total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer between 1998–2001. Mean follow-up was 18.8 months (range 3–35. Results Preoperatively 5/18 (28% were sexually active, 3/18 (17% of patients described urinary frequency and nocturia and 7/18 (39% described symptoms of stress incontinence prior to surgery. Postoperatively all sexually active patients remained active although all described some discomfort with penetration. Two of the patients sexually active described reduced libido secondary to the stoma. Postoperative urinary symptoms developed with 59% reporting the development of nocturia, 18% developed stress incontinence and one patient required a permanent catheter. Of those with symptoms, 80% persisted longer than three months from surgery. Symptoms were predominant in those patients with low rectal cancers, particularly those undergoing abdomino-perineal excision and in those who had previously undergone abdominal hysterectomy. Conclusion The treatment of rectal cancer involves surgery to the pelvic floor. Despite nerve preservation this is associated with the development of worsening nocturia and stress incontinence. This is most marked in those patients who had previously undergone a hysterectomy. Further studies are warranted to assess the interaction with previous gynaecological surgery.

  16. Dose-Effect Relationship in Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders; Ploen, John; Vuong, Té

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Locally advanced rectal cancer represents a major therapeutic challenge. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy is considered standard, but little is known about the dose-effect relationship. The present study represents a dose-escalation phase III trial comparing 2 doses of radiation...

  17. Reirradiation, surgery and IORT for recurrent rectal cancer in previously irradiated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J.M.E.; Ferenschild, Floris T.J.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M.M.; Wilt, Johannes H.W. de

    2008-01-01

    A total of 11 patients with recurrent rectal cancer who had been previously irradiated were treated with preoperative reirradiation (median dose 30 Gy), surgery and IORT. This treatment was related with high morbidity, a short pain-free survival (5 months) and poor local control (27% after 3 years), although some patients have long-term distant control and survival

  18. Management of synchronous rectal and prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, D O

    2012-11-01

    Although well described, there is limited published data related to management on the coexistence of prostate and rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to describe a single institution\\'s experience with this and propose a treatment algorithm based on the best available evidence.

  19. Current management of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Bak; Laurberg, Søren; Holm, Thorbjörn

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: A review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of the surgical management of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC) after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME). Method: A systematic literature search was undertaken using PubMed, Embase, Web...

  20. The frequencies and clinical implications of mutations in 33 kinase-related genes in locally advanced rectal cancer: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abdul-Jalil, Khairun I

    2014-08-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC: T3\\/4 and\\/or node-positive) is treated with preoperative\\/neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), but responses are not uniform. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), MAP kinase (MAPK), and related pathways are implicated in rectal cancer tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the association between genetic mutations in these pathways and LARC clinical outcomes.

  1. Preoperative evaluation of synchronous colorectal cancer using MR colonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Michael P; Holst Andersen, Lars P; Klein, Mads

    2009-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: It is well known that synchronous cancers (incidence, 2%-11%) and polyps (incidence, 12%-58%) occur in patients with colorectal cancer. Magnetic resonance colonography (MRC) seems like the obvious choice as a diagnostic tool in preoperative evaluation, because...... a full conventional colonoscopy or in whom full conventional colonoscopy was not possible. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a 13-month period, 47 patients diagnosed with rectal or sigmoid colon cancer scheduled for operation were included in the study. MRC was performed with bowel purgation either the night...... before surgery or as ambulatory MRC the week before surgery. RESULTS: Full MRC was performed in 98% of the patients. In four patients, 12 synchronous lesions (one cancer, two plaques of carcinosis, and nine adenomas) were found. One flat adenoma and five small polyps were missed by MRC and perioperative...

  2. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  3. Late side effects of short-course preoperative radiotherapy combined with total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer: increased bowel dysfunction in irradiated patients--a Dutch colorectal cancer group study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, K.C.; Velde, C.J. van de; Leer, J.W.H.; Martijn, H.; Junggeburt, J.M.; Kranenbarg, E.K.; Steup, W.H.; Wiggers, T.; Rutten, H.J.; Marijnen, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Preoperative short-term radiotherapy improves local control in patients treated with total mesorectal excision (TME). This study was performed to assess the presence and magnitude of long-term side effects of preoperative 5 x 5 Gy radiotherapy and TME. Also, hospital treatment was recorded

  4. Follow-up after rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovdenak Jakobsen, Ida; Juul, Therese; Bernstein, Inge

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main treatment for non-metastatic rectal cancer (RC) is surgical resection. Late adverse effects that are highly prevalent and negatively impact patients' symptom burden and quality of life are: bowel-, urological and sexual dysfunctions; psychological distress; fear of recurrence....... As a consequence, the randomized controlled trial Follow-up after Rectal Cancer (FURCA) has been launched, testing the effect of a new patient-led, follow-up program. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology used in the FURCA study and to report results from the development of the patient-led, follow......, or a control group following the current follow-up program with routine medicals. The primary outcomes are symptom burden and quality of life, measured by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Colorectal (FACT-C) questionnaire. Other outcome and demographic data are collected as patient...

  5. Comparison between Preoperative Rectal Diclofenac Plus Paracetamol and Diclofenac Alone for PostoperativePain of Hysterectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghar Samimi Sede

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available To detect whether the preoperative combined administration of rectal diclofenac and paracetamol is superior to placebo or rectal diclofenac alone for pain after abdominal hysterectomy.Ninety female patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA physical status I-II, scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy were recruited to this double blind trial and were randomized to receive one of three modalities before surgery: rectal combination of diclofenac and paracetamol, rectal diclofenac alone or rectal placebo alone which were given as a suppository one hour prior to surgery. The primary outcomes were visual analogue pain scores measured at 0, 0.5, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours after surgery and the time of first administration and also total amount of morphine used in the first 24 hour after surgery. A 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS was used to assess pain intensity at rest.In patients receiving the combination of diclofenac and paracetamol total dose of morphine used in the first 24 hour after surgery was significantly lower (13.9 ± 2.7 mg compared to diclofenac group (16.8± 2.8 mg and placebo group (20.1 ± 3.6 mg (p<0.05. VAS pain score was significantly lower in combination group compared to other groups all time during first 24 hours (p<0.05. There had been a significant difference between combination group and the two other groups in terms of the first request of morphine (p<0.05.According to our study Patients who receive the rectal diclofenac-paracetamol combination experience significantly a lower pain scale in the first 24 hour after surgery compared with patients receiving diclofenac or placebo alone. Their need to supplementary analgesic is significantly later and lower compared to placebo and diclofenac alone.

  6. Directory of Colon and Rectal Cancer Specialist Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health; Social Services and Public Safety

    2004-01-01

    The Directory of Colon and Rectal Cancer Specialist Teams has been produced under the auspices of the Northern Ireland Regional Advisory Committee on Cancer. It contains details of the full membership of the clinical teams providing care for colon and rectal cancer in each of Health and Social Services Board Area. Lead Clinicians For Colon and Rectal Cancer Services (PDF 74 KB) EHSSB (PDF 198 KB) NHSSB (PDF 107 KB) SHSSB (PDF 130 KB) WHSSB (PDF 131 KB)

  7. Preoperative cobalt60 irradiation delays the healing of rectal anastomoses in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, C.B.; Klug, W.A.; Capelhuchnik, P.

    2005-01-01

    The healing of colorectal anastomoses after irradiation therapy continues to be a major concern. The authors evaluated the healing of rectal anastomoses in a rat model after a preoperative 500-c Gy dose of cobalt 60 irradiation. Thirty-six male Wistar rats were divided into two equal groups: control (group A), and irradiation group (group B). Group B received a single 500-c Gy dose of irradiation, and a rectal resection and end-to-end anastomosis was performed in both groups on the seventh day after irradiation. Parameters of the healing process included bursting pressure and collagen content on the fifth, seventh, and fourteenth days after surgery. In the irradiation group, the mean bursting pressure on the fifth, seventh, and fourteenth days was 116, 218, and 273 mmHg, respectively. The collagen content assessed by histomorphometry was 9.0, 20.8, and 32%, respectively. In contrast, the control group had a mean bursting pressure of 175, 225 and 263 mmHg, and a collagen content of 17.8, 28.1, and 32.1%, respectively. The adverse effect of irradiation on healing was detectable only on the fifth postoperative day, as demonstrated by lower bursting pressure (P < 0.013) and collagen content (P < 0.008). However, there was no failure of anastomotic healing such as leakage or dehiscence due to irradiation. We conclude that a single preoperative 500-c Gy dose of irradiation delays the healing of rectal anastomosis in rats. (author)

  8. Preoperative cobalt{sup 60} irradiation delays the healing of rectal anastomoses in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, C.B.; Klug, W.A.; Capelhuchnik, P. [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Cirurgia]. E-mail: colon.reto@terra.com.br

    2005-06-15

    The healing of colorectal anastomoses after irradiation therapy continues to be a major concern. The authors evaluated the healing of rectal anastomoses in a rat model after a preoperative 500-c Gy dose of cobalt 60 irradiation. Thirty-six male Wistar rats were divided into two equal groups: control (group A), and irradiation group (group B). Group B received a single 500-c Gy dose of irradiation, and a rectal resection and end-to-end anastomosis was performed in both groups on the seventh day after irradiation. Parameters of the healing process included bursting pressure and collagen content on the fifth, seventh, and fourteenth days after surgery. In the irradiation group, the mean bursting pressure on the fifth, seventh, and fourteenth days was 116, 218, and 273 mmHg, respectively. The collagen content assessed by histomorphometry was 9.0, 20.8, and 32%, respectively. In contrast, the control group had a mean bursting pressure of 175, 225 and 263 mmHg, and a collagen content of 17.8, 28.1, and 32.1%, respectively. The adverse effect of irradiation on healing was detectable only on the fifth postoperative day, as demonstrated by lower bursting pressure (P < 0.013) and collagen content (P < 0.008). However, there was no failure of anastomotic healing such as leakage or dehiscence due to irradiation. We conclude that a single preoperative 500-c Gy dose of irradiation delays the healing of rectal anastomosis in rats. (author)

  9. Rectal cancer: The radiation basis of radiotherapy, target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosset, J.F.; Servagi-Vernat, S.; Crehange, G.; Azria, D.; Gerard, J.P.; Hennequin, C.

    2011-01-01

    Since the implementation of preoperative chemo-radiotherapy and meso-rectal excision, the 5-year rates of locoregional failures in T3-T4 N0-N1M0 rectal cancer fell from 25-30% thirty years ago to 5-8% nowadays. A critical analysis of the locoregional failures sites and mechanisms, as well as the identification of nodal extension, helps the radiation oncologist to optimize the radiotherapy target definition. The upper limit of the clinical target volume is usually set at the top of the third sacral vertebra. The lateral pelvic nodes should be included when the tumor is located in the distal part of the rectum. The anal sphincter and the levator muscles should be spared when a conservative surgery is planned. In case of abdomino-perineal excision, the ischio-rectal fossa and the sphincters should be included in the clinical target volume. A confrontation with radiologist and surgeon is mandatory to improve the definition of the target volumes to be treated. (authors)

  10. Multidisciplinary team conferences promote treatment according to guidelines in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brännström, Fredrik; Kroll Bjerregaard, Jon; Winbladh, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multidisciplinary team (MDT) conferences have been introduced into standard cancer care, though evidence that it benefits the patient is weak. We used the national Swedish Rectal Cancer Register to evaluate predictors for case discussion at a MDT conference and its impact on treatment...... radiotherapy. These results indirectly support the introduction into clinical practice of discussing all rectal cancer patients at MDT conferences, not least those being treated at low-volume hospitals....... on the implementation of preoperative radiotherapy was evaluated in 1043 patients with pT3c-pT4 M0 tumours, and in 1991 patients with pN+ M0 tumours. RESULTS: Hospital volume, i.e. the number of rectal cancer surgical procedures performed per year, was the major predictor for MDT evaluation. Patients treated...... at hospitals with

  11. Evidence and research in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Beets-Tan, Regina; Borras, Josep M.; Krivokapic, Zoran; Leer, Jan Willem; Pahlman, Lars; Roedel, Claus; Schmoll, Hans Joachim; Scott, Nigel; Velde, Cornelius Van de; Verfaillie, Christine

    2008-01-01

    The main evidences of epidemiology, diagnostic imaging, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and follow-up are reviewed to optimize the routine treatment of rectal cancer according to a multidisciplinary approach. This paper reports on the knowledge shared between different specialists involved in the design and management of the multidisciplinary ESTRO Teaching Course on Rectal Cancer. The scenario of ongoing research is also addressed. In this time of changing treatments, it clearly appears that a common standard for large heterogeneous patient groups have to be substituted by more individualised therapies based on clinical-pathological features and very soon on molecular and genetic markers. Only trained multidisciplinary teams can face this new challenge and tailor the treatments according to the best scientific evidence for each patient

  12. The Great Pretender: Rectal Syphilis Mimic a Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pisani Ceretti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rectal syphilis is a rare expression of the widely recognised sexual transmitted disease, also known as the great imitator for its peculiarity of being confused with mild anorectal diseases because of its vague symptoms or believed rectal malignancy, with the concrete risk of overtreatment. We present the case of a male patient with primary rectal syphilis, firstly diagnosed as rectal cancer; the medical, radiological, and endoscopic features are discussed below.

  13. Phase II Trial of Preoperative Radiation With Concurrent Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Bevacizumab Followed by Surgery and Postoperative 5-Fluorouracil, Leucovorin, Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX), and Bevacizumab in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Clinical Outcomes ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group E3204.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Jerome C; Feng, Yang; Prabhu, Roshan S; Cohen, Steven J; Staley, Charles A; Whittington, Richard; Sigurdson, Elin Ruth; Nimeiri, Halla; Verma, Udit; Benson, Al Bowen

    2015-06-01

    The 5-year oncologic outcomes from the trial regimen were excellent. However, the neoadjuvant and surgical toxicity of this regimen was significant and was the primary reason for the low compliance with adjuvant systemic therapy.Due to the lack of an improvement in the pathologic complete response rate, the substantial associated toxicity, and the negative phase III trials of adjuvant bevacizumab in colon cancer, this regimen will not be pursued for further study. The addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy improves overall survival for metastatic colorectal cancer. We initiated a phase II trial to evaluate preoperative capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab with radiation therapy (RT) followed by surgery and postoperative 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin (FOLFOX), and bevacizumab for locally advanced rectal cancer. The purpose of this report is to describe the 5-year oncologic outcomes of this regimen. In a phase II Simon two-stage design study, we evaluated preoperative treatment with capecitabine (825 mg/m(2) b.i.d. Monday-Friday), oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2) weekly), bevacizumab (5 mg/kg on days 1, 15, and 29), and RT (50.4 Gy). Surgery was performed by 8 weeks after RT. Beginning 8-12 weeks after surgery, patients received FOLFOX plus bevacizumab (5 mg/kg) every 2 weeks for 12 cycles (oxaliplatin stopped after 9 cycles). The primary endpoint was a pathologic complete response (path-CR) rate of 30%. Fifty-seven patients with resectable T3/T4 rectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled between 2006 and 2010. Of 57 enrolled patients, 53 were eligible and included in the analysis. Forty-eight (91%) patients completed preoperative therapy, all of whom underwent curative surgical resection. Nine patients (17%) achieved path-CR. There were 29 worst grade 3 events, 8 worst grade 4 events, and 2 patient deaths, 1 of which was attributed to study therapy. Twenty-six patients (54%) began adjuvant chemotherapy. After a median follow-up period of 41 months, the 5-year

  14. Laparoscopic versus open surgery for rectal cancer (COLOR II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Pas, Martijn Hgm; Haglind, Eva; Cuesta, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery as an alternative to open surgery in patients with rectal cancer has not yet been shown to be oncologically safe. The aim in the COlorectal cancer Laparoscopic or Open Resection (COLOR II) trial was to compare laparoscopic and open surgery in patients with rectal cancer....

  15. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer operated for cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Sune Høirup; Harling, Henrik; Kirkeby, Lene Tschemerinsky; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer; Mocellin, Simone

    2012-03-14

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the Western world. Apart from surgery - which remains the mainstay of treatment for resectable primary tumours - postoperative (i.e., adjuvant) chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based regimens is now the standard treatment in Dukes' C (TNM stage III) colon tumours i.e. tumours with metastases in the regional lymph nodes but no distant metastases. In contrast, the evidence for recommendations of adjuvant therapy in rectal cancer is sparse. In Europe it is generally acknowledged that locally advanced rectal tumours receive preoperative (i.e., neoadjuvant) downstaging by radiotherapy (or chemoradiotion), whereas in the US postoperative chemoradiotion is considered the treatment of choice in all Dukes' C rectal cancers. Overall, no universal consensus exists on the adjuvant treatment of surgically resectable rectal carcinoma; moreover, no formal systematic review and meta-analysis has been so far performed on this subject. We undertook a systematic review of the scientific literature from 1975 until March 2011 in order to quantitatively summarize the available evidence regarding the impact of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy on the survival of patients with surgically resectable rectal cancer. The outcomes of interest were overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). CCCG standard search strategy in defined databases with the following supplementary search. 1. Rect* or colorect* - 2. Cancer or carcinom* or adenocarc* or neoplasm* or tumour - 3. Adjuv* - 4. Chemother* - 5. Postoper* Randomised controlled trials (RCT) comparing patients undergoing surgery for rectal cancer who received no adjuvant chemotherapy with those receiving any postoperative chemotherapy regimen. Two authors extracted data and a third author performed an independent search for verification. The main outcome measure was the hazard ratio (HR) between the risk of event between the treatment arm (adjuvant chemotherapy

  16. Function-preserving surgery for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Yoshihiro

    2006-01-01

    When total mesorectal excision (TME) is accurately performed, dysfunction, theoretically, does not occur. However, there are differences among individuals in the running patterns and the volumes of nerve fibers, and if obesity or a narrow pelvis is present, nerve identification is difficult. Currently, the rate of urinary dysfunction after rectal surgery ranges from 33% to 70%. Many factors other than nerve preservation play a role in minor incontinence. Male sexual function shows impotence rates ranging from 20% to 46%, while 20%-60% of potent patients are unable to ejaculate. In women, information on sexual function is not easily obtained, and there are more unknown aspects than in men. As urinary, sexual, and defecation dysfunction due to adjuvant radiotherapy have been reported to occur at a high frequency, the creation of a protocol that enables analysis of long-term functional outcome will be essential for future clinical trials. In the treatment of rectal cancer, surgeon-related factors are extremely important, not only in achieving local control but also in preserving function. This article reviews findings from recent studies investigating urinary, sexual, and defecation dysfunction after rectal cancer surgery and discusses questions to be studied in the future. (author)

  17. Postoperative radiotherapy for rectal and rectosigmoid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman, B.M.P.; Lebesque, J.V.; Hart, A.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1988, 206 patients were treated with pelvic radiotherapy after macroscopically complete surgery for rectal or (recto)sigmoid cancer. Depending on an estimation of the amount of small bowel in the intended treatment volume a total dose was, in general, 45 or 50 Gy. An additional boost of 10 Gy was given to 6 patients because of microscopically involved surgical margins. For tumor stage B a statistically significant trend (p=0.017) for higher local control with higher total dose was observed comparing patients treated with a total dose of 45 Gy or less, with more than 45 Gy but less than 50 Gy or with a total dose of 50 Gy or more. This finding illustrates the impact of total dose on local control for postoperative radiotherapy for rectal carcinoma. (author). 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. An isolated vaginal metastasis from rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Sadatomo

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: We should keep the vagina within the field of view of pelvic MRI, which is one of the preoperative diagnostic tools for colorectal cancer. If female patients show gynecological symptoms, gynecological examination should be recommended. Isolated vaginal metastases are an indication for surgical resection, and adjuvant chemotherapy is also recommended.

  19. The ESTRO Breur Lecture 2010: Toward a tailored patient approach in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haustermans, Karin; Debucquoy, Annelies; Lambrecht, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    The last decades have been characterized by tremendous improvements in the treatment of rectal cancer. Based on the evidence gathered in these years, the standard treatment of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer has now become preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision. Although the locoregional control with this treatment regimen is quite favorable for the majority of the patients, there is still room for further improvement. For those patients with a good response to preoperative chemoradiation (CRT), extensive surgery could be avoided and replaced by minimal invasive surgery or no surgery at all. To date however, the only way to ascertain a complete remission is pathologic examination of the resection specimen. Early response prediction of the tumor to preoperative CRT is essential for further selection of patients who could be spared invasive surgery. This could be achieved by assessing molecular markers present in the tumor tissue and blood of the patients or by non invasive functional imaging before and during preoperative treatment. For those patients with a less favorable response, treatment intensification might be the way to go. This could be accomplished by dose painting on resistant tumor regions or by the addition of molecular targeted agents to the standard treatment. In this article, we review the current standard of care and the remaining challenges in the treatment of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer.

  20. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Is it needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinis, Kristijonas; Thornton, Michael; Montazeri, Amir; Rooney, Paul S

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has become a standard treatment of advanced rectal cancer in the West. The benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery alone have been well established. However, controversy surrounds the use adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, despite it being recommended by a number of international guidelines. Results of recent multicentre randomised control trials showed no benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in terms of survival and rates of distant metastases. However, concerns exist regarding the quality of the studies including inadequate staging modalities, out-dated chemotherapeutic regimens and surgical approaches and small sample sizes. It has become evident that not all the patients respond to adjuvant chemotherapy and more personalised approach should be employed when considering the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy. The present review discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the current evidence-base and suggests improvements for future studies. PMID:26677436

  1. Conservative treatment of premature rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The largest radical resections in rectal cancer with significant morbidity and mortality (Urinary dysfunction, sexual dysfunction, permanent colostomy, etc.), on certain occasions and with high selectivity, they can be avoided with the implementation of local resections. Our intention is to assess the results of conservative treatment of rectal cancer early. Material and Methods: Between 01.01.89 and 31.12.09 14 consecutive patients were treated carriers rectal adenocarcinoma who had never received prior cancer treatment and a second simultaneous showed no neoplasia. The age of the patients presented a range between 44 and 72 years with a mean of 60.4 years; sex similarly partitioned and according to ECOG performance status was 0≤2. All patients were operated through a anal resection of which 4 were performed a submucosal tumor excision (T1) and 10 excision was entire rectal wall and tumor invaded the muscularis propria (T2). For this one type of surgery patients were selected the following criteria: tumor ≤6 cm. the anal verge, size ≤3 cm., GH I-II, vegetative, mobile, and T1-2, N0 by EER. After intervention, the pathological examination of the surgical specimen showed that 4 patients GH III, lymphovascular invasion and / or peri neural, or close surgical margins (+) (≤3 mm.) And T3, so underwent Miles operation (March 1 T1 and T2). Subsequently the rest of the patients (10) underwent concomitant radio chemotherapy. Radiation therapy was similar all using megavoltage photons (CO-60, 18mV) to the entire pelvic volume in a normofraccionamiento to complete 50.40 Gy (1.8 Gy / 28) using multiple fields (box technique). Chemotherapy was prepared 5FU + LV in the first patient (4), in following (4) was used 5FU continuous infusion (1st and 5th week) and the remaining (2) Capecitabine. Follow up was complete. Results: In our sample we extract local failure was 4 (29%), distant failure 3 (20%) and two local and distant failures (14%) so it follows that

  2. Disseminated lung cancer presenting as a rectal mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noergaard, Mia M; Stamp, Inger M H; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths globally, and approximately 50% had metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. A rectal mass and unintended weight loss are common manifestations of rectal cancer. Our case presented with a rectal mass, but workup revealed...... a metastatic lesion from lung cancer. Lung cancer metastases to the lower gastrointestinal tract imply reduced survival compared with the already poor mean survival of stage IV lung cancer. Despite relevant therapy, the patient died 5 months after referral....

  3. Endoscopically observable white nodule caused by distal intramural lymphatic spread of rectal cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsumura Ayako

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report describes a case of rectal cancer with endoscopically observable white nodules caused by distal intramural lymphatic spread. A 57-year-old female presented to our hospital with frequent diarrhea and hemorrhoids. Computed tomography showed bilateral ovarian masses and three hepatic tumors diagnosed as rectal cancer metastases, and also showed multiple lymph node involvement. The patient was preoperatively diagnosed with stage IV rectal cancer. Colonoscopy demonstrated that primary rectal cancer existed 15 cm from the anal verge and that there were multiple white small nodules on the anal side of the primary tumor extending to the dentate line. Biopsies of the white spots were performed, and they were identified as adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent Hartmann’s procedure because of the locally advanced primary tumor. The white nodules were ultimately diagnosed as being caused by intramural lymphatic spreading because lymphatic permeation was strongly positive at the surrounding area. Small white nodules near a primary rectal cancer should be suspected of being intramural spreading. Endoscopic detection of white nodules may be useful for the diagnosis of distal intramural spread.

  4. Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Management: 2nd European Rectal Cancer Consensus Conference (EURECA-CC2).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentini, V.; Aristei, C.; Glimelius, B.; Minsky, B.D.; Beets-Tan, R.G.; Borras, J.M.; Haustermans, K.; Maingon, P.; Overgaard, J.; Pahlman, L.; Quirke, P.; Schmoll, H.J.; Sebag-Montefiore, D.; Taylor, I.; Cutsem, E. van; Velde, C. van de; Cellini, N.; Latini, P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: During the first decade of the 21st century a number of important European randomized studies were published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence from the literature, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer

  5. Rectal and colon cancer: Not just a different anatomic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamas, K; Walenkamp, A M E; de Vries, E G E; van Vugt, M A T M; Beets-Tan, R G; van Etten, B; de Groot, D J A; Hospers, G A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer might be responsible in part for the differing effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on overall survival, which is more evident in colon cancer than in rectal cancer. Apart from anatomic divergences, rectal and colon cancer also differ in their embryological origin and metastatic patterns. Moreover, they harbor a different composition of drug targets, such as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), which is preferentially mutated in proximal colon cancers, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is prevalently amplified or overexpressed in distal colorectal cancers. Despite their differences in metastatic pattern, composition of drug targets and earlier local treatment, metastatic rectal and colon cancer are, however, commonly regarded as one entity and are treated alike. In this review, we focused on rectal cancer and its biological and clinical differences and similarities relative to colon cancer. These aspects are crucial because they influence the current staging and treatment of these cancers, and might influence the design of future trials with targeted drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Improved Metastasis- and Disease-Free Survival With Preoperative Sequential Short-Course Radiation Therapy and FOLFOX Chemotherapy for Rectal Cancer Compared With Neoadjuvant Long-Course Chemoradiotherapy: Results of a Matched Pair Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovina, Stephanie; Youssef, Fady; Roy, Amit; Aggarwal, Sonya; Khwaja, Shariq; DeWees, Todd; Tan, Benjamin; Hunt, Steven; Myerson, Robert J; Chang, Daniel T; Parikh, Parag J; Olsen, Jeffrey R

    2017-10-01

    To compare treatment and toxicity outcomes between a phase 2 institutional trial of near total neoadjuvant therapy (nTNT) for locally advanced rectal cancer and a similar historical control cohort treated at Washington University in St. Louis with the current US standard of care, defined as neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT), total mesorectal excision (TME), and adjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy; to expand the comparison to an additional institution, patients treated with similar NCRT at Stanford University were included. Sixty-nine patients with cT3-4N0-2M0 rectal adenocarcinoma enrolled on the Washington University in St. Louis phase 2 study of nTNT were included for analysis. Patients treated at the same institution with conventional NCRT and adjuvant FOLFOX were matched for exact cTNM stage. Forty-one patients treated with NCRT at Stanford University were included in a second analysis. Kaplan-Meier analysis with log-rank test was used to compare local control, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Median follow-up was 49 and 54 months for nTNT and NCRT, respectively. Pathologic complete response and T-downstaging rates were 28% versus 16% (P=.21) and 75% versus 41% (P<.001) in the nTNT and NCRT cohorts, respectively. Three-year disease-free survival (85% vs 68%, P=.032) was significantly better in the nTNT group. Actuarial 3-year local control (92% vs 96%, P=.36) and overall survival (96% vs 88%, P=.67) were similar. The Stanford cohort had significantly lower clinical stage. After controlling for clinical stage, age, tumor location, institution, and number of chemotherapy cycles, nTNT treatment remained significantly associated with lower risk of recurrence (P=.006). Patients treated with nTNT had higher T-downstaging and superior distant metastasis-free survival and disease-free survival compared with conventional NCRT when matched for tumor location and exact cTNM stage. Near total neoadjuvant therapy remained a

  7. Prediction of nodal involvement in primary rectal carcinoma without invasion to pelvic structures: accuracy of preoperative CT, MR, and DWIBS assessments relative to histopathologic findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the accuracy of preoperative computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance (MR imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS in the prediction of nodal involvement in primary rectal carcinoma patients in the absence of tumor invasion into pelvic structures. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Fifty-two subjects with primary rectal cancer were preoperatively assessed by CT and MRI at 1.5 T with a phased-array coil. Preoperative lymph node staging with imaging modalities (CT, MRI, and DWIBS were compared with the final histological findings. RESULTS: The accuracy of CT, MRI, and DWIBS were 57.7%, 63.5%, and 40.4%. The accuracy of DWIBS with higher sensitivity and negative predictive value for evaluating primary rectal cancer patients was lower than that of CT and MRI. Nodal staging agreement between imaging and pathology was fairly strong for CT and MRI (Kappa value = 0.331 and 0.348, P<0.01 but was relatively weaker for DWIBS (Kappa value = 0.174, P<0.05. The accuracy was 57.7% and 59.6%, respectively, for CT and MRI when the lymph node border information was used as the criteria, and was 57.7% and 61.5%, respectively, for enhanced CT and MRI when the lymph node enhancement pattern was used as the criteria. CONCLUSION: MRI is more accurate than CT in predicting nodal involvement in primary rectal carcinoma patients in the absence of tumor invasion into pelvic structures. DWIBS has a great diagnostic value in differentiating small malignant from benign lymph nodes.

  8. Evaluating the effect of clinical care pathways on quality of cancer care: analysis of breast, colon and rectal cancer pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Han; Yang, Fengjuan; Su, Shaofei; Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Meiqi; Xiao, Yaming; Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jiaying; Liu, Meina

    2016-05-01

    Substantial gaps exist between clinical practice and evidence-based cancer care, potentially leading to adverse clinical outcomes and decreased quality of life for cancer patients. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of clinical pathways as a tool for improving quality of cancer care, using breast, colon, and rectal cancer pathways as demonstrations. Newly diagnosed patients with invasive breast, colon, and rectal cancer were enrolled as pre-pathway groups, while patients with the same diagnoses treated according to clinical pathways were recruited for post-pathway groups. Compliance with preoperative core biopsy or fine-needle aspiration, utilization of sentinel lymph node biopsy, and proportion of patients whose tumor hormone receptor status was stated in pathology report were significantly increased after implementation of clinical pathway for breast cancer. For colon cancer, compliance with two care processes was significantly improved: surgical resection with anastomosis and resection of at least 12 lymph nodes. Regarding rectal cancer, there was a significant increase in compliance with preoperative evaluation of depth of tumor invasion, total mesorectal excision treatment of middle- or low-position rectal cancer, and proportion of patients who had undergone rectal cancer surgery whose pathology report included margin status. Moreover, total length of hospital stay was decreased remarkably for all three cancer types, and postoperative complications remained unchanged following implementation of the clinical pathways. Clinical pathways can improve compliance with standard care by implementing evidence-based quality indicators in daily practice, which could serve as a useful tool for narrowing the gap between clinical practice and evidence-based care.

  9. Fournier gangrene: Rare complication of rectal cancer | Ossibi | Pan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. It's discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100 000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE ...

  10. Evaluation of Sexual and Urinary Function After Implementation of Robot-assisted Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Amalie F T; Broholm, Malene; Gögenur, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    dysfunction (OD). On multivariate analyses, older age was the only predictor for ED (P=0.0012). Older age (P=0.007) and having a rectal extirpation procedure (P=0.013) were predictors of OD. CONCLUSIONS: ED and OD are common after rectal cancer surgery. Robotic surgery was seemingly not associated with ED......: Questionnaires were mailed to 184 patients who underwent laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery between January 2009 and May 2013. Single questions were used to retrospectively assess preoperative urogenital dysfunction. Surgical data were collected from hospital records. Postoperative urinary and sexual function...... was measured with validated questionnaires and the results were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 97 questionnaires were included in the study. Of those sexually active before the operation, 81% reported some degree of erectile dysfunction (ED). In total, 73% reported some degree of orgasmic...

  11. Fournier Gangrene in a patient receiving chemo-radiation for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittaka, Maria; Georgiou, Chrysanthos; Polyviou, Petros; Kountourakis, Pantelis; Loizou, Panayiotis; Constantinou, Ifigenia; Andreopoulos, Demetris; Vassiliou, Vassilios P

    2018-02-01

    We herein present a case of a 24-year-old patient with a cT4N+ rectal cancer who developed Fournier's gangrene (FG) 1 week after the completion of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. The patient was promptly referred to the surgical department where she was treated with antibiotics and repeated surgical debridement. FG is a rare and life-threatening situation that needs to be managed aggressively with no delay. The clinical image above is unique and characteristic of this clinical entity.

  12. Long-Term Survival and Local Relapse Following Surgery Without Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Upper Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Seok; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Simon, NG Siu Man; Law, Wai Lun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Oh, Jae Hwan; Shan, Hester Cheung Yui; Kwak, Sang Gyu; Choi, Gyu-Seog

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Controversy remains regarding whether preoperative chemoradiation protocol should be applied uniformly to all rectal cancer patients regardless of tumor height. This pooled analysis was designed to evaluate whether preoperative chemoradiation can be safely omitted in higher rectal cancer. An international consortium of 7 institutions was established. A review of the database that was collected from January 2004 to May 2008 identified a series of 2102 patients with stage II/III rectal or sigmoid cancer (control arm) without concurrent chemoradiation. Data regarding patient demographics, recurrence pattern, and oncological outcomes were analyzed. The primary end point was the 5-year local recurrence rate. The local relapse rate of the sigmoid colon cancer (SC) and upper rectal cancer (UR) cohorts was significantly lower than that of the mid/low rectal cancer group (M-LR), with 5-year estimates of 2.5% for the SC group, 3.5% for the UR group, and 11.1% for the M-LR group, respectively. A multivariate analysis showed that tumor depth, nodal metastasis, venous invasion, and lower tumor level were strongly associated with local recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate of local failure was 90.6%, 92.5%, and 94.4% for tumors located within 5, 7, and 9 cm from the anal verge, respectively. Routine use of preoperative chemoradiation for stage II/III rectal tumors located more than 8 to 9 cm above the anal verge would be excessive. The integration of a more individualized approach focused on systemic control is warranted to improve survival in patients with upper rectal cancer. PMID:27258487

  13. Prognostic value of pathological response to chemo radiotherapy of locally advanced low rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannura C, Guillermo; Vargas N, Claudio; Barrera E, Alejandro; Melo L, Carlos; Illanes F, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Background: Preoperative chemo radiotherapy improves the prognosis of locally advanced low rectal cancer and induces a pathological response in the tumor, which may have prognostic value. Aim: To assess the results of rectal cancer treatment according to the degree of pathological response of the tumor after chemo radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: All patients with a locally advanced rectal cancer located within 11 cm of the rectal margin, subjected to preoperative chemo radiotherapy followed by surgical treatment in a period of 13 years, were included. Pathological response was classified as complete, intermediate and poor. The tumor was staged according to TNM 2002 classification. Survival was analyzed with Kaplan Meier curves and Cox regression. Results: Patients were followed for a mean of 50 months (range 18-156). Exclusive and global local relapse was observed in 3 and 9.6% of patients, respectively. Pathological response was complete in 13 patients (none died), intermediate in 23 (three died) and poor in 68 (22 died). Global five years survival was 74%. There was a concordance of 0.64 between survival and pathological response. The concordance between survival and TNM classification was 0.69. Conclusions: The pathological response of the tumor to chemo radiotherapy has a good concordance with prognosis, although it is not superior to the final pathological status

  14. Association of perioperative blood pressure with long-term survival in rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui-Chuan; Luo, Yan-Xin; Peng, Hui; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Zi-Huan; Huang, Mei-Jin; Kang, Liang; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2016-04-11

    Several studies suggested that hypertension is positively related to cancer incidence and mortality. In this study, we investigated the association between perioperative blood pressure (BP) and long-term survival outcomes in patients with rectal cancer. This study included a cohort of 358 patients with stages I-III rectal cancer who underwent a curative resection between June 2007 and June 2011. Both pre- and postoperative BPs were measured, by which patients were grouped (low BP: cancer-specific survival (CSS). Univariate analysis showed that patients with high preoperative systolic BP had lower 3-year DFS (67.2% vs. 82.1%, P = 0.041) and CSS rates (81.9% vs. 94.8%, P = 0.003) than patients with low preoperative systolic BP, and the associations remained significant in the Cox multivariate analysis, with the adjusted hazard ratios equal to 1.97 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08-3.60, P = 0.028] and 2.85 (95% CI = 1.00-8.25, P = 0.050), respectively. Similarly, in postoperative evaluation, patients with high systolic BP had significantly lower 3-year CSS rates than those with low systolic BP (78.3% vs. 88.9%, P = 0.032) in univariate analysis. Moreover, high pre- and/or postoperative systolic BP presented as risk factors for CSS in the subgroups of patients who did not have a history of hypertension, with and/or without perioperative administration of antihypertensive drugs. High preoperative systolic BP was an independent risk factor for both CSS and DFS rates, and high postoperative systolic BP was significantly associated with a low CSS rate in rectal cancer patients. Additionally, our results suggest that rectal cancer patients may get survival benefit from BP control in perioperative care. However, further studies should be conducted to determine the association between BP and CSS and targets of BP control.

  15. PET/CT diagnostic of colo-rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straciuc, O.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Objective: Presenting the advantages of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/ CT) examination, using the radiotracer fluorure 18-deoxyglucose (FDG) in colo-rectal cancer diagnostic. Basics of the method will be also presented. Introduction: FDG PET/CT is recognized as the most efficient diagnostic imaging weapon in colorectal cancer, enable too comprehend all the 3 targets needed for staging of colo-rectal cancers: 1)Detection and evaluation of primary tumor (T) and recurrence; 2) Lymphadenopathy (N); 3)Metastatic disease (M). Assessment of treatment response during and after therapy, follow up and radiotherapy planning are also indications for PET/CT. There are two essential advantages of the method: 1)The whole body examination; 2)The complementary morphological information offered by CT and functional information offered by PET. Material and methods: Study of a total of 394 patients diagnosed with colo-rectal cancer of the total of 4125 investigated by PET/CT in Diagnosztika Pozitron center of Oradea, between 01.06.2008 - 06.06.2012. All cases had documented preoperative or postoperative histopathologic evaluation. We used a Siemens Biograph 16 device and only FDG as radiotracer, injected intravenously at a dose of 0.1-0.15 mCi /kg. Standard protocol of examination was performed at 60 minutes after FDG injection. CT acquisition consists of 'low dose' from vertex to thighs, followed by PET acquisition in 7 to 8 beds. Results: We followed the performance of PET/CT diagnostic in staging and restaging of colorectal cancer compared with other imaging methods. 141 patients had negative examinations. 107 patients were diagnosed with locally recurrent lesions, lymphadenopathy and/ or metastases. Compared with the results of previous imaging new metabolically active lesions were detected in 87 patients by PET/CT and suspected lesions were denied in 48 patients. Significant clinically cases are presented. Conclusions: The data obtained by PET

  16. Rectal prolapse as initial clinical manifestation of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-W; Hsiao, C-W; Wu, C-C; Jao, S-W

    2008-04-01

    Rectal prolapse as the initial clinical manifestation of colorectal cancer is uncommon. We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon after presenting with complete rectal prolapse. The tumor caused rectosigmoid intussusception and then it prolapsed out through the anus. She underwent rectosigmoidectomy and rectopexy. The postoperative course was uneventful. The relationship between colorectal cancer and rectal prolapse has not been clearly established. This case report describes an unusual presentation of colorectal cancer. It suggests that rectal prolapse can present as the initial symptom of colorectal cancer and may also be a presenting feature of the occult intra-abdominal pathology. The importance of adequate investigation such as colonoscopy should be emphasized in patients who develop a new onset of rectal prolapse.

  17. Preoperative biliary drainage for pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heek, N. T.; Busch, O. R.; van Gulik, T. M.; Gouma, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    This review is to summarize the current knowledge about preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer. Most patients with pancreatic carcinoma (85%) will present with obstructive jaundice. The presence of toxic substances as bilirubin and bile

  18. Pre-operative radio-chemo-thermotherapy for advanced (T3-4) and/or recurrent rectal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wust, P.; Gremmler, M.; Rau, B.; Loeffel, J.; Gellermann, J.; Stahl, H.; Vogl, T.; Riess, H.; Schlag, P.; Felix, R.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: Recent studies suggest that pre-operative radio-chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer can increase resectability and local control (T4 stages), and might facilitate sphincter-preserving surgery (T3 stages). However, response rates are still unsatisfactory for radiotherapy alone, and are only slightly better for radio-chemotherapy. Radiofrequency hyperthermia has now achieved a technical stage already suitable for treating this tumor entity effectively in clinical practice. Therefore, a trimodal pre-operative approach for T3-4 rectal carcinomas has been investigated in a phase I/II study. Materials and Methods: A phase I/II study was conducted on 30 pts with advanced and/or recurrent rectal cancer. (7(30)) pts had recurrences, (9(30)) uT3, (14(30)) T4-stage of the primary. Initial tumor stage was assessed by endosonography, CT and occasionally MRI (T1-w ± Echovist, T2-w, proton density). Radiotherapy was delivered in prone position using a belly-board, three-field technique, standard blocks, 5x1.8 → 45 Gy in 5 weeks. In parallel, 5-FU (300-350 mg/kg, dose escalation) and folinic acid (50 mg) on days 1-5 and days 22-28. Regional hyperthermia was administered using the annular phased array applicator SIGMA-60 once a week. Index temperatures T x were deduced from thermal mapping scans in endocavitary/intratumoral catheters. Re-staging was done by endosonography and CT. Four weeks after radiotherapy, surgery was performed with preference to continence preserving operations. If the tumor remained unresectable, a boost to a total tumor dose of 60 Gy was claimed. Results: (7(30)) pts (23%) did not undergo resection because their tumors remained technically non-resectable: 4 pts with persistent local control of 12-18 mts, 2 pts with progressive disease, 1 pt with too short observation time. (23(30)) pts underwent surgery: only 1 R2-resection, 22 R0-resections. The patho-histological analysis documented 4 CR (17%) at the primary tumor, 12 PR

  19. Increased use of multidisciplinary treatment modalities adds little to the outcome of rectal cancer treated by optimal total mesorectal excision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chang, Kah Hoong

    2012-10-01

    Total mesorectal excision (TME) is the standard surgical treatment for rectal cancer. The roles of chemotherapy and radiotherapy have become more defined, accompanied by improvements in preoperative staging and histopathological assessment. We analyse our ongoing results in the light of changing patterns of treatment over consecutive time periods.

  20. Phase I trial of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy with S-1 and weekly irinotecan in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Jin; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Keum, Ki Chang; Cheon, Seong Ha; Shin, Sang Jun; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Choen, Jae Hee; Rha, Sun Young; Roh, Jae Kyung; Jeung, Hei-Cheul; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Ahn, Joong Bae

    2008-01-01

    S-1 is a novel, oral fluoropyrimidine and a known radiosensitizer. We conducted a phase I trial to establish a schedule of S-1/irinotecan with standard pelvic radiotherapy as a preoperative treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer. Our findings suggest that this new combination is feasible and well tolerable

  1. Chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Current status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Kanazawa, Takamitsu; Tada, Tomohiro; Komuro, Yasuhiro; Tsurita, Giichiro; Nagawa, Hirokazu; Muto, Tetsuichiro

    2004-01-01

    Lateral node dissection has been widely performed in rectal cancer surgery in Japan. In Western countries, radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy are conducted as adjuvant therapy, and their effectiveness is reviewed and discussed in this paper. First, three modalities, preoperative (PRE), intraoperative and postoperative (POST) radiation, are discussed for their respective benefits and disadvantages. Secondly, randomized trials for PRE vs POST adjuvant radiotherapy are reviewed including earlier one and recent three ones (2 in US and 1 in Germany). The latter three involve conventional doses and radiotherapy techniques, and chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil. Third, the time interval between PRE radiotherapy and surgery is pointed out not fully examined. Fourth, results of studies on PRE and POST radiotherapy are reviewed and, fifth, chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy are also reviewed in relation to recurrence and survival rates. Last, preoperative radiotherapy and lateral node dissection are discussed for effectiveness and adverse effects. In Japan, comparison of the lateral node dissection with or without total mesorectal excision is now studied. Further studies focusing on patient's quality of life are concluded to be necessary. (N.I.)

  2. Rectal cancer and Fournier's gangrene - current knowledge and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruketa, Tomislav; Majerovic, Matea; Augustin, Goran

    2015-08-14

    Fournier's gangrene (FG) is a rapid progressive bacterial infection that involves the subcutaneous fascia and part of the deep fascia but spares the muscle in the scrotal, perianal and perineal region. The incidence has increased dramatically, while the reported incidence of rectal cancer-induced FG is unknown but is extremely low. Pathophysiology and clinical presentation of rectal cancer-induced FG per se does not differ from the other causes. Only rectal cancer-specific symptoms before presentation can lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis of rectal cancer-induced FG should be excluded in every patient with blood on digital rectal examination, when urogenital and dermatological causes are excluded and when fever or sepsis of unknown origin is present with perianal symptomatology. Therapeutic options are more complex than for other forms of FG. First, the causative rectal tumor should be removed. The survival of patients with rectal cancer resection is reported as 100%, while with colostomy it is 80%. The preferred method of rectal resection has not been defined. Second, oncological treatment should be administered but the timing should be adjusted to the resolution of the FG and sometimes for the healing of plastic reconstructive procedures that are commonly needed for the reconstruction of large perineal, scrotal and lower abdominal wall defects.

  3. The Value of High-Resolution MRI Technique in Patients with Rectal Carcinoma: Pre-Operative Assessment of Mesorectal Fascia Involvement, Circumferential Resection Margin and Local Staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algebally, Ahmed Mohamed; Mohey, Nesreen; Szmigielski, Wojciech; Yousef, Reda Ramadan Hussein; Kohla, Samah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the accuracy of high-resolution MRI in the pre-operative assessment of mesorectal fascia involvement, circumfrential resection margin (CRM) and local staging in patients with rectal carcinoma. The study included 56 patients: 32 male and 24 female. All patients underwent high-resolution MRI and had confirmed histopathological diagnosis of rectal cancer located within 15 cm from the anal verge, followed by surgery. MRI findings were compared with pathological and surgical results. The overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of MRI-based T-staging were 92.8, 88.8%, 96.5%, 96%, and 90.3%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based assessment of CRM were 94.6%, 84.6%, 97.6%, 91.4, and 94.6%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI-based N-staging were 82.1%, 75%, 67.3%, 60%, and 86.1%, respectively. Preoperative high-resolution rectal MRI is accurate in predicting tumor stage and CRM involvement. MRI is a precise diagnostic tool to select patients who may benefit from neo-adjuvant therapy and to avoid overtreatment in those patients who can proceed directly to surgery

  4. Evaluation of endorectal ultrasound (ERUS) and MRI for prediction of circumferential resection margin (CRM) for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Catherine; Hague, Cameron; Xiong, Wei; Raval, Manoj; Karimuddin, Ahmer; Brown, Carl; Phang, P Terry

    2017-05-01

    ERUS and MRI are used for preoperative imaging of rectal cancer. Here, we compare ERUS and MRI for accuracy of CRM prediction at mid- and distal rectal locations. In retrospective review, 20 rectal cancer patients having TME surgery had both ERUS and MRI preoperatively: 8 mid rectum and 12 in distal rectum. Predicted CRM by ERUS and MRI were compared to TME pathology. Overall, predicted CRM was 6.5 ± 3.6 mm by ERUS, 7.7 ± 5.0 mm by MRI, and 6.0 ± 4.6 mm by pathology. Overall, correlation coefficients to pathology were 0.77 (p = 0.0004) for ERUS and 0.64 (p = 0.008) for MRI. In distal rectum, correlation coefficients were 0.71 (p = 0.02) for ERUS and -0.10 (p = 0.79) for MRI. In mid rectum, correlation coefficients were 0.92 (p = 0.01) for ERUS and 0.44 (p = 0.38) for MRI. While MRI is used routinely for preoperative rectal cancer imaging, ERUS can provide additional assessment of CRM for mid or distal rectal lesions. Further investigation is needed to support these preliminary ERUS CRM findings in mid and distal rectum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Late adverse effects of radiation therapy for rectal cancer - a systematic overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birgisson, Helgi; Paahlman, Lars; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Glimelius, Bengt

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. The use of radiation therapy (RT) together with improvement in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer improves survival and reduces the risk for local recurrences. Despite these benefits, the adverse effects of radiation therapy limit its use. The aim of this review was to present a comprehensive overview of published studies on late adverse effects related to the RT for rectal cancer. Methods. Meta-analyses, reviews, randomised clinical trials, cohort studies and case-control studies on late adverse effects, due to pre- or postoperative radiation therapy and chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer, were systematically searched. Most information was obtained from the randomised trials, especially those comparing preoperative short-course 5x5 Gy radiation therapy with surgery alone. Results. The late adverse effects due to RT were bowel obstructions; bowel dysfunction presented as faecal incontinence to gas, loose or solid stools, evacuation problems or urgency; and sexual dysfunction. However, fewer late adverse effects were reported in recent studies, which generally used smaller irradiated volumes and better irradiation techniques; although, one study revealed an increased risk for secondary cancers in irradiated patients. Conclusions. These results stress the importance of careful patient selection for RT for rectal cancer. Improvements in the radiation technique should further be developed and the long-term follow-up of the randomised trials is the most important source of information on late adverse effects and should therefore be continued

  6. Late adverse effects of radiation therapy for rectal cancer - a systematic overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgisson, Helgi; Paahlman, Lars; Gunnarsson, Ulf [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Dept. of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose. The use of radiation therapy (RT) together with improvement in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer improves survival and reduces the risk for local recurrences. Despite these benefits, the adverse effects of radiation therapy limit its use. The aim of this review was to present a comprehensive overview of published studies on late adverse effects related to the RT for rectal cancer. Methods. Meta-analyses, reviews, randomised clinical trials, cohort studies and case-control studies on late adverse effects, due to pre- or postoperative radiation therapy and chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer, were systematically searched. Most information was obtained from the randomised trials, especially those comparing preoperative short-course 5x5 Gy radiation therapy with surgery alone. Results. The late adverse effects due to RT were bowel obstructions; bowel dysfunction presented as faecal incontinence to gas, loose or solid stools, evacuation problems or urgency; and sexual dysfunction. However, fewer late adverse effects were reported in recent studies, which generally used smaller irradiated volumes and better irradiation techniques; although, one study revealed an increased risk for secondary cancers in irradiated patients. Conclusions. These results stress the importance of careful patient selection for RT for rectal cancer. Improvements in the radiation technique should further be developed and the long-term follow-up of the randomised trials is the most important source of information on late adverse effects and should therefore be continued.

  7. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  8. Impact of neoadjuvant treatment on total mesorectal excision for ultra-low rectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Joe FM

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study reviewed the impact of pre-operative chemoradiotherapy or post-operative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy on total mesorectal excision (TME for ultralow rectal cancers that required either low anterior resection with peranal coloanal anastomosis or abdomino-perineal resection (APR. We examined surgical complications, local recurrence and survival. Methods Of the 1270 patients who underwent radical resection for rectal cancer from 1994 till 2007, 180 with tumors within 4 cm with either peranal coloanal anastomosis or APR were analyzed. Patients were compared in groups that had surgery only (Group A, pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (Group B, and post-operative therapy (Group C. Results There were 115 males and the mean age was 65.43 years (range 30-89. APR was performed in 134 patients while 46 had a sphincter-preserving resection with peranal coloanal anastomosis. The mean follow-up period was 52.98 months (range: 0.57 to 178.9. There were 69, 58 and 53 patients in Groups A, B, and C, respectively. Nine patients in Group B could go on to have sphincter-saving rectal resection. The overall peri-operative complication rate was 43.4% in Group A vs. 29.3% in Group B vs. 39.6% in Group C, respectively. The local recurrence rate was significantly lower in Group B (8.6.9% vs. 21.7% in Group A vs. 33.9% in Group C p . The 5-year cancer-specific survival rates for Group A was 49.3%, Group B was 69.9% and Group C was 38.8% (p = 0.14. Conclusion Pre-operative chemoradiation in low rectal cancer is not associated with a higher incidence of peri-operative complications and its benefits may include reduction local recurrence.

  9. Laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery: Where do we stand?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mukta K Krane; Alessandro Fichera

    2012-01-01

    Large comparative studies and multiple prospective randomized control trials (RCTs) have reported equivalence in short and long-term outcomes between the open and laparoscopic approaches for the surgical treatment of colon cancer which has heralded widespread acceptance for laparoscopic resection of colon cancer.In contrast,laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) for the treatment of rectal cancer has been welcomed with significantly less enthusiasm.While it is likely that patients with rectal cancer will experience the same benefits of early recovery and decreased postoperative pain from the laparoscopic approach,whether the same oncologic clearance,specifically an adequate TME can be obtained is of concern.The aim of the current study is to review the current level of evidence in the literature on laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery with regard to short-term and long-term oncologic outcomes.The data from 8 RCTs,3 metaanalyses,and 2 Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was reviewed.Current data suggests that laparoscopic rectal cancer resection may benefit patients with reduced blood loss,earlier retum of bowel function,and shorter hospital length of stay.Concerns that laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery compromises shortterm oncologic outcomes including number of lymph nodes retrieved and circumferential resection margin and jeopardizes long-term oncologic outcomes has not conclusively been refuted by the available literature.Laparoscopic rectal cancer resection is feasible but whether or not it compromises short-term or long-term results still needs to be further studied.

  10. Laparoscopic resection for low rectal cancer: evaluation of oncological efficacy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Diarmaid C

    2011-09-01

    Laparoscopic resection of low rectal cancer poses significant technical difficulties for the surgeon. There is a lack of published follow-up data in relation to the surgical, oncological and survival outcomes in these patients.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging for clinical management of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To update the 2012 ESGAR consensus guidelines on the acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical staging and restaging of rectal cancer. METHODS: Fourteen abdominal imaging experts from the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdomin...

  12. Fournier gangrene: first manifestation of occult rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tovar, J; Córdoba, L; Devesa, J M

    2011-01-01

    Fournier gangrene is a necrotizing fasciitis of the genital and perineal region. Diverse factors predispose to Fournier gangrene, such as diabetes mellitus, ethylism, liver dysfunction, haematological disorders, obesity or recent regional instrumentation. Rectal tumours can also predispose to Fournier gangrene; most of the reported cases are perforated or unresectable colorectal tumours, but some cases of anorectal cancer diagnosed after recovery from Fournier gangrene have also been reported. In these cases, the presence of a rectal tumour at the time of, or prior to, diagnosis of Fournier gangrene could not be ruled out. We present three cases of rectal cancer whose first manifestation was as Fournier gangrene.

  13. Cell-free DNA levels and correlation to stage and outcome following treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Anders Kindberg; Wettergren, Yvonne; Sorensen, Boe Sandahl; Taflin, Helena; Gustavson, Bengt; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm

    2017-11-01

    Accurate staging of rectal cancer remains essential for optimal patient selection for combined modality treatment, including radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. We aimed at examining the correlation of cell free DNA with the pathologic stage and subsequent risk of recurrence for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing preoperative chemoradiation. We examined 75 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving preoperative chemoradiation. Blood samples for translational use were drawn prior to rectal surgery. The level of cell free DNA was quantified by digital droplet PCR and expressed as copy number of beta 2 microglobulin. We found a median level of cell free DNA in the AJCC stages I-III of 3100, 8300, and 10,700 copies/mL respectively. For patients with 12 sampled lymph nodes or above, the median level of cell free DNA were 2400 copies/mL and 4400 copies/mL (p = 0.04) for node negative and node positive disease respectively. The median follow-up was 39 months and 11 recurrences were detected (15%). The median level for patients with recurrent disease was 13,000 copies/mL compared to 5200 copies/mL for non-recurrent patients (p = 0.08). We have demonstrated a correlation between the level of total cell free DNA and the pathologic stage and nodal involvement. Furthermore, we have found a trend towards a correlation with the risk of recurrence following resection of localized rectal cancer.

  14. Celecoxib plus chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer: a phase II TCOG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling-Wei; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Chen, William Tzu-Liang; Lee, Hao-Hsien; Lin, Tzu-Chen; Chen, Hung-Chang; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Chien, Chun-Ru; Lin, Tze-Yi; Liu, Tsang-Wu

    2014-05-01

    To report the results of a phase II trial combining celecoxib and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients with clinical stage II or III rectal cancer were treated with radiotherapy of 44 Gy in 22 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of oral tegafur-uracil and folinate on days 1-30 and 38-65. Celecoxib (400 mg/day) given from days 1 to 65. Surgery was done on day 70. The expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in tumor tissues was evaluated microscopically as a prognostic factor. From 2008 to 2011, 53 patients completed CRT+ celecoxib therapy and 47 received radical surgery. Grade 3 diarrhea developed in 5 (9%). Grade 4 anemia was seen in 2 (4%). Pathological complete response (pCR) was seen in 6 (13%). T or N downstaging found in 38 (81%). Sphincter preservation was achieved in 77% of low-positioned tumors. Patients with tumors expressing high-level COX-2 after CRT + celecoxib treatment had inferior pelvic control (P = 0.01), disease-free survival (P = 0.04), and overall survival (P = 0.03) than those with low-level expression. Celecoxib can be safely combined with preoperative CRT for rectal cancer. More intensified adjuvant therapy may be considered for tumors expressing high-level COX-2 after CRT and surgery. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Combined modality treatment including intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveit, Kjell Maque; Wiig, Johan N.; Olsen, Dag Rune; Storaas, Andreas; Poulsen, Jan Peter; Giercksky, Karl-Erik

    1997-01-01

    Background: Treatment of locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer usually has a high local recurrence rate and poor survival. Promising results have been reported by combined external radiotherapy, extensive surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Methods: One hundred fifteen patients with locally advanced rectal cancers fixed to the pelvic wall or locally recurrent rectal cancers underwent preoperative external radiotherapy with 46-50 Gy. Six to 8 weeks later radical pelvic surgery was attempted, and was combined with intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (15-20 Gy) in 66 patients. The patients were followed closely to evaluate complication rate, local and distant recurrence rate and survival. Results: Surgery with no macroscopic tumour remaining was obtained in 65% of the patients with no postoperative deaths. Pelvic infection was the major complication (21%). Although the observation time is short (3-60 months), the local recurrence rate seems low (22%) and survival seems promising (about 60% at 4 years) in patients with complete tumour resection, in contrast to patients with residual tumour (none living at 4 years). Conclusions: The combined modality treatment with preoperative external radiotherapy and extensive pelvic surgery with IORT is sufficiently promising to start a randomized trial on the clinical value of IORT as a boost treatment in the multidisciplinary approach to this disease

  16. Histology and cell kinetics of rectal mucosa of A/HeJ mice administered syngeneic rectal antigen and its effects on radiation induced rectal cancer, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Yoritaka

    1980-01-01

    1. Four-week-old A/HeJ mice were immunized by rectal antigen and at the age of 6 weeks the pelvic region was exposed to 2,000 rad of X-ray for two times. They were observed for a maximum period of 84 weeks. The first rectal cancer detected 36 days after irradiation was histologically found to be mucous-secreting-adenocarinoma. Within 32 weeks after irradiation, rectal cancer was observed in 21 (61.76%) of the 34 autopsied mice. During the entire period of observation, rectal cancer was observed in 25 (55.56%) of the 45 mice. 2. On the other hand, among the mice whose pelvic region was exposed to 2,000 rad for two times, the first cancer was observed 56 days after irradiation. Within 32 weeks after irradiation, rectal cancer was observed in 4 (18.18%) of the 22 autopsied mice. During the entire period of observation, rectal cancer was observed in 12 (33.33%) of the 36 mice. 3. In the group of 51 non-irradiated mice, no rectal cancer was observed. 4. The stainability of HID-AB stain of the histologically normal mucosa near irradiated site was compared between cancer induced cases and normal cases. In 22 (84.62%) mice among 26 with induced cancer and in 9 (45%) among 20 mice without cancer, rectal crypt with AB positive goblet cells could be observed. (author)

  17. Prospective single-arm study of intraoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Jennifer; Hui, Andrew C; Heriot, Alexander G.; Mackay, Jack; Lynch, A. Craig; Van Dyk, Sylvia; Bressel, Mathias; Fox, Chris D.; Leong, Trevor; Ngan, Samuel Y.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and outcomes of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) using high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancers. Despite preoperative chemoradiation, patients with locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancers undergoing surgery remain at high risk of local recurrence. Intensification of radiation with IORT may improve local control. This is a prospective non-randomised study. Eligible patients were those with T4 rectal cancer or pelvic recurrence, deemed suitable for radical surgery but at high risk of positive resection margins, without evidence of metastasis. Chemoradiation was followed by radical surgery. Ten gray (Gy) was delivered to tumour bed via an IORT applicator at time of surgery. There were 15% primary and 85% recurrent cancers. The 71% received preoperative chemoradiation. R0, R1 and R2 resections were 70%, 22% and 7%, respectively. IORT was successfully delivered in 27 of 30 registered patients (90% (95% confidence interval (CI)=73–98)) at a median reported time of 12 weeks (interquartile range (IQR)=10–16) after chemoradiation. Mean IORT procedure and delivery times were 63 minutes (range 22–105 minutes). Ten patients (37% (95% CI=19–58)) experienced grade 3 or 4 toxicities (three wound, four abscesses, three soft tissue, three bowel obstructions, three ureteric obstructions and two sensory neuropathies). Local recurrence-free, failure-free and overall survival rates at 2.5 years were 68% (95% CI=52–89), 37% (95% CI=23–61) and 82% (95% CI=68–98), respectively. The addition of IORT to radical surgery for T4 or recurrent rectal cancer is feasible. It can be delivered safely with low morbidity and good tumour outcomes.

  18. Laparoscopic versus open total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vennix, Sandra; Pelzers, Loeki; Bouvy, Nicole; Beets, Geerard L.; Pierie, Jean-Pierre; Wiggers, Theo; Breukink, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer including rectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer deaths in the western world. For colon carcinoma, laparoscopic surgery is proven to result in faster postoperative recovery, fewer complications and better cosmetic results with equal oncologic results. These

  19. Principia of cancer therapy, 19. Effects of per rectum carmofur on radiotherapeutic efficacy of rectal carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishina, Hitoshi; Okuyama, Shinichi

    1987-12-01

    Radiotherapy combined with bleomycin in oil and tegafur and/or carmofur has already been shown markedly effective in those patients having rectal cancer as studied histologically (Okuyama et al. Tohoku J. Exp. Med. 143 : 503, 1984) as well as clinically (Hariu et al. Jap. Assoc. Gastrenterol. Surg., Hiroshima, 1983). In search for attainment of better effectiveness, carmofur suppositories were developed. Their pharmacokinetic analysis revealed a ten-time increment in the blood concentration of 5-FU as compared with tegafur suppositories. The clinical results in terms of reduction in tumor size, CEA titers and survival appeared to be improved. Histological studies on the surgical materials seemed promising, too. The probable clinical significance of carmofur suppositories may be that pre-operative radiotherapy of rectal cancers, and possibly those patients having their metastases to the liver organ be greatly expedited.

  20. Clinical results of tumor shrinkage and evaluation of quality of life in low rectal carcinoma after preoperative combined treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Osamu; Suganuma, Yasushi; Tamura, Takao; Ohnishi, Kazuyoshi; Nishiue, Takashi; Itoh, Masahiko; Horie, Hiroshi; Sawai, Seiji; Takahashi, Toshio

    1992-01-01

    To improve the surgical rate and the quality of life (QOL) for patients with advanced low rectal carcinoma, we investigated whether preoperative treatments (irradiation and hyperthermia and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) suppository, irradiation and hyperthermia, irradiation and 5-FU suppository, irradiation alone and 5-FU suppository alone) were useful. The tumor shrinkage rate after preoperative treatments was highest in the irradiation, hyperthermia and 5-FU suppository group. Pathologically complete regression was observed in the 2 of 18 cases (12%). According to our criteria of histological changes, the irradiation, hyperthermia and 5-FU suppository group showed the greatest effectiveness. The 4 year postoperative survival rate and the 4 year local recurrence rate were 100% and 8% in the irradiation, hyperthermia and 5-FU suppository group and the data suggest that these results were the best of the 5 treatments. After the carcinoma was shrunk after irradiation, hyperthermia and 5-FU suppository, the patients could receive curatively a sphincter-saving operation (super-low anterior resection and transanal rectal resection). The fecal continence of 7 patients after sphincter-saving operations was increased as good by manometric study, defecography and clinical evaluation. In conclusion, our data suggest that the preoperative combined treatment of irradiation, hyperthermia and 5-FU suppository prevents local recurrence and increases the possibility of a sphincter-saving operation for advanced rectal carcinoma. (author)

  1. Rectal cancer survival in the Nordic countries and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, J.; Engholm, G.; Ehrnrooth, E.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present detailed population-based survival estimates four patients with a rectal adenocarcinoma, using cancer register data supplemented with clinical data. Based oil cancer register data. differences in rectal cancer survival have been reported between countries ill...... Europe. Variation ill the distribution of stage at diagnosis. initial therapy including surgical technique, and comorbidity are possible explanatory factors. Adenocarcinomas in the rectum. diagnosed in 1997 and identified in the national cancer registries in the Nordic countries and Scotland were...

  2. Rectal cancer survival in the Nordic countries and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Joakim; Engholm, Gerda; Ehrnrooth, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present detailed population-based survival estimates for patients with a rectal adenocarcinoma, using cancer register data supplemented with clinical data. Based on cancer register data, differences in rectal cancer survival have been reported between countries...... in Europe. Variation in the distribution of stage at diagnosis, initial therapy including surgical technique, and comorbidity are possible explanatory factors. Adenocarcinomas in the rectum, diagnosed in 1997 and identified in the national cancer registries in the Nordic countries and Scotland were included...

  3. Time trends, improvements and national auditing of rectal cancer management over an 18-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodeda, K; Johansson, R; Zar, N; Birgisson, H; Dahlberg, M; Skullman, S; Lindmark, G; Glimelius, B; Påhlman, L; Martling, A

    2015-09-01

    The main aims were to explore time trends in the management and outcome of patients with rectal cancer in a national cohort and to evaluate the possible impact of national auditing on overall outcomes. A secondary aim was to provide population-based data for appraisal of external validity in selected patient series. Data from the Swedish ColoRectal Cancer Registry with virtually complete national coverage were utilized in this cohort study on 29 925 patients with rectal cancer diagnosed between 1995 and 2012. Of eligible patients, nine were excluded. During the study period, overall, relative and disease-free survival increased. Postoperative mortality after 30 and 90 days decreased to 1.7% and 2.9%. The 5-year local recurrence rate dropped to 5.0%. Resection margins improved, as did peri-operative blood loss despite more multivisceral resections being performed. Fewer patients underwent palliative resection and the proportion of non-operated patients increased. The proportions of temporary and permanent stoma formation increased. Preoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy became more common as did multidisciplinary team conferences. Variability in rectal cancer management between healthcare regions diminished over time when new aspects of patient care were audited. There have been substantial changes over time in the management of patients with rectal cancer, reflected in improved outcome. Much indirect evidence indicates that auditing matters, but without a control group it is not possible to draw firm conclusions regarding the possible impact of a quality control registry on faster shifts in time trends, decreased variability and improvements. Registry data were made available for reference. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. Complete Neoadjuvant Treatment for Rectal Cancer: The Brown University Oncology Group CONTRE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Kimberly; Safran, Howard; Sikov, William; Vrees, Matthew; Klipfel, Adam; Shah, Nishit; Schechter, Steven; Oldenburg, Nicklas; Pricolo, Victor; Rosati, Kayla; Dipetrillo, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Following preoperative chemoradiation and surgery, many patients with stage II to III rectal cancer are unable to tolerate full-dose adjuvant chemotherapy. BrUOG R-224 was designed to assess the impact of COmplete Neoadjuvant Treatment for REctal cancer (CONTRE), primary chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation and surgery, on treatment delivery, toxicities, and pathologic response at surgery. Patients with clinical stage II to III (T3 to T4 and/or N1 to N2) rectal cancer received 8 cycles of modified FOLFOX6 followed by capecitabine 825 mg/m bid concurrent with 50.4 Gy intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Surgery was performed 6 to 10 weeks after chemoradiation. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled between August 2010 and June 2013. Median age was 61 years (30 to 79 y); 7 patients (18%) were clinical stage II and 32 (82%) stage III. Thirty-six patients (92%) received all 8 cycles of mFOLFOX6, of whom 35 completed subsequent chemoradiation; thus 89% of patients received CONTRE as planned. No unexpected toxicities were reported. All patients had resolution of bleeding and improvement of obstructive symptoms, with no complications requiring surgical intervention. Pathologic complete response (ypT0N0) was demonstrated in 13 patients (33%; 95% CI, 18.24%-47.76%). CONTRE seems to be a well-tolerated alternative to the current standard treatment sequence. Evaluating its impact on long-term outcomes would require a large randomized trial, but using pathologic response as an endpoint, it could serve as a platform for assessing the addition of novel agents to preoperative treatment in stage II to III rectal cancer.

  5. Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuremsky, Jeffrey G.; Tepper, Joel E.; McLeod, Howard L. Phar

    2009-01-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) is currently treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Although approximately 45% of patients respond to neoadjuvant therapy with T-level downstaging, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond. Molecular biomarkers have been investigated for their ability to predict outcome in LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. A literature search using PubMed resulted in the initial assessment of 1,204 articles. Articles addressing the ability of a biomarker to predict outcome for LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation were included. Six biomarkers met the criteria for review: p53, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), thymidylate synthase, Ki-67, p21, and bcl-2/bax. On the basis of composite data, p53 is unlikely to have utility as a predictor of response. Epidermal growth factor receptor has shown promise as a predictor when quantitatively evaluated in pretreatment biopsies or when EGFR polymorphisms are evaluated in germline DNA. Thymidylate synthase, when evaluated for polymorphisms in germline DNA, is promising as a predictive biomarker. Ki-67 and bcl-2 are not useful in predicting outcome. p21 needs to be further evaluated to determine its usefulness in predicting outcome. Bax requires more investigation to determine its usefulness. Epidermal growth factor receptor, thymidylate synthase, and p21 should be evaluated in larger prospective clinical trials for their ability to guide preoperative therapy choices in LARC.

  6. Short-course radiotherapy followed by neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer – the RAPIDO trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Per J; Marijnen, Corrie AM; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Wiggers, Theo; Glimelius, Bengt; Etten, Boudewijn van; Hospers, Geke AP; Påhlman, Lars; Velde, Cornelis JH van de; Beets-Tan, Regina GH; Blomqvist, Lennart; Beukema, Jannet C; Kapiteijn, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Current standard for most of the locally advanced rectal cancers is preoperative chemoradiotherapy, and, variably per institution, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Short-course preoperative radiation with delayed surgery has been shown to induce tumour down-staging in both randomized and observational studies. The concept of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy has been proven successful in gastric cancer, hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer and is currently tested in primary colon cancer. Patients with rectal cancer with high risk features for local or systemic failure on magnetic resonance imaging are randomized to either a standard arm or an experimental arm. The standard arm consists of chemoradiation (1.8 Gy x 25 or 2 Gy x 25 with capecitabine) preoperatively, followed by selective postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy is optional and may be omitted by participating institutions. The experimental arm includes short-course radiotherapy (5 Gy x 5) followed by full-dose chemotherapy (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in 6 cycles before surgery. In the experimental arm, no postoperative chemotherapy is prescribed. Surgery is performed according to TME principles in both study arms. The hypothesis is that short-course radiotherapy with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy increases disease-free and overall survival without compromising local control. Primary end-point is disease-free survival at 3 years. Secondary endpoints include overall survival, local control, toxicity profile, and treatment completion rate, rate of pathological complete response and microscopically radical resection, and quality of life. Following the advances in rectal cancer management, increased focus on survival rather than only on local control is now justified. In an experimental arm, short-course radiotherapy is combined with full-dose chemotherapy preoperatively, an alternative that offers advantages compared to concomitant chemoradiotherapy with or without postoperative

  7. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepek, Joseph M; Chino, Junzo P; Willett, Christopher G; Palta, Manisha; Blazer III, Dan G; Tyler, Douglas S; Uronis, Hope E; Czito, Brian G

    2013-01-01

    To examine toxicity and outcomes for patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for gastric cancer. Patients with gastroesophageal (GE) junction (Siewert type II and III) or gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant CRT followed by planned surgical resection at Duke University between 1987 and 2009 were reviewed. Overall survival (OS), local control (LC) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Forty-eight patients were included. Most (73%) had proximal (GE junction, cardia and fundus) tumors. Median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients (75%) underwent surgery. Pathologic complete response and R0 resection rates were 19% and 86%, respectively. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 6%. At 42 months median follow-up, 3-year actuarial OS was 40%. For patients undergoing surgery, 3-year OS, LC and DFS were 50%, 73% and 41%, respectively. Preoperative CRT for gastric cancer is well tolerated with acceptable rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In this patient cohort with primarily advanced disease, OS, LC and DFS rates in resected patients are comparable to similarly staged, adjuvantly treated patients in randomized trials. Further study comparing neoadjuvant CRT to standard treatment approaches for gastric cancer is indicated

  8. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepek Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine toxicity and outcomes for patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT for gastric cancer. Methods Patients with gastroesophageal (GE junction (Siewert type II and III or gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant CRT followed by planned surgical resection at Duke University between 1987 and 2009 were reviewed. Overall survival (OS, local control (LC and disease-free survival (DFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results Forty-eight patients were included. Most (73% had proximal (GE junction, cardia and fundus tumors. Median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients (75% underwent surgery. Pathologic complete response and R0 resection rates were 19% and 86%, respectively. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 6%. At 42 months median follow-up, 3-year actuarial OS was 40%. For patients undergoing surgery, 3-year OS, LC and DFS were 50%, 73% and 41%, respectively. Conclusions Preoperative CRT for gastric cancer is well tolerated with acceptable rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In this patient cohort with primarily advanced disease, OS, LC and DFS rates in resected patients are comparable to similarly staged, adjuvantly treated patients in randomized trials. Further study comparing neoadjuvant CRT to standard treatment approaches for gastric cancer is indicated.

  9. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012: science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Velde, C J H; Boelens, P G; Tanis, P J; Espin, E; Mroczkowski, P; Naredi, P; Pahlman, L; Ortiz, H; Rutten, H J; Breugom, A J; Smith, J J; Wibe, A; Wiggers, T; Valentini, V

    2014-04-01

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the consensus document by well-known leaders in surgery that were involved in this multidisciplinary consensus process. Scientific evidence, experience and opinions are collected to support multidisciplinary teams (MDT) with arguments for medical decision-making in diagnosis, staging and treatment strategies for patients with colon or rectal cancer. Surgery is the cornerstone of curative treatment for colon and rectal cancer. Standardizing treatment is an effective instrument to improve outcome of multidisciplinary cancer care for patients with colon and rectal cancer. In this article, a review of the following focuses; Perioperative care, age and colorectal surgery, obstructive colorectal cancer, stenting, surgical anatomical considerations, total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and training, surgical considerations for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and local recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC), surgery in stage IV colorectal cancer, definitions of quality of surgery, transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM), laparoscopic colon and rectal surgery, preoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy, and how about functional outcome after surgery? Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A retrospective comparison of outcome and toxicity of preoperative image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus conventional pelvic radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chun-Ming; Huang, Ming-Yii; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Huang, Ching-Wen; Ma, Cheng-Jen; Lin, Chih-Hung; Huang, Chih-Jen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare clinical outcomes and toxicity between 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) administered through helical tomotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy. We reviewed 144 patients with Stage II–III rectal cancer receiving preoperative fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy followed by radical resection. Tumor responses following chemoradiotherapy were evaluated using the Dworak tumor regression grade (TRG). Of the 144 patients, 45 received IG-IMRT and 99 received 3DCRT. A significant reduction in Grade 3 or 4 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (IG-IMRT, 6.7%; 3DCRT, 15.1%; P = 0.039) was observed by IG-IMRT. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate did not differ between the IG-IMRT and the 3DCRT group (17.8% vs 15.1%, P = 0.52). Patients in the IG-IMRT group had the trend of favorable tumor regressions (TRG 3 or 4) compared with those in the 3DCRT group (66.7% vs 43.5%, P = 0.071). The median follow-up was 53 months (range, 18–95 months) in the 3DCRT group and 43 months (range, 17–69 months) in the IG-IMRT group. Four-year overall, disease-free, and local failure–free survival rates of the IG-IMRT and 3DCRT groups were 81.6% and 67.9% (P = 0.12), 53.8% and 51.8% (P = 0.51), and 88% and 75.1% (P = 0.031), respectively. LARC patients treated with preoperative IG-IMRT achieved lower acute gastrointestinal adverse effects and a higher local control rate than those treated with 3DCRT, but there was no prominent difference in distant metastasis rate and overall survival between two treatment modalities.

  11. Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy: A Risk Factor for Short-Term Wound Complications after Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubar, Stefan D; Brickman, Rachel K; Greaves, Spencer W; Ivatury, S Joga

    2016-08-01

    Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for rectal cancer may increase wound complications after oncologic proctectomy. We aimed to assess the relationship between neoadjuvant RT and 30-day wound complications after radical surgery for rectal cancer. We identified rectal cancer patients (International Classification of Diseases, revision-9 [ICD-9] code 154.1) who underwent radical resection, using NSQIP from 2005 to 2010. Patients were stratified into preoperative radiation vs no radiation groups. Our primary outcome was any wound complication. The association between preoperative RT and postoperative wound complication rate was assessed by univariate, multivariable, and propensity score analyses. Of 242,670 colorectal cases, 6,297 patients were included. Of these, 2,476 (39%) received RT within 90 days preoperatively. The RT group, compared with the no RT group, received more chemotherapy within 30 days preoperatively (15.0% vs 2.5%, p return to operating room (6.7% vs 6.7%, p = 0.96), or length of stay (8.4 vs 8.4 days, p = 0.72) between the RT and no RT groups, respectively. The mortality rate in the RT group was lower on univariate analysis (0.7% vs 1.4%, p = 0.008), but was not significantly different in the multivariable analyses. Multivariable and propensity score analyses were consistent with the lack of association between preoperative RT and postoperative wound complications. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy does not appear to be an independent risk factor for wound complications after radical surgery for rectal cancer. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Preoperative Quality of Life in Patients with Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Suk, Hyoam; Kwon, Oh Kyung; Yu, Wansik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the socio-personal and clinical factors that can affect preoperative quality of life to determine how to improve preoperative quality of life in patients with gastric cancer. Materials and Methods The preoperative quality of life data of 200 patients (68 females and 132 males; mean age 58.9?12.6 years) with gastric cancer were analyzed according to socio-personal and clinical factors. The Korean versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (E...

  13. Treatment of advanced rectal cancer after renal transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Yi Liu; Xiao-Bo Liang; Yao-Ping Li; Yi Feng; Dong-Bo Liu; Wen-Da Wang

    2011-01-01

    Renal transplantation is a standard procedure for end-stage renal disease today. Due to immunosuppressive drugs and increasing survival time after renal trans-plantation, patients with transplanted kidneys carry an increased risk of developing malignant tumors. In this case report, 3 patients with advanced rectal can-cer after renal transplantation for renal failure were treated with anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection plus total mesorectal excision, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. One patient eventually died of metastasized cancer 31 mo after therapy, although his organ grafts functioned well until his death. The other 2 patients were well during the 8 and 21 mo follow-up periods after rectal resection. We therefore strongly argue that patients with advanced rectal cancer should receive standard oncology treatment, including opera-tion and adjuvant treatment after renal transplantation. Colorectal cancer screening in such patients appears justified.

  14. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  15. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Dahl, Alv A.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik; Fossa, Sophie D.; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  16. Quality of life in rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy in Xi'an.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiuxiu; Li, Qin; Zhao, Haihong; Li, Junhua; Duan, Jiaobo; Wang, Dandan; Fang, Ningning; Zhu, Ping; Fu, Jufang

    2014-03-01

    To observe the quality of life (QOL) in rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy in different periods after operation. A 1-,3-,6-month prospective study of QOL in 51 rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy and 50 without permanent colostomy was assessed using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QOL-30 and CR38 questionnaires. The variation of QOL in different periods was "v" type. In the 1st postoperative month, these patients had the lowest quality of life scores, accompanied significantly varied functions and severe symptoms. Almost of all indexes of these patients had improved consistently in the postoperative period. The scores of global QOL even better than pre-operative level at 6th months post-operation, but the social function, body image, chemotherapy side effects and financial difficulties had not restored to the baseline level. Patients without permanent colostomy had a better score in most of categories of QOL-30 and CR38. The 1st postoperative month was crucial for patients' recovery, in which we should pay great attention to these problems which relate to the recovery of rectal cancer patients with permanent colostomy.

  17. The influence of hormone therapies on colon and rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Lidegaard, Øjvind; Keiding, Niels

    2016-01-01

    followed 1995–2009. Information on HT exposures was from the National Prescription Register and updated daily, while information on colon (n = 8377) and rectal cancers (n = 4742) were from the National Cancer Registry. Potential confounders were obtained from other national registers. Poisson regression...

  18. Phase 2 Neoadjuvant Treatment Intensification Trials in Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teo, Mark T W; McParland, Lucy; Appelt, Ane L

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Multiple phase 2 trials of neoadjuvant treatment intensification in locally advanced rectal cancer have reported promising efficacy signals, but these have not translated into improved cancer outcomes in phase 3 trials. Improvements in phase 2 trial design are needed to reduce these fals...

  19. Rectal cancer: Pattern and outcome of management in University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cancer of the colon and rectum was considered to be rare in Africa three to four decades ago. This is no longer true though it is not as common as in Western Europe and North America. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of rectal cancer, its pattern of presentation, diagnosis, treatment and ...

  20. Mechanisms of oncogenesis in colon versus rectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapiteijn, E.; Liefers, G.J.; Los, L.C.; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E.; Hermans, J.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Moriya, Y.; Veld, C.J.H. van de; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2001-01-01

    Observations support the theory that development of left- and right-sided colorectal cancers may involve different mechanisms. This study investigated different genes involved in oncogenesis of colon and rectal cancers and analysed their prognostic value. The study group comprised 35 colon and 42

  1. Functional results after treatment for rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrine Jossing Emmertsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With improving survival of rectal cancer, functional outcome has become in- creasingly important. Following sphincter-preserving resection many patients suffer from severe bowel dysfunction with an impact on quality of life (QoL – referred to as low ante- rior resection syndrome (LARS. Study objective: To provide an overview of the current knowledge of LARS regarding symp- tomatology, occurrence, risk factors, pathophysiology, evaluation instruments and treat- ment options. Results: LARS is characterized by urgency, frequent bowel movements, emptying difficulties and incontinence, and occurs in up to 50-75% of patients on a long-term basis. Known risk factors are low anastomosis, use of radiotherapy, direct nerve injury and straight anasto- mosis. The pathophysiology seems to be multifactorial, with elements of anatomical, sen- sory and motility dysfunction. Use of validated instruments for evaluation of LARS is es- sential. Currently, there is a lack of evidence for treatment of LARS. Yet, transanal irrigation and sacral nerve stimulation are promising. Conclusion: LARS is a common problem following sphincter-preserving resection. All pa- tients should be informed about the risk of LARS before surgery, and routinely be screened for LARS postoperatively. Patients with severe LARS should be offered treatment in order to improve QoL. Future focus should be on the possibilities of non-resectional treatment in order to prevent LARS. Resumo: Introdução: Com o aumento da sobrevida após câncer retal, o resultado funcional se tornou cada vez mais importante. Após ressecção com preservação do esfíncter, muitos pacientes sofrem de disfunção intestinal com um impacto sobre a qualidade de vida (QdV – denomi- nada síndrome da ressecção anterior baixa (LARS. Objetivo do estudo: Fornecer uma visão geral do conhecimento atual da LARS com relação à sintomatologia, à ocorrência, aos fatores de risco, à fisiopatologia, aos

  2. Treatment Options by Stage (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  3. Anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection for rectal cancer: comparison of stapled versus compression anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauser, Bernhard; Braunschmid, Tamara; Ghaffari, Shahbaz; Riss, Stefan; Stift, Anton; Herbst, Friedrich

    2013-10-01

    Surgical technique and perioperative management in rectal cancer surgery have been substantially improved and standardized during the last decades. However, anastomotic leakage following low anterior resection still is a significant problem. Based on animal experimental data of improved healing of compression anastomosis, we hypothesized that a compression anastomotic device might improve healing rates of the highest-risk anastomoses. All low anterior resections for rectal cancer performed or directly supervised by the senior author between January 2004 and June 2012 were analyzed. Only patients with a stapled or compression anastomosis located within 6 cm from the anal verge were included. Until December 2008, circular staplers were employed, while since January 2009, a novel compression anastomotic device was used for rectal reconstruction exclusively. Out of 197 patients operated for rectal cancer, a total of 96 (34 females, 35.4 %) fulfilled inclusion criteria. Fifty-eight (60.4 %) were reconstructed with circular staplers and 38 (39.6 %) using a compression anastomotic device. Significantly, more laparoscopic procedures were recorded in the compression anastomosis group, but distribution of gender, age, body mass index, American Society of Anaesthesiologists score, rate of preoperative radiotherapy, tumor staging, or stoma diversion rate were similar. Anastomotic leakage was observed in seven cases (7/58, 12.1 %) in the stapled and twice (2/38, 5.3 %) in the compression anastomosis group (p = 0.26). In this series, rectal reconstruction following low anterior resection using a novel compression anastomotic device was safe and (at least) equally effective compared to traditional circular staplers concerning leak rate.

  4. Intersphincteric Resection for Low Rectal Cancer – Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russu Cristian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical treatment for low rectal cancer represents a challenge: to perform a radical resection and to preserve the sphincter’s function. We report a case of intersphincteric resection in a combined multimodality treatment for low rectal cancer, with good oncologic and functional outcome. Case presentation: We report a case of a 73 years old woman admitted in April 2014 in surgery, for low rectal cancer. The diagnostic was established by colonoscopy and malignancy confirmed by biopsy. Complete imaging was done using computed tomography and magnetic resonance to establish the exact stage of the disease. The interdisciplinary individualized treatment began with radiotherapy (total dose of 50 Gy, administered in 25 fractions followed by surgery after eight weeks. We performed intersphincteric rectal resection by a modified Schiessel technique. There were no postoperative complications and the oncologic and functional results were very good at one year follow up. Conclusions: Intersphincteric resection, in this selected case of low rectal cancer, represented an efficient surgical treatment, with good functional results and quality of life for the patient. A multidisciplinary team is an invaluable means of assessing and further managing the appropriate, tailored to the case, treatment in the aim of achieving best results.

  5. Reverse-hybrid robotic mesorectal excision for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Ja; You, Y Nancy; Schlette, Erika; Nguyen, Sa; Skibber, John M; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Chang, George J

    2012-02-01

    The robotic system offers potential technical advantages over laparoscopy for total mesorectal excision with radical lymphadenectomy for rectal cancer. However, the requirement for fixed docking limits its utility when the working volume is large or patient repositioning is required. The purpose of this study was to evaluate short-term outcomes associated with a novel setup to perform total mesorectal excision and radical lymphadenectomy for rectal cancer by the use of a "reverse" hybrid robotic-laparoscopic approach. This is a prospective consecutive cohort observational study of patients who underwent robotic rectal cancer resection from January 2009 to March 2011. During the study period, a technique of reverse-hybrid robotic-laparoscopic rectal resection with radical lymphadenectomy was developed. This technique involves reversal of the operative sequence with lymphovascular and rectal dissection to precede proximal colonic mobilization. This technique evolved from a conventional-hybrid resection with laparoscopic vascular control, colonic mobilization, and robotic pelvic dissection. Perioperative and short-term oncologic outcomes were analyzed. Thirty patients underwent reverse-hybrid resection. Median tumor location was 5 cm (interquartile range 3-9) from the anal verge. Median BMI was 27.6 (interquartile range 25.0-32.1 kg/m). Twenty (66.7%) received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. There were no conversions. Median blood loss was 100 mL (interquartile range 75-200). Total operation time was a median 369 (interquartile range 306-410) minutes. Median docking time was 6 (interquartile range 5-8) minutes, and console time was 98 (interquartile range 88-140) minutes. Resection was R0 in all patients; no patients had an incomplete mesorectal resection. Six patients (20%) underwent extended lymph node dissection or en bloc resection. Reverse-hybrid robotic surgery for rectal cancer maximizes the therapeutic applicability of the robotic and conventional laparoscopic

  6. Preoperative radiation with concurrent chemotherapy for resectable rectal cancer: Effect of dose escalation on pathologic complete response, local recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Ward, Iain G.; Swallow, Carol; Oza, Amit M.; Cummings, Bernard; Pond, Gregory R.; Catton, Pamela; Kim, John; Ringash, Jolie; Wong, Chong S.; Wong, Rebecca; Siu, Lillian L.; Moore, Malcolm; Brierley, James

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Three Phase II studies of preoperative radiotherapy and concurrent 5FU chemotherapy were undertaken. The primary endpoints were acute toxicity and pathologic complete response rate (pCR). Secondary endpoints were local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: A total of 134 patients with adenocarcinoma of the rectum (clinical T3/T4 or N1/N2) were treated. The initial cohort received 40 Gy in 20 fractions, the second 46 Gy in 23 fractions, and the third 50 Gy in 25 fractions. 5FU (225 mg/m 2 /day) was given continuously throughout radiotherapy. A total of 121 patients underwent surgical resection. Results: Treatment was well tolerated. Grade 3/4 acute toxicity was observed in 13%, 4%, and 14% of patients in the 40 Gy, 46 Gy, and 50 Gy cohorts, respectively (p = 0.20). pCR was documented in 15%, 23%, and 33% of patients, respectively (p = 0.07). The 2-year actuarial LRFS was 72%, 90%, and 89% (p = 0.02); DFS was 62%, 84%, and 78% (p = 0.02); and OS was 72%, 94%, and 92%, respectively (p = 0.03). Conclusions: All treatment schedules were well tolerated. There was a trend toward increased pCR with higher doses. A statistically significant increase in LRFS, DFS, and OS was seen with radiation doses of 46 Gy and greater, but there was no difference between 46 Gy and 50 Gy

  7. The rectal cancer microRNAome - microRNA expression in rectal cancer and matched normal mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaedcke, Jochen; Grade, Marian; Camps, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: miRNAs play a prominent role in a variety of physiologic and pathologic biologic processes, including cancer. For rectal cancers, only limited data are available on miRNA expression profiles, whereas the underlying genomic and transcriptomic aberrations have been firmly established. We t...

  8. Rectal cancer : developments in multidisciplinary treatment, quality control and European collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijn, Willem van

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, treatment of rectal cancer has considerably improved in Europe. Although this applies to most solid malignancies, improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of rectal cancer surpass virtually all others. In the early 1990s, outcome after rectal cancer treatment was poor,

  9. The effect of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, hyperthermia and chemotherapy for rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, Fumio; Furuta, Kazuhiro; Saito, Yukio; Kataoka, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Hiroshi; Okada, Masaki; Kanazawa, Kyotaro; Sugahara, Tadashi; Shinohara, Naohiro (Jichi Medical School, Minamikawachi, Tochigi (Japan))

    1994-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, chemotherapy and hyperthermia for rectal carcinoma, two groups were compared. Group A consisted of 18 patients in whom hyperthermia, radiation and chemotherapy were performed. Group B consisted of 18 patients in whom only chemotherapy and radiation were performed. The total dose of radiation in both of the two groups was 40.5 Gy, and a radiation field covering the whole pelvis was used. Hyperthermia was performed using 8 MHz radiofrequency waves (Thermotron RF8, Yamamoto Vinyter, Japan), and tumors were heated at about 42 degrees C for 50 minutes. Hyperthermia was repeated five times during the preoperative treatment. Chemotherapy was performed by giving 5-fluorouracil suppositories to a total dose of 3400 mg. Mean tumor reduction rates on barium enema were 31.8% in group A and 18.2% in group B. The difference was statistically significant. The result of the histological assessment of tumor necrosis showed that there was a significantly higher degree of necrosis in group A than in group B. These results showed that the addition of hyperthermia enhanced tumor necrosis. It was concluded that the addition of hyperthermia would be an effective preoperative treatment of rectal carcinoma. (author).

  10. The effect of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, hyperthermia and chemotherapy for rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Fumio; Furuta, Kazuhiro; Saito, Yukio; Kataoka, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Hiroshi; Okada, Masaki; Kanazawa, Kyotaro; Sugahara, Tadashi; Shinohara, Naohiro

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, chemotherapy and hyperthermia for rectal carcinoma, two groups were compared. Group A consisted of 18 patients in whom hyperthermia, radiation and chemotherapy were performed. Group B consisted of 18 patients in whom only chemotherapy and radiation were performed. The total dose of radiation in both of the two groups was 40.5 Gy, and a radiation field covering the whole pelvis was used. Hyperthermia was performed using 8 MHz radiofrequency waves (Thermotron RF8, Yamamoto Vinyter, Japan), and tumors were heated at about 42 degrees C for 50 minutes. Hyperthermia was repeated five times during the preoperative treatment. Chemotherapy was performed by giving 5-fluorouracil suppositories to a total dose of 3400 mg. Mean tumor reduction rates on barium enema were 31.8% in group A and 18.2% in group B. The difference was statistically significant. The result of the histological assessment of tumor necrosis showed that there was a significantly higher degree of necrosis in group A than in group B. These results showed that the addition of hyperthermia enhanced tumor necrosis. It was concluded that the addition of hyperthermia would be an effective preoperative treatment of rectal carcinoma. (author)

  11. A case of small bowel injury induced by preoperative irradiation for rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Noguchi, Tomoyoshi; Akimoto, Shin

    1988-01-01

    A 54-year-old man underwent anterior resection with intraoperative radiation following preoperative irradiation for carcinoma of the rectum in August 1984, and subsequently was suffering from severe diarrhea and abdominal pain. One year and two months later he was admitted to our hospital with a sudden onset of lower abdominal pain, nausea and vomitting. The symptoms were so severe that emergency laparotomy was performed. There was no evidence of recurrent tumor, but the terminal ileum, from a point 30 cm. proximal to the cecum was found to be dark red, constricted and fixed to the urinary bladder. In addition, another two parts of the ileum from a point 50 cm. to that segment showed dark red. These damaged ileum were resected. Pathological examination revealed that there was thickness of the endothelium of arteriole and thromboses of the venule and mucosal damage (ie, ulceration, necroses). These vascular changes had resulted in radiation enteritis induced by preoperative radiotherapy. After the operation severe diarrhea continued until March 1986, when the granning diarrhea and pain became unbearable. At reoperation, another part of ileum was found to be dark red and constricted. There was a recurrent episode of radiation injury of small intestine. We report this case for the recognition of high-risk clinical factors and attention to careful selection or preparation of the patients with cancer for radiotherapy. (author)

  12. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak I

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Iwona Zaporowska-Stachowiak,1,2 Grzegorz Kowalski,3 Jacek Łuczak,2 Katarzyna Kosicka,4 Aleksandra Kotlinska-Lemieszek,3 Maciej Sopata,3 Franciszek Główka4 1Chair and Department of Pharmacology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Palliative Medicine In-patient Unit, University Hospital of Lord's Transfiguration, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 3Palliative Medicine Chair and Department, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 4Department of Physical Pharmacy and Pharmacokinetics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland Background: Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III "pain ladder" drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient's refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective: Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures, and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal on the bupivacaine plasma concentration.Cases: We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours. The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 m

  13. Whither papillon? Future directions for contact radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, J; Gerard, J P; Sun Myint, A

    2007-01-01

    of rectal cancer. As a result of these efforts, a European company is starting production of the new Papillon RT-50 machine, which will be available shortly. In addition, the ICONE group is planning an observational study on contact X-ray and transanal endoscopic microsurgery (CONTEM) for curative treatment...... of rectal cancer. This protocol will ensure standardised diagnostic procedures, patient selection and treatment in centres across the world and the data will be collected prospectively for analysis and audit. It is hoped that the CONTEM trial will provide the scientific evidence that is needed to obtain...

  14. Intratumoral Heterogeneity of MicroRNA Expression in Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Anne Haahr Mellergaard; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Nielsen, Boye Schnack

    2016-01-01

    study was to assess the heterogeneity of a panel of selected miRNAs in rectal cancer, using two different technical approaches. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The expression of the investigated miRNAs was analysed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH......) in tumour specimens from 27 patients with T3-4 rectal cancer. From each tumour, tissue from three different luminal localisations was examined. Inter- and intra-patient variability was assessed by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Correlations between RT-qPCR and ISH were evaluated...

  15. Ultrasound elastography in patients with rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, S R; Vagn-Hansen, C; Sørensen, T

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current literature has described several predictive markers in rectal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation, but so far none of them have been validated for clinical use. The purpose of the present study was to compare quantitative elastography based on ultrasound measurements...... in the course of chemoradiation with tumor response based on T stage classification and the Mandard tumor regression grading (TRG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively examined 31 patients with rectal cancer planned for high dose radiochemotherapy. The tumor and the mesorectal fat elasticity were measured...

  16. Management of stage IV rectal cancer: Palliative options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnekleiv-Kelly, Sean M; Kennedy, Gregory D

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with rectal cancer present with metastatic disease. Many of these patients have symptoms of bleeding or obstruction. Several treatment options are available to deal with the various complications that may afflict these patients. Endorectal stenting, laser ablation, and operative resection are a few of the options available to the patient with a malignant large bowel obstruction. A thorough understanding of treatment options will ensure the patient is offered the most effective therapy with the least amount of associated morbidity. In this review, we describe various options for palliation of symptoms in patients with metastatic rectal cancer. Additionally, we briefly discuss treatment for asymptomatic patients with metastatic disease. PMID:21412493

  17. Dosimetric evaluation of tomography and four-box field conformal radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Mina; Lee, Hyo Chun; Chung, Mi Joo; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Jeon, Dong Min; Cheon, Geum Seong

    2013-01-01

    To report the results of dosimetric comparison between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using Tomotherapy and four-box field conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for pelvic irradiation of locally advanced rectal cancer. Twelve patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received a short course preoperative chemoradiotherapy (25 Gy in 5 fractions) on the pelvis using Tomotherapy, between July 2010 and December 2010, were selected. Using their simulation computed tomography scans, Tomotherapy and four-box field CRT plans with the same dose schedule were evaluated, and dosimetric parameters of the two plans were compared. For the comparison of target coverage, we analyzed the mean dose, Vn Gy, Dmin, Dmax, radical dose homogeneity index (rDHI), and radiation conformity index (RCI). For the comparison of organs at risk (OAR), we analyzed the mean dose. Tomotherapy showed a significantly higher mean target dose than four-box field CRT (p 0.001). But, V26.25 Gy and V27.5 Gywere not significantly different between the two modalities. Tomotherapy showed higher Dmax and lower Dmin. The Tomotherapy plan had a lower rDHI than four-box field CRT (p = 0.000). Tomotherapy showed better RCI than four-box field CRT (p = 0.007). For OAR, the mean irradiated dose was significantly lower in Tomotherapy than four-box field CRT. In locally advanced rectal cancer, Tomotherapy delivers a higher conformal radiation dose to the target and reduces the irradiated dose to OAR than four-box field CRT.

  18. A Feasibility Study of Neoadjuvant XELOX Without Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Lower Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Takashi; Manabe, Tatsuya; Inoue, Shigetaka; Ienaga, Jun; Yamanaka, Naoki; Egami, Takuya; Ishikawa, Mikimasa; Konomi, Hiroyuki; Ikubo, Akashi; Nagayoshi, Kinuko; Nakamura, Masafumi; Tanaka, Masao

    2016-02-01

    This study was planned to evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) without radiation in patients with locally advanced lower rectal cancer. Patients with clinical stage II/III lower rectal cancer underwent three cycles of XELOX followed by radical surgery. The primary end-point was the R0 resection rate. Thirty-one patients were recruited between February 2012 and August 2014. The completion rate of neoadjuvant chemotherapy was 96.5% among the 29 patients who received it; the remaining two refused chemotherapy and underwent immediate surgery. Grade 3-4 adverse events occurred in nine patients (31%). All 29 patients who received chemotherapy underwent radical resection. The R0 resection rate was 96.5% among these 29 patients. Pathological complete responses were achieved in three patients (10.3%) and downstaging occurred in 13 (44.8%). This pilot study found that neoadjuvant XELOX for locally advanced lower rectal cancer is feasible and safe. This neoadjuvant treatment improved resection margin status. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  19. [Transanal laparoscopic radical resection with telescopic anastomosis for low rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiyong; Chen, Gang; Du, Junfeng; Chen, Guang; Wei, Xiaojun; Cui, Wei; Yuan, Qiang; Sun, Liang; Bai, Xue; Zuo, Fuyi; Yu, Bo; Dong, Xing; Ji, Xiqing

    2015-06-01

    To assess the safety, feasibility and clinical outcome of laparoscopic radical resection for low rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis or with colostomy by stapler through transanal resection without abdominal incisions. From January 2010 to September 2014, 37 patients underwent laparoscopic radical resection for low rectal cancer through transanal resection without abdominal incisions. The tumors were 4-7 cm above the anal verge. On preoperative assessment, 26 cases were T1N0M0 and 11 were T2N0M0. For all cases, successful surgery was performed. In telescopic anastomosis group, the mean operative time was (178±21) min, with average blood loss of (76±11) ml and (13±7) lymph nodes harvested. Return of bowel function was (3.0±1.2) d and the hospital stay was (12.0±4.2) d without postoperative complications. Patients were followed up for 3-45 months. Twelve months after surgery, 94.6%(35/37) patients achieved anal function Kirwan grade 1, indicating that their anal function returned to normal. Laparoscopic radical resection for low rectal cancer with telescopic anastomosis or colostomy by stapler through transanal resection without abdominal incisions is safe and feasible. Satisfactory clinical outcome can be achieved mini-invasively.</