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Sample records for preoperative radiotherapy rt

  1. Results of a selective policy for preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer surgery.

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    Gandy; O'Leary; Falk; Roe

    2000-01-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy (pRT) for rectal cancer may reduce local recurrence and improve survival. This study was undertaken to assess a selective policy of pRT in rectal cancer. The aim was to determine whether patients likely to have involved circumferential margins (CRM) could be reliably selected for pRT using clinical criteria. We have used CRM and delay in surgery as outcome measures. Seventy-nine patients with rectal cancer were assessed for preoperative radiotherapy using clinical criteria. Twelve of 26 (46%) pRT patients had positive CRM compared with three of 53 (5.6%) who did not receive pRT (P benefit from radiotherapy and has avoided excessive delays prior to surgery. However, almost half of the pRT patients did not have involved CRM. With improved imaging techniques we may be able to refine our selection criteria further.

  2. Radiotherapy for MTRA/RT; Strahlentherapie fuer MTRA/RT

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    Luetter, Christiana [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik

    2012-07-01

    The radiological practice textbook covers the following issues: tumor diseases, tumor diagnostics, fundamentals of radiotherapy, DIN, irradiation planning, documentation and quality assurance, strategies of tumor therapy, basic physics of radiotherapy and dosimetry, radiation protection - regulations and guidelines, radiobiology, biological radiation effects, special organ toxicity, psychological and medical attendance of patients, special oncology of the most important organ carcinomas, palliative radiotherapy, radiotherapy of benign diseases, other indications of radiotherapy, supportive therapy.

  3. Biological predictive factors in rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy.

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    Negri, F V; Campanini, N; Camisa, R; Pucci, F; Bui, S; Ceccon, G; Martinelli, R; Fumagalli, M; Losardo, P L; Crafa, P; Bordi, C; Cascinu, S; Ardizzoni, A

    2008-01-15

    We analysed the expression of microsatellite instability, p53, p21, vascular endothelial growth factor and thymidylate synthase (TS) in pretreatment biopsy specimens from 57 locally advanced rectal cancers. The aim of the study was to correlate the expression of these markers with pathological response. Nineteen patients were treated with preoperative concomitant radiotherapy (RT) and fluorouracil/oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy (RCT), while 38 had RT alone. Pathological complete remission (pCR) and microfoci residual tumour (micR) occurred more frequently in patients treated with RCT (P=0.002) and in N0 tumours (P=0.004). Among patients treated with RCT, high TS levels were associated with a higher response rate (pCR+micR; P=0.015). No such correlation was found in the RT group. The other molecular factors were of no predictive value. Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant interaction between nodal status and the probability of achieving a pathological response (P=0.023) and between TS expression and treatment, indicating that a high TS level is predictive of a higher pathological response in the RCT subset (P=0.007). This study shows that lymph node status is the most important predictive factor of tumour response to preoperative treatment. Thymidylate synthase expression assessed immunohistochemically from pretreatment tumour biopsies may be a useful predictive marker of rectal tumour response to preoperative RCT.

  4. Biological predictive factors in rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, F V; Campanini, N; Camisa, R; Pucci, F; Bui, S; Ceccon, G; Martinelli, R; Fumagalli, M; Losardo, P L; Crafa, P; Bordi, C; Cascinu, S; Ardizzoni, A

    2007-01-01

    We analysed the expression of microsatellite instability, p53, p21, vascular endothelial growth factor and thymidylate synthase (TS) in pretreatment biopsy specimens from 57 locally advanced rectal cancers. The aim of the study was to correlate the expression of these markers with pathological response. Nineteen patients were treated with preoperative concomitant radiotherapy (RT) and fluorouracil/oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy (RCT), while 38 had RT alone. Pathological complete remission (pCR) and microfoci residual tumour (micR) occurred more frequently in patients treated with RCT (P=0.002) and in N0 tumours (P=0.004). Among patients treated with RCT, high TS levels were associated with a higher response rate (pCR+micR; P=0.015). No such correlation was found in the RT group. The other molecular factors were of no predictive value. Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant interaction between nodal status and the probability of achieving a pathological response (P=0.023) and between TS expression and treatment, indicating that a high TS level is predictive of a higher pathological response in the RCT subset (P=0.007). This study shows that lymph node status is the most important predictive factor of tumour response to preoperative treatment. Thymidylate synthase expression assessed immunohistochemically from pretreatment tumour biopsies may be a useful predictive marker of rectal tumour response to preoperative RCT. PMID:18087284

  5. Livin expression is an independent factor in rectal cancer patients with or without preoperative radiotherapy.

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    Ding, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Olsson, Birgit; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2013-12-02

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression significance of Livin in relation to radiotherapy (RT), clinicopathological and biological factors of rectal cancer patients. This study included 144 primary rectal cancer patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Tissue microarray samples from the excised primary rectal cancers, normal mucosa and lymph node metastases were immunostained with Livin antibody. The proliferation of colon cancer cell lines SW620 and RKO was assayed after Livin knock-down. The expression of Livin was significantly increased from adjacent (P = 0.051) or distant (P = 0.028) normal mucosa to primary tumors. 15.4% (2/13) and 39.7% (52/131) patients with Livin-negative and positive tumors died at 180 months after surgery, and the difference tended to be statistically significant (P = 0.091). In multivariate analyses, the difference achieved statistical significance, independent of TNM stage, local and distant recurrence, grade of differentiation, gender, and age (odds ratio = 5.09, 95% CI: 1.01-25.64, P = 0.048). The in vitro study indicated colon cancer cells with Livin knock-down exhibited decreased proliferation compared with controls after RT. The expression of Livin was was independently related to survival in rectal cancer patients, suggesting Livin as a useful prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients.

  6. Optimal time intervals between preoperative radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy and surgery in rectal cancer?

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    Bengt eGlimelius

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background In rectal cancer therapy, radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (RT/CRT is extensively used preoperatively to (i decrease local recurrence risks, (ii allow radical surgery in non-resectable tumours and (iii increase the chances of sphincter-saving surgery or (iv organ preservation. There is a growing interest among clinicians and scientists to prolong the interval from the RT/CRT to surgery to achieve maximal tumour regression and to diminish complications during surgery.Methods The pros and cons of delaying surgery depending upon the aim of the preoperative RT/CRT are critically evaluated. Results Depending upon the clinical situation, the need for a time interval prior to surgery to allow tumour regression varies. In the first and most common situation (i, no regression is needed and any delay beyond what is needed for the acute radiation reaction in surrounding tissues to wash out can potentially only be deleterious. After short-course RT (5Gyx5 with immediate surgery, the ideal time between the last radiation fraction is 2-5 days since a slightly longer interval appears to increase surgical complications. A delay beyond 4 weeks appears safe; it results in tumour regression including pathologic complete responses, but is not yet fully evaluated concerning oncologic outcome. Surgical complications do not appear to be influenced by the CRT-surgery interval within reasonable limits (about 4-12 weeks, but this has not been sufficiently explored. Maximum tumour regression may not be seen in rectal adenocarcinomas until after several months; thus, a longer than usual delay may be of benefit in well responding tumours if limited or no surgery is planned, as in (iii or (iv, otherwise not.Conclusions A longer time interval is undoubtedly of benefit in some clinical situations but may be counterproductive in most situations.

  7. Effect of Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocyte on Local Control of Rectal Cancer after Preoperative Radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Gang; XU Bo; ZHANG Shan-wen

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes at cancer nest on local control of rectal cancer after preoperative radiotherapy.Methods:From Jan.1999 to Oct.2007,a total of 107 patients with rectal cancer were reviewed.They were treated by preoperative radiotherapy,30 Gy/10 fractions/12 days.Two weeks later,the patient underwent a surgical operation.Their pathological samples were kept in our hospital before and after radiotherapy.Lymphocyte infiltration(LI)degree,pathologic degradation and fibrosis degree after radiotherapy in paraffin section were evaluated under microscope.Results:After followed-up of 21 months(2-86 months),a total of 107 patients were reviewed.Univariate analysis showed that lymphocyte infiltration(LI),fibrosis and pathologic changes after radiotherapy were significant factors on local control.Logistic regression analysis showed that LI after radiotherapy was a significant effect factor on local control.Conclusion:LI,fibrosis and pathologic degradation after radiotherapy are significant for local control of rectal cancer after preoperative radiotherapy.LI after radiotherapy was a significantly prognostic index for local control of rectal cancer after preoperative radiotherapy.

  8. Pre-operative chemotherapy and radiotherapy in breast cancer

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    Goldhirsch, A. [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Via Ripamonti 435, 20121 Milan (Italy); Viale, G. [Division of Pathology, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Via Ripamonti 435, 20121 Milan (Italy); Zurrida, S.; Veronesi, P. [Division of Senology, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Via Ripamonti 435, 20121 Milan (Italy); Orecchia, A. [Service of Radiology, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Via Ripamonti 435, 20121 Milan (Italy); Luini, A. [Division of Senology, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Via Ripamonti 435, 20121 Milan (Italy); Noberasco, C.; Minchella, I.; Nole' , F.; Colleoni, M. [Division of Medical Oncology, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Via Ripamonti 435, 20121 Milan (Italy)

    1998-04-01

    Primary systemic treatment of breast cancer with cytotoxics yields a high response rate and allows conservative surgical procedures in bulky tumours. In order to maximise local control of disease, two innovations were introduced in a pilot study. The first was to identify the good responders after three cycles of chemotherapy and to treat them with three additional cycles. The second was to also give this group of patients a full dose of radiotherapy before surgery with the aim of verifying the rate of pathological complete remissions in view of a possible treatment of breast primary with chemoradiotherapy only. Patients were treated with doxorubicin 60 mg/m{sup 2} and cyclophosphamide, 600 mg/m{sup 2} both intravenously on day 1, every 21 days for three courses. Partial or complete responders received three more courses followed by radiotherapy (50 Gy plus a 10 Gy boost). The others underwent immediate surgery. A total of 32 patients (median age, 50 years; range 28-69 years); performance status, 0-1; T{sub 2} 22, T{sub 3} 8, T{sub 4} 2) were enrolled and were evaluable for response and side-effects. 9 patients had only three cycles of chemotherapy due to absence of response and 23 patients had six cycles of chemotherapy. Overall, 7 patients had a complete remission, 16 a partial remission and 9 had stable disease, for an overall response rate of 72% (95% confidence interval 53-86%). In the group of patients that completed the programme, two complete pathological remissions were observed and 5 patients had only microfoci of tumour. No toxic death or grade III-IV toxicities were observed. Mild or moderate side-effects included mucositis, nausea/vomiting and leucopenia. In conclusion, our results indicate that the addition of radiotherapy to pre-operative chemotherapy did not significantly enhance the incidence of pathological complete remissions. New primary treatment approaches should be explored in this subset of patients in order to improve outcome. (Copyright (c

  9. Preoperative hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for patients with rectal cancer

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    Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Shimono, Reishi; Inoue, Tetsuya; Mori, Masaki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Sugimachi, Keizo

    1989-04-01

    Between April 1986 and February 1988, 17 patients with rectal cancer were treated with preoperative hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy (HCR). Hyperthermia was given 4 or 5 times over a 2-week period before irradiation. X-ray irradiation was given 20 times in 1.5 Gy x 2/day to a total dose of 30 Gy. Two hundred and fifty milligrams of 5 FU was intravenously injected or 400-600 mg of HCFU was orally administered. Of evaluable 16 patients, 6 were roentgenologically evaluated as partial response, 3 as moderate response, and 7 as non-response. Histological examination revealed complete response in 9 (53%), moderate response in 4 (24%), and slight response in 4 (24%). In 9 patients seropositive for CEA, CEA tended to decrease after HCR. Early side effects of HCR was not encountered. Although some of the patients complained of fever in the anal site, defecation desire, and micturition desire attributable to hyperthermia, these complaints were not so severe as to discontinue the treatment. (Namekawa, K).

  10. High relapse-free survival after preoperative and intraoperative radiotherapy and resection for sulcus superior tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N. van Geel (Albert); P.P. Jansen (Peter); R.J. van Klaveren (Rob); J.R. van der Sijp (Joost)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractSTUDY OBJECTIVES: Relapse-free survival in patients with sulcus superior tumors. DESIGN: Prospective registration study. SETTING: Department of surgical oncology of a university hospital. PATIENTS: Twenty-one patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy (46 Gy), lobe

  11. Comparison of preoperative short-course radiotherapy and long-course radiochemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

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    Guckenberger, M.; Saur, G.; Wehner, D.; Sweeney, R.A.; Flentje, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Thalheimer, A.; Germer, C.T. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik I

    2012-07-15

    Background: The purpose of this work was to perform a single institution comparison between preoperative short-course radiotherapy (SC-RT) and long-course radiochemotherapy (LC-RCHT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: A total of 225 patients with clinical stage UICC II-III rectal cancer were treated with SC-RT (29 Gy in 10 twice daily fractions followed by immediate surgery; n = 108) or LC-RCHT (54 Gy in 28 fractions with simultaneous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) {+-} oxaliplatin chemotherapy followed by delayed surgery; n = 117). All patients in the LC-RCHT cohort and patients in the SC-RT with pathological UICC stage {>=} II received adjuvant chemotherapy. Before 2004, the standard of care was SC-RT with LC-RCHT reserved for patients where downstaging was considered as required for sphincter preservation or curative resection. In the later period, SC-RT was practiced only for patients unfit for radiochemotherapy. Results: Patients in the LC-RCHT cohort had a significantly higher proportion of cT4 tumors, clinical node positivity, and lower tumor location. The 5-year local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were 91% and 66% without differences between the SC-RT and LC-RCHT groups. Acute toxicity was increased during LC-RCHT (grade {>=} II 1% vs. 33%) and there were no differences in postoperative complications. Severe late toxicity grade {>=} III was increased after SC-RT (12% vs. 3%). Of patients aged > 80 years, 7 of 7 patients and 4 of 9 patients received curative surgery after SC-RT and LC-RCHT, respectively. Conclusion: Despite the fact that patients with worse prognostic factors were treated with LC-RCHT, there were no significant differences in LC and OS between the SC-RT and LC-RCHT group. Age > 80 years was identified as a significant risk factor for LC-RCHT and these patients could be treated preferably with SC-RT. (orig.)

  12. PINCH is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer patients without preoperative radiotherapy--a study in a Swedish rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, Annica; Gao, Jingfang; Holmlund, Birgitta; Adell, Gunnar; Carstensen, John; Langford, Dianne; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2012-02-10

    The clinical significance between particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine rich protein (PINCH) expression and radiotherapy (RT) in tumours is not known. In this study, the expression of PINCH and its relationship to RT, clinical, pathological and biological factors were studied in rectal cancer patients. PINCH expression determined by immunohistochemistry was analysed at the invasive margin and inner tumour area in 137 primary rectal adenocarcinomas (72 cases without RT and 65 cases with RT). PINCH expression in colon fibroblast cell line (CCD-18 Co) was determined by western blot. In patients without RT, strong PINCH expression at the invasive margin of primary tumours was related to worse survival, compared to patients with weak expression, independent of TNM stage and differentiation (P = 0.03). No survival relationship in patients with RT was observed (P = 0.64). Comparing the non-RT with RT subgroup, there was no difference in PINCH expression in primary tumours (invasive margin (P = 0.68)/inner tumour area (P = 0.49). In patients with RT, strong PINCH expression was related to a higher grade of LVD (lymphatic vessel density) (P = 0.01) PINCH expression at the invasive margin was an independent prognostic factor in patients without RT. RT does not seem to directly affect the PINCH expression.

  13. PINCH is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer patients without preoperative radiotherapy - a study in a Swedish rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy

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    Holmqvist Annica

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical significance between particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine rich protein (PINCH expression and radiotherapy (RT in tumours is not known. In this study, the expression of PINCH and its relationship to RT, clinical, pathological and biological factors were studied in rectal cancer patients. Methods PINCH expression determined by immunohistochemistry was analysed at the invasive margin and inner tumour area in 137 primary rectal adenocarcinomas (72 cases without RT and 65 cases with RT. PINCH expression in colon fibroblast cell line (CCD-18 Co was determined by western blot. Results In patients without RT, strong PINCH expression at the invasive margin of primary tumours was related to worse survival, compared to patients with weak expression, independent of TNM stage and differentiation (P = 0.03. No survival relationship in patients with RT was observed (P = 0.64. Comparing the non-RT with RT subgroup, there was no difference in PINCH expression in primary tumours (invasive margin (P = 0.68/inner tumour area (P = 0.49. In patients with RT, strong PINCH expression was related to a higher grade of LVD (lymphatic vessel density (P = 0.01 Conclusions PINCH expression at the invasive margin was an independent prognostic factor in patients without RT. RT does not seem to directly affect the PINCH expression.

  14. Anorectal and sexual functions after preoperative radiotherapy and full-thickness local excision of rectal cancer.

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    Gornicki, A; Richter, P; Polkowski, W; Szczepkowski, M; Pietrzak, L; Kepka, L; Rutkowski, A; Bujko, K

    2014-06-01

    Local excision with preoperative radiotherapy may be considered as alternative management to abdominal surgery alone for small cT2-3N0 tumours. However, little is known about anorectal and sexual functions after local excision with preoperative radiotherapy. Evaluation of this issue was a secondary aim of our previously published prospective multicentre study. Functional evaluation was based on a questionnaire completed by 44 of 64 eligible disease-free patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy and local excision. Additionally, ex post, these results were confronted with those recorded retrospectively in the control group treated with anterior resection alone (N = 38). In the preoperative radiotherapy and local excision group, the median number of bowel movements was two per day, incontinence of flatus occurred in 51% of patients, incontinence of loose stool in 46%, clustering of stools in 59%, and urgency in 49%; these symptoms occurred often or very often in 11%-21% of patients. Thirty-eight per cent of patients claimed that their quality of life was affected by anorectal dysfunction. Nineteen per cent of men and 20% of women claimed that the treatment negatively influenced their sexual life. The anorectal functions in the preoperative radiotherapy and local excision group were not much different from that observed in the anterior resection alone group. Our study suggests that anorectal functions after preoperative radiotherapy and local excision may be worse than expected and not much different from that recorded after anterior resection alone. It is possible that radiotherapy compromises the functional effects achieved by local excision. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hypofractionation in the era of modulated radiotherapy (RT).

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    Mouw, Kent W; Harris, Jay R

    2013-08-01

    The use of radiation therapy (RT) as a component of breast-conserving therapy (BCT) has been shown to reduce the risk of local-regional recurrence and improve overall survival. As has been the common practice in the United States and Continental Europe, the majority of studies that demonstrated these benefits utilized daily radiation doses ranging from 1.8 to 2.0 Gray (Gy) per day given for approximately 5 weeks. However, due to geographic limitations, patient preferences, and financial considerations, there have been continued attempts to evaluate the efficacy and safety of abbreviated or hypofractionated courses of whole-breast radiation. Two key factors in these attempts have been: 1) advances in radiobiology allowing for a more precise estimation of equivalent dosing, and 2) advances in the delivery of RT ('modulation') that have resulted in substantially improved dose homogeneity in the target volume. Hypofractionated schedules have been compared to conventional radiation courses in several randomized controlled trials, as well as many prospective and retrospective experiences. These studies, now with about 10 years of follow-up, have demonstrated equivalent rates of local-regional recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival. The rates of toxicity have generally not been increased with hypofractionated regimens; however, certain toxicities may take decades to manifest. The generalizability of these results is unclear, as the majority of patients in the trials were elderly with early-stage hormone-receptor positive disease. Nevertheless, there is now sufficient evidence to recommend hypofractionated whole breast RT for a substantial percentage of patients.

  16. Prospective randomized trial of surgery combined with preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy for rectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of surgery combined with preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy(sandwich treatment)in rectal carcinoma.Methods From October 1990 to January 2002,260 patients with stage Ⅱ(117 patients)and stage Ⅲ(143 patients)rectal carcinoma were randomly divided into three groups:sandwich group(92 patients,group A),postoperative radiotherapy group(98 patients,Group B)and operation group(70 patients,Group C).The preoperative accelerated hyperfractionation(15Gy/6f/3d)was given for sandwic...

  17. Preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer treatment -- is it really a gold standard?

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    Pătraşcu, Tr; Doran, H; Mihalache, O

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy in the treatment of rectal cancer was thought to be an achievement of similar importance to total mesorectal excision (TME), for the therapeutic management of rectal malignancies. However, numerous criticisms have been discussed in this field lately. We have analysed the two main purposes of preoperative radiation: possible sphincter preservation and the conversion of a non-resectable tumor into a resectable one in a series of 31 consecutive patients, operated in our clinic. In 20 of them, preoperative radio chemoradiotherapy was applied, while 11 patients were firstly operated and then irradiated. The surgical procedure included total mesorectal excision in 30 patients, as part of a low anterior resection,in 13 cases and of an abdominal perineal resection, in the other 17 cases. We have found that preoperative radiotherapy improves the local recurrence rate but has no influence on the overall survival rate. However, we should not overlook the adverse effects of this method: toxicity of radiotherapy on the small bowel and the urinary bladder, the healing of the perineal wounds and the risk of anastomotic leaks. We concluded in favor of elective preoperative radiotherapy in selected cases: any T4 tumors, T3 tumors which threaten the mesorectal fascia on MRI, whenever there is a suspicion of nodal involvement and also for very low tumors. Celsius.

  18. RT-01FRACTIONATED STEREOTACTIC RADIOTHERAPY FOR PITUITARY ADENOMA WITH NOVALIS

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    Arakawa, Yoshiki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Ogura, Kengo; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Hojo, Masato; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Murata, Daiki

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radiation therapy is an available treatment modality for pituitary adenoma. In particular, it is effective for the case unable to be removed with surgery or repeating recurrence. However, hypopituitarism and optic nerve injury associated with radiation therapy become a problem. Novalis® (Brain Lab) is an equipment of radiation to establish the detailed irradiation area, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (fSRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Retrospectively, we review local control and morbidity following fSRT with Novalis in pituitary adenoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 2007 and 2012, 29 patients with pituitary adenoma (9 functioning, 20 non-functioning) received fSRT with Novalis in our institute. Total radiation dose was 50.4-54Gy (1.8 Gy per fraction) and prescribed to the gross target volume + 2 mm. The effectiveness of fSRT was evaluated by tumor volume and clinical symptoms on pre- fSRT, and every 1-year. RESULTS: The median follow-up time was 59.1 months (20 to 83 months). Tumor regrowth was observed in 2 cases. Progression free survival rate was 93%. New visual field deficit was observed in 1 case, and new pituitary dysfunction were not observed in all patients. CONCLUSION: fSRT with Novalis is safe and effective in the treatment for pituitary adenoma. Although follow-up time is short, any problematic complications were not observed. In the future, fSRT is expected to make for safe and effective treatment in pituitary adenoma impossible to cure surgically.

  19. Relationship of short-course preoperative radiotherapy and serum albumin level with postoperative complications in rectal cancer surgery

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    Trifunović Bratislav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The identification of risk factors could play a role in improving early postoperative outcome for rectal cancer surgery patients. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between short-course preoperative radiotherapy (RT, serum albumin level and the development of postoperative complications in patients after anterior rectal resection due to rectal cancer without creation of diverting stoma. Methods. This retrospective study included patients with histopathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the rectum by and the clinical stage of T2-T4 operated on between 2007 and 2012. All the patients underwent open anterior rectal resection with no diverting stoma creation. Preoperative serum albumin was measured in each patient. Tumor location was noted intraoperatively as the distance from the inferior tumor margin to the anal verge. Tumor size was measured and noted by the pathologist who assessed specimens. Some of the patients received short-course preoperative RT, and some did not. The patients were divided into two groups (group 1 with short-course preoperative RT, group 2 with no short-course preoperative RT. Postoperative complications included clinically apparent anastomotic leakage, wound infection, diffuse peritonitis and pneumonia. They were compared between the groups, in relation to preoperative serum albumin level, patients age, tumor size and location. Results. The study included 107 patients (51 in the group 1 and 56 in the group 2. There were no significant difference in age (p = 0.95, and gender (p = 0.12 and tumor distance from anal verge (p = 0.53. The size of rectal carcinoma was significantly higher in the group 1 than in the group 2 (51.37 ± 12.04 mm vs 45.57 ± 9.81 mm, respectively; p = 0.007. The preoperative serum albumin level was significantly lower in the group 1 than in the group 2 (34.80 ± 2.85 g/L vs 37.55 ± 2.74 g/L, respectively; p < 0.001. A significant correlation between the tumor

  20. Quality assurance in preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer : evaluation of a pre-trial dummy-run

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, J; Sedlmayer, F; Stanek, C; Potter, R

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To assess inter-institution variability of treated volumes in preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer among Austrian radiotherapy institutions in the framework of a multi-centre phase-In clinical trial. Materials and,methods: All eleven Austrian radiotherapy departments were invited to

  1. Molecular prognostic factors in locally irresectable rectal cancer treated preoperatively by chemo-radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reerink, O; Karrenbeld, Arend; Plukker, JTM; Verschueren, Rene; Szabo, BG; Sluiter, WJ; Hospers, GAP; Mulder, NH

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between survival and value of molecular markers in the primary tumour in a group of patients with irresectable rectal cancer, treated with preoperative chemo-radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Immunohistochemistry for p53, p21, bcl-2

  2. Sentinel node detection after preoperative short-course radiotherapy in rectal carcinoma is not reliable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat, AE; Moll, FCP; de Vries, JE; Wiggers, T

    2005-01-01

    Background: Seninel node (SN) detection may be used in patients with colonic carcinoma. However, its use in patients with rectal carcinoma may be unreliable. To address this, SN detection was evaluated in patients with rectal carcinoma after short-course preoperative radiotherapy. Methods: Patent Bl

  3. Preoperative external beam radiotherapy and reduced dose brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix: survival and pathological response

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    Pellizzon Antonio

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the pathologic response of cervical carcinoma to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB and outcome. Materials and methods Between 1992 and 2001, 67 patients with cervical carcinoma were submitted to preoperative radiotherapy. Sixty-five patients were stage IIb. Preoperative treatment included 45 Gy EBRT and 12 Gy HDRB. Patients were submitted to surgery after a mean time of 82 days. Lymphadenectomy was performed in 81% of patients. Eleven patients with residual cervix residual disease on pathological specimen were submitted to 2 additional insertions of HDRB. Results median follow up was 72 months. Five-year cause specific survival was 75%, overall survival 65%, local control 95%. Complete pelvic pathological response was seen in 40%. Surgery performed later than 80 days was associated with pathological response. Pelvic nodal involvement was found in 12%. Complete pelvic pathological response and negative lymphnodes were associated with better outcome (p = .03 and p = .005. Late grade 3 and 4 urinary and intestinal adverse effects were seen in 12 and 2% of patients. Conclusion Time allowed between RT and surgery correlated with pathological response. Pelvic pathological response was associated with improved outcome. Postoperative additional HDRB did not improve therapeutic results. Treatment was well tolerated.

  4. [Carcinoma of the cervix uteri--the morphological changes after preoperative radiotherapy].

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    Veselinova, T; Ivanova, R; Gorchev, G; Tsvetkov, Ch

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective morphological research is made on 11 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix for a three-years period of time (1995-1997). Preoperative radiotherapy (intracavitary radiotherapy with Cs and/or external radiation) is carried out. A control group of 10 patients with cancer of uterine cervix without preoperative radiotherapy is also studied. All of the women undergo a wider hysterectomy by the method of Piver class IV. The radiation alterations in the tumor and the surrounding normal uterine tissues are also researched. A full regression of the tumor Ts size. There are demonstrative changes in the tumor and surrounding normal tissues, which are the prove the answer to the ionizing irradiation.

  5. Preoperative radiotherapy and extracellular matrix remodeling in rectal mucosa and tumour matrix metalloproteinases and plasminogen components

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    Angenete, Eva; Oeresland, Tom; Falk, Peter; Breimer, Michael; Ivarsson, Marie-Louise (Dept. of Surgery, Inst. of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Univ. of Goeteborg, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Hultborn, Ragnar (Dept. of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital/Sahlgrenska, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2009-11-15

    Background. Preoperative radiotherapy reduces recurrence but increases postoperative morbidity. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of radiotherapy in rectal mucosa and rectal tumour extracellular matrix (ECM) by studying enzymes and growth factors involved in ECM remodeling. Materials and methods. Twenty patients with short-term preoperative radiotherapy and 12 control patients without radiotherapy were studied. Biopsies from rectal mucosa and tumour were collected prior to radiotherapy and at surgery. Tissue MMP-1, -2, -9, TIMP-1, uPA, PAI-1, TGF-beta1 and calprotectin were determined by ELISA. Biopsies from irradiated and non-irradiated peritoneal areas were also analysed. Results. Radiotherapy increased the tissue levels of MMP-2 and PAI-1 in both the rectal mucosa and tumours while calprotectin and uPA showed an increase only in the mucosa after irradiation. The increase of calprotectin was due to an influx of inflammatory cells as revealed by immunohistochemistry. Prior to irradiation, the tumour tissues had increased levels of MMP-1, -2, -9, total TGF-beta1, uPA, PAI-1 and calprotectin compared to mucosa, while TIMP-1 and the active TGF-beta1 fraction showed no statistical difference. Conclusions. This study indicates a radiation-induced effect on selected ECM remodeling proteases. This reaction may be responsible for early and late morbidity. Interference of this response might reduce these consequences.

  6. Functional results of delayed coloanal anastomosis after preoperative radiotherapy for lower third rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olagne, E; Baulieux, J; de la Roche, E; Adham, M; Berthoux, N; Bourdeix, O; Gerard, J P; Ducerf, C

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess functional outcomes of patients who had a delayed coloanal anastomosis for a lower third rectal cancer after preoperative radiotherapy. From January 1988 to December 1997, 35 patients with an adenocarcinoma of the lower third of the rectum received preoperative radiotherapy (45Gy) followed by a rectal resection, combining an abdominal and transanal approach. Colorectal resection was performed about 32 days after the end of the radiotherapy. The distal colon stump was pulled through the anal canal. On postoperative day 5 the colonic stump was resected and a direct coloanal anastomosis performed without colostomia diversion. There was no mortality. There was no leakage. One patient had a pelvic abscess. One patient had a necrosis of the left colon requiring reoperation. Another delayed coloanal anastomosis could be performed. Median followup was 43 months (range 6 to 113 months). Functional results were evaluated with a new scoring system including 13 items. Function was considered good in 59% and 70% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. This new procedure is a safe and effective sphincter-preserving operation that avoids a diverting stoma for patients with rectal cancer of the lower third of the rectum. This technique is well adapted for patients receiving preoperative radiotherapy, with low local morbidity and good functional results. Further adaptation could be imagined for a coelioscopic approach.

  7. Response to treatment and interval to surgery after preoperative short-course radiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cabezas, Sonia; Rodríguez-Liñán, Milagrosa; Otero-Romero, Ana M; Bueno-Serrano, Carmen M; Gómez-Barbadillo, José; Palacios-Eito, Amalia

    2016-10-01

    Preoperative short-course radiotherapy with immediate surgery improves local control in patients with rectal cancer. Tumor responses are smaller than those described with radiochemotherapy. Preliminary data associate this lower response to the short period until surgery. The aim of this study is to analyze the response to preoperative short-course radiotherapy and its correlation with the interval to surgery especially analyzing patients with mesorectal fascia involvement. A total of 155 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy (5×5Gy) were retrospectively analyzed. Tumor response in terms of rates of complete pathological response, downstaging, tumor regression grading and status of the circumferential resection margin were quantified. The mean interval from radiotherapy to surgery was 23 days. The rate of complete pathological response was 2.2% and 28% experienced downstaging (stage decreased). No differences between these rates and interval to surgery were detected. Eighty-eight patients had magnetic resonance imaging for staging (in 31 patients the mesorectal fascia was involved).The mean time to surgery in patients with involvement of the fascia and R0 surgery was 27 days and 16 days if R1 (P=.016). The cutoff of 20 days reached the highest probability of achieving a free circumferential resection margin between patients with mesorectal fascia involvement, with no statistically significant differences: RR 3.036 95% CI=(0.691-13.328), P=.06. After preoperative short-course radiotherapy, an interval>20 days enhances the likelihood of achieving a free circumferential resection margin in patients with mesorectal fascia involvement. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Tafazzin protein expression is associated with tumorigenesis and radiation response in rectal cancer: a study of Swedish clinical trial on preoperative radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surajit Pathak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tafazzin (TAZ, a transmembrane protein contributes in mitochondrial structural and functional modifications through cardiolipin remodeling. TAZ mutations are associated with several diseases, but studies on the role of TAZ protein in carcinogenesis and radiotherapy (RT response is lacking. Therefore we investigated the TAZ expression in rectal cancer, and its correlation with RT, clinicopathological and biological variables in the patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. METHODS: 140 rectal cancer patients were included in this study, of which 65 received RT before surgery and the rest underwent surgery alone. TAZ expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in primary cancer, distant, adjacent normal mucosa and lymph node metastasis. In-silico protein-protein interaction analysis was performed to study the predictive functional interaction of TAZ with other oncoproteins. RESULTS: TAZ showed stronger expression in primary cancer and lymph node metastasis compared to distant or adjacent normal mucosa in both non-RT and RT patients. Strong TAZ expression was significantly higher in stages I-III and non-mucinious cancer of non-RT patients. In RT patients, strong TAZ expression in biopsy was related to distant recurrence, independent of gender, age, stages and grade (p = 0.043, HR, 6.160, 95% CI, 1.063-35.704. In silico protein-protein interaction study demonstrated that TAZ was positively related to oncoproteins, Livin, MAC30 and FXYD-3. CONCLUSIONS: Strong expression of TAZ protein seems to be related to rectal cancer development and RT response, it can be a predictive biomarker of distant recurrence in patients with preoperative RT.

  9. Colonic anastomotic healing after preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzu, M.A.; Koeksoy, C. [Univ. of Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Medicine; Akyol, F.H.; Uzal, D.; Kale, I.T.

    1999-03-01

    In order to investigate the effects of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy on colonic anastomotic healing, an experimental study resembling the clinical use of neo-adjuvant concomitant 5-FU+irradiation treatment of colorectal cancer was conducted. Seventy-one male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: a control group (I) underwent left colon resection and primary anastomosis; a sham-treated group (II); and a study group (III) which received fractionated irradiation to the whole pelvis to a total dose of 22 Gy, 5.5 Gy per fraction, in four consecutive days with linear accelerator and concomitant intra-peritoneal 5-FU for five consecutive days. The last fraction of irradiation and the last injection were given four and three days before colonic resection and anastomosis, respectively. Within each group one-half of the animals were anesthetized on the third postoperative day and one-half on the seventh postoperative day. Abdominal wound healing, intraperitoneal adhesions, anastomotic complications, and anastomotic bursting pressure measurements were recorded. Following these measurements the anastomotic segment was resected for hydroxyproline content, myeloperoxidase activity, and histopathological evaluation. At three and seven days, the mean bursting pressures of the anastomoses were 36.5 mm Hg and 208 mm Hg in group I, 34.5 and 228 in group II, and 27 and 167 in group III, respectively . The burst occurred at the anastomosis in all animals tested on the third postoperative day, and 10% of group I, none in group II, and 40% of group III on the seventh postoperative day. (K.H.)

  10. Comparison of Three-Dimensional (3D) Conformal Proton Radiotherapy (RT), 3D Conformal Photon RT, and Intensity-Modulated RT for Retroperitoneal and Intra-Abdominal Sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, Erika L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Indelicato, Daniel J., E-mail: dindelicato@floridaproton.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Louis, Debbie; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Morris, Christopher G.; Paryani, Nitesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Slopsema, Roelf [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To compare three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3DCPT), intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT), and 3D conformal photon radiotherapy (3DCRT) to predict the optimal RT technique for retroperitoneal sarcomas. Methods and Materials: 3DCRT, IMRT, and 3DCPT plans were created for treating eight patients with retroperitoneal or intra-abdominal sarcomas. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the gross tumor plus a 2-cm margin, limited by bone and intact fascial planes. For photon plans, the planning target volume (PTV) included a uniform expansion of 5 mm. For the proton plans, the PTV was nonuniform and beam-specific. The prescription dose was 50.4 Gy/Cobalt gray equivalent CGE. Plans were normalized so that >95% of the CTV received 100% of the dose. Results: The CTV was covered adequately by all techniques. The median conformity index was 0.69 for 3DCPT, 0.75 for IMRT, and 0.51 for 3DCRT. The median inhomogeneity coefficient was 0.062 for 3DCPT, 0.066 for IMRT, and 0.073 for 3DCRT. The bowel median volume receiving 15 Gy (V15) was 16.4% for 3DCPT, 52.2% for IMRT, and 66.1% for 3DCRT. The bowel median V45 was 6.3% for 3DCPT, 4.7% for IMRT, and 15.6% for 3DCRT. The median ipsilateral mean kidney dose was 22.5 CGE for 3DCPT, 34.1 Gy for IMRT, and 37.8 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral mean kidney dose was 0 CGE for 3DCPT, 6.4 Gy for IMRT, and 11 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral kidney V5 was 0% for 3DCPT, 49.9% for IMRT, and 99.7% for 3DCRT. Regardless of technique, the median mean liver dose was <30 Gy, and the median cord V50 was 0%. The median integral dose was 126 J for 3DCPT, 400 J for IMRT, and 432 J for 3DCRT. Conclusions: IMRT and 3DCPT result in plans that are more conformal and homogenous than 3DCRT. Based on Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in Clinic benchmarks, the dosimetric advantage of proton therapy may be less gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity.

  11. A national cohort study of long-course preoperative radiotherapy in primary fixed rectal cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.; Jensen, L.H.; Altaf, R.

    2010-01-01

    of radiotherapy concerning technique of radiotherapy, dose and fractionation and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Outcome was determined by actuarial analysis of local control, disease-free survival and overall survival. RESULTS: A total of 258 patients with fixed rectal cancer received long-course radiotherapy......-7%), and the actuarial distant recurrence rate was 41% (95% CI: 35-47%). The cumulative 5-year disease-free survival was 27% (95% CI: 22-32%) and overall 5-year survival was 34% (95% CI: 29-39%). CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first population-based report on outcome of preoperative long-course radiotherapy in a large...

  12. Preoperative radiotherapy for inoperable stage II endometrial cancer: insights into improving treatment and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Marette H; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Hoskins, Paul J; Lim, Peter; Kwon, Janice S

    2013-07-01

    To review recurrence patterns and survival outcomes of women receiving preoperative radiotherapy for clinical stage II endometrial cancer in British Columbia. We performed a retrospective population-based cohort study of all patients with clinical stage II endometrial cancer who were referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency from 2000 to 2008, deemed ineligible for primary surgery, and therefore offered preoperative radiotherapy followed by surgery. Patient demographics, uterine risk factors, timing and details of treatments, and timing and sites of recurrence were obtained from patient records. Primary outcome measures were the sites and rates of recurrence and recurrence-free survival. We identified 29 patients with a mean age of 61 years (range 41 to 83) and median follow-up of 3.1 years (range 0.3 to 5.3). Three-year overall survival was 79%, and median recurrence-free survival was 2.5 years. Eight patients had recurrence of disease (27.6%), with a median time to recurrence of 1.3 years, (range 0.4 to 2.7). Six of these eight women had two or more high-risk uterine factors (deep myometrial invasion, grade 3 tumour), ovarian involvement, or adverse histological type (carcinosarcoma), compared with only one of 21 patients without recurrence. Seven of eight women had recurrence outside the radiated volume of tissue. Median survival after recurrence was 1.0 years (range 0.4 to 2.2). Women with clinical stage II endometrial cancer had a significant risk of recurrence when treated with preoperative radiotherapy followed by surgery. They were more likely to have distant recurrences, implying the need for an alternate treatment paradigm.

  13. Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braendengen, Morten, E-mail: mortbrae@medisin.uio.no [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Tveit, Kjell Magne [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Bruheim, Kjersti [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Cvancarova, Milada [Department of Clinical Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Berglund, Ake [Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25 {+-} 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

  14. Prognostic impact of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR expression on loco-regional recurrence after preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ychou Marc

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR represents a major target for current radiosensitizing strategies. We wished to ascertain whether a correlation exists between the expression of EGFR and treatment outcome in a group of patients with rectal adenocarcinoma who had undergone preoperative radiotherapy (RT. Methods Within a six-year period, 138 patients underwent preoperative radiotherapy and curative surgery for rectal cancer (UICC stages II-III at our institute. Among them, 77 pretherapeutic tumor biopsies were available for semi-quantitative immunohistochemical investigation evaluating the intensity and the number (extent of tumor stained cells. Statistical analyses included Cox regression for calculating risk ratios of survival endpoints and logistic regression for determining odds ratios for the development of loco-regional recurrences. Results Median age was 64 years (range: 30–88. Initial staging showed 75% and 25% stage II and III tumors, respectively. RT consisted of 44-Gy pelvic irradiation in 2-Gy fractions using 18-MV photons. In 25 very low-rectal-cancer patients the primary tumor received a boost dose of up to 16 Gy for a sphincter-preservation approach. Concomitant chemotherapy was used in 17% of the cases. All patients underwent complete total mesorectal resection. Positive staining (EGFR+ was observed in 43 patients (56%. Median follow-up was 36 months (range: 6–86. Locoregional recurrence rates were 7 and 20% for EGFR extent inferior and superior to 25%, respectively. The corresponding locoregional recurrence-free survival rate at two years was 94% (95% confidence interval, CI, 92–98% and 84% (CI 95%, 58–95%, respectively (P = 0.06. Multivariate analyses showed a significant correlation between the rate of loco-regional recurrence and three parameters: EGFR extent superior to 25% (hazard ratio = 7.18, CI 95%, 1.17–46, P = 0.037, rectal resection with microscopic residue (hazard ratio = 6.92, CI 95

  15. Morbidity and Mortality Following Short Course Preoperative Radiotherapy in Rectal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Farhan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the morbidity and mortality in patients with operable stage II and III rectal cancers within one or two months after surgery, who has been treated pre-operatively with short course radiotherapy. Twenty-eight patients with rectal adenocarcinoma, consecutively referred to the Cancer Institute of Imam Khomeini Hospital from March 2009 to March 2010, were selected for the study after staging by endorectal ultrasound and CT of abdomen, pelvis, and chest; and if they had inclusion criteria for short course schedule, they were treated with radiotherapy alone at 2500 cGy for 5 sessions, and then they were referred to the surgical service for operation one week later. They were visited there by a surgeon unaware of the research who completed a questionnaire about pre-operative, operative, and post-operative complications. Of 28 patients, 25 patients underwent either APR or LAR surgery with TME. One patient developed transient anal pain grade I and one patient had dysuria grade I; they were improved in subsequent follow-up. Short course schedule can be performed carefully in patients with staged rectal cancer without concerning about serious complications. This shorter treatment schedule is cost-effective and would be more convenient for patients due to fewer trips to the hospital and the main treatment, i.e. operating the patient, will be done with the shortest time the following diagnosis.

  16. A phase i study on the combination of neoadjuvant radiotherapy plus pazopanib in patients with locally advanced soft tissue sarcoma of the extremities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L.M. Haas (Rick L. M.); H. Gelderblom (Hans); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); H.H. van Boven (Hester); A. Scholten (Astrid); L. Dewit (Luc); G. Borst (Gerben); J.A. van der Hage (Jos); J.M. Kerst (Martijn); R.A. Nout; H.H. Hartgrink (H.); I. de Pree (Ilse); C. Verhoef (Kees); N. Steeghs (Neeltje); F. van Coevorden (Frits)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAccumulating evidence suggests significant synergism combining radiotherapy (RT) with angiogenesis targeted therapies. This multicenter prospective phase I clinical trial established the safety profile and recommended dose for further studies of pazopanib concurrent with preoperative RT

  17. Preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer: a comparative study of quality control adherence at two cancer hospitals in Spain and Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fundowicz, Magdalena; Macia, Miguel; Marin, Susanna; Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta; Konstanty, Ewelina; Modolel, Ignaci; Malicki, Julian; Guedea, Ferran

    2014-06-01

    We performed a clinical audit of preoperative rectal cancer treatment at two European radiotherapy centres (Poland and Spain). The aim was to independently verify adherence to a selection of indicators of treatment quality and to identify any notable inter-institutional differences. A total of 162 patients, in Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO) 68 and in Greater Poland Cancer Centre (GPCC) 94, diagnosed with locally advanced rectal cancer and treated with preoperative radiotherapy or radio-chemotherapy were included in retrospective study. A total of 7 quality control measures were evaluated: waiting time, multidisciplinary treatment approach, portal verification, in vivo dosimetry, informed consent, guidelines for diagnostics and therapy, and patient monitoring during treatment. Several differences were observed. Waiting time from pathomorphological diagnosis to initial consultation was 31 (ICO) vs. 8 (GPCC) days. Waiting time from the first visit to the beginning of the treatment was twice as long at the ICO. At the ICO, 82% of patient experienced treatment interruptions. The protocol for portal verification was the same at both institutions. In vivo dosimetry is not used for this treatment localization at the ICO. The ICO utilizes locally-developed guidelines for diagnostics and therapy, while the GPCC is currently developing its own guidelines. An independent external clinical audit is an excellent approach to identifying and resolving deficiencies in quality control procedures. We identified several procedures amenable to improvement. Both institutions have since implemented changes to improve quality standards. We believe that all radiotherapy centres should perform a comprehensive clinical audit to identify and rectify deficiencies.

  18. Breath-hold technique in conventional APPA or intensity-modulated radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Comparison of ILROG IS-RT and the GHSG IF-RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, Jan; Spickermann, Max; Lehrich, Philipp; Reinartz, Gabriele; Eich, Hans; Haverkamp, Uwe [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Schmidberger, Heinz [University Mainz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    The present study addresses the role of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in contrast to standard RT (APPA) for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) with a focus on deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique and a comparison between the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) Involved Site Radiotherapy (IS-RT) versus the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) Involved Field Radiotherapy (IF-RT). APPA treatment and 2 IMRT plans were compared for 11 patients with HL. Furthermore, treatment with DIBH versus free breathing (FB) and two different treatment volumes, i.e. IF-RT versus IS-RT, were compared. IMRT was planned as a sliding-window technique with 5 and 7 beam angles. For each patient 12 different treatment plans were calculated (132 plans). Following organs at risk (OAR) were analysed: lung, heart, spinal cord, oesophagus, female breast and skin. Comparisons of the different values with regard to dose-volume histograms (DVH), conformity and homogeneity indices were made. IS-RT reduces treatment volumes. With respect to the planning target volume (PTV), IMRT achieves better conformity but the same homogeneity. Regarding the D{sub mean} for the lung, IMRT shows increased doses, while RT in DIBH reduces doses. The IMRT shows improved values for D{sub max} concerning the spinal cord, whereas the APPA shows an improved D{sub mean} of the lung and the female breast. IS-RT reduces treatment volumes. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy shows advantages in the conformity. Treatment in DIBH also reduces the dose applied to the lungs and the heart. (orig.) [German] Ziel dieser Auswertung ist es, die konventionelle APPA-Feldanordnung mit der Intensitaetsmodulierten Radiotherapie (IMRT) bei Patienten mit Hodgkin-Lymphom (HL) zu vergleichen. Ein besonderer Fokus liegt hierbei auf der Bestrahlung in tiefer Inspiration und Atemanhaltetechnik (DIBH). Des Weiteren wurde die ''Involved-site''-Radiotherapie (IS-RT) der International

  19. Preoperative radiotherapy for advanced lower rectal cancer. Combination of external and high-dose-rate intraluminal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horikawa, Noriko; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Tamamoto, Tetsuro; Tsuji, Yoshihiko; Uto, Fumiaki; Ohishi, Hajime; Uchida, Hideo; Fujii, Hisao; Nakano, Hiroshige [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the therapeutic results of preoperative irradiation using a combination of external irradiation and high dose rate intraluminal irradiation using {sup 60}Co aimed at enhancing postoperative local control of advanced rectal cancer. The subjects comprised 38 patients (RT group) in whom {>=} A{sub 1}` lower rectal cancer was suspected and who underwent preoperative irradiation at this hospital. A control group (N-RT group) consisted of 16 patients subjected to operation alone in whom clinical {>=} A{sub 1}` and postoperative histological study revealed {>=} a{sub 1}. Intraluminal irradiation was performed using a balloon applicator. The external irradiation was performed with a 10 MVX delivering 30-40 Gy/15-20 Fr to the entire pelvic cavity. Using the criteria of Ohboshi and Shimozato to judge the histopathological effect, no cases showed Grade I, while of Grade II, 15 cases showed IIA and 19 cases IIB, Grade III in 4 cases. Grade IIB or above was noted in 23 of 38 (61%). Five and 8-year survival rates were 82.5 and 82.5% in the RT group, and were 79.5 and 79.5% in the N-RT group. Although these differences were not significant, a trend to better survival was found in the RT group. The local recurrence rate was 8% (3/38 cases) in the RT group in contrast to 25% (4/16 cases) in the N-RT group. The following complications developed during radiation therapy: diarrhea 19 (50%), anal pain 18 (47%), and others. Postoperative complications consisted of perineal fluid collection 4 (10%), bowel obstruction 3 cases (8%), an anastomotic insufficiency 3 (8%), fistula formation of bladder 2 (5%), ureteral narrowing 1 (3%), and thrombosis of vein 1 cases (3%) of the RT group, while perineal fluid collection 1 (6%), bowel obstruction 1 (6%), an anastomotic insufficiency 4 (25%) of the N-RT group, only one case of RT group (3%) required surgical treatment for the fistula formation of bladder. (K.H.)

  20. Sphincter Preservation After Short-term Preoperative Radiotherapy for Low Rectal Cancer - Presentation of Own Data and a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujko, Krzysztof; Nowacki, Marek P.; Oldzki, Janusz; Sopyo, Rafa; Skoczylas, Jerzy; Chwaliski, Maciej [The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Inst. of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2001-07-01

    This report is based on a series of 108 patients with clinically staged T2 (9), T3 (94) and T4 (5) rectal cancer treated with preoperative irradiation with 25 Gy, 5 Gy per fraction given for one week. In 77% of patients, the tumour was located within 7 cm of the anal verge and in 15% the anal canal was involved. Surgery was usually undertaken during the week after irradiation. For low tumours, total mesorectal excision was performed, and for middle and upper cancers, the whole circumference of the mesorectum was excised at least 2 cm below the lower pole of a tumour. Tumour was resected in 103 patients, and sphincter-preserving surgery was performed in 73% of them. In the subgroup where the tumour was located higher than 4 cm from the anal verge, sphincter-preserving surgery was performed in 95%. The follow-up period ranged from 10 to 49 months, with a median of 25 months. Local recurrences were observed in 4% of patients. Anorectal dysfunction caused impairment of social life in 40% of patients and 18% admitted that their quality of life was seriously affected - however, none of them stated that they would have preferred a colostomy. These preliminary data suggest that following high dose per fraction short-term preoperative radiotherapy a high rate of sphincter-preserving surgery can be reached, with acceptable anorectal function and an acceptable rate of local failure and late complications. The results of our own data and literature review indicate the need for a randomized clinical trial comparing high dose per fraction preoperative radiotherapy with immediate surgery with conventional preoperative radiochemotherapy with delayed surgery.

  1. Role of radiotherapy in the pre-operative management ofcarcinoma of the esophagus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bryan H Burmeister

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiotherapy in the management ofcarcinoma of the esophagus and gastro-esophagealjunction has undergone much evolution over the past2 decades. Advances to define its role have been slowwith meta-analyses often providing the most usefuldata. In spite of this many institutions around the worldare divided about the role of radiotherapy in this diseaseand attribute different roles to radiotherapy based onclinical stage, tumor site and histology. The purpose ofthis review is to try to define the role of radiotherapygiven our current knowledge base and to reviewwhich current and future trials may fill the gaps ofknowledge that we currently have. It will also highlightthe difficulties in making firm recommendations aboutthe use of radiotherapy especially in a time whentechnology and treatments are rapidly evolving.

  2. Long-term quality of life in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative (chemo)-radiotherapy within a randomized trial; Evaluation a long terme de la qualite de vie de patients atteints de cancer rectal apras (chimio) radiotherapie dans un essai controle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiv, M.; Puyraveau, M.; Mercier, M.; Bosset, J.F. [EA3181, Besancon University Hospital, University of Franche-Comte, 25 - Besancon (France); Puyraveau, M. [Clinical Research Management Unit, Besancon University Hospital, 25 - Besancon (France); Mineur, L. [Department of Radiation Therapy, Clinic Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France); Calais, G. [Department of Radiation Therapy, University Francois-Rabelais, 37 - Tours (France); Maingon, P. [Department of Radiation Therapy, Cancer Center Dijon, 21 - Dijon (France); Bardet, E. [Department of Radiation Therapy, centre Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes-Saint-Herblain (France); Mercier, M.; Bosset, J.F. [Department of Radiation Therapy, Besancon University Hospital, 25 - Besancon (France)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Few studies have evaluated the quality of life (QoL) of patients with rectal cancer. This report describes the quality of life of French patients who entered the 22921 EORTC trial that investigated the role and place of chemotherapy (CT) added to preoperative radiotherapy (preop-RT). Patients and Methods: Patients without recurrences were evaluated with EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR38 questionnaires, after a median time of 4.6 years from randomization. Results: All the scores of QLQ-C30 functions were high, from 78 up to 88, with those of global health quality of life scale (GHQL) status being 73. The mean scores of symptoms were low except for diarrhea. For QLQ-CR38, the mean scores for 'body image' and 'future perspective' were high at 79.6 and 69.7 respectively. The scores for 'sexual functioning' and 'enjoyment' were low. Men had more sexual problems than females (62.5 vs 25 mean scores respectively). Chemotherapy was associated with more diarrhea complaints, lower 'role', lower 'social functioning' and lower global health quality of life scale. Conclusion: The overall quality of life of patients with rectal cancer is quite good 4.6 years after the beginning preoperative treatments. However, adding chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy has a negative effect on diarrhea complaints and some quality of life dimensions. (authors)

  3. Opposite association of serum prolactin and survival in patients with colon and rectal carcinomas: influence of preoperative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Marcos Gutiéerrez De La; Trejo, Belem; Luna-Péerez, Pedro; López-Barrera, Fernándo; Escalera, Gonzalo Martínez De La; Clapp, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a pleiotropic hormone associated with the progression of various cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we investigate whether the association of serum PRL concentration and survival is affected by tumor location and preoperative radiotherapy (PRERT) in patients with CRC cancer. Serum PRL was determined in 82 CRC patients without previous treatment. Patients with PRL concentrations at and above the 75th percentile (high PRL) or below this level (low PRL), had a significant correlation with overall survival determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. In colon cancer, there was an increased risk of mortality when PRL values were at and above the highest quartile (22% vs. 73%; P = 0.01). In contrast, in rectal cancer, high PRL values were associated with a significant overall survival advantage (88% vs. 44%; P = 0.05), which became more significant (100% vs. 34%; P = 0.005) when only rectal cancer patients receiving PRERT were compared. These findings suggest that tumor location and adjuvant radiotherapy influence the association between circulating PRL and survival in CRC.

  4. Clinico-pathological studies on the effects of preoperative hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for advanced esophageal carcinoma

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    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Ide, Hiroko; Eguchi, Reiki (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan)) (and others)

    1991-12-01

    We report clinico-pathological studies on the effect of preoperative hyperthermia and chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy (HCR) for progress of the local curability of advanced esophageal carcinoma. The subjects of these studies were 17 patients who underwent subtotal esophagectomy after preoperative irradiation of 40 Gy from 1980 to 1989, of which 8 patients had HCR, 6 patients irradiation only (R), 3 patients both irradiation and chemotherapy (CR). The clinical response rate of the patients with R or CR was 33% (PR 3, MR 3, NC 3), and the histological effective (Ef{sub 3} or Ef{sub 2}) rate was 56% (Ef{sub 3} 1, Ef{sub 2} 4, Ef{sub 1} 4). The clinical response rate of the patients with HCR was 88% (PR 7, MR 1), and the histological effective rate was 100% (Ef{sub 3} 1, Ef{sub 2} 7). HCR was more effective than R or CR for the local lesion of esophageal carcinoma histopathologically (p<0.05). However, the survival rate of patients with HCR was similar to R and CR, respectively. These results suggest that further improvement of the heating methods and the methods of combining hyperthermia with irradiation and chemotherapy is needed. (author).

  5. Expression of HER-2 in rectal cancers treated with preoperative radiotherapy: a potential biomarker predictive of metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yun-Feng; Du, Chang-Zheng; Chen, Nan; Chen, Pengju; Gu, Jin

    2014-05-01

    Evidence suggests HER-2 overexpression may be predictive of prognosis in colorectal cancer patients, though this remains controversial. This study was performed to assess the prognostic value of HER-2 expression in locally advanced rectal cancer patients after preoperative radiotherapy. HER-2 expression was evaluated based on immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of resected specimens from 142 mid-to-low rectal cancer patients. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to confirm HER-2 overexpression in samples with an IHC score of 2+. Tumor regression grading (TRG) of the primary tumors was determined semiquantitatively using a tumor regression grading scheme advocated in the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual 7 edition. When the total staining intensity was evaluated, 106 samples (74.6%) showed barely-perceptible positivity (0-1+; HER-2--negative), 15 samples (10.6%) showed moderate positivity (2+) and 21 samples (14.8%) showed strong positivity (3+, HER-2 positive). FISH confirmed that 2 cases showing moderate HER-2 positivity (2+) overexpressed HER2. There was no significant difference between the HER-2 positive and -negative groups with respect to age, gender, TRG, TNM stage, downstaging status, lymphovascular invasion or tumor differentiation. A significant correlation was found between HER-2 overexpression and the incidence of distant metastasis (p = 0.005). Subgroup analysis revealed this correlation was not significant (p = 0.247) in the radiation-insensitive (TRG0-2) subgroup, whereas a significant correlation (p = 0.026) between HER-2 overexpression and distant metastasis was found in the radiation-resistant (TRG3) subgroup. Multivariate analysis identified ypN stage (OR = 0.473, p = 0.002)and overexpression of HER-2 (OR = 3.704, p = 0.008) as independent risk factors for distant metastasis. There was no correlation between HER-2 overexpression and disease-free survival or overall survival among the study population. We reported that HER-2

  6. Clinicopathological studies on preoperative three combined treatments with hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer

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    Yoshioka, Yuji [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1995-08-01

    To prevent local recurrence of rectal cancer postoperatively, we treated patients using preoperative hyperthermia (5-6 times), irradiation (total 30 Gy) and a 5-Fluorouracil suppository (2000-2500 mg). The subjects were 31 patients given combined preoperative treatments and 28 patients given surgery alone. The results were as follows: Histologically, therapeutic effects were recognized in 80.6% of the combined treatments group. The mean distance from the adventitia to the site of cancer infiltration was 6.44 mm in the combined treatments group and 3.35 mm in the surgery alone group. The difference between the two was significant (p<0.05). The combined treatments produced a reduced tumor infiltration into the anal side, and resulted in making a safe margin for anastomosis. The rate of local recurrence in the combined treatments group was less than that of the surgery alone group. No systematic side effects or severe complications were observed during hospitalization in the combined treatments group. The survival rate of the combined treatments group was higher than that of the surgery alone group. It was considered that combined preoperative treatments for rectal cancer is beneficial to expand indications of super low anterior resection. (author).

  7. Preoperative radiotherapy followed by radical vulvectomy with inguinal lymphadenectomy for advanced vulvar carcinomas

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    Rotmensch, J.; Rubin, S.J.; Sutton, H.G.; Javaheri, G.; Halpern, H.J.; Schwartz, J.L.; Stewart, M.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Herbst, A.L. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA))

    1990-02-01

    A therapeutic alternative to exenteration for large locally advanced vulvar carcinoma involving the rectum, anus, or vagina is the use of preoperative radiation followed by radical surgery. Between 1980 and 1988, 13 patients with Stage III and 3 with Stage IV vulvar carcinoma involving the rectum/anus, urethra, or vagina were treated with 4000 rad to the vulva and 4500 rad to the inguinal and pelvic nodes followed by a radical vulvectomy and inguinal lymphadenectomy 4 weeks later. The overall 5 year cumulative survival was 45%. Twelve tumors regressed after radiation with 62.5% of the patients having visceral preservation while in 4 patients there was no major response to radiation and urinary or fecal diversion was required. Of the 6 recurrences 4 were central and 2 distant. Three patients with central recurrences had tumor within 1 cm of the vulvectomy margin. Complications included wet desquamation, inguinal wound separation, lymphedema, and urethral strictures. There were no operative deaths. It is concluded that the use of preoperative radiation followed by radical vulvectomy may be an alternative to pelvic exenteration in selected patients with advanced vulvar lesions.

  8. Preoperative simultaneous combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy with mainly composed of CDDP in oral cancer

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    Kirita, Tadaaki; Tsuyuki, Motokatsu; Ohgi, Kazuhiko; Kamibayashi, Toyohiko; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Horiuchi, Katsuhiro; Sugimura, Masahito [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    Thirty-six patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral region were treated preoperatively with CDDP (15 mg/m{sup 2} x 3 days), PEP (5 mg/body x 4 days) or CBDCA (70-100 mg/m{sup 2} x 3 days), 5FU (500-750 mg/body x 4 days) in combination with simultaneous radiation (30-40 Gy). Thirty-three patients (91.2%) had Stage III or IV carcinomas whereas 3 patients had Stage II lesions. The clinical response was vary encouraging: 22 patients (61.1%) achieved CR, 13 patients (36.1%) were judged as PR, only one patient (2.8%) was NC, and overall response rates were 97.2%. Histological effects were seen in 33/36 (91.7%) (9 as Grade IIB, 8 as Grade III, 16 as Grade IV according to Shimosato`s classification.) and especially 72.7% of CR were histologically negative for tumor. Side effects of this therapy were minimal and reversible. With a follow-up ranging from 8-76 months, 5-year cumulative survival rates are 81.5% for all patients, and 100% as Stage II, 87.4% as Stage III, 72.8% as Stage IV, respectively. Morbidity after subsequent curative surgery is none, and histologic complete response are frequent. This preoperative combined simultaneous chemoradiotherapy appeares a highly active and well tolerated regimen for even advanced and highly malignant carcinomas of the oral cavity. (author).

  9. Dosimetric comparison of preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy techniques: 3D CRT, noncoplanar IMRT, coplanar IMRT, and VMAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sua; Blitzblau, Rachel; Yin, Fang-Fang; Horton, Janet K

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to compare dosimetric parameters of treatment plans among four techniques for preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy in order to select an optimal treatment technique. The techniques evaluated were noncoplanar 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT), noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRTNC), coplanar IMRT (IMRTCO), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The planning CT scans of 16 patients in the prone position were used in this study, with the single-fraction prescription doses of 15 Gy for the first eight patients and 18 Gy for the remaining eight patients. Six (6) MV photon beams were designed to avoid the heart and contralateral breast. Optimization for IMRT and VMAT was performed to reduce the dose to the skin and normal breast. All plans were normalized such that 100% of the prescribed dose covered greater than 95% of the clinical target volume (CTV) consisting of gross tumor volume (GTV) plus 1.5 cm margin. Mean homogeneity index (HI) was the lowest (1.05 ± 0.02) for 3D CRT and the highest (1.11 ± 0.04) for VMAT. Mean conformity index (CI) was the lowest (1.42 ± 0.32) for IMRTNC and the highest (1.60 ± 0.32) for VMAT. Mean of the maximum point dose to skin was the lowest (73.7 ± 11.5%) for IMRTNC and the highest (86.5 ± 6.68%) for 3D CRT. IMRTCO showed very similar HI, CI, and maximum skin dose to IMRTNC (differences radiotherapy, we can conclude that noncoplanar or coplanar IMRT were optimal in this study as IMRT plans provided homogeneous and conformal target coverage, skin sparing, and relatively short treatment delivery time.

  10. Preoperative Single Fraction Partial Breast Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palta, Manisha; Yoo, Sua; Adamson, Justus D.; Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Horton, Janet K., E-mail: janet.horton@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Several recent series evaluating external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) have reported adverse cosmetic outcomes, possibly related to large volumes of normal tissue receiving near-prescription doses. We hypothesized that delivery of external beam PBI in a single fraction to the preoperative tumor volume would be feasible and result in a decreased dose to the uninvolved breast compared with institutional postoperative PBI historical controls. Methods and Materials: A total of 17 patients with unifocal Stage T1 breast cancer were identified. Contrast-enhanced subtraction magnetic resonance images were loaded into an Eclipse treatment planning system and used to define the target volumes. A 'virtual plan' was created using four photon beams in a noncoplanar beam arrangement and optimized to deliver 15 Gy to the planning target volume. Results: The median breast volume was 1,713 cm{sup 3} (range: 1,014-2,140), and the median clinical target volume was 44 cm{sup 3} (range: 26-73). In all cases, 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the clinical target volume. The median conformity index was 0.86 (range: 0.70-1.12). The median percentage of the ipsilateral breast volume receiving 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose was 3.8% (range: 2.2-6.9) and 13.3% (range: 7.5-20.8) compared with 18% (range: 3-42) and 53% (range: 24-65) in the institutional historical controls treated with postoperative external beam PBI (p = .002). The median maximum skin dose was 9 Gy. The median dose to 1 and 10 cm{sup 3} of skin was 6.7 and 4.9 Gy. The doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung were negligible. Conclusion: Preoperative PBI resulted in a substantial reduction in ipsilateral breast tissue dose compared with postoperative PBI. The skin dose appeared reasonable, given the small volumes. A prospective Phase I trial evaluating this technique is ongoing.

  11. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  12. Histomorphological changes of vessel structure in head and neck vessels following preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy; Histomorphologische Strukturveraenderungen von Kopf-Hals-Gefaessen nach prae- oder postoperativer Radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultze-Mosgau, S.; Wehrhan, F.; Wiltfang, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Mund-, Kiefer-, Gesichtschirurgie, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Grabenbauer, G.G.; Sauer, R.; Roedel, F. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Radespiel-Troeger, M. [Inst. fuer Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2002-06-01

    Patients and Methods: In 348 patients (October 1995-March 2002) receiving primarly or secondarily 356 microvascular hard- and soft tissue reconstruction, a total of 209 vessels were obtained from neck recipient vessels and transplant vessels during anastomosis. Three groups were analysed: group 1 (27 patients) treated with no radiotherapy or chemotherapy; group 2 (29 patients) treated with preoperative irradiation (40-50 Gy) and chemotherapy (800 mg/m{sup 2}/day 5-FU and 20 mg/m{sup 2}/day cisplatin) 1.5 months prior to surgery; group 3 (20 patients) treated with radiotherapy (60-70 Gy) (median interval 78.7 months; IQR: 31.3 months) prior to surgery. From each of the 209 vessel specimens, 3 sections were investigated histomorphometrically, qualitatively and quantitatively (ratio media area/total vessel area) by NIH-Image-digitized measurements. To evaluate these changes as a function of age, radiation dose and chemotherapy, a statistical analysis was performed using an analysis of covariance and {chi}{sup 2} tests (p > 0.05, SPSS V10). Results: In group 3, qualitative changes (intima dehiscence, hyalinosis) were found in recipient arteries significantly more frequently than in groups 1 and 2. For group 3 recipient arteries, histomorphometry revealed a significant decrease in the ratio media area/total vessel area (median 0.51, IQR 0.10) in comparison with groups 1 (p = 0.02) (median 0.61, IQR 0.29) and 2 (p = 0.046) (median 0.58, IQR 0.19). No significant difference was found between the vessels of groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.48). There were no significant differences in transplant arteries and recipient or transplant veins between the groups. Age and chemotherapy did not appear to have a significant influence on vessel changes in this study (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Following irradiation with 60-70 Gy, significant qualitative and quantitative histological changes to the recipient arteries, but not to the recipient veins, could be observed. In contrast, irradiation at a

  13. Symptoms 10-17 years after breast cancer radiotherapy data from the randomised SWEBCG91-RT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstedt, Dan; Gustafsson, Magnus; Malmström, Per; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Alsadius, David; Sundberg, Agnetha; Wilderäng, Ulrica; Holmberg, Erik; Anderson, Harald; Steineck, Gunnar; Karlsson, Per

    2010-11-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy decreases the risk for local recurrence and improves overall survival in women with breast cancer. We have limited information on radiotherapy-induced symptoms 10-17 years after therapy. Between 1991 and 1997, women with lymph node-negative breast cancer were randomised in a Swedish multi-institutional trial to breast conserving surgery with or without postoperative radiotherapy. In 2007, 10-17 years after randomisation, the group included 422 recurrence-free women. We collected data with a study-specific questionnaire on eight pre-selected symptom groups. For six symptom groups (oedema in breast or arm, erysipelas, heart symptoms, lung symptoms, rib fractures, and decreased shoulder mobility) we found similar occurrence in both groups. Excess occurrence after radiotherapy was observed for pain in the breast or in the skin, reported to occur "occasionally" by 38.1% of survivors having undergone radiotherapy and surgery versus 24.0% of those with surgery alone (absolute difference 14.1%; p=0.004) and at least once a week by 10.3% of the radiotherapy group versus 1.7% (absolute difference 8.6%; p=0.001). Daily life and analgesic use did not differ between the groups. Ten to 17 years after postoperative radiotherapy 1 in 12 women had weekly pain that could be attributed to radiotherapy. The symptoms did not significantly affect daily life and thus the reduced risk for local recurrence seems to outweigh the risk for long-term symptoms for most women. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy on local recurrence-free survival in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

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    Kim, Yeon Joo; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Jang, Se Jin; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Sik [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The concentration of capecitabine peaks at 1–2 hours after administration. We therefore assumed that proper timing of capecitabine administration and radiotherapy would maximize radiosensitization and influence survival among patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 223 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent preoperative chemoradiation, followed by surgery from January 2002 to May 2006. All patients underwent pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy/25 fractions) and received capecitabine twice daily at 12-hour intervals (1,650 mg/m2/day). Patients were divided into two groups according to the time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy. Patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy were classified as Group A (n = 109); all others were classified as Group B (n = 114). The median follow-up period was 72 months (range, 7 to 149 months). Although Group A had a significantly higher rate of good responses (44% vs. 25%; p = 0.005), the 5-year local recurrence-free survival rates of 93% in Group A and 97% in Group B did not differ significantly (p = 0.519). The 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were also comparable between the groups. Despite the better pathological response in Group A, the time interval between capecitabine and radiotherapy administration did not have a significant effect on survivals. Further evaluations are needed to clarify the interaction of these treatment modalities.

  15. Preoperative oxaliplatin, capecitabine, and external beam radiotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed, primary operable, cT3NxMo, low rectal cancer. A phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oefner, Dietmar [Paracelsus Private Medical Univ., Salzburg (Austria). Dept. of Surgery; Innsbruck Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Visceral, Transplant and Thoracic Surgery; DeVries, Alexander F. [Feldkirch Hospital (Austria). Dept. of Radio-Oncology; Schaberl-Moser, Renate [Medical Univ. Graz (AT). Div. of Oncology] (and others)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: In patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), preoperative chemoradiation is known to improve local control, and down-staging of the tumor serves as a surrogate for survival. Intensification of the systemic therapy may lead to higher downstaging rates and, thus, enhance survival. This phase II study investigated the efficacy and safety of preoperative capecitabine and oxaliplatin in combination with radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Patients with LARC of the mid and lower rectum, T3NxM0 staged by MRI received radiotherapy (total dose 45 Gy) in combination with oral capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} twice a day on radiotherapy days; weeks 1-4) and oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously (days 1, 8, 15, and 22). Efficacy was evaluated as rate of tumor down-categorization at the T level. Results: A total of 59 patients were enrolled (19 women, 40 men; median age of 61 years) and all were evaluable for efficacy and toxicity. Down-categorization at the T level was observed in 53% with pathological complete response in 6 patients (10%). Actual total radiotherapy, oxaliplatin and capecitabine doses received were 97%, 90%, and 93% of the protocol-specified preplanned doses, respectively. Grade 3/4 toxicity was observed in 15 patients (25%). The most frequent was diarrhea (12%). Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with capecitabine and oxaliplatin is feasible in patients with MRI-proven cT3 LARC. The only clinically relevant toxicity was diarrhea. Overall, efficacy of the multimodality treatment was good, but not markedly exceeding that of 5-FU- or capecitabine-based chemoradiation approaches. (orig.)

  16. Effect of pre-operative neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy and surgical treatment on resectable esophageal cancer: a Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei ZHU

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effect of pre-operative adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy and surgical treatment on resectable esophageal cancer.Methods By searching Medline,CENTRAL(the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials,EMBASE,CBM(China Biology Medicine and CNKI(China National Knowledge Infrastructure by computer,the data of randomized controlled trials(RCTs of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgical treatment for resectable esophageal cancer were selected and analyzed using Stata 11.0 statistical software.The study population was patients with resectable early or medium stage esophageal cancer,the intervention was neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy(include sequential chemoradiotherapy and concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed with surgical resection,the outcome indices were 1-and 3-year survival rates and local recurrence rate.The combined odds ratio(OR,relative risk(RR and their 95% confidence interval(CI were calculated to estimate the results.Results Nine articles including a total of 1156 patients were finally analyzed in the Meta-analysis.Among all the patients,579 received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy(study group and 577 received surgical treatment only(control group.Compared the study group and control group,the OR of 1-and 3-year survival rate was 1.06(95%CI=0.94-1.19,Z=0.97,P=0.33 and 1.30(95%CI=1.07.-1.57,Z=2.67,P=0.008,respectively,and the RR of local recurrence rate was 0.75(95%CI=0.50-1.12,Z=1.40,P=0.162.Conclusions Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy could improve the 3-year survival rate of patients with resectable esophageal cancer,but could not decrease the local recurrence rate.

  17. SU-E-J-93: Development of Pre-Contoured Human Model Library in DICOM-RT Format for the Epidemiological Study of the Radiotherapy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyakuryal, A; Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pelletier, C [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Jung, J [East Carolina Univ, Greenville, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Prior to 3D conformal radiation therapy planning, patient anatomy information was mostly limited to 2D beams-eye-view from the conventional simulator. To analyze the outcomes of such treatments for radiation late effects, 3D computational human models are often used in commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs). However, several underlying difficulties such as time-consuming manual delineation procedures of a large number of structures in the model have always limited its applications. Primary objective of this work was to develop a human model library for the epidemiological study by converting 3D-surface model organs to DICOM-RT format (DICOM-RT structure) using an in-house built software. We converted the ICRP reference human models to DICOM-RT models, which can be readily adopted for various dose calculations. Methods: MATLAB based code were utilized to convert the contour drawings extracted in text-format from the 3D graphic-tool, Rhinoceros into DICOM-RT structure format for 50 different organs of each model using a 16GB dual-core processor. The conversion periods were measured for each DICOM-RT models, and the reconstructed structure volumes were validated against the original 3D-surface models in the TPS. Ten reference hybrid whole-body models (8-pediatric and 2-adults) were automatically processed to create DICOM-RT computational human model library. Results: Mean contour conversion period was found to be 580 (N=2) and 394.5 (N=8) seconds for 50 organs in the adult and pediatric models respectively. A good agreement for large organs (NRMSD <1.0%) and small organs (NRMSD <7.7%) was also observed between the original volumes and corresponding DICOM-RT structure volumes of the organs. Conclusion: The ICRP reference human models were converted into DICOM-RT format to support the epidemiological study using a large cohort of conventional radiotherapy patients. Due to its DICOM-compatibility, the library may be implemented to many other different

  18. Predictive and prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV in patients with laryngeal carcinoma treated by radiotherapy (RT / concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Yabuki

    Full Text Available To evaluate the predictive and prognostic value of pretreatment metabolic tumor volume (MTV in patients with treated by radiotherapy (RT or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT.We reviewed the records of 118 patients with newly diagnosed laryngeal carcinoma, who had been treated by RT or CCRT. Pretreatment positron emission tomography (PET was performed, and MTV values were obtained by contouring margins of standardized uptake value. Clinical factors and MTV were analyzed for their association with survival.Patients with residual disease showed a significantly higher MTV than those with a complete response (CR after primary treatment. Univariate analysis showed that the patients with a high MTV had a significantly lower disease-free survival (DFS (p < 0.001. Subsite (p = 0.010, T-stage (p < 0.001, nodal metastasis (p < 0.001 and clinical stage (p < 0.001 also correlated significantly with DFS. In the multivariate analysis, MTV and clinical stage were both found to be independent prognostic factors for DFS (p = 0.001, p = 0.034, respectively. The 3-year DFS for patients with a high MTV were significantly poorer than those with a low MTV (p < 0.001.MTV of the primary tumor is a significant prognostic factor for DFS in patients with laryngeal carcinoma treated by RT or CCRT. The results imply that MTV could be an important factor when planning treatment and follow-up for patients with laryngeal carcinoma.

  19. Treatment Guidelines for Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma: Preliminary Consensus of an International Expert Panel

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    Baldini, Elizabeth H., E-mail: ebaldini@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wang, Dian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Haas, Rick L.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Catton, Charles N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Indelicato, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Medical Center, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Roberge, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Salerno, Kilian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (United States); Deville, Curtiland [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Washington, DC (United States); Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); O' Sullivan, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Petersen, Ivy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Le Pechoux, Cecile [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Evidence for external beam radiation therapy (RT) as part of treatment for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) is limited. Preoperative RT is the subject of a current randomized trial, but the results will not be available for many years. In the meantime, many practitioners use preoperative RT for RPS, and although this approach is used in practice, there are no radiation treatment guidelines. An international expert panel was convened to develop consensus treatment guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS. Methods and Materials: An expert panel of 15 academic radiation oncologists who specialize in the treatment of sarcoma was assembled. A systematic review of reports related to RT for RPS, RT for extremity sarcoma, and RT-related toxicities for organs at risk was performed. Due to the paucity of high-quality published data on the subject of RT for RPS, consensus recommendations were based largely on expert opinion derived from clinical experience and extrapolation of relevant published reports. It is intended that these clinical practice guidelines be updated as pertinent data become available. Results: Treatment guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS are presented. Conclusions: An international panel of radiation oncologists who specialize in sarcoma reached consensus guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS. Many of the recommendations are based on expert opinion because of the absence of higher level evidence and, thus, are best regarded as preliminary. We emphasize that the role of preoperative RT for RPS has not been proven, and we await data from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study of preoperative radiotherapy plus surgery versus surgery alone for patients with RPS. Further data are also anticipated pertaining to normal tissue dose constraints, particularly for bowel tolerance. Nonetheless, as we await these data, the guidelines herein can be used to establish treatment uniformity to aid future assessments of efficacy

  20. Usefulness of two independent histopathological classifications of tumor regression in patients with rectal cancer submitted to hyperfractionated pre-operative radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    (L)ukasz Liszka; Ewa Zieli(n)ska-Paj(a)k; Jacek Paj(a)k; Dariusz Go(l)ka; Jacek Starzewski; Zbigniew Lorenc

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the usefulness of two independent histopathological classifications of rectal cancer regression following neo-adjuvant therapy.METHODS: Forty patients at the initial stage cT3NxMO submitted to preoperative radiotherapy (42 Gy during 18 d) and then to radical surgical treatment. The relationship between "T-downstaging" versus regressive changes expressed by tumor regression grade (TRG 1-5)and Nasierowska-Guttmejer classification (NG 1-3) was studied as well as the relationship between TRG and NG versus local tumor stage ypT and lymph nodes status,ypN.RESULTS: Complete regression (ypTO, TRG 1) was found in one patient. "T-downstaging" was observed in 11 (27.5%) patients. There was a weak statistical significance of the relationship between "T-downstaging"and TRG staging and NG stage. Patients with ypT1 were diagnosed as TRG 2-3 while those with ypT3 as TRG5.No lymph node metastases were found in patients with TRG 1-2. None of the patients without lymph node metastases were diagnosed as TRG 5. Patients in the ypT1 stage were NG 1-2. No lymph node metastases were found in NG 1. There was a significant correlation between TRG and NG.CONCLUSION: Histopathological classifications may be useful in the monitoring of the effects of hyperfractionated preoperative radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer at the stage of cT3NxMO. There is no unequivocal relationship between "T-downstaging"and TRG and NG. There is some concordance in the assessment of lymph node status with ypT, TRG and NG.TRG and NG are of limited value for the risk assessment of the lymph node involvement.

  1. SU-E-T-311: Dosimetric Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans for Preoperative Radiotherapy Rectal Cancer Using Flattening Filter-Free and Flattening Filter Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W; Zhang, J; Lu, J; Chen, C [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference of volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT) for preoperative radiotherapy rectal cancer using 6MV X-ray flattening filter free(FFF) and flattening filter(FF) modes. Methods: FF-VMAT and FFF-VMAT plans were designed to 15 rectal cancer patients with preoperative radiotherapy by planning treatment system(Eclipse 10.0),respectively. Dose prescription was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. All plans were normalized to 50 Gy to 95% of PTV. The Dose Volume Histogram (DVH), target and risk organ doses, conformity indexes (CI), homogeneity indexes (HI), low dose volume of normal tissue(BP), monitor units(MU) and treatment time (TT) were compared between the two kinds of plans. Results: FF-VMAT provided the lower Dmean, V105, HI, and higher CI as compared with FFF-VMAT. The small intestine of D5, Bladder of D5, Dmean, V40, V50, L-femoral head of V40, R-femoral head of Dmean were lower in FF-VMAT than in FFF-VMAT. FF-VMAT had higher BP of V5, but no significantly different of V10, V15, V20, V30 as compared with FFF-VMAT. FF-VMAT reduceed the monitor units(MU) by 21%(P<0.05), as well as the treatment time(TT) was no significantly different(P>0.05), as compared with FFF-VMAT. Conclusion: The plan qualities of FF and FFF VMAT plans were comparable and both clinically acceptable. FF-VMAT as compared with FFF-VMAT, showing better target coverage, some of OARs sparing, the MUs of FFF-VMAT were higher than FF-VMAT, yet were delivered within the same time. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  2. Preoperative treatment with capecitabine, cetuximab and radiotherapy for primary locally advanced rectal cancer : A phase II clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisterer, Wolfgang; de Vries, Alexander; Öfner, Dietmar; Rabl, Hans; Koplmüller, Renate; Greil, Richard; Tschmelitsch, Jöerg; Schmid, Rainer; Kapp, Karin; Lukas, Peter; Sedlmayer, Felix; Höfler, Gerald; Gnant, Michael; Thaler, Josef; Widder, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: To investigate the feasibility and safety of preoperative capecitabine, cetuximab and radiation in patients with MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, cT3/T4). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 31 patients with LARC were treated with cetuximab and capecitabine concomitantly with 45

  3. Preoperative treatment with capecitabine, cetuximab and radiotherapy for primary locally advanced rectal cancer : A phase II clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisterer, Wolfgang; de Vries, Alexander; Öfner, Dietmar; Rabl, Hans; Koplmüller, Renate; Greil, Richard; Tschmelitsch, Jöerg; Schmid, Rainer; Kapp, Karin; Lukas, Peter; Sedlmayer, Felix; Höfler, Gerald; Gnant, Michael; Thaler, Josef; Widder, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: To investigate the feasibility and safety of preoperative capecitabine, cetuximab and radiation in patients with MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, cT3/T4). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 31 patients with LARC were treated with cetuximab and capecitabine concomitantly with 45 G

  4. A comparison study between gross tumor volumes defined by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, postoperative specimens, and tumor bed for radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aiping; Li, Jianbin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yongsheng; Mu, Dianbin; Chen, Zhaoqiu; Shao, Qian; Li, Fengxiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The identification and contouring of target volume is important for breast-conserving therapy. The aim of the study was to compare preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), postoperative pathology, excised specimens’ (ES) size, and tumor bed (TB) delineation as methods for determining the gross tumor volume (GTV) for radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods: Thirty-three patients with breast cancer who underwent preoperative MRI and radiotherapy after BCS were enrolled. The GTVs determined by MRI, pathology, and the ES were defined as GTVMRI, GTVPAT, and GTVES, respectively. GTVMRI+1 was defined as a 1.0-cm margin around the GTVMRI. The radiation oncologist delineated GTV of the TB (GTVTB) using planning computed tomography according to ≥5 surgical clips placed in the lumpectomy cavity (LC). Results: The median GTVMRI, GTVMRI+1, GTVPAT, GTVES, and GTVTB were 0.97 cm3 (range, 0.01–6.88), 12.58 cm3 (range, 3.90–34.13), 0.97 cm3 (range, 0.01–6.36), 15.46 cm3 (range, 1.15–70.69), and 19.24 cm3 (range, 4.72–54.33), respectively. There were no significant differences between GTVMRI and GTVPAT, GTVMRI+1 and GTVES, GTVES and GTVTB (P = 0.188, 0.070, and 0.264, respectively). GTVMRI is positively related with GTVPAT. However, neither GTVES nor GTVTB correlated with GTVMRI (P = 0.071 and 0.378, respectively). Furthermore, neither GTVES nor GTVTB correlated with GTVMRI+1 (P = 0.068 and 0.375, respectively). Conclusion: When ≥5 surgical clips were placed in the LC for BCS, the volume of TB was consistent with the volume of ES. Neither the volume of TB nor the volume of ES correlated significantly with the volume of tumor defined by preoperative MRI. PMID:28079816

  5. Radiotherapy for stage II and stage III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes after preoperative chemotherapy and mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Scodan, Romuald; Selz, Jessica; Stevens, Denise; Bollet, Marc A; de la Lande, Brigitte; Daveau, Caroline; Lerebours, Florence; Labib, Alain; Bruant, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [The role of magnetic resonance imaging to select patients for preoperative treatment in rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödel, Claus; Sauer, Rolf; Fietkau, Rainer

    2009-08-01

    Traditionally, the decision to apply preoperative treatment for rectal cancer patients has been based on the T- and N-category. Recently, the radial distance of the tumor to the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has been identified as an important risk factor for local failure. By magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) this distance can be measured preoperatively with high reliability. Thus, selected groups have started to limit the indication for preoperative therapy to tumors extending to - or growing within 1 mm from - the mesorectal fascia (CRM+). Pros and cons of this selected approach for preoperative treatment and first clinical results are presented. Prerequisites are the availability of modern high-resolution thin-section MRI technology as well as strict quality control of MRI and surgical quality of total mesorectal excision (TME). By selecting patients with CRM-positive tumors on MRI for preoperative therapy, only approximately 35% patients will require preoperative radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). However, with histopathologic work-up of the resected specimen after primary surgery, the indication for postoperative RCT is given for a rather large percentage of patients, i.e., for pCRM+ (5-10%), intramesorectal or intramural excision (30-40%), pN+ (30-40%). Postoperative RCT, however, is significantly less effective and more toxic than preoperative RCT. A further point of concern is the assertion that patients, in whom a CRM-negative status is achieved by surgery alone, do not benefit from additional RT. Data of the Dutch TME trial and the British MRC (Medical Research Council) CR07 trial, however, suggest the reverse. To omit preoperative RT/RCT for CRM-negative tumors on MRI needs to be further investigated in prospective clinical trials. The German guidelines for the treatment of colorectal cancer 2008 continue to indicate preoperative RT/RCT based on the T- and N-category.

  7. Breast cancer radiotherapy: controversies and prospectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jin-ming; WANG Yong-sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Despite consensus on breast cancer radiotherapy, there are still some controversies over post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), appropriate sequence of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal treatment, and radiotherapy after preoperative systemic therapy.

  8. Circumferential resection margin positivity after preoperative chemoradiotherapy based on magnetic resonance imaging for locally advanced rectal cancer: implication of boost radiotherapy to the involved mesorectal fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Min Jung; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Byung Soh; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Ho Geun; Koom, Woong Sub

    2016-04-01

    To identify patients who are at a higher risk of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement using preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Between October 2008 and November 2012, 165 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT4 or cT3 with fascia) who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy were analysed. The morphologic patterns on post-chemoradiotherapy magnetic resonance imaging were categorized into five patterns from Pattern A (most-likely negative pathologic circumferential resection margin) to Pattern E (most-likely positive pathologic circumferential resection margin). In addition, the location of mesorectal fascia involvement was classified as lateral, posterior and anterior. The diagnostic accuracy of the morphologic criteria was calculated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was identified in 17 patients (10.3%). The diagnostic accuracy of predicting pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was 0.73 using the five-scale magnetic resonance imaging pattern. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for predicting pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement were 76.5, 65.5, 20.3 and 96.0%, respectively, when cut-off was set between Patterns C and D. On multivariate logistic regression, the magnetic resonance imaging patterns D and E (P= 0.005) and posterior or lateral mesorectal fascia involvement (P= 0.017) were independently associated with increased probability of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement. The rate of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement was 30.0% when the patient had Pattern D or E with posterior or lateral mesorectal fascia involvement. Patients who are at a higher risk of pathologic circumferential resection margin involvement can be identified using preoperative magnetic resonance imaging although the predictability is moderate. © The

  9. Radiotherapy and local control in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, V; Rosetto, M E; Fares, C; Mantini, G; Salvi, G; Turriziani, A

    1998-01-01

    Recurrence is a stage in the natural history of rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy or postoperative radiochemotherapy lower the rate of recurrence, improving local control. From 1980 to 1997, at the "Divisione di Radioterapia" of the "Università Cattolica del S. Cuore" of Rome 380 patients with rectal cancer of early clinical stage T2-3, candidates for surgery for cure, underwent radiation therapy. 119 patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy (45-50 Gy); 45 patients underwent "sandwich" radiotherapy (45 Gy:27 Gy before and 28 Gy after surgery), of whom 7 were treated with preoperative radiotherapy alone; 145 patients underwent preoperative concomitant radiochemotherapy according to 3 different protocols, radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with mitomycin C and 5-FU; radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) combined with cisplatin and 5-FU; radiotherapy (45 Gy) combined with 5-FU and folinic acid. 71 patients were treated with preoperative radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with IORT (10 Gy). Median follow-up was 6 years. Overall local control was 85% at 3 years, 83% at 5 years, 81% at 10 years. The rate of local control at 5 years was: 76% for postoperative radiotherapy, 83% for "sandwich" radiotherapy, 84% for preoperative radiochemotherapy and 93% for preoperative radiotherapy combined with IORT. Local control was shown to be significantly better with preoperative treatment as compared to postoperative treatment (p = 0.02). The incidence of metastases was 35% in the patients with local recurrence and 16% in those with local control. The difference in survival was highly significant in patients with local control as compared to those with local recurrence: at 5 years 87% and 32% respectively. Patients with local control showed a lower incidence of metastasis and a better survival.

  10. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging for preoperative staging of rectal cancer in clinical practice: high accuracy in predicting circumferential margin with clinical benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videhult, P; Smedh, K; Lundin, P; Kraaz, W

    2007-06-01

    The aims were to determine agreement between staging of rectal cancer made by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathological examination and the influence of MRI on choice of radiotherapy (RT) and surgical procedure. In this retrospective audit, preoperative MRI was performed on 91 patients who underwent bowel resection, with 93% having total mesorectal excision. Tumour stage according to mural penetration, nodal status and circumferential resection margin (mCRM) involvement was assessed and compared with histopathology. Five radiologists interpreted the images. Overall agreement between MRI and histopathology for T stage was 66%. The greatest difficulty was in distinguishing between T1, T2 and minimal T3 tumours. The accuracy for mCRM (MRI) was 86% (78/91),with an interobserver variation between 80% and 100%. In the 13 cases with no agreement between mCRM and pCRM (pathological), seven had long-term RT and nine en bloc resections, indicating that the margins initially were involved with an even higher accuracy for mCRM. Preoperative short-term RT was routine, but based on MRI findings, choice of RT was affected in 29 cases (32%); 17 patients had no RT and 12 long-term RT. The surgical procedure was affected in 17 cases (19%) with planned perirectal en bloc resections in all. CRM was involved (CRM with high accuracy in rectal cancer. MRI could be used as a clinical guidance with high reliability as indicated by the low figures of histopathologically involved CRM.

  12. Analysis of preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for superior sulcus lung tumor%术前同期放化疗治疗肺上沟瘤的疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical effect and toxicities of preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CT/RT)with radiotherapy (RT) alone in patients with superior sulcus lung tumor. Methods: Fifty-six patients with superior sulcus lung tumor were divided randomly into two groups: twenty-six patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy, the other thirty patients received only radiotherapy. For both groups, the same radiation technic was given with the convention fraction. The total dose was 45 Gy/25 Fr/5 Wk. For the CT/RT group, the patients were also given with concurrent chemotherapy (navelbine 15-18 mg/m2 on the 1st and 8th day, cisplatin 60 mg/m2 on the 1 st day). Results: The rate of complete resection in the CT/RT group was significantly higher than that in the RT group (92.3% vs 80%, P < 0.05). The complete pathological response rate and 2-year survival rate in the CT/RT group were significantly higher than those in the RT group (P < 0.01, P < 0.01). The incidences of grades Ⅲ-Ⅳ radiation esophagitis and leukopenia in the CT/RT group were significantly higher than those in the RT group (23.1% and 23.1% vs 6.7% and 0, P < 0.01, P < 0.01). Conclusion: Preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy has the potential of improving the survival rate of superior sulcus lung tumors. Though this treatment regimen also increases the acute toxic effect, all patients can tolerate it. It is expected to be a new "standard treatment" for this malignant tumor.

  13. Pre- and post-radiotherapy MRI results as a predictive model for response in laryngeal carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ljumanovic, Redina; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Knol, Dirk L.; Leemans, C. Rene; Castelijns, Jonas A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to determine if pre-radiotherapy (RT) and/or post-radiotherapy magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can predict response in patients with laryngeal carcinoma treated with RT. Pre- and post-RT MR examinations of 80 patients were retrospectively reviewed and associated with regard to local

  14. Comparative analysis of late functional outcome following preoperative radiation therapy or chemoradiotherapy and surgery or surgery alone in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contin, Pietro; Kulu, Yakup; Bruckner, Thomas; Sturm, Martin; Welsch, Thilo; Müller-Stich, Beat P; Huber, Johannes; Büchler, Markus W; Ulrich, Alexis

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluates the anorectal and genitourinary function of patients treated by preoperative short-term radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by surgery and surgery alone for rectal cancer. For this study, a total of 613 patients, who were identified from a prospective rectal cancer database, underwent anterior resection of the rectum between October 2001 and December 2007. Standardized questionnaires were used to determine fecal incontinence, urinary, and sexual function. Relevant clinical variables were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. Independent predictors of functional outcome were identified by a binary logistic regression analysis. The data of 263 (43 %) patients were available for analysis. On multivariate analysis, neoadjuvant RT (P < 0.01) and low anterior resection (LAR) (P = 0.049) were associated with fecal incontinence. In univariate analysis, fecal incontinence was linked to preoperative neoadjuvant treatment (RT and/or CRT vs. LAR) (P < 0.01). The hazard ratio for developing fecal incontinence was 3.3 (1.6-6.8) for patients who received RT. One hundred twenty-five patients (51.2 %) experienced urinary incontinence following surgery, the majority of whom were female (P < 0.01). On univariate analysis, male sexual function was associated with age (P < 0.01), ASA class (P = 0.01) and LAR (P = 0.01). Multimodal therapy of low rectal cancer increases the incidence of fecal incontinence and negatively affects sexual function. The potential benefits of RT or CRT need to be balanced against the risk of increased bowel dysfunction when determining the appropriate treatment for individual patients with rectal cancer.

  15. Influence of the vocal cord mobility in salvage surgery after radiotherapy for early-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the glottic larynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorphe, Philippe; Blanchard, Pierre; Temam, Stephane; Janot, François

    2015-10-01

    Disease relapses occur in up to 40% of cases after radiotherapy (RT) for early-stage glottic laryngeal neoplasms, and the foremost remaining treatment option is salvage total laryngectomy (STL). Our objectives were to review the outcomes of patients treated with salvage surgery after RT for early-stage carcinoma of the glottic larynx and to assess prognostic factors. We retrospectively analyzed 43 patients who underwent surgery. Overall and disease-free survival rates among subgroups were calculated and compared, stratified by preoperative stage, vocal cord mobility and postoperative histopathologic data. Recurrences occurred 22.7 months after the end of RT. Surgery was STL in 33 cases (76.8%). The main prognostic factors associated with survival rates were initial vocal cord mobility, vocal cord mobility at the diagnosis of recurrence, and changes in mobility. Vocal cord mobility is an important clinical criterion in treatment decision making for early-stage glottis carcinoma and remains important during follow-up.

  16. Psychological functioning in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiegelis, HE; Ranchor, AV; Sanderman, R

    2004-01-01

    Although many side-effects of radiotherapy (RT) are physical, previous studies have shown that patients, when treated with RT, also experience psychological problems. This review describes the psychological functioning of cancer patients prior to, during, and after RT. Moreover, we examined whether

  17. Floating JMaRT

    CERN Document Server

    Bossard, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    We define a new partially solvable system of equations that parametrises solutions to six-dimensional N=(1,0) ungauged supergravity coupled to tensor multiplets. We obtain this system by applying a series of dualities on the known floating brane system, imposing that it allows for the JMaRT solution. We construct an explicit multi-centre solution generalising the JMaRT solution, with an arbitrary number of additional BPS centres on a line. We describe explicitly the embedding of the JMaRT solution in this system in five dimensions.

  18. Value of intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferenschild, Floris T. J.; Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J. M. E.; Graveland, Wilfried J.; Marinelli, Andreas W. K. S.; van der Sijp, Joost R.; Wiggers, Theo; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to analyze the results of a multimodality treatment using preoperative radiotherapy, followed by surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: Between 1987 and 2002, 123 patients with initial unresectable an

  19. Intermediate-fraction neoadjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Tiancheng; Gu, Jin; Li, Ming; Du, Changzheng

    2013-04-01

    In China, standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy has not been well accepted, not only because of financial constraints but also because of the poorly-tolerated long duration of the regimen. The current study aimed to evaluate the impact of a modified neoadjuvant radiation regimen on the prognosis of rectal cancer patients in China. This was a nonrandomized cohort study evaluating outcomes of patients who chose to undergo preoperative radiotherapy compared with those who chose not to undergo preoperative radiotherapy (controls). The study was carried out in Peking University Cancer Hospital, a tertiary care cancer center in China. Records of patients with locally advanced, mid-to-low rectal cancer who underwent total mesorectal excision at Peking University Cancer Hospital from 2001 through 2005 were analyzed in this study. Patients who chose preoperative radiotherapy received a total dose of 30 Gy delivered in 10 once-daily fractions of 3.0 Gy each, with at least a 14-day delay of surgery after delivery of the last fraction. Tumor downstaging was evaluated. Local recurrence, distant metastases, and disease-free and overall survival were analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 101 patients accepted and 162 patients declined the modified preoperative radiotherapy regimen. Of the 101 patients receiving preoperative radiotherapy, 5 (5%) had a complete response, and 50 (50%) achieved TNM downstaging. The local recurrence rate was 5% with preoperative radiotherapy and 18% in the control groups (p = 0.02). Within the preoperative radiotherapy group, 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were significantly higher in patients with T-, N-, or TNM-downstaging than in patients without downstaging. Evaluation of literature reports indicated that clinical safety and effectiveness of the modified protocol are comparable to results of standard neoadjuvant procedures. The allocation to study groups was not randomized, and patient self-selection may

  20. RT-PLG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yahya, Bernardo Nugroho; Khosiawan, Yohanes; Choi, Woosik

    2016-01-01

    Streaming process mining has been rising as an emergent tool to analyze industrial practices. Obviously, the advance of streaming process mining requires the availability of a suite of real-world business processes and the execution logs in the real time manner. Literally, it is hard to obtain it....... This paper aims to develop a real time process log generator for the usage of streaming process mining tool. The real time process log generator (RT-PLG) is constructed in an independent tool. Afterward, the RT-PLG is utilized to generate a synthetic log for streaming process mining. The tool has been...

  1. Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytte, Tine; Hansen, Olfred; Stohlberg-Rohr, Thomine

    2010-01-01

    report the heart toxicities in locally-regionally advanced NSCLC (LA-NSCLC) patients (pts) treated with RT in our centre.   Methods and material: From 01.01.1995-30.11.2007, 287 pts with LA-NSCLC (stage IIB-IIIB) were treated with RT at our centre with planned dose 60-66 Gy. All RT was applied as 3D RT......    Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC Tine Schytte, Olfred Hansen, Thomine Stolberg-Rohr* and Carsten Brink*. Dept. Oncology and Radiophysic Lab.* Odense University Hospital, Denmark   Keyword: Radiotherapy, Locally advanced NSCLC, Cardiac toxicity...

  2. Impact of simultaneous assay, the PCNA, cyclinD1, and DNA content with specimens before and after preoperative radiotherapy on prognosis of esophageal cancer-possible incorporation into clinical TNM staging system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Chai Zhu; Ren Li; Yu-Xiang Wang; Wei Feng; Juan Li; Rong Qiu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the present study is to use immunohistochemical methods to investigate the clinical implications of tumor markers in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and evaluate their impact on prognosis.METHODS: From November 1990 to December 1996, 47patients were treated with preoperative radiation followed by radical esophagectomy. All patients were confirmed pathologically as suffering from squamous cell carcinoma.Immunohistochemical stain was done for PCNA, cyclinD1 protein expression and DNA content analyzed by image cytometry. Kaplan-Meier method for single prognostic factor and log-rank test was used to test the significant difference. Cox stepwise regression model and prognosis index model were used for survival analysis with multiple prognostic factors.RESULTS: Radio-pathological change, T stage and N stage, as the traditional prognostic factors had statistical difference in 3-, 5- and 10-year survival rates. While, tumor cell proliferating marked PCNA, cyclinD1 and DNA content served as independent prognostic factors of esophageal carcinoma. There was definitely an identity between the single and multiple factor analyses. PI was more accurate to evaluate the prognosis of esophageal carcinoma.CONCLUSION: It is possible that tumor cell proliferating marked PCNA, cyclinD1 and DNA content would become the endpoints for evaluating the prognosis of esophageal carcinoma.

  3. Helical Tomotherapy Combined with Capecitabine in the Preoperative Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yii Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of helical tomotherapy plus capecitabine as a preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC. Thirty-six LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT were analyzed. Radiotherapy (RT consisted of 45 Gy to the regional lymph nodes and simultaneous-integrated boost (SIB 50.4 Gy to the tumor, 5 days/week for 5 weeks. Chemotherapy consisted of capecitabine 850 mg/m2, twice daily, during the RT days. Patients underwent surgery 6–8 weeks after completion of CRT. Information was collected for patient characteristics, treatment response, and acute and late toxicities. Grade 3/4 (G3+ toxicities occurred in 11.1% of patients (4/36. Sphincter preservation rate was 85.2% (23/27. Five patients (14.3% achieved pathological complete response. Tumor, nodal, and ypT0-2N0 downstaging were noted in 60% (21/35, 69.6% (16/23, and 57.1% (20/35. Tumor regression grade 2~4 was achieved in 28 patients (80%. After a median follow-up time of 35 months, the most common G3+ late morbidity was ileus and fistula (5.7%, 2/35. The study showed that capecitabine plus helical tomotherapy with an SIB is feasible in treatment of LARC. The treatment modality can achieve a very encouraging sphincter preservation rate and a favorable ypT0-2N0 downstaging rate without excessive toxicity.

  4. Limited benefit of inversely optimised intensity modulation in breast conserving radiotherapy with simultaneously integrated boost

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Hans Paul; Dolsma, Willemtje; Schilstra, C; Korevaar, Erik W; de Bock, Geertruida H; Maduro, John H; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To examine whether in breast-conserving radiotherapy (RT) with simultaneously integrated boost (SIB), application of inversely planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT-SIB) instead of three-dimensional RT (3D-CRT-SIB) has benefits that justify the additional costs, and

  5. Radiotherapy; Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannenmacher, M. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Debus, J. [Univ. Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Wenz, F. (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2006-07-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy.

  6. 直肠癌术前容积旋转调强放疗和五野静态调强放疗的剂量学比较%Dosimetric comparison between preoperative volumetric modulated arc therapy and five-field intensity modulated radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪琳; 张红雁; 钱立庭; 吴爱东; 方为; 闫冰

    2016-01-01

    目的:比较直肠癌术前患者应用五野静态调强放疗(5F-IMRT)和容积弧形调强放疗( VMAT)两种计划的剂量学差别。方法分别将16例术前行同期放化疗的直肠癌患者进行5F-IMRT和VMAT两种计划设计,应用剂量体积直方图比较分析靶区和危及器官的剂量学差异及治疗参数。结果两种治疗计划均能满足临床剂量要求。5F-IMRT计划的适形指数(CI)为0.88±0.04,VMAT计划的CI为0.90±0.03,两种计划均能很好满足95%等剂量曲线对100%PTV体积的完全覆盖;VMAT 和 IMRT 计划的均匀性指数(HI)分别为1.06±0.01和1.05±0.01,差异无统计学意义(t=1.37,P>0.05)。5F-IMRT和VMAT计划中重要的危及器官如小肠、膀胱和股骨头等的关键剂量评价指标( Dmean、Dmax)及受照射体积的关键评价指标( V20、V30、V40和V50)在两种放疗计划中差异无统计学意义( P >0.05)。VMAT计划组较5F-IMRT计划组机器跳数( MU)平均值减少39%(P=0.000)。结论直肠癌术前放疗中采用VMAT技术可获得等同于5F-IMRT计划的剂量分布,危及器官均能得到较好的保护, VMAT计划MU明显降低,治疗时间明显缩短。%Objective To compare the dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arc therapy( VMAT) and five-field intensity modulated radiotherapy(5F-IMRT) in preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods Six-teen patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative chemo-radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. VMAT and 5F-IMRT plans were designed for each patient. The dose distribution in target volumes and organs at risk was e-valuated according to the dose-volume histogram. Results Both plans could meet target dose specifications and nor-mal tissue constraint. The CI was similar between the 5F-IMRT(0. 88 ± 0. 04) and VMAT plans (0. 90 ± 0. 03), which could satisfy 95% of prescribed dose for covered PTV. The HI of the VMAT plan was 1. 06 ± 0. 01 compared to 1. 05 ± 0. 01

  7. [Radiotherapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnt, T; Müller, A C; Janich, M; Gerlach, R; Hädecke, J; Duncker, G I W; Dunst, J

    2004-11-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease, an autoimmune disorder of the thyroid, whereas the precise pathogenesis still remains unclear. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis the occurrence of proptosis is an extremely rare event. The therapy for middle and severe courses of GO shows in partly disappointing results, although several therapy modalities are possible (glucocorticoid therapy, radiotherapy, antithyroid drug treatment, surgery). All these therapies lead in only 40 - 70 % to an improvement of the pathogenic symptoms. An intensive interdisciplinary cooperation is necessary to satisfy the requirements for the treatment of Graves' ophthalmopathy. As a consequence of the very different results of the few of clinical studies that were accomplished with reference to this topic, treatment by radiotherapy in the management of the disease is presently controversially discussed. In the German-speaking countries the radiotherapy is, however, firmly established as a therapy option in the treatment of the moderate disease classes (class 2-5 according to NO SPECS), especially if diplopia is present. This article describes the sequences, dosages and fractionation schemes as well as the risks and side effects of the radiotherapy. Altogether, radiotherapy is assessed as an effective and sure method. The administration of glucocorticoids can take place before the beginning of or during the radiotherapy. For the success of treatment the correct selection of patients who may possibly profit from a radiotherapy is absolutely essential. By realising that GO proceeds normally over a period of 2-5 years, which is followed by a period of fibrotic alteration, the application of the radiotherapy in the early, active phase is indispensable. A precise explanation for the effects of radiotherapy in treatment of the GO does not exist at present. The determination of the most effective irradiation doses was made from retrospectively evaluated

  8. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelian, Jason M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Callister, Matthew D., E-mail: Callister.matthew@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Ashman, Jonathan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Young-Fadok, Tonia M. [Division of Colorectal Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Borad, Mitesh J. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Gunderson, Leonard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  9. Efficiency of radiotherapy during local hyperthermia in the treatment of laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Choinzonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer of the larynx and laryngopharynx, which is accessible to visual and instrumental examination, remains the most relevant and complicated problem among head and neck malignances as before. Investigations show that the incidence of cancer at these sites in Russia in the last decade has risen from 4.5 to 9.67 %. This is a severe and poor prognostic form of cancer, which is characterized by its nonspecific early clinical manifestations, complex anatomic and topographic structure, and a high rate of regional metastases. The mainstay of treatment for head and neck cancer involves 3 components: surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy (RT, which are performed alone or in combination. The most commonly used technique is combined, frequently crippling due to organ-removing operations. The clinical introduction of current radio modifiers, local and deep hyperthermia systems, is a promising approach to improving the results of treatment, to enhancing the radiation damage of RT, and to achieving the tumor regression sufficient for surgical intervention without augmenting the early and late toxicity inherent in chemoradiation treatment. The results of the performed study of 35 patients with T2–3N0–2M0 laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal cancer proved the high efficiency of local hyperthermia in treating malignancies in this region during both preoperative (grades III– IV therapeutic pathomorphism and radical beam RT.

  10. Supine MRI for regional breast radiotherapy: imaging axillary lymph nodes before and after sentinel-node biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heijst, Tristan C. F.; Eschbach-Zandbergen, Debora; Hoekstra, Nienke; van Asselen, Bram; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; de Waard, Stephanie N.; Witkamp, Arjen J.; van Dalen, Thijs; Desirée van den Bongard, H. J. G.; Philippens, Marielle E. P.

    2017-08-01

    Regional radiotherapy (RT) is increasingly used in breast cancer treatment. Conventionally, computed tomography (CT) is performed for RT planning. Lymph node (LN) target levels are delineated according to anatomical boundaries. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could enable individual LN delineation. The purpose was to evaluate the applicability of MRI for LN detection in supine treatment position, before and after sentinel-node biopsy (SNB). Twenty-three female breast cancer patients (cTis-3N0M0) underwent 1.5 T MRI, before and after SNB, in addition to CT. Endurance for MRI was monitored. Axillary levels were delineated. LNs were identified and delineated on MRI from before and after SNB, and on CT, and compared by Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. LN locations and LN-based volumes were related to axillary delineations and associated volumes. Although postoperative effects were visible, LN numbers on postoperative MRI (median 26 LNs) were highly reproducible compared to preoperative MRI when adding excised sentinel nodes, and higher than on CT (median 11, p  <  0.001). LN-based volumes were considerably smaller than respective axillary levels. Supine MRI of LNs is feasible and reproducible before and after SNB. This may lead to more accurate RT target definition compared to CT, with potentially lower toxicity. With the MRI techniques described here, initiation of novel MRI-guided RT strategies aiming at individual LNs could be possible.

  11. Role of radiotherapy for pancreatobiliary neuroendocrine tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Shim; Choi, Jin Hyun; Choi, Chihwan; Seong, Jinsil [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    We investigated the role of radiotherapy (RT) for pancreatobiliary neuroendocrine tumors (PB-NETs). We identified 9 patients with PB-NETs who received RT between January 2005 and March 2012. Of these 9 patients, 4 were diagnosed with NETs in the pancreas and 5 were diagnosed with NETs in the gallbladder. All patients received RT to the primary tumor or resection bed with a median total irradiation dose of 50.4 Gy, with or without chemotherapy. The tumor response rate and tumor control rate in the RT field were 60% and 100 %, respectively. All 4 patients who underwent surgery had no evidence of disease in the RT field. Of the 5 patients who received RT to the primary gross tumor, 1 had complete response, 2 had partial response, and 2 had stable disease in the RT field. The median time to progression was 11 months. Of the 9 patients, four patients had no progression, and 5 patients had progression of disease (locoregional, 2; distant, 2; locoregional/distant, 1). Of the 4 patients without progression, 3 were treated with RT in adjuvant or neoadjuvant setting, and one received RT to primary tumor. One patient experienced radiation-induced duodenitis at 3 months after concurrent chemoradiation without treatment-related mortality. RT can yield local control for advanced PB-NETs. RT should be considered an essential part of multimodality treatment in management of advanced PB-NETs.

  12. Accelerated Deformable Registration of Repetitive MRI during Radiotherapy in Cervical Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Tanderup, Kari; Kiritsis, Christian;

    2006-01-01

    Tumour regression and organ deformations during radiotherapy (RT) of cervical cancer represent major challenges regarding accurate conformation and calculation of dose when using image-guided adaptive radiotherapy. Deformable registration algorithms are able to handle organ deformations, which can...... be useful with advanced tools such as auto segmentation of organs and dynamic adaptation of radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to accelerate and validate deformable registration in MRI-based image-guided radiotherapy of cervical cancer.    ...

  13. Peripheral myeloid-derived suppressor and T regulatory PD-1 positive cells predict response to neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Maria; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Cardone, Eleonora; Trotta, Anna Maria; Pecori, Biagio; Rega, Daniela; Pace, Ugo; Scala, Dario; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Cacciapuoti, Carmela; Pacelli, Roberto; Delrio, Paolo; Scala, Stefania

    2015-04-10

    Short-course preoperative radiotherapy (SC-RT) followed by total mesorectal excision (TME) is one therapeutic option for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients. Since radio-induced DNA damage may affect tumor immunogenicity, Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and T regulatory cells (Tregs) were evaluated in 13 patients undergoing SC-RT and TME for LARC. Peripheral Granulocytic-MDSCs (G-MDSC) [LIN-/HLA-DR-/CD11b+/CD14-/CD15+/CD33+], Monocytic (M-MDSC) [CD14+/HLA-DR-/lowCD11b+/CD33+] and Tregs [CD4+/CD25hi+/FOXP3+- CTLA-4/PD1] basal value was significantly higher in LARC patients compared to healthy donors (HD). Peripheral MDSC and Tregs were evaluated at time 0 (T0), after 2 and 5 weeks (T2-T5) from radiotherapy; before surgery (T8) and 6-12 months after surgery (T9, T10). G-MDSC decreased at T5 and further at T8 while M-MDSC cells decreased at T5; Tregs reached the lowest value at T5. LARC poor responder patients displayed a major decrease in M-MDSC after SC-RT and an increase of Treg-PD-1. In this pilot study MDSCs and Tregs decrease during the SC-RT treatment could represent a biomarker of response in LARC patients. Further studies are needed to confirm that the deepest M-MDSC reduction and increase in Treg-PD1 cells within 5-8 weeks from the beginning of treatment could discriminate LARC patients poor responding to SC-RT.

  14. Surgery Followed by Radiotherapy Versus Radiotherapy Alone for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression From Unfavorable Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck (Germany); Huttenlocher, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck (Germany); Bajrovic, Amira [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Karstens, Johann H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University Hannover (Germany); Adamietz, Irenaeus A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ruhr University Bochum (Germany); Kazic, Nadja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Despite a previously published randomized trial, controversy exists regarding the benefit of adding surgery to radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). It is thought that patients with MSCC from relatively radioresistant tumors or tumors associated with poor functional outcome after radiotherapy alone may benefit from surgery. This study focuses on these tumors. Methods and Materials: Data from 67 patients receiving surgery plus radiotherapy (S+RT) were matched to 134 patients (1:2) receiving radiotherapy alone (RT). Groups were matched for 10 factors and compared for motor function, ambulatory status, local control, and survival. Additional separate matched-pair analyses were performed for patients receiving direct decompressive surgery plus stabilization of involved vertebrae (DDSS) and patients receiving laminectomy (LE). Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 22% of patients after S+RT and 16% after RT (p = 0.25). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 67% and 61%, respectively (p = 0.68). Of nonambulatory patients, 29% and 19% (p = 0.53) regained ambulatory status. One-year local control rates were 85% and 89% (p = 0.87). One-year survival rates were 38% and 24% (p = 0.20). The matched-pair analysis of patients receiving LE showed no significant differences between both therapies. In the matched-pair analysis of patients receiving DDSS, improvement of motor function occurred more often after DDSS+RT than RT (28% vs. 19%, p = 0.024). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 86% and 67% (p = 0.30); 45% and 18% of patients regained ambulatory status (p = 0.29). Conclusions: Patients with MSCC from an unfavorable primary tumor appeared to benefit from DDSS but not LE when added to radiotherapy in terms of improved functional outcome.

  15. Preoperative Chemoradiotheraph for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo Ren; Qi Wang; Yaoxiong Yan; Shaolin Li; Biyou Huang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To observe the effect of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for inflammatory breast cancer.METHODS From December 1996 to December 2000, we received and treated 21 patients with inflammatory breast carcinoma with a combinedmodality treatment. The chemotherapy protocol consisted of cyclophosphamide (CTX), pirarubicin (THP-ADM) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or CTX, 5-Fu and methotrexate (MTX). The same infusion scheme was repeated on day 21. After 3~4 cycles the patients were treated with radiotherapy. When the radiation dose reached 40 Gy, the patients who were unable or unwilling to under go an operation received continued radiotherapy. When the radiation dose to the supra clavicular fossa and internal mammary lymph nodes reached 60 Gy and 50 Gy respectively, the radiotherapy was stopped. Chemotherapy was then continued with the original scheme. Patients who had indications for surgery and were willing to under go an operation received no treatment for 2 weeks, after which a total mastectomy was performed. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy was resumed with the original scheme after the operations. When the radiation dose reached 50 Gy, radiotherapy was stopped.RESULTS All patients were followed-up for more than 5 years with a follow-up rate of 100%. The overall 3 and 5-year survival rates of these patients were 42.9%, and 23.8% respectively. For patients in Stage ⅢB the 3 and 5-year survival rates were 50.0% and 27.8% respectively, and for patients in Stage Ⅳ, the 3 and 5-year survival rates were both 0.0%.There was a significant difference between the 2 stage groups (P<0.05,X2=11.60). For patients who received an operation, the 3 and 5-year survival rates were 80.0% and 33.3% respectively, For patients who were not treated with an operation, the 3 and 5-year survival rates were both0.0%, There was a significant difference between the operated and nonoperated groups (P<0.05, X2=11.64).CONCLUSION The prognosis of inflammatory breast carcinoma is poor

  16. Preoperative preparation of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Reshma Aranha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is a stressful and anxiety provoking experience for children. Millions of children undergo surgery every year. The majority of children experience significant preoperative anxiety which intern can affect their recovery. Preoperative anxiety may bring about physical and physiological changes in children, which can be particularly evident in terms of increased heart rate and blood pressure. To identify various strategies used to minimize the preoperative anxiety of children and update their clinical effectiveness among children undergoing surgery, the authors searched PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Cochrane Library for identifying the relevant studies and retrieved available literature. It is concluded that utilization of the strategies available to reduce the preoperative anxiety of children will be a promising intervention to reduce anxiety, to promote relaxation, satisfaction, and speedy recovery. Many of these techniques are simple, cost-effective and can be easily carried out by nurses. It is essential to use the age appropriate and individualized methods in preparing children for surgery. Further research is required to strengthen the evidence.

  17. Postmastectomy radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikama, Naoto; Koguchi, Masahiko; Sasaki, Shigeru; Kaneko, Tomoki; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Since there have been few reports on postmastectomy radiotherapy having a high evidence level in Japan, the significance of postoperative radiotherapy and the irradiation techniques were reviewed based on reports from Western countries. Authors focused on the indications for postoperative irradiation, irradiation methods (irradiation sites, irradiation techniques; prosthetics, methods of irradiating the chest wall and lymph nodes, timing of irradiation), and complications, and discuss them. The factors thought to be adaptable to postmastectomy radiotherapy have been listed. Axillary lymph node metastasis and the size of the primary focus are thought to be important factors in locoregional recurrence. The chest wall and the supraclavicular lymph nodes are the usual sites of irradiation after mastectomy. The irradiation method consists of tangential irradiation of the chest wall and single-field irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes, with 46-50 Gy in fractional doses of 1.8-2 Gy x 5/w is administered for 4.5-5.5 weeks. The timing of irradiation in the West is generally after chemotherapy. Adverse radiation effects include ischemic heart disease, pneumonitis, arm edema, rib fractures, and brachial plexus paralysis. The frequency of these complications is increased by the combined use of chemotherapy or surgery. The breast cancer cure rate in Japan is generally better than in the West. It remains to be determined whether the clinical data from Europe and America are applicable to the treatment of breast cancer in Japan. To address this issue, a clinical investigation should be performed in Japan with close cooperation between surgeons, physicians, pathologists, and radiotherapists. (K.H.)

  18. Comparison of aesthetic breast reconstruction after skin-sparing or conventional mastectomy in patients receiving preoperative radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Eric I; Ly, Daphne P; Wey, Philip D

    2007-07-01

    Many options exist for the surgical treatment of breast cancer in terms of tumor extirpation and reconstruction. Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction offers patients a superior result, but this can be jeopardized by preoperative radiotherapy. We compared the outcomes of reconstruction after SSM or conventional mastectomy (CM) in the previously irradiated breast. We evaluated 41 patients over an 8-year period, who were divided into 3 categories: preoperative radiotherapy prior to SSM (n = 8), CM after preoperative radiation therapy (n = 9), and no chest wall irradiation prior to SSM (n = 20). The first group demonstrated significantly higher frequency of native flap compromise and capsular contracture formation than the other 2 groups.SSM with TRAM or latissimus with implant reconstruction is an esthetically optimal option for the treatment of patients without previous radiotherapy. However, for patients with preoperative chest wall radiation, TRAM flap reconstruction was superior to latissimus flap with implant after SSM.

  19. Survival benefit and additional value of preoperative chemoradiotherapy in resectable gastric and gastro-oesophageal junction cancer: a direct and adjusted indirect comparison meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, K; Rouvelas, I; Tsai, J A; Mariosa, D; Lind, P A; Lindblad, M; Ye, W; Lundell, L; Schuhmacher, C; Mauer, M; Burmeister, B H; Thomas, J M; Stahl, M; Nilsson, M

    2015-03-01

    Several phase I/II studies of chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer have reported promising results, but the significance of preoperative radiotherapy in addition to chemotherapy has not been proven. In this study, a systematic literature search was performed to capture survival and postoperative morbidity and mortality data in randomised clinical studies comparing preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy or chemotherapy versus surgery alone, or preoperative chemoradiotherapy versus chemotherapy for gastric and/or gastro-oesophageal junction (GOJ) cancer. Hazard ratios (HRs) for overall mortality were extracted from the original studies, individual patient data provided from the principal investigators of eligible studies or the earlier published meta-analysis. The incidences of postoperative morbidities and mortalities were also analysed. In total 18 studies were eligible and data were available from 14 of these. The meta-analysis on overall survival yielded HRs of 0.75 (95% CI 0.65-0.86, P < 0.001) for preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and 0.83 (95% CI 0.67-1.01, P = 0.065) for preoperative chemotherapy when compared to surgery alone. Direct comparison between preoperative chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy resulted in an HR of 0.71 (95% CI 0.45-1.12, P = 0.146). Combination of direct and adjusted indirect comparisons yielded an HR of 0.86 (95% CI 0.69-1.07, P = 0.171). No statistically significant differences were seen in the risk for postoperative morbidity or mortality between preoperative treatments and surgery alone, or preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy for gastric and GOJ cancer showed significant survival benefit over surgery alone. In comparisons between preoperative chemotherapy and (chemo)radiotherapy, there is a trend towards improved survival when adding radiotherapy, without increased postoperative morbidity or mortality.

  20. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, A; Villebro, N

    2005-01-01

    Smokers have a substantially increased risk of intra- and postoperative complications. Preoperative smoking intervention may be effective in decreasing this incidence. The preoperative period may be a well chosen time to offer smoking cessation interventions due to increased patient motivation....

  1. The cost of radiotherapy in a decade of technology evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Werf, Evelyn; Verstraete, Jan; Lievens, Yolande

    2012-01-01

    To quantify changes in radiotherapy costs occurring in a decade of medical-technological evolution. The activity-based costing (ABC) model of the University Hospitals Leuven (UHL) radiotherapy (RT) department was adapted to current RT standards. It allocated actual resource costs to the treatments based on the departmental work-flow and patient mix in 2009. A benchmark with the former model analyzed the cost increases related to changes in RT infrastructure and practice over 10 years. A considerable increase in total RT costs was observed, resulting from higher capital investments (96%) and personnel cost (103%), the latter dominating the total picture. Treatment delivery remains the most costly activity, boosted by the cost of improved quality assurance (QA), 23% of total product costs, coming along with more advanced RT techniques. Hence, cost increases at the product level are most obvious for complex treatments, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), representing cost increases ranging between 38% and 88% compared to conformal approaches. The ABC model provides insight into the financial consequences of evolving technology and practice. Such data are a mandatory first step in our strive to prove RT cost-effectiveness and thus support optimal reimbursement and provision of radiotherapy departments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Re-irradiation of recurrent esophageal cancer after primary definitive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Lee, Chang Geol; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Tae Hyung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University Health System, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    For recurrent esophageal cancer after primary definitive radiotherapy, no general treatment guidelines are available. We evaluated the toxicities and clinical outcomes of re-irradiation (re-RT) for recurrent esophageal cancer. We analyzed 10 patients with recurrent esophageal cancer treated with re-RT after primary definitive radiotherapy. The median time interval between primary radiotherapy and re-RT was 15.6 months (range, 4.8 to 36.4 months). The total dose of primary radiotherapy was a median of 50.4 Gy (range, 50.4 to 63.0 Gy). The total dose of re-RT was a median of 46.5 Gy (range, 44.0 to 50.4 Gy). The median follow-up period was 4.9 months (range, 2.6 to 11.4 months). The tumor response at 3 months after the end of re-RT was complete response (n = 2), partial response (n = 1), stable disease (n = 2), and progressive disease (n = 5). Grade 5 tracheoesophageal fistula developed in three patients. The time interval between primary radiotherapy and re-RT was less than 12 months in two of these three patients. Late toxicities included grade 1 dysphagia (n = 1). Re-RT of recurrent esophageal cancer after primary radiotherapy can cause severe toxicity.

  3. Exclusive Alternating Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy in Nonmetastatic Inflammatory Breast Cancer: 20 Years of Follow-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgier, Celine, E-mail: bourgier@igr.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Breast Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Pessoa, Eduardo Lima [Department of Radiation Oncology, Breast Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Dunant, Ariane [Biostatistics and Epidemiology Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Heymann, Steve [Department of Radiation Oncology, Breast Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Spielmann, Marc [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Uzan, Catherine [Department of Breast Surgery, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Mathieu, Marie-Christine [Department of Pathology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Arriagada, Rodrigo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Breast Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radiation Oncology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Marsiglia, Hugo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Breast Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Radiation Department University of Florence, Florence (Italy)

    2012-02-01

    Background: Locoregional treatment of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is crucial because local relapses may be highly symptomatic and are commonly associated with distant metastasis. With a median follow-up of 20 years, we report here the long-term results of a monocentric clinical trial combining primary chemotherapy (CT) with a schedule of anthracycline-based CT and an alternating split-course of radiotherapy (RT Asterisk-Operator CT) without mastectomy. Methods and Materials: From September 1983 to December 1989, 124 women with nonmetastatic IBC (T4d M0) were treated with three cycles of primary AVCMF chemotherapy (anthracycline, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) and then an alternating RT Asterisk-Operator CT schedule followed by three cycles of FAC. Hormonal therapy was systematically administered: ovarian irradiation (12 Gy in four fractions) or tamoxifen 20 mg daily. Results: Local control was achieved in 82% of patients. The 10- and 20-year local relapse rates were 26% and 33%, respectively, but only 10% of locally controlled cases were not associated with concurrent distant metastasis. The 10- and 20-year overall survival rates were 39% and 19%, respectively. Severe fibrosis occurred in 54% of patients, grade 3 brachial plexus neuropathy in 4%, grade 2 pneumonitis in 9%. Grade 1, 2 and 3 cardiac toxicity was observed in 3.8%, 3.8% and 1.2% of cases respectively. Conclusions: This combined regimen allowed good long-term local control without surgery. Survival rates were similar to those obtained with conventional regimens (primary chemotherapy, total mastectomy, and adjuvant radiotherapy). Since IBC continues to be an entity with a dismal prognosis, this approach, safely combining preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy and systemic treatments, should be reassessed when suitable targeted agents are available.

  4. Patients who die during palliative radiotherapy. Status survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, B.; Ankele, H.; Bamberg, M.; Zips, D. [University of Tuebingen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Palliative radiotherapy (RT) is routinely used in end of life care of patients with advanced malignancies; however, unnecessarily burdensome treatment shortly before death should be avoided. There is little knowledge on incidence and causes of intercurrent deaths during palliative RT. In this study death events among inpatients receiving palliative RT between January 2009 and December 2011 at this department were retrospectively analyzed. Among epidemiological factors, treatment schedule and chronology, latency and duration of treatment in relation to the actual survival were identified. In this study 52 patients died during or shortly after palliative RT. Symptomatic bone metastases and brain metastases represented the most common RT indications. The general health status was poor with a median Karnofsky performance score of 50 %, RT was realized with a median single dose of 2.5 Gy to a median total dose of 30.5 Gy and was stopped prematurely in 73 % of patients. On average 53 % of the remaining lifetime was occupied by latency to starting RT. Once RT was begun the treatment duration required a median 64 % of the still remaining lifetime. The majority of patients who died had explicitly adverse pre-existing factors and rarely completed RT as scheduled. Latency to RT and RT duration occupied more than half of the remaining lifetime. (orig.) [German] Die palliative Radiotherapie (RT) hat einen hohen Stellenwert in der Symptomenkontrolle terminal erkrankter Tumorpatienten. Unnoetig belastende Therapien kurz vor Lebensende sollten jedoch vermieden werden. Bislang gibt es kaum strukturierte Daten ueber Sterbefaelle unter palliativer RT. Im Rahmen der vorgestellten Studie wurden die Sterbefaelle unter stationaer palliativ bestrahlten Patienten der eigenen Abteilung zwischen Januar 2009 und Dezember 2011 analysiert. Ausgewertet wurden epidemiologische Faktoren, Behandlungskonzept und -verlauf. Zeit bis zum RT-Beginn und RT-Dauer wurden ins Verhaeltnis zur tatsaechlichen

  5. Hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koulis TA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Theodora A Koulis, Tien Phan, Ivo A Olivotto Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB, Canada Abstract: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT is an important part of breast cancer management but the dose and fractionation schedules used are variable. A total of 50 Gy in 25 daily fractions delivered over 5 weeks is often considered the "standard" adjuvant RT prescription. Hypofractionated regimes such as 42.5 Gy in 16 daily fractions or 40 Gy in 15 daily fractions following breast-conserving surgery have proven to be equally effective and achieve similar or better cosmetic and normal tissue outcomes for both invasive and in situ diseases and when treating the regional nodes. Hypofractionation is more convenient for patients and less costly. However, certain patients at higher risk of RT late effects may benefit from a less intense, even more extended fractionation schedule. This review describes the indications for whole breast hypofractionated adjuvant RT for patients with breast cancer following breast-conserving surgery and proposes that hypofractionation should be the new "standard" for adjuvant breast cancer RT. Keywords: fractionation, breast cancer, cosmesis, radiotherapy

  6. Chemotherapy, radiotherapy and combined modality for Hodgkin's disease, with emphasis on second cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franklin, J.G.; Paus, M.D.; Pluetschow, A.;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Second malignancies (SM) are a major late effect of treatment for Hodgkin's disease (HD). Reliable comparisons of SM risk between alternative treatment strategies are lacking. OBJECTIVES: Radiotherapy (RT), chemotherapy (CT) and combined chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) for newly-diagnosed Ho......BACKGROUND: Second malignancies (SM) are a major late effect of treatment for Hodgkin's disease (HD). Reliable comparisons of SM risk between alternative treatment strategies are lacking. OBJECTIVES: Radiotherapy (RT), chemotherapy (CT) and combined chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) for newly......-diagnosed Hodgkin's disease are compared with respect to SM risk, overall (OS) and progression-free (PFS) survival. Further, involved-field (IF-)RT is compared to extended-field (EF-)RT. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, PubMed, EMBASE, CancerLit, LILACS, relevant conference...

  7. Pattern of radiotherapy care in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjieva, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The paper reveals the changing pattern of Bulgarian Radiotherapy (RT) care after the successful implementation of 15 projects for 100 million euro under the European Regional Development Fund in Operational Programme for Regional Development 2007-2013. The project enables a total one-step modernization of 14 Bulgarian RT Centres and creation of a new one. At the end of the Programme (mid 2015), 16 new Linacs and 2 modern cobalt machines will be available together with 11 virtual CT simulators, 5 CT simulators, 1 MRI and 1 PET CT for RT planning and all dosimetry facilities needed. Such a modernization has moved Bulgarian RT forward, with 2.7 MV units per one million of population (MV/mln.inh) in comparison with 0.9 MV/mln.inh in 2012. Guild of Bulgarian Radiotherapists includes 70 doctors, 46 physicists and 10 engineers, together with 118 RTTs and 114 nurses and they all have treated 16,447 patients in 2013. Major problems are inadequate reimbursement from the monopolistic Health Insurance Fund (900 euro for 3D conformal RT and 1500 euro for IMRT); fragmentation of RT care with 1-2 MV units per Centre; no payment for patient travel expenses; need for quick and profound education of 26% of doctors and 46% of physicists without RT license, along with continuous education for all others; and resource for 5000-9000 more patients to be treated yearly by RT in order to reach 45-50% from current service of 32%. After 15 years of struggle of RT experts, finally the pattern of Bulgarian RT care at 2014-2015 is approaching the level of modern European RT.

  8. Evaluation of 14 patients performed radiotherapy due to Kaposi sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Teke

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Methods: The patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT because of the KS between the years 2005-2012 in Radiation Oncology Department of Dicle University Hospital were included. All patients underwent RT with different dose-fractionation schemes to increase quality of life and to palliate the symptoms. Patients with lesions in multiple regions underwent RT in the same or different dates. Responses to radiotherapy were recorded as complete or partial response. Results: Fourteen patients received radiotherapy because of f KS were evaluated retrospectively. Twenty two different regions of 14 patients underwent RT . Only one patient (4.5% was performed RT to glans penis as a third region while performed to the two regions in six patients (27.3%. At irradiations, 6 MV and 10 MV photon energies with 6 MeV, 9 MeV and 12 MeV electron energy were used. Water phantom or bolus material was used to obtain a homogeneous dose distribution in the photon irradiation. RT dose administered to a total of 22 different regional was median 800 cGy (Range: 800-3000 cGy. Median number of RT fractions was 1 (Range: 1-10. When treatment response were evaluated stable disease was present in the 4 (18.1% regions. Partial response was achieved in eight (36.4% regions, complete response in 10 (45.5%. RT-related common lymphedema in the feet and legs was observed in the four (57.3% regions in the acute period. Complication of pain was present in two (28.7% regions. Conclusion: RT is an appropriate and effective treatment regimen in the palliative treatment of KS lesions. Excellent response rates of skin lesions may be obtained by RT. Lesions and symptoms such as itching may be lost after RT. Side effects such as edema and pain may be relieved by supportive treatment.

  9. Pre-operative anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, B; Richards, T

    2015-01-01

    Pre-operative anaemia is a relatively common finding, affecting a third of patients undergoing elective surgery. Traditionally associated with chronic disease, management has historically focused on the use of blood transfusion as a solution for anaemia in the peri-operative period. Data from large series now suggest that anaemia is an independent risk associated with poor outcome in both cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. Furthermore, blood transfusion does not appear to ameliorate this risk, and in fact may increase the risk of postoperative complications and hospital length of stay. Consequently, there is a need to identify, diagnose and manage pre-operative anaemia to reduce surgical risk. Discoveries in the pathways of iron metabolism have found that chronic disease can cause a state of functional iron deficiency leading to anaemia. The key iron regulatory protein hepcidin, activated in response to inflammation, inhibits absorption of iron from the gastrointestinal tract and further reduces bioavailability of iron stores for red cell production. Consequently, although iron stores (predominantly ferritin) may be normal, the transport of iron either from the gastrointestinal tract or iron stores to the bone marrow is inhibited, leading to a state of 'functional' iron deficiency and subsequent anaemia. Since absorption from the gastrointestinal tract is blocked, increasing oral iron intake is ineffective, and studies are now looking at the role of intravenous iron to treat anaemia in the surgical setting. In this article, we review the incidence and impact of anaemia on the pre-operative patient. We explain how anaemia may be caused by functional iron deficiency, and how iron deficiency anaemia may be diagnosed and treated.

  10. Hormonal cytoreduction and radiotherapy for carcinoma of the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, R.J.; Davies, J.H.; Gelister, J.S.K.; Dearnaley, D.P. (Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1992-05-01

    We report the effect on prostatic volume of the administration of the luteinising hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogue goserelin in 22 patients with locally advanced carcinoma of the prostrate; 20 achieved a significant reduction in volume, the median volume being 66 ml before treatment and 30 ml after 17 weeks. If used before external beam radiotherapy (RT), volume reduction will permit smaller boost fields and thus potentially reduce adverse radiotherapy effects. In addition, reducing tumour volume before RT may lead to an increase in local control. We discuss the possible role of hormonal volume reduction in the management of prostatic cancer. (Author).

  11. Current concepts on imaging in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecchi, Michela; Elisei, Federica; Lucignani, Giovanni [University of Milan, Institute of Radiological Sciences, Milan (Italy); San Paolo Hospital, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Fossati, Piero [University of Milan, Institute of Radiological Sciences, Milan (Italy); CNAO Foundation, Milan (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [University of Milan, Institute of Radiological Sciences, Milan (Italy); CNAO Foundation, Milan (Italy); European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Milan (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    New high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or hadrontherapy, allow better dose distribution within the target and spare a larger portion of normal tissue than conventional RT. These techniques require accurate tumour volume delineation and intrinsic characterization, as well as verification of target localisation and monitoring of organ motion and response assessment during treatment. These tasks are strongly dependent on imaging technologies. Among these, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonography (US) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been applied in high-precision RT. For tumour volume delineation and characterization, PET has brought an additional dimension to the management of cancer patients by allowing the incorporation of crucial functional and molecular images in RT treatment planning, i.e. direct evaluation of tumour metabolism, cell proliferation, apoptosis, hypoxia and angiogenesis. The combination of PET and CT in a single imaging system (PET/CT) to obtain a fused anatomical and functional dataset is now emerging as a promising tool in radiotherapy departments for delineation of tumour volumes and optimization of treatment plans. Another exciting new area is image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), which focuses on the potential benefit of advanced imaging and image registration to improve precision, daily target localization and monitoring during treatment, thus reducing morbidity and potentially allowing the safe delivery of higher doses. The variety of IGRT systems is rapidly expanding, including cone beam CT and US. This article examines the increasing role of imaging techniques in the entire process of high-precision radiotherapy. (orig.)

  12. Current concepts on imaging in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecchi, Michela; Fossati, Piero; Elisei, Federica; Orecchia, Roberto; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2008-04-01

    New high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or hadrontherapy, allow better dose distribution within the target and spare a larger portion of normal tissue than conventional RT. These techniques require accurate tumour volume delineation and intrinsic characterization, as well as verification of target localisation and monitoring of organ motion and response assessment during treatment. These tasks are strongly dependent on imaging technologies. Among these, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonography (US) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been applied in high-precision RT. For tumour volume delineation and characterization, PET has brought an additional dimension to the management of cancer patients by allowing the incorporation of crucial functional and molecular images in RT treatment planning, i.e. direct evaluation of tumour metabolism, cell proliferation, apoptosis, hypoxia and angiogenesis. The combination of PET and CT in a single imaging system (PET/CT) to obtain a fused anatomical and functional dataset is now emerging as a promising tool in radiotherapy departments for delineation of tumour volumes and optimization of treatment plans. Another exciting new area is image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), which focuses on the potential benefit of advanced imaging and image registration to improve precision, daily target localization and monitoring during treatment, thus reducing morbidity and potentially allowing the safe delivery of higher doses. The variety of IGRT systems is rapidly expanding, including cone beam CT and US. This article examines the increasing role of imaging techniques in the entire process of high-precision radiotherapy.

  13. The role of radiotherapy in the management of localized soft tissue sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiong, Siaw Sze; Dickie, Colleen; Haas, Rick L.; O’Sullivan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The combination of radiotherapy (RT) and function-preserving surgery is the most usual contemporary approach in the management of soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Pre- and postoperative RT result in similar local control rates, as shown by a landmark trial in extremity STS. In this review, the role of RT in the management of extremity STS will be discussed, but STS in other sites, including retroperitoneal STS, will also be addressed. The focus will consider various aspects of RT including strategies to reduce the volume of tissue being irradiated, dose, scheduling, and the possible of omission of RT in selected cases. Finally, technology advances through the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided IMRT, intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) and particle therapy will also be discussed. PMID:27807504

  14. The role of radiotherapy in the management of localized soft tissue sarcomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siaw Sze Tiong; Colleen Dickie; Rick L Haas; Brian OSullivan

    2016-01-01

    The combination of radiotherapy (RT) and function-preserving surgery is the most usual contemporary approach in the management of soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Pre- and postoperative RT result in similar local control rates, as shown by a landmark trial in extremity STS. In this review, the role of RT in the management of extremity STS will be discussed, but STS in other sites, including retroperitoneal STS, will also be addressed. The focus will consider various aspects of RT including strategies to reduce the volume of tissue being irradiated, dose, scheduling, and the possible of omission of RT in selected cases. Finally, technology advances through the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided IMRT, intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) and particle therapy will also be discussed.

  15. Radiotherapy Can Cause Haemostasis in Bleeding Skin Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Sung-In Jang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy (RT can cause haemostasis in select cases of malignant bleeding. We present two cases where RT was used to prevent fatal exsanguination from bleeding skin malignancies. Treatment was with radical intent in one case and palliative intent in the other. The dose used in both cases was 20 Gray (Gy in 5 fractions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of radiation-induced haemostasis in bleeding skin malignancies.

  16. 直肠癌术前五野静态调强和容积弧形调强放疗剂量学的比较研究%Dosimetric comparison between preoperative five-field intensity modulated radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy in the treatment of rectum cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶序卷; 高远红; 陈利; 杜乐辉; 张广顺; 贾钰铭; 雷开键; 刘孟忠

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨直肠癌术前五野静态调强(5 F-IMRT)和容积弧形调强(VMAT)放疗计划的剂量学特点.方法 应用CMS monaco治疗计划系统分别对23例术前同期放化疗的直肠癌患者行5F-IMRT和VMAT放疗计划设计,比较两种放疗技术的靶区剂量分布特点以及小肠、膀胱、双侧股骨头等正常组织的受照射剂量及体积.结果 5F-IMRT计划的适形指数(CI)为0.810±0.043,VMAT计划的CI为0.822±0.062,两者均能很好满足95%等剂量曲线对100% PTV体积的完全覆盖;5F-IMRT计划中GTV、CTV和PTV的均匀指数(HI)分别为1.052±0.019、1.063±0.016、1.075±0.020,VMAT计划分别为1.037±0.008、1.047 ±0.008、1.072±0.018,差异均无统计学意义.5F-IMRT和 VMAT计划中重耍的危及器官如小肠、膀胱和股骨头等的关键剂量评价指标(D5、Dmin、Dmean和Dmax)差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).小肠、膀胱和股骨头等受照射体积的关键评价指标(V20、V30、V40和V50)在两种放疗计划中差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 5F-IMRT和VMAT计划靶区的剂量分布均较理想,对小肠、膀胱、双侧股骨头等正常组织均有很好的保护作用.%Objective To investigate the dosimetric comparison between prenperalive live-field intensity modulated radiotherapy (5F-IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy ( VMAT) in the. rectum cancer patients with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Methods With the application of CMS monaco syslems( V2. 0,Sweden) , 5F-IMRT and VMAT plans were simulated in 23 rectum cancer patients with preoperative concurrent chemoradlotherapy. The dose characteristic of target volume was evaluated and the dose-volume relationship of small bowel, bladder and bilateral femoral head was compared. Results The CI was similar between the 5F-IMRT(0. 810 ±0. 043) and VMAT plans(0. 822 ±0. 062) , which could satisfy 95% of prescribed dose for covered PTV. The HI of the prescribed dose to GTV( 1. 052 ±0. 019 vs. 1

  17. Radiation-induced abnormal cortical thickness in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiabao Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional MRI studies showed that radiation-induced brain necrosis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC in years after radiotherapy (RT could involve brain gray matter (GM and impair brain function. However, it is still unclear the radiation-induced brain morphological changes in NPC patients with normal-appearing GM in the early period after RT. In this study, we acquired high-resolution brain structural MRI data from three groups of patients, 22 before radiotherapy (pre-RT NPC patients with newly diagnosed but not yet medically treated, 22 NPC patients in the early-delayed stage after radiotherapy (post-RT-ED, and 20 NPC patients in the late-delayed stage after radiotherapy (post-RT-LD, and then analyzed the radiation-induced cortical thickness alteration in NPC patients after RT. Using a vertex-wise surface-based morphometry (SBM approach, we detected significantly decreased cortical thickness in the precentral gyrus (PreCG in the post-RT-ED group compared to the pre-RT group. And the post-RT-LD group showed significantly increased cortical thickness in widespread brain regions, including the bilateral inferior parietal, left isthmus of the cingulate, left bank of the superior temporal sulcus and left lateral occipital regions, compared to the pre-RT group, and in the bilateral PreCG compared to the post-RT-ED group. Similar analysis with ROI-wise SBM method also found the consistent results. These results indicated that radiation-induced brain injury mainly occurred in the post-RT-LD group and the cortical thickness alterations after RT were dynamic in different periods. Our findings may reflect the pathogenesis of radiation-induced brain injury in NPC patients with normal-appearing GM and an early intervention is necessary for protecting GM during RT.

  18. 直肠癌术前容积调强与固定野调强技术的剂量学比较%Dosimetric Comparison between Preoperative Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy and Fixed-field Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨波; 庞廷田; 孙显松; 胡克; 邱杰; 张福泉

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the dosimetric characteristics of preoperative volumetric modulated arc therapy ( VMAT) and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy ( FF-IMRT) for rectal cancer .Methods The CT images of 15 patients with rectal cancer were transferred into Eclipse planning system .FF-IMRT and VMAT plans were optimized on an Eclipse treatment planning system using beam data generated for Varian Trilogy linear accelerator .Same institutional dose-volume constraints for rectal cancer were used in both techniques .Targets and organs at risk were evaluated .Results The target volume coverage could meet the requirement of described dosage in both VMAT plan group and FF-IMRT plan group .Compared with the FF-IMRT plan group , the plan-ning target volume ( PTV) 105% ( PTV105%) coverage, Dmean, and Dmax significantly increased in the VMAT plan group ( P=0.011, P=0.017, and P=0.006, respectively), the radiation conformity index (CI) significantly decreased ( P=0.008 ) , and the homogeneity index showed no significant difference ( P=0.193 ) . Compared with the FF-IMRT plan group , the V50 of the bladder in the VMAT plan group was increased by about 15%( P=0.009 ) , and the Dmax increased by 0.7 Gy ( P=0.003 );the V30 of the small intestine decreased by 10% (P=0.004), and the Dmax was increased by 0.9 Gy (P=0.000); the V10, V30, and V40 of the bone marrow reduced by 2%, 10%, and 10%( P=0.000 , P=0.000 , and P=0.000 ) , and the Dmean re-duced by 1.7 Gy ( P=0.000 );the D5 of the left and right femoral heads reduced by 3.2 Gy and 2.4 Gy ( P=0.000 , P=0.000 ); the V10 , V20 , V30 , and V40 of the body also significantly decreased ( P=0.003 , P=0.000 , P=0.000 , and P=0.004 ) .The VMAT group also had significantly lower number of monitor units ( MU) when compared with the FF-IMRT plan group ( P=0.000 ) .Conclusions In patients with rectal canc-er, preoperative VMAT can achieve equivalent or superior dose distribution compared with the FF -IMRT.In addi-tion, VMAT can

  19. Post Pelvic Radiotherapy Bony Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Seung Jae [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    There has been recent interest in radiation-induced bone injury in clinical conditions, especially for pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF). A PIF is caused by the effect of normal or physiological stress on bone with demineralization and decreased elastic resistance. Pelvic radiotherapy (RT) can also contribute to the development of a PIF. A PIF has been regarded as a rare complication with the use of megavoltage equipment. However, recent studies have reported the incidence of PIFs as 8.2{approx}20% after pelvic RT in gynecological patients, an incidence that was higher than previously believed. The importance of understanding a PIF lies in the potential for misdiagnosis as a bony metastasis. If patients complain of pelvic pain after whole-pelvis radiation therapy, the presence of a PIF must be considered in the differential diagnosis. The use of multibeam arrangements and conformal RT to reduce the volume and dose of irradiated pelvic bone can be helpful to minimize the risk of fracture. In addition to a PIF, osteonecrosis and avascular necrosis of the femoral head can develop after radiation therapy. Osteoradionecrosis of the pelvic bone is a clinical diagnostic challenge that must be differentiated from an osseous metastasis. A post-radiation bone sarcoma can result as a long-term sequela of pelvic irradiation for uterine cervical cancer.

  20. Sexual function in females after radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Guren, Marianne G. (The Cancer Centre, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway)), E-mail: Kjersti.bruheim@medisin.uio.no; Fossaa, Sophie D. (Faculty of Medicine, Univ. of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)); Skovlund, Eva (School of Pharmacy, Univ. of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)); Balteskard, Lise (Dept. of Oncology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Norway, Tromsoe (Norway)); Carlsen, Erik (Dept. of Clinical Cancer Research, Oslo Univ. Hospital, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway))

    2010-08-15

    Background. Knowledge about female sexual problems after pre- or postoperative (chemo-)radiotherapy and radical resection of rectal cancer is limited. The aim of this study was to compare self-rated sexual functioning in women treated with or without radiotherapy (RT+ vs. RT?), at least two years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and materials. Female patients diagnosed from 1993 to 2003 were identified from a national database, the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Eligible patients were without recurrence or metastases at the time of the study. The Sexual function and Vaginal Changes Questionnaire (SVQ) was used to measure sexual functioning. Results. Questionnaires were returned from 172 of 332 invited and eligible women (52%). The mean age was 65 years (range 42-79) and the time since surgery for rectal cancer was 4.5 years (range 2.6-12.4). Sexual interest was not significantly impaired in RT+ (n=62) compared to RT? (n=110) women. RT+ women reported more vaginal problems in terms of vaginal dryness (50% vs. 24%), dyspareunia (35% vs. 11%) and reduced vaginal dimension (35% vs. 6%) compared with RT? patients; however, they did not have significantly more worries about their sex life. Conclusion. An increased risk of dyspareunia and vaginal dryness was observed in women following surgery combined with (chemo-)radiotherapy compared with women treated with surgery alone. Further research is required to determine the effect of adjuvant therapy on female sexual function

  1. Soft-Rt: software for IMRT simulations based on MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira F, T. C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Campos, T., E-mail: tcff01@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Programa de Pos Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is an advanced treatment technique, widely used in external radiotherapy. This paper presents the Soft-Rt which allows the simulation of an entire IMRT treatment protocol. The Soft-Rt performs a full three-dimensional rendering of a set of patient images, including the definitions of region of interest with organs in risk, and the target tumor volume and margins (PTV). Thus, a more accurate analysis and planning can be performed, taking into account the features and orientation of the radiation beams. The exposed tissues as well as the amount of absorbed dose is depicted in healthy and/or cancerous tissues. As conclusion, Soft-Rt can predict dose on the PTV accurately, preserving the surrounding healthy tissues. Soft-Rt is coupled with SISCODES code. The SISCODES code is firstly applied to segment the set of CT or MRI patient images in distinct tissues pointing out its respective density and chemical compositions. Later, the voxel model is export to the Soft-Rt IMRT planning module in which a full treatment planning is created. All geometrical parameters are sent to the general purpose Monte Carlo transport code - MCNP - to simulate the interaction of each incident beam towards to the PTV avoiding organs in risk. The normalized dose results are exported to the Soft-Rt out-module, in which the three-dimensional model visualization is shown in a transparent glass procedure adopting gray scale for the dependence on the mass density of the correlated tissue; while, a color scale to depict dose values in a superimpose protocol. (Author)

  2. Radiotherapy, cancer and some anatomical structures related with the pelvic floor: an evaluation of the scientific literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria; Presta, Giuseppe Antonio [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. Biomedico. Dept. de Fisiologia Humana; Paoli, Severo de [Centro Universitario Serra dos Orgaos, Teresopolis, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude; Missailids, Sotiris [The Open University, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry and Analytical Sciences

    2008-12-15

    Radiotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy X-rays or other types of ionizing radiation to try to kill the cancer cells in various organs/tissues. PubMed is a database used as a tool in various publications. The aim of this work was to evaluate, in the PubMed, the number of publications (NP) in radiotherapy and cancer in various organs related to the pelvic floor as well as brachytherapy. The searches were performed (August 2008) in the PubMed (http://www.pubmed.com) using the words: radiotherapy (RT) or cancer (CA), RT and CA, RT and CA and prostate, RT and CA and testis, RT and CA and breast, RT and CA and kidneys, RT and CA and vulva, RT and CA and vagina, RT and CA and penis, RT and CA and uterus, RT and CA and ovary, RT and CA and bladder, and RT and CA and urethra. A search using brachytherapy was also performed. The NP in each subject was determined and was 2178635 to CA and about 9% of them are related with RT. The NP in RT and CA and breast or prostate is bigger than for the other organs, whereas brachytherapy is mainly cited in the studies about CA of prostate, bladder and breast. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate the importance of radiation therapy studies in the cancer of several organs. This information is crucial in understanding the field and demonstrates areas of significant progress or existing gaps of research in radiotherapy treatment of various cancers of the pelvis. Furthermore, it could significantly aid the interprofessional team in the determination of actions related to the treatment of patients that are undertaking radiotherapy, due to the possible complications of this modality of treatment. (author)

  3. [Radiotherapy in cancers of the oesophagus, the gastric cardia and the stomach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Créhange, G; Huguet, F; Quero, L; N'Guyen, T V; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T

    2016-09-01

    Localized oesophageal and gastric cancers have a poor prognosis. In oesophageal cancer, external radiotherapy combined with concomitant chemotherapy is accepted as part of the therapeutic armamentarium in a curative intent in the preoperative setting for resectable tumours; or without surgery in inoperable patients or non-resectable tumours due to wide local and/or regional extension. Data from the literature show conflicting results with no clinical evidence in favour of either a unique dose protocol or consensual target volume definition in the setting of exclusive chemoradiation. In the preoperative setting, chemoradiotherapy has become the standard in oesophageal cancer, even though there is no evidence that surgery may be beneficial in locally advanced tumours that respond to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The main cause of failure after exclusive chemoradiotherapy in oesophageal cancer is locoregional relapse suggesting that doses and volumes usually considered may be inadequate. In gastric cancer, radiotherapy may be indicated postoperatively in patients with resected tumours that include less than D2 lymph node dissection or in the absence of perioperative chemotherapy. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in gastric cancers is still under investigation. The evolving techniques of external radiotherapy, such as image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arctherapy (VMAT) have reduced the volume of lung and heart exposed to radiation, which seems to have diminished radiotherapy-related morbi-mortality rates. Given this, quality assurance for radiotherapy and protocols for radiotherapy delivery must be better standardized. This article on the indications for radiotherapy and the techniques used in oesophageal and gastric cancers is included in a special issue dedicated to national recommendations from the French society of radiation oncology (SFRO) on radiotherapy indications, planning, dose prescription, and techniques of radiotherapy delivery.

  4. Preoperative anxiety in neurosurgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perks, Anna; Chakravarti, Sucharita; Manninen, Pirjo

    2009-04-01

    Anxiety is common in surgical patients, with an incidence of 60% to 92%. There is little information on the incidence and severity of preoperative anxiety in patients scheduled for neurosurgery. The aim of this study was to measure the level of preoperative anxiety in neurosurgical patients and to assess any influencing factors. After the Institutional Review Board approval and informed written consent, 100 patients booked for neurosurgery were interviewed preoperatively. Each patient was asked to grade their preoperative anxiety level on a verbal analog scale, Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale, and a set of specific anxiety-related questions. The anxiety scores and the responses to the questions were compared between the sex, age, weight, diagnosis, and history of previous surgery. The mean age (+/-SD) was 50+/-13 years. The preoperative diagnosis was tumor (n=64), aneurysm (n=14), and other (n=22). Overall verbal analog scale was 5.2+/-2.7; the score was higher for female (5.8+/-2.8) than male patients (4.6+/-2.5) (PAmsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale anxiety and knowledge scores were greater for surgery than for anesthesia. Questionnaire results showed that the most common anxieties were waiting for surgery, physical/mental harm, and results of the operation. In conclusion, our study showed that neurosurgical patients have high levels of anxiety, with a higher incidence in females. There was a moderately high need for information, particularly in patients with a high level of preoperative anxiety.

  5. Radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, Lena [Rigshospitalet Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Depts. of Oncology and Haematology; Yahalom, Joachim (eds.) [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-07-01

    This book deals in detail with all aspects of the best practice in modern radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma. It provides the background and rationale for the inclusion of radiotherapy in today's combined-modality approach, including special clinical situations such as Hodgkin lymphoma in children, in the pregnant patient, and in the elderly. Radiotherapy planning using state-of-the-art imaging, target definition, planning software, and treatment equipment is expounded in detail. Acute and long-term side effects of radiotherapy are analyzed, and the implications for modern radiotherapy approaches in Hodgkin lymphomas are explained. (orig.)

  6. Modeling Radiotherapy Induced Normal Tissue Complications: An Overview beyond Phenomenological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassi, Marcello; Strigari, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    An overview of radiotherapy (RT) induced normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models is presented. NTCP models based on empirical and mechanistic approaches that describe a specific radiation induced late effect proposed over time for conventional RT are reviewed with particular emphasis on their basic assumptions and related mathematical translation and their weak and strong points. PMID:28044088

  7. Long-term molecular changes in WHO grade Ⅱ astrocytomas following radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Ying Yu; Ke Sai; Qiu-Liang Wu; Yun-Fei Xia; Su-Huan Yu; Zhong-Ping Chen

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring the long-term radiotherapy-associated molecular changes in low-grade gliomas (LGGs)facilitates the understanding of LGG response to radiotherapy. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to analyze the expression of Ki-67,tumor protein P53 (TP53),P21,and P27 in 8paired WHO grade Ⅱ astrocytoma samples.The interval between radiotherapy (RT) and the second surgery was more than 3 months in all cases.The average Ki-67 labeling index (LI) was 5.3% in pre-RT samples and 11.54% in post-RT samples.Ki-67 LI was higher in the primary tumors that underwent malignant transformation observed at the second surgery after radiation.Post-RT Ki-67 LI decreased in 2 cases with an interval of less than 12 months between RT and the second surgery.TP53 expression was found in 3 out of 4 pre-RT samples with malignant transformation and in 1 out of 4 pre-RT samples without malignant transformation.Post-RT TP53 increased in 2 cases in which increased expression of P21 or P27 was also observed.Our study suggests that radiotherapy can inhibit WHO grade Ⅱ astrocytoma proliferation as reflected by Ki-67 LI,but the effect attenuates with time.In addition,there is a tendency of malignant transformation for WHO grade Ⅱ astrocytomas with a high Ki-67 level or TP53 expression in initial samples.

  8. Delineation of target volumes and organs at risk in adjuvant radiotherapy of early breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette H; Berg, Martin; Pedersen, Anders N

    2013-01-01

    During the past decade planning of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) of early breast cancer has changed from two-dimensional (2D) to 3D conformal techniques. In the planning computerised tomography (CT) scan both the targets for RT and the organs at risk (OARs) are visualised, enabling an increased focu...

  9. Image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer: bladder volume variation and its relation to margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muren, Ludvig; Redpath, Anthony Thomas; Lord, Hannah

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To control and account for bladder motion is a major challenge in radiotherapy (RT) of bladder cancer. This study investigates the relation between bladder volume variation and margins in conformal and image-guided RT (IGRT) for this disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The cor...

  10. A virtual reality solution for evaluation of radiotherapy plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Daniel; Muren, Ludvig; Mehus, Anfinn

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a VR system for evaluation of treatment plans used in radiotherapy (RT), developed to improve the understanding of the spatial relationships between the patient anatomy and the calculated dose distribution. The VR system offers visualization through interactive volume renderi...

  11. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy with vagina carotica protection technique for local residual nasopharyngeal carcinoma after primary radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Feng; HUAN Fu-kui; FANG Hao; WAN Bao; LI Ye-xiong; XIAO Jian-ping; XU Ying-jie; ZHANG Ye; XU Guo-zhen; GAO Li; YI Jun-lin; LUO Jing-wei; HUANG Xiao-dong

    2012-01-01

    Background Local failure of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) after radiotherapy (RT) remains one of the major treatment failures.This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and complications of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) with vagina carotica protection technique for local residual of NPC patients after the primary RT.Methods From August 2006 to August 2010,FSRT with vagina carotica protection technique was applied to 36 patients in our department,the patients aged between 13 and 76 years with a median of 41.3 years,25 of them were male and 11were female.According to 2002 Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) Staging System,the stages before primary radiotherapy were:Ⅱa 2,Ⅱb 5,Ⅲ 18,Ⅳa 7,Ⅳb 4.In the first course of radiotherapy,9 patients received conventional RT,27 patients received intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 20 out of the 36 patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy.The total dose in the first course of RT was 69.96-76.90 Gy (median,72.58 Gy).The intervals between the primary RT and FSRT ranged from 12 to 147 days (median,39.8 days).Target volumes ranged from 1.46 to 32.98 cm3 (median,14.94 cm3).The total FSRT doses were 10.0-24.0 Gy (median,16.5 Gy) with 2.0-5.0Gy per fraction.The most common regimen was 15 Gy in 5 fractions of 3 Gy,the irradiation dose to vagina carotica was less than 2 Gy per fraction.Results The median follow-up time was 34 months (range,12-59 months).The 3-year local control rate was 100%;the 3-year overall survival rate was 94.4%;the 3-year disease-free survival rate was 77.8%.In this study,we had one case of cranial nerve injury,two cases of temporal lobe necrosis,and no nasopharyngeal massive hemorrhage was observed.Conclusion FSRT with vagina carotica protection technique is an effective and safe RT regimen for local residual of NPC with reduction of radiation-related neurovascular lesions.

  12. No Increased Risk of Second Cancer After Radiotherapy in Patients Treated for Rectal or Endometrial Cancer in the Randomized TME, PORTEC-1, and PORTEC-2 Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltink, Lisette M; Nout, Remi A; Fiocco, Marta; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, Elma; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M; Jobsen, Jan J; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Rutten, Harm J T; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Creutzberg, Carien L; Marijnen, Corrie A M

    2015-05-20

    This study investigated the long-term probability of developing a second cancer in a large pooled cohort of patients treated with surgery with or without radiotherapy (RT). All second cancers diagnosed in patients included in the TME, PORTEC-1, and PORTEC-2 trials were analyzed. In the TME trial, patients with rectal cancer (n = 1,530) were randomly allocated to preoperative external-beam RT (EBRT; 25 Gy in five fractions) or no RT. In the PORTEC trials, patients with endometrial cancer were randomly assigned to postoperative EBRT (46 Gy in 2-Gy fractions) versus no RT (PORTEC-1; n = 714) or EBRT versus vaginal brachytherapy (VBT; PORTEC-2; n = 427). A total of 2,554 patients were analyzed (median follow-up, 13.0 years; range 1.8 to 21.2 years). No differences were found in second cancer probability between patients who were treated without RT (10- and 15-year rates, 15.8% and 26.5%, respectively) and those treated with EBRT (10- and 15-year rates, 15.4% and 25.6%, respectively) or VBT (10-year rate, 14.9%). In the individual trials, no significant differences were found between treatment arms. All cancer survivors had a higher risk of developing a second cancer compared with an age- and sex-matched general population. The standardized incidence ratio for any second cancer was 2.98 (95% CI, 2.82 to 3.14). In this pooled trial cohort of > 2,500 patients with pelvic cancers, those who underwent EBRT or VBT had no higher probability of developing a second cancer than patients who were treated with surgery alone. However, patients with rectal or endometrial cancer had an increased probability of developing a second cancer compared with the general population. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Temozolomide and Radiotherapy versus Radiotherapy Alone in High Grade Gliomas: A Very Long Term Comparative Study and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Parisi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Temozolomide (TMZ is the first line drug in the care of high grade gliomas. The combined treatment of TMZ plus radiotherapy is more effective in the care of brain gliomas then radiotherapy alone. Aim of this report is a survival comparison, on a long time (>10 years span, of glioma patients treated with radiotherapy alone and with radiotherapy + TMZ. Materials and Methods. In this report we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 128 consecutive pts with diagnosis of high grade gliomas referred to our institutions from April 1994 to November 2001. The first 64 pts were treated with RT alone and the other 64 with a combination of RT and adjuvant or concomitant TMZ. Results. Grade 3 (G3 haematological toxicity was recorded in 6 (9% of 64 pts treated with RT and TMZ. No G4 haematological toxicity was observed. Age, histology, and administration of TMZ were statistically significant prognostic factors associated with 2 years overall survival (OS. PFS was for GBM 9 months, for AA 11. Conclusions. The combination of RT and TMZ improves long term survival in glioma patients. Our results confirm the superiority of the combination on a long time basis.

  14. Long-Term Outcome of Definitive Radiotherapy for Early Glottic Cancer: Prognostic Factors and Patterns of Local Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Yu Jin; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Kwon, Tack-Kyun; Hah, J. Hun; Sung, Myung-Whun; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Park, Charn Il

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates the long-term results of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for early glottic cancer. Clinical and treatment factors related to local control and patterns of failure are analyzed. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 222 patients with T1-2N0 squamous cell carcinoma of the glottic larynx treated with definitive RT from 1981 to 2010. None of the patients received elective nodal RT or combined chemotherapy. The median total RT dose was 66 Gy. The daily fractio...

  15. Gold namoprtices enhance anti-tumor effect of radiotherapy to hypoxic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Jae Won; Keum, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Ui Seok; Koh, Won Gun [Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Hypoxia can impair the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Therefore, a new strategy is necessary for enhancing the response to RT. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of nanoparticles and RT is effective in eliminating the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) consisting of a silica core with a gold shell were used. CT26 colon cancer mouse model was developed to study whether the combination of RT and GNPs reduced hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) was used as a hypoxia marker. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining were conducted to evaluate cell death. Hypoxic tumor cells had an impaired response to RT. GNPs combined with RT enhanced anti-tumor effect in hypoxic tumor compared with RT alone. The combination of GNPs and RT decreased tumor cell viability compare to RT alone in vitro. Under hypoxia, tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed a higher response than that shown by tumors treated with RT alone. When a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger was added, the enhanced antitumor effect of GNPs + RT was diminished. In the present study, hypoxic tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed favorable responses, which might be attributable to the ROS production induced by GNPs + RT. Taken together, GNPs combined with RT seems to be potential modality for enhancing the response to RT in hypoxic tumors.

  16. A psychoeducational intervention reduces the need for anesthesia during radiotherapy for young childhood cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsenmeier Claudia

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy (RT has become an important treatment modality in pediatric oncology, but its delivery to young children with cancer is challenging and general anesthesia is often needed. Methods To evaluate whether a psychoeducational intervention might reduce the need for anesthesia, 223 consecutive pediatric cancer patients receiving 4141 RT fractions during 244 RT courses between February 1989 and January 2006 were studied. Whereas in 154 RT courses corresponding with 2580 RT fractions patients received no psychoeducational intervention (group A, 90 RT courses respectively 1561 RT fractions were accomplished by using psychoeducational intervention (group B. This tailored psychoeducational intervention in group B included a play program and interactive support by a trained nurse according to age to get familiar with staff, equipment and procedure of radiotherapy. Results Group A did not differ significantly from group B in age at RT, gender, diagnosis, localization of RT and positioning during RT. Whereas 33 (21.4% patients in group A got anesthesia, only 8 (8.9% patients in group B needed anesthesia. The median age of cooperating patients without anesthesia decreased from 3.2 to 2.7 years. In both uni- and multivariate analyses the psychoeducational intervention significantly and independently reduced the need for anesthesia. Conclusion We conclude that a specifically tailored psychoeducational intervention is able to reduce the need for anesthesia in children undergoing RT for cancer. This results in lower costs and increased cooperation during RT.

  17. 术前新辅助放化疗与单纯手术对可切除食管癌疗效的Meta分析%Effect of pre-operative neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy and surgical treatment on resectable esophageal cancer: a Metaanalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱炜

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of pre-operative adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy and surgical treatment on resectable esophageal cancer. Methods By searching Medline, CENTRAL (the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials), EMBASE, CBM (China Biology Medicine) and CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure) by computer, the data of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgical treatment for resectable esophageal cancer were selected and analyzed using Stata 11.0 statistical software. The study population was patients with resectable early or medim stage esophageal cancer, the intervention was neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (include sequential chemoradiotherapy and concurrent chemoradiotherapy) followed with surgical resection,the outcome indices were 1- and 3-year survival rates and local recurrence rate. The combined odds ratio (OR), relative risk (RR) and their 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated to estimate the results. Results Nine articles including a total of 1156 patients were finally analyzed in the Mere-analysis. Among all the patients, 579 received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (study group) and 577 received surgical treatment only (control group). Compared the study group and control group, the OR of 1- and 3-year survival rate was 1.06 (95%CI=0. 94-1. 19, Z=0. 97, P=0. 33) and 1.30 (95%CI=1.07. -1.57, Z=2. 67, P=0. 008), respectively, and the RR of local recurrence rate was 0. 75 (95%CI= 0. 50- 1. 12, Z= 1.40, P= 0. 162). Conclusions Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy could improve the 3-year survival rate of patients with resectable esophageal cancer, but could not decrease the local recurrence rate.%目的 探讨术前新辅助放化疗在可切除食管癌治疗中的作用.方法 通过计算机检索Medline、CENTRAL(the Co-chrane central register of controlledtrials)、EMBASE、中国生物医学文献数据库系统(CBM)、中国期刊全文数据库(CNKI),收集国内外公开发表的关于可

  18. A matched cohort study of standard chemo-radiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone in elderly nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zeng

    Full Text Available The impact of standard chemo-radiotherapy (CRT as preferred therapy for elderly patients (age≥60 years with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC remains unclear. Therefore, a strict matched cohort study was conducted to compare the survival and treatment toxicity of standard chemo-radiotherapy in the elderly NPC patients with those of radiotherapy (RT alone. From 1998 to 2003, total 498 newly diagnosed elderly non-metastatic NPC patients were abstracted and classified into two groups by the treatments they received. For each patient in the CRT group, a matched pair in RT group was identified by matching for gender, age, histological type, T and N classifications, RT dose to primary tumor and neck nodes, and days of radiotherapy. Treatment tolerability and toxicity were clarified, and treatment outcomes were calculated and compared between the two groups. Two groups were well balanced in clinical characteristics because of the strict matching conditions. Totally 87 pairs can be assessed according to the criteria. The 5-year OS, CSS, FFS, and LR-FFS for CRT and RT groups were 62% versus 40% (P=0.013, 67% versus 47% (P=0.018, 65% versus 53% (log-rank: P=0.064, Breslow: P=0.048, and 88% versus 72%, (P=0.019, respectively. There was no significant difference in 5-year D-FFS between the two groups (75% vs. 73%, P=0.456. The CRT group experienced significantly more Grade ≥3 acute mucositis (46.0% vs. 28.7%, P= 0.019. We concluded that standard chemo-radiotherapy can achieve a reasonable local and regional control in elderly NPC patients with acceptable and reversible acute toxicity. However, distant metastasis remains the dominant failure pattern. When the elderly NPC patients are in good performance status following a complete evaluation of overall functional status and comorbidity conditions, standard chemo-radiotherapy is worthy of recommendation.

  19. Preoperative alcoholism and postoperative morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, H; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative risk assessment has become part of daily clinical practice, but preoperative alcohol abuse has not received much attention. METHODS: A Medline search was carried out to identify original papers published from 1967 to 1998. Relevant articles on postoperative morbidity...... in alcohol abusers were used to evaluate the evidence. RESULTS: Prospective and retrospective studies demonstrate a twofold to threefold increase in postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers, the most frequent complications being infections, bleeding and cardiopulmonary insufficiency. Wound complications...... to postoperative morbidity. CONCLUSION: Alcohol consumption should be included in the preoperative assessment of likely postoperative outcome. Reduction of postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers may include preoperative alcohol abstinence to improve organ function, or perioperative alcohol administration...

  20. Acurácia na reprodutibilidade do posicionamento diário de pacientes submetidos a radioterapia conformada (RT3D para câncer de próstata Accuracy in the reproducibility of daily patients' setup in 3D conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelmo José Giordani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a reprodutibilidade do posicionamento de pacientes com diagnóstico de câncer de próstata submetidos a radioterapia conformada. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 960 (posições anterior e lateral filmes radiológicos, de um total de 120 pacientes que receberam radioterapia conformada na próstata com técnica isocêntrica. As imagens foram obtidas em acelerador linear de partículas 6 MV. Aplicou-se protocolo específico para planejamento e tratamento da próstata, com o paciente em posição supina, mãos colocadas sobre o tórax, pés apoiados em suporte apropriado. Diariamente, os pacientes foram posicionados conforme demarcações na pele, coincidentes com os lasers da sala. Os filmes radiológicos foram comparados com as radiografias reconstruídas digitalmente (digitally reconstructed radiography - DRR em sistema de planejamento computadorizado Eclipse, a partir das tomografias. As radiografias de posicionamento foram realizadas no primeiro dia e após, semanalmente, até o término do tratamento. RESULTADOS: As médias dos deslocamentos observados foram de 1,99 ± 1,25 mm no sentido crânio-caudal, 1,37 ± 0,84 mm no látero-lateral e 1,94 ± 1,10 mm no ântero-posterior. CONCLUSÃO: O uso de protocolos específicos para posicionamento dos pacientes é possível na prática clínica, possibilita reprodutibilidade adequada e rápida correção dos possíveis erros.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the reproducibility of daily patients' setup in 3D conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present study evaluated a total of 960 radiological images (anterior and lateral views of 120 patients submitted to conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer with the isocentric technique. A 6 MV particle accelerator was utilized in the process. A specific protocol for prostate radiotherapy planning and treatment was applied, with the patients placed in supine position, hands on the chest and legs placed on and

  1. Pre-evaluation of an ionization chamber for clinical radiotherapy dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Xavier, Marcos; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: mxavier@ipen.b, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J., E-mail: khoury@ufpe.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    This work presents some pre-operational tests for characterization of a new homemade ionization chamber developed at the Calibration Laboratory of Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP). This chamber was designed for use in radiotherapy dosimetry. To study the utilization of this chamber in radiotherapy, some tests were undertaken: short- and medium-term stabilities, saturation curve, recombination loss, polarity effect and leakage current. All results obtained in these tests were within the international recommendations. (author)

  2. Effects of nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy: A prospective randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck malignant tumors have numerous locations of the disease. After patients receive radiotherapy, their nutritional status is very poor, thus the curative effect is unsatisfactory. The aims of the present study were to investigate and analyze the nutritional status of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy (RT) in order to provide positive nutrition intervention for assisting the radiotherapy effect. A total of 40 patients with head and neck cancer were selected ...

  3. Osteoradionecrosis of the Ribs following Breast Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Nicholls

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN of the chest wall is a rare complication after whole-breast radiotherapy (RT. Herein, we report a case of ORN involving the underlying ribs following adjuvant whole-breast RT using standard fractionation and conduct a review of the literature. Case Report: A previously well 43-year-old female with right-sided, early-stage, node-negative breast cancer was treated with breast-conserving surgery. She subsequently underwent adjuvant whole-breast RT receiving 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks using standard tangential photon fields with 6 MV photons followed by an electron boost of 10 Gy in 5 fractions according to International Commission on Radiation Units (ICRU requirements. Eleven months after RT, the patient developed right lateral chest wall pain, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrating two fractures involving the underlying right fifth and sixth ribs associated with fatty marrow changes in the second to sixth ribs, thus raising the possibility of ORN. Treatments including hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline and vitamin E were used with symptomatic improvements. There was demonstrable resolution on follow-up MRI at 2.5 years. Conclusion: The incidence of ORN utilising modern RT techniques and standard fractionation is rare. Numerous treatments are available, with variable response rates. Emerging evidence of predictive gene profiling to estimate the risk of radiation sensitivity may assist in individualising preventative strategies to mitigate the risk of ORN.

  4. Present Status of Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duehmke, Eckhart

    Aims of radiation oncology are cure from malignant diseases and - at the same time preservation of anatomy (e.g. female breast, uterus, prostate) and organ functions (e.g. brain, eye, voice, sphincter ani). At present, methods and results of clinical radiotherapy (RT) are based on experiences with natural history and radiobiology of malignant tumors in properly defined situations as well as on technical developments since World War II in geometrical and biological treatment planning in teletherapy and brachytherapy. Radiobiological research revealed tolerance limits of healthy tissues to be respected, effective total treatment doses of high cure probability depending on histology and tumor volume, and - more recently - altered fractionation schemes to be adapted to specific growth fractions and intrinsic radiosensitivities of clonogenic tumor cells. In addition, Biological Response Modifiers (BRM), such as cis-platinum, oxygen and hyperthermia may steepen cell survival curves of hypoxic tumor cells, others - such as tetrachiordekaoxid (TCDO) - may enhance repair of normal tissues. Computer assisted techniques in geometrical RT-planning based on individual healthy and pathologic anatomy (CT, MRT) provide high precision RT for well defined brain lesions by using dedicated linear accelerators (Stereotaxy). CT-based individual tissue compensators help with homogenization of distorted dose distributions in magna field irradiation for malignant lymphomas and with total body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, e.g. for leukemia. RT with fast neutrons, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), RT with protons and heavy ions need to be tested in randomized trials before implementation into clinical routine.

  5. Four and five dimensional radiotherapy with reference to prostate cancer - definitions, state of the art and further directions - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennernaes, Bo (Dept. of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Hospital and Academy, Univ. of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden)), e-mail: bo.lennernas@telia.com; Castellanos, Enrique; Nilsson, Sten; Levitt, Seymour (Dept. of Oncology/Pathology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital and Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2011-06-15

    Radiotherapy (RT) always requires a compromise between tumor control and normal tissue side-effects. Technical innovation in radiation therapy (RT), such as three dimensional RT, is now established. Concerning prostate cancer (PC), it is reasonable to assume that RT of PC will increase in the future. The combination of small margins, a movable target (prostate), few fractions and high doses will probably demand dynamically positioning systems and in real time. This is called four dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT). Moreover, biological factors must be included in new treatments such as hypofractionation schedules. This new era is called five dimensional radiotherapy, 5DRT. In this paper we discuss new concepts in RT in respect to PC

  6. Effect of Suboptimal Chemotherapy on Preoperative Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hye; Kang, Hyun Cheol; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Park, Jae Gahb; Oh, Do Youn; Im, Seock Ah; Kim, Tae You; Bang, Yung Jue; Ha, Sung Whan [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    To examine the effect of suboptimal chemotherapy in patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiotherapy for the treatment of rectal cancer. The medical records of 43 patients who received preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy, followed by radical surgery for the treatment of pathologically proven adenocarcinoma of the rectum from April 2003 to April 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. The delivered radiation dose ranged from 41.4 to 50.4 Gy. The standard group consisted of patients receiving two cycles of a 5-FU bolus injection for three days on the first and fifth week of radiotherapy or twice daily with capecitabine. The standard group included six patients for each regimen. The non-standard group consisted of patients receiving one cycle of 5-FU bolus injection for three days on the first week of radiotherapy. The non-standard group included 31 patients. Radical surgery was performed at a median of 58 days after the end of radiotherapy. A low anterior resection was performed in 36 patients, whereas an abdominoperineal resection was performed in 7 patients. No significant difference was observed between the groups with respect to pathologic responses ranging from grades 3 to 5 (83.3% vs. 67.7%, p=0.456), downstaging (75.0% vs. 67.7%, p=0.727), and a radial resection margin greater than 2 mm (66.7% vs. 83.9%, p=0.237). The sphincter-saving surgery rate in low-lying rectal cancers was lower in the non-standard group (100% vs. 75%, p=0.068). There was no grade 3 or higher toxicity observed in all patients. Considering that the sphincter-saving surgery rate in low-lying rectal cancer was marginally lower for patients treated with non-standard, suboptimal chemotherapy, and that toxicity higher than grade 2 was not observed in the both groups, suboptimal chemotherapy should be avoided in this setting.

  7. Radiotherapy of esthesioneuroblastoma. Radiotherapie beim Aesthesioneuroblastom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strnad, V. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik); Grabenbauer, G.G. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik); Dunst, J. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik); Sauer, R. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik)

    1994-02-01

    From 1985 through 1990, twelve patients with estehesioneuroblastoma have been treated at the Department of Radiotherapy at the University of Erlangen. Two had Kadish stage A, one stage B, and nine stage C. There were seven males and five females with a mean age of 43 years. Eleven patients had combined trancranial-transbasal surgery prior to radiotherapy (five R0-, four R1-, and two patients R2-resections) and one received radiotherapy only. The dose was 12 to 60 Gy (mean 54 Gy) in 1.8 Gy to 2 Gy per fraction. 8/12 patients (67%) were locally controlled. One had progressive disease during radiotherapy after partial resection and died. Three had local recurrences, one in-field and two marginal. One patient with a local recurrence developed cervical lymph node metastases, and one locally controlled patient developed bone metastases but is alive eight years after chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for metastatic disease. The five-year-overall and recurrence-free survival was 72% and 55%, respectively. (orig./MG)

  8. Outcomes after primary or adjuvant radiotherapy for salivary gland carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Adam; Morris, Christopher G; Amdur, Robert J; Dziegielewski, Peter T; Boyce, Brian; Mendenhall, William M

    2017-03-01

    We report long-term outcomes of patients treated with primary radiotherapy (RT) or surgery and adjuvant RT for salivary gland malignancies. From 1964 to 2012, 291 patients received primary RT (n = 67) or RT combined with surgery (n = 224). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year local control, local-regional control, distant metastasis-free survival, cause-specific survival and overall survival rates were 82%, 77% and 73%; 77%, 72% and 67%; 74%, 70% and 70%; 70%, 59% and 54%; and 63%, 47% and 38%, respectively. Per multivariate analysis, combined surgery and RT and T stage impacted local control; overall stage and combined surgery and RT impacted local-regional control; overall stage impacted distant metastasis-free survival; and overall stage, node positivity, clinical nerve invasion, and surgery and RT impacted cause-specific and overall survival. Five percent of patients experienced grade 3 or worse toxicity. Combined surgery and RT improves local control, local-regional control, and cause-specific survival compared with primary RT for salivary tumors.

  9. Phase Measurement of Cognitive Impairment Specific to Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Carol L., E-mail: armstrongc@email.chop.edu [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neuro-Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Shera, David M. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lustig, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Phillips, Peter C. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neurology and Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Memory impairment is an early-delayed effect of radiotherapy (RT). The prospective longitudinal measurement of the cognitive phase effects from RT was conducted on treated and untreated brain tumor patients. The study design investigated semantic vs. perceptual and visual vs. verbal memory to determine the most disease-specific measure of RT-related changes and understanding of the neurotoxicity from RT to the brain. Methods and Materials: Tests of memory that had previously shown RT-related phasic changes were compared with experimental tests of memory to test hypotheses about cognition targeted to the neural toxicity of RT. The results from 41 irradiated and 29 nonirradiated patients with low-grade, supratentorial tumors were analyzed. The methods controlled for comorbid white matter risk, recurrence, interval after treatment, and age (18-69 years). The effects were examined before RT and at three points after RT to 1 year using a mixed effects model that included interval, group, surgical status, medication use, practice, and individual random effects. Four new tests of memory and other candidate cognitive tests were investigated, and a post hoc analysis of a comprehensive battery of tests was performed to identify the cognitive processes most specific to RT. Results: The RT effects on memory were identified in the treated group only; among the new tests of memory and the complete neurocognitive battery, the RT effects were significant only for delayed recall (p < 0.009) and interval to recognize (p < 0.002). Tumor location was not related to the treatment effect. Memory decline was specific to retrieval of semantic memories; a double dissociation of semantic from perceptual visual memory was demonstrated in the RT group. Conclusions: These results implicate memory dependent on the semantic cortex and the hippocampal memory system. A cognitive measurement that is brief but specific to neural mechanisms is effective and feasible for studies of RT damage.

  10. Long-term results of radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas. Evaluation of tumor control and hypopituitarism after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchida, Emiko; Sakai, Kunio; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Sugita, Tadashi; Sasamoto, Ryuta [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-09-01

    To evaluate the results of conventional radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas assessed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Endpoints include tumor control, normalization of hormone levels in functioning adenomas, and hypopituitarism after radiotherapy as an adverse effect. Forty-two patients were treated with radiotherapy from 1982 to 1995 at Niigata University Hospital. Forty patients were irradiated after surgery because of residual adenomas in 33 patients and tumor regrowth in 7 patients. One patient was treated with radiotherapy alone, and the remaining 1 patient was treated with preoperative radiotherapy. Tumor size and extension were evaluated using CT or MRI, and all tumors were macroadenomas. They consisted of 18 non-functioning and 24 functioning adenomas (growth hormone (GH)-secreting: 11, prolactinomas: 7, concomitant GH and prolactin (PRL)-secreting: 5, gonadotropin-secreting: 1). Treatment was given in 200 cGy daily fraction size and a total dose of 50 Gy was given to most patients. Sixteen patients with GH- and/or PRL-secreting adenomas received bromocriptine. Tumor progression was determined by increase in tumor size as shown by CT or MRI. Hypopituitarism after radiotherapy was evaluated using the functions of corticotropin (ACTH), thyrotropin (TSH), and gonadotropin. Median follow-up time from the end of radiotherapy was 103 months. Tumor progression occurred in 2 out of 42 patients and 10-year progression-free rate for all patients was 93.7%. Normalization of GH levels was obtained in 12 of 16 GH-secreting adenomas with a mean time of 27 months after radiotherapy, and 9 of 12 PRL-secreting adenomas achieved normalization of PRL levels with a mean time of 34 months. One gonadotropin-secreting adenoma achieved normalization of gonadotropin level at 21 months after radiotherapy. The incidence of hypopituitarism after radiotherapy increased with time, and cumulative risk of deficiencies of ACTH, TSH, and gonadotropin at 10

  11. Targeted tumor radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unak Perihan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted tumor radiotherapy is selectively delivery of curative doses of radiation to malignant sites. The aim of the targeted tumor radiotherapy is to use the radionuclides which have high LET particle emissions conjugated to appropriate carrier molecules. The radionuclides are selectively collected by tumor cells, depositing lethal doses to tumor cells while no admission occur to normal cells. In theory, targeted radiotherapy has several advantages over conventional radiotherapy since it allows a high radiation dose to be administered without causing normal tissue toxicity, although there are some limitations in the availability of appropriate targeting agents and in the calculations of administered doses. Therefore, for routine clinical applications more progress is still needed. In this article, the potential use of targeted tumor radiotherapy is briefly reviewed. More general aspects and considerations, such as potential radionuclides, mechanisms of tumor targeting was also outlined.

  12. Long-term results of a phase II trial of high-dose radiotherapy (60 Gy) and UFT/l-leucovorin in patients with non-resectable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestermark, Lene W.; Qvortrup, Camilla; Baatrup, Gunnar; Pfeiffer, Per (Odense Univ. Hospital, Odense (Denmark)); Bisgaard, Claus; Jacobsen, Anders (Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark)); Hansen, Flemming; Rasmussen, Peter (Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2008-03-15

    Background. Preoperative radiochemotherapy is a cornerstone in patients with non-resectable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To improve outcome (number of R0 resections and survival) high-dose radiotherapy (RT) was combined with oral UFT/l-leucovorin to allow tumour regression before radical intended surgery. Methods. Pelvic RT was delivered with megavoltage photons using a 5 field technique. RT was CT-based, given 5 days a week through one posterior field and two lateral fields (48.6 Gy/27 fractions) to encompass the primary tumour and the regional lymph nodes. In addition, the tumour bed received a concurrent boost (5.4 Gy/27 fractions) and a final boost (6 Gy/3 fractions); thus GTV received 60 Gy/30 fractions. Concurrent with RT patients received a daily dose of oral UFT 300 mg/m2 plus l-leucovorin 22.5 mg 5/7days (divided in three doses). Results. From September 2000 to November 2004, 52 patients (median age 60 years (32-83); median PS 0 (0-2)) with LARC (36 primary, 16 recurrent) were included in this phase II study. All but three patients received the planned 60 Gy, median duration of RT was 42 days (25-49). Toxicity was very modest; only four patients had a dose reduction of UFT. No hematological toxicity of clinical significance was seen. Non-hematological toxicity grade 1 (GI-toxicity, fatigue and/or dysuria) was frequently observed but only four patients experienced grade 3 toxicity (diarrhoea and/or nausea/vomiting). Forty patients (77%) were operated (30 R0, 5 R1, 5 R2) median 55 days (27-112) after completion of RT. Seven (13%) patients had a pathological complete response (pCR). Thirty-one patients (60%) died after median 25.4 months (1.6-45.2 months). Twenty-one patients (40%) are still alive June 2007. Conclusions. Preoperative high-dose RT and concomitant UFT produces major regression in most patients with non-resectable LARC and thus a good chance of cure

  13. E4D_RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-22

    Time-lapse ERT imaging for monitoring both natural and engineered subsurface processes has advanced rapidly over the past 15-20 years. However, imaging results generally required a significant amount of manual and computational effort, and therefore were not available while the process was occurring. Although the value of real-time imaging was recognized, several obstacles prevented it's implementation. E4D_RT addresses these obstacles by 1) providing specialized algorithms that negate the need for user intervention, thereby automating the time-lapse data processing steps, 2) linking field data collection systems with parallel supercomputing systems via wireless data transfer link, and 3) addressing the computational burdens by utilizing distributed memory supercomputing resources, thereby enabling rapid data processing and imaging results.

  14. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Villebro, Nete; Møller, Ann Merete

    2014-01-01

    : Randomized controlled trials that recruited people who smoked prior to surgery, offered a smoking cessation intervention, and measured preoperative and long-term abstinence from smoking or the incidence of postoperative complications or both outcomes. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The review authors......BACKGROUND: Smokers have a substantially increased risk of postoperative complications. Preoperative smoking intervention may be effective in decreasing this incidence, and surgery may constitute a unique opportunity for smoking cessation interventions. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this review...... are to assess the effect of preoperative smoking intervention on smoking cessation at the time of surgery and 12 months postoperatively, and on the incidence of postoperative complications. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register in January 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA...

  15. Radiotherapy and antiangiogenic TM in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohamed K; Miller, Meredith W; Taylor, Jeremy; Gill, Navkiranjit K; Dick, Robert D; Van Golen, Kenneth; Brewer, George J; Merajver, Sofia D

    2002-01-01

    Tetrathiomolybdate (TM) is a potent nontoxic orally delivered copper complexing agent under development for the last several years for the treatment of Wilson's disease. It has been shown to block angiogenesis in primary and metastatic tumors. Therefore, the combination of cytotoxic radiotherapy (RT) and antiangiogenic TM could target both the existing tumor and the tumor microvasculature in a comprehensive strategy. Using a Lewis lung high metastatic (LLHM) carcinoma mouse tumor model, we demonstrate that the combination of TM and RT is more effective than either used as monotherapy. We also show that their therapeutic effects are additive, with no additional toxicity. We show that TM has no significant cytotoxicity in vitro against LLHM tumor cells, further supporting the antiangiogenic mechanism for its action.

  16. Radiotherapy and Antiangiogenic TM in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed K. Khan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrathiomolybdate (TM is a potent nontoxic orally delivered copper complexing agent under development for the last several years for the treatment of Wilson's disease. It has been shown to block angiogenesis in primary and metastatic tumors. Therefore, the combination of cytotoxic radiotherapy (RT and antiangiogenic TM could target both the existing tumor and the tumor microvasculature in a comprehensive strategy. Using a Lewis lung high metastatic (LLHM carcinoma mouse tumor model, we demonstrate that the combination of TM and RT is more effective than either used as monotherapy. We also show that their therapeutic effects are additive, with no additional toxicity. We show that TM has no significant cytotoxicity in vitro against LLHM tumor cells, further supporting the antiangiogenic mechanism for its action.

  17. New quality assurance program integrating ''modern radiotherapy'' within the German Hodgkin Study Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T. [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Baues, C.; Marnitz-Schulze, S. [University of Cologne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Koeln (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, R. [University of Marburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Marburg (Germany); Herfarth, K. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Lukas, P. [University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Innsbruck (Austria); Schmidberger, H. [University of Mainz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mainz (Germany); Fuchs, M.; Engert, A. [University of Cologne, Department of Internal Medicine, Koeln (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Field design changed substantially from extended-field RT (EF-RT) to involved-field RT (IF-RT) and now to involved-node RT (IN-RT) and involved-site RT (IS-RT) as well as treatment techniques in radiotherapy (RT) of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the establishment of a quality assurance program (QAP) including modern RT techniques and field designs within the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG). In the era of modern conformal RT, this QAP had to be fundamentally adapted and a new evaluation process has been intensively discussed by the radiotherapeutic expert panel of the GHSG. The expert panel developed guidelines and criteria to analyse ''modern'' field designs and treatment techniques. This work is based on a dataset of 11 patients treated within the sixth study generation (HD16-17). To develop a QAP of ''modern RT'', the expert panel defined criteria for analysing current RT procedures. The consensus of a modified QAP in ongoing and future trials is presented. With this schedule, the QAP of the GHSG could serve as a model for other study groups. (orig.) [German] Nicht nur die Zielvolumendefinitionen haben sich von der Extended-Field- (EF-RT) ueber die Involved-Field- (IF-RT) bis zur Involved-Node- (IN-RT) und Involved-Site-Radiotherapie (IS-RT) weiterentwickelt. Auch die Radiotherapie(RT)-Techniken in der Behandlung von Patienten mit Hodgkin-Lymphom haben Aenderungen erfahren. Wir moechten aufzeigen, wie die Arbeit des Qualitaetssicherungsprogramms (QAP) innerhalb der Deutschen Hodgkin Studiengruppe (German Hodgkin Study Group [GHSG]) in der Aera der ''modernen RT'' hinsichtlich intensitaetsmodulierter RT (IMRT) und bildgefuehrter RT (IGRT), aber auch hinsichtlich moderner Felddefinitionen wie bei der IN-RT angepasst wurde. In der Aera der ''modernen RT'' wurde das QAP vom radiotherapeutischen Expertenpanel der GHSG im Rahmen einiger

  18. Reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Julia

    2013-01-01

    RT-PCR is commonly used to test for genetic diseases and to characterize gene expression in various tissue types, cell types, and over developmental time courses. This serves as a form of expression profiling, but typically as a candidate approach. RT-PCR is also commonly used to clone cDNAs for further use with other molecular biology techniques (e.g., see Oligo(dT)-primed RT-PCR isolation of polyadenylated RNA degradation intermediates and Circularized RT-PCR (cRT-PCR): analysis of RNA 5' ends, 3' ends, and poly(A) tails).

  19. Clinical study on radiotherapy combined with surgical treatment of 162 patients with cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaopeng Zhong; Xukun Tong; Lingfang Yang; Donglin Yuan; Huigao Cai

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare the 5-year survival rates and complications of internal and external irradiation therapy combined with operation in patients with Ⅱ-Ⅲ period of cervical cancer.Methods: 162 cervical cancer patients after the whole palace resection pelvic lymphadenectomy were divided into three groups, and then accepted radiotherapy.The first group with 91 cases was accepted internal and external irradiation therapy before operation; the second group with 37 cases was given internal irradiation therapy before operation; the third group with 34 cases was given routine postoperative radiotherapy.External irradiation used 60Co irradiation or a linear accelerator, to the whole basin, and the irradiation dose of "B" point in preoperative radiotherapy was 26-30 Gy, in postoperative radiotherapy was 46-50 Gy; intraluminal brachytherapy used 192lr,the dose of "A" point was 5-15 Gy.Results: The 5-year survival rate of preoperative combined radiotherapy group was 78.0%(71/91), preoperative intracavitary radiotherapy group 64.9% (24/37), and postoperative radiotherapy group 35.3% (12/34).Comparing the 5-year survival rates of the preoperative combined and postoperative irradiation groups, there was significant difference (P<0.05).The major complications were radioactive proctitis and cystitis, the complication incidences of three groups were 35.2% (32/91), 32.4% (12/37), 38.2% (13/34), respectively, and the differences were not statistically significant (P>0.05).Conclusion: The intraluminal brachytherapy plus external irradiation can significantly increase the 5-year survival rate of patients with Ⅱa-Ⅲa stages, and the incidence of complications was not significant difference.

  20. RISK FACTORS FOR HEARING LOSS IN PATIENTS TREATED WITH INTENSITY-MODULATED RADIOTHERAPY FOR HEAD-AND-NECK TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Zuur; Y.J. Simis; E.A. Lamers; A.A. Hart; W.A. Dreschler; A.J. Balm; C.R. Rasch

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is a common treatment of head-and-neck carcinoma. The objective of this study was to perform a prospective multivariate assessment of the dose-effect relationship between intensity-modulated RT and hearing loss. Methods and Materials: Pure tone audiometry at 0.250-16 kHz w

  1. Deformable image registration for geometrical evaluation of DIBH radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Lykkegaard Andersen, J. A.; Borrisova, S.

    2014-01-01

    Respiration and anatomical variation during radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer yield dosimetric uncertainties of the delivered dose, possibly affecting the clinical outcome if not corrected for. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART), based on deformable image registration (DIR) and Deep-Inspiration-Breath-Ho......Respiration and anatomical variation during radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer yield dosimetric uncertainties of the delivered dose, possibly affecting the clinical outcome if not corrected for. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART), based on deformable image registration (DIR) and Deep....... Delineations of anatomical structures were performed on each image set. The CT images were retrospective rigidly and deformable registered to all obtained images using the Varian Smart Adapt v. 11.0. The registered images were analysed for volume change and Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Result...

  2. Anxiety in preoperative anesthetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela Millán, Jaquelyn; Barrera Serrano, José René; Ornelas Aguirre, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Preoperative anxiety is a common and poorly evaluated condition in patients who will undergo an anesthetic and surgical intervention. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of anxiety in a group of patients undergoing elective surgery, as assessed by the Amsterdam Anxiety Preoperative and Information (AAPI) scale. We studied 135 patients scheduled for elective surgery applying the AAPI scale 24 h before the surgical procedure to evaluate the presence of anxiety and patient characteristics. A descriptive analysis with mean +/- standard deviation for categorical variables was done. For intragroup differences, chi(2) test was used. Pearson correlation for the association between anxiety and postoperative complications was carried out. A value of p =0.05 was considered significant. One hundred six patients were surgically treated, 88% were female (average age 44 +/- 12 years). Some degree of preoperative anxiety was present in 72 patients (76%; p = 0.001) with a grade point average on the AAPI scale equal to 17 +/- 7 points, of which 95 (70%, OR = 5.08; p = 0.002) were females. Results of this study suggest the presence of high levels of preoperative anxiety in patients scheduled for elective surgery. The origin of the anxiety appears to be related to many factors that can be evaluated in pre-anesthetic consultation. Further study is needed to prevent the presence of this disorder.

  3. Treatment of ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, William R; Werning, John W; Kaye, Frederic J; Mendenhall, William M

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to report our institutional experience using radiotherapy in the treatment of ameloblastoma and ameloblastic carcinoma. Three patients with ameloblastoma and 3 patients with ameloblastic carcinoma were treated with radiotherapy alone (2 patients) or surgery and postoperative radiotherapy (4 patients) at the University of Florida between 1973 and 2007. Follow-up ranged from 4.0 to 13.1 years with a median of 7.8 years. Radiotherapy complications were scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Local control was achieved in 4 of the 6 patients. One patient treated with RT alone for an unresectable ameloblastoma developed a local recurrence and metastases in both the cervical lymph nodes and lungs, but had excellent response to dual BRAF/MEK inhibition with dabrafenib and trametinib. Another patient treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy for an ameloblastic carcinoma recurred locally without metastasis, but was not salvaged. No significant treatment-related complications were observed. For patients with local recurrence or inadequate margins after surgery, adjuvant radiotherapy provides the potential for disease control. In the setting of metastatic disease, targeted therapies may provide an additional opportunity for salvage.

  4. Radiotherapy- and Chemotherapy-Induced Myelodysplasia Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Min; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Liang, Ji-An; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study explored which kinds of cancer are related to a higher incidence of subsequent myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) after radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). We performed a nested case–control study by using data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance (NHI) system. The case group included cancer patients who developed MDS. For the control group, 4 cancer patients without MDS were frequency-matched with each MDS case by age, sex, year of cancer diagnosis, and MDS index year. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated. Overall, cancer patients who received RT or CT exhibited secondary MDS more frequently than did those who did not (RT: OR = 1.53; 95% CI = 1.33–1.77; CT: OR = 1.51; 95% CI = 1.25–1.82). Analysis by cancer site showed that RT increased the risk of MDS for patients with stomach, colorectal, liver, breast, endometrial, prostate, and kidney cancers. By contrast, CT was more likely to increase the risk of MDS for patients with lung, endometrial, and cervical cancers. Further analysis revealed that RT and CT seemed to have a positive interaction. The major limitation of this study was the lack of certain essential data in the NHI Research Database, such as data regarding cancer stage and treatment dose details. This population-based nested case–control study determined that RT and CT predisposed patients in Taiwan to the development of MDS. This effect was more prominent when both modalities were used. PMID:25929909

  5. Early MR changes in vertebral bone marrow for patients following radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, M; Savu, M; Lungu-Solomonescu, C; Harabagiu, I; Pop, T

    2001-01-01

    Our study aimed to evaluate the vertebral marrow changes in patients following radiotherapy (RT) by measuring the T2 relaxation times before and during RT. We were mostly interested in evaluating early MR marrow changes during RT. Fifteen patients treated by RT for cervical cancer were submitted to MR examination before and during RT (5-23 days of RT). T2 values were calculated for irradiated and non-irradiated tissues (lumbar and sacral vertebral bone marrow, symphysis pubis marrow, and regional muscle). Fourteen patients presented increased T2 values for irradiated vertebral bone marrow (VBM), and 3 patients showed increased T2 values even for non-irradiated VBM. We found T2 variations for VBM as early as in the fifth day of RT for an absorbed dose as small as 9 Gy. Calculated T2 values in irradiated and also in non-irradiated tissues prove very early tissue alterations.

  6. Case report of verrucous carcinoma of the lower molar region, effectively treated with preoperative irradiation and continuous intraarterial infusion of fluorouracil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Yoshihiro; Uchiyama, Guio; Hayashi, Sanshin

    1987-01-01

    Verrucous carcinoma, invading the lower molar region, oropharynx and nasopharynx was treated with preoperative irradiation (3400 cGy), continuous intraarterial infusion of anticancer agent (fluorouracil: 4000 mg), and surgery. The tumor response to radiotherapy was excellent and no tumor cells were found in the surgical specimen. Recurrence and anaplastic transformation of the tumor was not recognized for 10 months after the therapy. Radiotherapy of verrucous carcinoma has not been recommended because of its poor local controllability and possible anaplastic transformation. But at least in diffuse invasive tumor such as this case, preoperative irradiation appears to be significant.

  7. Open reading frame sequencing and structure-based alignment of polypeptides encoded by RT1-Bb, RT1-Ba, RT1-Db, and RT1-Da alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Ruth A; Moustakas, Antonis K; Lobaton, Suzanne D

    2004-11-01

    MHC class II genes are major genetic components in rats developing autoimmunity. The majority of rat MHC class II sequencing has focused on exon 2, which forms the first external domain. Sequence of the complete open reading frame for rat MHC class II haplotypes and structure-based alignment is lacking. Herein, the complete open reading frame for RT1-Bbeta, RT1-Balpha, RT1-Dbeta, and RT1-Dalpha was sequenced from ten different rat strains, covering eight serological haplotypes, namely a, b, c, d, k, l, n, and u. Each serological haplotype was unique at the nucleotide level of the sequenced RT1-B/D region. Within individual genes, the number of alleles identified was seven, seven, six, and three and the degree of amino-acid polymorphism between allotypes for each gene was 22%, 16%, 19%, and 0.4% for RT1-Bbeta, RT1-Balpha, RT1-Dbeta, and RT1-Dalpha, respectively. The extent and distribution of amino-acid polymorphism was comparable with mouse and human MHC class II. Structure-based alignment identified the beta65-66 deletion, the beta84a insertion, the alpha9a insertion, and the alpha1a-1c insertion in RT1-B previously described for H2-A. Rat allele-specific deletions were found at RT1-Balpha76 and RT1-Dbeta90-92. The mature RT1-Dbeta polypeptide was one amino acid longer than HLA-DRB1 due to the position of the predicted signal peptide cleavage site. These data are important to a comprehensive understanding of MHC class II structure-function and for mechanistic studies of rat models of autoimmunity.

  8. Comprehensive and Alternative Medicine in Preventing Radiotherapy-Induced Adverse Skin Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    TITLE: Comprehensive and Alternative Medicine in Preventing Radiotherapy-Induced Adverse Skin Reactions PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jennifer J. Hu...and Alternative Medicine in Preventing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Radiotherapy-Induced Adverse Skin Reactions 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0493 5c... alternative medicine with anti-inflamm atory properties, Calendula officinalis and Ching Wan Hung, in RT -induced EASRs. W e have tested two animal m

  9. Planning a Radiotherapy Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, D

    2017-02-01

    The master planning of new radiotherapy facilities requires the input and engagement of a range of highly specialised professionals, both in the construction and health sector. Although radiation protection and safety aspects of radiotherapy services are universal, low and middle income countries are often presented with unique challenges that also need to be considered, e.g. competing needs within the health sector, lack of financial and human resources, environmental factors like poor provision of transport or electrical power, inadequate regulatory infrastructure, etc. Efforts to establish, upgrade or expand radiotherapy services should therefore not only focus on the technology that is appropriate and sustainable, but also be mindful of the need for quality, safety and optimal utilisation of technology. The workflow in a radiotherapy department can be facilitated by strategic placement of the main functional areas into the concept design. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanoparticle-guided radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and nano-sized particles for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of a target tissue. More specifically, the invention relates to nano-sized particles comprising X-ray-imaging contrast agents in solid form with the ability to block x-rays, allowing for simult...... for simultaneous or integrated external beam radiotherapy and imaging, e.g., using computed tomography (CT)....

  11. Locally advanced non inflammatory breast cancer treated by combined chemotherapy and preoperative irradiation: updated results in a series of 120 patients; Cancer du sein localement evolue non inflammatoire traite par association de chimiotherapie et de radiotherapie a dose preoperatoire: reactualisation des resultats d'une serie de 120 patientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerouge, D.; Touboul, E.; Moureau-Zabotto, L. [Hopital Tenon AP-HP, Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Lefran, J.P.; Blondon, J. [Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere AP-HP, Service de chirurgie generale et gynecologique, 75 - Paris (France); Genestie, C. [Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere AP-HP, Service d' anatomopathologie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2004-06-01

    Purpose. - To evaluate our updated data concerning survival and locoregional control in a study of locally advanced non inflammatory breast cancer after primary chemotherapy followed by external preoperative irradiation. Patients and methods. - Between 1982 and 1998, 120 patients (75 stage IIIA, 41 stage IIIB, and 4 stage IIIC according to AJCC staging system 2002) were consecutively treated by four courses of induction chemotherapy with anthracycline-containing combinations followed by preoperative irradiation (45 Gy to the breast and nodal areas) and a fifth course of chemotherapy. Three different locoregional approaches were proposed, depending on tumour characteristics and tumour response. After completion of local therapy, all patients received a sixth course of chemotherapy and a maintenance adjuvant chemotherapy regimen without anthracycline. The median follow-up from the beginning of treatment was 140 months. Results. - Mastectomy and axillary dissection were performed in 49 patients (with residual tumour larger than 3 cm in diameter or located behind the nipple or with bifocal tumour), and conservative treatment in 71 patients (39 achieved clinical complete response or partial response >90% and received additional radiation boost to initial tumour bed; 32 had residual mass {<=}3 cm in diameter and were treated by wide excision and axillary dissection followed by a boost to the excision site). Ten-year actuarial local failure rate was 13% after irradiation alone, 23% after wide excision and irradiation, and 4% after mastectomy (p =0.1). After multivariate analysis, possibility of breast-conserving therapy was related to initial tumour size (<6 vs. {>=}6 cm in diameter, p =0.002). Ten-year overall metastatic disease-free survival rate was 61%. After multivariate analysis, metastatic disease-free survival rates were significantly influenced by clinical stage (stage IIIA-B vs. IIIC, p =0.0003), N-stage (N0 vs. N1-2a, and 3c, p = 0.017), initial tumour size (<6

  12. Deep inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, Gitte F; Bangsgaard, Jens P

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the impact of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and tumour baseline shifts on image quality and registration uncertainty in image-guided DIBH radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced lung cancer. METHODS: Patients treated with daily cone beam CT (CBCT)-guided free...... ≤2 mm did not affect the CBCT image quality considerably. CONCLUSION: DIBH CBCT improved image quality and reduced registration uncertainty in the craniocaudal direction in image-guided RT of locally advanced lung cancer. Baseline shifts ≤2 mm in DIBH during CBCT acquisition did not affect image...

  13. Prophylactic Swallowing Exercises in Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, H R; Jensen, Kenneth; Aksglæde, K

    2015-01-01

    Many head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors experience reduced quality of life due to radiotherapy (RT)-related dysphagia. The aim of this prospective randomized trial was to evaluate the impact of prophylactic swallowing exercises on swallowing-related outcomes in HNC patients treated with curative...... of the dysphagia outcomes during and after treatment. Adherence to exercises was poor and dropouts due to especially fatigue were very frequent in both groups. Systematic swallowing exercises had no impact on swallowing outcomes within the first year after RT. Despite repeated supervised sessions, adherence...

  14. A comparison of radiotherapy with radiotherapy plus surgery for brain metastases from urinary bladder cancer. Analysis of 62 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany); Fokas, Emmanouil; Henzel, Martin

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of radiotherapy (RT) and prognostic factors in 62 patients with brain metastases from transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder. Patients and Methods: 62 patients received either RT (n = 49), including whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and/or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), or surgery (OP) combined with WBRT (n = 13). Overall survival (OS), intracerebral control (ICC) and local control (LC) were retrospectively analyzed. Six potential prognostic factors were assessed: age, gender, number of brain metastases, extracerebral metastases, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, and interval from tumor diagnosis to RT. Results: Median OS and ICC for the entire cohort were 9 and 7 months. No significant difference between RT and OP + RT was found for OS (p = 0.696) and ICC (p = 0.996). On multivariate analysis, improved OS was associated with lack of extracerebral metastases (p < 0.001) and RPA class (p < 0.001), and ICC with the latter (p < 0.001). SRS-incorporating RT resulted in 1-, 2-, and 3-year LC probability of 78%, 66%, and 51%. No association between LC and any of the potential prognostic factors was observed. The results of the subgroup RPA class analyses were similar to the entire cohort. Conclusion: Patient outcome for the RT-alone arm was not significantly different from OP + RT. SRS-incorporating treatment offers excellent LC rates. RPA class and the presence of extracerebral metastases demonstrated a significant prognostic role for survival. The latter should be used as stratification factors in randomized trials and can help define the cohort of patients that may benefit from more aggressive therapies. (orig.)

  15. 局部进展期直肠癌术前3DCRT或VMAT同期化疗后肠壁残余癌细胞分布比较%A comparative study of distribution of residual cancer cells in the bowel wall after preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy versus volumetric modulated arc therapy with concurrent chemotherapy in treatment of locally advanced rectum cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖林; 祝喻甲; 邱波; 肖巍巍; 余昕; 曾智帆; 刘孟忠; 高远红

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the distribution of residual cancer cells (RCC) in each layer of bowl wall after preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) versus volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) combined with concurrent chemotherapy,and to investigate the effect of different radiotherapy techniques on the distribution of RCC.Methods A total of 334 patients with locally advanced rectum cancer (LARC) who were admitted to our hospital from May 2007 to April 2013 were enrolled as subjects.In those patients,172 received preoperative 3DCRT (46 Gy/23 F) with concurrent chemotherapy and 162 received VMAT (50 Gy/25 F) with concurrent chemotherapy.There was no significant difference in the distribution of clinical stage Ⅱ or Ⅲ between the 3DCRT group and VMAT group.All the RCCs in different layers of surgical specimens were evaluated pathologically.Between-group comparison of data was made by Pearson Chi-Square and Fisher's exact test.Results There were no significant differences in ypT,ypN,or ypTNM staging between the two groups (P values>0.05).In the 226 patients with ypT2-4 disease,the proportion of RCC in the mucosa,submucosa,muscularis propria,and subserosa/perirectal fat was 34.1%,43.8%,73.5%,and 69.0%,respectively.In patients with ypT2-4,pN+,cN+,or cT4 disease,compared with the VMAT group,the 3DCRT group had significantly higher proportion of RCCs in the mucosa (47.9% vs.18.1%,54.5% vs.17.2%,39.8% vs.15.3%,41.3% vs.14.3%;P=0.000,0.001,0.000,0.000) and submucosa (50.4% vs.36.2%,56.8% vs.27.6%,43.0% vs.26.6%,45.3% vs.27.5%;P=0.032,0.014,0.006,0.017).In patients with pN0 or cT3 disease,the 3DCRT group had a significantly higher proportion of RCCs in the mucosa than the VMAT group (28.1% vs.12.9%,P=0.002;29.5% vs.13.2%,P=0.015).In patients with ypT2-4,pN0/pN+,cT3/cT4,or cN0/cN+ disease,there were no significant differences in the proportion of RCCs in the muscularis propria or subserosa/perirectal fat

  16. [Preoperative fasting guidelines: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Muñoz, A C; Busto Aguirreurreta, N; Tomás Braulio, J

    2015-03-01

    Anesthesiology societies have issued various guidelines on preoperative fasting since 1990, not only to decrease the incidence of lung aspiration and anesthetic morbidity, but also to increase patient comfort prior to anesthesia. Some of these societies have been updating their guidelines, as such that, since 2010, we now have 2 evidence-based preoperative fasting guidelines available. In this article, an attempt is made to review these updated guidelines, as well as the current instructions for more controversial patients such as infants, the obese, and a particular type of ophthalmic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Villebro, Nete; Møller, Ann Merete

    2010-01-01

    and keywords (surgery) or (operation) or (anaesthesia) or (anesthesia). MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL were also searched, combining tobacco- and surgery-related terms. Most recent search April 2010. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that recruited people who smoked prior to surgery, offered......Background Smokers have a substantially increased risk of postoperative complications. Preoperative smoking intervention may be effective in decreasing this incidence, and surgery may constitute a unique opportunity for smoking cessation interventions. Objectives The objective of this review...... was to assess the effect of preoperative smoking intervention on smoking cessation at the time of surgery and 12 months postoperatively and on the incidence of postoperative complications. Search strategy The specialized register of the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group was searched using the free text...

  18. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Villebro, N.; Møller, Ann Merete;

    2010-01-01

    Background Smokers have a substantially increased risk of postoperative complications. Preoperative smoking intervention may be effective in decreasing this incidence, and surgery may constitute a unique opportunity for smoking cessation interventions. Objectives The objective of this review...... was to assess the effect of preoperative smoking intervention on smoking cessation at the time of surgery and 12 months postoperatively and on the incidence of postoperative complications. Search strategy The specialized register of the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group was searched using the free text......; pooled RR 10.76 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.55 to 25.46, two trials) and RR 1.41 (95% CI 1.22 to 1.63, five trials) respectively. Four trials evaluating the effect on long-term smoking cessation found a significant effect; pooled RR 1.61 (95% CI 1.12 to 2.33). However, when pooling intensive...

  19. Radiotherapy, cancer and some anatomical structures related with the pelvic floor: an evaluation of the scientific literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião David Santos-Filho

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy X-rays or other types of ionizing radiation to try to kill the cancer cells in various organs/tissues. PubMed is a database used as a tool in various publications. The aim of this work was to evaluate, in the PubMed, the number of publications (NP in radiotherapy and cancer in various organs related to the pelvic floor as well as brachytherapy. The searches were performed (August 2008 in the PubMed (http://www.pubmed.com using the words: (i radiotherapy (RT or cancer (CA, (ii RT and CA, (iii RT and CA and prostate, RT and CA and testis, RT and CA and breast, RT and CA and kidneys, RT and CA and vulva, RT and CA and vagina, RT and CA and penis, RT and CA and uterus, RT and CA and ovary, RT and CA and bladder, and RT and CA and urethra. A search using brachytherapy was also performed. The NP in each subject was determined and was 2178635 to CA and about 9% of them are related with RT. The NP in RT and CA and breast or prostate is bigger than for the other organs, whereas brachytherapy is mainly cited in the studies about CA of prostate, bladder and breast. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate the importance of radiation therapy studies in the cancer of several organs. This information is crucial in understanding the field and demonstrates areas of significant progress or existing gaps of research in radiotherapy treatment of various cancers of the pelvis. Furthermore, it could significantly aid the interprofessional team in the determination of actions related to the treatment of patients that are undertaking radiotherapy, due to the possible complications of this modality of treatment.Radioterapia é uma forma de tratamento para câncer que usa raios X de alta energia ou outros tipos de radiação ionizante para tentar matar as células do câncer em vários órgãos/tecidos. O objetivo desse trabalho foi avaliar, no PubMed, o número de publicações (NP em radioterapia e câncer em

  20. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, T.P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Jones, N.L. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  1. Radiotherapy as an effective treatment modality for follicular lymphoma: a single institution experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seo Hee; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Jin Seok; Cheong, June Won; Suh, Chang Ok [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that is highly sensitive to radiotherapy (RT). However, the effectiveness of RT has not been well established. We reviewed our experiences to assess the role of RT for FL and analyze treatment results. Retrospective analysis was done on 29 patients who received first RT between January 2003 and August 2013. Of 23 early stage (stage I, II) patients, 16 received RT alone, four received chemotherapy followed by RT, two received RT postoperatively, and one received salvage RT for relapse after resection. Six advanced-stage (stage III, IV) patients received RT after chemotherapy: two received consolidation RT, three received salvage RT for residual lesions, and one received RT for progressive sites. Median RT dose was 30.6 Gy (range, 21.6 to 48.6 Gy). Median follow-up duration was 62 months (range, 6 to 141 months). All patients showed complete response in the radiation field. Eight outfield relapses were reported. Seven patients received salvage treatment (three chemotherapy, four RT). Four patients showed excellent responses, especially to RT. Estimated 5-year and 10-year relapse-free survivals were 72% and 60%. In the RT-alone group, 5-year relapse-free survival was 74.5%. All advanced-stage patients were disease-free with 100% 5-year overall survival. Disease-specific death was noted in only one patient; four others died of other unrelated causes. No significant toxicity was reported. RT resulted in excellent treatment outcomes for all FL stages when used as a primary treatment modality for early stage or salvage-treatment modality for advanced-stage disease.

  2. Using CoRT Thinking in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Timothy M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of Edward de Bono's CoRT (Cognitive Research Trust) program in English classes during the past five years at Memorial Junior High School in Valley Stream, New York. CoRT tools were used to analyze literary characters and plot development and to generate and organize ideas for writing assignments. (TE)

  3. Four and five dimensional radiotherapy with reference to prostate cancer--definitions, state of the art and further directions--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennernäs, Bo; Castellanos, Enrique; Nilsson, Sten; Levitt, Seymour

    2011-06-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) always requires a compromise between tumor control and normal tissue side-effects. Technical innovation in radiation therapy (RT), such as three dimensional RT, is now established. Concerning prostate cancer (PC), it is reasonable to assume that RT of PC will increase in the future. The combination of small margins, a movable target (prostate), few fractions and high doses will probably demand dynamically positioning systems and in real time. This is called four dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT). Moreover, biological factors must be included in new treatments such as hypofractionation schedules. This new era is called five dimensional radiotherapy, 5DRT. In this paper we discuss new concepts in RT in respect to PC.

  4. Brain Radiotherapy plus Concurrent Temozolomide versus Radiotherapy Alone for Patients with Brain Metastases: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhao

    Full Text Available We performed a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials to compare the efficacy of brain radiotherapy (RT combined with temozolomide (TMZ versus RT alone as first-line treatment for brain metastases (BM.Medline, Embase, and Pubmed were used to search for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Two investigators reviewed the abstracts and independently rated the quality of trials and relevant data. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS. Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS, objective response rate (ORR, and adverse events.Seven studies were selected from the literature search. RT plus TMZ produced significant improvement in ORR with odds ratio (OR of 2.27 (95% CI, 1.29 to 4.00; P = 0.005 compared with RT alone. OS and PFS were not significantly different between the two arms (OS: HR, 1.00; P = 0.959; PFS: HR, 0.73; P = 0.232. However, the RT plus TMZ arm was associated with significantly more grade 3 to 4 nausea and thrombocytopenia.Concomitant RT and TMZ, compared to RT alone, significantly increases ORR in patients with BM, but yields increased toxicity and fails to demonstrate a survival advantage.

  5. Brain Radiotherapy plus Concurrent Temozolomide versus Radiotherapy Alone for Patients with Brain Metastases: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Qin, Qin; Sun, Jinglong; Han, Dan; Wang, Zhongtang; Teng, Junjie; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective We performed a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials to compare the efficacy of brain radiotherapy (RT) combined with temozolomide (TMZ) versus RT alone as first-line treatment for brain metastases (BM). Methods Medline, Embase, and Pubmed were used to search for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Two investigators reviewed the abstracts and independently rated the quality of trials and relevant data. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate (ORR), and adverse events. Results Seven studies were selected from the literature search. RT plus TMZ produced significant improvement in ORR with odds ratio (OR) of 2.27 (95% CI, 1.29 to 4.00; P = 0.005) compared with RT alone. OS and PFS were not significantly different between the two arms (OS: HR, 1.00; P = 0.959; PFS: HR, 0.73; P = 0.232). However, the RT plus TMZ arm was associated with significantly more grade 3 to 4 nausea and thrombocytopenia. Conclusion Concomitant RT and TMZ, compared to RT alone, significantly increases ORR in patients with BM, but yields increased toxicity and fails to demonstrate a survival advantage. PMID:26930609

  6. The effect on esophagus after different radiotherapy techniques for early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anni; Maraldo, M.; Brodin, Nils Patrik

    2013-01-01

    The cure rate of early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is excellent; investigating the late effects of treatment is thus important. Esophageal toxicity is a known side effect in patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to the mediastinum, although little is known of this in HL survivors. This study inv...... investigates the dose to the esophagus in the treatment of early stage HL using different RT techniques. Estimated risks of early esophagitis, esophageal stricture and cancer are compared between treatments....

  7. Planned preoperative cisplatin and radiation therapy for locally advanced bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, H W; Yagoda, A; Batata, M; Sogani, P C; Whitmore, W F

    1983-12-15

    Cisplatin (DDP) is an active agent in the treatment of disseminated bladder cancer. In addition to its direct tumor cytotoxicity, recent animal and clinical data suggest synergism with radiation therapy (RT). Since improved survival with preoperative RT is largely restricted to bladder cancer patients in whom radiation-induced downstaging (P less than T) may be recognized, the authors administered DDP + RT preoperatively to patients with locally advanced (T3, T4) bladder tumors selected for cystectomy. The aim was to evaluate the feasibility of such a combination in relation to surgical and hematologic complications, the immediate effect on tumor downstaging, disease progression, and survival. Two thousand rad (400 rad X 5 days) was delivered to the whole pelvis, followed by cystectomy in 2 days. DDP (70 mg/m2) was given intravenously on day 2 of the RT. Twenty-four patients received preoperative DDP + RT and underwent attempted cystectomy; however, six patients were nonresectable owing to extensive pelvic disease, and an additional five patients had resectable pelvic lymph node metastases. Pelvic complications developed in 3 of 24 (12%) patients, but none required reoperation. No patient had a wound dehiscence. Transient myelosuppression was similar to that induced by 2000 rad preoperative RT alone. Tumor downstaging (P less than T) was seen in 9 of 24 (38%) patients, and in 5 (21%) patients, no tumor was found in the surgical specimen (P0). Distant metastases alone have been detected in 4 of 18 (22%) patients who had a cystectomy (all 4 had nodal metastases). Disease-free survival at a median follow-up of 22 months (range, 12-34 months) is 60% (14/24) for all patients (89% for P less than T and 40% for P greater than or equal to T patients) and 78% (14/18) for the resected patients. Combined preoperative DDP + RT proved to be a safe and feasible regimen which resulted in a possibly greater recognition of radioresponsive bladder tumors, and after cystectomy, an

  8. Radiotherapy in cancer of the paranasal sinuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlappack, O.K.; Dobrowsky, W.; Schmid, A.P.; Schratter, M.; Grasl, M.; Swoboda, H.; Mailath, G.; Pavelka, R.; Braun, O.

    1986-05-01

    Carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses are usually advanced when diagnosed and present a therapeutic challenge. During the period between February 1970 and June 1981 44 patients were treated. 22 received postoperative irradiation, seven in combination with chemotherapy. 18 patients were treated with radiation alone, eleven with concomitant chemotherapy. Four patients received preoperative irradiation, three in combination with chemotherapy. The three-year survival is 43% and the five-year survival 33%. For those 26 patients who were irradiated pre- or postoperatively with or without concomitant chemotherapy the five-year survival is 45%. We believe the patient will be afforded the greatest opportunity for cure with the combined efforts of the radiotherapist and the surgeon. The combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy did not provide better results but increased acute and chronic toxicity of the therapy.

  9. Do psychological interventions reduce preoperative anxiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Tessa; Leary, Alison; Wiseman, Theresa

    The systematic review investigates whether, during preoperative assessments, nurse-delivered psychological interventions reduce anxiety levels preoperatively for patients undergoing elective surgery. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria for data extraction and in-depth critiquing. Of these, two were discarded due to lack of validity, while the remaining studies were organised thematically in a narrative synthesis, generating two principal results: patients' preoperative anxieties were lowered by nurse-delivered general preoperative psychological interventions; and patients valued individualised preoperative interventions delivered by nurses. However, the single oncology study in the review showed an elevation in preoperative anxiety, regardless of intervention, and highlights the need for more research in this under-reviewed area. In the meantime, the authors believe that service improvements should be implemented to ensure that, where possible, psychological preoperative interventions are individualised.

  10. Clinical advantages of carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Baba, Masayuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotoshi; Kato, Shingo; Yamada, Shigeru; Yasuda, Shigeo; Yanagi, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Hara, Ryusuke; Yamamoto, Naotaka; Mizoe, Junetsu

    2008-07-01

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) possesses physical and biological advantages. It was started at NIRS in 1994 using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC); since then more than 50 protocol studies have been conducted on almost 4000 patients with a variety of tumors. Clinical experiences have demonstrated that C-ion RT is effective in such regions as the head and neck, skull base, lung, liver, prostate, bone and soft tissues, and pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer, as well as for histological types including adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, malignant melanoma and various types of sarcomas, against which photon therapy could be less effective. Furthermore, when compared with photon and proton RT, a significant reduction of overall treatment time and fractions has been accomplished without enhancing toxicities. Currently, the number of irradiation sessions per patient averages 13 fractions spread over approximately three weeks. This means that in a carbon therapy facility a larger number of patients than is possible with other modalities can be treated over the same period of time.

  11. Treatment planning system for carbon ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama-Ito, Hiroko [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the treatment planning (TP) and its peripheral system for carbon ion therapy that has been developed and in clinical use in recent two years at our institution. A new treatment planning system which is FOCUS customized to our irradiation system will be launched in clinical use soon. A new DICOM based PACS has been developed and in use. Now MRI, PET images are ready to be utilized for patient definition with image fusion functionality of radiotherapy TP. We implemented the exchange functionality of TP data specified by RTOG 3D QA Center in FOCUS, Pinnacle3 and heavy ion TP. Target volume and normal structure contours and dose distributions are exchangeable. A database system of carbon ion therapy dedicated to analysis of therapy data has been designed and implemented. All accessible planning data and treatment records of more than 1000 patients treated for seven and half years have been archived. The system has a DICOM RT sever and a database for miscellaneous text data. Limited numbers of private attributes were introduced for ion therapy specific objects. On-line as well as manual registration along with edit functionalities is prepared. Standard web browser is used to search and retrieve information. A DICOM RT viewer has been developed to view and retrieve RT images, dose distributions and structure set. These system described above are all designed to conform to the up-to-date standards of radiation therapy so as to be bases of the future development of the therapy at our institution. (author)

  12. Preoperative localization in primary hyperparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sanson; Kitamura, Hiroyuki; Takagita, Shin-ichi; Maetani, Toshiki; Iwahashi, Yuka; Miyazaki, Masakazu; Yamamoto, Norio [Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    Between 1992 and 1996, 31 cases (8 men and 23 women) with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) were treated in our department. In this study, we compared which of the preoperative localization methods was most useful in the detection of PHPT. The sensitivity for detection of abnormal parathyroid glands was 88.6% on ultrasonography (US), 76.9% on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 74.3% on Tl-Tc subtraction scintigraphy and 68.8% on computed tomography. We concluded that US should be performed first, with MRI as a supplementary method, for the detection of abnormal parathyroid glands and the evaluation of invasion within the body. (author)

  13. Preoperative Evaluation for Noncardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Steven L

    2016-12-06

    This issue provides a clinical overview of preoperative evaluation for noncardiac surgery, focusing on risk factors, elements of evaluation, medication management, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  14. Radiotherapy for the medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gose, Kyuhei; Imajo, Yoshinari; Imanaka, Kazufumi (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-08-01

    Eighteen patients with medulloblastoma, treated between 1972 and 1981, at Kobe University School of Medicine, were retrospectively studied. Of those completing post operative irradiation, 50% have survived for 2 years, 15% for 5 years and mean survival periods was 22.2 months. 13 out of 18 patients developed local recurrence and spinal dissemination. The mean time from the initial radiotherapy to recurrence was 8.5 months. It was suggested that posterior fossa should recieve 5,000 rad, the spine should 2,000 rad and recurrences should be treated by the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  15. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimi D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have residual salivary gland function. Unfortunately, it is well established that in most cases radiotherapy destroys most of the salivary gland and associated salivary secretions.     

  16. Role of salvage radiotherapy for regional lymph node recurrence after radical surgery in advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Hyuck; Eom, Keun Yong; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Hyung Ho; Park, Do Jong [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    To evaluate the role of salvage radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of regional lymph node recurrence (RLNR) after radical surgery in advanced gastric cancer. We retrospectively analyzed medical records of 26 patients who underwent salvage treatment after diagnosis of RLNR between 2006 and 2011. Patients with peritoneal seeding or distant metastasis were excluded. Eighteen patients received RT with or without chemotherapy and the other 8 did chemotherapy only without RT. A three-dimensional conformal RT was performed with median dose of 56 Gy (range, 44 to 60 Gy). Sixteen patients had fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy, 5 did taxane-based chemotherapy, and irinotecan was applied in 4. With a median follow-up of 20 months (range, 5 to 57 months), median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) after diagnosis of RLNR were 29 months and 12 months in the entire patients, respectively. Radiotherapy (p = 0.007) and disease-free interval (p = 0.033) were statistically significant factors for OS in multivariate analysis. Median OS was 36 months in patients who received RT and 16 months in those who did not. Furthermore, delivery of RT (p < 0.001), complete remission after salvage treatment (p = 0.040) and performance status (p 0.023) were associated with a significantly better PFS. Gastrointestinal toxicities from RT were mild in most patients. Salvage RT combined with systemic chemotherapy may be an effective treatment managing RLNR from advanced gastric cancer.

  17. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and immunotherapy combinations: turning the future into systemic therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walshaw, Richard C; Honeychurch, Jamie; Illidge, Tim M

    2016-10-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is effective at cytoreducing tumours and until relatively recently the focus in radiobiology has been on the direct effects of RT on the tumour. Increasingly, however, the effect of RT on the tumour vasculature, tumour stroma and immune system are recognized as important to the overall outcome. RT is known to lead to the induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD), which can generate tumour-specific immunity. However, systemic immunity leading to "abscopal effects" resulting in tumour shrinkage outside of the RT treatment field is rare, which is thought to be caused by the immunosuppressive nature of the tumour microenvironment. Recent advances in understanding the nature of this immunosuppression and therapeutics targeting immune checkpoints such as programmed death 1 has led to durable clinical responses in a range of cancer types including malignant melanoma and non-small-cell lung cancer. The effects of RT dose and fraction on the generation of ICD and systemic immunity are largely unknown and are currently under investigation. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) provides an opportunity to deliver single or hypofractionated large doses of RT and potentially increase the amount of ICD and the generation of systemic immunity. Here, we review the interplay of RT and the tumour microenvironment and the rationale for combining SABR with immunomodulatory agents to generate systemic immunity and improve outcomes.

  18. Preoperative preparation of patients with pituitary gland disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenković, Vesna; Gvozdenović, Ljiljana; Milaković, Branko; Sabljak, Vera; Ladjević, Nebojsa; Zivaljević, Vladan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the most common disorders of pituitary function: acromegaly, hypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus and syndrome similar to diabetes insipidus, in terms of their importance in preoperative preparation of patients. Pituitary function manages almost the entire endocrine system using the negative feedback mechanism that is impaired by these diseases. The cause of acromegaly is a pituitary adenoma, which produces growth hormone in adults. Primary therapy of acromegaly is surgical, with or without associated radiotherapy. If a patient with acromegaly as comorbidity prepares for non-elective neurosurgical operation, then it requires consultation with brain surgeons for possible delays of that operation and primary surgical treatment of pituitary gland. If operative treatment of pituitary gland is carried out, the preoperative preparation (for other surgical interventions) should consider the need for perioperative glucocorticoid supplementation. Panhypopituitarism consequences are different in children and adults and the first step in diagnosis is to assess the function of target organs. Change of electrolytes and water occurs in the case of pituitary lesions in the form of central or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus as a syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). Preoperative preparation of patients with pituitary dysfunction should be multidisciplinary, whether it is a neurosurgical or some other surgical intervention. The aim is to evaluate the result of insufficient production of pituitary hormones (hypopituitarism), excessive production of adenohypophysis hormones (acromegaly, Cushing's disease and hyperprolactinemia) and the influence of pituitary tumours in surrounding structures (compression syndrome) and to determine the level of perioperative risk. Pharmacological suppressive therapy of the hyperfunctional pituitary disorders can have significant interactions with drugs used in the perioperative period.

  19. Radiotherapy infrastructure and human resources in Europe - present status and its implications for 2020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Samiei, Massoud; Bodis, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is required for nearly half of the newly diagnosed cancer patients. To optimise the quality and availability of RT, guidelines have been proposed by European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology-QUAntification of Radiation Therapy Infrastructure And Staffing Needs (ESTRO-QUARTS) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This study evaluates the present status of RT capacity in Europe and the projected needs by 2020 as per these recommendations. Thirty-nine of the 53 countries, listed in Europe by the UN Statistical Division, whose cancer incidences, teletherapy and human resources were available in the Global Cancer Incidence, Mortality and Prevalence (GLOBOCAN), International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and DIrectory of RAdiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) (IAEA) databases were evaluated. A total of 3550 teletherapy units (TRT), 7017 radiation oncologists (RO), 3685 medical physicists (MP) and 12,788 radiotherapy technologists (RTT) are presently available for the 3.44 million new cancer cases reported annually in these countries. The present infrastructure and human resources in RT are estimated to provide RT access to 74.3% of the patients requiring RT. The current capacity in TRT, RO, MP and RTT when compared with recommended guidelines has a deficit of 25.6%, 18.3%, 22.7% and 10.6%, respectively. Thus, to respond to requirements by 2020, the existing capacity needs to be augmented by an additional 1698 TRTs, 2429 ROs, 1563 MPs and 2956 RTTs. With an imminent rise in cancer incidence, multifaceted strategic planning at national and international levels within a coordinated comprehensive cancer control programme is highly desirable to give adequate access to all patients who require radiotherapy across Europe. Specific steps to address this issue at national and continental levels involving all major stakeholders are proposed.

  20. Intensity-Modulated and Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Patients with Locally Advanced Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer after Preradiation Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sinn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Radiotherapy (RT in patients with pancreatic cancer is still a controversial subject and its benefit in inoperable stages of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC, even after induction chemotherapy, remains unclear. Modern radiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT may improve effectiveness and reduce radiotherapy-related toxicities. Methods. Patients with LAPC who underwent radiotherapy after chemotherapy between 09/2004 and 05/2013 were retrospectively analyzed with regard to preradiation chemotherapy (PRCT, modalities of radiotherapy, and toxicities. Progression-free (PFS and overall survival (OS were estimated by Kaplan-Meier curves. Results. 15 (68% women and 7 men (median age 64 years; range 40–77 were identified. Median duration of PRCT was 11.1 months (range 4.3–33.0. Six patients (27% underwent conventional RT and 16 patients (73% advanced IMRT and IGRT; median dosage was 50.4 (range 9–54 Gray. No grade III or IV toxicities occurred. Median PFS (estimated from the beginning of RT was 5.8 months, 2.6 months in the conventional RT group (conv-RT, and 7.1 months in the IMRT/IGRT group (P=0.029; median OS was 11.0 months, 4.2 months (conv-RT, and 14.0 months (IMRT/IGRT; P=0.141. Median RT-specific PFS for patients with prolonged PRCT > 9 months was 8.5 months compared to 5.6 months for PRCT 9 months group, with 19.0 months compared to 8.5 months in the PRCT  <  9 months group (P=0.049. Conclusions. IGRT and IMRT after PRCT are feasible and effective options for patients with LAPC after prolonged preradiation chemotherapy.

  1. Preoperative short-term radiation therapy (25 Gy, 2.5 Gy twice daily) for primary resectable rectal cancer (phase II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, J; Herbst, F; Dobrowsky, W; Schmid, R; Pokrajac, B; Jech, B; Chiari, C; Stift, A; Maier, A; Karner-Hanusch, J; Teleky, B; Wrba, F; Jakesz, R; Poetter, R

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and long-term bowel function of preoperative hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in primary resectable rectal cancer. A total of 184 consecutive patients ( median age 65 years, male : female = 2 : 1) with clinical T3Nx rectal adenocarcinoma received

  2. Erythropoietin and radiotherapy; Erythropoietine et radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Fur, E.; Albarghach, M.N.; Pradier, O. [CHU de Morvan, Dept. de radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2010-01-15

    Erythropoietin (E.P.O.) is a glycoprotein hormone. This hormone is a growth factor for red blood cells precursors in the bone marrow. The decrease of oxygen partial pressure, a reduced number of erythrocytes caused by bleeding or excessive destruction, or increased tissues oxygen requirements lead to increased secretion of E.P.O.. Its action takes place on bone marrow erythroblastic cells through specific receptors. E.P.O. stimulates the proliferation of red cell precursors stem cells in the bone marrow, thus increasing their production in one to two weeks. The effectiveness of E.P.O. at increasing haemoglobin and improving patients quality of life has been demonstrated by several studies. However, its use in radiotherapy remains controversial. While tumour hypoxia caused by anaemia is a factor of radio resistance and thus a source of local failure, tumour expression of E.P.O. receptors presents a significant risk for tumour progression and neo-angiogenesis, which would be increased during the administration of E.P.O.. The purpose of this article is to answer the question: is there a place for E.P.O. in combination with radiotherapy in the management of cancer?

  3. Preoperative fasting time in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adeel, S

    2012-02-01

    The aim of preoperative fasting is to prevent regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration while limiting potential problems of thirst, dehydration and hypoglycaemia. The American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) has suggested guidelines for preoperative fasting for children undergoing elective surgery. We did a postal survey to determine the current practice regarding these guidelines amongst all specialist registrars in anaesthesia in Ireland. A questionnaire was sent to all specialist registrars in anaesthesia (90 in total), 60 (67%) were returned and analysed. The question asked was how long children should be kept fasting before elective surgery. The results of our survey suggest that most of the respondents are following the ASA guidelines for clear fluids and solids however there were differing opinion regarding the duration of fasting for formula milk and breast milk. In conclusion, we would recommend greater awareness and collaboration between anaesthetists, nurses and surgeons to ensure that fasting instructions are consistent with the ASA guidelines and that patient and their parents understand these directives as well.

  4. Feasibility of preoperative hypo-fractionated volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for malignant soft tissue tumor in rabbit extremity%兔肢体恶性软组织肿瘤术前大分割容积弧形调强放疗可行性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    时广力; 刘艳; 王崇文; 白靖平; 杨爱梅

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨应用兔肢体软组织肿瘤模型实施术前大分割容积弧形调强放疗(volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy,VMAT)的可行性.方法 成功构建30只兔VX2软组织肿瘤模型,2周后随机分为VMAT大分割放疗组10只(VMAT组)、常规分割调强放疗(intensity modulation radiated therapy,IMRT)放疗组10只(IMRT组)和对照组10只,给予的单次剂量分别为3 Gy、2 Gy和不采取任何处理.放疗结束后,3组行MRI扫描评估,并采用Envision法检测肿瘤组织Ki-67表达率.结果 VMAT组和IMRT组肿瘤体积[(21.11±2.36)、(23.56±3.21)cm3]和肿瘤组织Ki-67表达率[(49.67±2.34)%、(51.00±2.39)%]均小于对照组[(46.78±3.38)cm3,(68.22±5.21)%](P<0.01),VMAT组与IMRT组比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 大分割VMAT在兔肢体恶性软组织肿瘤的术前放疗中可取得与常规分割IMRT相同疗效.

  5. 局部晚期中低位直肠癌术前螺旋断层同期加量放疗并同步口服卡培他滨化疗的效果%Chemoradiation effect of combined preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy with oral capecitabine in patients with locally advanced mid-low rectal cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost of tomotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许卫东; 高军茂; 赵一虹; 陈纲; 杜峻峰; 张富利

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) with oral capecitabine in patients with locally advanced mid-low rectal cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) of tomotherapy.Methods Total 16 patients with resectable locally advanced mid-low rectal cancer (patients with T3 to T4 and/or N ± rectal cancer) were enroll in current study.Patients were received IMRT to 2 dose levels simultaneously (55 and 47.5 Gy in 25 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine 825 mg/m2 twice daily,5 days/week.Total mesorectal excision was performed at 8 to 9 week after the completion of chemoradiation.The primary end point included side effect,the rate of sphinctersparing,postoperative complication and pathological complete response rate (pCR) were observed.Side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0.Results All patients were received chemoradiotion therapy without any break.Tomotherapy showed superiority with respect to target coverage,homogeneity and conformality.Two patients refused to perform radical surgery because of almost complete primary tumor regression and complete symptom relief after neoadjuvant therapy.Fourteen patients underwent surgical resection and 11 patients (78.6%) underwent sphincter-sparing lower anterior resection.Four patients(28.6%) had a pathological complete response.The incidence of grade 1-2 hematologic,gastro-intestinal toxicities were 62.5% (10/16) and 18.8% (3/16).The incidence of grade 3 skin toxicities were 68.8%(10/16).Grade Ⅳ side effect was not observed.Surgical complications (incisional infection on thirteen after surgery) were observed in 1 patient.Conclusion Preoperative simultaneous integrated boost of tomotherapy with concurrent oral capecitabine is safe and well tolerated in patients with a promising local control.However,a larger number of patients and a long follow-up are required to assess its

  6. Arvo Pärt. Litany / Peter Korfmacher

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Korfmacher, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Pärt, Arvo. Litany; Psalom; Trisagion. Hilliard Ensemble, Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir, Tallinn Chamber Orchestra, Tõnu Kaljuste"; Lithuanian Chamber Orchestra, Saulius Sondeckis. ECM 1592/449 810-2

  7. rt: Fratres / Robert Cowan

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Cowan, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Pärt: Fratres (seven versions). Festina Lente. Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten. Summa. Peter Manning (vn.), France Springuel (vc.), Mireille Gleizes (pf.), I Fiamminghi. Telare CD CD80387 (79 minutes)

  8. rt: Berliner Messe / Rob Cowan

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Cowan, Rob

    1998-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Pärt: Berliner Messe. The Beatitudes. Annum per Annum. Magnificat. Seven Magnificat Antiphons. De profundis. Polyphony / Steven Layton with Andrew Lucas" Hyperion CDA66960 (74 minutes:DDD)

  9. rt: Berliner Messe / Rob Cowan

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Cowan, Rob

    1998-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Pärt: Berliner Messe. The Beatitudes. Annum per Annum. Magnificat. Seven Magnificat Antiphons. De profundis. Polyphony / Steven Layton with Andrew Lucas" Hyperion CDA66960 (74 minutes:DDD)

  10. rt: Fratres / Robert Cowan

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Cowan, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Pärt: Fratres (seven versions). Festina Lente. Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten. Summa. Peter Manning (vn.), France Springuel (vc.), Mireille Gleizes (pf.), I Fiamminghi. Telare CD CD80387 (79 minutes)

  11. Innovations in Radiotherapy Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feain, I J; Court, L; Palta, J R; Beddar, S; Keall, P

    2017-02-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries, together with remote and low socioeconomic populations within high-income countries, lack the resources and services to deal with cancer. The challenges in upgrading or introducing the necessary services are enormous, from screening and diagnosis to radiotherapy planning/treatment and quality assurance. There are severe shortages not only in equipment, but also in the capacity to train, recruit and retain staff as well as in their ongoing professional development via effective international peer-review and collaboration. Here we describe some examples of emerging technology innovations based on real-time software and cloud-based capabilities that have the potential to redress some of these areas. These include: (i) automatic treatment planning to reduce physics staffing shortages, (ii) real-time image-guided adaptive radiotherapy technologies, (iii) fixed-beam radiotherapy treatment units that use patient (rather than gantry) rotation to reduce infrastructure costs and staff-to-patient ratios, (iv) cloud-based infrastructure programmes to facilitate international collaboration and quality assurance and (v) high dose rate mobile cobalt brachytherapy techniques for intraoperative radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiotherapy for craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ajay; Fersht, Naomi; Brada, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Radiotherapy remains the mainstay of multidisciplinary management of patients with incompletely resected and recurrent craniopharyngioma. Advances in imaging and radiotherapy technology offer new alternatives with the principal aim of improving the accuracy of treatment and reducing the volume of normal brain receiving significant radiation doses. We review the available technologies, their technical advantages and disadvantages and the published clinical results. Fractionated high precision conformal radiotherapy with image guidance remains the gold standard; the results of single fraction treatment are disappointing and hypofractionation should be used with caution as long term results are not available. There is insufficient data on the use of protons to assess the comparative efficacy and toxicity. The precision of treatment delivery needs to be coupled with experienced infrastructure and more intensive quality assurance to ensure best treatment outcome and this should be carried out within multidisciplinary teams experienced in the management of craniopharyngioma. The advantages of the combined skills and expertise of the team members may outweigh the largely undefined clinical gain from novel radiotherapy technologies.

  13. TAK1-regulated expression of BIRC3 predicts resistance to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in oesophageal adenocarcinoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, G; Giacopuzzi, S; Bencivenga, M; Carbone, C; Verlato, G; Frizziero, M; Zanotto, M; Mina, M M; Merz, V; Santoro, R; Zanoni, A; De Manzoni, G; Tortora, G; Melisi, D

    2015-01-01

    Background: About 20% of resectable oesophageal carcinoma is resistant to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Here we hypothesised that the expression of the antiapoptotic gene Baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat containing (BIRC)3 induced by the transforming growth factor β activated kinase 1 (TAK1) might be responsible for the resistance to the proapoptotic effect of chemoradiotherapy in oesophageal carcinoma. Methods: TAK1 kinase activity was inhibited in FLO-1 and KYAE-1 oesophageal adenocarcinoma cells using (5Z)-7-oxozeaenol. The BIRC3 mRNA expression was measured by qRT–PCR in 65 pretreatment frozen biopsies from patients receiving preoperatively docetaxel, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and concurrent radiotherapy. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses were performed to determine the performance of BIRC3 expression levels in distinguishing patients with sensitive or resistant carcinoma. Results: In vitro, (5Z)-7-oxozeaenol significantly reduced BIRC3 expression in FLO-1 and KYAE-1 cells. Exposure to chemotherapeutic agents or radiotherapy plus (5Z)-7-oxozeaenol resulted in a strong synergistic antiapoptotic effect. In patients, median expression of BIRC3 was significantly (P<0.0001) higher in adenocarcinoma than in the more sensitive squamous cell carcinoma subtype. The BIRC3 expression significantly discriminated patients with sensitive or resistant adenocarcinoma (AUC-ROC=0.7773 and 0.8074 by size-based pathological response or Mandard's tumour regression grade classifications, respectively). Conclusions: The BIRC3 expression might be a valid biomarker for predicting patients with oesophageal adenocarcinoma that could most likely benefit from preoperative chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26291056

  14. The impact of radiotherapy on clinical outcomes in parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Seon; Lim, Do Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Radiotherapy (RT) is considered a mainstay of treatment in parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS). We aim to determine the treatment outcomes and prognostic factors for PM-RMS patients who treated with RT. In addition, we tried to evaluate the adequate dose and timing of RT. Twenty-two patients with PM-RMS from 1995 to 2013 were evaluated. Seven patients had intracranial extension (ICE) and 17 patients had skull base bony erosion (SBBE). Five patients showed distant metastases at the time of diagnosis. All patients underwent chemotherapy and RT. The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 40.0 to 56.0 Gy). The median follow-up was 28.7 months. Twelve patients (54.5%) experienced failure after treatment; 4 local, 2 regional, and 6 distant failures. The 5-year local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were 77.7% and 38.5%, respectively. The 5-year OS rate was 50.8% for patients without distant metastases and 0% for patients with metastases (p < 0.001). Radiation dose (<50 Gy vs. ≥50 Gy) did not compromise the LC (p = 0.645). However, LC was affected by ICE (p = 0.031). Delayed administration (>22 weeks) of RT was related to a higher rate of local failure (40.0%). RT resulted in a higher rate of local control in PM-RMS. However, it was not extended to survival outcome. A more effective treatment for PM-RMS is warranted.

  15. The impact of involved node, involved field and mantle field radiotherapy on estimated radiation doses and risk of late effects for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, M V; Jørgensen, M; Brodin, N P;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of radiotherapy (RT) is debated for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) due to the late effects of treatment. Radiation doses to the thyroid, heart, lungs, and breasts are compared with the extensive mantle field (MF), Involved Field RT(IFRT), Modified IFRT (m...

  16. Factors associated with acute and late dysphagia in the DAHANCA 6 & 7 randomized trial with accelerated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Hanna Rahbek; Overgaard, Jens; Jensen, Kenneth;

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common and debilitating side effect in head and neck radiotherapy (RT). Prognostic factors are numerous and their interrelationship not well understood. The aim of this study was to establish a multivariate prognostic model for acute and late dysphagia after RT, based on informatio...

  17. Factors associated with acute and late dysphagia in the DAHANCA 6 & 7 randomized trial with accelerated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Hanna R; Overgaard, Jens; Jensen, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common and debilitating side effect in head and neck radiotherapy (RT). Prognostic factors are numerous and their interrelationship not well understood. The aim of this study was to establish a multivariate prognostic model for acute and late dysphagia after RT, based on information...

  18. Phase II study of palliative low-dose local radiotherapy in disseminated indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jóhannsson, Jakob; Specht, Lena; Mejer, Johannes

    2002-01-01

    Indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (INHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are highly sensitive to radiotherapy (RT). Previous retrospective studies have shown high response rates after local palliative RT of 4 Gy in 2 fractions, which prompted this prospective Phase II trial of the palliative...

  19. What is Sensemaking in the Context of External Radiotherapy Treatment Planning?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aselmaa, A.; Goossens, R.H.M.; Freudenthal, A.

    2013-01-01

    The external beam radiotherapy (RT) is one of the medical treatments against cancer, which is changing rapidly in these years as a result of technological advancements. Despite the expected benefits of integrating new technologies, often it results in increased cognitive workload for the user. This

  20. Preoperative information management system using wireless PDAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Tomohiro; Okahara, Masaharu; Santo, Masayuki; Schmidt, Ulrich; Nakata, Yoshinori; Morita, Shigeho; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2003-01-01

    Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) and wireless communication are currently available in clinical settings. We developed wireless PDA software that assists anesthesiologists in pre-operative patient assessment. The device communicates with the hospital information system through a wireless LAN and is equipped with pre-programmed data entry templates for pre-operative assessment. As a preliminary test of the device, we randomly assigned residents in preoperative assessment to an intervention and a control arm and compared the results.

  1. The current role of radiotherapy in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, B.M.P.; Bartelink, H. [Nederlands Kanker Inst. `Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis`, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gunderson, L.L. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1995-07-01

    During the last two decades, radiotherapy has become an integral part of the multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Currently, radiotherapy is seen mainly as an adjuvant therapy, sometimes in combination with chemotherapy, in a pre- or post-operative setting. Adjuvant radiotherapy alone leads to a significant reduction of local recurrence rates, but an impact on survival is seen only in subset analyses. Combined modality treatment can reduce local recurrence rates even further, and can also reduce the rate of distant relapses and increase survival. The acute toxicity of combined modality is considerably higher. Local radiation can also be used as a component of organ conserving local treatment for selected early lesions. Radiotherapy has been an important palliative treatment modality, diminishing symptoms in cases of inoperable primary rectal cancers or pelvic recurrences. The timing of radiation, surgery and chemotherapy has been under evaluation for years. For patients with locally advanced primary or recurrent malignancies (unresectable due to fixation), the preferred sequence is pre-operative irradiation with or without chemotherapy, followed by surgical resection. For mobile resectable lesions, sequencing issues are being tested in phase III randomised trials. (author).

  2. Radiotherapy of bile duct carcinoma; Effectiveness of external irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiina, Takeki; Itami, Jun; Uno, Takashi; Kato, Hajime; Tani, Masanao; Kawai, Saburou (National Medical Center of Hospital, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-10-01

    Twenty-six patients with cholangiocarcinoma and nineteen patients with carcinoma of the gallbladder treated with external radiotherapy were analyzed. Of the twenty-six patients, eighteen had cancer of the hepatic hilus (Klatskin), four intrahepatic and the remaining four extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. All but two of the patients had advanced disease. Thirty-three patients received primary irradiation for unresectable tumors, ten patients adjuvant irradiation after non-curative gross tumor resection, and two patients preoperative radiotherapy. Patients with cholangiocarcinoma who underwent radiotherapy with relatively small radiation field tolerated the treatment well, but there was no significant difference in survival according to field size or radiation doses (TDF). On the other hand, patients with carcinoma of gallbladder were treated with larger field size and lower dose. In the patients without gross tumor resection, those receiving radiation doses[>=]90 TDF had significantly longer survival than <90 TDF (p<0.05). Regarding to the field size, patients irradiated by smaller field size ([<=]100 cm[sup 2]) had longer survival (p=0.07). The patients with gross tumor resection had significantly longer survival than that without resection in both cholangiocarcinoma and carcinoma of gallbladder. Postmortem examination revealed tumor recurrence even in the patients with gross tumor resection, but widespread distant metastases were present simultaneously. Cholangitis and liver abscess were special and lethal conditions related to these carcinomas, and intensive therapy must be developed for these conditions. External radiotherapy may be effective in the treatment of bile duct carcinoma in terms of palliation and survival. (author).

  3. Radiotherapy with and without temozolomide in elderly patients with glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niyazi, M.; Schwarz, S.B.; Belka, C. [Ludwig-Maximilian-Univ. Munich, Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Suchorska, B. [Ludwig-Maximilian-Univ. Munich, Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2012-02-15

    The optimal treatment for elderly patients (age {>=} 70 years) with glioblastoma (GBM) remains controversial. We conducted a retrospective analysis in 43 consecutive elderly patients with glioblastoma who either underwent radiotherapy (RT) or radiotherapy plus concomitant temozolomide (TMZ). A total of 43 patients ({>=} 70 years of age, median age 75.8 years) with newly diagnosed glioblastoma and a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) {>=} 70 were treated with RT alone (median 60 Gy in 2 Gy single fractions) or RT plus TMZ at a dose of 75 mg/m{sup 2} per day. The two groups were well-balanced; univariate (log-rank test) and multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis were used to identify relevant prognostic factors. The median overall survival (mOS) of the entire patient cohort was 264 days (8.8 months) and the median progression-free survival (PFS) was 192 days (6.4 months). The factors age, sex, previous surgery, KPS, and concomitant use of TMZ had no significant influence on OS/PFS; multivariate analysis was performed to obtain adjusted hazard ratios. TMZ use resulted in a trend toward poorer overall survival when applied concomitantly (314 days compared to 192 days within the TMZ group, p = 0.106). The subgroup analysis revealed that TMZ use resulted in significantly worse survival rates in patients with KPS70 (p = 0.027), but for patients with KPS80 this difference was not detectable. TMZ should only be used carefully in elderly patients with unfavorable KPS. In this patient cohort, radiotherapy alone is a reasonable option. Standard RT plus concomitant TMZ may be an advantageous treatment option for elderly patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma who present with good prognostic factors. (orig.)

  4. Phase II study of preoperative radiation plus concurrent daily tegafur-uracil (UFT with leucovorin for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calais Gilles

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerable variation in intravenous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU metabolism can occur due to the wide range of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD enzyme activity, which can affect both tolerability and efficacy. The oral fluoropyrimidine tegafur-uracil (UFT is an effective, well-tolerated and convenient alternative to intravenous 5-FU. We undertook this study in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of UFT with leucovorin (LV and preoperative radiotherapy and to evaluate the utility and limitations of multicenter staging using pre- and post-chemoradiotherapy ultrasound. We also performed a validated pretherapy assessment of DPD activity and assessed its potential influence on the tolerability of UFT treatment. Methods This phase II study assessed preoperative UFT with LV and radiotherapy in 85 patients with locally advanced T3 rectal cancer. Patients with potentially resectable tumors received UFT (300 mg/m/2/day, LV (75 mg/day, and pelvic radiotherapy (1.8 Gy/day, 45 Gy total 5 days/week for 5 weeks then surgery 4-6 weeks later. The primary endpoints included tumor downstaging and the pathologic complete response (pCR rate. Results Most adverse events were mild to moderate in nature. Preoperative grade 3/4 adverse events included diarrhea (n = 18, 21% and nausea/vomiting (n = 5, 6%. Two patients heterozygous for dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene (DPYD experienced early grade 4 neutropenia (variant IVS14+1G > A and diarrhea (variant 2846A > T. Pretreatment ultrasound TNM staging was compared with postchemoradiotherapy pathology TN staging and a significant shift towards earlier TNM stages was observed (p Conclusion Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using UFT with LV plus radiotherapy was well tolerated and effective and represents a convenient alternative to 5-FU-based chemoradiotherapy for the treatment of resectable rectal cancer. Pretreatment detection of DPD deficiency should

  5. Preoperative evaluation of oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Lauren G; Gress, Frank G

    2015-02-01

    The preoperative evaluation of oesophageal adenocarcinoma involves endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET). With routine Barrett's oesophagus surveillance, superficial cancers are often identified. EUS, CT and PET have a limited role in the staging of superficial tumours. Standard EUS has limited accuracy, but high frequency ultrasound miniprobes are valuable for assessing tumour stage in superficial tumours. However, the best method for determining depth of invasion, and thereby stage of disease, is endoscopic mucosal resection. In contrast, in advanced oesophageal cancers, a multi-modality approach is crucial. Accurate tumour staging is very important since the treatment of advanced cancers involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. EUS is very useful for staging of the tumour and nodes. High frequency ultrasound miniprobes provide the ability to perform staging when the lesion is obstructing the oesophageal lumen. CT and PET provide valuable information regarding node and metastasis staging.

  6. Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Palliative Radiotherapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Absence of a Dose Threshold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Alia M; Hudson, Mack; Magnus, Kenneth G; Huang, Fleur; Danielson, Brita L; Venner, Peter; Saluja, Ronak; LeGuerrier, Bronwen; Daly, Helene; Emmenegger, Urban; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-03-06

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is the final common pathway resulting from insufficient blood supply to bone, commonly the femoral head. There are many postulated etiologies of non-traumatic AVN, including corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, and radiotherapy (RT). However, it is unclear whether there is a dose threshold for the development of RT-induced AVN. In this case report, we describe a patient with prostate cancer metastatic to bone diagnosed with AVN after receiving single-fraction palliative RT to the left femoral head. Potential contributing factors are discussed, along with a review of other reported cases. At present, the RT dose threshold below which there is no risk for AVN is unknown, and therefore detrimental impact from the RT cannot be excluded. Given the possibility that RT-induced AVN is a stochastic effect, it is important to be aware of the possibility of this diagnosis in any patient with a painful hip who has received RT to the femoral head.

  7. Prophylactic training for the prevention of radiotherapy-induced trismus - a randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loorents, Vera; Rosell, Johan; Karlsson, Charlott; Lidbäck, Maria; Hultman, Kristina; Börjeson, Sussanne

    2014-04-01

    Radiotherapy-induced trismus (RTIT) is a debilitating condition without any proven effective treatment. This study investigates the effectiveness of prophylactic training to prevent RTIT during and up to 12 months after completed RT in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), also investigating the incidence of RTIT. Sixty-six consecutive patients from two RT clinics in Sweden were randomised into one of two groups: training with TheraBite(®) Jaw Motion Rehabilitation System(™) or a control group. Maximum interincisal openings (MIO) were recorded at baseline and once a week during treatment, three, six and 12 months after completed RT. Training frequency was recorded by patients in a log book. There were no significant differences in MIO between the intervention and control groups at any of the measurement points. Patients in both groups maintained their normal variation in MIO at 12 months after completed RT. A small group of patients in the control group had a 17% mean decrease in MIO by week 6 compared to baseline and improved their MIO by using the training programme. There was a significant mean difference in MIO from baseline to week 6 (3 mm, p = 0.018), and month 6 (2.7 mm, p = 0.040), for patients receiving 3D conformal radiotherapy. There was a significant difference in MIO between patients treated with RT and concurrent chemotherapy compared to patients with RT only at 12 months (p = 0.033). Patients with HNC undergoing high dose RT do not need to be burdened with an intense prophylactic training programme during RT and up to 12 months after completed RT. MIO measurements during RT and up to 12 months after completed RT are recommended to identify a small risk group who are an exception and may need a training programme.

  8. The early response of p53-dependent proteins during radiotherapy in human rectal carcinoma and in adjacent normal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stift, A; Prager, G; Selzer, E; Widder, J; Kandioler, D; Friedl, J; Teleky, B; Herbst, F; Wrba, F; Bergmann, M

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the activation of the p53 pathway and the induction of apoptosis during preoperative radiotherapy in normal human rectal tissue and in rectal carcinoma. Twelve patients with rectal cancer of the lower third were enrolled in this study. Tumor specimens and adj

  9. Radiotherapy of cutaneous lymphomas; Radiotherapie des lymphomes cutanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirova, Y.M.; Piedbois, Y.; Pan, Q.; Guo, J.P.; Le Bourgeois, J.P. [Hopital Henri-Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France). Dept. de cancerologie

    1999-03-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of cutaneous lymphomas. In the treatment of Mycosis fungoides, total skin electron beam radiation therapy is efficient for patients with limited and superficial forms of the disease. Radiotherapy is also efficient for the locally advanced forms of non-epidermo-tropic lymphomas. The palliative radiotherapy is indicated for advanced, nodular and treatment resistant forms of cutaneous lymphomas and for voluminous lymphadenopathies. (authors)

  10. Distinct patterns of stomatitis with concurrent cetuximab and radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, D I; Burmeister, E; Burmeister, B H; Poulsen, M G; Porceddu, S V

    2011-10-01

    To describe the distinct patterns of severe anterior stomatitis seen with concurrent cetuximab and radiotherapy (RT) compared to chemoRT or altered fractionation RT (AFRT) and explore potential associations with clinical and dosimetric parameters. We reviewed acute toxicity data from 42 patients receiving cetuximab-RT and a matched cohort of 36 patients receiving chemoRT or AFRT. The occurrence of grade ≥3 oral toxicities was analysed with respect to clinical (age, gender, smoking/alcohol history, tumour subsite, grade of acneiform rash) and dosimetric parameters. Cetuximab-RT patients experienced higher rates of grade ≥3 cheilitis (26% vs 6%, p=0.01) and anterior stomatitis (38% vs 6%, p=0.002), despite these structures receiving low RT doses (median maximum dose to lips 9.3 Gy, anterior oral cavity 20 Gy). Multivariable analyses identified increasing severity of acneiform rash as the strongest predictor of grade ≥3 cheilitis whilst increasing RT dose was weakly correlated. A trend was observed for increasing pack years of smoking on univariate analysis only. The combination of cetuximab and low doses of RT to the anterior oral cavity has resulted in a distinctive pattern of cheilitis and anterior stomatitis in our patients. Further exploration of this phenomenon may yield additional insights into the interaction of cetuximab with RT in non-target tissues.

  11. Castleman′s disease and radiotherapy: A single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Uysal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The role of radiotherapy (RT in the management of Castleman′s disease (CD is analyzed. Aims: The main goal of this study is to examine the efficiency of RT in the treatment of unresectable and recurrent CD. Settings and Design: Retrospective study. Subjects and Methods: Between 1980 and 2012, 11 CD patients referred and treated at our clinic were studied. Three of the patients were female, and eight of them were male. Four patients had multicentric (MC and seven patients had unicentric CD. Five patients were managed with incisional biopsy and RT; three unicentric patients underwent total excision followed by RT, and three unicentric patients had total excision and chemotherapy. Patients were retrospectively evaluated. Median follow-up time was 36 (24-60 months with median age 41 (24-52 years and RT dose 30 (30-45 Gy. Statistical Analysis Used: Kaplan-Meier method. Results: About 72.7% of patients were male, and 27.3% were female. 63.6% of the patients were unicentric, and 36.4% were MC CD. 54.5% of the patients were managed with total excision, and 45.5% underwent incisional biopsy. About 63.6% of CD patients received RT and 27.3% were given only chemotherapy, whereas one patient (9.09% received both RT and chemotherapy. Three-year survival was 83%, and 3-year disease free survival was 91%. No late toxicity was noted with. Acute toxicity was noted in two patients who received 45 Gy and no late radiation-induced toxicity was observed. Conclusions: RT is an effective treatment option for CD recurrences and sole treatment for unresectable CD.

  12. Radiotherapy of hemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauwerky, F.

    1982-10-11

    The findings about the regular, spontaneous and complete regression of cavernous skin hemangiomas occurring in infants and those findings about the damaging effects due to ionising radiation - here particularly local growth disturbances - led to the development of very cautious diagnostic methods and to a considerate individual dosage and radiotherapy, which always takes into consideration the spontaneous regression tendency of the hemangiomas. However, a function-impairing localisation at the orifices, fulminant macrosomia, tendency to hemorrhages and poly-infection with superficial ulceration and even thrombopenic syndromes of the Kasabach-Merritt type may become necessary, urgent and also vital indications for a particular radiotherapy. For the sake of the patients, irradiation methods, which do not provoke any risk of radiation hazards, have to be preserved and applied in practice. Certainly further research and the nosologic nature of hemangiomas is required. A general non-treatment of hemangiomas is refused.

  13. Preoperative Smoking Status and Postoperative Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønkjær, Marie; Eliasen, Marie; Skov-Ettrup, Lise Skrubbeltrang;

    2014-01-01

    To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type.......To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type....

  14. Melanoma: Last call for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenel, Sophie; Vallard, Alexis; Rancoule, Chloé; Garcia, Max-Adrien; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Chargari, Cyrus; Deutsch, Eric; Magné, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Melanoma is traditionally considered to be a radioresistant tumor. However, radiotherapy and immunotherapy latest developments might upset this radiobiological dogma. Stereotactic radiotherapy allows high dose per fraction delivery, with high dose rate. More DNA lethal damages, less sublethal damages reparation, endothelial cell apoptosis, and finally clonogenic cell dysfunction are produced, resulting in improved local control. Radiotherapy can also enhance immune responses, inducing neoantigens formation, tumor antigen presentation, and cytokines release. A synergic effect of radiotherapy with immunotherapy is expected, and might lead to abscopal effects. If hadrontherapy biological properties seem able to suppress hypoxia-induced radioresistance and increase biological efficacy, ballistic advantages over photon radiations might also improve radiotherapy outcomes on usually poor prognosis locations. The present review addresses biological and clinical effects of high fraction dose, bystander effect, abscopal effect, and hadrontherapy features in melanoma. Clinical trials results are warranted to establish indications of innovative radiotherapy in melanoma.

  15. Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Small-sized Hepatocellular Carcinoma as Salvage Therapy: Sustained Local Control and Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sun Hyun; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Lee, Jung Ae; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the rate of tumor response, local control, and treatment-related complications after hypofractionated radiotherapy for recurrent hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) less than 5 cm in size. Among the HCC patients who were treated by radiotherapy (RT) between 2006 and 2007 after the failure of previous treatment, a total of 12 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The criteria for hypofractionated RT was as follows: 1) HCC less than 5 cm, 2) HCC not adjacent to a critical organ, 3) HCC without portal vein tumor thrombosis, and 4) less than 15% of normal liver volume that irradiated 50% of the prescribed dose. Hypofractionated RT was performed with 50 Gy delivered in 10 fractions, at a rate of 5 fractions per week. The evaluation of tumor response was determined by CT scans performed at 3 months after the cessation of RT, followed by the evaluation of toxicity by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. The median follow-up period after radiotherapy was 18 months. A complete response (CR) was achieved in 5 of 12 lesions (41.7%) at CT performed at 3 months after the cessation, whereas the overall complete response was observed in 7 of 12 cases (58.3%). In-field local control rate was sustained in 83.3% of patients. All patients developed intra-hepatic metastases except for 2 patients. The overall survival rate was 90.0% at 1 year and 67.5% at 2 years, respectively. Three patients developed Grade 1 nausea during RT and 1 patient showed a progression of ascites after RT. There was no grade 3 or greater treatment-related toxicities. Hypofractionated RT for small-sized HCC as a salvage therapy showed a 58.3% CR rate and 83.3% of local control. Fifty Gy administered in 10 fractions of partial liver irradiation is considered as a tolerable dose that does not cause severe complications.

  16. Preoperative concurrent chemo-radiation in rectal cancer; Radiochimiotherapie concomitante preoperatoire pour cancer du rectum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, C.; Kirscher, S.; Felix-Faure, C.; Chauvet, B.; Vincent, P.; Brewer, Y.; Reboul, F. [Clinique Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France)

    1998-05-01

    To evaluate retrospectively treatment-related morbidity of concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy for rectal cancer. Between 1992 and 1995, 38 patients (median age: 60) were treated for locally advanced resectable rectal cancer. Median dose of radiotherapy was 45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks. Chemotherapy consisted of two courses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin administered during the first and the fifth weeks of radiotherapy. Median dose of 5-fluorouracil was 350 mg/m{sup 2}/day, and median dose of leucovorin was 350 mg/m{sup 2}/day, day 1 to day 5. Surgery was performed 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Before surgery, one patient died of febrile neutropenia and sepsis after two cycles of chemotherapy and 45 Gy. Main pre-operative grade 3-4 toxicities were respectively: neutropenia: 3% ; nausea/vomiting: 3%; diarrhea: 3%; proctitis: 5%; radiation dermatitis: 8%. Twenty-six patients underwent a low anterior resection and 11 an abdomino-perineal resection. A temporary colostomy was performed in 12 patients. Pathologic complete response rate was 27 %. There was one post-operative death due to thrombo-embolic disease. Major post-operative grade 3-4 complications were: pelvic infection: 14 %; abdominal infection : 5%; perineal sepsis: 8%; anastomotic dehiscence: 8%; cardiac failure: 5%. Delayed perineal wound healing was observed in six patients. No significant prognostic factor of post-operative complications has been observed. Median duration of hospitalization was 22 days. With a median follow-up of 24 months, 2-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 82 and 64%. Tolerance of preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy was acceptable. Ongoing controlled studies will assess the impact of this combined treatment on survival. (authors)

  17. Radiotherapy of vertebral hemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Kohichi; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atushi; Sido, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tamakawa, Mituharu; Akiba, Hidenari; Morita, Kazuo [Dept. of Radiology, Sapporo Medical Univ., School of Medicine (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Between 1975 and 1996, 14 patients (11 females, 3 males) with vertebral hemangioma received treatment with radiotherapy. Thirteen patients had a history of back pain or lumbago and 2 patients had neurological symptoms such as sensory impairment or paraplegia. The standard dose administered was 36 Gy in 18 fractions (five treatments per week). In the 13 patients with pain, this was completely or partially relieved. The condition of a man with hypesthesia of the legs deteriorated and a woman with paraplegia who was treated with decompressive laminectomy followed by radiotherapy recovered completely after irradiation. CT scan before irradiation showed thickened trabeculae as small punctate areas of sclerosis in all patients. At MR imaging before irradiation, T2-weighted MR images showed areas of high intensity in all patients and MR images demonstrated lesion enhancement. However, none of the patients who were treated successfully with radiation demonstrated any changes of the affected vertebra in the conventional radiographic films, CT scan or MR imaging, even 5 years after irradiation. Radiological imaging is indispensable for the diagnosis of vertebral hemangiomas but does not appear to be useful for evaluating the effects of radiotherapy. (orig.).

  18. Prospective assessment of the quality of life before, during and after image guided intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveistrup, Joen; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Bjørner, Jakob B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy (RT) in combination with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer (PCa) carries a risk of gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary toxicity, which might affect the quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was to assess the QoL in patients with PCa...... before, during and after radiotherapy (RT) and to compare the QoL 1 year after RT to a normal population. METHODS: The QoL was evaluated prospectively by the self-administered questionnaire SF-36 in 87 patients with PCa. The SF-36 was completed before RT (baseline), at start of RT, at end of RT and 1...... year after RT. A mixed model analysis was used to determine the changes in QoL at each time point compared to baseline. The patients' QoL 1 year after RT was compared to a normal population consisting of 462 reference subjects matched on age and education. RESULTS: One year after RT, patients reported...

  19. Preoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage after resection for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Gessler, B; Burcharth, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    for cancer. The meta-analyses found that a low rectal anastomosis [OR = 3.26 (95% CI: 2.31-4.62)], male gender [OR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.37-1.60)] and preoperative radiotherapy [OR = 1.65 (95% CI: 1.06-2.56)] may be risk factors for anastomotic leakage. Primarily as a result of observational design, the quality...... was used for bias assessment within studies, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was used for quality assessment of evidence on outcome levels. RESULTS: This review included 23 studies evaluating 110,272 patients undergoing colorectal resection......AIM: Colorectal anastomotic leakage is a serious complication. Despite extensive research, no consensus on the most important preoperative risk factors exists. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate risk factors for anastomotic leakage in patients operated...

  20. RT-SET虚拟演播室

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ RT-SET,广播图像解决方案供应商的佼佼者,正与Excite合作制作Paranoia节目.Paranoia采用了RT-SET虚拟演播室技术,在美国霍士家庭电视台(Fox Family Channel)现场和交互式播放,成为美国第一个现场直播、多参与者参加、端对端的网络游戏节目.

  1. Preoperative radio-chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Forecasting the next steps through ongoing and forthcoming studies; Chimioradiotherapie preoperatoire des cancers du rectum: ce que laissent presager les etudes en cours et a venir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crehange, G.; Maingon, P. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, 21000 Dijon (France); Bosset, J.F. [Service d' oncologie radiotherapie, CHU Jean-Minjoz, boulevard Flemming, 25000 Besancon (France)

    2011-10-15

    Protracted preoperative radio-chemotherapy with a 5-FU-based scheme, or a short course of preoperative radiotherapy without chemotherapy, are the standard neo-adjuvant treatments for resectable stage II-III rectal cancer. Local failure rates are low and reproducible, between 6 and 15% when followed with a 'Total Meso-rectal Excision'. Nevertheless, the therapeutic strategy needs to be improved: distant metastatic recurrence rates remain stable around 30 to 35%, while both sphincter and sexual sequels are still significant. The aim of the present paper was to analyse the ongoing trials listed on the following search engines: the Institut National du Cancer in France, the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Health in the United States, and the major cooperative groups. Keywords for the search were: 'rectal cancer', 'preoperative radiotherapy', 'phase II-III', 'preoperative chemotherapy', 'adjuvant chemotherapy' and 'surgery'. Twenty-three trials were selected and classified in different groups, each of them addressing a question of strategy: (1) place of adjuvant chemotherapy; (2) optimization of preoperative radiotherapy; (3) evaluation of new radiosensitization protocols and/or neo-adjuvant chemotherapy; (4) optimization of techniques and timing of surgery; (5) place of radiotherapy for non resectable or metastatic tumors. (authors)

  2. Short-course palliative radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Ju Hye; Ki, Yong Kan; Kim, Won Taek; Park, Dahl; Kim, Dong Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Ji Ho; Jeon, Sang Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of short-course hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for the palliation of uterine cervical cancer. Seventeen patients with cancer of the uterine cervix, who underwent palliative hypofractionated 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy between January 2002 and June 2012, were retrospectively analyzed. RT was delivered to symptomatic lesions (both the primary mass and/or metastatic regional lymph nodes). The total dose was 20 to 25 Gy (median, 25 Gy) in 5 Gy daily fractions. The median follow-up duration was 12.2 months (range, 4 to 24 months). The median survival time was 7.8 months (range, 4 to 24 months). Vaginal bleeding was the most common presenting symptom followed by pelvic pain (9 patients). The overall response rates were 93.8% and 66.7% for vaginal bleeding control and pelvic pain, respectively. Nine patients did not have any acute side effects and 7 patients showed minor gastrointestinal toxicity. Only 1 patient had grade 3 diarrhea 1 week after completion of treatment, which was successfully treated conservatively. Late complications occurred in 4 patients; however, none of these were of grade 3 or higher severity. Short-course hypofractionated RT was effective and well tolerated as palliative treatment for uterine cervical cancer.

  3. Clinical and histopathological effect of combined preoperative radiation and intratumoral injections in rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarashina, H.; Todoroki, T.; Orii, K.; Otsu, H.; Iwasaki, Y.

    1987-05-01

    Twenty-one surgical patients with carcinoma of the rectum (Group 3) were treated with preoperative radiotherapy and intratumoral injections of Pepleomycin and BUdR (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine). On the other hand, 25 patients (Group 1) were treated by surgery alone and 7 patients (Group 2) were treated with preoperative radiotherapy alone. The difference in the background factors of the patients for three groups was not significant. The total dose of preoperative radiation was 42.6 Gy., e.i., 30.6 Gy. (1.8 Gy./fr. x 5/wk) delivered to the entire pelvis plus an additional 12 Gy. (3.0 Gy./fr. x 4/wk) to the primary tumor. The reduction rates in tumor regression on roentgenogram for Groups 2 and 3 were 30.5 % and 46.5 %, respectively. The extent of cancer cell invasion in rectal wall of the surgical specimens was examined histopathologically. In the preoperative radiation group, especially in Group 3, it was indicated that the stage of the lesion had been reduced. The rates of patients with an ew of less than 2 mm were 64.0 % in Group 1, 28.6 % in Group 2 and 14.3 % in Group 3 (Group 1 - 3 : p = 0.02). The incidence of positive lymph nodes was higher in Group 1 than in Groups 2 and 3. In a histopathological investigation of the patients in Group 3, the degenerative changes were heavier than in Group 2. Scattered mucocele transformation from the submucosal layer through to the adventitial tissue was noted in Group 3. This study suggests that the clinical and pathological effect of this combination therapy is able to increase the local control and survival rate.

  4. Cardiovascular effects of radiotherapy on the patient with cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Leonardo Augusto Robert; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade, E-mail: wolney_martins@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    The incidence of cancer (CA) has increased globally and radiotherapy (RT) is a vital component in its treatment. Cardiovascular injuries induced by RT in the treatment of thoracic and cervical CA have been causing problems in clinical practice for decades, and are among the most serious adverse effects of radiation experienced by the growing number of cancer survivors. This article presents a review on the Lilacs, Scielo and Pubmed databases of the main cardiovascular injuries, their mechanisms, clinical presentations, treatments and prevention proposals. Injuries caused by RT include diseases of the pericardium, coronary artery disease, valvular disease, myocardial disease with systolic and diastolic dysfunction, conduction disorders, and carotid artery and great vessels disease. Thoracic and cervical irradiation increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Despite the great progress in the improvement of RT techniques, totally excluding prime areas of the cardiovascular system from the irradiation field is not yet possible. Guidelines must be created for monitoring, diagnosis and treatment of patients with CA treated with RT. (author)

  5. Hypofractionated radiotherapy in carcinoma breast: What we have achieved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapesh Bhattacharyya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthy breast tissue is sensitive to radiation fraction size, such that small changes in fraction size can lead to larger changes in radiation effects on these tissues. Conventional breast and/or chest wall irradiation uses 2 Gy daily fractions, for 5-6 weeks. Such a long treatment schedule has major implications on both patient quality of life and burden of radiotherapy (RT departments. Some investigators have hypothesized that breast cancer is as sensitive as normal breast tissue to fraction size. According to the hypothesis, small fraction sizes of 2.0 Gy or less offer no therapeutic advantage, and a more effective strategy would be to deliver fewer, larger fractions that result in a lower total radiation dose. This short (hypofractionated RT schedule would be more convenient for patients (especially those coming from remote areas to RT facilities and for healthcare providers, as it would increase the turnover in RT departments. This thought has prompted us to write a systematic review on role of hypofractionated RT in breast cancer in a developing country like ours where patient burden is an alarming problem.

  6. Neurogenesis, Exercise, and Cognitive Late Effects of Pediatric Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaefali P. Rodgers

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is a common type of childhood malignancy, and radiotherapy (RT is a mainstay of treatment. RT is effective for tumor eradication, and survival rates are high. However, RT damages the brain and disrupts ongoing developmental processes, resulting in debilitating cognitive “late” effects that may take years to fully manifest. These late effects likely derive from a long-term decrement in cell proliferation, combined with a neural environment that is hostile to plasticity, both of which are induced by RT. Long-term suppression of cell proliferation deprives the brain of the raw materials needed for optimum cognitive performance (such as new neurons in the hippocampus and new glia in frontal cortex, while chronic inflammation and dearth of trophic substances (such as growth hormone limit neuroplastic potential in existing circuitry. Potential treatments for cognitive late effects should address both of these conditions. Exercise represents one such potential treatment, since it has the capacity to enhance cell proliferation, as well as to promote a neural milieu permissive for plasticity. Here, we review the evidence that cognitive late effects can be traced to RT-induced suppression of cell proliferation and hostile environmental conditions, as well as emerging evidence that exercise may be effective as an independent or adjuvant therapy.

  7. Salivary Gland. Photon beam and particle radiotherapy: Present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, Ester; Iacovelli, Nicola Alessandro; Bonora, Maria; Cavallo, Anna; Fossati, Piero

    2016-09-01

    Salivary gland cancers (SGCs) are rare diseases and their treatment depends upon histology, stage and site of origin. Radical surgery is the mainstay of treatment but radiotherapy (RT) plays a key role in both the postoperative and the inoperable setting, as well as in recurrent disease. In the absence of prospective randomized trials, a wide retrospective literature suggests postoperative RT (PORT) in patients with high risk pathological features. SGCs, and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) in particular, are known to be radio-resistant tumors and should therefore respond well to particle beam therapy. Recently, excellent outcome has been reported with radical carbon ion RT (CIRT) in particular for ACC. Both modern photon- and hadron-based treatments are effective and are characterized by a favourable toxicity profile. But it is not clear whether one modality is superior to the other for disease control, due to the differences in patients' selection, techniques, fractionation schedules and outcome measurements among clinical experiences. In this paper, we review the role of photon and particle RT for malignant SGCs, discussing the difference between modalities in terms of biological and technical characteristics. RT dose and target volumes for different histologies (ACC versus non-ACC) have also been taken into consideration.

  8. Characterization of risk factors for adjuvant radiotherapy-associated pain in a tri-racial/ethnic breast cancer population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunkyung; Takita, Cristiane; Wright, Jean L; Reis, Isildinha M; Zhao, Wei; Nelson, Omar L; Hu, Jennifer J

    2016-05-01

    Pain related to cancer or treatment is a critical quality of life issue for breast cancer survivors. In a prospective study of 375 patients with breast cancer (enrolled during 2008-2014), we characterized the risk factors for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT)-associated pain. Pain score was assessed at pre-RT and post-RT as the mean of 4 pain severity items (ie, pain at its worst, least, average, and now) from the Brief Pain Inventory with 11-point numeric rating scale (0-10). Pain scores of 4 to 10 were considered clinically relevant pain. The study consists of 58 non-Hispanic whites (15%), 78 black or African Americans (AA; 21%), and 239 Hispanic whites (HW; 64%). Overall, the prevalence of pre-RT, post-RT, and RT-associated clinically relevant pain was 16%, 31% and 20%, respectively. In univariate analysis, AA and HW had significantly higher pre-RT and post-RT pain than non-Hispanic whites. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, pre-RT pain was significantly associated with HW and obesity; post-RT pain was significantly associated with AA, HW, younger age, ≥2 comorbid conditions, above-median hotspot volume receiving >105% prescribed dose, and pre-RT pain score ≥4. Radiotherapy-associated pain was significantly associated with AA (odds ratio [OR] = 3.27; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09-9.82), younger age (OR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.24-4.79), and 2 or ≥3 comorbid conditions (OR = 3.06, 95% CI = 1.32-7.08; OR = 4.61, 95% CI = 1.49-14.25, respectively). These risk factors may help to guide RT decision-making process, such as hypofractionated RT schedule. Furthermore, effective pain management strategies are needed to improve quality of life in patients with breast cancer with clinically relevant pain.

  9. rt, Arvo: "Litany" / Patric Wiklacz

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Wiklacz, Patric

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Pärt, Arvo: "Litany". Litany. Psalom. Trisagion. The Hilliard Ensemble, Orchestre de chambre de Tallinn, Choeur de chambre Philharmonique d'Estonie, Tõnu Kaljuste. Orchestre de chambre de Lituanie, Saulius Sondeckis. ECM New Series ECM 1592, distribution Polygram 449 810-2 (CD:158F)

  10. rt, Arvo: "Litany" / Barry Witherden

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Witherden, Barry

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Pärt, Arvo: "Litany". Litany. Psalom. Trisagion. The Hilliard Ensemble, Tallinn Chamber Orchestra, Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra, Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir, Tõnu Kaljuste. Orchestre de chambre de Lituanie, Saulius Sondeckis". ECM New Series ECM 1592, distribution Polygram 449 810-2 (CD:158F)

  11. rt, Arvo: "Litany" / Patric Wiklacz

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Wiklacz, Patric

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Pärt, Arvo: "Litany". Litany. Psalom. Trisagion. The Hilliard Ensemble, Orchestre de chambre de Tallinn, Choeur de chambre Philharmonique d'Estonie, Tõnu Kaljuste. Orchestre de chambre de Lituanie, Saulius Sondeckis. ECM New Series ECM 1592, distribution Polygram 449 810-2 (CD:158F)

  12. Avameelsete naiste maailm / Kärt Hellerma

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hellerma, Kärt, 1956-

    2001-01-01

    Arvustus: Fielding, Helen. Bridget Jones: täitsa lõpp / tlk. Tiina Laats. Tln. : Varrak, 2001. Ilmunud ka kogumikus: Hellerma, Kärt. Kohanenud kirjandus : valik kirjanduskriitikat 1987-2006. Eesti Keele Sihtasutus : Tallinn, 2006. Lk. 127-129

  13. rt, Arvo: "Litany" / Barry Witherden

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Witherden, Barry

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Pärt, Arvo: "Litany". Litany. Psalom. Trisagion. The Hilliard Ensemble, Tallinn Chamber Orchestra, Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra, Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir, Tõnu Kaljuste. Orchestre de chambre de Lituanie, Saulius Sondeckis". ECM New Series ECM 1592, distribution Polygram 449 810-2 (CD:158F)

  14. Kiskjakirjanik Atwoodi lihakirves / Kärt Hellerma

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hellerma, Kärt, 1956-

    2001-01-01

    Arvustus: Atwood, Margaret. Pime palgamõrvar / tlk. Katrin Suursalu. Tallinn : Eesti Raamat, 2001. Ilmunud ka kogumikus: Hellerma, Kärt. Kohanenud kirjandus : valik kirjanduskriitikat 1987-2006. Eesti Keele Sihtasutus : Tallinn, 2006. Lk. 183-185, pealk. Õhus rippuv lihakirves

  15. Forført af hjernen?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lieberoth, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Blandingen af offentlig interesse, gode mediehistorier og smarte sælgere har ført til sejlivede neuromyter, der ikke bare distraherer almindelige mennesker, men også fører til udbredte misforståelser blandt professionelle som lærere og plejepersonale. I bedste fald leder neuromyter til spild af t...

  16. Kiskjakirjanik Atwoodi lihakirves / Kärt Hellerma

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hellerma, Kärt, 1956-

    2001-01-01

    Arvustus: Atwood, Margaret. Pime palgamõrvar / tlk. Katrin Suursalu. Tallinn : Eesti Raamat, 2001. Ilmunud ka kogumikus: Hellerma, Kärt. Kohanenud kirjandus : valik kirjanduskriitikat 1987-2006. Eesti Keele Sihtasutus : Tallinn, 2006. Lk. 183-185, pealk. Õhus rippuv lihakirves

  17. Radiotherapy Dose-Volume Effects on Salivary Gland Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Marks, Lawrence; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nam, Jiho; Eilsbruch, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    Publications relating parotid dose-volume characteristics to radiotherapy-induced salivary toxicity were reviewed. Late salivary dysfunction has been correlated to the mean parotid gland dose, with recovery occurring with time. Severe xerostomia (defined as long-term salivary function of <25% of baseline) is usually avoided if at least one parotid gland is spared to a mean dose of less than ≈20 Gy or if both glands are spared to less than ≈25 Gy (mean dose). For complex, partial-volume RT patterns (e.g., intensity-modulated radiotherapy), each parotid mean dose should be kept as low as possible, consistent with the desired clinical target volume coverage. A lower parotid mean dose usually results in better function. Submandibular gland sparing also significantly decreases the risk of xerostomia. The currently available predictive models are imprecise, and additional study is required to identify more accurate models of xerostomia risk. PMID:20171519

  18. Efficacy and toxicity of (chemo)radiotherapy for primary subglottic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, M.; Koike, I.; Odagiri, K.; Minagawa, Y.; Inoue, T. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Taguchi, T.; Nishimura, G.; Takahashi, M.; Komatsu, M.; Sano, D. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology

    2013-01-15

    Background and purpose: Primary subglottic cancer is a rare malignancy. We investigated the efficacy and toxicity of radiotherapy for subglottic cancer. Patients and methods: Nineteen patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the subglottis received radiotherapy, 14 of whom also underwent chemotherapy. Of the 19 patients, 15 received definitive radiotherapy to the gross tumors with total doses of 70-70.2 Gy in 35-39 fractions, and 4 underwent preoperative radiotherapy with total doses of 37.8-55.8 Gy in 21-31 fractions, followed by total laryngectomy. Results: Of the 19 patients, 5 developed local progression and 2 developed distant metastasis at the median follow-up period of 5 years. The 5-year local control and disease-free rates were 74 and 63%, respectively. Three patients died of tumor progression, and the 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 80 and 63%, respectively. Regarding acute toxicities, transient mucositis and dermatitis of grade 3 or lower were observed in all patients, but there were no late toxicities of grade 3 or higher. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the subglottis. The use of chemotherapy together with radiotherapy may enhance treatment efficacy and contribute to larynx preservation through good local control. (orig.)

  19. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin in locally advanced rectal cancer. A phase I-II multicenter study of the Dutch colorectal cancer group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospers, Geke A.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Tesselaar, Margot E.; Cats, Annemieke; Havenga, Klaas; Leer, Jan W. H.; Marijnen, Corrie A.; Jansen, Edwin P.; Van Krieken, Han H. J. M.; Wiggers, Theo; de Velde, Cornelis J. H. Van; Mulder, Nanno H.

    2007-01-01

    Background: We studied the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of oxaliplatin added to capecitabine and radiotherapy (Capox-RT) as neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer. Methods: T3-4 rectal cancer patients received escalating doses of oxaliplatin (day 1 and 29) with a fixed dose of capecitabi

  20. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin in locally advanced rectal cancer. A phase I-II multicenter study of the Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospers, G.A.; Punt, C.J.A.; Tesselaar, M.E.; Cats, A.; Havenga, K.; Leer, J.W.H.; Marijnen, C.A.M.; Jansen, E.P.W.A.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Wiggers, T.; Velde, C.J. van de; Mulder, N.H.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We studied the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of oxaliplatin added to capecitabine and radiotherapy (Capox-RT) as neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer. METHODS: T3-4 rectal cancer patients received escalating doses of oxaliplatin (day 1 and 29) with a fixed dose of capecitabi

  1. Dosimetric predictors of diarrhea during radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe [Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Endres, Eugene J.; Parker, Brent C. [Physics Dept., Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Sormani, Maria Pia [Biostatistics Unit, Univ. of Genoa (Italy)

    2009-06-15

    Purpose: to investigate dosimetric predictors of diarrhea during radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Patients and methods: all patients who underwent external-beam radiotherapy as part of treatment for localized prostate cancer at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA, from May 2002 to November 2006 were extracted from the own database. From the cumulative dose-volume histogram (DVH), the absolute volumes (V-value) of intestinal cavity (IC) receiving 15, 30, and 45 Gy were extracted for each patient. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was prospectively scored at each weekly treatment visit according to CTC (common toxicity criteria) v2.0. The endpoint was the development of peak grade {>=} 2 diarrhea during RT. Various patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were evaluated using logistic regression. Results: 149 patients were included in the analysis, 112 (75.2%) treated with whole-pelvis intensity-modulated radiotherapy (WP-IMRT) and 37 (24.8%) with prostate-only RT, including or not including, the seminal vesicles (PORT {+-} SV). 45 patients (30.2%) developed peak grade {>=} 2 diarrhea during treatment. At univariate analysis, IC-V{sub 15} and IC-V{sub 30}, but not IC-V{sub 45}, were correlated to the endpoint; at multivariate analysis, only IC-V{sub 15} (p = 0.047) along with peak acute proctitis (p = 0.041) was independently correlated with the endpoint. Conclusion: these data provide a novel and prostate treatment-specific ''upper limit'' DVH for IC. (orig.)

  2. Plan optimization for stereotactic radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. de Pooter (Jacobus Abraham)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractCancer is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Next to surgery and chemotherapy, radiotherapy is one of the most used treatment modalities for cancer. About 50% of the patients with cancer will be treated with radiotherapy during the management of their disease. In radiothera

  3. The Confluence of Radiotherapy & Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Robert Weichselbaum

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy has been considered a local modality and outcomes have emphasized local and regional control of tumors. Recent data suggests that radiotherapy may activate the immune system and the combination of radiation therapy and immune therapies may have the potential to improve both local and distant control of tumor deposits. Below we review principals underlying the concepts of combining both modalities.

  4. A DICOM-RT based ePR radiation therapy information system for managing brain tumor patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Brent J.; Law, Maria; Huang, H. K.; Zee, C. S.; Chan, Lawrence

    2005-04-01

    The need for comprehensive clinical image data and relevant information in image-guided Radiation Therapy (RT) is becoming steadily apparent. Multiple standalone systems utilizing the most technological advancements in imaging, therapeutic radiation, and computerized treatment planning systems acquire key data during the RT treatment course of a patient. One example are patients treated for brain tumors of greater sizes and irregular shapes that utilize state-of-the-art RT technology to deliver pinpoint accurate radiation doses. One such system, the Cyberknife, is a radiation treatment system that utilizes image-guided information to control a multi-jointed, six degrees of freedom, robotic arm to deliver precise and required radiation dose to the tumor site of a cancer patient. The image-guided system is capable of tracking the lesion orientations with respect to the patient"s position throughout the treatment process. This is done by correlating live radiographic images with pre-operative, CT and MR imaging information to determine relative patient and tumor position repeatedly over the course of the treatment. The disparate and complex data generated by the Cyberknife system along with related data is scattered throughout the RT department compromising an efficient clinical workflow since the data crucial for a clinical decision may be time-consuming to retrieve, temporarily missing, or even lost. To address these shortcomings, the ACR-NEMA Standards Committee extended its DICOM (Digital Imaging & Communications in Medicine) Standard from Radiology to RT by ratifying seven DICOM RT objects starting in 1997. However, they are rarely used by the RT community in daily clinical operations. In the past, the research focus of an RT department has primarily been developing new protocols and devices to improve treatment process and outcomes of cancer patients with minimal effort dedicated to integration of imaging and information systems. Our research, tightly

  5. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  6. Feasibility of small animal cranial irradiation with the microRT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiehl, Erich L.; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Limbrick, David; Jost, Sarah C.; Garbow, Joel R.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Khullar, Divya; Izaguirre, Enrique W.; Parikh, Parag J.; Low, Daniel A.; Hope, Andrew J. [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate methods for small-animal CNS radiotherapy using the microRT system. Materials and Methods: A custom head immobilizer was designed and built to integrate with a pre-existing microRT animal couch. The Delrin couch-immobilizer assembly, compatible with multiple imaging modalities (CT, microCT, microMR, microPET, microSPECT, optical), was first imaged via CT in order to verify the safety and reproducibility of the immobilization method. Once verified, the subject animals were CT-scanned while positioned within the couch-immobilizer assembly for treatment planning purposes. The resultant images were then imported into CERR, an in-house-developed research treatment planning system, and registered to the microRTP treatment planning space using rigid registration. The targeted brain was then contoured and conformal radiotherapy plans were constructed for two separate studies: (1) a whole-brain irradiation comprised of two lateral beams at the 90 degree sign and 270 degree sign microRT treatment positions and (2) a hemispheric (left-brain) irradiation comprised of a single A-P vertex beam at the 0 degree sign microRT treatment position. During treatment, subject animals (n=48) were positioned to the CERR-generated treatment coordinates using the three-axis microRT motor positioning system and were irradiated using a clinical Ir-192 high-dose-rate remote after-loading system. The radiation treatment course consisted of 5 Gy fractions, 3 days per week. 90% of the subjects received a total dose of 30 Gy and 10% received a dose of 60 Gy. Results: Image analysis verified the safety and reproducibility of the immobilizer. CT scans generated from repeated reloading and repositioning of the same subject animal in the couch-immobilizer assembly were fused to a baseline CT. The resultant analysis revealed a 0.09 mm average, center-of-mass translocation and negligible volumetric error in the contoured, murine brain. The experimental use of the head

  7. Stereotactic radiotherapy of vestibular schwannoma. Hearing preservation, vestibular function, and local control following primary and salvage radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putz, Florian; Mueller, Jan; Wimmer, Caterina; Goerig, Nicole; Knippen, Stefan; Semrau, Sabine; Fietkau, Rainer; Lettmaier, Sebastian [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Iro, Heinrich; Grundtner, Philipp [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Eyuepoglu, Ilker; Roessler, Karl [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this publication is to present long-term data on functional outcomes and tumor control in a cohort of 107 patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (RT) for vestibular schwannoma. Included were 107 patients with vestibular schwannoma (primary or recurrent following resection) treated with stereotactic RT (either fractioned or single-dose radiosurgery) between October 2002 and December 2013. Local control and functional outcomes were determined. Analysis of hearing preservation was limited to a subgroup of patients with complete audiometric data collected before treatment and during follow-up. Vestibular function test (FVT) results could be analyzed in a subset of patients and were compared to patient-reported dizziness. After a mean follow-up of 46.3 months, actuarial local control for the whole cohort was 100% after 2, 97.6% after 5, and 94.1% after 10 years. In patients with primary RT, serviceable hearing was preserved in 72%. Predictors for preservation of serviceable hearing in multivariate analysis were time of follow-up (odds ratio, OR = 0.93 per month; p = 0.021) and pre-RT tumor size (Koos stage I-IIa vs. IIb-IV; OR = 0.15; p = 0.031). Worsening of FVT results was recorded in 17.6% (N = 3). Profound discrepancy of patient-reported dizziness and FVT results was observed after RT. In patients with primary RT, worsening of facial nerve function occurred in 1.7% (N = 1). Stereotactic RT of vestibular schwannoma provides good functional outcomes and high control rates. Dependence of hearing preservation on time of follow-up and initial tumor stage has to be considered. (orig.) [German] Praesentation von Langzeitdaten zu funktionellen Ergebnissen und Tumorkontrolle nach stereotaktischer Radiotherapie (RT) in einer Kohorte von 107 Patienten mit Akustikusneurinom. Zwischen Oktober 2002 und Dezember 2013 wurden 107 Patienten mit Akustikusneurinom (primaer oder rezidiviert nach vorangegangener Resektion) mittels stereotaktischer RT behandelt

  8. Evaluation of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) boost in the management of endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiral, S; Beyzadeoglu, M; Uysal, B; Oysul, K; Kahya, Y Elcim; Sager, O; Dincoglan, F; Gamsiz, H; Dirican, B; Surenkok, S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) boost with multileaf collimator technique after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in patients with endometrial cancer. Consecutive patients with endometrial cancer treated using LINAC-based SBRT boost after pelvic RT were enrolled in the study. All patients had undergone surgery including total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy ± pelvic/paraortic lymphadenectomy before RT. Prescribed external pelvic RT dose was 45 Gray (Gy) in 1.8 Gy daily fractions. All patients were treated with SBRT boost after pelvic RT. The prescribed SBRT boost dose to the upper two thirds of the vagina including the vaginal vault was 18 Gy delivered in 3 fractions with 1-week intervals. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3 (CTCAE v3).Between April 2010 and May 2011, 18 patients with stage I-III endometrial cancer were treated with LINAC-based SBRT boost after pelvic RT. At a median follow-up of 24 (8-26) months with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and gynecological examination, local control rate of the study group was 100 % with negligible acute and late toxicity.LINAC-based SBRT boost to the vaginal cuff is a feasible gynecological cancer treatment modality with excellent local control and minimal toxicity that may replace traditional brachytherapy boost in the management of endometrial cancer.

  9. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, W.

    1982-10-11

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent pseudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. syringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine.

  10. Randomized study of postoperative radiotherapy and simultaneous temozolomide without adjuvant chemotherapy for glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, M.; Mueller, R.P. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital, Cologne (Germany); Frommolt, P. [Inst. for Biostatistics, Informatics, and Epidemiology, Univ. Hospital, Cologne (Germany); Borberg, S.K. [Gemeinschaftspraxis for Radiation Oncology and Radiotherapy, Hannover (Germany); Ruehl, U. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Vivantes Klinikum im Friedrichshain, Berlin (Germany); Steingraeber, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Vivantes Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Niewald, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Homburg/Saar (Germany); Staar, S. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Zentralkrankenhaus St.-Juergen-Str., Bremen (Germany); Stuschke, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Essen (Germany); Becker, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Klinik am Eichert, Goeppingen (Germany); Fischedick, A.R. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Clemens-Hospital, Muenster (Germany); Herfarth, K. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Grauthoff, H. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Lukaskrankenhaus Neuss (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the efficacy of simultaneous postoperative temozolomide radiochemotherapy in glioblastoma patients. Patients and methods: from February 2002 to July 2004, n = 65 patients from 11 German centers with macroscopic complete tumor resection were randomized to receive either postoperative radiotherapy alone (RT, n = 35) or postoperative radiotherapy with simultaneous temozolomide (RT + TMZ, n = 30). Patients were stratified according to age ({<=}/> 50 years) and WHO performance score (0-1 vs. 2). RT consisted of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. In the RT + TMZ arm, oral TMZ was administered daily at a dose of 75 mg/m{sup 2} including weekends (40-42 doses). Adjuvant treatment was not given, but in both arms, patients with recurrent tumors and in good condition (WHO 0-2) were scheduled for salvage chemotherapy with TMZ. Results: the trial was stopped early due to the results of EORTC-study 26981-22981 that showed a survival benefit for the combination of concomitant and adjuvant TMZ compared to radiotherapy alone. In total, 62/65 patients were evaluable. Stratification variables were well balanced ({<=} 50 years 26% vs. 20%, WHO 0-1 91% vs. 100%). Neither overall survival (median 17 vs. 15 months) nor progression-free survival (median 7 vs. 6 months) differed significantly between the two arms. In the RT (RT + TMZ) arm, 76% (62%) of the progressing patients received salvage chemotherapy with TMZ, 36% (50%) had a second resection. There was a time-constant trend for increased general quality of life (EORTC questionnaire QLQ C30) and brain-specific quality of life (EORTC questionnaire B20) in the combined arm. Lymphopenia G3-4 was more frequent (33 vs. 6%) in the RT + TMZ arm. Conclusion: after early closure of this trial, a benefit for progression-free survival for simultaneous TMZ radiochemotherapy alone could not be demonstrated. In both arms, salvage therapies were frequently used and probably had a major effect on overall survival. (orig.)

  11. Fractionated stereotactically guided radiotherapy for pharmacoresistant epilepsy; Fraktionierte, stereotaktisch gefuehrte Radiotherapie der pharmakoresistenten Epilepsie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabenbauer, G.G.; Reinhold, C.; Lambrecht, U.; Sauer, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Kerling, F.; Pauli, E.; Stefan, H. [Neurologische Klinik, Abt. Epileptologie, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Mueller, R.G. [Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Ganslandt, O. [Neurochirurgische Klinik, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Aim: This prospective study evaluated the efficiency of fractionated stereotactically guided radiotherapy as a treatment of pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Patients and Methods: Inclusion criteria were patients aged between 17 and 65 years with one-sided temporally located focus, without sufficient epilepsy control by, antiepileptic drugs or neurosurgery. Between 1997 and 1999, two groups of six patients each were treated with 21 Gy (7 times 3 Gy) and 30 Gy (15 times 2 Gy). Study end points were seizure frequency, intensity, seizure length and neuropsychological parameters. Results: All patients experienced a marked reduction in seizure frequency. The mean reduction of seizures was 37% (range 9-77%, i.e. seizures reduced from a monthly mean number of 11.75 to 7.52) at 18 months following radiation treatment and 46% (23-94%, i.e. 0.2-23 seizures per month) during the whole follow-up time. Seizure length was reduced in five out of eleven patients and intensity of seizures in seven out of eleven patients. Conclusion: Radiotherapy was identified as safe and effective for pharmacoresistant epilepsy since a very good reduction of seizure frequency was observed. It is no substitute for regular use of antiepileptic drugs, but means an appropriate alternative for patients with contraindication against neurosurgery or insufficient seizure reduction after neurosurgery. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Diese prospektive Studie untersuchte die Effizienz einer fraktionierten stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (RT) bei therapieresistenter Temporallappenepilepsie. Patienten und Methoden: Einschlusskriterien waren Patienten im Alter von 17 bis 65 Jahren, die weder medikamentoes noch epilepsiechirurgisch anfallsfrei wurden und einen einseitigen Fokus aufwiesen. Zwei Patientenkohorten zu je sechs Patienten wurden zwischen 1997 und 1999 einer fraktionierten, stereotaktisch gefuehrten Radiotherapie mit 21 Gy (7 x 3 Gy) bzw. 30 Gy (15 x 2 Gy) unterzogen. Endpunkte der Untersuchung waren

  12. The value of temozolomide in combination with radiotherapy during standard treatment for newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul-Kee; Lee, Se-Hoon; Kim, Tae Min; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Sung-Hye; Heo, Dae Seog; Kim, Il Han; Jung, Hee-Won

    2013-04-01

    The current best standard care for glioblastoma still has limitations and unsatisfactory outcomes in patients with an unmethylated O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter. Whether the effects of temozolomide are primarily due to its concomitant use with radiotherapy or are also mediated by their independent use in the adjuvant phase remain unclear. To validate the concomitant use of temozolomide in the standard protocol, we compared the overall survival of two prospective patient groups: one treated with radiotherapy alone followed by adjuvant temozolomide (RT → TMZ group) and the other treated with concomitant radiotherapy and temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide (CCRT-TMZ group). Each patient in the RT → TMZ group (n = 25) was matched with two patients in the CCRT-TMZ group (n = 50) with respect to age, extent of resection, MGMT promoter methylation status, and postsurgical performance status to minimize the influence of confounding factors. In patients with MGMT promoter methylation, the CCRT-TMZ group showed superior overall survival (OS; median, 41.0 months) and progression-free survival (PFS; median, 24.0 months) compared with the RT → TMZ group. However, the OS and PFS did not differ between the CCRT-TMZ and the RT → TMZ groups in the patients without MGMT promoter methylation. Although this data is from a retrospective analysis using small number of patients, the study might indicate that concomitant use of temozolomide with radiotherapy is a crucial step in the standard treatment for glioblastoma patients with MGMT promoter methylation. And the use of temozolomide, either concurrently or by adjuvant after radiotherapy, remains a questionable value for those with an unmethylated MGMT promoter.

  13. A fresh look at preoperative body washing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Judith; Gould, Dinah; Jenkins, Philip; Hilliam, Rachel; Mistry, Neetesh; Walsh, Susannah

    2012-01-01

    National guidelines do not support preoperative body washing to reduce surgical site infections, instead recommending bathing or showering with soap. Yet preoperative body washing continues to be widely used in many hospitals across Europe. This paper suggests that existing trials of preoperative body washing, upon which guidelines are based, are dated and proposes a new investigation of preoperative body washing using modern definitions of surgical site infection with standardised patient follow up, modern surgical techniques and well designed trials. This paper provides a critique of existing guidelines and describes a randomised trial with 60 participants to compare the effect of soap and two antiseptic washing products on colony forming units (CFUs) for up to six hours. Chlorhexidine gluconate and octenidine were significantly more effective than soap in reducing CFUs in the underarm, and chlorhexidine was significantly more effective than soap in reducing CFUs in the groin. PMID:22448182

  14. Preoperative steroid in abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Brøndum, Tina Lee; Belhage, Bo

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative administration of high-dose glucocorticoid leads to improved recovery and decreased length of stay after abdominal surgery. Even so, studies on administration of glucocorticoids for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) for giant ventral hernia repair ...

  15. Preoperative alcohol cessation prior to elective surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oppedal, Kristian; Møller, Ann Merete; Pedersen, Bolette

    2012-01-01

    Hazardous drinking has been associated with an increased postoperative complication rate after surgery. Common complications include postoperative infections, cardiopulmonary complications, and bleeding episodes. Preoperative abstinence may to some degree reverse alcohol-induced pathophysiological...

  16. Preoperative steroid in abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Brøndum, Tina Lee; Belhage, Bo;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative administration of high-dose glucocorticoid leads to improved recovery and decreased length of stay after abdominal surgery. Even so, studies on administration of glucocorticoids for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) for giant ventral hernia repair ...

  17. Arthroscopic Synovectomy and Postoperative Assisted Radiotherapy for Treating Diffuse Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the Knee: An observational retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Sun, Xiaofei; Lin, Jianning; Ji, Wei; Ruan, Dike

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective observational study aims to explore the treatment procedure and outcomes of arthroscopically assisted radiotherapy for diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the knee joint. From September 2006 to August 2011, 28 diffuse PVNS patients were diagnosed and treated under arthroscopy. Twenty six underwent post-operative radiotherapy. All patients were followed up, and the average follow-up period was 54 months (range: 24 to 72 months). All 26 patients who received external radiotherapy showed no recurrence at post-operative follow-up; The Lysholm knee joint function score increased from 54.3±9.0 at pre-operation to 71.2±6.7 at post-operation (paired t-test, t = -13.35, PPVNS of the knee. Adjuvant post-operative external radiotherapy prevents the recurrence of diffuse PVNS.

  18. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer II. Radiotherapy of non-invasive neoplasia of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, R. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [LKH Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, P. [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Harms, W. [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Wenz, F. [University Hospital Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.

    2014-01-15

    To complement and update the 2007 practice guidelines of the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) for radiotherapy (RT) of breast cancer. Owing to its growing clinical relevance, in the current version, a separate paper is dedicated to non-invasive proliferating epithelial neoplasia of the breast. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines, this paper is especially focused on indication and technique of RT in addition to breast conserving surgery. The DEGRO expert panel performed a comprehensive survey of the literature comprising recently published data from clinical controlled trials, systematic reviews as well as meta-analyses, referring to the criteria of evidence-based medicine yielding new aspects compared to 2005 and 2007. The literature search encompassed the period 2008 to September 2012 using databases of PubMed and Guidelines International Network (G-I-N). Search terms were ''non invasive breast cancer'', ''ductal carcinoma in situ, ''dcis'', ''borderline breast lesions'', ''lobular neoplasia'', ''radiotherapy'' and ''radiation therapy''. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines, this paper is especially focused on indications of RT and decision making of non-invasive neoplasia of the breast after surgery, especially ductal carcinoma in situ. Among different non-invasive neoplasia of the breast only the subgroup of pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS; synonym ductal intraepithelial neoplasia, DIN) is considered for further recurrence risk reduction treatment modalities after complete excision of DCIS, particularly RT following breast conserving surgery (BCS), in order to avoid a mastectomy. About half of recurrences are invasive cancers. Up to 50?% of all recurrences require salvage mastectomy

  19. Adaptive RT in rectal cancer: superior to 3D-CRT? A simple question, a complex answer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haustermans, K.; Roels, S.; Verstraete, J.; Depuydt, T. [Leuvens Kanker Inst., Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); Slagmolen, P. [ESAT/Radiology, Medical Image Computing, Univ. Hospital Gasthuisberg, ESAT, Leuven (Belgium)

    2007-12-15

    Although the introduction of modern treatment techniques such as Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) and combined preoperative chemoradiation has strongly reduced local recurrence rates, there is still room for improvement in treatment in high-risk patients (T3-T4, lymph node positive). In these selected patients, progress may be achieved with higher preoperative doses and by integrating novel chemotherapeutic and molecular targeted agents. Better treatment techniques such as adaptive radiotherapy may ultimately lead to less local recurrences and more sphincter and even organ preservation. But before adaptive radiation can be introduced into clinical routine several steps have to be taken going from target definition over target localisation and positioning to re-planning and cumulative dosimetry. (orig.)

  20. Preoperative education for lumbar surgery for radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Louw, A; Louw, Q; L. Crous

    2009-01-01

    To date no studies have been published on preoperative education forpatients who had lumbar surgery. The aim of this study was to determine if there is a demand for preoperative education for patients who had lumbar surgery for radiculopathy. A convenience sample of 47 patients who had lumbar surgery and a random sample of 141 physiotherapists involved in treating patients who had lumbar surgery completed a newly developed spinal surgery questionnaire. The data were analyzed using descriptive...

  1. Preoperative prediction of severe postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkman, C J; Visser, K; Moen, J; Bonsel, G J; Grobbee, D E; Moons, K G M

    2003-10-01

    We developed and validated a prediction rule for the occurrence of early postoperative severe pain in surgical inpatients, using predictors that can be easily documented in a preoperative setting. A cohort of surgical inpatients (n=1416) undergoing various procedures except cardiac surgery and intracranial neurosurgery in a University Hospital were studied. Preoperatively the following predictors were collected: age, gender, type of scheduled surgery, expected incision size, blood pressure, heart rate, Quetelet index, the presence and severity of preoperative pain, health-related quality of life the (SF-36), Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS). The outcome was the presence of severe postoperative pain (defined as Numeric Rating Scale > or =8) within the first hour postoperatively. Multivariate logistic regression in combination with bootstrapping techniques (as a method for internal validation) was used to derive a stable prediction model. Independent predictors of severe postoperative pain were younger age, female gender, level of preoperative pain, incision size and type of surgery. The area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.71 (95% CI: 0.68-0.74). Adding APAIS scores (measures of preoperative anxiety and need for information), but not STAI, provided a slightly better model (ROC area 0.73). The reliability of this extended model was good (Hosmer and Lemeshow test p-value 0.78). We have demonstrated that severe postoperative pain early after awakening from general anesthesia can be predicted with a scoring rule, using a small set of variables that can be easily obtained from all patients at the preoperative visit. Before this internally validated preoperative prediction rule can be applied in clinical practice to support anticipatory pain management, external validation in other clinical settings is necessary.

  2. Choanal stenosis: a rare complication of radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma; Stenose choanale post-radique: une complication rare de la radiotherapie des carcinomes nasopharynges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfils, P.; Preobrajenski, N. de [Universite Rene-Descartes, Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service d' ORL et de Chirurgie Cervicofaciale, Faculte de Medecine Paris-Descartes, 75 - Paris (France); Florent, A. [Cabinet d' ORL, 75 - Paris (France); Bensimon, J.L. [Cabinet de radiologie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2007-05-15

    Choanal stenosis is usually a congenital anomaly in children. Acquired choanal stenosis after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a very rare pathology; only two publications report seven cases in the literature. We describe the clinical history, preoperative evaluation, surgical treatment and outcome of a case of acquired choanal stenosis after radiotherapy. The patient, a 56-year-old woman, presented with a history of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (T2- NO-MO) one year before that had been successful treated with radiotherapy (68 Gy). At the end of radiotherapy, she complained of complete nasal obstruction, anosmia and hearing loss due to a bilateral serous otitis media. Bilateral complete choanal stenosis was confirmed by endoscopy and CT scan. Functional endoscopic surgery was performed, and nasal stents were left in place for 3 weeks. One year after, the patient have good airflow, and a patent nasopharynx without choanal stenosis. In conclusion, choanal stenosis is an unusual complication of radiotherapy that can be successfully treated with trans-nasal endoscopic resection. (authors)

  3. Efficient RT-Level Fault Diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ozgur Sinanoglu; Alex Orailoglu

    2005-01-01

    Increasing IC densities necessitate diagnosis methodologies with enhanced defect locating capabilities. Yet the computational effort expended in extracting diagnostic information and the stringent storage requirements constitute major concerns due to the tremendous number of faults in typical ICs. In this paper, we propose an RT-level diagnosis methodology capable of responding to these challenges. In the proposed scheme, diagnostic information is computed on a grouped fault effect basis, enhancing both the storage and the computational aspects. The fault effect grouping criteria are identified based on a module structure analysis, improving the propagation ability of the diagnostic information through RT modules. Experimental results show that the proposed methodology provides superior speed-ups and significant diagnostic information compression at no sacrifice in diagnostic resolution, compared to the existing gate-level diagnosis approaches.

  4. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  5. Radiotherapy and "new" drugs-new side effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyazi Maximilian

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Targeted drugs have augmented the cancer treatment armamentarium. Based on the molecular specificity, it was initially believed that these drugs had significantly less side effects. However, currently it is accepted that all of these agents have their specific side effects. Based on the given multimodal approach, special emphasis has to be placed on putative interactions of conventional cytostatic drugs, targeted agents and other modalities. The interaction of targeted drugs with radiation harbours special risks, since the awareness for interactions and even synergistic toxicities is lacking. At present, only limited is data available regarding combinations of targeted drugs and radiotherapy. This review gives an overview on the current knowledge on such combined treatments. Materials and methods Using the following MESH headings and combinations of these terms pubmed database was searched: Radiotherapy AND cetuximab/trastuzumab/panitumumab/nimotuzumab, bevacizumab, sunitinib/sorafenib/lapatinib/gefitinib/erlotinib/sirolimus, thalidomide/lenalidomide as well as erythropoietin. For citation crosscheck the ISI web of science database was used employing the same search terms. Results Several classes of targeted substances may be distinguished: Small molecules including kinase inhibitors and specific inhibitors, antibodies, and anti-angiogenic agents. Combination of these agents with radiotherapy may lead to specific toxicities or negatively influence the efficacy of RT. Though there is only little information on the interaction of molecular targeted radiation and radiotherapy in clinical settings, several critical incidents are reported. Conclusions The addition of molecular targeted drugs to conventional radiotherapy outside of approved regimens or clinical trials warrants a careful consideration especially when used in conjunction in hypo-fractionated regimens. Clinical trials are urgently needed in order to

  6. The role of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy in resected esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Geol; Kim, Choong Bae; Chung, Kyung Young; Lee, Doo Yun; Seong Jin Sil; Kim, Gwi Eon; Suh, Chang Ok [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    A retrospective study was performed to evaluate whether postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy can improve survival and decrease recurrence as compared with surgery alone in resected esophageal cancer. From Jan. 1985 to Dec. 1993, among 94 esophageal cancer patients treated with surgery, fifty-one patients were included in this study. Transthoracic esophagectomy was performed in 35 patients and transhiatal esophagectomy in 16. Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy was performed 4 weeks after surgery in 26 among 38 patients in stage II and III. A total dose of 30 {approx} 60 Gy in 1.8 Gy daily fraction, median 54 Gy over 6 weeks, was delivered in the mediastinum + both supraclavicular lymph nodes or celiac lymph nodes according to the tumor location. Forty-seven patients (92%) had squamous histology. The median follow-up period was 38 months. The overall 2-year and 5-year survival and median survival were 56.4%, 36.8% and 45 months. Two-year and 5-year survival and median survival by stage were 92%, 60.3% for stage I, 63%, 42% and 51 months for stage II and 34%, 23% and 19 months for stage III ({rho} = 0.04). For stage II and III patients, 5-year survival and median survival were 22.8%. 45 months for the surgery alone group and 37.8%, 22 months for the postoperative RT group ({rho} = 0.89). For stage III patients, 2-year survival and median survival were 0%, 11 months for the surgery alone group and 36.5%, 20 months for the postoperative RT group ({rho} = 0.14). Local and distant failure rates for stage II and III were 50%, 16% for the surgery alone and 39%, 31% for the postoperative RT group. For N1 patients, local failure rate was 71% for the surgery alone group and 37% for the postoperative RT group ({rho} = 0.19). Among 10 local failures in the postoperative RT group, in-field failures were 2, marginal failures 1, out-field 5 and anastomotic site failures 2. There were no statistically significant differences in either the overall survival or the patterns of failure

  7. Hypothyroidism after Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Eun; Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu [Kyungpook National Yonsei University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yea, Ji Woon [Dongguk University Gyeongju Hospital, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of hypothyroidism in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) either with or without neck dissection. From January 2000 to December 2005, 115 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer and who received definitive RT or postoperative RT including standard anterior low-neck field were recruited to be part of this study. Nineteen patients had undergone ipsilateral neck dissection, whereas, 18 patients underwent bilateral neck dissection, and 78 patients were received RT alone. Patients' ages ranged from 28 to 85 years (median, 59 years) and there were a total of 73 male and 42 female patients. The primary tumor sites were the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and other sites in 18, 40, 28, 22 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 44 Gy to 66 Gy with a median dose of 50 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 91 months, with a median of 29 months. The 1- and 3- year incidence of hypothyroidism was 28.7% (33 patients) and 33.0% (38 patients), respectively. The median time to detection of hypothyroidism was 8.5 months (range, 0 to 36 months). A univariate analysis revealed that neck node dissection was a risk factor for hypothyroidism (p=0.037). However, no factor was statistically significant from the results of a multivariate analysis. Patients treated for advanced head and neck cancer with radiotherapy with or without neck dissection will develop hypothyroidism. It is important to check the thyroid function periodically in these patients especially with the risk factor of neck node dissection.

  8. Radiation-induced fibrosis in the boost area after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost technique for early-stage breast cancer : A multivariable prediction model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammer, C.; Maduro, J. H.; Bantema-Joppe, E. J.; van der Schaaf, A.; van der Laan, H. P.; Langendijk, J. A.; Crijns, A. P. G.

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: To develop a multivariable prediction model for the risk of grade >= 2 fibrosis in the boost area after breast conserving surgery (BCS) followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (RT) with a simultaneous integrated photon boost (3D-CRT-SIB), five years after RT. Mat

  9. A clip-based protocol for breast boost radiotherapy provides clear target visualisation and demonstrates significant volume reduction over time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Lorraine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Cox, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Morgia, Marita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Atyeo, John [Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Lamoury, Gillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    The clinical target volume (CTV) for early stage breast cancer is difficult to clearly identify on planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Surgical clips inserted around the tumour bed should help to identify the CTV, particularly if the seroma has been reabsorbed, and enable tracking of CTV changes over time. A surgical clip-based CTV delineation protocol was introduced. CTV visibility and its post-operative shrinkage pattern were assessed. The subjects were 27 early stage breast cancer patients receiving post-operative radiotherapy alone and 15 receiving post-operative chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. The radiotherapy alone (RT/alone) group received a CT scan at median 25 days post-operatively (CT1rt) and another at 40 Gy, median 68 days (CT2rt). The chemotherapy/RT group (chemo/RT) received a CT scan at median 18 days post-operatively (CT1ch), a planning CT scan at median 126 days (CT2ch), and another at 40 Gy (CT3ch). There was no significant difference (P = 0.08) between the initial mean CTV for each cohort. The RT/alone cohort showed significant CTV volume reduction of 38.4% (P = 0.01) at 40 Gy. The Chemo/RT cohort had significantly reduced volumes between CT1ch: median 54 cm{sup 3} (4–118) and CT2ch: median 16 cm{sup 3}, (2–99), (P = 0.01), but no significant volume reduction thereafter. Surgical clips enable localisation of the post-surgical seroma for radiotherapy targeting. Most seroma shrinkage occurs early, enabling CT treatment planning to take place at 7 weeks, which is within the 9 weeks recommended to limit disease recurrence.

  10. Cone beam computed tomography guided treatment delivery and planning verification for magnetic resonance imaging only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Andreasen, Daniel; Mahmood, Faisal;

    2015-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy based on MRI only (MRI-only RT) shows a promising potential for the brain. Much research focuses on creating a pseudo computed tomography (pCT) from MRI for treatment planning while little attention is often paid to the treatment delivery. Here, we investigate if cone beam...

  11. Dose to the contralateral breast from radiotherapy and risk of second primary breast cancer in the WECARE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovall, M.; Smith, S.A.; Langholz, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantify the risk of second primary breast cancer in the contralateral breast (CB) after radiotherapy (RT) for first breast cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: The study population included participants in the Women's Environmental, Cancer, and Radiation Epidemiology study: 708 cases (wome...

  12. First-line temozolomide chemotherapy in progressive low-grade astrocytomas after radiotherapy: molecular characteristics in relation to response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taal, W.; Dubbink, H.J.; Zonnenberg, C.B.; Zonnenberg, B.A.; Postma, T.J.; Gijtenbeek, J.M.M.; Boogerd, W.; Groenendijk, F.H.; Kros, J.M.; Kouwenhoven, M.C.; Marion, R. van; Heuvel, I. van; Holt, B. van der; Bromberg, J.E.; Sillevis Smitt, P.A.; Dinjens, W.N.; Bent, M.J. van den

    2011-01-01

    Only a few studies examined the effect of temozolomide (TMZ) in recurrent low-grade astrocytoma (LGA) after surgery, none of which included a homogeneous and sufficiently sized group of patients with progression after radiotherapy (RT). We evaluated a cohort of 58 patients treated with TMZ for progr

  13. First-line temozolomide chemotherapy in progressive low-grade astrocytomas after radiotherapy: Molecular characteristics in relation to response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Taal (Walter); H.J. Dubbink (Erik Jan); B.A. Zonnenberg; T.J. Postma (Tjeerd); J. Gijtenbeek (Johanna); W. Boogerd (Willem); F.H. Groenendijk (Floris); J.M. Kros (Johan); M.C.M. Kouwenhoven (Mathilde); R. van Marion (Ronald); I. van Heuvel (Irene); B. van der Holt (Bronno); J.E.C. Bromberg (Jacolien); P.A. Smitt (Peter); W.N.M. Dinjens (Winand); M.J. van den Bent (Martin)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractOnly a few studies examined the effect of temozolomide (TMZ) in recurrent low-grade astrocytoma (LGA) after surgery, none of which included a homogeneous and sufficiently sized group of patients with progression after radiotherapy (RT). We evaluated a cohort of 58 patients treated with T

  14. Tumor perfusion increases during hypofractionated short-course radiotherapy in rectal cancer : Sequential perfusion-CT findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Marco H. M.; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.; Kierkels, Roel G. J.; Backes, Walter H.; Ollers, Michel C.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate perfusion of rectal tumors and to determine early responses to short-course hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT). Material and methods: Twenty-three rectal cancer patients were included, which underwent perfusion-CT imaging before (pre-scan) and af

  15. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    External-beam radiotherapy has long been challenged by the simple fact that patients can (and do) move during the delivery of radiation. Recent advances in imaging and beam delivery technologies have made the solution--adapting delivery to natural movement--a practical reality. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy provides the first detailed treatment of online interventional techniques for motion compensation radiotherapy. This authoritative book discusses: Each of the contributing elements of a motion-adaptive system, including target detection and tracking, beam adaptation, and pati

  16. Preoperative irradiation for prevention of heterotopic ossification following prosthetic total hip replacement. Results of a prospective study in 462 hips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koelbl, O.; Seufert, J.; Pohl, F.; Flentje, M. [Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany). Klinik and Poliklinik for Radiotherapy; Tauscher, A.; Springorum, H.W. [Caritas Hospital, Bad Mergentheim (Germany). Orthopedic Clinic; Lehmann, H. [Caritas Hospital, Bad Mergentheim (Germany). Inst. of Radiology

    2003-11-01

    Background: The effectiveness of pre- or postoperative radiotherapy for prevention of heterotopic ossification (HO) following total hip replacement (THR) has already been demonstrated in the past. Thereby, in most studies using preoperative radiotherapy patients were irradiated < 6 h before surgery. The purpose of this prospective study was to analyze the effectiveness of preoperative irradiation on the evening before surgery and to identify risk factors for HO in a homogeneous collective of patients. Patients and Methods: From July 1997 to July 2001, 416 patients (462 hips; 235 males, 227 females) received preoperative radiotherapy of the hip on the evening before surgery with a 7-Gy single fraction. The patients' median age was 67.1 years. The most frequent indication for radiotherapy was hypertrophic osteoarthritis (383 hips, 82.9%). Treatment results were assessed by comparison of pre- and postoperative hip X-rays (immediately and 6 months after surgery). The analysis of radiographs was performed according to the Brooker score. Results: The overall incidence of HO was 18.1% (n = 84), Brooker score 1 12.3% (n = 57), score 2 3.9% (n = 18), score 3 1.5% (n = 7), and score 4 0.4% (n = 2). Sex, body height, hypertrophic osteoarthritis of higher degree, size of the femoral component of the prosthesis, previous ipsi- or contralateral HO, and short course of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (diclofenac) therapy significantly influenced the HO rate in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, an interdependence of prosthesis size, sex and patient's height was found. From these three variables, only prosthesis size was statistically significant in multivariate analysis. The cumulative dose of diclofenac ({<=} 300 mg or > 300 mg) within the first 7 postoperative days and previous ipsi- or contralateral HO influenced the incidence of HO in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Preoperative radiotherapy on the evening before surgery is an effective treatment

  17. Audiometric patterns in ototoxicity after radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients of head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Shamrao Malgonde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inspite of various strategies adopted to protect the sensitive structures during organ preservation strategies, radiation damage can occur from the pharyngotympanic tube to the brain stem auditory pathway causing hearing loss. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the audiometric abnormalities and characterize them among the patients of head and neck cancers who have undergone radiotherapy (RT and chemoradiation therapy (CT+RT. Materials and Methods: Sixty-six histopathologically proven head and neck cancer patients receiving RT and 34 patients receiving concomitant CT + RT underwent evaluation for audiometric abnormalities from 1 st September 2010 to 31 st August 2012. Results: Hearing losses were predominately of sensorineural type and mild. Patients who received concomitant CT+RT experienced greater sensorineural hearing loss compared with patients treated with RT alone. A paired sample t-test was conducted to compare the hearing losses before therapy and 6 and 12 months after therapy and was found to be significant ( P < 0.05. It was found that hearing loss was persistent. Significant difference was found in the proportion of hearing loss after RT and RT+CT ( P < 0.05 after 1 month. In addition, mixed hearing loss occurred due to damage to the middle ear contents and can be improved if intervened appropriately.

  18. Nipple-sparing mastectomy in breast cancer patients: The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Stefan; Holz-Sapra, Edna; Rades, Dirk; Moser, Alexander; Studer, Gabriela

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) following nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer, based on the published literature. Currently, there is no standard for RT following NSM. NSM aims to spare the nipple areola complex (NAC) without compromising locoregional control. Long-term follow-up studies have begun to show promising results. A search of the English literature was performed using the Medline database and Cochrane central library, with the keywords 'nipple/areola-sparing mastectomy', 'whole skin mastectomy' and 'NAC preservation'. A total of 32 original studies with data on NSM in terms of locoregional control, NAC control, NAC necrosis and adjuvant RT were identified. The median locoregional and NAC recurrence rates were 3.2 and 1.4% (range, 0-28.4% and 0-3.7%), respectively. The volume of remaining breast tissue following NSM was reported inconsistently. In 15 studies, RT was not mentioned. In the remaining 17 studies, RT was administered in 0-100% of patients. Only 7 studies provided detailed information regarding the use of adjuvant RT. Adjuvant thoracic wall irradiation was not used in certain studies, not even for locoregionally advanced tumors. Overall, NSM appears a feasible treatment without increased risk of locoregional recurrence for selected patients. The role of adjuvant RT following NSM requires further clarification. The decision regarding adjuvant RT must be made in interdisciplinary tumor boards and with consideration of the individual situation of the patient.

  19. Combining Targeted Agents With Modern Radiotherapy in Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Philip; Houghton, Peter; Kirsch, David G.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Dicker, Adam P.; Ahmed, Mansoor; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Teicher, Beverly A.; Coleman, C. Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Curran, Walter J.

    2014-01-01

    Improved understanding of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) biology has led to better distinction and subtyping of these diseases with the hope of exploiting the molecular characteristics of each subtype to develop appropriately targeted treatment regimens. In the care of patients with extremity STS, adjunctive radiation therapy (RT) is used to facilitate limb and function, preserving surgeries while maintaining five-year local control above 85%. In contrast, for STS originating from nonextremity anatomical sites, the rate of local recurrence is much higher (five-year local control is approximately 50%) and a major cause of death and morbidity in these patients. Incorporating novel technological advancements to administer accurate RT in combination with novel radiosensitizing agents could potentially improve local control and overall survival. RT efficacy in STS can be increased by modulating biological pathways such as angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, cell survival signaling, and cancer-host immune interactions. Previous experiences, advancements, ongoing research, and current clinical trials combining RT with agents modulating one or more of the above pathways are reviewed. The standard clinical management of patients with STS with pretreatment biopsy, neoadjuvant treatment, and primary surgery provides an opportune disease model for interrogating translational hypotheses. The purpose of this review is to outline a strategic vision for clinical translation of preclinical findings and to identify appropriate targeted agents to combine with radiotherapy in the treatment of STS from different sites and/or different histology subtypes. PMID:25326640

  20. Multimodality treatment with radiotherapy for huge hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hee Ji; Kim, Mi Sun; Cha, Jihye; Choi, Jin Sub; Han, Kwang Hyub; Seong, Jinsil

    2014-01-01

    For huge hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), therapeutic decisions have varied from local therapy to systemic therapy, with radiotherapy (RT) playing only a palliative role. In this study, we investigated whether multimodality treatment involving RT could be effective in huge HCC. This study was performed in 116 patients with HCC >10 cm. The number of patients in stage II, III and IV was 12, 54 and 50, respectively. RT was given as a combined modality in most patients. The median dose was 45 Gy, with 1.8 Gy per fraction. The median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 14.8 and 6.5 months, respectively. The median infield PFS was not reached. Infield failure, outfield intrahepatic and extrahepatic failure were observed in 8.6, 18.1, and 12.1% of patients, respectively. For OS and PFS, number of tumors, initial alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level, treatment response, percent AFP decrement, and hepatic resection were significant prognostic factors. Tumor characteristics and treatment response were significantly different between long-term survivors and the other patients. Although huge HCC presents an aggressive clinical course, multimodality approaches involving RT can offer an opportunity for prolonged survival. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. External beam radiotherapy as curative treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisansky, Thomas M

    2005-07-01

    External beam radiotherapy (RT) has been used as a curative treatment of prostate cancer for more than 5 decades, with the "modern" era emerging more than 3 decades ago. Its history is marked by gradual improvements punctuated by several quantum leaps that are increasingly driven by advancements in the computer and imaging sciences and by its integration with complementary forms of treatment. Consequently, the contemporary use of external beam RT barely resembles its earliest form, and this must be appreciated in the context of current patient care. The influence of predictive factors on the use and outcomes of external beam RT is presented, as is a selected review of the methods and outcomes of external beam RT as a single therapeutic intervention, in association with androgen suppression, or as a postoperative adjunct. Thus, the "state of the (radiotherapeutic) art" is presented to enhance the understanding of this treatment approach with the hope that this information will serve as a useful resource to physicians as they care for patients with prostate cancer.

  2. 放疗诱导人肝细胞癌上皮-间质转化%Induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition(EMT) in human hepatocellular carcinoma after radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ximing Xu; Junjian Deng; Guangjin Yuan; Miao Xiang; Biao Chen; Jiao Yang; Yiqiao Zhang; Lei Shi; Zuguo Li

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a critical early event for the invasion and metastasis of many carcinomas. In the present study, we examined EMT markers in the residual cancer cells of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after radiotherapy. Methods: Eight patients with large HCC who underwent hepatectomy with preoperative radiotherapy were studied. The expressions of E-cadherin and vimentin were determined immunohistochemically in the residual cancer cells of HCC following radiotherapy, and also in the pre-radiotherapy biopsy cancer cells. Results: Histological analysis showed that some residual cancer cells of HCC displayed an elongated spindle or fibroblast-like shape. The expression of Ecadherin was markedly reduced or negative in the spindle residual cancer cells, but the expression of vimentin significantly induced.However, the above changes were not found in the pre-radiotherapy biopsy cancer cells. Conclusion: EMT is induced in the residual cancer cells of HCC following radiotherapy, which may facilitate the systemic dissemination of cancer cells.

  3. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in patients with prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannelli, Giancarlo; Caivano, Rocchina; Rago, Luciana; Simeon, Vittorio; Lotumolo, Antonella; Rabasco, Paola; Villonio, Antonio; Gioioso, Matilde; Mastrangelo, Pietro; Barchetti, Flavio; Panebianco, Valeria; Macarini, Luca; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Cammarota, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of a multiparametric 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study using diffusion-weighted images (DWI) for the assessment of prostate cancer before and after radiotherapy (RT). A total of 34 patients, who received a histologic diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma, underwent MRI examination before and after local RT for the assessment of response to treatment. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated and compared. Before RT, DWI shows pathologic restriction of signal, while after RT pathologic restriction of signal was reduced or disappeared. The ADC values were significantly increased after therapy (p<0.05). The use of DWI with ADC measurements may be an imaging biomarker in the assessment of prostate cancer.

  4. Late effects and quality of life of childhood cancer survivors: Part 2. Impact of radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yasushi; Sakamoto, Naoko; Kamibeppu, Kiyoko; Kakee, Naoko; Iwai, Tsuyako; Ozono, Shuichi; Maeda, Naoko; Okamura, Jun; Asami, Keiko; Inada, Hiroko; Honda, Misato; Horibe, Keizo

    2010-07-01

    To examine the late effects and health-related quality of life of childhood cancer survivors (CCS) after radiotherapy (RT), we performed a cross-sectional survey using self-rating questionnaires. The subjects were divided into 3 groups: CCS treated with or without RT, and a general population matched for age, gender, residential area, and work status. The numbers in each group were 113, 72, and 1,000, respectively. The median ages of CCS at diagnosis and the time of the survey were 8 and 22 years, respectively. The mean final heights of males and females were significantly lower in CCS with RT than in the other 2 groups. Risk factors for a short stature were total body irradiation (TBI) [odds ratio (OR) 17.8, p 50% of CCS with RT.

  5. Phase II Study of Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy With a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, Benedikt; Tournel, Koen [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Everaert, Hendrik [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Hoorens, Anne [Department of Pathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Sermeus, Alexandra [Department of Gastroenterology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Christian, Nicolas; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); De Ridder, Mark, E-mail: mark.deridder@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The addition of concomitant chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. The combined treatment modality increases the complete response rate and local control (LC), but has no impact on survival or the incidence of distant metastases. In addition, it is associated with considerable toxicity. As an alternative strategy, we explored prospectively, preoperative helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Methods and Materials: A total of 108 patients were treated with intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art II system. A dose of 46 Gy, in daily fractions of 2 Gy, was delivered to the mesorectum and draining lymph nodes, without concomitant chemotherapy. Patients with an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm, based on magnetic resonance imaging, received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Acute and late side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: A total of 102 patients presented with cT3-4 tumors; 57 patients entered the boost group and 51 the no-boost group. One patient in the no-boost group developed a radio-hypersensitivity reaction, resulting in a complete tumor remission, a Grade 3 acute and Grade 5 late enteritis. No other Grade {>=}3 acute toxicities occurred. With a median follow-up of 32 months, Grade {>=}3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity were observed in 6% and 4% of the patients, respectively. The actuarial 2-year LC, progression-free survival and overall survival were 98%, 79%, and 93%. Conclusions: Preoperative helical tomotherapy displays a favorable acute toxicity profile in patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. A SIB can be safely administered in patients with a narrow CRM and resulted in a promising LC.

  6. Early hematologic changes during prostate cancer radiotherapy predictive for late urinary and bowel toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Djukic, Victoria; Klotz, Jens; Holy, Richard; Eble, Michael J. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany); Ribbing, Carolina [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Aachen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    The primary objective of the study was to identify early hematologic changes predictive for radiotherapy (RT)-associated genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. In a group of 91 prostate cancer patients presenting for primary (n = 51) or postoperative (n = 40) curative RT, blood samples (blood count, acute phase proteins, and cytokines) were analyzed before (T1), three times during (T2-T4), and 6-8 weeks after (T5) radiotherapy. Before RT (baseline), on the last day (acute toxicity), a median of 2 months and 16 months (late toxicity) after RT, patients responded to a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). Acute score changes > 20 points and late changes > 10 points were considered clinically relevant. Radiotherapy resulted in significant changes of hematologic parameters, with the largest effect on lymphocytes (mean decrease of 31-45 %) and significant dependence on target volume. C-reactive protein (CRP) elevation > 5 mg/l and hemoglobin level decrease ≥ 5 G/1 at T2 were found to be independently predictive for acute urinary toxicity (p < 0.01, respectively). CRP elevation was predominantly detected in primary prostate RT (p = 0.02). Early lymphocyte level elevation ≥ 0.3G/l at T2 was protective against late urinary and bowel toxicity (p = 0.02, respectively). Other significant predictive factors for late bowel toxicity were decreasing hemoglobin levels (cut-off ≥ 5 G/l) at T2 (p = 0.04); changes of TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor; p = 0.03) and ferritin levels (p = 0.02) at T5. All patients with late bowel toxicity had interleukin (IL)-6 levels < 1.5 ng/l at T2 (63 % without; p = 0.01). Early hematologic changes during prostate cancer radiotherapy are predictive for late urinary and bowel toxicity. (orig.) [German] Das primaere Ziel der Studie war die Identifikation von fruehen haematologischen Veraenderungen mit praediktiver Bedeutung fuer radiotherapieassoziierte genitourinale und gastrointestinale Toxizitaet. In einer

  7. Preoperative education for lumbar surgery for radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Louw

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available To date no studies have been published on preoperative education forpatients who had lumbar surgery. The aim of this study was to determine if there is a demand for preoperative education for patients who had lumbar surgery for radiculopathy. A convenience sample of 47 patients who had lumbar surgery and a random sample of 141 physiotherapists involved in treating patients who had lumbar surgery completed a newly developed spinal surgery questionnaire. The data were analyzed using descriptiveand inferential statistical tests. Results showed that 100% of the patients and 99% of therapists view preoperative education to be an important component for lumbar surgery for radiculopathy. The most important factors identifiedfor inclusion in preoperative educational programs were reason for surgery, risks associated with surgery, limitations following surgery and more education regarding pain. The preferred method of education delivery was verbal one-on-one education. This study demonstrates that there is a demand for preoperative education for patients who had lumbar surgery.

  8. [Preoperative assessment of lung disease patients.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gilson; Ramos Filho, José; Pereira, Edísio; Junqueira, Marcos; Assis, Carlos Henrique C

    2003-02-01

    Lung complications are the most frequent causes of postoperative morbidity-mortality, especially in lung disease patients. So, those patients should be preoperatively carefully evaluated and prepared, both clinically and laboratorially. This review aimed at determining surgical risk and at establishing preoperative procedures to minimize peri and postoperative morbidity-mortality in lung disease patients. Major anesthetic-surgical repercussions in lung function have already been described. Similarly, we tried to select higher-risk patients, submitted or not to lung resection. To that end, clinical and laboratorial propedeutics were used. Finally, a proposal of a preoperative algorithm was presented for procedures with lung resection. Lung disease patients, especially those with chronic evolution, need to be preoperatively thoroughly evaluated. ASA physical status and Goldmans cardiac index are important risk forecasting factors for lung disease patients not candidates for lung resection. Adding to these criteria, estimated postoperative max VO2, FEV1 and diffusion capacity are mandatory for some patients submitted to lung resection. beta2-agonists and steroids should be considered in the preoperative period of these patients.

  9. Postoperative radiotherapy for endometrial cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choi, Eun Cheol; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae; Byun, Sang Jun; Park, Seung Gyu; Kwon, Sang Hoon

    2012-01-01

    .... Sixty four patients with stage I-III endometrial cancer (EC) treated with postoperative radiotherapy alone between January 1989 and December 2008 at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center were chosen for the present study...

  10. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy in oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Keshtgar, Mohammed; Wenz, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy is a major advance in the management of cancer patients. With an emphasis on practical aspects, this book offers an ideal introduction to this innovative  technology for clinicians.

  11. Stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzevic, Dario; Legcevic, Jelena; Splavski, Bruno;

    2014-01-01

    ; Web of Science; CAB Abstracts; ISRCTN and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 24 July 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) exploring the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy compared with observation alone, microsurgical...

  12. Psychophysiological assessment of sexual function in women after radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer : a pilot study on four patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukink, S.O.; Wouda, J.C.; van der Werf-Eldering, M.J.; van de Wiel, H.B.; Bouma, E.M.; Pierie, J.P.; Wiggers, T.; Meijerink, J.W.; Weijmar Schultz, W.C.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The potential contribution of psychological and anatomical changes to sexual dysfunction in female patients following short-term preoperative radiotherapy (5 x 5 Gy) and total mesorectal excision (TME) is not clear. Aim. In this study we assessed female sexual dysfunction in patients w

  13. Evaluation of short-course radiotherapy followed by neoadjuvant bevacizumab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin and subsequent radical surgical treatment in primary stage IV rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, T.H. van; Tamas, K.; Beukema, J.C.; Beets, G.L.; Gelderblom, A.J.; Jong, K.P. de; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Rutten, H.J.; Velde, C.J. van de; Wiggers, T.; Hospers, G.A.; Havenga, K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of preoperative short-course radiotherapy followed by capecitabine and oxaliplatin treatment in combination with bevacizumab and subsequent radical surgical treatment of all tumor sites in patients with stage IV rectal cancer. PATIENTS AND

  14. Psychophysiological assessment of sexual function in women after radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer : a pilot study on four patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukink, S.O.; Wouda, J.C.; van der Werf-Eldering, M.J.; van de Wiel, H.B.; Bouma, E.M.; Pierie, J.P.; Wiggers, T.; Meijerink, J.W.; Weijmar Schultz, W.C.

    INTRODUCTION: The potential contribution of psychological and anatomical changes to sexual dysfunction in female patients following short-term preoperative radiotherapy (5 x 5 Gy) and total mesorectal excision (TME) is not clear. Aim. In this study we assessed female sexual dysfunction in patients

  15. DEGRO practical guidelines. Radiotherapy of breast cancer I. Radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy for invasive breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlmayer, F. [Paracelsus Medical Univ. Hospital, Salzburg (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinium Karlsruhe (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)] [and others

    2013-10-15

    Background and purpose: The aim of the present paper is to update the practical guidelines for postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2007 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society for Radiooncology (Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO). The present recommendations are based on a revision of the German interdisciplinary S-3 guidelines published in July 2012. Methods: A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy (BCT) was performed using the search terms 'breast cancer', 'radiotherapy', and 'breast conserving therapy'. Data from lately published meta-analyses, recent randomized trials, and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2007, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the DKG (Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft), this paper addresses indications, target definition, dosage, and technique of radiotherapy of the breast after conservative surgery for invasive breast cancer. Results: Among numerous reports on the effect of radiotherapy during BCT published since the last recommendations, the recent EBCTCG report builds the largest meta-analysis so far available. In a 15 year follow-up on 10,801 patients, whole breast irradiation (WBI) halves the average annual rate of disease recurrence (RR 0.52, 0.48-0.56) and reduces the annual breast cancer death rate by about one sixth (RR 0.82, 0.75-0.90), with a similar proportional, but different absolute benefit in prognostic subgroups (EBCTCG 2011). Furthermore, there is growing evidence that risk-adapted dose augmentation strategies to the tumor bed as well as the implementation of high precision RT techniques (e.g., intraoperative radiotherapy) contribute substantially to a further reduction of local relapse rates. A main focus of ongoing

  16. Voice outcomes after laser surgery vs. radiotherapy of early glottic carcinoma: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guangyuan; Liu, Chuan; Yu, Wenbin; Li, Juan; Li, Wei; Wang, Chengyuan; Zhu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy and laser resection are established treatment modalities for early glottic carcinoma. To date, there is no confirmed conclusion which treatment is better for early glottic cancer. The objective of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis to compare the voice outcomes after laser resection (LS) and radiotherapy (RT) of Tis-T1N0M0 glottic carcinoma. Methods: we searched the relevant electronic studies and performed a meta-analysis based on 13 published studies. The Chi-square based I2-statistic test was performed to evaluate possible heterogeneity across the studies. Additionally, random-effects models were used to calculate mean differences with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Overall, a total of 13 published studies were included in our study, with 368 patients in the RT group and 440 patients in the LS group, respectively. No significant differences in Voice Handicap Index (VHI), jitter and shimmer were found between RT and endoscopic LS among patients with Tis-T1N0M0 glottic carcinoma and T1aN0M0 laryngeal cancer. However, the acoustic voice analysis parameters of Fo values were significantly lower in RT group than that in LS group. Conclusion: The results from this meta-analysis support that the LS has more advantages than RT in terms of voice quality. However, more studies on voice outcome need to validate our findings. PMID:26770313

  17. Treatment of resectable distal rectal cancer with preoperative chemoradiation and sphincter saving surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omrani Pour R

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available To determine if pre-operative combined chemoradiation therapy increase sphincter preservation in the treatment of low-lying rectal cancer, 15 patients were treated with pre-operative chemoradiation: 5FU plus mitomycin C plus 4500-5000 Rad concurrent external beam radiotherapy between Jan 1997 and Jan 1999. There were 10 men and 5 women (Mean age: 49 y with the diagnosis of invasive resectable primary adenocarcinoma of distal rectum limited to pelvis. Median tumor distance from anal verge was 3.3 cm (Range 0-5 cm and half of the patients were absolute candidate for abdominoperineal resection. After 4-6 weeks, all patients were undergone proctectomy and eventually sphincter preservation surgery was done on 9 patients with colonal anastomosis. Function of sphincter was excellent in 6 of them (66% and good in 3 patients (33%. There was no case of incontinence. Complications of surgery were minimal: One case of stricture (10% and one case of partial rupture of anastomosis (10%. Complete pathologic response was achieved on one patient (6.6% and combined pre-operative chemoradiation has changed the plane of surgery from abdominoperineal resection to sphincter saving in 69.2% of patients.

  18. Surveillance versus adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with high-risk stage I seminoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Mette S; Bandak, Mikkel; Kier, Maria Gg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal treatment strategy for patients with clinical stage I (CS-1) seminoma is controversial. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the outcomes for patients considered to be at high risk of disease recurrence with a tumor size ≥6 cm. Patients were treated with either...... adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or followed with surveillance. METHODS: From the Danish Testicular Cancer database, the authors identified 473 patients with CS-1 seminoma with a tumor size ≥6 cm. Of these, 254 patients underwent adjuvant RT and 219 were followed with surveillance. Cumulative incidence function...

  19. A Review of Healthcare Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA) in Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, M; Cantone, M C; Tomarchio, E; Veronese, I

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a review of risk analyses in radiotherapy (RT) processes carried out by using Healthcare Failure Mode Effect Analysis (HFMEA) methodology, a qualitative method that proactively identifies risks to patients and corrects medical errors before they occur. This literature review was performed to provide an overview of how to approach the development of HFMEA applications in modern RT procedures, comparing recently published research conducted to support proactive programs to identify risks. On the basis of the reviewed literature, the paper suggests HFMEA shortcomings that need to be addressed.

  20. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Survey in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Naoki, E-mail: naokinak@luke.or.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke' s International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Hidaka (Japan); Wada, Hitoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Miyagi Cancer Center, Natori (Japan); Harada, Hideyuki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, Mishima (Japan); Nozaki, Miwako [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, Koshigaya (Japan); Nagakura, Hisayasu [Department of Radiology, KKR Sapporo Medical Center, Sapporo (Japan); Tago, Masao [Department of Radiology, Teikyo University Mizonokuchi Hospital, Kawasaki (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, Nobue [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shimane University Hospital, Izumo (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the current patterns of practice in Japan and to investigate factors that may make clinicians reluctant to use single-fraction radiotherapy (SF-RT). Methods and Materials: Members of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) completed an Internet-based survey and described the radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for four hypothetical cases describing patients with painful bone metastasis (BM). Case 1 described a patient with an uncomplicated painful BM in a non-weight-bearing site from non-small-cell lung cancer. Case 2 investigated whether management for a case of uncomplicated spinal BM would be different from that in Case 1. Case 3 was identical with Case 2 except for the presence of neuropathic pain. Case 4 investigated the prescription for an uncomplicated painful BM secondary to oligometastatic breast cancer. Radiation oncologists who recommended multifraction radiotherapy (MF-RT) for Case 2 were asked to explain why they considered MF-RT superior to SF-RT. Results: A total of 52 radiation oncologists from 50 institutions (36% of JROSG institutions) responded. In all four cases, the most commonly prescribed regimen was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. SF-RT was recommended by 13% of respondents for Case 1, 6% for Case 2, 0% for Case 3, and 2% for Case 4. For Case 4, 29% of respondents prescribed a high-dose MF-RT regimen (e.g., 50 Gy in 25 fractions). The following factors were most often cited as reasons for preferring MF-RT: 'time until first increase in pain' (85%), 'incidence of spinal cord compression' (50%), and 'incidence of pathologic fractures' (29%). Conclusions: Japanese radiation oncologists prefer a schedule of 30 Gy in 10 fractions and are less likely to recommend SF-RT. Most Japanese radiation oncologists regard MF-RT as superior to SF-RT, based primarily on the time until first increase in pain.

  1. Calcified carotid artery atheromas on panoramic radiographs of head and neck cancer patients before and after radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markman, Renata-Lucena; Conceição-Vasconcelos, Karina-Gondim-Moutinho; Brandão, Thais-Bianca; Prado-Ribeiro, Ana-Carolina; Santos-Silva, Alan-Roger

    2017-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to verify if head and neck radiotherapy (RT) is able to induce calcified carotid artery atheroma (CCAA) in a large head and neck cancer (HNC) population and also to compare the socio-demographic and clinical findings of patients with and without CCAA detected on panoramic radiographs. Material and Methods Panoramic radiographs taken before and after head and neck radiotherapy (RT) of 180 HNC patients were selected and analyzed in order to identify the presence of CCAA. In addition, CCAA presence or absence on panoramic radiographs were compared and correlated with clinicopathological findings. Results A high overall prevalence of CCAA was found on panoramic radiographs (63 out of 180 = 35%) of HNC patients. No significant difference of CCAA before and after RT was observed. There were also no differences between groups (with and without CCAA) regarding age, gender, tobacco and alcohol use, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, acute myocardial infarction, hypercholesterolemia, tumor location, clinical stage of disease and RT dose. However, there was a greater prevalence of strokes in patients with CCAA (p<0.05). Conclusions Although CCAA were frequently found in panoramic radiographs of patients with HNC, RT seems not to alter the prevalence of these calcifications. Key words:Head and neck cancer, radiotherapy, carotid artery diseases, panoramic radiography. PMID:28160583

  2. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in the pelvis successfully treated with consolidative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habibeh, Omar; Elsayad, Khaled; Kriz, Jan; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are aggressive malignancies which represent one of the major post-transplant complications. However, treatment options vary significantly and localized disease may be curatively treated with radiotherapy (RT) or surgery. We report a case of recurrent rectal PTLD, which was successfully treated by chemoimmunotherapy followed by RT. We describe a patient who developed a rectal lymphoproliferative lesion 11 years after kidney transplant, which was successfully treated with consolidative RT using 25.4 Gy sequential to chemoimmunotherapy (R-CHOP). RT was well tolerated and the patient showed no signs of grade 3 or 4 toxicity. This patient is free of recurrence 52 months after RT, with an overall survival of 62 months since diagnosis. Conventionally fractionated moderate-dose RT appears to be a tolerable and effective treatment option for localized PTLD if a sufficient systemic treatment cannot be applied. (orig.) [German] Posttransplantationslymphoproliferative Erkrankungen (PTLDs) sind eine haeufige Komplikation nach einer Organtransplantation. Nichtdestotrotz unterscheiden sich die Behandlungsmoeglichkeiten signifikant und vor allem lokalisierte Stadien koennen kurativ entweder mit Strahlentherapie (RT) und/oder Operation behandelt werden. Wir berichten ueber einen Fall einer rezidivierten rektalen PTLD, die erfolgreich mit einer Chemoimmuntherapie mit anschliessender RT behandelt wurde. Wir beschreiben einen Patienten der 11 Jahre nach einer Nierentransplantation eine PTLD entwickelte. Diese wurde erfolgreich mit konsolidierender RT (25,4 Gy) im Anschluss an eine Chemoimmuntherapie (R-CHOP) behandelt. Die RT wurde komplikationslos vertragen und es zeigten sich keine Nebenwirkungen. Das rezidivfreie Ueberleben betrug zum Zeitpunkt der letzten Nachsorgeuntersuchung 52 Monate mit einer Gesamtueberlebenszeit von 62 Monaten seit der Diagnose. Die konventionelle fraktionierte moderat dosierte RT scheint eine gut

  3. The significance of radiotherapy in a multidisciplinary treatment approach of bladder cancer. Die Radiotherapie im interdisziplinaeren Behandlungskonzept des Harnblasenkarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunst, J. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik)

    1991-10-01

    Bladder cancer accounts for approximately 3% of all malignancies. About 70% of bladder cancers are superficial tumors (Ta, Tis, T1), the remaining 30% are muscleinvasive (T2-4). Important prognostic factors include TNM-stage, histologic grade, multifocality, associated Tis, and residual tumor after TUR. Superficial cancers are managed by TUR and, if necessary, intravesical chemotherapy, and bladder preservation is possible. In case of T1 G3-cancers, we favour TUR plus irradiation with a moderate dose instead of cystectomy. Even advanced bladder cancers may be treated by an organ sparing approach. TUR plus radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy offer comparable survival figures and local control rate as compared to radical cystectomy. The 5-year survival rates are 60-70% for T1-2, 40% for T3, and 15% for T4-tumors. About 70% of long-term survivors maintain a functioning bladder. Radiochemotherapy (RCT) with platin compounds is equally effective but less toxic as compared to multi-agent chemotherapy or intraarterial administrations. We do not recommend preoperative radiotherapy or RCT with planned cystectomy because of the definitive organ loss. Optimal treatment results are achieved by complete TUR prior to irradiation. Persistent or recurrent tumor after radiotherapy requires salvage cystectomy. Intravesical recurrences in the spared bladder have a good prognosis. Adjuvant chemotherapy of bladder cancer is not established. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may result in 20-30% complete remissions, but these figures are lower than those after radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Nevertheless, adjuvant treatment protocols are necessary because of the fact that even sophisticated local treatment with increased local control has not yet improved the overall survival rates. (orig./MG).

  4. The role of radiotherapy for locally advanced gallbladder carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Soo [College of Medicine, Pochon CHA Univ., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jin Sil [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    A retrospective review of 72 patients with locally advanced gallbladder carcinoma, between January 1900 and December 1996, was performed. Survival results and prognostic factors are analyzed for the patients treated with a various modalities. The patients were classified by treatment modality: group 1 included to 27 patients treated with palliative surgery alone, and group 2 for 11 patient treated with palliative surgery and radiotherapy; group 3 for 18 patients not treated by any treatment modality, and group 4 for 16 patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Age distribution ranged from 35 to 80 years with a mean of 63 years. The stage was classified by TNM and Nevin's staging system; all patients had an advanced stage more than III. Palliative surgery was done in 3B patients and adjuvant radiation therapy (Rl1 was followed in 11. For 34 patients, in whom no resection was tried, definitive RT was done in 16. Radiation delivered to tumor site and draining nodes up to 45-612 Gy using 10 MY linear accelerator. Chemotherapy was given to 25 patients with 5-FU based regimens. Median survival time was 10.3 months and 3-year survival rates (3-YSR) were 13.0% in all patients. Survival rates according to the treatment modalities were as followed; in palliative surgery alone, 3-YSR was 2.5%; in palliative surgery and adjuvant RT, 3-YSR was 45.5%; in no treatment group, 3YSR were 8.3%; and definitive RT was 13.1%. It was better survival in additional RT after palliative surgery group than palliative surgery alone (p=0.0009). It was better survival in definitive RT group than no treatment group (p=0.022). Significant prognostic factors by multivariate analysis were treatment modalities, the type of tumor and TNM stage. Significant prognostic factors by multivariate analysis were treatment modalities, the type of tumor and the presence of jaundice. It is suggested that RT could be potentially effective as adjuvant treatment modalities after palliative surgery or primary

  5. [Definition of accurate planning target volume margins for esophageal cancer radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesueur, P; Servagi-Vernat, S

    2016-10-01

    More than 4000 cases of esophagus neoplasms are diagnosed every year in France. Radiotherapy, which can be delivered in preoperative or exclusive with a concomitant chemotherapy, plays a central role in treatment of esophagus cancer. Even if efficacy of radiotherapy no longer has to be proved, the prognosis of esophagus cancer remains unfortunately poor with a high recurrence rate. Toxicity of esophageal radiotherapy is correlated with the irradiation volume, and limits dose escalation and local control. Esophagus is a deep thoracic organ, which undergoes cardiac and respiratory motion, making the radiotherapy delivery more difficult and increasing the planning target volume margins. Definition of accurate planning target volume margins, taking into account the esophagus' intrafraction motion and set up margins is very important to be sure to cover the clinical target volume and restrains acute and late radiotoxicity. In this article, based on a review of the literature, we propose planning target volume margins adapted to esophageal radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Pre-operative fasting guidelines: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søreide, E; Eriksson, L I; Hirlekar, G

    2005-01-01

    Liberal pre-operative fasting routines have been implemented in most countries. In general, clear fluids are allowed up to 2 h before anaesthesia, and light meals up to 6 h. The same recommendations apply for children and pregnant women not in labour. In children......Liberal pre-operative fasting routines have been implemented in most countries. In general, clear fluids are allowed up to 2 h before anaesthesia, and light meals up to 6 h. The same recommendations apply for children and pregnant women not in labour. In children...

  7. Radioprotectors in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, C.K.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Parida, D.K.; Nomura, Taisei

    2001-03-01

    This review article focuses on clinically relevant radioprotectors and their mechanisms of radioprotection. Radiotherapy is the most common modality of human cancer therapy. Obtaining optimal results requires a judicious balance between the total dose of radiotherapy delivered and the threshold limit of critical surrounding normal tissues, and the normal tissues need to be protected against radiation injury to obtain better tumor control by using a higher dose. For this reason, radiation-protective agents play an important role in clinical radiotherapy. Radiation-protective agents can be classified into three groups: radioprotectors, adaptogens, and absorbents. The first group generally consists of sulfhydryl compounds and other antioxidants. They include several myelo-, entero-, and cerebro-protectors. Adaptogens act as promotors of radioresistance. They are natural protectors that offer chemical protection against low levels of ionizing radiation. Absorbents protect organs from internal radiation and chemicals. They include drugs that prevent incorporation of radioiodine by the thyroid gland and absorption of radionuclides. This article thoroughly describes the properties, mechanisms of action, and perspectives on clinical application of the following categories of radioprotectors: sulfhydryl compounds (e.g., cysteine, cysteamine, glutathione, AET, WR 2127, and other WR-compounds), antioxidants (e.g., tempace, Hoechst 33342, vitamin A, E, and C, TMG, melatonin), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (e.g., captopril, elanopril, penicillamine, pentoxifylline, L-158, 809), cytoprotective agents (mesna, dexrazoxane, and amifostin), metalloelements (e.g., manganese chloride, cadmium salts, bismuth subnitrate), immunomodulators (gamma-interferon, polysaccharides AM5, AM218, heat-killed lactobacillus cells, broncho-vaxom, trehalose dicorynomycolate, and AS101), lipopolysaccharides and prostaglandins, plant extracts and compounds isolated from plants (curcmin

  8. The result of external radiotherapy and side effect for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sougawa, Mitsuharu; Nakazawa, Masanori; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Abe, Tatsuyuki; Miyama, Hiroshi; Sunakawa, Yoshimitsu; Hayashi, Shinya; Kawai, Tsuneo; Yamashita, Takashi (Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital); Kawai, Tsuneo

    1993-03-01

    Radiotherapy for 67 patients with prostate cancer at the Cancer Institute Hospital during the period of January 1980 to December 1989 is reported. Mean age was 70 years (43-85), and clinical stages were classified as Stage A, 10; B, 24; C, 19; D, 11; not specified (NS), 3. Pathological classification showed well differentiated, 19; moderately differentiated, 20; poorly differentiated, 19; NS, 9. Treatment was performed as follows: radiotherapy (RT) only, 18; RT plus hormonal therapy, 34; RT plus transurethral resection of prostate (TUR-P), 13; RT plus chemotherapy, 2. Local irradiation to the prostate was conducted mainly by bilateral 120 degree arc rotation with 10 MV photons and a mean dose of 69[+-]2 Gy (TDF=118[+-]10). Pelvic lymph nodes were treated by lymphadenectomy in 18 patients, or by whole pelvic radiotherapy in 6 cases. Overall survival (OS) and disease specific survival (DSS) at 5 years were 70% and 87%, and at 10 years 51% and 87%, respectively. According to the clinical staging, OS and DSS at 5 years were, respectively: Stage A, 100%, 100%; Stage B, 89%, 100%; Stage C, 63%, 81%; Stage D, 37%, 65%. Pollakiuria (27%), urinary retention (19%), and bloody stool (8%) were temporally observed as acute radiation complications. Late radiation hazards manifested as rectal bleeding or tarry stool in 2 cases; one with overlappling field resulted in disseminated intravascular coagulation, and the other with mispositioning of the posterior margin of the radiation field, was finally salvaged by artificial anal replacement. Local radiotherapy by bilateral arc rotation method for prostate cancer would be warranted instead of radical prostatectomy. (author).

  9. Detection of cancer cells in peripheral blood with nested RT-PCR and itssignificance in patients with gastric carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Zeng Xia; Hao Ran Yin; Zheng Gang Zhu; Min yan

    2000-01-01

    AIM To study the detection of micrometastasis in peripheral blood of patients with gastric carcinomas andits clinical significance.METHODS A cytokeratin 19 (CK19)-specific nested reverse transcriptase-polimerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed to detect CK19 expressing cancer cells, the sensitivity was determined by serialdilution method using CK19 expressing gastric cancer cells, the specificity was assessed by examining 12negative controls and 12 positive controls. Then pre-operative peripheral blood from 42 patients with gastriccancer was detected and the relationship between positive results and biological behavior was studied.RESULTS CK19mRNA was expressed in all the 12 gastric cancer tissues but not in peripheral blood from12 healthy individuals;sensitivity of nested RT-PCR amplification for CK19mRNA was confirmed to be 1/106 by serial dilution method using human gastric cancer line SGC-7901; micrometastases in pre-operativeperipheral blood were detected in 13 (30,9%) patients with gastric carcinomas, the frequency ofmicrometastasis in peripheral blood was significantly correlated with tumor size,depth of invasion and TNMstage (x2 test, P<0.05).CONCLUSION Nested RT-PCR amplification for CK19mRNA is a sensitive and specific method for thedetection of micrometastases in peripheral blood in gastric cancer patients; pre-operative detection ofmicrometastasis in peripheral blood may be helpful in the prediction of tumor progression.

  10. A Phase I trial of preoperative eniluracil plus 5-fluorouracil and radiation for locally advanced or unresectable adenocarcinoma of the rectum and colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czito, Brian G; Hong, Timothy J; Cohen, Darrel P; Tyler, Douglas S; Lee, Catherine G; Anscher, Mitchell S; Ludwig, Kirk A; Seigler, Hilliard F; Mantyh, Christopher; Morse, Michael A; Lockhart, Albert C; Petros, William P; Honeycutt, Wanda; Spector, Neil L; Ertel, Phillip J; Mangum, Steve G; Hurwitz, Herbert I

    2004-03-01

    Eniluracil, an effective inactivator of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, allows for oral dosing of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which avoids the morbidity of continuous infusion 5-FU. We addressed the safety of oral eniluracil and 5-FU combined with preoperative radiotherapy and determined the recommended Phase II dose and dose-limiting toxicity in patients with locally advanced rectal and colon cancer. Patients with TNM Stage II or III rectal cancer and residual or recurrent colon cancer received eniluracil (starting at 6.0 mg/m(2) every 12 h) and 5-FU (starting at 0.6 mg/m(2) every 12 h). Eniluracil and 5-FU were given with a 5-week course of preoperative radiotherapy of 4500 cGy, with a possible 540-cGy boost. Surgery was performed approximately 4 weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy. Twenty-two patients were enrolled; 1 patient was withdrawn owing to noncompliance. Chemotherapy was completed in all patients; radiotherapy was completed in 20 patients. The recommended Phase II dose of eniluracil and 5-FU was 8 mg/m(2) every 12 h and 0.8 mg/m(2) every 12 h, respectively. Diarrhea was the dose-limiting toxicity. Eleven of the 17 patients with primary rectal cancer underwent a sphincter-sparing procedure. One patient had a pathologic complete response. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with oral eniluracil and 5-FU is feasible and well tolerated. Additional investigation is warranted.

  11. Mid-radiotherapy PET/CT for prognostication and detection of early progression in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensheimer, Michael F; Hong, Julian C; Chang-Halpenny, Christine; Zhu, Hui; Eclov, Neville C W; To, Jacqueline; Murphy, James D; Wakelee, Heather A; Neal, Joel W; Le, Quynh-Thu; Hara, Wendy Y; Quon, Andrew; Maxim, Peter G; Graves, Edward E; Olson, Michael R; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W

    2017-08-19

    Pre- and mid-radiotherapy FDG-PET metrics have been proposed as biomarkers of recurrence and survival in patients treated for stage III non-small cell lung cancer. We evaluated these metrics in patients treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT). We also evaluated outcomes after progression on mid-radiotherapy PET/CT. Seventy-seven patients treated with RT with or without chemotherapy were included in this retrospective study. Primary tumor and involved nodes were delineated. PET metrics included metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and SUVmax. For mid-radiotherapy PET, both absolute value of these metrics and percentage decrease were analyzed. The influence of PET metrics on time to death, local recurrence, and regional/distant recurrence was assessed using Cox regression. 91% of patients had concurrent chemotherapy. Median follow-up was 14months. None of the PET metrics were associated with overall survival. Several were positively associated with local recurrence: pre-radiotherapy MTV, and mid-radiotherapy MTV and TLG (p=0.03-0.05). Ratio of mid- to pre-treatment SUVmax was associated with regional/distant recurrence (p=0.02). 5/77 mid-radiotherapy scans showed early out-of-field progression. All of these patients died. Several PET metrics were associated with risk of recurrence. Progression on mid-radiotherapy PET/CT was a poor prognostic factor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Power lies in interdisciplinary cooperation / Kärt Summatavet ; interv. Kärt Blumberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Summatavet, Kärt, 1963-

    2008-01-01

    Ehtekunstnik Kärt Summatavet oma uudsest meetodist ehete valmistamisel - paberil oleva kujutise ülekandmisest arvuti abil metallile, mille ta töötas väljas oma doktoritöö raames Soomes Helsingi Kunsti- ja Disainiülikoolis ning mis pälvis Soulis toimunud ülemaailmsel naisleiutajate konkursil hõbemedali

  13. PREOPERATIVE ENDOSCOPIC MARKING OF UNPALPABLE COLONIC TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Goncharov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of small colon lesions is one of the major problems in laparoscopic colonic resection.Research objective: to develop a technique of visualization of small tumors of a colon by preoperative endoscopic marking of a tumor.Materials and methods. In one day prior to operation to the patient after bowel preparation the colonoscopy is carried out. In the planned point near tumor on antimesentery edge the submucous infiltration of marking solution (Micky Sharpz blue tattoo pigment, UK is made. The volume of entered solution of 1–3 ml. In only 5 months of use of a technique preoperative marking to 14 patients with small (the size of 1–3 cm malignant tumors of the left colon is performed.Results. The tattoo mark was well visualized by during operation at 13 of 14 patients. In all cases we recorded no complications. Time of operation with preoperative marking averaged 108 min, that is significantly less in comparison with average time of operation with an intra-operative colonoscopy – 155 min (р < 0.001.Conclusions. The first experience of preoperative endoscopic marking of non palpable small tumors of a colon is encouraging. Performance of a technique wasn't accompanied by complications and allowed to reduce significantly time of operation and to simplify conditions of performance of operation.

  14. Preoperative exercise training to improve postoperative outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenet, K.

    2017-01-01

    It is common knowledge that better preoperative physical fitness is associated with better postoperative outcomes. However, as a result of aging of the population and improved surgical and anaesthesia techniques, the proportion of frail patients with decreased physical fitness levels undergoing majo

  15. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  16. Preoperative evaluation : risk management and implementation aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, W.A. van

    2002-01-01

    In preoperative risk management the anesthesiologist uses diagnostic information to estimate the probability of outcomes and to decide on the anesthetic strategy in a particular patient. The aim of this thesis was explore to what extent simple patient characteristics, particularly obtained from

  17. Pre-operative fasting guidelines: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søreide, E; Eriksson, L I; Hirlekar, G

    2005-01-01

    Liberal pre-operative fasting routines have been implemented in most countries. In general, clear fluids are allowed up to 2 h before anaesthesia, and light meals up to 6 h. The same recommendations apply for children and pregnant women not in labour. In children...

  18. Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  19. Preoperative and intraoperative continuous use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-13

    Sep 13, 2016 ... in clinics to improve patient safety and effectiveness with. Introduction ... and control group according to different use of drugs. The two ... Key words: Anesthesia, dexmedetomidine, effect, intervention, preoperative, recovery, remifentanil .... will lead to postoperative pain in patients and severe agitation after ...

  20. Preoperational test, vent building ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-20

    Preoperational Test Procedure for Vent Building Ventilation System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The Vent Building ventilation system provides ventilation, heating, cooling, and zone confinement control for the W-030 Project Vent Building. The tests verify correct System operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control system.

  1. Preoperative evaluation : risk management and implementation aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, W.A. van

    2002-01-01

    In preoperative risk management the anesthesiologist uses diagnostic information to estimate the probability of outcomes and to decide on the anesthetic strategy in a particular patient. The aim of this thesis was explore to what extent simple patient characteristics, particularly obtained from preo

  2. Evaluation of Tumor Response after Short-Course Radiotherapy and Delayed Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rega, Daniela; Pecori, Biagio; Scala, Dario; Avallone, Antonio; Pace, Ugo; Petrillo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant therapy is able to reduce local recurrence in rectal cancer. Immediate surgery after short course radiotherapy allows only for minimal downstaging. We investigated the effect of delayed surgery after short-course radiotherapy at different time intervals before surgery, in patients affected by rectal cancer. Methods From January 2003 to December 2013 sixty-seven patients with the following characteristics have been selected: clinical (c) stage T3N0 ≤ 12 cm from the anal verge and with circumferential resection margin > 5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging); cT2, any N, CRM+ve who resulted unfit for chemo-radiation, were also included. Patients underwent preoperative short-course radiotherapy with different interval to surgery were divided in three groups: A (within 6 weeks), B (between 6 and 8 weeks) and C (after more than 8 weeks). Hystopatolgical response to radiotherapy was measured by Mandard’s modified tumor regression grade (TRG). Results All patients completed the scheduled treatment. Sixty-six patients underwent surgery. Fifty-three of which (80.3%) received a sphincter saving procedure. Downstaging occurred in 41 cases (62.1%). The analysis of subgroups showed an increasing prevalence of TRG 1–2 prolonging the interval to surgery (group A—16.7%, group B—36.8% and 54.3% in group C; p value 0.023). Conclusions Preoperative short-course radiotherapy is able to downstage rectal cancer if surgery is delayed. A higher rate of TRG 1–2 can be obtained if interval to surgery is prolonged to more than 8 weeks. PMID:27548058

  3. Pelvic Radiotherapy versus Radical Prostatectomy with Limited Lymph Node Sampling for High-Grade Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B. Baker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare oncologic outcomes for patients with Gleason score (GS ≥ 8 prostate adenocarcinoma treated with radical prostatectomy (RP versus external beam radiotherapy combined with androgen deprivation (RT + ADT. Methods. Between 2001 and 2014, 121 patients with GS ≥ 8 were treated at our institution via RT + ADT (n=71 or RP (n=50 with ≥ 1 year of biochemical follow-up. Endpoints included biochemical failure (BF, distant metastasis, and initiation of salvage ADT. Results. The RT + ADT group was older, had higher biopsy GS, and had greater risk of lymph node involvement. All other pretreatment characteristics were similar between groups. Mean number of lymph nodes (LNs sampled for patients undergoing RP was 8.2 (±6.18. Mean biochemical follow-up for all patients was 61 months. Five-year estimates of BF for the RT + ADT and RP groups were 7.2% versus 42.3%, (p<0.001. The RT + ADT group also had lower rates of distant metastasis (2% versus 7.8% and salvage ADT (8% versus 33.8%. Conclusion. In this analysis, RT + ADT was associated with improved biochemical and metastatic control when compared to RP with limited LN sampling. How RT + ADT compares with more aggressive lymphadenectomy, as is currently our institutional standard, remains an important unanswered question.

  4. Significance of prophylactic radiotherapy over the parasternal and supraclavicular regions against n0 breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, D.; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Nakazawa, Hideki; Okazaki, Atsushi [Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    The analysis of the prognosis of breast cancer at the Department of Endocrine Surgery, Toranomon Hospital revealed significant differences in relation to the location of the tumor (medial and lateral) as well as the axillary involvement. Accordingly, we conducted radiotherapy (RT) over the PS and SC regions in some of the patients we could an agreement of RT with tumor located medially, and examined the benefits and disadvantages of RT. We experienced a total of 128 patients of n0 breast cancer with medical tumor undergoing modified radical mastectomy between 1989 and 1997. Forty patients were in RT+ group, and 88 were in RT- group. The nine-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 97.5%, 86.0% in RT+ group, and 91.6%, 86.9% in RT- group, respectively, exhibiting statistically no significant differences. While improvement in the survival rate was not achieved by PS and SC irradiation against n0 breast cancer, the result of our study suggest that the irradiation may be effective for local control. (author)

  5. Estimation of internal organ motion-induced variance in radiation dose in non-gated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sumin; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Mutian; Zheng, Dandan; Lei, Yu; Li, Sicong; Bennion, Nathan; Verma, Vivek; Zhen, Weining; Enke, Charles

    2016-12-01

    In the delivery of non-gated radiotherapy (RT), owing to intra-fraction organ motion, a certain degree of RT dose uncertainty is present. Herein, we propose a novel mathematical algorithm to estimate the mean and variance of RT dose that is delivered without gating. These parameters are specific to individual internal organ motion, dependent on individual treatment plans, and relevant to the RT delivery process. This algorithm uses images from a patient’s 4D simulation study to model the actual patient internal organ motion during RT delivery. All necessary dose rate calculations are performed in fixed patient internal organ motion states. The analytical and deterministic formulae of mean and variance in dose from non-gated RT were derived directly via statistical averaging of the calculated dose rate over possible random internal organ motion initial phases, and did not require constructing relevant histograms. All results are expressed in dose rate Fourier transform coefficients for computational efficiency. Exact solutions are provided to simplified, yet still clinically relevant, cases. Results from a volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) patient case are also presented. The results obtained from our mathematical algorithm can aid clinical decisions by providing information regarding both mean and variance of radiation dose to non-gated patients prior to RT delivery.

  6. Quality control of involved field radiotherapy in the HD 13 and HD 14 trials. Report of the radiotherapy panel of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, J.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T. [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Baues, C. [University of Cologne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cologne (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, R. [University of Marburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Marburg (Germany); Herfarth, K. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Lukas, P. [University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Innsbruck (Austria); Pluetschow, A.; Fuchs, M.; Engert, A. [University of Cologne, Department of Internal Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Schmidberger, H. [University of Mainz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mainz (Germany); Staar, S. [Bremen Mitte, Department of Radiation Oncology, Bremen (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    As part of the foundation of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) in 1978, a central radiotherapy (RT) reference centre was established to evaluate and to improve the quality of treatment. During the study generations, the quality assurance programs (QAP) were continued and adapted to the demands of each study. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the results of the fifth study generation and to compare them to the previous findings. With the start of the fourth GHSG study generation (HD10-12), a central prospective review of all diagnostic images was established to create an individual treatment plan for each early stage study patient. The quality of involved field RT was retrospectively evaluated by an expert panel of radiation oncologists. In the fifth study generation (HD13-15), the retrospective review of radiotherapy performed was refined and the results were compared with the findings of the fourth generation. The expert panel analyzed the RT planning and application of 1037 (28 %) patients (HD13 n = 465, HD14 n = 572). Simulation films were available in 85 % of cases and verification films in 87 %. RT was assessed as major violation in 46 % (HD13 = 38 %, HD14 = 52 %), minor violation in 9 % (HD13 = 9 %, HD14 = 9 %) and according to the protocol in 45 % (HD13 = 52 %, HD14 = 38 %). The value for QAP of RT within the GHSG trials is well known. Still there were several protocol violations. In the future, the QAP program has to be adapted to the requirements of ''modern RT'' in malignant lymphoma. (orig.) [German] Seit Gruendung der German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) im Jahr 1978 wurde ein zentrales Qualitaetssicherungsprogramm (QAP) der Radiotherapie (RT) etabliert, um die Qualitaet der RT sicherzustellen. Waehrend der fortlaufenden Studiengenerationen wurde dieses QAP kontinuierlich weiterentwickelt. In dieser Auswertung werden die Ergebnisse der fuenften Studiengeneration (HD13-15) praesentiert und mit frueheren Ergebnissen

  7. Salvage Treatment With Hypofractionated Radiotherapy in Patients With Recurrent Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sun Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Chul, E-mail: rophc@skku.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Do Hoon; Lee, Jung Ae [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gwak, Geum Yeon; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul [Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the rates of tumor response and local control in patients with recurrent small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) as a salvage treatment and to evaluate treatment-related toxicities. Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2009, a total of 20 patients with recurrent small HCC were treated with hypofractionated RT after the failure of previous treatment. The eligibility criteria for hypofractionated RT were as follows: 1) HCC less than 5 cm, 2) HCC not adjacent to critical organs, 3) HCC without portal vein tumor thrombosis, and 4) less than 15% of normal liver volume that would be irradiated with 50% of prescribed dose. The RT dose was 50 Gy in 10 fractions. The tumor response was determined by CT scans performed 3 months after the end of RT. Results: The median follow-up period after RT was 22 months. The overall survival rates at 1 and 2 years were 100% and 87.9%, respectively. Complete response (CR) was achieved in seven of 20 lesions (35%) evaluated by CT scans performed 3 months after the end of RT. In-field local control was achieved in 85% of patients. Fourteen patients (70%) developed intra-hepatic metastases. Six patients developed grade 1 nausea or anorexia during RT, and two patients had progression of ascites after RT. There was no grade 3 or greater treatment-related toxicities. Conclusions: The current study showed a favorable outcome with respect to hypofractionated RT for small HCC. Partial liver irradiation with 50 Gy in 10 fractions is considered tolerable without severe complications.

  8. Radiotherapy in prostate cancer treatment: Results of the patterns of care study in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ah Ram; Park, Won [Division for Urologic Cancer, Korean Radiation Oncology Group, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe treatment patterns of radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer in Korea. A questionnaire about radiation treatment technique and principles in 2013 was sent to 83 radiation oncologists and data from 57 hospitals were collected analyzed to find patterns of RT for prostate cancer patients in Korea. The number of patients with prostate cancer treated with definitive RT ranged from 1 to 72 per hospital in 2013. RT doses and target volumes increased according to risk groups but the range of radiation doses was wide (60 to 81.4 Gy) and the fraction size was diverse (1.8 to 5 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used for definitive treatment in 93.8% of hospitals. Hormonal therapy was integrated with radiation for intermediate (63.2%) and high risk patients (77.2%). Adjuvant RT after radical prostatectomy was performed in 46 hospitals (80.7%). Indications of adjuvant RT included positive resection margin, seminal vesicle invasion, and capsular invasion. The total dose for adjuvant RT ranged from 50 to 72 Gy in 24–39 fractions. Salvage RT was delivered with findings of consecutive elevations in prostate-specific antigen (PSA), PSA level over 0.2 ng/mL, or clinical recurrence. The total radiation doses ranged from 50 to 80 Gy with a range of 1.8 to 2.5 Gy per fraction for salvage RT. This nationwide patterns of care study suggests that variable radiation techniques and a diverse range of dose fractionation schemes are applied for prostate cancer treatment in Korea. Standard guidelines for RT in prostate cancer need to be developed.

  9. Germline polymorphisms may act as predictors of response to preoperative chemoradiation in locally advanced T3 rectal tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise G; Nielsen, Jens N; Lindebjerg, Jan;

    2007-01-01

    with locally advanced T3 rectal tumors were analyzed for thymidylate synthase, epidermal growth factor receptor Sp1-216, and epidermal growth factor A61G gene polymorphisms by polymerase chain reaction. Treatment consisted of preoperative radiotherapy (total dose 65 Gy) and concomitant chemotherapy (Uftoral......PURPOSE: Patients with locally advanced T3 rectal tumors who present with complete pathologic response to preoperative chemoradiation have a low rate of local recurrence and an excellent prognosis. Predictive markers for complete pathologic response are needed with the perspective of improving...... individualized treatment of these patients. This study was designed to investigate the predictive value of a new combination of three gene polymorphisms: thymidylate synthase, epidermal growth factor receptor Sp1-216, and epidermal growth factor A61G. METHODS: Pretreatment blood samples from 60 patients...

  10. Commissioning and quality control of a dedicated wide bore 3T MRI simulator for radiotherapy planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitang Xing

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe a practical approach to commissioning and quality assurance (QA of a dedicated wide-bore 3 Tesla (3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner for radiotherapy planning.Methods: A comprehensive commissioning protocol focusing on radiotherapy (RT specific requirements was developed and performed. RT specific tests included: uniformity characteristics of radio-frequency (RF coil, couch top attenuation, geometric distortion, laser and couch movement and an end-to-end radiotherapy treatment planning test. General tests for overall system performance and safety measurements were also performed.Results: The use of pre-scan based intensity correction increased the uniformity from 61.7% to 97% (body flexible coil, from 50% to 90% (large flexible coil and from 51% to 98% (small flexible coil. RT flat top couch decreased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR by an average of 42%. The mean and maximum geometric distortion was found to be 1.25 mm and 4.08 mm for three dimensional (3D corrected image acquisition, 2.07 mm and 7.88 mm for two dimensional (2D corrected image acquisition over 500 mm × 375 mm × 252 mm field of view (FOV. The accuracy of the laser and couch movement was less than ±1 mm. The standard deviation of registration parameters for the end-to-end test was less than 0.41 mm. An on-going QA program was developed to monitor the system’s performance.Conclusion: A number of RT specific tests have been described for commissioning and subsequent performance monitoring of a dedicated MRI simulator (MRI-Sim. These tests have been important in establishing and maintaining its operation for RT planning.

  11. Radiotherapy and skin tumors; Radiotherapie et tumeurs curanees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calitchi, E.; KIrova, Y.; Le bourgeois, J.P. [Hopital Henri-Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France)

    1998-09-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in treatment of skin tumours. For skin carcinomas, external irradiation (kilo-voltage X-rays or electrons according to clinical characteristics) is more valuable than interstitial brachytherapy, which is recommended for tumours of the lip and of the nasal vestibule. In mycosis fungoides, total cutaneous electron beam radiation therapy is efficient for patients with limited superficial plaques. In the classical form of Kaposi`s sarcoma, radiotherapy can achieve local control-whereas it obtains good palliative results in the epidemic form. (author)

  12. Role of Radiotherapy in Aggressive Digital Papillary Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmeyer, Laurence; Prieto, Victor G; Ivan, Doina; Nagarajan, Priyadharsini; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Curry, Jonathan L; Bell, Diana; Moon, Bryan S; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Aung, Phyu P

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma (ADPA) is a rare and often misdiagnosed malignant tumor of the sweat glands, most commonly encountered on the extremities. Due to the relatively high metastatic potential of the tumor, aggressive surgical treatment, including amputation, is generally recommended. We present a case of a 36-year-old male with an over 10-year history of a skin lesion on the right hand in the web space between the index and the middle finger. Histologically, the lesion revealed a malignant epithelioid neoplasm with features consistent with ADPA. The lesion was treated with 5-weeks preoperative radiation (total 5000 cGy) followed by surgical resection. There was no evidence of residual disease confirmed by pathological study of re-excision specimen as well as imaging studies. This is, to the best of knowledge, the first report of complete regression of an ADPA after radiotherapy.

  13. Risk of pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator after radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer in Denmark, 1982-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehammar, Jens Christian; Johansen, Jens Brock; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Videbæk, Lars; Jørgensen, Ole Dan; Lorenzen, Ebbe; Ewertz, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    To examine the risk of cardiac conduction abnormalities or severe ventricular arrhythmias requiring implantation of a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED), either a pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, subsequent to breast cancer (BC) radiotherapy (RT). All women treated for early-stage BC in Denmark from 1982 to 2005 were identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. By record linkage to the Danish Pacemaker and ICD Registry information was retrieved on CIED implants subsequent to RT. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) of CIED implantation were estimated for women receiving RT and compared to women not receiving RT for BC. Uni- and multivariate Poisson regression models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) among irradiated women compared to non-irradiated. Of 44,423 BC patients, 179 had a CIED implanted among 18,251 women who received RT, and 401 had a CIED in 26,172 who did not receive RT. The unadjusted IRR was 1.09 (0.91-1.30 95% CI) for CIED implants among women receiving RT compared to non-irradiated women and the IRR was 1.13 (0.93-1.38 95% CI) when adjustments were made. BC RT as practiced in Denmark in 1982-2005 did not increase the risk of CIED implants. This indicates that RT for BC does not increase the risk of severe ventricular arrhythmias or cardiac conduction abnormalities. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Technological advances in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milan; Vosmik; Jiri; Petera; Igor; Sirak; Miroslav; Hodek; Petr; Paluska; Jiri; Dolezal; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and surgery represent the main treatment modalities in esophageal cancer.The goal of modern radiotherapy approaches,based on recent technological advances,is to minimize post-treatment complications by improving the gross tumor volume definition (positron emission tomography-based planning),reducing interfraction motion (image-guided radiotherapy) and intrafraction motion (respiratory-gated radiotherapy),and by better dose delivery to the precisely defined planning ...

  15. AT-13R9802: PHASE III STUDY OF RADIATION THERAPY (RT) WITH OR WITHOUT PROCARBAZINE, CCNU, AND VINCRISTINE (PCV) IN LOW-GRADE QLIOMA: RESULTS BY HISTOLOGIC TYPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Jan; Shaw, Edward; Pugh, Stephanie; Gilbert, Mark; Barger, Geoffrey; Coons, Stephen; Ricci, Peter; Bullard, Dennis; Brown, Paul; Stelzer, Keith; Brachman, David; Suh, John; Schultz, Christopher; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Fisher, Barbara; Kim, Harold; Murtha, Albert; Won, Minhee; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent results of R9802 (Buckner et al; J Clin Oncol 32:5s, 2014 (suppl; abstr 2000)) demonstrated that PCV given with RT at the time of initial diagnosis prolongs both progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients enrolled in the trial. Herein, we report the impact of treatment on PFS and OS based upon specific histologic type. METHODS: Eligibility criteria included age 40 with any extent of resection, and supratentorial grade ll oligodendroglioma (O), oligo-astrocytoma (OA), or astrocytoma (A). Patients were stratified by age, histology, Karnofsky Performance Status, and presence versus absence of contrast enhancement on the preoperative imaging study and randomized to RT alone (54 Gy in 30 fractions) or RT followed by 6 cycles of PCV chemotherapy. In an exploratory analysis, we used the log rank test to compare survival and progression free survival (PFS) distributions for each histologic type. RESULTS: 251 eligible patients were accrued from 1998 to 2002: 107 had O, 79 had OA, and 65 had A. In total, 67% have progressed and 55% have died. Median PFS (RT vs. RT + PCV) overall, O, OA, and A, respectively, are 4.0 vs 10.4 (p 40 years of age, PCV + RT prolongs both OS and PFS compared with RT alone. The observed benefit is most definitive for O and OA patients.

  16. The effect of antiemetics and reduced radiation fields on acute gastrointestinal morbidity of adjuvant radiotherapy in Stage I seminoma of the testis: a randomized pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoo, V.S.; Rainford, K.; Horwich, A.; Dearnaley, D.P. [Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute gastrointestinal morbidity of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for Stage I seminoma of the testis. Ten Stage I patients receiving para-aortic and ipsilateral pelvic nodal (dog-leg) RT provided a toxicity baseline (group A). Twenty Stage I patients randomized to dog-let RT or para-aortic RT (10 per group) were further randomized to received prophylactic ondansetron or expectant therapy with metoclopramide (group B). Daily patient-completed questionnaires evaluated acute toxicity. Dog-leg RT for Stage I seminomas is associated with readily demonstrable gastrointestinal tract (GIT) toxicity. The number of patients in this study is too small to produce definitive results, but there appears to be reduced GIT toxicity with prophylactic antiemetics. The effect of reduced RT fields has been assessed further in the MRC randomized tiral of field sizes (TE10). (Author).

  17. Technical Note: DIRART- A software suite for deformable image registration and adaptive radiotherapy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Deshan; Brame, Scott; El Naqa, Issam; Aditya, Apte; Wu Yu; Murty Goddu, S.; Mutic, Sasa; Deasy, Joseph O.; Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University in Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in image guide radiotherapy technology and a growing interest in the possibilities for adapting treatment planning and delivery over the course of treatment. One obstacle faced by the research community has been the lack of a comprehensive open-source software toolkit dedicated for adaptive radiotherapy (ART). To address this need, the authors have developed a software suite called the Deformable Image Registration and Adaptive Radiotherapy Toolkit (DIRART). Methods: DIRART is an open-source toolkit developed in MATLAB. It is designed in an object-oriented style with focus on user-friendliness, features, and flexibility. It contains four classes of DIR algorithms, including the newer inverse consistency algorithms to provide consistent displacement vector field in both directions. It also contains common ART functions, an integrated graphical user interface, a variety of visualization and image-processing features, dose metric analysis functions, and interface routines. These interface routines make DIRART a powerful complement to the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR) and popular image-processing toolkits such as ITK. Results: DIRART provides a set of image processing/registration algorithms and postprocessing functions to facilitate the development and testing of DIR algorithms. It also offers a good amount of options for DIR results visualization, evaluation, and validation. Conclusions: By exchanging data with treatment planning systems via DICOM-RT files and CERR, and by bringing image registration algorithms closer to radiotherapy applications, DIRART is potentially a convenient and flexible platform that may facilitate ART and DIR research.

  18. Combination of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy is associated with improved survival at early stage type II endometrial cancer and carcinosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozen, Hamdullah; Çiftçi, Rumeysa; Vatansever, Dogan; Topuz, Samet; Iyibozkurt, Ahmet Cem; Bozbey, Hamza Ugur; Yaşa, Cenk; Çali, Halime; Yavuz, Ekrem; Kucucuk, Seden; Aydiner, Adnan; Salihoglu, Yavuz

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the impact of postoperative adjuvant treatment modalities and identify risk factors associated with recurrence and survival rates in women diagnosed with early stage type II endometrial cancer and carcinosarcoma. In this retrospective study, patients diagnosed with early stage (stages I-II) carcinosarcoma and type II endometrial cancer were reviewed. All women underwent comprehensive surgical staging. Postoperative treatment options of chemotherapy (CT), radiotherapy (RT), observation (OBS) and chemotherapy-radiotherapy (CT-RT) combination were compared in terms of recurrence and survival outcome. In CT-RT treatment arm, recurrence rate was found as 12.5% and this result is significantly lower than the other treatment approaches (P = 0.01 CT alone: 33.3%, RT alone: 26.7%, OBS: 62.5%). Three-year disease free survival(DFS) rate and overall survival (OS) rate were statistically higher for the group of women treated with combination of CT-RT (92-95%) compared to the women treated with RT alone (65-72%), treated with CT alone (67-74%) and women who received no adjuvant therapy (38-45%). The multivariate analysis revealed that carcinosarcoma histology was associated with shortened DFS and OS (P = 0.001, P = 0.002). On the other hand, being at stage Ia (P = 0.01, P = 0.04) and receiving adjuvant treatment of CT-RT combination (P = 0.005, P = 0.002) appeared to lead to increased DFS and OS rates. We identified that a combination treatment of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is superior compared to other postoperative adjuvant treatment approaches concerning PFS, OS and recurrence rates in stages I-II of type II endometrial cancers and uterine carcinosarcoma. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  19. Late effects on human bone marrow after extended field radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmentier, C.; Morardet, N.; Tubiana, M.

    1983-09-01

    Thirty-two patients with lymphoma were treated by extended radiotherapy (RT) at a dose of 40 Gy and were studied by ferrokinetic studies and surface counting at various times following irradiation. Loss of hematopoietic activity in the irradiated areas is compensated by increased activity in the non-irradiated areas. Despite the return of peripheral blood counts to normal, the hyperactivity of the non-irradiated bone marrow persists over up to 13 years after RT, while the hematopoietic activity of the irradiated areas remains depressed and is only slightly higher than immediately after RT. The hypoactivity persisted even when the hemopoietic tissues had been subjected to the intense stimulation provoked by an aplasia caused by chemotherapy. However, a recovery was observed for dose of 20 Gy or lower. The hemopoietic activity of the irradiated bone marrow appears to be related to the volume of the marrow irradiated and is higher after a mantle + inverted Y field than after a mantle field. Bone marrow scintigraphies with /sup 59/Fe in 7 out of 9 patients studied revealed an extension of hematopoiesis into a normally dormant area of the marrow, such as the femora. In 2 patients an erythropoietic activity was observed in spleens which had received a dose of 40 Gy, and extra medullary erythropoiesis was found in approximately two-thirds of the patients.

  20. Preoperative staging of perforated diverticulitis by computed tomography scanning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.M. Gielens; I.M. Mulder (Irene); E. van der Harst (Erwin); M.P. Gosselink (Martijn Pieter); K.J. Kraal; H.T. Teng; J.F. Lange (Johan); J. Vermeulen (Jefrey)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Treatment of perforated diverticulitis depends on disease severity classified according to Hinchey's preoperative classification. This study assessed the accuracy of preoperative staging of perforated diverticulitis by computerized tomography (CT) scanning. Methods: All patie

  1. The Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moerman, N; Dam, van, F.S.A.M; Muller, M.J; Oosting, H

    1996-01-01

    ... phase.During routine preoperative screening, 320 patients were asked to assess their anxiety and information requirement on a six-item questionnaire, the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS...

  2. Image Guided Hypofractionated Radiotherapy by Helical Tomotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Toxicity and Impact on Nadir PSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvina Barra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the toxicity of a hypofractionated schedule for primary radiotherapy (RT of prostate cancer as well as the value of the nadir PSA (nPSA and time to nadir PSA (tnPSA as surrogate efficacy of treatment. Material and Methods. Eighty patients underwent hypofractionated schedule by Helical Tomotherapy (HT. A dose of 70.2 Gy was administered in 27 daily fractions of 2.6 Gy. Acute and late toxicities were graded on the RTOG/EORTC scales. The nPSA and the tnPSA for patients treated with exclusive RT were compared to an equal cohort of 20 patients treated with conventional fractionation and standard conformal radiotherapy. Results. Most of patients (83% did not develop acute gastrointestinal (GI toxicity and 50% did not present genitourinary (GU toxicity. After a median follow-up of 36 months only grade 1 of GU and GI was reported in 6 and 3 patients as late toxicity. Average tnPSA was 30 months. The median value of nPSA after exclusive RT with HT was 0.28 ng/mL and was significantly lower than the median nPSA (0.67 ng/mL of the conventionally treated cohort (P=0.02. Conclusions. Hypofractionated RT schedule with HT for prostate cancer treatment reports very low toxicity and reaches a low level of nPSA that might correlate with good outcomes.

  3. Radiotherapy versus concurrent 5-day cisplatin and radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Long-term results of a Phase III randomized trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Viorica; Coza, Ovidiu; Ghilezan, Nicolae [' Ion Chiricuta' Cancer Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; ' Iuliu Hatieganu' Univ. of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ordeanu, Claudia; Todor, Nicolae [' Ion Chiricuta' Cancer Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Traila, Alexandru [' Ion Chiricuta' Cancer Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania). Dept. of Surgery; Rancea, Alin [' Iuliu Hatieganu' Univ. of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); ' Ion Chiricuta' Cancer Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania). Dept. of Surgery

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To prove the superiority of concurrent radiochemotherapy (RTCT) over radiotherapy (RT) alone in locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Patients and Methods: In this randomized monocentric phase III study, 566 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were included: 284 in arm A (RT) and 282 in arm B (concurrent RTCT with cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} x 5 days). 238 patients (42%) were in stage IIB, 209 (37%) in stage IIIA, and 119 (21%) in stage IIIB. The median follow-up was 62.8 months. RT to the pelvis was delivered to a dose of 46 Gy/23 fractions. A cervical boost was given using the X-ray arch technique or high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy at a dose of 10 Gy. Thereafter, patients were evaluated: those with good response optionally underwent surgery and the others continued RT until 64 Gy/pelvis (with or without CT according to randomization) and 14 Gy/central tumor volume. Results: The 5-year survival rate was statistically significantly superior in the concurrent RTCT group (74%) versus the RT group (64%; p < 0.05). In patients undergoing surgery after RT or RTCT, superior results were obtained, compared to the nonoperated patients: 5-year survival rate 86% versus 53% (p < 0.01). 192 failures were recorded: 109 (38%) after RT alone versus 83 (29%) after concurrent RTCT (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The results of this study prove the obvious superiority of concurrent RTCT with 5-day cisplatin compared to RT alone in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma, regarding local control (78% vs. 67%) and 5-year survival rates (74% vs. 64%). (orig.)

  4. [Preoperative assessment of patients with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2010-07-01

    The perioperative morbidity of diabetic patients is related to preoperative end-organ damage. Due to the microvascular pathology, autonomic neuropathy is common and cardiovascular abnormalities such as hypertension, painless myocardial ischemia, and orthostatic hypotension may predispose patients to perioperative cardiovascular instability. Autonomic dysfunction also contributes to delayed gastric emptying, and preoperative administration of a histamine antagonist and a gastric emptying agent is needed. Chronic hyperglycemia leads to glycosylation of tissue proteins and the accumulation of abnormal collagen can cause stiff joint syndrome resulting in difficult tracheal intubation. The primary goal of pre and intraoperative blood glucose control is to avoid hypoglycemia and ketosis. Moreover, the tight glycemic control has been reported to improve survival in critically ill patients who were treated in the intensive care unit.

  5. Preoperatively diagnosed mucocele of the appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojnoveanu, Gh; Ghidirim, Gh; Mishin, I; Vozian, M; Mishina, A

    2014-01-01

    Mucocele of the appendix is an infrequent entity, characterized by distension of the lumen due to accumulation of mucoid substance and is rarely diagnosed preoperatively. If untreated, mucocele may rupture producing a potentially fatal entity known as pseudomyxoma peritonei. The type of surgical treatment is related to the dimensions and the histology of the mucocele. Appendectomy is used for simple mucocele or for cystadenoma. Right hemi-colectomy is recommended for cystadeno carcinoma. In this paper, we report a case of an asymptomatic 37-year-old woman in whom mucocele was found on a routine ultrasound examination and preoperative computed tomography scan. Surgery revealed a big appendix measuring 84 mm in length and 40 mm in diameter. The final pathologic diagnosis was simple mucocele. Celsius.

  6. Radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Immediate or early delayed?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottke, D.; Bartkowiak, D.; Schrader, M.; Wiegel, T. [University Hospital Ulm (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Background: Biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP) is associated with risk indicators, including Gleason score, preoperative PSA level, tumor stage, seminal vesicle invasion, and positive surgical margins. The 5-year biochemical progression rate among predisposed patients is as high as 50-70%. Post-RP treatment options include adjuvant radiotherapy (ART, for men with undetectable PSA) or salvage radiotherapy (SRT, for PSA persisting or re-rising above detection threshold). Presently, there are no published randomized trials evaluating ART vs. SRT directly. Methods: Published data on ART and SRT were reviewed to allow a comparison of the two treatment approaches. Results: Three randomized phase III trials demonstrated an almost 20% absolute benefit for biochemical progression-free survival after ART (60-64 Gy) compared to a 'wait and see' policy. The greatest benefit was achieved in patients with positive margins and pT3 tumors. SRT can be offered to patients with elevated PSA after RP. In 30-70% of SRT patients, PSA will decrease to an undetectable level, thus giving a second curative chance. The rate of side effects for both treatments is comparably low. The role of irradiation of pelvic lymph nodes and the additional use of hormone therapy and radiation dose are discussed. Conclusion: It remains unclear whether early SRT initiated after PSA failure is equivalent to ART. Where SRT is indicated, it should be started as early as possible. (orig.)

  7. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance fusion imaging in cholesteatoma preoperative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Agustín; Mata, Federico; Reboll, Rosa; Peris, María Luisa; Basterra, Jorge

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe a method for developing fusion imaging for the preoperative evaluation of cholesteatoma. In 33 patients diagnosed with cholesteatoma, a high-resolution temporal bone computed tomography (CT) scan without intravenous contrast and propeller diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. Both studies were then sent to the BrainLAB work station, where the images were fused to obtain a morphological and color map. Intraoperative findings coincided with fusion CT-MRI imaging in all but two patients. In addition, one false positive and one false negative case were observed. CT and diffusion-weighted MRI are complementary techniques that should be employed to assess a cholesteatoma prior to surgery in many cases. Hence, to combine the advantages of each technique, we developed a fusion image technique similar to those that are routinely employed for radiotherapy planning and positron emission tomography-CT imaging. Fusion images can prove useful in selected cases.

  8. Preoperative radio-chemotherapy in advanced carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrowsky, W.; Dobrowsky, E.; Rausch, E.M.; Strassl, H.; Braun, O.

    1987-06-01

    In a prospective study, 16 patients with advanced carcinoma of oral cavity and oropharynx were submitted to a combined preoperative radio-chemotherapy. The radiosensitizers mitomycin and 5 fluorouracil were given simultaneously with the beginning of radiotherapy. The primary tumor as well as the lymph node regions were exposed to a total dose of 50 Gy administered over five weeks. Eight out of 16 pretreated patients had a complete histological remission, 4/16 a partial remission, and 4/16 showed a tumor reduction of less than 50%. A progression was found in no case. The treatment of lymph node metastases had a slightly poorer effect: CR 7/16, PR 3/16, NC 5/16, PD 0. Therapy effect and side effects as well as the effect on late results of simultaneous radio-chemotherapy are discussed.

  9. PET/CT and Histopathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Charlotte; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne K

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using positron emission tomography/computer tomography to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. METHODS: The study included 30 patients with locally...... advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with a combination of radiotherapy and concurrent Uftoral(R) (uracil, tegafur) and leucovorine. All patients were evaluated by positron emission tomography/computer tomography scan seven weeks after end of chemoradiation, and the results were compared...... of chemoradiation is not able to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer. There is an obvious need for other complementary methods especially with respect to the low sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computer tomography....

  10. Preoperative Alcohol Consumption and Postoperative Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Marie; Grønkjær, Marie; Skov-Ettrup, Lise Skrubbeltrang

    2013-01-01

    .30-2.49), prolonged stay at the hospital (RR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.18-1.31), and admission to intensive care unit (RR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.03-1.61). Clearly defined high alcohol consumption was associated with increased risk of postoperative mortality (RR = 2.68; 95% CI: 1.50-4.78). Low to moderate preoperative alcohol...... complications, prolonged stay at the hospital, and admission to intensive care unit....

  11. Effect of continued tobacco smoking during radiotherapy on loco-regional control for carcinoma of the larynx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, P.; Primdahl, H.; C, A. Kristensen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Tobacco smoking impose a poor prognosis on cancer patients either from reduced treatment response, new primary cancers, or other tobacco-related diseases. The effect of tobacco cessation in smokers commencing radiation treatment for head and neck cancer has only been investigated...... were all active smokers at the date of diagnosis. Patients treated with primary radiotherapy > 60 Gy were included. No surgery was allowed. Tobacco consumption was recorded weekly during radiotherapy, and two and six weeks after, and any smoking during RT was considered active smoking. Follow-up data...

  12. Contouring and dose calculation in head and neck cancer radiotherapy after reduction of metal artifacts in CT images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Rønn; Lübeck Christiansen, Rasmus; Lorenzen, Ebbe Laugaard

    2017-01-01

    Background: Delineation accuracy of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in radiotherapy planning for head and neck (H&N) cancer is affected by computed tomography (CT) artifacts from metal implants which obscure identification of tumor as well as organs at risk (OAR). This study investigates the impact...... region preceding curative radiotherapy (RT). The GTV-tumor (GTV-T), GTV-node and parotid glands were contoured by four independent observers on standard CT images and MAR images. Dose calculation was evaluated on thirty H&N patients with dental implants near the treated volume. For each patient, the dose...

  13. Does accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy increase mammographic density or change mammographic features?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesio, Luisella; Brachet Cota, Piero B; Berrino, Carla; Cataldi, Aldo; Gatti, Giovanni; Mondini, Guido; Paino, Ovidio; Comello, Erika G; Orlassino, Renzo; Pasquino, Massimo; Cante, Domenico; La Porta, Maria R; Patania, Sebastiano; La Valle, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare mammographic features before and after accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy (AWB-RT) and to evaluate possible appearance of modifications. Methods: A retrospective review of 177 females before and after an AWB-RT treatment (follow-up ranging from 5 to 9 years) was performed by four radiologists focused in breast imaging who independently evaluated diffuse mammographic density patterns and reported on possible onset of focal alterations; modifications in density and fibrosis with parenchymal distortion were deemed as indicators of AWB-RT treatment impact in breast imaging. Results: Prevalent mammographic density (D) patterns in the 177 females evaluated were according to the American College of Radiology–Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR-BIRADS): D1, fibroadipose density (score percentage from 55.9% to 43.5%); and D2, scattered fibroglandular density (from 42.9% to 32.7%). No change in diffuse mammographic density and no significant difference in mammographic breast parenchymal structure were observed. “No change” was reported with score percentage from 87% to 79.6%. Appearance of fibrosis with parenchymal distortion was reported by all radiologists in only two cases (1.1%, p = 0.3); dystrophic calcification was identified with percentage score from 2.2% to 3.3% (small type) and from 9.6% to 12.9% (coarse type). Conclusion: No statistically significant changes in follow-up mammographies 5–9 years after AWB-RT were detected, justifying large-scale selection of AWB-RT treatment with no risk of altering radiological breast parameters of common use in tumour recurrence detection. Advances in knowledge: The hypofractionated radiotherapy (AWB-RT treatment) is a new proven, safe and effective modality in post-operative patients with early breast cancer with excellent local control and survival. In our study, the absence of changes in mammographic density patterns and in breast imaging before and after

  14. Preoperative Arterial Interventional Chemotherapy on Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui; LING HU-Hua; TANG Liang-dan; ZHANG Xing-hua

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To discuss the therapeutic effect of preoperative interventional chemotherapy on cervical cancer.Methods:Preoperative interventional chemotherapy by femoral intubation was performed in 25 patients with bulky cervical cancer.The patients received bleomycin 45 mg and cisplatin or oxaliplatin 80 mg/m2.Results:25 cases(including 8 cases with stage Ⅰ and 17 cases with stage Ⅱ)received one or two courses of preoperative interventional chemotherapy.The size of the focal lesions was decreased greatly and radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy were performed successfully in all the patients.All of the specimens were sent for pathological examination.Lymphocyte infiltration was found more obvious in the cancer tissues as compared with their counterpart before treatment.As a result,relevant vaginal bleeding was stopped completely shortly after the treatment.Conclusion:Arterial interventional chemotherapy was proved to reduce the local size of cervical cancer and thus control the hemorrhage efficiently.The patients with cervical cancer can receive radical hysterectomy therapy after the interventional chemotherapy.

  15. Citrus aurantium blossom and preoperative anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Mahmood; Shabanian, Gholamreza; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Parvin, Neda; Saadat, Mitra; Akhlaghi, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    Reducing anxiety is very important before operation. Preoperative visit and use of premedication are popular methods to achieve this goal, but the role of anxiolytic premedication remains unclear and postoperative side-effects may result from routine premedication. Citrus aurantium is used as an alternative medicine in some countries to treat anxiety, and recently the anxiolytic role of this medicinal plant was established in an animal model study. The aim of this study was to assess the anxiolytic effect of Citrus aurantium blossomon preoperative anxiety. We studied 60 ASA I patients undergoing minor operation. In a randomized double-blind design, two groups of 30 patients received one of the following oral premedication two hours before induction of anesthesia: 1) Citrus aurantium blossom distillate 1mL.kg(-1) (C-group); 2) Saline solution 1mL.kg(-1) as placebo (P-group). Anxiety was measured before and after premedication using the Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI-state) and the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale (APAIS) before operation. After premedication, both the STAI-state and the APAIS scales were decreased in C-group (ppreoperative anxiety before minor operation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Preoperative imaging diagnosis of carotid body tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Ojeda, Luis A; Martínez-Viteri, Miguel A

    2010-01-01

    Carotid body tumors (CBTs) are relatively frequent lesions encountered at high altitudes, such in as the Andean Mountains. A correct preoperative diagnosis is essential for surgical planning and performance. For this reason, we have reviewed the evolution of our experience in the imaging diagnosis of these tumors. Between 1980 and June 2008, 160 CBTs were diagnosed. A total of 138 tumors were operated on, 4 are waiting for surgery, and 18 were not operated on because of age, medical conditions, or patient refusal. We have reviewed retrospectively the modalities of imaging diagnosis in our patients who underwent operation. Among the 138 tumors operated on, a correct preoperative diagnosis was done in 127 cases (92%). The preoperative diagnosis of the remaining 11 patients was unspecified benign tumor for 6 patients and neck lymph node for 5 patients. The imaging methods performed by different radiologists were conventional ultrasound, color Doppler ultrasound, carotid conventional angiography (CA), axial tomography, magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance angiography, and computed tomographic angiography (CTA). Most patients had more than one image study. Review of radiologist reports revealed a correct diagnosis in all carotid CA, magnetic resonance studies, and CTA. Additionally, CTA appeared to be a valuable method to predict the Shamblin group. Clinical suspicion and current image techniques permit a correct diagnosis in practically all cases of CBT.

  17. Implications of preoperative hypoalbuminemia in colorectal surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adam Truong; Mark H Hanna; Zhobin Moghadamyeghaneh; Michael J Stamos

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin has traditionally been used as a quantitative measure of a patient’s nutritional status because of its availability and low cost. While malnutrition has a clear definition within both the American and European Societies for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition clinical guidelines, individual surgeons often determine nutritional status anecdotally. Preoperative albumin level has been shown to be the best predictor of mortality after colorectal cancer surgery. Specifically in colorectal surgical patients, hypoalbuminemia significantly increases the length of hospital stay, rates of surgical site infections, enterocutaneous fistula risk, and deep vein thrombosis formation. The delay of surgical procedures to allow for preoperative correction of albumin levels in hypoalbuminemic patients has been shown to improve the morbidity and mortality in patients with severe nutritional risk. The importance of preoperative albumin levels and the patient’s chronic inflammatory state on the postoperative morbidity and mortality has led to the development of a variety of surgical scoring systems to predict outcomes efficiently. This review attempts to provide a systematic overview of albumin and its role and implications in colorectal surgery.

  18. Longitudinal study of sexual function and vaginal changes after radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille T; Groenvold, Mogens; Klee, Marianne C

    2003-01-01

    % of the patients, and 45% were never, or only occasionally, able to complete sexual intercourse. Despite sexual dysfunction and vaginal adverse effects, 63% of those sexually active before having cancer remained sexually active after treatment, although with a considerably decreased frequency. CONCLUSIONS......: Patients who are disease free after RT for locally advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer are at high risk of experiencing persistent sexual and vaginal problems compromising their sexual activity and satisfaction.......PURPOSE: To investigate the longitudinal course of self-reported sexual function and vaginal changes in patients disease free after radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 118 patients referred for RT were included...

  19. Role of perfusion SPECT in prediction and measurement of pulmonary complications after radiotherapy for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina P; Kramer, Stine; Khalil, Azza A

    2015-01-01

    radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS: Patients with NSCLC undergoing curative RT were included prospectively. Perfusion SPECT/CT and global pulmonary function tests (PFT) were performed before RT and four times during follow-up. Functional activity on SPECT was measured using...... a semiquantitative perfusion DS. Pulmonary morbidity was graded by the National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4 for pneumonitis. Patients were divided into two groups according to the severity of RP. RESULTS: A total of 71 consecutive patients were included in the study....... Baseline DS was associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A significant inverse correlation was found between baseline DS and forced expiratory volume in 1 s and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide. Patients with severe RP had significantly higher baseline total lung DS (mean 5...

  20. [Use of hypnosis in radiotherapy as an alternative to general anesthesia in pediatric radiation oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claude, Line; Morelle, Magali; Mancini, Sandrine; Duncan, Anita; Sebban, Henri; Carrie, Christian; Marec-Berard, Perrine

    2016-11-01

    General anesthesia (GA) is often needed for radiotherapy (RT) in young children. This study aimed to evaluate the place of the rituals and/or hypnosis in pediatric in a reference center in pediatric radiation oncology in Rhône-Alpes Auvergne. This observational study retrospectively collected data on AG in childrenhypnosis systematically. Explanatory analyses of AG were performed using logistic regression. One hundred and thirty-two children benefited from RT in that period and were included (70 patients until 2008, 62 after 2008). Fifty-three percent were irradiated under GA. There was significant reduction (Phypnosis can be used instead of GA in about half of patients under 5 years, even also with high-technicity RT requiring optimal immobilization. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Adjuvant radiotherapy of regional lymph nodes in breast cancer - a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy (RT) improves overall survival (OS) of breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery and after mastectomy in patients with involved lymph nodes (LN). The contribution of RT to the regional LN to this survival benefit was poorly understood. Recently, the results of three large randomized trials addressing this question have become available. Material and methods The published abstracts (full publication pending) of the MA.20 (n=1832) and the EORTC 22922–10925 (EORTC) (n=4004) trial and the full publication of the French trial (n=1334) were basis of the meta-analysis. Main eligibility criteria were positive axillary LN (all trials), LN negative disease with high risk for recurrence (MA.20), and medial/central tumor location (French, EORTC). The MA.20 and the EORTC trial tested the effect of additional regional RT to the internal mammary (IM) LN and medial supraclavicular (MS) LN, whereas in the French trial all patients received RT to the MS-LN and solely RT to the IM-LN was randomized. Primary endpoint was OS. Secondary endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS). Results Regional RT of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) resulted in a significant improvement of OS (Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.85 (95% CL 0.75 - 0.96)). Adding the results of the French trial and using the random effects model to respect the different design of the French trial, the effect on OS of regional radiotherapy was still significant (HR 0.88 (95% CL 0.80 - 0.97)). The absolute benefits in OS were 1.6% in the MA.20 trial at 5 years, 1.6% in the EORTC trial at 10 years, and 3.3% in the French trial at 10 years (not significant in single trials). Regional radiotherapy of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) was associated with a significant improvement of DFS (HR 0.85 (95% CL 0.77 - 0.94)) and DMFS (HR 0.82 (95% CL 0.73 - 0.92)). The effect sizes were not significantly different between trials for any end point

  2. Thalassaemic osteoarthropathy treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, A.N. (King' s Coll. Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1993-11-01

    Patients with beta thalassaemia may develop a specific osteoarthropathy involving the feet. A number of different treatments for this condition have been tried, including rest, analgesia and hypertransfusion. We report a case of a patient with thalassaemic osteoarthropathy who responded to radiotherapy after failing conventional treatment. (author).

  3. Oral complications of cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreizen, S.; Daly, T.E.; Drane, J.B.; Brown, L.R.

    1977-02-01

    Injury to surrounding tissues during radiotherapy for oral cancer can have devastating physical and psychologic consequences for the patient. Oral complications include xerostomia, dental decay, mucositis, taste loss, osteoradionecrosis, infection, and trismus. In many instances, these problems can be eradicated or controlled with appropriate treatment.

  4. Evaluation of treatment outcomes of early-stage endometrial cancer radiotherapy: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiral, S; Beyzadeoglu, M; Sager, O; Dincoglan, F; Uysal, B; Gamsiz, H; Akin, M; Turker, T; Dirican, B

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in the management of early stage endometrial cancer (EC) is still controversial. Here we report our institutional experience with patients who received postoperative RT for stage I-II EC over a period of 35 years and assess potential predictors of local recurrence (LR), distant metastasis (DM), and overall survival (OS). A total of 188 patients undergoing postoperative RT for stage IA-II EC between 1977 and 2012 were evaluated. Some 96 received median 46 Gy whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) (range: 40-60 Gy), 37 were given WPRT with vaginal cuff therapy (VCT), and 55 received only VCT either with brachytherapy (BT) or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Chemotherapy was given to 5 patients with uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC). Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the effect of clinicopathological factors on LR, DM, and OS. Median follow-up time was 11 years (range: 1-35 years). At the time of analysis, 34 patients were not alive. Of the 15 patients with LR, 7 (46.7%) recurred in the vaginal stump, 5 (33.3%) in the pelvic region, and 3 (20%) in the paraaortic nodal region, while 12 had distant metastasis. UPSC histology (p=0.027), sole VCT (p=0.041), high histologic grade (p=0.034), and age≥71 (p=0.04) were poor prognostic factors on univariate analysis. In our patients receiving radiotherapy for early-stage EC, grade III disease and age≥71 were associated with shorter OS whereas UPSC histology was an independent predictor for both LR and DM.

  5. Det truede arbejdsliv - hvad er prekært arbejde?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fersch, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Arbejde på irregulære vilkår – såkaldt truet eller prekært arbejde – breder sig mere og mere. Denne udvikling kan føre til problemer vedr. utryghed og eksklusion blandt de ”atypiske”, som tit diskuteres i forbindelse med begrebet ”prekært arbejde”. Artiklen præsenterer diskussionen om prekært...

  6. THE IMPROVEMENT OF RT-PCR TECHNIQUE ON DETECTING ROTAVIRUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To establish a speed and effective method to detect rotavirus. Methods Using ELISA and one step RT-PCR to detect 196 clinic samples from Xi'an area. Results Compared with ELISA method, one step RT PCR was more sensitive and specific (P <0.05). Conclusion One step RT-PCR is a simple, speed, sensitive and spe cific method for clinic and epidemic studies of rotavirus.

  7. Prognostic significance of clusterin expression in advanced-stage cervical cancer treated with curative intended radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Hidemichi; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Han, Yimin; Wang, Lei; Hosaka, Masayoshi; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Shinya; Shirato, Hiroki; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2012-03-01

    Overexpression of clusterin (CLU), an antiapoptotic molecule, has been reported to induce resistance to radiotherapy (RT) in a variety of cancer cell types. The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of CLU expression to predict survival of patients with advanced-stage cervical cancer who received curative intended RT. Biopsy tissue specimens of advanced-stage cervical cancer before curative intended RT were obtained from 34 patients who were treated at Hokkaido University Hospital between 1998 and 2008 and whose complete medical records were available. The expression of CLU protein was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Findings were evaluated in relation to several clinicopathological factors. Survival analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier curves and the log-rank test. Independent prognostic factors were determined by multivariate Cox regression analysis. Clusterin protein was mainly present in the cytoplasm of cervical cancer cells. The expression of CLU protein in cervical cancer tissues before curative intended RT was not significantly related to any clinicopathological factors analyzed, including age, clinical stage, histologic type, and response to RT. Univariate analysis on prognostic factors showed that histologic type (P = 0.001), and CLU expression (P = 0.02) were related to survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that both histologic type (P = 0.002), and CLU expression (P = 0.02) were independent prognostic factors for overall survival. We conclude that CLU could be a new molecular marker to predict overall survival of patients with advanced-stage cervical cancer treated with curative intended RT.

  8. Tissue expander placement and adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical resection of retroperitoneal liposarcoma offers improved local control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyojun; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, BoKyong; Lim, Do Hoon; Choi, Yoon-La; Choi, Gyu Seong; Kim, Jong Man; Park, Jae Berm; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Sung Joo

    2016-08-01

    Given that retroperitoneal liposarcoma (LPS) is extremely difficult to completely resect, and has a relatively high rate of recurrence, radiotherapy (RT) is the treatment of choice after surgical resection. However, it is difficult to obtain a sufficient radiation field because of the close proximity of surrounding organs. We introduce the use of tissue expanders (TEs) after LPS resection in an attempt to secure a sufficient radiation field and to improve recurrence-free survival.This study is a retrospective review of 53 patients who underwent surgical resection of LPS at Samsung Medical Center between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2012, and had no residual tumor detected 2 months postoperatively. The median follow-up period was 38.9 months.Patients were divided into 3 groups. Those in group 1 (n = 17) had TE inserted and received postoperative RT. The patients in group 2 (n = 9) did not have TE inserted and received postoperative RT. Finally, those in group 3 (n = 27) did not receive postoperative RT. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival within 3 years. Younger age, history of LPS treatment, and RT after TE insertion (group 1 vs group 2 or 3) were significantly favorable factors influencing 3-year recurrence-free survival.TE insertion after LPS resection is associated with increased 3-year recurrence-free survival, most likely because it allows effective delivery of postoperative RT.

  9. Long-term outcomes of surgery and radiotherapy for secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, Young Kee; Kim, El [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate treatment outcome and long term complication after surgery and radiotherapy (RT) for pituitary adenoma. From 1990 to 2009, 73 patients with surgery and RT for pituitary adenoma were analyzed in this study. Median age was 51 years (range, 25 to 71 years). Median tumor size was 3 cm (range, 1 to 5 cm) with suprasellar (n = 21), cavernous sinus extension (n = 14) or both (n = 5). Hormone secreting tumor was diagnosed in 29 patients; 16 patients with prolactin, 12 patients with growth hormone, and 1 patient with adrenocorticotrophic hormone. Impairment of visual acuity or visual field was presented in 33 patients at first diagnosis. Most patients (n = 64) received RT as postoperative adjuvant setting. Median RT dose was 45 Gy (range, 45 to 59.4 Gy). Median follow-up duration was 8 years (range, 3 to 22 years). In secreting tumors, hormone normalization rate was 55% (16 of 29 patients). For 25 patients with evaluable visual field and visual acuity test, 21 patients (84%) showed improvement of visual disturbance after treatment. The 10-year tumor control rate for non-secreting and secreting adenoma was 100% and 58%, respectively (p < 0.001). Progression free survival rate at 10 years was 98%. Only 1 patient experienced endocrinological recurrence. Following surgery, 60% (n = 44) suffered from pituitary function deficit. Late complication associated with RT was only 1 patient, who developed cataract. Surgery and RT are very effective and safe in hormonal and tumor growth control for secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenoma.

  10. Radiotherapy as valid modality for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul

    2016-08-14

    Although the current standard treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is sorafenib, many previous studies have established the need for a reliable local modality for PVTT control, which is a major cause of liver function deterioration and metastasis. Additionally, there is growing evidence for the prognostic significance of PVTT classification according to the location of tumor thrombosis. Favorable outcomes can be obtained by applying local modalities, including surgery or transarterial chemoembolization, especially in second-order or distal branch PVTT. Rapid control of PVTT could maintain or improve liver function and reduce intrahepatic as well as distant metastasis. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of the main locoregional treatment modalities in oncologic fields, but has rarely been used in HCC because of concerns regarding hepatic toxicity. However, with the development of advanced techniques, RT has been increasingly applied in HCC management. Randomized studies have yet to definitively prove the benefit of RT, but several comparative studies have justified the application of RT in HCC. The value of RT is especially noticeable in HCC with PVTT; several prospective and retrospective studies have reported favorable outcomes, including a 40% to 60% objective response rate and median overall survival of 15 mo to 20 mo in responders. In this review, we evaluate the role of RT as an alternative local modality in HCC with PVTT.

  11. Low-Dose-Rate Californium-252 Neutron Intracavitary Afterloading Radiotherapy Combined With Conformal Radiotherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Min [Department of Oncology, Armed Police Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Xu Hongde [Cancer Center, Armed Police Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Pan Songdan; Lin Shan; Yue Jianhua [Department of Oncology, Armed Police Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Liu Jianren, E-mail: liujianren0571@hotmail.com [Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To study the efficacy of low-dose-rate californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) neutron intracavitary afterloading radiotherapy (RT) combined with external pelvic RT for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 96 patients treated for cervical cancer from 2006 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. For patients with tumors {<=}4 cm in diameter, external beam radiation was performed (1.8 Gy/day, five times/week) until the dose reached 20 Gy, and then {sup 252}Cf neutron intracavitary afterloading RT (once/week) was begun, and the frequency of external beam radiation was changed to four times/week. For patients with tumors >4 cm, {sup 252}Cf RT was performed one to two times before whole-pelvis external beam radiation. The tumor-eliminating dose was determined by using the depth limit of 5 mm below the mucosa as the reference point. In all patients, the total dose of the external beam radiation ranged from 46.8 to 50 Gy. For {sup 252}Cf RT, the dose delivered to point A was 6 Gy/fraction, once per week, for a total of seven times, and the total dose was 42 Gy. Results: The mean {+-} SD patient age was 54.7 {+-} 13.7 years. Six patients had disease assessed at stage IB, 13 patients had stage IIA, 49 patients had stage IIB, 3 patients had stage IIIA, 24 patients had stage IIIB, and 1 patient had stage IVA. All patients obtained complete tumor regression (CR). The mean {+-} SD time to CR was 23.5 {+-} 3.4 days. Vaginal bleeding was fully controlled in 80 patients within 1 to 8 days. The mean {+-} SD follow-up period was 27.6 {+-} 12.7 months (range, 6-48 months). Five patients died due to recurrence or metastasis. The 3-year survival and disease-free recurrence rates were 89.6% and 87.5 %, respectively. Nine patients experienced mild radiation proctitis, and 4 patients developed radiocystitis. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate {sup 252}Cf neutron RT combined with external pelvic RT is effective for treating cervical cancer, with a low incidence of

  12. Stability of spinal bone metastases in breast cancer after radiotherapy. A retrospective analysis of 157 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlampp, Ingmar; Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Foerster, Robert; Debus, Juergen; Rief, Harald [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruckner, Thomas [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Medical Biometry, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    This retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate osteolytic bone lesions of breast cancer in the thoracic and lumbar spine after radiotherapy (RT) in terms of stability using a validated scoring system. The stability of 157 osteolytic metastases, treated from January 2000 to January 2012, in 115 patients with breast cancer was evaluated retrospectively using the Taneichi score. Predictive factors for stability were analyzed and survival rates were calculated. Eighty-five (54 %) lesions were classified as unstable prior to RT. After 3 and 6 months, 109 (70 %) and 124 (79 %) lesions, respectively, were classified as stable. Thirty fractures were detected prior to RT, and after RT seven cases (4.5 %) with pathologic fractures were found within 6 months. None of the examined predictive factors showed significant correlation with stability 6 months after RT. After a median follow-up of 16.7 months, Kaplan-Meier estimates revealed an overall survival of 83 % after 5 years. The majority of patients showed an improved or unchanged stability of the involved vertebral bodies after 6 months. The patients showed only minor cancer-related morbidity during follow-up and reached comparably high survival rates. (orig.) [German] Die retrospektive Analyse untersuchte osteolytische Knochenmetastasen von Patienten mit Mammakarzinom der thorakalen und lumbalen Wirbelsaeule nach Radiotherapie (RT) hinsichtlich Stabilitaet anhand eines validierten Scores. Die Stabilitaet von 157 osteolytischen Metastasen bei 115 Patienten mit Brustkrebs, behandelt von Januar 2000 bis Januar 2012, wurde retrospektiv anhand des Taneichi-Scores evaluiert. Prognostische Faktoren bezueglich Stabilitaet und Ueberlebensraten wurden analysiert. Vor RT wurden 85 Laesionen (54 %) als instabil gewertet. Nach 3 und 6 Monaten wurden 109 (70 %) und 124 (79 %) Laesionen als stabil klassifiziert. Vor RT wurden 30 Frakturen gefunden, nach RT zeigten sich 7 weitere (4,5 %) pathologische Frakturen. Kein prognostischer

  13. Iron therapy for pre-operative anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Oliver; Keeler, Barrie D; Mishra, Amitabh; Simpson, Alastair; Neal, Keith; Brookes, Matthew J; Acheson, Austin G

    2015-12-22

    Pre-operative anaemia is common and occurs in up to 76% of patients. It is associated with increased peri-operative allogeneic blood transfusions, longer hospital lengths of stay and increased morbidity and mortality. Iron deficiency is one of the most common causes of this anaemia. Oral iron therapy has traditionally been used to treat anaemia but newer, safer parenteral iron preparations have been shown to be more effective in other conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, chronic heart failure and post-partum haemorrhage. A limited number of studies look at iron therapy for the treatment of pre-operative anaemia. The aim of this Cochrane review is to summarise the evidence for use of iron supplementation, both enteral and parenteral, for the management of pre-operative anaemia. The objective of this review is to evaluate the effects of pre-operative iron therapy (enteral or parenteral) in reducing the need for allogeneic blood transfusions in anaemic patients undergoing surgery. We ran the search on 25 March 2015. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), Ovid MEDLINE(R), Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE(R) Daily and Ovid OLDMEDLINE(R), EMBASE Classic and EMBASE (Ovid), CINAHL Plus (EBSCO), PubMed, clinical trials registries, conference abstracts, and we screened reference lists. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compared pre-operative iron monotherapy to placebo, no treatment, standard of care or another form of iron therapy for anaemic adults undergoing surgery. Anaemia was defined by haemoglobin values less than 13 g/dL for males and 12 g/dL for non-pregnant females. Data were collected by two authors on the proportion of patients who receive a blood transfusion, amount of blood transfused per patient (units) and haemoglobin measured as continuous variables at pre-determined time-points: pre

  14. Longitudinal assessment of nutritional risk in patients under chemo or radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastelaro, Isabelle; Pupin, Mariana Pietrobom; Ribeiro, Sofia Miranda de Figueiredo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Harley Francisco de; Peria, Fernanda Maris; Cunha, Selma Freire de Carvalho da, E-mail: sfreire@fmrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-10-15

    Objective: To compare nutritional risk in adult patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the beginning, middle, and end of oncologic treatment. Method: This prospective, comparative study included 83 adult patients, 44 undergoing chemotherapy (CT group) and 39 undergoing radiotherapy (RT group) at an oncology treatment center. Nutritional risk was determined by NRS-2002 in the beginning, middle, and end of therapy. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistica 8.0 software. Results: No differences in food intake or body mass index were observed between the CT (24.6±4.8 kg/m²) and RT groups (25.0±5.9 kg/m², p=0.75). Weight loss in the preceding 3 months was detected in 56.8% of CT group and 38.5% of RT group (p=0.09). The weight loss percentage compared with the usual weight within 3 months was greater (p<0.001) in the CT (11.4±6.5%) than in the RT group (3.9±6.8%). In the beginning of treatment, we observed high percentages of patients at moderate (18.2 vs. 15.4%, p=0.73) and high nutritional risk (61.4 vs. 48.7%, p=0.25), with no statistical difference between the CT and RT groups, respectively. During therapy, the nutritional risk remained unaltered in both groups. In the end of therapy, the majority of patients were at moderate (18.2 vs. 12.8%, p=0.50) or severe nutritional risk (50.0 vs. 51.3%, p=0.91), in the CT and RT groups, respectively, regardless of the type of oncologic treatment. Conclusion: The high prevalence of patients at moderate or high nutritional risk in the beginning of treatment indicates the need for an early and continuous follow-up of the nutritional status of patients undergoing oncologic treatment. (author)

  15. The Timing of Salvage Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy: A Systematic Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Christopher R., E-mail: crking@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Salvage radiotherapy (SRT) after radical prostatectomy can potentially eradicate residual microscopic disease. Defining the optimal patient and treatment factors is essential and is particularly relevant within the context of adjuvant vs early vs delayed postoperative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A systematic review of all published SRT studies was performed to identify the pathologic, clinical, and treatment factors associated with relapse-free survival (RFS) after SRT. A total of 41 studies encompassing 5597 patients satisfied the study entry criteria. Radiobiologic interpretation of biochemical tumor control was used to provide the framework for the observed relationships. Results: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level before SRT (P<.0001) and RT dose (P=.0052) had a significant and independent association with RFS. There was an average 2.6% loss of RFS for each incremental 0.1 ng/mL PSA at the time of SRT (95% CI, {approx}2.2-3.1). With a PSA level of 0.2 ng/mL or less before SRT, the RFS approached 64%. The dose for salvage RT in the range of 60-70 Gy seemed to be on the steep part of the sigmoidal dose-response curve, with a dose of 70 Gy achieving 54% RFS compared with only 34% for 60 Gy. There was a 2% improvement in RFS for each additional Gy (95% CI, {approx}0.9-3.2). The observed dose-response was less robust on sensitivity analysis. Conclusions: This study provides Level 2a evidence for initiating SRT at the lowest possible PSA. Dose escalation is also suggested by the data. Progressively better tumor control rates with SRT after radical prostatectomy are achieved with a lower PSA at initiation and with a higher RT dose. Early salvage RT may be an equivalent strategy to adjuvant RT.

  16. A systematic review of radiotherapy capacity in low and middle income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi eGrover

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The cancer burden in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC is substantial. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe country and region-specific patterns of radiotherapy (RT facilities in LMIC. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was undertaken. A search strategy was developed to include articles on radiation capacity in LMIC from the following databases: PubMed, Embase, CINAHL Plus, Global Health and the Latin-American and Caribbean System on Health Sciences Information. Searches included all literature up to April 2013. Results: A total of 49 articles were included in the review. Studies reviewed were divided into one of four regions: Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and South America. The African continent has the least amount of resources for RT. Furthermore, a wide disparity exists, as 60% of all machines on the continent are concentrated in Egypt and South Africa while 29 countries in Africa are still lacking any RT resource. A significant heterogeneity also exists across Southeast Asia despite a three-fold increase in megavoltage teletherapy machines from 1976 to 1999, which corresponds with a rise in economic status. In LMIC of the Americas, only Uruguay met the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA recommendations of 4 MV/million population, whereas Bolivia and Venezuela had the most radiation oncologists (>1 per 1000 new cancer cases. The main concern with the review of RT resources in Eastern Europe was the lack of data.Conclusions: There is a dearth of publications on RT therapy infrastructure in LMIC. However, based on limited published data, availability of RT resources reflects the economic status of the countries. The challenges to delivering radiation in the discussed regions are multidimensional and include: lack of physical resources, lack of human personnel, and lack of data. Furthermore, access to existing radiotherapy and affordability of care remains a large problem.

  17. Generation of the regulatory protein rtTA transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kang Xu; Xin-Yan Deng; Ying Yue; Zhong-Min Guo; Bing Huang; Xun Hong; Dong Xiao; Xi-Gu Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To translate Tet-on system into a conditional mouse model, in which hepatitis B or C virus (HBV or HCV) gene could be spatiotemporally expressed to overcome "immune tolerance" formed during the embryonic development and "immune escape" against hepatitis virus antigen(s), an effector mouse, carrying the reverse tetracycline-responsive transcriptional activator (rtTA) gene under the tight control of liver-specific human apoE promoter, is required to be generated. METHODS: To address this end, rtTA fragment amplified by PCR was effectively inserted into the vector of pLiv.7 containing apoE promoter to create the rtTA expressing vector, I.e., pApoE-rtTA. ApoE-rtTA transgenic fragment (-6.9 kb) released from pApoE-rtTA was transferred into mice by pronucleus injection, followed by obtaining one transgene (+) founder animal from microinjection through PCR and Southern blot analysis.RESULTS: rtTA transgene which could be transmitted to subsequent generation (F1) derived from founder was expressed in a liver-specific fashion. CONCLUSION: Taken together, these findings demonstrate that rtTA transgenic mice, in which rtTA expression is appropriately targeted to the murine liver, are successfully produced, which lays a solid foundation to 'off-on-off' regulate expression of target gene (s) (e.g., HBV and/or HCV) in transgenic mice mediated by Tet-on system.

  18. Experiment vs simulation RT WFNDEC 2014 benchmark: CIVA results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisseur, D.; Costin, M.; Rattoni, B.; Vienne, C.; Vabre, A.; Cattiaux, G.; Sollier, T.

    2015-03-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission and Alternative Energies (CEA) has developed for years the CIVA software dedicated to simulation of NDE techniques such as Radiographic Testing (RT). RT modelling is achieved in CIVA using combination of a determinist approach based on ray tracing for transmission beam simulation and a Monte Carlo model for the scattered beam computation. Furthermore, CIVA includes various detectors models, in particular common x-ray films and a photostimulable phosphor plates. This communication presents the results obtained with the configurations proposed in the World Federation of NDEC 2014 RT modelling benchmark with the RT models implemented in the CIVA software.

  19. Re-irradiation of unresectable recurrent head and neck cancer: using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Songmi; Yoo, Eun Jung; Kim, Ji Yoon; Han, Chi Wha; Kim, Ki Jun; Kay, Chul Seung [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Re-irradiation (re-RT) is considered a treatment option for inoperable locoregionally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC) after prior radiotherapy. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy as image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in recurrent HNC. Patients diagnosed with recurrent HNC and received re-RT were retrospectively reviewed. Primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) and secondary endpoints were locoregional control and toxicities. The median follow-up period of total 9 patients was 18.7 months (range, 4.1 to 76 months) and that of 3 alive patients was 49 months (range, 47 to 76 months). Median dose of first radiotherapy and re-RT was 64.8 and 47.5 Gy10. Median cumulative dose of the two courses of radiotherapy was 116.3 Gy10 (range, 91.8 to 128.9 Gy10) while the median interval between the two courses of radiation was 25 months (range, 4 to 137 months). The response rate after re-RT of the evaluated 8 patients was 75% (complete response, 4; partial response, 2). Median locoregional relapse-free survival after re-RT was 11.9 months (range, 3.4 to 75.1 months) and 5 patients eventually presented with treatment failure (in-field failure, 2; in- and out-field failure, 2; out-field failure, 1). Median OS of the 8 patients was 20.3 months (range, 4.1 to 75.1 months). One- and two-year OS rates were 62.5% and 50%, respectively. Grade 3 leucopenia developed in one patient as acute toxicity, and grade 2 osteonecrosis and trismus as chronic toxicity in another patient. Re-RT using Helical Tomotherapy for previously irradiated patients with unresectable locoregionally recurrent HNC may be a feasible treatment option with long-term survival and acceptable toxicities.

  20. Validation of the total dysphagia risk score (TDRS) in head and neck cancer patients in a conventional and a partially accelerated radiotherapy scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nevens, Daan; Deschuymer, Sarah; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Daisne, Jean -Francois; Duprez, Frederic; De Neve, Wilfried; Nuyts, Sandra

    Background and purpose: A risk model, the total dysphagia risk score (TDRS), was developed to predict which patients are most at risk to develop grade >= 2 dysphagia at 6 months following radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer. The purpose of this study was to validate this model at 6 months and

  1. [Preoperative concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy in cervix cancer: preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochbati, Lotfi; Ben Ammar, Chiraz Nasr; Benna, Farouk; Hechiche, Monia; Boussen, Hamouda; Besbes, Mounir; Ben Abdallah, Mansour; Rahal, Khaled; Ben Ayed, Farhat; Ben Romdhane, Khaked; Maalej, Mongi

    2005-03-01

    This is a retrospective study of patients treated for cervix cancer staged IB2, IIA or IIB with bulky tumor (> 4cm). Treatment was concurrent radiotherapy (45Gy with 1,8Gy daily fraction) and chemotherapy (5 cycles of Platinum 40mg/m2/week). All patients underwent Brachytherapy (15Gy on the reference isodose according to Paris system) followed by surgery (radical abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy: Piver 3) Between October 1999 and December 2002, forty five patients were treated in this protocol. Median age was 46 years (21- 68). Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 93% and glandular carcinoma in 7%. Average external radiation dose was 44Gy (20-50). Ninety three percent of patients had at least 3 cycles of chemotherapy and 46,5% received the planned 5 cycles. On the operative specimens, there was 62,5% complete response and only 7 pelvic node involvement (17,5%). Four postoperative complications were noted (one vascular injury, one urinary fistula, one phlebitis and one lymph collection). Preoperative combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the early bulky stages of uterine cervix cancer is well tolerated and "gives" a high rate of sterilisation. There was no increase in surgical morbidity.

  2. Role of glutamine versus placebo in prevention of acute gastrointestinal toxicity in pelvic radiotherapy: A randomized control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Sazzad Manir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal cramping, ano-proctitis are common acute gastrointestinal (GI toxicities during pelvic radiotherapy (RT, having important impact on treatment outcome. Glutamine has a major role in mucosal growth and function. This phase III study is conducted to evaluate the role of prophylactic glutamine supplementation in prevention of acute GI toxicities during pelvic RT. Materials and Methods: Eighty five nonmetastatic patients with pelvic malignancy needing pelvic RT are included in this double blind randomized control trial. During RT 42 patients (Arm A received 10 g glutamine oral supplementation 1 h before every RT fraction. Forty three patients received glycine as placebo (Arm B in same schedule. Patients were assessed weekly for common acute RT induced GI toxicities. Toxicities were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.02. Results: Two arms were well balanced with all baseline parameters. Median age was 57. 56.47% (n = 48 patients had cervical cancer. There was no significant difference between two arms in grade wise incidence of any of the GI toxicities. Trends of diarrhoea during weekly assessments also similar in both arms. Conclusion: There is no significant beneficial effect of glutamine during pelvic RT. As per our study data and our dose schedule glutamine should not be indicated in pelvic RT.

  3. Characteristics of speech production in patients with T1 glottic cancer who underwent laser cordectomy or radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yong Tae; Park, Min Ju; Hong, Ki Hwan

    2017-10-04

    Laser cordectomy (LC) or radiotherapy (RT) is often recommended in the early stage of laryngeal cancer. We conducted perceptual and acoustic analysis to compare sustained vowel and stop consonants since there is no article evaluating both the sustained vowel and stop consonants. Eventually, we might determine which management is superior in terms of speech production. A total of 28 patients who underwent LC and RT for early T1 glottic cancer were selected. The sustained vowel /a/ and bilabial stop consonants were used to assess the perceptual scores. The fundamental frequency (Fo), jitter, shimmer and noise-to-harmonic ratio (NHR) levels for sustained vowels were evaluated. Voice onset time (VOT), vowel duration (VD) and closure duration of the bilabial plosives were analyzed. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to evaluate significant results statistically. The GRBAS and discrimination scores were not significantly different between two groups. Fo and jitter were significantly higher in the LC than RT. The cut-off value was statistically higher in the LC group and statistically lower in the RT group. The VOT was significantly longer in the LC than RT. The cut-off value of the /pipida/ VOT was statistically longer in the LC group and statistically shorter in the RT group. The differences may have been due to muscular fibrosis after RT. Movements of vocal cords with fibrosis were sluggish, when impulsion developed to pronounce the initial /p/ sound, so the VOT was shortened and the VD was longer after RT.

  4. Patient Preferences and Physician Practice Patterns Regarding Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoopes, David J., E-mail: david.hoopes@wpafb.af.mil [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, WPAFB, OH (United States); Kaziska, David; Chapin, Patrick [Air Force Institute of Technology, WPAFB, OH (United States); Weed, Daniel [Clarian Healthcare, Methodist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Hale, E. Ronald [Wright-Patterson Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, WPAFB, OH (United States); Johnstone, Peter A. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: There are multiple current strategies for breast radiotherapy (RT). The alignment of physician practice patterns with best evidence and patient preferences will enhance patient autonomy and improve cancer care. However, there is little information describing patient preferences for breast RT and physician practice patterns. Methods and Materials: Using a reliable and valid instrument, we assessed the preferences of 5,000 randomly selected women (with or without cancer) undergoing mammography. To assess practice patterns, 2,150 randomly selected physician-members of American Society for Radiation Oncology were surveyed. Results: A total of 1,807 women (36%) and 363 physicians (17%) provided usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < {+-}2.3% for patients and < {+-}5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) 62%, partial breast irradiation (PBI) 28%, and conventionally fractionated whole breast irradiation (CF-WBI) 10%. By comparison, 82% of physicians use CF-WBI for more than 2/3 of women and 56% never use HF-WBI. With respect to PBI, 62% of women preferred three-dimensional (3D)-PBI and 38% favor brachytherapy-PBI, whereas 36% of physicians offer 3D-PBI and 66% offer brachytherapy-PBI. 70% of women prefer once-daily RT over 10 days vs. twice-daily RT over 5 days. 55% of physicians who use PBI do not offer PBI on clinical trial. Conclusions: HF-WBI, while preferred by patients and supported by evidence, falls behind the unproven and less preferred strategy of PBI in clinical practice. There is a discrepancy between women's preferences for PBI modality and type of PBI offered by physicians. Further alignment is needed between practice patterns, patient preferences, and clinical evidence.

  5. Mamma diagnostics for MTRA (medical-radiological personnel)/RT (radiologists); Mammadiagnostik fuer MTRA/RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Uwe; Baum, Friedemann

    2014-07-01

    The text book on mamma diagnostics for MTRA (medical-radiological personnel)/RT (radiologists) covers the following issues: Anatomy, development and physiology of mammary glands; tumor development an breast cancer risk; pathology, non-imaging diagnostics; mammography: physical-technical fundamentals; mammography: analogue technique; mammography: digital technique; mammography: quality assurance; mammography: legal questions and radiation protection; mammography: new developments; mammography: setting technique; mammography: use and appraisal; mamma-sonography: technique and methodology; mamma-sonography: assignment and appraisal, mamma-NMR: technique and methodology; mamma-NMR: assignment and appraisal lymph node diagnostics; mamma interventions; biopsy; mamma interventions: marking examination concepts; therapeutic concepts; hygienic concepts; communication and interaction.

  6. Delineation of target volumes and organs at risk in adjuvant radiotherapy of early breast cancer: national guidelines and contouring atlas by the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette H; Berg, Martin; Pedersen, Anders N;

    2013-01-01

    During the past decade planning of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) of early breast cancer has changed from two-dimensional (2D) to 3D conformal techniques. In the planning computerised tomography (CT) scan both the targets for RT and the organs at risk (OARs) are visualised, enabling an increased focus...... on target dose coverage and homogeneity with only minimal dose to the OARs. To ensure uniform RT in the national prospective trials of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG), a national consensus for the delineation of clinical target volumes (CTVs) and OARs was required....

  7. A new method to estimate doses to the normal tissues after past extended and involved field radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Lundemann, Michael; Vogelius, Ivan R;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reconstruction of radiotherapy (RT) performed decades ago is challenging, but is necessary to address dose-response questions from epidemiological data and may be relevant in re-irradiation scenarios. Here, a novel method to reconstruct extended and involved field RT for patients...... with Hodgkin lymphoma was used. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For 46 model patients, 29 organs at risk (OARs) were contoured and seven treatment fields reconstructed (mantle, mediastinal, right/left neck, right/left axillary, and spleen field). Extended and involved field RT were simulated by generating RT plans...... by superpositions of the seven individual fields. The mean (standard deviation) of the 46 individual mean organ doses were extracted as percent of prescribed dose for each field superposition. RESULTS: The estimated mean doses to the OARs from 17 field combinations were presented. The inter-patient variability...

  8. Paclitaxel and concomitant radiotherapy in high-risk endometrial cancer patients: preliminary findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frigerio Luigi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is still much debate about the best adjuvant therapy after surgery for endometrial cancer (EC and there are no current guidelines. Radiotherapy (RT alone does not seem to improve overall survival. We investigated whether concomitant Paclitaxel (P and RT gave better clinical results. Methods Twenty-three patients with high-risk EC (stage IIB, IIIA, IIIC or IC G3 without lymphadenectomy or with aneuploid tumor underwent primary surgery and were then referred for adjuvant therapy. P was given at a dose of 60 mg/m2 once weekly for five weeks during RT, which consisted of a total radiation dose of 50.4 Gy. Three further weekly cycles of P at a dose of 80 mg/m2 were given at the end of RT. Overall survival and disease-free survival were calculated from the time of surgery. Patterns of failure were recorded by the sites of failure. Results A total of 157 cycles of P were administered both during radiotherapy and consolidation chemotherapy. Relapses occurred in five patients (21.7%. Median time to recurrence was 18.6 months (range 3–28. Survival rate for all the patients was 78.2%. Overall survival for the patients who completed chemo-radiation was of 81%. In this group median time to recurrence was 19.2 months (range 3–28. All recurrences were outside the radiation field. Mortality rate was 14.2%. Conclusion This small series demonstrates pelvic radiotherapy in combination with weakly P followed by three consolidation chemotherapy cycles as an effective combined approach in high risk endometrial carcinoma patients.

  9. Analysis of 57 nonagenarian cancer patients treated by radical radiotherapy. A survey of eight institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Ishikura, Satoshi [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan). Hospital East; Oguchi, Masahiko; Niibe, Hideo; Yorozu, Atsunori; Nakano, Kikuo; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Watanabe, Sadao; Teshima, Teruki

    1999-08-01

    As the human society grows more aged, it is considered important to elucidate factors essential in applying radical radiotherapy (RT) to the elderly, with ages as high as 90 years and greater. A retrospective survey was conducted for patients 90 years of age or older who received radiotherapy with radical intent in eight leading institutions in Japan from 1990 through 1995. Fifty-seven nonagenarian patients were studied. Their ages ranged up to 98 (median 91) and there was a strong female preponderance (M/F: 16/41). The distribution by site was as follows: head and neck, 16; skin and adnexae, 11; uterine cervix, 7; esophagus, 6. The prevailing histopathological diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma (34), followed by adenocarcinomas (8). The highest age at RT was 98 years [female, skin cancer, died of senility 2.5 years after treatment, with no evidence of disease (NED)] and the longest survivor is 102 years old (female, glottic cancer T2, age at RT 93, alive NED for 8 years, uses wheel-chair). The rate of completion of treatment was 75% (43/57), if the treatment field was limited to the gross primary tumor volume only and if the cumulative dose was above 80% of the tolerable adult dose. Familial escort was necessary for most of the patients in completing the day-to-day RT. Radiotherapy is feasible with radical intent even in the elderly, if the treatment field is limited to the gross primary tumor volume only, if the cumulative dose is above 80% of the tolerable adult dose and if familial support is adequate. (author)

  10. Lymphovascular invasion in rectal cancer following neoadjuvant radiotherapy: A retrospective cohort study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Zheng Du; Wei-Cheng Xue; Yong Cai; Ming Li; Jin Gu

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the meaning of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant radiotherapy. METHODS: A total of 325 patients who underwent radical resection using total mesorectal excision (TME) from January 2000 to January 2005 in Beijing cancer hospital were included retrospectively, divided into a preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) group and a control group, according to whether or not they underwent preoperative radiation. Histological assessments of tumor specimens were made and the correlation of LVI and prognosis were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: The occurrence of LVI in the PRT and control groups was 21.4% and 26.1% respectively. In the control group, LVI was significantly associated with histological differentiation and pathologic TNM stage, whereas these associations were not observed in the PRT group. LVI was closely correlated to disease progression and 5-year overall survival (OS) in both groups. Among the patients with disease progression, LVI positive patients in the PRT group had a significantly longer median disease-free period (22.5 mo vs 11.5 mo, P = 0.023) and overall survival time (42.5 mo vs 26.5 mo, P = 0.035) compared to those in the control group, despite the fact that no significant difference in 5-year OS rate was observed (54.4% vs 48.3%, P = 0.137). Multivariate analysis showed the distance of tumor from the anal verge, pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen level, pathologic TNM stage and LVI were the major factors affecting OS. CONCLUSION: Neoadjuvant radiotherapy does not reduce LVI significantly; however, the prognostic meaning of LVI has changed. Patients with LVI may benefit from neoadjuvant radiotherapy.

  11. Collision prediction software for radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, Laura [Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Pearson, Erik A. [Techna Institute and the Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Pelizzari, Charles A., E-mail: c-pelizzari@uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: This work presents a method of collision predictions for external beam radiotherapy using surface imaging. The present methodology focuses on collision prediction during treatment simulation to evaluate the clearance of a patient’s treatment position and allow for its modification if necessary. Methods: A Kinect camera (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) is used to scan the patient and immobilization devices in the treatment position at the simulator. The surface is reconstructed using the SKANECT software (Occipital, Inc., San Francisco, CA). The treatment isocenter is marked using simulated orthogonal lasers projected on the surface scan. The point cloud of this surface is then shifted to isocenter and converted from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates. A slab models the treatment couch. A cylinder with a radius equal to the normal distance from isocenter to the collimator plate, and a height defined by the collimator diameter is used to estimate collisions. Points within the cylinder clear through a full gantry rotation with the treatment couch at 0° , while points outside of it collide. The angles of collision are reported. This methodology was experimentally verified using a mannequin positioned in an alpha cradle with both arms up. A planning CT scan of the mannequin was performed, two isocenters were marked in PINNACLE, and this information was exported to AlignRT (VisionRT, London, UK)—a surface imaging system for patient positioning. This was used to ensure accurate positioning of the mannequin in the treatment room, when available. Collision calculations were performed for the two treatment isocenters and the results compared to the collisions detected the room. The accuracy of the Kinect-Skanect surface was evaluated by comparing it to the external surface of the planning CT scan. Results: Experimental verification results showed that the predicted angles of collision matched those recorded in the room within 0.5°, in most cases (largest deviation

  12. Long-term results and complications of preoperative radiation in the treatment of rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, W.P.; Garb, J.L.; Park, W.C.; Stark, A.J.; Chabot, J.R.; Friedmann, P.

    1988-02-01

    A retrospective study of 149 patients with rectal cancer diagnosed between 1972 and 1979 was undertaken to compare survival, disease-free survival, recurrence sites, and long-term complications of 40 patients who received 4000 to 4500 rads of preoperative adjuvant radiotherapy (radiation group) with those of 109 patients treated by resection alone (control group). After a mean follow-up of 84 months and 99 months, respectively, survival of the irradiated patients was significantly better than that of controls (68% versus 52%, p less than 0.05). Disease-free survival of those patients rendered free of disease by treatment was also superior for the irradiated group (84% versus 57%, p less than 0.005). Local recurrence without signs of distant metastases developed only one-third as often in irradiated patients (6% versus 18%). Distant metastases, alone or in combination with local recurrence, were also less common after radiation (12% versus 27%). Second primary tumors developed in 15% and 10% of the respective groups, a difference that was not statistically significant. When we consider the survival benefit of preoperative radiation therapy, long-term complications were relatively mild. Delayed healing of the perineum was noted in two irradiated patients. Persistent diarrhea was severe enough to warrant treatment in only one case, and one patient required a colostomy for intestinal obstruction from pelvic fibrosis.

  13. Sympathoadrenal and hypophyseal-adrenal systems in preoperative irradiation of patients with esophageal and cardiac cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarutinov, V.I.; Starosel' skij, I.V.; Gol' dshmidt, B.Ya.; Shmal' ko, Yu.P.; Levchenko, A.M. (Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Rentgeno-Radiologicheskij i Onkologicheskij Inst., Kiev (Ukrainian SSR))

    1983-11-01

    A study was made of 74 patients with esophageal and cardiac cancer, Stages 3 and 4. The excretion of catecholamines, corticosteroids and their precursors was studied, tests with adrenalin before and after preoperative irradiation at a summary dose of 30 Gy were done. It has been shown that before the start of radiation therapy the excretion of catecholamines and corticosteroids is lowered, the reaction to adrenalin administration is negative in most patients, the phase syndrome of cardiac hypodynamics associated with disturbed function of the sympathoadrenal system was revealed. Preoperative irradiation in patients with esophageal and cardiac cancer results in an increased excretion of 17-ketosteroids (17-KS) and 17-ketogenic steroids, however 17-KS excretion does not reach the normal level. For better tolerance of irradiation and for a radiosensitization effect testenate is administered to patients before and during radiation therapy. The administration of testenate 7-10 days before the start and during radiotherapy proved to be effective which was confirmed by noticeable necrobiotic and necrotic changes of cancer cells.

  14. Multiplex RT-PCR-based detections of CEA, CK20 and EGFR in colorectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouma, Aikaterini; Aggeli, Chrysanthi; Lembessis, Panagiotis; Zografos, George N; Korkolis, Dimitris P; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Skondra, Maria; Pissimissis, Nikolaos; Tzonou, Anastasia; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To develop a multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method detecting circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. METHODS: Peripheral blood samples were collected from 88 CRC patients and 40 healthy individuals from the blood donors’ clinic and subsequently analyzed by multiplex RT-RCR for the expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 20 (CK20) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA. The analysis involved determining the detection rates of CEA, CK20 and EGFR transcripts vs disease stage and overall survival. Median follow-up period was 19 mo (range 8-28 mo). RESULTS: Rates of CEA, CK20 and EGFR detection in CRC patients were 95.5%, 78.4% and 19.3%, respectively. CEA transcripts were detected in 3 healthy volunteer samples (7.5%), whereas all control samples were tested negative for CK20 and EGFR transcripts. The increasing number of positive detections for CEA, CK20 and EGFR transcripts in each blood sample was positively correlated with Astler-Coller disease stage (P < 0.001) and preoperative serum levels of CEA (P = 0.029) in CRC patients. Data analysis using Kaplan-Meier estimator documented significant differences in the overall survival of the different CRC patient groups as formed according to the increasing number of positivity for CEA, CK20 and EGFR transcripts. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that multiplex RT-PCR assay can provide useful information concerning disease stage and overall survival of CRC patients. PMID:21157973

  15. Tolerance and efficacy of preoperative intracavitary HDR brachytherapy in IB and IIA cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialas, Brygida; Fijalkowski, Marek; Raczek-Zwierzycka, Katarzyna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this work is to analyze the efficacy and tolerance of preoperative intracavitary HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in patients with IB and IIA cervical cancer. Material and methods 139 patients with cervical cancer IB-IIA with preoperative HDR-BT, out of which 60 patients with cervical cancer IB (43.2%) and 79 with IIA (56.8%) were treated since 1996 to 2002. In preoperative BT total dose to point A ranged from 30-45 Gy in 6-9 fractions twice a week. The fraction dose was 4-5 Gy at point A. Six weeks after BT all patients underwent radical Wertheim-Meigs hysterectomy. Patients with disadvantageous risk factors or with positive specimen histology had a complementary therapy: external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) given to the whole pelvic volume in daily fractions of 2 Gy up to total dose of 36-52 Gy (20 patients) or EBRT with cisplatin-based chemotherapy with the dose of 30-40 mg/m2 in 5-7 fractions given weekly (7 patients) or chemotherapy (6 patients). Acute and late radiation toxicity was evaluated according to EORTC/RTOG. Results In postoperative specimen histopathology the number of 114 women (82%) had tumor-free specimen within brachytherapy target (in cervix and cavity), 96 women (60.1%) had tumor-free specimen both in and outside brachytherapy target (lymph nodes, parametra, adnexis). The 5-year and 10-year DFS were 93.8% and 88% for IB and 89.7% and 64.7% for IIA respectively. 7.9% of patients developed acute toxicity both in rectum and bladder (only in I and II grade of EORTC/RTOG). Late severe complication occurred in rectum in 2.2% of patients and in bladder 1.4%. Conclusions 1. Preoperative HDR-BT in patients with IB and IIA cervical cancer is an effective and well tolerated therapy with acceptable rate of side effects. 2. Preoperative HDR-BT followed by surgery in a group without risk factors is a sufficient treatment option with no additional adjuvant therapy requirement.

  16. Preoperative urinary tract obstruction in scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Kotani, Toshiaki; Mori, Kazuetsu; Kawamura, Ken; Ohtake, Akira

    2017-01-01

    While the association between scoliosis and cardiac and respiratory function impairments has been well characterized in clinical practice and research, the potential effect of scoliosis on urinary tract structure and renal function has received little attention. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the preoperative clinical characteristics of urinary tract structure and renal function in pediatric patients with idiopathic scoliosis, using a combination of blood tests, urinalysis, and imaging. Preoperative measures of urinary tract structure and renal function were obtained for 16 patients, 13-17 years old, scheduled for corrective surgery for idiopathic scoliosis. Preoperative assessment included blood test and urinalysis, combined with structural imaging on ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance urography (MRU), and radioisotope tracing (RI), using technetium-99 m mercaptoacetyltriglycine ((99m) Tc-MAG3). Differences in blood and urine tests between patients with and without urinary tract obstruction (UTO) were evaluated for significance using Mann-Whitney U test. For all 16 patients, blood tests and MRU were within normal limits. Dilatation of the renal pelvis was identified on US in eight patients (50.0%). UTO was identified on RI in six patients (37.5%). UTO was associated with elevated β2-microglobulin concentration. Urinary β2-microglobulin concentration >0.7 μg/mg Cr differentiated patients with UTO from those without UTO, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 70%. β2-Microglobulin concentration may be a useful marker to screen for asymptomatic UTO in patients with idiopathic scoliosis. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  17. Preoperative Evaluation: Estimation of Pulmonary Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarasimhachar, Anand; Smetana, Gerald W

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are common after major non-thoracic surgery and associated with significant morbidity and high cost of care. A number of risk factors are strong predictors of PPCs. The overall goal of the preoperative pulmonary evaluation is to identify these potential, patient and procedure-related risks and optimize the health of the patients before surgery. A thorough clinical examination supported by appropriate laboratory tests will help guide the clinician to provide optimal perioperative care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A preoperative checklist in esthetic plastic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Anger,Jaime; Letizio,Nelson; Orel,Maurício; Souza Junior,José Leão de; Santos,Márcio Martines dos

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a checklist to be used at the last stage of a preoperative visit for esthetic plastic surgery composed of 29 yes/no questions, four blank spaces for entering data, and one question for ranking the level of risk of deep vein thrombosis. The criteria are divided into three tables relating to three areas: anesthesia, psychological aspects, and clinical risk factors. The answers are framed in four colors that identify the level of risk and suggest the degree of attention warra...

  19. Preoperational test report, recirculation ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-11

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102 and supports the ability to exhaust air from each tank. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a fan, condenser, and moisture separator; equipment is located inside each respective tank farm in its own hardened building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  20. Preoperational test report, raw water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-10-29

    This represents the preoperational test report for the Raw Water System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system supplies makeup water to the W-030 recirculation evaporative cooling towers for tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. The Raw Water pipe riser and associated strainer and valving is located in the W-030 diesel generator building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  1. Preoperative irradiation and cystectomy for bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J A; Batata, M; Grabstald, H; Sogani, P C; Herr, H; Whitmore, W F

    1982-03-01

    Between 1971 and 1974, 101 patients at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center underwent planned integrated treatment for bladder cancer with 2000 rads by megavoltage delivered to the whole pelvis over five consecutive days followed by radical cystectomy within a week. The overall five-year survival rate was 39%; the hospital mortality rate was 2%. In the pelvis alone tumor recurred in 9% of the patients. These results support other studies demonstrating the efficacy of this and other regimens of preoperative irradiation and cystectomy.

  2. Hydrogel injection reduces rectal toxicity after radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Berneking, Vanessa; Koenig, Liane; Frank, Dilini; Bretgeld, Marilou; Eble, Michael J. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Injection of a hydrogel spacer before prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) is known to reduce the dose to the rectal wall. Clinical results from the patient's perspective are needed to better assess a possible benefit. A group of 167 consecutive patients who received prostate RT during the years 2010 to 2013 with 2-Gy fractions up to 76 Gy (without hydrogel, n = 66) or 76-80 Gy (with hydrogel, n = 101) were included. The numbers of interventions resulting from bowel problems during the first 2 years after RT were compared. Patients were surveyed prospectively before RT, at the last day of RT, and at a median of 2 and 17 months after RT using a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). Baseline patient characteristics were well balanced. Treatment for bowel symptoms (0 vs. 11 %; p < 0.01) and endoscopic examinations (3 vs. 19 %; p < 0.01) were performed less frequently with a spacer. Mean bowel function scores did not change for patients with a spacer in contrast to patients without a spacer (mean decrease of 5 points) >1 year after RT in comparison to baseline, with 0 vs. 12 % reporting a new moderate/big problem with passing stools (p < 0.01). Statistically significant differences were found for the items ''loose stools'', ''bloody stools'', ''painful bowel movements'' and ''frequency of bowel movements''. Spacer injection is associated with a significant benefit for patients after prostate cancer RT. (orig.) [German] Bei der Radiotherapie (RT) des Prostatakarzinoms kann die Dosis an der Rektumwand durch die Injektion eines Hydrogelabstandhalters gesenkt werden. Klinische Ergebnisse aus der Sicht des Patienten sind zur Einschaetzung eines moeglichen Vorteils erforderlich. Eine Gruppe von 167 konsekutiven Patienten, die in den Jahren 2010-2013 eine Prostata-RT mit Einzeldosen von 2 bis 76 Gy (ohne Hydrogel, n = 66) bzw. 76-80 Gy (mit Hydrogel, n = 101

  3. RT-PLG: Real Time Process Log Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yahya, Bernardo Nugroho; Khosiawan, Yohanes; Choi, Woosik;

    2016-01-01

    . This paper aims to develop a real time process log generator for the usage of streaming process mining tool. The real time process log generator (RT-PLG) is constructed in an independent tool. Afterward, the RT-PLG is utilized to generate a synthetic log for streaming process mining. The tool has been...... evaluated using an existing simulation model....

  4. rt Avandi valiti EFA gala õhtujuhiks

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    4. detsembril Tallinnas toimuvat 23. Euroopa Filmiauhindade gala juhivad eesti näitleja Märt Avandi ja saksa koomik Anke Engelke. Lühidalt galast. Märt Avandi vastab küsimustele õhtu juhtimise ja selleks ettevalmistamise kohta

  5. Norwegian program of quality assurance in radiotherapy (KVIST) - Organisation, benefits and experience feedback;Programme norvegien d'assurance qualite dans la radiotherapie (KVIST) - Organisation, benefices et retour d'experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merete Olerud, H. [Oslo Univ., Autorite Norvegienne de Radioprotection, Osteras, Institut de Physique et Biophysique (Norway); Levernes, S. [Oslo Univ., Centre Hospitalier, Autorite Norvegienne de Radioprotection, Osteras - DNR, Montebello (Norway); Hellebust, T.P. [Autorite Norvegienne de Radioprotection, Osteras, Centre Hospitalier, DNR, Montebello (Norway); Heikkela, I.E. [Autorite Norvegienne de Radioprotection, Osteras D.C., Johannessen, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire - Ulleval, Oslo (Norway); Bjerke, H. [Autorite Norvegienne de Radioprotection, Osteras, Rekstad BL, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire - Ulleval, Oslo (Norway); Sundqvist, E. [Programme Radiographie, Faculte de la Sante, Oslo, College Universitaire, Oslo (Norway); Frykholm, G. [Oslo Univ., Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Autorite Norvegienne de Radioprotection, Osteras, St.Olav, Trondheim (Norway)

    2009-12-15

    In 2000, the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (N.R.P.A.) initiated work to develop a national quality assurance programme in radiotherapy. The program was named K.V.I.S.T.: i.e. Norwegian abbreviation of Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy (KValitetSikring STraleterapi). The programme is performed by the multidisciplinary K.V.I.S.T. Group and aims to stimulate collaboration by focussing on clinical, technical and administrative problems that can be addressed and solved on a national level. An important objective is to establish a positive attitude towards quality assurance and better communication between centres and the various professions and professionals involved in radiotherapy, i.e. the oncologists, medical physicists and radiation therapy technologists. Information is also provided to other stake holders such as health authorities, hospital administrators and patients. In 2007 radiotherapy in Norway represent 10 departments and forty accelerators. Since radiotherapy is given high priority in cancer care good quality assurance is required. The member of the K.V.I.S.T.-group are part time at N.R.P.A. and part time in different radiotherapy departments. Professionals with competencies within radiotherapy (R.T.) have permanent positions in a national public entity. The K.V.I.S.T.-group is multidisciplinary. The K.V.I.S.T.-group acts as a coordinating group for all type of national Q.A. projects. The recommendations/guidelines are developed by national consensus. The work is performed by the radiotherapy community it self, thus creating an atmosphere of ownership. (N.C.)

  6. Predictors of pathologic complete response after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy of rectal cancer: A single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Cheol [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae; Kim, Mi Young; Oh, Young Ki; Baek, Sung Gyu [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To identify possible predictors of pathologic complete response (pCR) of rectal cancer after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). We conducted a retrospective review of 53 patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CCRT followed by radical surgery at a single center between January 2007 and December 2012. The median radiotherapy dose to the pelvis was 54.0 Gy (range, 45.0 to 63.0 Gy). Five-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy was administered via continuous infusion with leucovorin. The pCR rate was 20.8%. The downstaging rate was 66%. In univariate analyses, poor and undifferentiated tumors (p = 0.020) and an interval of ≥7 weeks from finishing CCRT to surgery (p = 0.040) were significantly associated with pCR, while female gender (p = 0.070), initial carcinoembryonic antigen concentration of <5.0 ng/dL (p = 0.100), and clinical stage T2 (p = 0.100) were marginally significant factors. In multivariate analysis, an interval of ≥7 weeks from finishing CCRT to surgery (odds ratio, 0.139; 95% confidence interval, 0.022 to 0.877; p = 0.036) was significantly associated with pCR, while stage T2 (odds ratio, 5.363; 95% confidence interval, 0.963 to 29.877; p = 0.055) was a marginally significant risk factor. We suggest that the interval from finishing CCRT to surgery is a predictor of pCR after preoperative CCRT in patients with rectal cancer. Stage T2 cancer may also be an important predictive factor. We hope to perform a robust study by collecting data during treatment to obtain more advanced results.

  7. Comparison of acute skin reaction following morning versus late afternoon radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer who have undergone curative surgical resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hyojung; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Seol, Seung Won; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kil, Won-Ho

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the relationship between the time of radiotherapy (RT) and treatment outcomes in breast cancer. Patients with pathologic T1-2N0-1 breast cancer who received adjuvant RT in the morning (before 10:00 AM) or late afternoon (after 3:00 PM) were eligible for inclusion in this study. We retrospectively compared the clinicopathologic characteristics, acute skin reaction, and survival outcomes according to the time of RT. The median follow-up duration was 83 months (range, 10-131 months). From the 395 eligible patients, 190 (48.1%) and 205 (51.9%) patients were classified into the morning RT group and the afternoon RT group, respectively. The clinicopathologic characteristics were relatively well balanced between the treatment groups, except for pathologic N-stage (P = 0.0409). Grade 2 or higher acute skin reaction according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria was observed in 39 (9.9%) patients, with a higher frequency in the afternoon RT group than the morning RT group (13.7% vs 5.8%, respectively; P = 0.0088). There was no difference in the failure patterns or survival outcomes between the treatment groups. RT in late afternoon was associated with increased Grade 2 or more skin reaction after RT for breast cancer patients, but treatment outcomes did not differ according to the time of RT. Individualized considerations for treatment should be taken into account to reduce the risk of skin reactions.

  8. Impact of HPV-associated p16-expression on radiotherapy outcome in advanced oropharynx and non-oropharynx cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Pernille; Primdahl, Hanne; Johansen, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    HPV-associated p16-expression in a cohort of patients with stage III-IV pharynx and larynx cancer treated with primary, curatively intended (chemo-)RT, aiming to test the hypothesis that the impact of HPV/p16 also extends to tumors of non-oropharyngeal origin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 1294 patients......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: HPV is found in head and neck cancer from all sites with a higher prevalence in oropharynx cancer (OPC) compared to non-OPC. HPV/p16-status has a significant impact on radiotherapy (RT) outcome in advanced OPC, but less is known about the influence in non-OPC. We analyzed...

  9. Patch-based generation of a pseudo CT from conventional MRI sequences for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Daniel; Van Leemput, Koen; Hansen, Rasmus H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the only modality, the information on electron density must be derived from the MRI scan by creating a so-called pseudo computed tomography (pCT). This is a nontrivial task, since the voxel-intensities in an MRI scan are n...... on conventional T1-weighted MRI sequences and without deformable registrations. In our evaluations, the method performed better than existing voxel-based and atlas-based methods and showed a promising potential for RT of the brain based only on MRI....

  10. Risk of pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator after radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer in Denmark, 1982-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehammar, Jens Christian; Johansen, Jens Brock; Jensen, Maj-Britt

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To examine the risk of cardiac conduction abnormalities or severe ventricular arrhythmias requiring implantation of a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED), either a pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, subsequent to breast cancer (BC) radiotherapy...... (RT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: All women treated for early-stage BC in Denmark from 1982 to 2005 were identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. By record linkage to the Danish Pacemaker and ICD Registry information was retrieved on CIED implants subsequent to RT. Standardized incidence...

  11. Inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein and radiotherapy-induced early adverse skin reactions in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Takita, Cristiane; Wright, Jean; Reis, Isildinha M; Zhao, Wei; Lally, Brian E; Hu, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in American women. Postsurgery adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) significantly reduced the local recurrence rate. However, many patients develop early adverse skin reactions (EASR) that impact quality of life and treatment outcomes. We evaluated an inflammatory biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP), in predicting RT-induced EASRs in 159 patients with breast cancer undergoing RT. In each patient, we measured pre- and post-RT plasma CRP levels using a highly sensitive ELISA CRP assay. RT-induced EASRs were assessed at weeks 3 and 6 using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (v3.0). Associations between EASRs and CRP levels were assessed using logistic regression models after adjusting for potential confounders. RT-induced grade 2+ EASRs were observed in 8 (5%) and 80 (50%) patients at weeks 3 and 6 (end of RT), respectively. At the end of RT, a significantly higher proportion of African Americans developed grade 3 EASRs (13.8% vs. 2.3% in others); grade 2+ EASRs were significantly associated with: change of CRP > 1 mg/L [odds ratio (OR), 2.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-5.95; P = 0.04], obesity (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.03-4.21; P = 0.04), or combined both factors (OR, 5.21; 95% CI, 1.77-15.38; P = 0.003). This is the first study to demonstrate that an inflammatory biomarker CRP is associated with RT-induced EASRs, particularly combined with obesity. Future larger studies are warranted to validate our findings and facilitate the discovery and development of anti-inflammatory agents to protect normal tissue from RT-induced adverse effects and improve quality of life in patients with breast cancer undergoing RT. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of the spine treated with RapidArc volumetric-modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Trone, Jane-Chloé [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire, St Priest en Jarez (France); Chargari, Cyrus [Department of Radiation Oncology, HIA du Val de Grâce, Paris (France); Falk, Alexander Tuan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Khodri, Mustapha [Department of Physics, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire, St Priest en Jarez (France); Magné, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.magne@icloire.fr [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut de Cancérologie de la Loire, St Priest en Jarez (France)

    2014-10-01

    Radiotherapy for epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE) using volumetric intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT). A 48-year-old woman was referred for curative irradiation of a vertebral EHE after failure of surgery. A comparison between VMAT and conventional conformal tridimensional (3D) dosimetry was performed and potential advantage of VMAT for sparing critical organs from irradiation's side effects was discussed. The total delivered dose on the planning target volume was 54 Gy in 27 fractions. The patient was finally treated with VMAT. The tolerance was excellent. There was no acute toxicity, including no increase in pain. With a follow-up of 18 months, no delayed toxicity was reported. The clinical response consisted of a decrease in the dorsal pain. The D{sub max} for the spinal cord was reduced from 55 Gy (3D-radiotherapy [RT]) (which would be an unacceptable dose to the spine because of the risk of myelopathy) to 42.8 Gy (VMAT), which remains below the recommended dose threshold (45 Gy). The dose delivered to 20% of organ volume (D{sub 20}) was reduced from 47 Gy (3D-RT) to 3 Gy (VMAT) for the spinal cord. The study shows that VMAT allows the delivery of curative treatment for vertebral EHEs because of critical organ sparing.

  13. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: The Lasting Effects of a Fleeting Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet B. Eldredge-Hindy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In well-selected patients who choose to pursue breast conservation therapy (BCT for early-stage breast cancer, partial breast irradiation (PBI delivered externally or intraoperatively, may be a viable alternative to conventional whole breast irradiation. Two large, contemporary randomized trials have demonstrated breast intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT to be noninferior to whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT when assessing for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in select patients. Additionally, IORT and other PBI techniques are likely to be more widely adopted in the future because they improve patient convenience by offering an accelerated course of treatment. Coupled with these novel techniques for breast radiotherapy (RT are distinct toxicity profiles and unique cosmetic alterations that differ from conventional breast EBRT and have the potential to impact disease surveillance and patient satisfaction. This paper will review the level-one evidence for treatment efficacy as well as important secondary endpoints like RT toxicity, breast cosmesis, quality of life, patient satisfaction, and surveillance mammography following BCT with IORT.

  14. FDG-PET-based radiotherapy planning in lung cancer. Optimum breathing protocol and patient positioning - an intraindividual comparison; FDG-PET-basierte Bestrahlungsplanung von nicht kleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinomen. Optimales Atemprotokoll und Patientenpositionierung - ein intraindividueller Vergleich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grgic, A.; Schaefer-Schuler, A.; Kirsch, C.M.; Hellwig, D. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Nestle, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Kremp, S. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2008-12-15

    FDG-PET and PET / CT is increasingly used for radiotherapy (RT) planning in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The planning process is often based on separately-acquired FDG-PET / CT and planning CT. We compared intraindividual differences between PET acquired in diagnostic and radiotherapy treatment position coregistered with planning CTs acquired using different breathing protocols. Sixteen patients with NSCLC underwent two PET acquisitions (diagnostic position-D-PET, radiotherapy position-RT-PET) and three planning-CT acquisitions (expiration-EXP, inspiration-INS, mid-breathhold-MID) on the same day. All scans were rigidly coregistered resulting in six fused datasets: D-INS, D-EXP, D-MID, RT-INS, RT-EXP and RT-MID. Fusion accuracy was assessed by three readers at eight anatomical landmarks: lung apices, aortic arch, heart, spine, sternum, carina, diaphragm and tumor using an alignment score ranging from 1 (no alignment) to 5 (exact alignment). RT-PET showed better alignment with any CT than D-PET (p < 0.001). With regard to breathing, RT-MID showed the best mean alignment score (3.7 {+-} 1.0) followed by RT-EXP (3.5 {+-} 0.9) and RT-INS (3.0 {+-} 0.8), all differences being significant (p < 0.001). Comparing the alignment scores with regard to anatomical landmarks, the largest deviations were found at diaphragm, heart and apices. Overall, there was a fair agreement (? = 0.48; p < 0.001) among the three readers. Significantly better fusion of PET and planning-CT can be reached with PET acquired in RT-position. The best intraindividual fusion results are obtained with the planning-CT performed during mid-breathhold. Our data justify the acquisition of a separate planning-PET in RT-treatment position if only a diagnostic PET-scan is available. (orig.)

  15. Plasma citrulline levels predict intestinal toxicity in patients treated with pelvic radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onal, Cem; Kotek, Ayse; Arslan, Gungor; Topkan, Erkan (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Baskent Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Adana (Turkey)), E-mail: hcemonal@hotmail.com; Unal, Birsel (Dept. of Biochemistry, Baskent Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)); Yavuz, Aydin; Yavuz, Melek (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Akdeniz Univ. Faculty of Medicine, Antalya (Turkey))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) for abdominal and pelvic malignancies often causes severe small bowel toxicity. Citrulline concentrations are known to decrease with intestinal failure. We thus evaluated the feasibility of plasma citrulline levels in predicting radiation-induced intestinal toxicity. Material and methods. Fifty-three patients (36 prostate cancer, 17 endometrial cancer) who received 45 Gy pelvic RT using conventional fractionation were prospectively evaluated. Patients with prostate cancer received an additional 25-30.6 Gy conformal boost. Plasma citrulline levels were assessed on day 0, mid- (week 3) and post-RT (week 8), and four months post-RT. Dose-volume histogram, citrulline concentration changes, and weekly intestinal toxicity scores were analyzed. Results. Mean age was 63 years (range: 43-81 years) and mean baseline citrulline concentration was 38.0 +- 10.1 mumol/l. Citrulline concentrations were significantly reduced at week 3 (27.4 +- 5.9 mumol/l; p < 0.0001), treatment end (29.9 +- 8.8 mumol/l; p < 0.0001), and four months post-treatment (34.3 +- 12.1; p 0.01). The following factor pairs were significantly positively correlated: Citrulline concentration/mean bowel dose during, end of treatment, and four months post-RT; dose-volume parameters/citrulline change groups; cumulative mean radiation dose/intestinal toxicity at end and four months post-RT; citrulline changes/intestinal toxicity during and end of RT. Citrulline concentration changes significantly differed during treatment according to RTOG intestinal toxicity grades (p < 0.0001). Although the citrulline changes differed significantly within RTOG intestinal toxicity grades (p = 0.003), the difference between Grade 0 and Grade 1 did not differ significantly at the end of the treatment. At four months after RT, no significant differences were apparent. Conclusion. Citrulline-based assessment scores are objective and should be considered in measuring radiation-induced intestinal toxicity

  16. Radiotherapy with or without temozolomide in elderly patients aged ≥ 70 years with glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoglanoglu, Ozden; Akyazici, Emine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although the recommended optimal treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, trials in GBM have excluded patients older than 70 years. In this study, we aimed to assess overall survival (OS) and prognostic factors in elderly patients (≥ 70 years) with newly diagnosed GBM treated with radiotherapy (RT) ± concurrent/adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Material and methods Inclusion criteria were patients ≥ 70 years, pre-RT Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥ 60, and time between diagnosis and start of RT ≤ 2 months. A total of 40 patients aged ≥ 70 years, 12 female and 28 male, treated between January 2004 and December 2012, were evaluated. Median age was 73.5 years (range, 70–83 years). The median RT dose was 60 Gy (range, 30–62 Gy). Twenty-one (52.5%) received concurrent TMZ, and of those 12 (30%) went on to receive adjuvant TMZ. Results The median OS was 7 months (95% CI: 5.45–8.54). One- and two-year OS for the whole cohort was 38% and 16%, respectively. Sex, type of surgery, tumor size, and RT dose did not significantly affect the OS. Presence of concurrent TMZ (p < 0.005) and presence of adjuvant TMZ (p < 0.001) were associated with longer OS in our cohort. Conclusions RT ± TMZ seems to be a well-tolerated treatment in patients ≥ 70 years with GBM. Even though no superiority was found between conventional or hypofractionated RT regimens (p = 0.405), the addition of concurrent and adjuvant TMZ to RT increased the OS in our study. PMID:27647990

  17. Radiotherapy Improves Survival in Unresected Stage I-III Bronchoalveolar Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Damien [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Mishra, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Onn, Amir [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Symon, Zvi; Pfeffer, M. Raphael [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Lawrence, Yaacov Richard, E-mail: yaacovla@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) improves the outcome of patients with unresected, nonmetastatic bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) by performing a population-based analysis within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria were as follows: patients diagnosed with BAC, Stage I-III, between 2001 and 2007. Exclusion criteria included unknown stage, unknown primary treatment modality, Stage IV disease, and those diagnosed at autopsy. Demographic data, treatment details, and overall survival were retrieved from the SEER database. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Results: A total of 6933 patients with Stage I-III BAC were included in the analysis. The median age at diagnosis was 70 years (range, 10-101 years). The majority of patients were diagnosed with Stage I (74.4%); 968 patients (14%) did not undergo surgical resection. Unresected patients were more likely to be older (p < 0.0001), male (p = 0.001), black (p < 0.0001), and Stage III (p < 0.0001). Within the cohort of unresected patients, 300 (31%) were treated with RT. The estimated 2-year overall survival for patients with unresected, nonmetastatic BAC was 58%, 44%, and 27% in Stage I, II, and III, respectively. Factors associated with improved survival included female sex, earlier stage at diagnosis, and use of RT. Median survival in those not receiving RT vs. receiving RT was as follows: Stage I, 28 months vs. 33 months (n = 364, p = 0.06); Stage II, 18 months vs. not reached (n = 31, nonsignificant); Stage III, 10 months vs. 17 months (n = 517, p < 0.003). Conclusions: The use of RT is associated with improved prognosis in unresected Stage I-III BAC. Less than a third of patients who could have potentially benefited from RT received it, suggesting that the medical specialists involved in the care of these patients underappreciate the importance of RT.

  18. Radiotherapy of splenomegaly. A palliative treatment option for a benign phenomenon in malignant diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, Jan; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Eich, Hans Theodor [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Micke, Oliver [St. Franziskus Hospital, Bielefeld (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bruns, Frank [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Haverkamp, Uwe [Clemens Hospital, Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Radiation and Radiation Oncology; Muecke, Ralph; Schaefer, Ulrich [Hospital Lippe (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Seegenschmiedt, Heinrich [Center of Radiotherapy, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Since the 20{sup th} century, radiotherapy (RT) has been used for treatment of symptomatic splenomegaly (SM). SM occurs in association with hematologic disorders. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the indication, treatment concepts, and efficiency of RT. Material and Methods: Clinical features, treatment concepts, and outcome data during the past 20 years were analyzed. Endpoints were pain relief, symptomatic and hematological response, and treatment-related side effects. Results: From 1989-2009, a total of 122 patients received 246 RT courses because of symptomatic SM. Overall 31 patients had chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), 37 had chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), 23 had osteomyelofibrosis (OMF), 17 had polycythemia vera (PV), 5 had acute myelogenous leukemia, 4 had idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), 3 had non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and 2 had multiple myeloma (MM). Patients were treated with {sup 60}Co gamma rays or 5-15MV photons. The fraction size ranged from 10-200 cGy and the total dose per treatment course from 30-1600 cGy. Significant pain relief was achieved for 74.8% of the RT courses given for splenic pain. At least 50% regression was attained for 77% of the RT courses given for SM. 36 patients died within 2 months due to the terminal nature of their disease. Of the RT courses applied for cytopenia, 73.6% achieved a significant improvement of hematological parameters and reduction of transfusion need. Notable hematologic toxicities were reported < EORTC/RTOG II . Conclusion: The present analysis documents the efficacy of RT. In addition, RT as a palliative treatment option for symptomatic SM should not be forgotten. (orig.)

  19. Palliative radiotherapy in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Ho Kyung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the palliative role of radiotherapy (RT and define the effectiveness of chemotherapy combined with palliative RT (CCRT in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods From August 1995 to December 2007, 80 patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer were treated with palliative RT at Samsung Medical Center. Initial presenting symptoms were pain (68 cases, bleeding (18 cases, and obstruction (nine cases. The pelvic mass originated from rectal cancer in 58 patients (73% and from colon cancer in 22 patients (27%. Initially 72 patients (90% were treated with surgery, including 64 complete local excisions; 77% in colon cancer and 81% in rectal cancer. The total RT dose ranged 8-60 Gy (median: 36 Gy with 1.8-8 Gy per fraction. When the α/β for the tumor was assumed to be 10 Gy for the biologically equivalent dose (BED, the median RT dose was 46.8 Gy10 (14.4-78. Twenty one patients (26% were treated with CCRT. Symptom palliation was assessed one month after the completion of RT. Results Symptom palliation was achieved in 80% of the cases. During the median follow-up period of five months (1-44 months, 45% of the cases experienced reappearance of symptoms; the median symptom control duration was five months. Median survival after RT was six months. On univariate analysis, the only significant prognostic factor for symptom control duration was BED ≥40 Gy10 (p Conclusions RT was an effective palliation method in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer. For improvement of symptom control rate and duration, a BED ≥ 40 Gy10 is recommended when possible. Considering the low morbidity and improved symptom palliation, CCRT might be considered in patients with good performance status.

  20. Long-term results of radiotherapy in patients with chronic palmo-plantar eczema or psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumila, M.; Notter, M.; Bodis, S.; Gruber, G. [State Hospital, Aarau (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiation Oncology; Itin, P. [State Hospital, Aarau (Switzerland). Dept. of Dermatology

    2008-04-15

    Background and Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is well accepted for therapy-refractory palmo-plantar eczema or psoriasis, despite of lacking evidence regarding beneficial long term effects. Furthermore, the optimal irradiation dose is unknown. We evaluated the outcome of RT with two different RT single/total dose (SD/TD) treatment policies. Patients and Methods: 28 consecutive patients with therapy-refractory eczema (n = 22) or psoriasis (n = 6) of palms and/or soles were irradiated twice a week either with a D{sub max} SD of 1 Gy (6/98-5/03; median TD: 12 Gy) or 0.5 Gy (6/03-7/04; median TD: 5 Gy). Median age was 52 years (27-71), median follow-up 20 months (4-76). Totally 88 regions were treated, 49 with 1 Gy, 39 with 0.5 Gy SD. Eight different symptoms were scored from 0 (absent) -3 (severe), giving a possible sum score of 0-24. Patients' rating of RT result was also documented (worse/stable/better/complete remission). Results: The sum score was 15 (6-23) before RT, 2 (0-16) at the end of RT, and 1 (0-21) at last follow-up, respectively. The improvement was highly significant in both treatment regimens. Better or complete remission by the patients were reported in 44 and 39 (= 83 out of 88) localisations, that was often stable during the follow-up. 5 (6%) regions in 3 (11%) patients didn't benefit from RT. Conclusion: RT reveals excellent results in palmo-plantar eczema or psoriasis. We recommend a SD of 0.5 Gy twice a week up to a TD of 4-5 Gy. (orig.)

  1. Time patterns of changes in biomarkers, symptoms and histopathology during pelvic radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Annette; Dahl, Olav [Section of Oncology, Institute of Medicine, Univ. of Bergen, and Dept. of Oncology, Haukeland Univ. Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Bjoerge, Benedikte; Klementsen, Beate [National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research, Bergen (Norway); Helgeland, Lars [Dept. of Pathology, Haukeland Univ. Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Wentzel-Larsen, Tore [Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland Univ. Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Fagerhol, Magne K. [Dept. of Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Hovdenak, Nils [Dept. of Medicine, Haukeland Univ. Hospital, Bergen (Norway)

    2007-07-15

    Acute radiation proctitis was evaluated before, during and after radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. The main aims of the study were to examine changes related to the increasing radiation dose, and identify surrogate markers of gastrointestinal (GI) reaction to radiation. Twenty consecutive prostate cancer patients scheduled for 7 weeks of conformal RT were prospectively included in a longitudinal study assessing symptoms, inflammation in rectal mucosa biopsies, and blood and stool samples at four time points (before RT and 2, 6 and 11 weeks after start of RT). Blood samples were examined for acute phase response-related markers, fatty acids (FAs), vitamin E and leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Lactoferrin, calprotectin and S100A12 were measured in stool samples and FAs in biopsies from rectal mucosa. The increase in histopathological inflammation reached a maximum 2 weeks after start of RT. Symptoms of GI toxicity increased with higher radiation dose and had not returned to pre-treatment level 4 weeks after RT. Lactoferrin concentrations in stool increased significantly at week 6. Significant decreases of vitamin E, leukocyte count, hemoglobin and some groups of FAs were discovered, while a few FAs increased significantly during the study period. Time courses vary between the selected indicators of acute radiation proctitis. The biopsy grading of inflammatory changes were most intense 2 weeks into the treatment period while symptoms continued to increase until week 6. Lactoferrin in stool samples could be a non-invasive marker of GI inflammation during RT. A transient decrease in vitamin E and some FAs during RT warrants further studies.

  2. Pediatric radiotherapy planning and treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Olch, Arthur J

    2013-01-01

    "This is a very well-written and -organized book covering the planning and delivery aspects unique to pediatric radiotherapy. The author is a respected and well-known medical physicist with extensive pediatric radiotherapy experience. … a very useful book for any clinical physicist treating pediatric cases and seeking contextual and historical perspective. … a great reference for medical physicists who may not see many pediatric cases and can look to this text as a one-stop shop for not only a comprehensive overview, but detailed explanation for specific pediatric disease sites. Overall, it is a great addition to the reference library of any radiation therapy physicist."-Medical Physics, April 2014.

  3. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladra, Matthew M.; Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    Pediatric sarcomas represent a distinct group of pathologies, with approximately 900 new cases per year in the United States alone. Radiotherapy plays an integral role in the local control of these tumors, which often arise adjacent to critical structures and growing organs. The physical properties of proton beam radiotherapy provide a distinct advantage over standard photon radiation by eliminating excess dose deposited beyond the target volume, thereby reducing both the dose of radiation delivered to non-target structures as well as the total radiation dose delivered to a patient. Dosimetric studies comparing proton plans to IMRT and 3D conformal radiation have demonstrated the superiority of protons in numerous pediatric malignancies and data on long-term clinical outcomes and toxicity is emerging. In this article, we review the existing clinical and dosimetric data regarding the use of proton beam radiation in malignant bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  4. Gel dosimetry for conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G. [Department of Physics of the University and INFN, Milan (Italy)]. e-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it

    2005-07-01

    With the continuum development of conformal radio therapies, aimed at delivering high dose to tumor tissue and low dose to the healthy tissue around, the necessities has appeared of suitable improvement of dosimetry techniques giving the possibility of obtaining dose images to be compared with diagnostic images. Also if wide software has been developed for calculating dose distributions in the fields of various radiotherapy units, experimental verifications are necessary, in particular in the case of complex geometries in conformal radiotherapy. Gel dosimetry is a promising method for imaging the absorbed dose in tissue-equivalent phantoms, with the possibility of 3D reconstruction of the spatial dose distribution, with milli metric resolution. Optical imaging of gel dosimeters, based on visible light absorbance analysis, has shown to be a reliable technique for achieving dose distributions. (Author)

  5. Religiousness and preoperative anxiety: a correlational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimollahi Mansoureh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major life changes are among factors that cause anxiety, and one of these changes is surgery. Emotional reactions to surgery have specific effects on the intensity and velocity as well as the process of physical disease. In addition, they can cause delay in patients recovery. This study is aimed at determining the relationship between religious beliefs and preoperative anxiety. Methods This survey is a correlational study to assess the relationship between religious beliefs and preoperative anxiety of patients undergoing abdominal, orthopaedic, and gynaecologic surgery in educational hospitals. We used the convenience sampling method. The data collection instruments included a questionnaire containing the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, and another questionnaire formulated by the researcher with queries on religious beliefs and demographic characteristics as well as disease-related information. Analysis of the data was carried out with SPSS software using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results were arranged in three tables. Results The findings showed that almost all the subjects had high level of religiosity and moderate level of anxiety. In addition, there was an inverse relationship between religiosity and intensity of anxiety, though this was not statistically significant. Conclusion The results of this study can be used as evidence for presenting religious counselling and spiritual interventions for individuals undergoing stress. Finally, based on the results of this study, the researcher suggested some recommendations for applying results and conducting further research.

  6. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepek Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine toxicity and outcomes for patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT for gastric cancer. Methods Patients with gastroesophageal (GE junction (Siewert type II and III or gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant CRT followed by planned surgical resection at Duke University between 1987 and 2009 were reviewed. Overall survival (OS, local control (LC and disease-free survival (DFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results Forty-eight patients were included. Most (73% had proximal (GE junction, cardia and fundus tumors. Median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients (75% underwent surgery. Pathologic complete response and R0 resection rates were 19% and 86%, respectively. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 6%. At 42 months median follow-up, 3-year actuarial OS was 40%. For patients undergoing surgery, 3-year OS, LC and DFS were 50%, 73% and 41%, respectively. Conclusions Preoperative CRT for gastric cancer is well tolerated with acceptable rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In this patient cohort with primarily advanced disease, OS, LC and DFS rates in resected patients are comparable to similarly staged, adjuvantly treated patients in randomized trials. Further study comparing neoadjuvant CRT to standard treatment approaches for gastric cancer is indicated.

  7. Preoperative evaluation for lung cancer resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyratos, Dionysios; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Angelis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Pataka, Athanasia; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andreas; Arikas, Stamatis; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Tsiouda, Theodora; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Siminelakis, Stavros; Argyriou, Michael; Kotsakou, Maria; Kessis, George; Kolettas, Alexander; Beleveslis, Thomas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades lung cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide for both sexes. Even though cigarette smoking has been proved to be the main causative factor, many other agents (e.g., occupational exposure to asbestos or heavy metals, indoor exposure to radon gas radiation, particulate air pollution) have been associated with its development. Recently screening programs proved to reduce mortality among heavy-smokers although establishment of such strategies in everyday clinical practice is much more difficult and unknown if it is cost effective compared to other neoplasms (e.g., breast or prostate cancer). Adding severe comorbidities (coronary heart disease, COPD) to the above reasons as cigarette smoking is a common causative factor, we could explain the low surgical resection rates (approximately 20-30%) for lung cancer patients. Three clinical guidelines reports of different associations have been published (American College of Chest Physisians, British Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society/European Society of Thoracic Surgery) providing detailed algorithms for preoperative assessment. In the current mini review, we will comment on the preoperative evaluation of lung cancer patients. PMID:24672690

  8. The Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale provides a simple and reliable measure of preoperative anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boker, Abdulaziz; Brownell, Laurence; Donen, Neil

    2002-10-01

    To compare three anxiety scales; the anxiety visual analogue scale (VAS), the anxiety component of the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale (APAIS), and the state portion of the Spielburger state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI), for assessment of preoperative anxiety levels in same day admission patients. Patients completed the three anxiety assessment scales both before and after seeing the anesthesiologist preoperatively. The scales used were the STAI, the six-question APAIS, and the VAS. APAIS was further subdivided to assess anxiety about anesthesia (sum A), anxiety about surgery (sum S) and a combined anxiety total (i.e., sum C = sum A + sum S). These scales were compared to one another. Pearson's correlation (pair-wise deletion) was used for validity testing. Cronbach's alpha analysis was used to test internal validity of the various components of the APAIS scale. A correlation co-efficient (r) > or = 0.6 and P scale sets were completed by 197 patients. There was significant and positive correlation between VAS and STAI r = 0.64, P anxiety components of the APAIS (sum C) and desire for information were 0.84 and 0.77 respectively. In addition to VAS, the anxiety component of APAIS (sum C) is a promising new practical tool to assess preoperative patient anxiety levels.

  9. Health related quality of life and symptoms after pelvic lymphadenectomy or radiotherapy vs. no adjuvant regional treatment in early-stage endometrial carcinoma: a large population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V; Pijnenborg, Johanna M A; Boll, Dorry; Vos, M Caroline; van den Berg, Hetty; Lybeert, Marnix L M; de Winter, Karin; Kruitwagen, Roy F P M

    2012-10-01

    Routine lymphadenectomy (LA) in early stage endometrial cancer does not improve survival. However, in the absence of lymph node metastasis, radiotherapy (RT) could be withheld and hence could result in less morbidity. Our aim was to evaluate health related quality of life (HRQL) in endometrial cancer survivors that received routine pelvic LA without RT compared to no LA, but RT in the presence of risk factors. Stage I-II endometrial cancer survivors diagnosed between 1999 and 2007 were selected from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry. Survivors completed the SF-36 and the EORTC-QLQ-EN24. ANCOVA and multiple linear regression analyses were applied. 742 (77%) of the endometrial cancer survivors returned a completed questionnaire. 377 (51%) had received no LA nor RT (LA-RT-), 198 (27%) had received LA+RT-, 153 (21%) LA-RT+ and 14 patients (2%) had received both. LA+ women reported as higher lymphedema symptom scores (25 vs. 20, p=0.04). Women who were treated with RT reported higher gastrointestinal symptom scores vs. those who did not (23 vs. 16, p=0.04). HRQL scales were comparable between all four treatment groups. Despite distinct symptom patterns among women who received LA or RT, no clinically relevant differences in HRQL were observed when compared to women not receiving adjuvant therapy. Using LA to tailor adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy and prevent over-treatment in low-risk patients cannot be recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Technological advances in radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes the available evidence for the use of modern radiotherapy techniques for chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, with specific focus on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. RECENT FINDINGS: The dosimetric....... Overall results are encouraging, as toxicity levels - although varying across reports - appear lower than for 3D conformal radiotherapy. Innovative treatment techniques and strategies which may be facilitated by the use of IMRT/VMAT include simultaneously integrated tumour boost, adaptive treatment...

  11. Inflammatory Skin Conditions Associated With Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Aragüés, I; Pulido Pérez, A; Suárez Fernández, R

    2017-04-01

    Radiotherapy for cancer is used increasingly. Because skin cells undergo rapid turnover, the ionizing radiation of radiotherapy has collateral effects that are often expressed in inflammatory reactions. Some of these reactions-radiodermatitis and recall phenomenon, for example-are very familiar to dermatologists. Other, less common radiotherapy-associated skin conditions are often underdiagnosed but must also be recognized. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. A comparative dosimetric study of neoadjuvant 3D conformal radiotherapy for operable rectal cancer patients versus conventional 2D radiotherapy in NCI-airo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Mahmoud; Hesham A. EL-Hossiny; Nashaat A. Diab; Marwa A. EL Razek

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study was to compare this multiple-field conformal technique to the AP-PA technique with respect to target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues.Methods: We conducted a single institutional prospective comparative dosimetric analysis of 22 patients who received neoadjuvant radiation therapy for rectal cancer presented to radiotherapy department in National Cancer Institute, Cairo in period between June 2010 to September 2011 using 3D conformal radiotherapy technique for each patient, a second radiotherapy treatment plan was done using an anteroposterior (AP-PA) fields, the two techniques were then compared using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis.Results: Comparing different DVHs, it was found that the planning target volume (PTV) was adequately covered in both ( 3D & 2D ) plans while it was demonstrates that this multiple field conformal technique produces superior distribution compared to 2D technique, with considerable sparing of bladder, ovaries and head of both femora.Conclusion: From the present study, it shows that it is recommended to use 3D planning for preoperative cases of cancer rectum so far it produces good coverage of the target as well as good sparing of the surrounding critical organs.

  13. Radiotherapy-Induced Malfunction in Contemporary Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices: Clinical Incidence and Predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jonathan D; Jensen, Garrett L; Tang, Chad; Pollard, Julianne M; Kry, Stephen F; Krishnan, Sunil; Dougherty, Anne H; Gomez, Daniel R; Rozner, Marc A

    2015-08-01

    Risk stratification and management paradigms for patients with cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) requiring radiotherapy (RT) vary widely and are based on limited clinical data. To identify the incidence and predictors of CIED malfunction and describe associated clinical consequences in a large cohort of patients treated with photon- and electron-based RT. Retrospective analysis of all patients with a functioning CIED who underwent RT between August 2005 and January 2014 with CIED interrogation data following RT at an academic cancer center. We identified 249 courses of photon- and electron-based RT in 215 patients (123 pacemakers [57%]; 92 implantable cardioverter-defibrillators [43%]). Substantial neutron production was generated in 71 courses (29%). Implantation of CIED with subsequent therapeutic radiation treatment (neutron producing with 15- or 18-MV photons and non-neutron producing with electrons, GammaKnife, or 6-MV photons). Malfunction of CIED, characterized as single-event upset (data loss, parameter resets, unrecoverable resets), and delayed effects including signal interference, pacing threshold changes, and premature battery depletion. Malfunction of CIED attributable to RT occurred during 18 courses (7%), with 15 CIEDs experiencing single-event upsets, and 3, transient signal interference. All single-event upsets occurred during neutron-producing RT, at a rate of 21%, 10%, and 34% per neutron-producing course for CIEDs, pacemakers, and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, respectively. No single-event upsets were found among 178 courses of non-neutron-producing RT. Incident CIED dose did not correlate with device malfunction. Patients treated to the abdomen and pelvis region were more likely to undergo a single-event upset (hazard ratio, 5.2 [95% CI, 1.2-22.6]; P = .03). Six patients with a CIED parameter reset developed clinical symptoms: 3 experienced hypotension and/or bradycardia, 2 experienced abnormal chest ticking

  14. Risk-adapted targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max;

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A trial compared risk-adapted radiotherapy using single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) versus fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for breast cancer. We report 5-year results for local recurrence and the first analysis of overall survival....

  15. Measuring preoperative anxiety in patients with intracranial tumors: the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Simone; Kaup, Lea; Mehdorn, Hubertus Maximilian

    2011-10-01

    Preoperative anxiety is a major problem in patients with brain tumors and is of high clinical relevance. However, to date no instruments have been validated for the assessment of preoperative anxiety for this patient group. The Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) has shown promising results for the assessment of preoperative anxiety. The aim of this study was to determine its psychometric properties and the optimal cutoff score for patients with intracranial tumors to make it applicable in the neurosurgical setting. The sample totaled 180 neurosurgical patients with intracranial tumors. Patients were administered the APAIS along with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale as the gold standard against which the APAIS was compared. Patients scoring 11 or above in the anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were defined as clinical cases having anxiety. The psychometric properties of the APAIS were evaluated for a postulated 2-factor structure, Cronbach α, and correlations. The postulated 2-factor structure could not be replicated. Instead, we found a 3-factor solution (anxiety about the operation, anxiety about the anesthesia, information requirement). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve ranged from ≥0.65 to ≥0.77. Optimal cutoff scores were calculated. The cutoff score for the anxiety scale was ≥10 for the whole sample and men only, and was ≥11 for women only. Analysis of the psychometric properties yielded satisfactory results (eg. Cronbach α for the anxiety scale >0.84). Despite its brevity, the APAIS is valid and recommendable for the assessment of preoperative anxiety in patients with intracranial tumors. As this is the first validation study focusing on patients with severe diseases and major surgeries, we recommend the application of our cutoff scores also for patients similar to our study population with regard to disease and surgery severity.

  16. The effect of preoperative smoking cessation or preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation on outcomes after lung cancer surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hansen, Mia; Page, Richard; Hasler, Elise

    2013-03-01

    The preferred treatment for lung cancer is surgery if the disease is considered resectable and the patient is considered surgically fit. Preoperative smoking cessation and/or preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation might improve postoperative outcomes after lung cancer surgery. The objectives of this systematic review were to determine the effectiveness of (1) preoperative smoking cessation and (2) preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation on peri- and postoperative outcomes in patients who undergo resection for lung cancer. We searched MEDLINE, PreMedline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Cinahl, BNI, Psychinfo, Amed, Web of Science (SCI and SSCI), and Biomed Central. Original studies published in English investigating the effect of preoperative smoking cessation or preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation on operative and longer-term outcomes in ≥ 50 patients who received surgery with curative intent for lung cancer were included. Of the 7 included studies that examined the effect of preoperative smoking cessation (n = 6) and preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation (n = 1) on outcomes after lung cancer surgery, none were randomized controlled trials and only 1 was prospective. The studies used different smoking classifications, the baseline characteristics differed between the study groups in some of the studies, and most had small sample sizes. No formal data synthesis was therefore possible. The included studies were marked by methodological limitations. On the basis of the reported bodies of evidence, it is not possible to make any firm conclusions about the effect of preoperative smoking cessation or of preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation on operative outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for lung cancer.

  17. Role of radiotherapy in hospice care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tetsuo; Sugiyama, Akira; Shimizu, Teppei; Ichinohe, Kenji; Teshima, Takeshi; Kaneko, Masao; Hara, Yoshio; Chihara, Satoshi.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of palliative radiotherapy for the terminally ill is to improve the quality of the remaining span of life. From November 1982 to September 1987, 69 patients in the Seirei Hospice have been treated with such radiotherapy, and symptomatic relief was obtained in 64% of these patients. Radiotherapy also proved useful in achieving an improvement in their performance status. While the aim of hospice care is not directed towards treatment of the underlying disease, the use of radiotherapy is considered to have an important role in hospice care.

  18. Microfluidic manufacture of rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandadai, Madhuvanthi A.; Mukherjee, Prithviraj; Shekhar, Himanshu; Shaw, George J.; Papautsky, Ian; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-01-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), loaded with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and microbubbles that act as cavitation nuclei, are under development for ultrasound-mediated thrombolysis. Conventional manufacturing techniques produce a polydisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP population with only a small percentage of particles containing microbubbles. Further, a polydisperse population of rt-PA-loaded ELIP has a broadband frequency response with complex bubble dynamics when exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In this work, a microfluidic flow-focusing device was used to generate monodisperse rt-PA-loaded ELIP (µtELIP) loaded with a perfluorocarbon gas. The rt-PA associated with the µtELIP was encapsulated within the lipid shell as well as intercalated within the lipid shell. The µtELIP had a mean diameter of 5 µm, a resonance frequency of 2.2 MHz, and were found to be stable for at least 30 min in 0.5%bovine serum albumin. Additionally, 35 % of µtELIP particles were estimated to contain microbubbles, an order of magnitude higher than that reported previously for batch-produced rt-PA-loaded ELIP. These findings emphasize the advantages offered by microfluidic techniques for improving the encapsulation efficiency of both rt-PA and perflurocarbon microbubbles within echogenic liposomes. PMID:27206512

  19. Comparative Study on Fluorescence RT-PCR and RT-PCR Testing Methods for Detecting Avian Influenza Virus in Chickens%荧光RT-PCR与常规RT-PCR检测禽流感病毒比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宫爱艳; 吴胜昔; 胡仁健; 王健

    2006-01-01

    采用目前公认的2种敏感特异的检测方法--荧光RT-PCR和常规RT-PCR--检测标准毒株禽流感病毒H9亚型(鸡胚尿囊液)及部分待检样品,进行灵敏度、特异性、安全性等方面的比较.结果表明:荧光RT-PCR方法在4 h内就能得出结果,检测尿囊液的禽流感病毒灵敏性达到10-7; RT-PCR方法 6 h出结果,其灵敏度为10-5,且荧光RT-PCR不需电泳,不接触EB,更安全.因此,荧光RT-PCR比常规RT-PCR更灵敏、快速和安全.

  20. Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) arising from the acoustic nerve in a young adult: a case report and a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingfu; Liu, Xueyong; Lin, Zhixiong; Chen, Yupeng; Wang, Pengcheng; Zhang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RTs) are rare, highly malignant central nervous system tumors that predominantly occur in young children. A 22-year-old woman presented with a 4-year history of relapsing tinnitus and gradual hearing loss. Neuroimaging revealed an enhanced intrinsic left internal auditory canal mass. The patient underwent radiotherapy treatment. Three years later, the tumor size continued to increase, as observed by imaging, and ultimately evolved into the left cerebellopontine angle. As a consequence, a total tumor resection was performed, and a pathological diagnosis of AT/RT was made. Aggressive radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment continued; however, the tumor recurred within 11 months after the total tumor resection. The patient died within 4 months of the second operation. Histopathologically, the tumor contained characteristic rhabdoid cells with areas that resembled a classical primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Immunostaining showed loss of INI1 protein expression in tumor cells, and fluorescence in situ hybridization showed a hemizygous deletion of the hSNF5/INI1 gene region on 22q11.2. This is the first report of an AT/RT that arised from the acoustic nerve in a young adult. Despite manifold diagnostic and therapeutic advances, the prognosis of patients with AT/RT remains poor.

  1. Design and dosimetric characteristics of a new endocavitary contact radiotherapy system using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Susan; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Lu Wei; Myerson, Robert J.; Parikh, Parag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To present design aspects and acceptance tests performed for clinical implementation of electronic brachytherapy treatment of early stage rectal adenocarcinoma. A dosimetric comparison is made between the historically used Philips RT-50 unit and the newly developed Axxent{sup Registered-Sign} Model S700 electronic brachytherapy source manufactured by Xoft (iCad, Inc.). Methods: Two proctoscope cones were manufactured by ElectroSurgical Instruments (ESI). Two custom surface applicators were manufactured by Xoft and were designed to fit and interlock with the proctoscope cones from ESI. Dose rates, half value layers (HVL), and percentage depth dose (PDD) measurements were made with the Xoft system and compared to historical RT-50 data. A description of the patient treatment approach and exposure rates during the procedure is also provided. Results: The electronic brachytherapy system has a lower surface dose rate than the RT-50. The dose rate to water on the surface from the Xoft system is approximately 2.1 Gy/min while the RT-50 is 10-12 Gy/min. However, treatment times with Xoft are still reasonable. The HVLs and PDDs between the two systems were comparable resulting in similar doses to the target and to regions beyond the target. The exposure rate levels around a patient treatment were acceptable. The standard uncertainty in the dose rate to water on the surface is approximately {+-}5.2%. Conclusions: The Philips RT-50 unit is an out-of-date radiotherapy machine that is no longer manufactured with limited replacement parts. The use of a custom-designed proctoscope and Xoft surface applicators allows delivery of a well-established treatment with the ease of a modern radiotherapy device. While the dose rate is lower with the use of Xoft, the treatment times are still reasonable. Additionally, personnel may stand farther away from the Xoft radiation source, thus potentially reducing radiation exposure to the operator and other personnel.

  2. Pre-operative pain and sensory function in groin hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske K; Hansen, Jeanette B; Kehlet, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    mechanism. AIMS: To investigate the correlation between pre-operative pain intensity and sensory functions in the groin hernia area. METHODS: Patients with unilateral groin hernia were examined preoperatively by quantitative sensory testing (thermal, mechanical, and pressure [detection and pain thresholds...... pain is not related to findings of hyperalgesia or other changes in sensory function that may support pain-induced pre-operative neuroplasticity as a pathogenic mechanism for the development of persistent postherniotomy pain....

  3. Comparison of long-term survival between temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone for patients with low-grade gliomas after surgical resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Xiu-juan; Wei, Yu-mei; Tao, Heng-min; An, Dian-zheng; Sun, Jia-teng; Li, Bao-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to compare the survival outcomes of temozolomide-based chemoradiotherapy (TMZ + RT) vs radiotherapy alone (RT-alone) for low-grade gliomas (LGGs) after surgical resection. Patients and methods In this retrospective analysis, we reviewed postoperative records of 69 patients with LGGs treated with TMZ + RT (n=31) and RT-alone (n=38) at the Shandong Cancer Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University between June 2011 and December 2013. Patients in the TMZ + RT group were administered 50–100 mg oral TMZ every day until the radiotherapy regimen was completed. Results The median follow-up since surgery was 33 months and showed no significant intergroup differences (P=0.06). There were statistically significant intergroup diff