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Sample records for preoperative radiotherapy regimens

  1. Impaired anastomotic healing after preoperative radiotherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Patients with rectal carcinoma undergoing total mesorectal excision (TME) have a lower recurrence rate with preoperative radiotherapy (RT). The aim of this study was to assess the side-effects in patients who had preoperative RT compared with those who did not receive it (because of palliative resections, ...

  2. Preoperative radiotherapy for bone and soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Seiichi; Kawaguchi, Noriyoshi; Amino, Katsuhisa; Manabe, Jun; Yamashita, Takashi; Kaneta, Kouichi; Furuya, Kohtaro; Isobe, Yasushi.

    1989-01-01

    The role of preoperative radiotherapy was evaluated in 16 cases with soft tissue sarcoma and 13 cases with osteosarcoma. Nine osteosarcoma cases underwent radiotherapy of whole lesion, and 4 cases had radiotherapy only of the surgically uncurable portion. There were no local recurrences in M0 cases, but skin necrosis occurred in the whole radiation group. As for the soft tissue sarcomas, local recurrence was not seen in virgin cases, but two cases which had received previous treatment showed local recurrence. There were no cases with severe side effects. Partial radiotherapy was effective as preoperative treatment for osteosarcoma. Preoperative radiotherapy is better than postoperative radiotherapy from many standpoints. (author)

  3. Preoperative radiotherapy of maxillary sinus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu

    1998-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the effectiveness of preoperative radiotherapy in maxillary sinus cancer. A retrospective analysis was done for 42 patients with maxillary sinus cancer who were treated with radiation with or without surgery from April 1986 to September 1996. There were 27 male and 15 female patients. Patients' age ranged from 24 to 75 years (median 56 years). Stage distribution showed 2 in T2, 19 in T3, and 21 in T4 lesions. The histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 38, undifferentiated carcinoma in 1, transitional cell carcinoma in 1, and adenoid cystic carcinoma in 2 patients, All patients were treated with radiation initially with a dosage range of 50.4-70.2 Gy (median 70.2 Gy) before further evaluation of remnant disease. Eleven patients were given induction chemotherapy (2 cycles of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) concurrently with radiotherapy. Six to eight weeks after radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, computerized tomography (CT) of paranasal sinus was taken to evaluate remnant disease. If the CT finding showed remnant disease, a Caldwell-Luc procedure was done to get the specimen of suspicious lesions. A radical maxillectomy was done if the specimen was proven to contain malignancy. In contrast periodic follow-up examination was done without any radical surgery if the tissue showed only granulation tissue. Follow-up period ranged from 3 to 92 months with a median 16 months. Nine (21.4%) patients showed complete response (CR) and 33 patients (78.6%) showed persistent disease (PER) to initial radiotherapy. Among the 9 CR patients, 7 patients had no evidence of disease (NED), 1 patient had local failure, and 1 patient had regional failure. Among 33 PER patients, salvage total maxillectomy was done in 10 patients, and the surgery was not feasible or refused in 23 patients. Following the salvage radical surgery, 2 patients were NED and 8 patients were PER status. Overall and disease- free survival rate at 5 years was 23.1% and 16

  4. Preoperative radiotherapy of maxillary sinus cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu [College of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    This study was to evaluate the effectiveness of preoperative radiotherapy in maxillary sinus cancer. A retrospective analysis was done for 42 patients with maxillary sinus cancer who were treated with radiation with or without surgery from April 1986 to September 1996. There were 27 male and 15 female patients. Patients' age ranged from 24 to 75 years (median 56 years). Stage distribution showed 2 in T2, 19 in T3, and 21 in T4 lesions. The histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 38, undifferentiated carcinoma in 1, transitional cell carcinoma in 1, and adenoid cystic carcinoma in 2 patients, All patients were treated with radiation initially with a dosage range of 50.4-70.2 Gy (median 70.2 Gy) before further evaluation of remnant disease. Eleven patients were given induction chemotherapy (2 cycles of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) concurrently with radiotherapy. Six to eight weeks after radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, computerized tomography (CT) of paranasal sinus was taken to evaluate remnant disease. If the CT finding showed remnant disease, a Caldwell-Luc procedure was done to get the specimen of suspicious lesions. A radical maxillectomy was done if the specimen was proven to contain malignancy. In contrast periodic follow-up examination was done without any radical surgery if the tissue showed only granulation tissue. Follow-up period ranged from 3 to 92 months with a median 16 months. Nine (21.4%) patients showed complete response (CR) and 33 patients (78.6%) showed persistent disease (PER) to initial radiotherapy. Among the 9 CR patients, 7 patients had no evidence of disease (NED), 1 patient had local failure, and 1 patient had regional failure. Among 33 PER patients, salvage total maxillectomy was done in 10 patients, and the surgery was not feasible or refused in 23 patients. Following the salvage radical surgery, 2 patients were NED and 8 patients were PER status. Overall and disease- free survival rate at 5 years was 23.1% and 16

  5. Low dose preoperative radiotherapy for carcinoma of the oesophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, S.J.; Duncan, W.; Kerr, G.R.; Jack, W.J.L.; Mackillop, W.J.; Walbaum, P.R.; Cameron, E.

    1992-01-01

    Patients (176) with potentially operable squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma of middle or lower thirds of oesophagus were randomly assigned to preoperative radiotherapy or surgery alone. Patients assigned to the radiotherapy arm received 20 Gy in 10 treatments over 2 weeks, using parallel opposed 4 MV beams. The preoperative radiotherapy was not associated with any significant acute morbidity or any increase in operative complications. The median survival of the overall group of 176 patients was 8 moths, and the 5-year survival was 13%. There was no significant difference in the survival of the 90 patients who received preoperative radiotherapy and the 86 who were managed by surgery alone. Proportional hazards analysis identified lymph node involvement, high tumor grade and male sex as significant adverse prognostic features, but the treatment option assigned had no prognostic significance. It was concluded that low dose preoperative radiotherapy offered no advantage over surgery alone. (author). 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 6 tabs

  6. Hypofractionation Regimens for Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Large Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jiankui; Wang, Jian Z.; Lo, Simon; Grecula, John C.; Ammirati, Mario; Montebello, Joseph F.; Zhang Hualin; Gupta, Nilendu; Yuh, William T.C.; Mayr, Nina A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate equivalent regimens for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) for brain tumor treatment and to provide dose-escalation guidance to maximize the tumor control within the normal brain tolerance. Methods and Materials: The linear-quadratic model, including the effect of nonuniform dose distributions, was used to evaluate the HSRT regimens. The α/β ratio was estimated using the Gammaknife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) and whole-brain radiotherapy experience for large brain tumors. The HSRT regimens were derived using two methods: (1) an equivalent tumor control approach, which matches the whole-brain radiotherapy experience for many fractions and merges it with the GKSRS data for few fractions; and (2) a normal-tissue tolerance approach, which takes advantages of the dose conformity and fractionation of HSRT to approach the maximal dose tolerance of the normal brain. Results: A plausible α/β ratio of 12 Gy for brain tumor and a volume parameter n of 0.23 for normal brain were derived from the GKSRS and whole-brain radiotherapy data. The HSRT prescription regimens for the isoeffect of tumor irradiation were calculated. The normal-brain equivalent uniform dose decreased as the number of fractions increased, because of the advantage of fractionation. The regimens for potential dose escalation of HSRT within the limits of normal-brain tolerance were derived. Conclusions: The designed hypofractionated regimens could be used as a preliminary guide for HSRT dose prescription for large brain tumors to mimic the GKSRS experience and for dose escalation trials. Clinical studies are necessary to further tune the model parameters and validate these regimens

  7. Analysis of oral cancer treated by preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Yoichiro; Kaneko, Masayuki; Yasuda, Motoaki

    1997-01-01

    Fifty-eight patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral region, treated by preoperative radiotherapy between January 1988 and December 1993, were reviewed to evaluate the relation between prognosis and pathological findings after preoperative radiotherapy. All patients underwent external radiotherapy of up to 40 Gy in 16 fractions (2.5 Gy a day, 4 fractions a week) before surgery, and the average term from the end of preoperative radiotherapy to surgery were 27.3 days. According to pathological findings during surgery, the patients were divided into a radiation effective group and a radiation noneffective group. There was a significant difference in the survival rates of the two groups, but there was no difference in local control rates. After surgery, regional lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis were more common in the radiation noneffective group than in the radiation effective group. It was considered that regional lymph node metastasis after treatment in the noneffective group is the determining factor in the progress. (author)

  8. MR images of oral cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onizawa, Kojiro; Niitsu Mamoru; Yusa, Hiroshi; Yanagawa, Toru; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the relationship between the effect of preoperative radiotherapy for oral cancer and the changes of signal intensity with MR images. T2-weighted images were compared before and after radiotherapy in 18 patients with primary oral cancer, and the effect on the lesions was histologically evaluated in surgically resected specimens obtained four weeks after the therapy. The MR images showed significantly decreased signal intensity of the lesions. The decrease of signal intensity was remarkable starting at two weeks after completion of the radiotherapy, compared with the decrease at less than two weeks after the therapy. The change of signal intensity was more obvious in tongue cancer than in other oral cancers. There was no significant difference in the change of the signal intensity between cancers with histologically poor response to the therapy and those with good response. These results suggested that signal intensity of oral cancer on T2-weighted images showed a significant decrease after preoperative radiotherapy, and that the intensity could be affected by duration after radiotherapy and primary sites. (author)

  9. Stage I/II endometrial carcinomas: preoperative radiotherapy: results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, P.; Belichard, C.; Horiot, J.C.; Barillot, I.; Fraisse, J.; Collin, F.

    1996-01-01

    The AIM of this retrospective study is to analyse the indications and the results of treatment of endometrial carcinomas by preoperative radiotherapy. MATERIAL: From 1976 to 1995, 183 patients FIGO stage I or II were treated by preoperative radiotherapy consisting in 95 cases of external radiotherapy (XRT) and brachytherapy (BT) followed by surgery (S) and, in 88 cases of BT alone before surgery, XRT was indicated in cases of grade 2 or 3 and/or cervical involvement. METHODS: XRT was delivered with a 4-fields technique to 40 Gy in 20 fractions with a medial shielding at 30 Gy. BT was done with low dose rate Cs137 and Fletcher-Suit-Delclos applicators with two intra-uterine tubes and vaginal ovoieds. Complications were scored using the French-Italian syllabus. RESULTS: Five-year actuarial survival rates per stage are: Ia=91%, Ib=83%, II=71%, and per grade: G1=80%, G2=79%, G3=90%. Failures were pelvic in 5/183 (2.7%), vaginal in 4 cases (2%) and nodal in 2 cases (1%). Twelve patients developed metastases (6.5%). Complications were analysed during the radiotherapy, after the surgery and with unlimited follow-up. After BT/S, 12 grade 1, 1 grade 2 and 1 grade 3 complications were observed. In the group of patients treated by RT/BT/S, 22 grade 1, 11 grade 2, 4 grade 3 occurred. There is no statistical correlation between complications and parameters of treatment (XRT, hwt, HWT, reference dose to the bladder and rectum, dose rate of brachytherapy). SUMMARY: Preoperative irradiation is an effective and safe treatment of high risk stage I/II endometrial carcinomas. Results seem independent of the pathology grade

  10. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy in esophageal cancer followed by transhiatal esophagectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, H.S.; Choi, E.K.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, J.S.; Min, Y.I.; Lee, Y.S.; Sohn, K.H.; Lee, J.W.; Park, S.I.; Lee, I.; Song, H.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: A prospective study for localized esophageal cancer using hyperfractionated radiotherapy(1.2Gy/fx, BID, 48Gy/4wks) with concurrent chemotherapy FP(CDDP 60mg/M 2 /d, d1 and d29, 5-FU 1gm/M 2 /d, continuous infusion d2-6 and d30-34) followed by esophagectomy has been conducted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiation followed by surgery and curative potential of transhiatal esophagecomy. We analyze the clinical/pathological response and toxicity of preoperative regimen and report the patterns of failure and the survival of patients in esophagectomy group compared with patients who treated with definitive radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Since May 1993, 48 patients with localized esophageal cancer entered on this trial and 42 patients were evaluated for response and toxicity in 4 weeks after completion of preoperative regimen. 15 patients underwent surgery and 5 are waiting for surgery. Among 22 patients who refused the surgery, 11 patients received the definitive radiotherapy (≥60Gy) and 11 of them refused further therapy. In 41 men and 1 women with median age of 61 years old (range 41-75 years), 8 patients were staged as SI, 22 SII, and 12 SIII with endoscopic, histologic and radiologic evaluation. Results: Clinical tumor response was observed in 79%((33(42))) and 66%((23(35))) of patients who had histologic evaluation showed complete pathologic response. (13(15)) who underwent surgery achieved complete resection and surgical specimen of 7(47%) patients showed no histologic evidence of disease. 20% ((3(15))) surgical mortality was observed. Among 15 patients who underwent surgery, 53% ((8(15))) are alive NED in 3-19 months (median 7 months), 1 patient is alive with disease in 3 months, 2 patients died of progression, 3 postoperative mortality and 1 patient died of lung cancer in 5 months. Among 11 patients who received curative radiotherapy, 6 are alive with good performance, NED in 9-15 months (median 10 months), 3 are alive

  11. Preoperative radiotherapy in esophageal carcinoma: a meta-analysis using individual patient data (oesophageal cancer collaborative group)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, Sydney J.; Duncan, William; Gignoux, Marc; Girling, David J.; Hansen, Hanne S.; Launois, B.; Nygaard, Knut; Parmar, Mahesh K.B.; Roussel, Alain; Spiliopoulos, G.; Stewart, Lesley A.; Tierney, Jayne F.; Wang Mei; Zhang Rugang

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The existing randomized evidence has failed to conclusively demonstrate the benefit or otherwise of preoperative radiotherapy in treating patients with potentially resectable esophageal carcinoma. This meta-analysis aimed to assess whether there is benefit from adding radiotherapy prior to surgery. Methods and Materials: This quantitative meta-analysis included updated individual patient data from all properly randomized trials (published or unpublished) comprising 1147 patients (971 deaths) from five randomized trials. Results: With a median follow-up of 9 years, the hazard ratio (HR) of 0.89 (95% CI 0.78-1.01) suggests an overall reduction in the risk of death of 11% and an absolute survival benefit of 3% at 2 years and 4% at 5 years. This result is not conventionally statistically significant (p 0.062). No clear differences in the size of the effect by sex, age, or tumor location were apparent. Conclusion: Based on existing trials, there was no clear evidence that preoperative radiotherapy improves the survival of patients with potentially resectable esophageal cancer. These results indicate that if such preoperative radiotherapy regimens do improve survival, then the effect is likely to be modest with an absolute improvement in survival of around 3 to 4%. Trials or a meta-analysis of around 2000 patients would be needed to reliably detect such an improvement (15→20%)

  12. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy in resectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong H.; Choi, Eun K.; Kim, Sung B.; Park, Seung I.; Kim, Dong K.; Song, Ho Y.; Jung, Hwoon Y.; Min, Young I.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the local control rates, survival rates, and patterns of failure for esophageal cancer patients receiving preoperative concurrent chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiotherapy followed by esophagectomy. Methods and Materials: From May 1993 through January 1997, 94 patients with resectable esophageal cancers received continuous hyperfractionated radiation (4,800 cGy/40 fx/4 weeks), with concurrent FP chemotherapy (5-FU 1 g/m 2 /day, days 2-6, 30-34, CDDP 60 mg/m 2 /day, days 1, 29) followed by esophagectomy 3-4 weeks later. If there was evidence of disease progression on preoperative re-evaluation work-up, or if the patient refused surgery, definitive chemoradiotherapy was delivered. Minimum follow-up time was 2 years. Results: All patients successfully completed preoperative treatment and were then followed until death. Fifty-three patients received surgical resection, and another 30 were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Eleven patients did not receive further treatment. Among 91 patients who received clinical reevaluation, we observed 35 having clinical complete response (CR) (38.5%). Pathologic CR rate was 49% (26 patients). Overall survival rate was 59.8% at 2 years and 40.3% at 5 years. Median survival time was 32 months. In 83 patients who were treated with surgery or definitive chemoradiotherapy, the esophagectomy group showed significantly higher survival, disease-free survival, and local disease-free survival rates than those in the definitive chemoradiation group. Conclusion: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in this trial showed improved clinical and pathologic tumor response and survival when compared to historical results. Patients who underwent esophagectomy following chemoradiation showed decreased local recurrence and improved survival and disease-free survival rates compared to the definitive chemoradiation group

  13. Peripheral blood count in preoperative radiotherapy (with radiomodificators) of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demidchik, Yu.E.; Zharkov, V.V.; Prokhorova, V.I.; Rubanova, C.Z.

    1989-01-01

    Indices of peripheral blood in 215 patients with lung cancer during preoperative radiation using hyperglycemia or metronidazole are studied. It is shown that after preoperative radiotherapy, when radiomodifying effects are not used, the content of erythrocytes, thrombocytes, leukocytes, the concentration of hemoglobin in peripheral blood, as well as erythrocyte sedimentation rare didn't change. Functional disorders of the leukopoietic function and the thrombopoietic function of bone marrow when using metronidazole are registered when applying various types of preoperative radiotherapy. Lymphopenia is established when using various types of radiotherapy with radiomodificators

  14. Decreased tumor cell proliferation as an indicator of the effect of preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adell, Gunnar; Zhang Hong; Jansson, Agneta; Sun Xiaofeng; Staal, Olle; Nordenskjoeld, Bo

    2001-01-01

    Background: Rectal cancer is a common malignancy, with significant local recurrence and death rates. Preoperative radiotherapy and refined surgical technique can improve local control rates and disease-free survival. Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the tumor growth fraction in rectal cancer measured with Ki-67 and the outcome, with and without short-term preoperative radiotherapy. Method: Ki-67 (MIB-1) immunohistochemistry was used to measure tumor cell proliferation in the preoperative biopsy and the surgical specimen. Materials: Specimens from 152 patients from the Southeast Swedish Health Care region were included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial 1987-1990. Results: Tumors with low proliferation treated with preoperative radiotherapy had a significantly reduced recurrence rate. The influence on death from rectal cancer was shown only in the univariate analysis. Preoperative radiotherapy of tumors with high proliferation did not significantly improve local control and disease-free survival. The interaction between Ki-67 status and the benefit of radiotherapy was significant for the reduced recurrence rate (p=0.03), with a trend toward improved disease-free survival (p=0.08). In the surgery-alone group, Ki-67 staining did not significantly correlate with local recurrence or survival rates. Conclusion: Many Ki-67 stained tumor cells in the preoperative biopsy predicts an increased treatment failure rate after preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer

  15. Neorectal Irritability After Short-Term Preoperative Radiotherapy and Surgical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakx, Roel; Doeksen, Annemiek; Slors, J. Frederik M.; Bemelman, Willem A.; van Lanschot, J. Jan B.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E. E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Preoperative radiotherapy followed by rectal resection with total mesorectal excision (TME) and colo-anal anastomosis severely compromises anorectal function, which has been attributed to a decrease in neorectal capacity and neorectal compliance. However, to what extent altered motility

  16. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes predict efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Gang; Zhang Shanwen; Xu Bo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of tumor infiltrating lymphocyte(TIL) on prognosis of rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy. Methods: From Jan. 1999 to Oct. 2007,107 patients with rectal cancer were treated with preoperative radiotherapy of 30 Gy/10f/12 days. The relationships among TIL, pathologic regression and prognosis were analyzed. Results: Before radiotherapy, TIL in rectal cancer was 75 patients (70.1%) in grade 1,16 (15.0%) in grade 2 and 16 (15.0%) in grade 3; While after radiotherapy, it changed to 19 (17.7%) in grade 1,43 (40.2%) in grade 2,35 (32.7%) in grade 3 and 10 (9.3%) in grade 4. After radiotherapy, pathologic regression was 36 (33.6%) in grade 1,57 (53.3%) in grade 2 and 14 (13.1%) in grade 3. Univariate analysis showed that TIL both before and after radiotherapy was the significant prognostic factor for local pathologic regression (χ 2 =36.80, P 2 = 14.00, P 2 =24.00, P 2 =12.17, P 2 =8.05, P<0.01). Conclusions: For rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy, TIL before and after radiotherapy is significantly related with local pathologic regression, and TIL after radiotherapy is a prognostic factor. (authors)

  17. Cost-effectiveness of preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer: results from the Swedish Rectal Cancer Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlberg, Michael; Stenborg, Anna; Paahlman, Lars; Glimelius, Bengt

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The Swedish Rectal Cancer Trial (SRCT) demonstrated that a short-term regimen of high-dose fractionated preoperative radiotherapy (5 x 5 Gy) reduced the local recurrence rates and improved overall survival. This has had an impact on the primary treatment of rectal cancer. The current study investigated the cost-effectiveness of the new combined approach. Methods and Materials: After an 8-year follow-up, in-hospital and outpatient costs related to the treatment of rectal cancer and its complications were analyzed for 98 randomly allocated patients who participated in the SRCT from a single Swedish health care region. The costs were then related to the clinical data from the SRCT regarding complications, local and distant recurrences, and survival. Results: The total cost for a nonirradiated patient was US$30,080 compared with US$35,268 for an irradiated patient. The surgery-alone group had increased costs related to local recurrences, and the radiotherapy group had increased costs for irradiation and complications. With a survival benefit of 21 months (retrieved from the SRCT), the cost for a saved year was US$3654. Sensitivity analyses for different rates of local recurrences, the costs related to complications and less marked survival benefit showed that this figure could vary up to US$15,228. Conclusion: The cost for a life-year saved in these data was US$3654. This figure could reach US$15,228 in the most pessimistic setting of the sensitivity tests, a cost still comparable with other well-accepted medical interventions

  18. Radiotherapy in addition to radical surgery in rectal cancer: evidence for a dose-response effect favoring preoperative treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glimelius, Bengt; Isacsson, Ulf; Jung, Bo; Paahlman, Lars

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the relationship between radiation dose and reduction in local recurrence rate after preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: All randomized trials initiated prior to 1988 comparing preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy with surgery alone or with each other were included. Local failure rates were available in 5626 randomized patients. The linear quadratic formula was used to compensate for different radiotherapy schedules. Results: For preoperative radiotherapy, a clear dose-response relationship could be established. For postoperative radiotherapy, the range of doses was narrow, and a dose-response relationship could not be demonstrated. At similar doses, preoperative radiotherapy appeared to be more efficient in reducing local failure rate than postoperative. The only trial comparing preoperative with postoperative radiotherapy confirms this notion. A 15-20 Gy higher dose may be required postoperatively than preoperatively to reach similar efficacy. Neither approach alone significantly influences survival, although it is likely that a small survival benefit may be seen after preoperative radiotherapy. Conclusions: The information from the entire randomized experience suggests that preoperative radiotherapy may be more dose efficient than postoperative radiotherapy

  19. Comparative Analysis between preoperative Radiotherapy and postoperative Radiotherapy in Clinical Stage I and II Endometrial Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Chang Geol; Chung, Eun Ji; Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Woo Cheol; Chang, Sei Kyung; Oh, Young Taek; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : To obtain the optical treatment method in patients with endometrial carcinoma(clinical stage FIGO I, II) by comparative analysis between preoperative radiotherapy(pre-op R) and postoperative radiotherapy(post-op RT). Materials and Methods : A retrospective review of 62 endometrial carcinoma patients referred to the Yonsei Cancer Center for radiotherapy between 1985 and 1991 was undertaken. Of 62 patients, 19 patients(Stage I; 12 patients, Stage II; 7 patients) received pre-op RT before TAH(Total Abdominal Hysterectomy) and BSO(Bilateral Salphingoophorectomy) (Group 1) and 43 patients( Stage 1; 32 patients, Stage 2; 11 patients) received post-op RT after TAH and BSO (Group 2). Pre-op irradiation was given 4-6 weeks prior to surgery and post-op RT was administered on 4-5 weeks following surgery. All patients exept 1 patient(Group2; ICR alone) received external irradiation. Seventy percent(13/19) of pre-op RT group and 54 percent(23/42) of post-op RT group received external pelvic irradiation and intracavitary radiation therapy(ICR). External radiation dose was 39.6-55Gy(median 45Gy) in 5-6 week through opposed AP/PA fields or 4-field box technique treating daily, five days per week, 180cGy per fraction. ICR doses were prescribed to point A(20-39.6 Gy, median 39Gy) in Group 1 and 0.5cm depth from vaginal surface (18-30 Gy, median 21Gy) in Group2. Results : The overall 5 year survival rate was 95%. No survival difference between pre-op and post-op RT group.(89.3% vs 97.7%, p>0.1) There was no survival difference by stage, grade and histology between two groups. The survival rate was not affected by presence of residual tumor of surgical specimen after pre-op RT in Group 1(p>0.1), but affected by presence of lymph node metastasis in post-op RT group(p<0.5). The complication rate of pre-op RT group was higher than post-op RT.(16% vs 5%) Conclusion : Post-op radiotherapy offers the advantages of accurate surgical-pathological staging and low complication rate

  20. Haemostatis activity in rectal cancer patients exposed to preoperative radiotherapy: a clinical prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Mogens T; Larsen, Torben B; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether markers of haemostasis activity increased during preoperative radiotherapy and whether postoperative marker levels were increased in irradiated rectal cancer patients when compared with nonirradiated rectal and colon cancer patients. In 45 rectal cancer patients, we measured...... plasma levels of prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2), thrombin-antithrombin complex, and D-dimer during radiotherapy. Postoperative levels of F1 + 2, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and D-dimer in irradiated patients were compared with postoperative levels in 123 nonirradiated colon and rectal cancer...... for activation of the haemostatic system during preoperative radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. Some evidence was provided for increased postoperative haemostatic activity among rectal cancer patients who received short-term high-intensity radiotherapy, when compared with patients who received long...

  1. Treatment results of preoperative radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Naoto; Oguchi, Masahiko; Kurita, Hiroshi; Katsuno, Satoshi

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and nine patients with advanced head and neck cancers (oral cavity: 50, oropharynx: 11, hypopharynx: 18, larynx: 30) received preoperative radiotherapy from 1987 through 1997 in our institute. The median age was 66 years (20-83). Almost all patients had advanced disease (stage II: 17, III: 34, IV: 58). The median dose of preoperative radiotherapy was 40 Gy (20-50). Seventy patients received chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 30 months. The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates of all patients were 66% and 56%, respectively. The 5-year locoregional and distant failure rates were 36% and 10%, respectively. The locoregional failure rate of oral cavity cancer (54%) was worse than those of other sites (13-28%) (p=0.0015). The locoregional failure rates of oral cavity cancers according to clinical stage were 59% (II), 57% (III) and 48% (IV), respectively. Incidentally those of other sites were 0% (II), 16% (III) and 30% (IV), respectively. Thirty-eight patients had major complication after surgery. The locoregional failure rates of preoperative radiotherapy following surgery for oral cavity cancers of all stages and other sites of stage IV were high. Preoperative radiotherapy should be stopped and postoperative radiotherapy for these patients should be considered. (author)

  2. Preoperative radiotherapy (RT) for prevention of heterotopic ossification (HO) after total hip replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyd, R.; Schopohl, B.; Boettcher, H.D.; Kirchner, J.

    1997-01-01

    Preliminary results of a prospective study which investigates the efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) for prevention of heterotopic ossification (HO) after total hip arthroplasty are summarized. A total number of 20 hip joints (18 patients) were irradiated with a single dose of 6.0 Gy Brooker grade II). The functional outcome quantified with the Harris score was improved by an average of 37.9 points. The authors conclude that preoperative RT is an effective alternative for postoperative irradiation. (orig.) [de

  3. ACCELERATED REGIMENS OF ADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Afonin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of breast cancer (BC is a complex multidisciplinary problem. Often, radiation therapy is an obligatory component of treatment of breast cancer patients. Numerous large randomized trials have proved the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy in both the standard fractionation regimen in a single focal dose of 2 Gy to a total focal dose of 50 Gy for 25 fractions and in modes of hypofractionation using radiation exposure at a larger daily dose with a reduction in the total treatment time. The presented review summarizes the data of the largest studies on the modes of hypofractionation of postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. Most of the studies comparing the standard mode of fractionation of postoperative radiotherapy with the modes of hypofractionation showed comparable results for the main oncological parameters with similar tolerability, frequency of complications and good cosmetic results. It also shows the economic feasibility of applying accelerated regimes in everyday practice. Despite the fact that radiotherapy in the mode of hypofractionation has already become the standard of treatment and is recommended for use by the largest European and American cancer associations, indications for its conduct, the criteria for selection in the studies and the range of recommended single focal doses differ. The obtained results do not give an opportunity to confidently judge the advantage of one or another regime. It is necessary to determine the factors of a favorable and unfavorable prognosis, to clarify the indications for the use of various radiotherapy techniques. Therefore, questions about the optimal mode of hypo-fractionation of adjuvant radiotherapy, the timing of its initiation and the criteria for selecting patients for this type of therapy as part of the comprehensive treatment of breast cancer have not yet been fully resolved. Also open is the choice of optimal single and total doses of radiation, its combination with drug

  4. Single vs. multiple fraction regimens for palliative radiotherapy treatment of multiple myeloma. A prospective randomised study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudzianskiene, Milda; Inciura, Arturas; Gerbutavicius, Rolandas; Rudzianskas, Viktoras; Dambrauskiene, Ruta; Juozaityte, Elona; Macas, Andrius; Simoliuniene, Renata; Kiavialaitis, Greta Emilia

    2017-01-01

    To compare the impact of a single fraction (8 Gy x 1 fraction) and multifraction (3 Gy x 10 fractions) radiotherapy regimens on pain relief, recalcification and the quality of life (QoL) in patients with bone destructions due to multiple myeloma (MM). In all, 101 patients were included in a randomised prospective clinical trial: 58 patients were included in the control arm (3 Gy x 10 fractions) and 43 patients into the experimental arm (8 Gy x 1 fraction). The response rate was defined according to the International Consensus on Palliative Radiotherapy criteria. Recalcification was evaluated with radiographs. QoL questionnaires were completed before and 4 weeks after treatment. Pain relief was obtained in 81/101 patients (80.2%): complete response in 56 (69%) and partial in 25 patients (30.9%). No significant differences were observed in analgesic response between the groups. Significant factors for pain relief were female gender, age under 65, IgG MM type, presence of recalcification at the irradiated site. Recalcification was found in 32/101 patients (33.7%): complete in 17 (53.2%) and partial in 15 (46.2%). No significant differences were observed in recalcification between the groups. Significant factors for recalcification were Karnofsky index ≥ 60%, haemoglobin level ≤ 80 g/dl, MM stage II and analgesic response at the irradiated site. The QoL after radiotherapy was improved in the control group. The same analgesic and recalcification response was observed using two different radiotherapy regimens. Higher doses should be used to achieve a better QoL. (orig.) [de

  5. A phase I trial of pre-operative radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Clinical and translational studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supiot, Stephane; Shubbar, Shubber; Fleshner, Neil; Warde, Padraig; Hersey, Karen; Wallace, Kris; Cole, Heather; Sweet, Joan; Tsihlias, John; Jewett, Michael A.S.; Klotz, Laurence; Bristow, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Selected patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer can be at high-risk for pT3 disease and require subsequent radiotherapy. In a phase I trial, we investigated the feasibility of pre-operative radiotherapy for this patient subset. Materials and methods: Eligibility criteria were: T1/T2N0M0 tumors plus (i) Gleason ≥ 7, PSA > 10 ng/ml and 15 ng/ml and less WAF associated with reduced cell proliferation. Conclusion: Intra-operative morbidity is low following short-course, pre-operative radiotherapy. A phase II trial is planned to fully document biochemical response with this combined-modality approach

  6. Risk of acute anastomotic leakage after preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devid Belalla

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the preoperative radiotherapy and its role in anastomotic leakage. Methods: A total of 327 patients who had an anterior resection (AR in elective surgery for a rectal carcinoma were selected and operated in our clinic of surgery during the period from 2003 to 2015. Among them, 135 patients had a low anterior resection (LAR and the other 192 had an AR. This is a retrospective study. Chi-squared test was used to evaluate statistical differences and the P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 126 patients had radiotherapy before surgery, and 50 of them had a LAR. In the other 201 patients, surgery was the first treatment modality, and 83 of them had a LAR. We had an overall anastomotic leakage of 7.95% or 26% patients. Anastomotic leakage was found in 14 patients with LAR, 9 of which had radiotherapy before surgery. From the 12 patients with AR who had an anastomotic leakage, 6 of them had radiotherapy before surgery. Conclusions: Radiotherapy may affect anastomotic healing and increase the risk of leakage. This risk is higher in low anterior anastomoses where a protective stoma may be considered. A better evaluation and support for patients with preoperative radiotherapy is needed in order to diminish the concomitant risk factors as much as possible.

  7. Clinical target volume for rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorchel, F.; Bossel, J.F.; Baron, M.H.; Goubard, O.; Bartholomot, B.; Mantion, G.; Pelissier, E.P.; Maingon, P.

    2001-01-01

    The total meso-rectal excision allows the marked increase of the local control rate in rectal cancer. Therefore, the meso-rectal space is the usual field for the spread of rectal cancer cells. It could therefore be considered as the clinical target volume in the preoperative plan by the radiation oncologist. We propose to identify the mesorectum on anatomical structures of a treatment-position CT scan. (authors)

  8. Preoperative radiotherapy of renal adenocarcinomas from the point of view of tumor biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kob, D; Kriester, A; Hacker, I; Kloetzer, K H [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Jena (German Democratic Republic). Radiologische Klinik und Poliklinik

    1982-05-01

    26 patients with pulmonary metastases of renal adenocarcinomas were examined under the aspect of tumor biology. Growth functions were used to calculate the time at which the metastases began to grow, in relation to the time of operation and with the aim to get information on the indication for preoperative radiotherapy. In 3 patients (11.5%) there was an indication for preoperative irradiation. For comparative clinical tests as to the value of preoperative irradiation a minimum of 871 patients are needed in each group for comparison to evaluate the 3-year survival rate and 489 patients to evaluate the 5-year survival rate in order to be certain of the positive effect of preoperative irradiation with 1% statistical probability. The investigations are to be considered a model.

  9. Outcomes of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Combined Chemotherapy with Radiotherapy Without Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supaadirek, Chunsri; Pesee, Montien; Thamronganantasakul, Komsan; Thalangsri, Pimsiree; Krusun, Srichai; Supakalin, Narudom

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the treatment outcomes of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) or combined chemotherapy together with radiotherapy (CMTRT) without surgery. A total of 84 patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma (stage II or III) between January 1st, 2003 and December 31st, 2013 were enrolled, 48 treated with preoperative CCRT (Gr.I) and 36 with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy (CMTRT) without surgery (Gr.II). The chemotherapeutic agents used concurrent with radiotherapy were either 5fluorouracil short infusion plus leucovorin and/or capecitabine or 5fluorouracil infusion alone. All patients received pelvic irradiation. There were 5 patients (10.4%) with a complete pathological response. The 3 yearoverall survival rates were 83.2% in Gr.I and 24.8 % in Gr.II (prectal cancer demonstrated that in preoperative CCRT a sphincter sparing procedure can be performed. The results of treatment with preoperative CCRT for locally advanced rectal cancer showed comparable rates of overall survival and sphincter sparing procedures as compared to previous studies.

  10. Nonrandomized study comparing the effects of preoperative radiotherapy and daily administration of low-dose cisplatin with those radiotherapy alone for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Hiroshi; Azegami, Takuya; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kurashina, Kenji; Tanaka, Kouichi; Kotani, Akira; Oguchi, Masahiko; Tamura, Minoru.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of preoperative radiotherapy and daily administration of low-dose cisplatin with those of radiotherapy alone for oral cancer. Ten patients underwent preoperative radiotherapy of 30 to 40 Gy with concomitant daily administration of low-dose cisplatin (5 mg/body or 5 mg/m 2 ). Ten patients received external radiotherapy alone. The locoregional response rates (complete response and partial response) did not differ significantly between the two groups (80% for combined therapy and 60% for radiotherapy alone). On histopathologic evaluation of surgical specimens, however, the combined-therapy group (80%) had a higher response rate than did the radiotherapy-alone group (10%; p<0.01). We conclude that daily administration of low-dose cisplatin enhances the efficacy of radiotherapy against primary tumors. We also suggested that combined therapy may be beneficial as an initial treatment for oral cancer before a planned operation. (author)

  11. Significance of Cox-2 expression in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachkoria, Ketevan; Zhang Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Sun Xiaofeng

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has reduced local recurrence of rectal cancers, but the result is not satisfactory. Further biologic factors are needed to identify patients for more effective radiotherapy. Our aims were to investigate the relationship of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression to radiotherapy, and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers with or without radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cox-2 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distal normal mucosa (n = 28), in adjacent normal mucosa (n = 107), in primary cancer (n = 138), lymph node metastasis (n = 30), and biopsy (n = 85). The patients participated in a rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Results: Cox-2 expression was increased in primary tumor compared with normal mucosa (p < 0.0001), but there was no significant change between primary tumor and metastasis. Cox-2 positivity was or tended to be related to more p53 and Ki-67 expression, and less apoptosis (p ≤ 0.05). In Cox-2-negative cases of either biopsy (p = 0.01) or surgical samples (p = 0.02), radiotherapy was related to less frequency of local recurrence, but this was not the case in Cox-2-positive cases. Conclusion: Cox-2 expression seemed to be an early event involved in rectal cancer development. Radiotherapy might reduce a rate of local recurrence in the patients with Cox-2 weakly stained tumors, but not in those with Cox-2 strongly stained tumors

  12. Single vs. multiple fraction regimens for palliative radiotherapy treatment of multiple myeloma. A prospective randomised study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudzianskiene, Milda; Inciura, Arturas; Gerbutavicius, Rolandas; Rudzianskas, Viktoras; Dambrauskiene, Ruta; Juozaityte, Elona [Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Oncology Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania); Macas, Andrius [Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Anaesthesiology Department, Kaunas (Lithuania); Simoliuniene, Renata [Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Department of Physics, Mathematics and Biophysics, Kaunas (Lithuania); Kiavialaitis, Greta Emilia [University Hospital Zurich, Intitute of Anesthesiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-09-15

    To compare the impact of a single fraction (8 Gy x 1 fraction) and multifraction (3 Gy x 10 fractions) radiotherapy regimens on pain relief, recalcification and the quality of life (QoL) in patients with bone destructions due to multiple myeloma (MM). In all, 101 patients were included in a randomised prospective clinical trial: 58 patients were included in the control arm (3 Gy x 10 fractions) and 43 patients into the experimental arm (8 Gy x 1 fraction). The response rate was defined according to the International Consensus on Palliative Radiotherapy criteria. Recalcification was evaluated with radiographs. QoL questionnaires were completed before and 4 weeks after treatment. Pain relief was obtained in 81/101 patients (80.2%): complete response in 56 (69%) and partial in 25 patients (30.9%). No significant differences were observed in analgesic response between the groups. Significant factors for pain relief were female gender, age under 65, IgG MM type, presence of recalcification at the irradiated site. Recalcification was found in 32/101 patients (33.7%): complete in 17 (53.2%) and partial in 15 (46.2%). No significant differences were observed in recalcification between the groups. Significant factors for recalcification were Karnofsky index ≥ 60%, haemoglobin level ≤ 80 g/dl, MM stage II and analgesic response at the irradiated site. The QoL after radiotherapy was improved in the control group. The same analgesic and recalcification response was observed using two different radiotherapy regimens. Higher doses should be used to achieve a better QoL. (orig.) [German] Vergleich der einzeitigen vs. fraktionierten palliativen Radiotherapie in Bezug auf Schmerzlinderung, Knochenrekalzifizierung und Lebensqualitaet (QoL) bei Patienten mit multiplem Myelom (MM). In die randomisierte, prospektive Studie wurden 101 Patienten eingeschlossen: Die Kontrollgruppe (n = 58) erhielt eine fraktionierte (3 Gy x 10 Fraktionen) und die Experimentgruppe (n = 43) eine

  13. Hyperfractionation as an altered fractionation regimen in primary radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstevska, V.; Smichkoska, S.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of hyperfractionation as altered fractionation treatment schedule in comparison with conventional fractionation in primary definitive radiotherapy for laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. From March 1999 to December 2000, a group of 28 patients with previously untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx were irradiated with conventional fractionation to to total doses of 66 to 70 Gy in 33 to 35 fraction/6.5 to 7 weeks, 2 Gy/fraction/day, 5 days/week. From January 2001 to June 2004, the other 27 patients with the same diagnosis, were treated prospectively with hyperfractionation receiving radiotherapy delivered at 1.2 Gy/fraction, twice daily, 5 days/week to 74.4 to 79.2 Gy/62 to fractions/6.2 to 7 weeks. Complete response rates after two mounts of radiotherapy completion were 78.6% (22 of 28) and 66.7% (18 of 27) in the conventional fractionation and hyperfractionation group, respectively (Fisher exact test; P=0.246). The two year loco-regional control rates were 61 .0%±18.1 (95% CI) in the conventional fractionation group and 45.0%±18.8 (95% CI) in the hyperfractionation group (long-rank test; P=0.075). Overall survival rate at two years was 71.0%±16.8 (95% CI) for the conventional group and 43.0%±18.7 (95% CI) for the hyperfractionation group (long- rank test; P=0.071). The absence of statistically significant differences either in loco-regional control or overall survival observed between the two treatment modalities suggested that hyperfractionation regimen was not more efficacious than conventionally fractionated radiotherapy for previously untreated carcinoma of the larynx.

  14. Optimal time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Won Sik; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chang, Heung Moon; Ryu, Min Hee; Jang, Se Jin; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Capecitabine and its metabolites reach peak plasma concentrations 1 to 2 hours after a single oral administration, and concentrations rapidly decrease thereafter. We performed a retrospective analysis to find the optimal time interval between capecitabine administration and radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy was measured in patients who were treated with preoperative radiotherapy and concurrent capecitabine for rectal cancer. Patients were classified into the following groups. Group A1 included patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy, and Group B1 included all other patients. Group B1 was then subdivided into Group A2 (patients who took capecitabine 2 hours before radiotherapy) and Group B2. Group B2 was further divided into Group A3 and Group B3 with the same method. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 weeks after completion of chemoradiation and the pathologic response was evaluated. Results: A total of 200 patients were enrolled in this study. Pathologic examination showed that Group A1 had higher rates of complete regression of primary tumors in the rectum (23.5% vs. 9.6%, p = 0.01), good response (44.7% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.006), and lower T stages (p = 0.021) compared with Group B1; however, Groups A2 and A3 did not show any improvement compared with Groups B2 and B3. Multivariate analysis showed that increases in primary tumors in the rectum and good response were only significant when capecitabine was administered 1 hour before radiotherapy. Conclusion: In preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, the pathologic response could be improved by administering capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy

  15. Colonic anastomotic healing after preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzu, M.A.; Koeksoy, C. [Univ. of Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Medicine; Akyol, F.H.; Uzal, D.; Kale, I.T.

    1999-03-01

    In order to investigate the effects of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy on colonic anastomotic healing, an experimental study resembling the clinical use of neo-adjuvant concomitant 5-FU+irradiation treatment of colorectal cancer was conducted. Seventy-one male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: a control group (I) underwent left colon resection and primary anastomosis; a sham-treated group (II); and a study group (III) which received fractionated irradiation to the whole pelvis to a total dose of 22 Gy, 5.5 Gy per fraction, in four consecutive days with linear accelerator and concomitant intra-peritoneal 5-FU for five consecutive days. The last fraction of irradiation and the last injection were given four and three days before colonic resection and anastomosis, respectively. Within each group one-half of the animals were anesthetized on the third postoperative day and one-half on the seventh postoperative day. Abdominal wound healing, intraperitoneal adhesions, anastomotic complications, and anastomotic bursting pressure measurements were recorded. Following these measurements the anastomotic segment was resected for hydroxyproline content, myeloperoxidase activity, and histopathological evaluation. At three and seven days, the mean bursting pressures of the anastomoses were 36.5 mm Hg and 208 mm Hg in group I, 34.5 and 228 in group II, and 27 and 167 in group III, respectively . The burst occurred at the anastomosis in all animals tested on the third postoperative day, and 10% of group I, none in group II, and 40% of group III on the seventh postoperative day. (K.H.)

  16. Colonic anastomotic healing after preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzu, M.A.; Koeksoy, C.; Akyol, F.H.; Uzal, D.; Kale, I.T.

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy on colonic anastomotic healing, an experimental study resembling the clinical use of neo-adjuvant concomitant 5-FU+irradiation treatment of colorectal cancer was conducted. Seventy-one male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: a control group (I) underwent left colon resection and primary anastomosis; a sham-treated group (II); and a study group (III) which received fractionated irradiation to the whole pelvis to a total dose of 22 Gy, 5.5 Gy per fraction, in four consecutive days with linear accelerator and concomitant intra-peritoneal 5-FU for five consecutive days. The last fraction of irradiation and the last injection were given four and three days before colonic resection and anastomosis, respectively. Within each group one-half of the animals were anesthetized on the third postoperative day and one-half on the seventh postoperative day. Abdominal wound healing, intraperitoneal adhesions, anastomotic complications, and anastomotic bursting pressure measurements were recorded. Following these measurements the anastomotic segment was resected for hydroxyproline content, myeloperoxidase activity, and histopathological evaluation. At three and seven days, the mean bursting pressures of the anastomoses were 36.5 mm Hg and 208 mm Hg in group I, 34.5 and 228 in group II, and 27 and 167 in group III, respectively . The burst occurred at the anastomosis in all animals tested on the third postoperative day, and 10% of group I, none in group II, and 40% of group III on the seventh postoperative day. (K.H.)

  17. Clinical outcome in 520 consecutive Danish rectal cancer patients treated with short course preoperative radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L H; Altaf, R; Harling, H

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to analyse the results of preoperative short course radiotherapy in a consecutive, national cohort of patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: Through a validated, prospective national database we identified 520 Danish patients who presented with high-risk mobile...... tumours in the lower two thirds of the rectum and were referred for preoperative radiotherapy with 5 x 5 Gy. The inclusion period was 56 months. Radiotherapy data was retrospectively collected. RESULTS: Of the 520 patients, 514 completed radiotherapy and 506 had surgery. Surgery was considered curative...... in 439 patients. The 3-year local recurrence rate was 4.0% (95% CI 2.5-6.5%) and the distant recurrence rate at 3 years was 18.7% (95% CI 15.4-22.5%). The 5-year disease free survival rate was 40.2% (95% CI 27.0-53.1%) and overall survival 50.4% (95% CI 36.1-63.1%). Most tumours (61%) were classified...

  18. MRI after preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer; correlation with histopathology and the role of volumetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torkzad, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Lennart; Lindholm, Johan; Glimelius, Bengt; Martling, Anna; Cedermark, Bjoern

    2007-01-01

    The objective is to assess if tumor size after radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer can be assessed by a second magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), after radiotherapy prior to surgery and to correlate changes observed on MRI with findings at histopathology at surgery. Twenty-five patients with MRI before and after radiotherapy were included. Variables studied were changes in tumor size, T-staging and distance to the circumferential resection margin (CRM). RVs was measured as tumor volume at surgery (Vs) divided by tumor volume at the initial MRI (Vi) in percent. RVm was defined as the tumor volume at the second MRI (Vm) divided by Vi in percent. The ypT-stage was the same or more favorable than the initial MRI T-stage in 24 of 25 patients. The second MRI was not more accurately predictive than the initial MRI for ypT-staging or distance to CRM (p > 0.05). Vm correlated significantly to Vs, as did RVs to RVm, although the former was always smaller than the latter. Vm and RVm correlated well with ypT-stage (p < 0.001). Volumetry seems to correlate with ypT-stage after preoperative radiotherapy for resectable rectal cancer. The value of a second MRI after radiotherapy for assessment of distance to CRM and ypT-staging is, however, not apparent. (orig.)

  19. Preoperative Radiotherapy in Resectable Rectal Cancer: A Prospective Randomized Study of Two Different Approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EITTA, M.A.; EL- WAHIDI, G.F.; FOUDA, M.A.; ABO EL-NAGA, E.M.; GAD EL-HAK, N.

    2010-01-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy in resectable rectal cancer has a number of potential advantages, most importantly reducing local recurrence, increasing survival and down-staging effect. Purpose: This prospective study was designed to compare between two different approaches of preoperative radiotherapy, either short course or long course radiotherapy. The primary endpoint is to evaluate the local recurrence rate, overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS). The secondary endpoint is to evaluate down staging, treatment toxicity and ability to do sphincter sparing procedure (SSP), aiming at helping in the choice of the optimal treatment modality. Patients and Methods: This is a prospective randomized study of patients with resectable rectal cancer who presented to the department of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Mansoura University during the time period between June 2007 and September 2009. These patients received preoperative radiotherapy and were randomized into two arms: Arm 1, short course (SCRT) 25Gy/week/5 fractions followed by surgery within one week, and arm 2, long course preoperative radiotherapy (LCRT) 45Gy/5 weeks/25 fractions followed by surgery after 4-6 weeks. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given 4-6 weeks after surgery according to the postoperative pathology. Results: After a median follow-up of 18 months (range 6 to 28 months), we studied the patterns of recurrence. Three patients experienced local recurrence (LR), two out of 14 (14.2%) in arm 1 and one out of 15 patients (6.7%) in arm 2, (p=0.598). Three patients developed distant metastases [two in arm 1 (14.2%) and one in arm 2 (6.7%), p=0.598]. Two-year OS rate was 64±3% and 66±2%, (p= 0.389), and the 2-year DFS rate was 61±2% and 83±2% for arms 1 and 2, respectively (p=0.83). Tumor (T) downstaging was more achieved in LCRT arm with a statistically significant difference, but did not reach statistical significance in node (N) down-staging. SSP was more available in LCRT but with no

  20. A national cohort study of long-course preoperative radiotherapy in primary fixed rectal cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.; Jensen, L.H.; Altaf, R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Preoperative radiotherapy has been shown to enable a fixed rectal cancer to become resectable which in turn may result in long-time survival. In this study, we analysed the outcome of long-course preoperative radiotherapy in fixed rectal cancer in a national cohort including all Danish...... patients registered with primary inoperable rectal cancer and treated in the period May 2001 to December 2005. METHOD: The study was based on surgical and demographic data from a continuously updated and validated national database. In addition, retrospective data were retrieved from all departments...... of radiotherapy concerning technique of radiotherapy, dose and fractionation and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Outcome was determined by actuarial analysis of local control, disease-free survival and overall survival. RESULTS: A total of 258 patients with fixed rectal cancer received long-course radiotherapy...

  1. Preoperative concurrent CBDCA chemotherapy and accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omura, Ken; Harada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Takeuchi, Yosuke; Hatano, Kazuo; Togawa, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    Between 1994 and 2000, 28 patients with T3/T4 squamus cell carcinoma of the maxillary region (maxillary sinus, 22; maxillary gingiva, 4; maxillary bone, 1; buccal mucosa, 1) had accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy combined with simultaneous CBDCA chemotherapy preoperatively, at Chiba Cancer Center Hospital. The protocol consisted of combined therapy with accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation of 1.6 Gy, twice a day, to a total dose of 32.0-51.2 Gy and concurrent intra-arterial or intravenous infusion of CBDCA 20-30 mg/body/day for a cumulative total dose of 270-480 mg. After completion of the preoperative combined therapy, the clinical CR rate was 17.9%, and the good PR·CR rate was 32.1%. According to the initial findings and response to the combined therapy, all patients had maxillectomy (subtotal, 3; total, 16; extended, 9) 4 weeks after completion of the preoperative combined therapy. Postoperatively, the complete pathologic response (Ohboshi and Shimozato's classification, grade III and IV) rate was 28.6%. And the actuarial local control rate was 85.7%, with a mean follow-up of 46.2 months. Based on these results, we believe this preoperative therapy with CBDCA chemotherapy and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation is a significant choice as treatment for squamous cell cancer of the maxillary region. (author)

  2. Preoperative concurrent CBDCA chemotherapy and accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omura, Ken; Harada, Hiroyuki [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). Graduate School; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Takeuchi, Yosuke; Hatano, Kazuo; Togawa, Takashi

    2001-11-01

    Between 1994 and 2000, 28 patients with T3/T4 squamus cell carcinoma of the maxillary region (maxillary sinus, 22; maxillary gingiva, 4; maxillary bone, 1; buccal mucosa, 1) had accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy combined with simultaneous CBDCA chemotherapy preoperatively, at Chiba Cancer Center Hospital. The protocol consisted of combined therapy with accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation of 1.6 Gy, twice a day, to a total dose of 32.0-51.2 Gy and concurrent intra-arterial or intravenous infusion of CBDCA 20-30 mg/body/day for a cumulative total dose of 270-480 mg. After completion of the preoperative combined therapy, the clinical CR rate was 17.9%, and the good PR{center_dot}CR rate was 32.1%. According to the initial findings and response to the combined therapy, all patients had maxillectomy (subtotal, 3; total, 16; extended, 9) 4 weeks after completion of the preoperative combined therapy. Postoperatively, the complete pathologic response (Ohboshi and Shimozato's classification, grade III and IV) rate was 28.6%. And the actuarial local control rate was 85.7%, with a mean follow-up of 46.2 months. Based on these results, we believe this preoperative therapy with CBDCA chemotherapy and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation is a significant choice as treatment for squamous cell cancer of the maxillary region. (author)

  3. High Efficacy of Preoperative Low-Dose Radiotherapy with Sanazole (AK-2123 for Extraskeletal Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Sakabe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma is a rare soft tissue tumor that is morphologically indistinguishable from Ewing's sarcoma of bone. We report a case of extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma with several systemic problems. A 69-year-old man presented with a 5-month history of a rapidly enlarging mass in the right thigh. Because preoperative radiotherapy with sanazole (AK-2123 contributed the tumor mass reduction down to 40% in size, the tumor was successfully resected with clear surgical margins and repaired with a musculocutaneous flap. The high efficacy of pre-operative low-dose radiotherapy with sanazole was histologically confirmed that the resected tumor specimen involved no viable tumor cells and showed 100% necrosis. Based on clinical outcomes in this case, the combined modality of pre-operative low-dose radiotherapy with hypoxic cell radiosensitizer and adequate surgical resection might provide for the useful clinical application of extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma treatment.

  4. Clinical target volume delineation in glioblastomas: pre-operative versus post-operative/pre-radiotherapy MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, P; Giri, M G; Meliadò, G; Amelio, D; Widesott, L; Ricciardi, G K; Dall'Oglio, S; Rizzotti, A; Sbarbati, A; Beltramello, A; Maluta, S; Amichetti, M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Delineation of clinical target volume (CTV) is still controversial in glioblastomas. In order to assess the differences in volume and shape of the radiotherapy target, the use of pre-operative vs post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 and T2 weighted MRI was compared. Methods 4 CTVs were delineated in 24 patients pre-operatively and post-operatively using T1 contrast-enhanced (T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV) and T2 weighted images (T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV). Pre-operative MRI examinations were performed the day before surgery, whereas post-operative examinations were acquired 1 month after surgery and before chemoradiation. A concordance index (CI) was defined as the ratio between the overlapping and composite volumes. Results The volumes of T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV were not statistically different (248 ± 88 vs 254 ± 101), although volume differences >100 cm3 were observed in 6 out of 24 patients. A marked increase due to tumour progression was shown in three patients. Three patients showed a decrease because of a reduced mass effect. A significant reduction occurred between pre-operative and post-operative T2 volumes (139 ± 68 vs 78 ± 59). Lack of concordance was observed between T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV (CI = 0.67 ± 0.09), T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV (CI = 0.39 ± 0.20) and comparing the portion of the T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV not covered by that defined on T2PRECTV images (CI = 0.45 ± 0.16 and 0.44 ± 0.17, respectively). Conclusion Using T2 MRI, huge variations can be observed in peritumoural oedema, which are probably due to steroid treatment. Using T1 MRI, brain shifts after surgery and possible progressive enhancing lesions produce substantial differences in CTVs. Our data support the use of post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 weighted MRI for planning purposes. PMID:21045069

  5. A randomised trial of preoperative radiotherapy for stage T3 adenocarcinoma of rectum (TROG 01.04): a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngan, S.; Fisher, R.; McKay, M.J.; McClure, B.; Burmeister, B.H.; Schache, D.; Joseph, D.; Solomon, M.; Ackland, S.P.; Goldstein, D.; McLachlan, S.; Dhillon, H.; Thompson, P.

    2003-01-01

    To provide a progress report of the conduct of the randomised trial TROG 01.04. This is a randomised Australian and New Zealand multi-centre trial of preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer currently being conducted under the auspices of Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group, Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group, Colorectal Surgical Society of Australasia, and Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. The trial comprises two studies, each with its own main objective. These objectives are, in patients with T3 clinically resectable carcinoma of the rectum, to demonstrate that (Study 1) the local recurrence rate in patients treated with a long course (LC) of pre-operative radiotherapy with continuous infusion 5-FU is lower than that in patients treated with a short course (SC) of pre-operative radiotherapy with early surgery; and (Study 2) the local recurrence rate in patients given pre-operative radiotherapy and chemotherapy is lower than that in patients treated with initial surgery. Over 150 patients have been accrued from 21 centres in the first 21 months. All patients were enrolled on Study 1, SC versus LC pre-operative radiotherapy. Study 2 has enrolled no patients in 15 months and has been discontinued. There was no obvious difference in rates of serious adverse events of SC and LC. An Independent Data Monitoring Committee is monitoring these and other aspects of the trial. The trial of SC versus LC is progressing well: such a trial is clearly feasible in Australia and New Zealand. It is however not feasible to compare initial surgery with preoperative radiotherapy

  6. Local control of muscle-invasive bladder cancer: preoperative radiotherapy and cystectomy versus cystectomy alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Christopher J; Pollack, Alan; Zagars, Gunar K; Dinney, Colin P; Swanson, David A; Eschenbach, Andrew C. von

    1995-05-15

    Purpose: The role of preoperative radiotherapy for patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer remains controversial. Since 1985, the primary modality for treatment of these patients at our institution has been radical cystectomy alone. Prior to that time, the use of preoperative radiotherapy and cystectomy had been the mainstay of treatment. In this retrospective review we compare the results of these treatments, focusing on local control. Methods and Materials: The preoperative radiotherapy and radical cystectomy (PREOP) group was comprised of 338 patients with muscle-invasive (Stages T2-T4) transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder treated between 1960 and 1983. A mean total dose of 49.3 {+-} 0.2 Gy ({+-} SE) was administered at 2 Gy per fraction 4-6 weeks prior to cystectomy. The radical cystectomy alone (CYST) group was comprised of 232 patients treated between 1985 and 1990. The median follow-up for the PREOP group was 91 months and for the CYST group was 54 months. Only those patients who completed planned PREOP (n = 301) and CYST (n = 220) treatments were included in the analyses described below. Results: The treatment groups were stratified by clinical stage and compared in terms of actuarial local control. There were no differences between the groups for Stage T2 or T3a patients, and there were not enough Stage T4 patients in the PREOP group with which to make a meaningful comparison. However, for those with T3b disease, actuarial 5 year local control for the PREOP group (n = 92) was 91%, compared to 72% for the CYST group (n = 43). This difference was significant at p = 0.003 (log rank). Patients with T3b disease who received PREOP also fared slightly better at 5 years in terms of freedom from distant metastasis (67% vs. 54%), disease freedom (59% vs. 47%), and overall survival (52% vs. 40%); although, these differences did not reach statistical significance. The distribution of prognostic factors in the groups was analyzed to determine if this could

  7. Preoperative vs. postoperative radiotherapy in the treatment of soft tissue sarcomas: a matter of presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollack, Alan; Zagars, Gunar K.; Goswitz, Mary S.; Pollock, Raphael A.; Feig, Barry W.; Pisters, Peter W.T.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for soft tissue sarcoma is typically preoperative or postoperative, with advocates of each. In this study, the relationship of the sequencing of radiotherapy and surgery to local control was examined. Methods and Materials: The cohort consisted of 453 patients with Grade 2-3 malignant fibrous histiocytoma, synovial sarcoma, or liposarcoma treated from 1965-1992. Retroperitoneal sarcomas were excluded. Median follow-up was 97 months. There were 3 groups of patients that were classified by the treatment administered at our institution: preoperative radiotherapy to a median dose of 50 Gy given before excision at MDACC (Preop; n = 128); postoperative radiotherapy to a median dose of 64 Gy given after excision at MDACC (Postop; n = 165); and radiotherapy to a median dose of 65 Gy without excision at MDACC (RT Alone; n = 160). Those in the RT Alone Group had gross total excision at an outside center prior to referral. Results: Histological classification, whether locally recurrent at referral, and final MDACC margins were independent determinants of local control in Cox proportional hazards multivariate analysis using the entire cohort. The type of treatment was not significant; however, tumor status at presentation (gross disease vs. excised) affected these findings greatly. Gross disease treated with Preop was controlled locally in 88% at 10 years, as compared to 67% with Postop (p = 0.01). This association was independently significant for patients treated primarily (not for recurrence). In contrast, for those presenting after excision elsewhere, 10-year local control was better with Postop (88% vs. 73%, p = 0.07), particularly for patients treated primarily (91% vs. 72%, p 0.02 in univariate analysis; p = 0.06 in multivariate analysis). Re-excision at MDACC (Postop) resulted in enhanced 10-year local control over that with RT Alone (88% vs. 75%, p = 0.06), and was confirmed to be an independent predictor in multivariate analysis (p = 0

  8. Should carbogen and nicotinamide be given throughout the full course of fractionated radiotherapy regimens?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, A.M.; Johns, H.; Fiat, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    Tumor radiosensitization with carbogen and nicotinamide (CON) was compared when both agents were given throughout fractionated radiotherapy with the sensitization observed when administered with only half of the fractions. The effect of overall treatment time on the local control of tumors irradiated in air or with CON was also investigated. Local tumor control of a rodent adenocarcinoma, CaNT, was studied using eight different 20-fraction x-ray regimens. An overall time of either 10 or 20 days was used and CON was given with all, the first half or last half of the treatment. Relative to air, all six sensitizer combinations gave a large and significant increase in sensitization (p much-lt 0.00001). Enhancement ratios were 1.9 and 2.1 when CON was given with all 20 fractions in either 10 or 20 days, respectively. For both overall times, enhancement ratios were reduced by 15-25% when CON was given with only half of the fractions. In air, reducing the treatment time from 20 to 10 days gave a small but significant decrease in the isoeffective doses. When CON was administered with either all or part of a schedule, varying the treatment time had little or no effect on local tumor control. No toxic side-effects were encountered when the sensitizers were administered 10 or 20 times, either once or twice per day. CON is an effective and non-toxic tumor radiosensitizer. In CaNT tumors, a significantly greater effect is seen when CON is given with every fraction of the schedule. The sensitizers reduced or abolished the sparing effect of overall time. 22 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  9. Preoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Combined with Temozolomide for Locally Advanced Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakob, Jens; Wenz, Frederik; Dinter, Dietmar J.; Stroebel, Philipp; Hohenberger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) combined with temozolomide to improve local tumor control in soft-tissue sarcoma (STS). Patients and Methods: A cohort of 15 consecutive patients with nonmetastasized, primary high-grade or locally recurrent Stage III (n = 14) or IIb (n = 1) STS not amenable to surgical resection without significant organ or extremity function loss was prospectively investigated. Median tumor size was 9.8 cm, and most tumors were non-extremity sarcomas. Patients preoperatively received 50 mg/m 2 of temozolomide during IMRT (50.4 Gy). Resection was intended 6 weeks thereafter. Toxicity was assessed by the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, and response was assessed by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Results: Of 15 patients, 14 completed preoperative treatment. No Grade 4 toxicities occurred. Nausea and vomiting were the most frequent Grade 3 toxicities. The most frequent toxicities of any grade were dermatologic, gastrointestinal, and hematologic. Response was partial response in 5, stable disease in 7, and progressive disease in 2 patients. Ten patients underwent surgery: 7 were resected with clear margins (R0), and 2 patients had an R1 resection; in 1 patient the tumor was not resectable. Postoperative complications occurred in 4 patients. Five patients did not undergo surgery because of intercurrent metastatic disease, unresectable disease, or refusal. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with temozolomide and IMRT can be administered safely and with promising efficacy in patients with locally advanced STS.

  10. Apoptosis and downstaging after preoperative radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chyle, Valerian; Pollack, Alan; Czerniak, Bogdan A.; Stephens, L. Clifton; Zagars, Gunar K.; Terry, Nicholas H.A.; Meyn, Raymond E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the relationship between pretreatment (basal) apoptosis levels and clinical-to-pathologic downstaging resulting from preoperative radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Between 1960-1983, 338 patients were dispositioned to receive preoperative radiotherapy and radical cystectomy for muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Of these, adequate hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections for morphologic analysis of apoptosis were available in 158 patients. These patients were treated to a mean dose of 49.4 ± 3.0 Gy (± S.D.) and a median dose of 50 Gy. The average fractional dose was 2.0 ± 0.2 Gy with a median of 2.0 Gy. No patient had clinical or radiographic evidence of lymph nodal or distant metastasis, and none received neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. The median follow-up for those living was 90 mo. The apoptotic index (AI) was calculated from the ratio of the number of apoptotic cells divided by the total counted and multiplied by 100. The apoptotic cells were counted from several random high powered fields. A minimum of 500 cells were counted from each patient. Results: The average AI for the whole group (n=158) was 2.0 ± 1.3 with a median of 1.8. The association of several potential prognostic factors to AI revealed that AI correlated strongly with clinical stage. The average AI for clinical stage T2 (n=56) was 1.8, for stage T3a (n=51) was 1.9, and for stage T3b (n=51) was 2.4 (p=0.036, Kendall Correlation). The relationship of AI to radiotherapy response also was significant with an average AI of 2.2 for those who were downstaged (n=103), 1.9 for those in whom the stage remained unchanged (n=20), and 1.7 for those who were upstaged (n=35, p=0.054, Kendall Correlation). The only other correlations with AI were for the factors gender (p=0.035) and pretreatment hemoglobin level (p=0.077). The AI was then categorized into 3 groups (≤1, >1 and ≤3, and >3) to examine the prognostic significance of this

  11. Apoptosis and downstaging after preoperative radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyle, Valerian; Pollack, Alan; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Stephens, L Clifton; Zagars, Gunar K; Terry, Nicholas H.A.; Meyn, Raymond E

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the relationship between pretreatment (basal) apoptosis levels and clinical-to-pathologic downstaging resulting from preoperative radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Between 1960-1983, 338 patients were dispositioned to receive preoperative radiotherapy and radical cystectomy for muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Of these, adequate hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections for morphologic analysis of apoptosis were available in 158 patients. These patients were treated to a mean dose of 49.4 {+-} 3.0 Gy ({+-} S.D.) and a median dose of 50 Gy. The average fractional dose was 2.0 {+-} 0.2 Gy with a median of 2.0 Gy. No patient had clinical or radiographic evidence of lymph nodal or distant metastasis, and none received neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. The median follow-up for those living was 90 mo. The apoptotic index (AI) was calculated from the ratio of the number of apoptotic cells divided by the total counted and multiplied by 100. The apoptotic cells were counted from several random high powered fields. A minimum of 500 cells were counted from each patient. Results: The average AI for the whole group (n=158) was 2.0 {+-} 1.3 with a median of 1.8. The association of several potential prognostic factors to AI revealed that AI correlated strongly with clinical stage. The average AI for clinical stage T2 (n=56) was 1.8, for stage T3a (n=51) was 1.9, and for stage T3b (n=51) was 2.4 (p=0.036, Kendall Correlation). The relationship of AI to radiotherapy response also was significant with an average AI of 2.2 for those who were downstaged (n=103), 1.9 for those in whom the stage remained unchanged (n=20), and 1.7 for those who were upstaged (n=35, p=0.054, Kendall Correlation). The only other correlations with AI were for the factors gender (p=0.035) and pretreatment hemoglobin level (p=0.077). The AI was then categorized into 3 groups ({<=}1, >1 and {<=}3, and >3) to examine the prognostic

  12. Early toxicity from preoperative radiotherapy with continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil for resectable adenocarcinoma of the rectum: a Phase II trial for the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngan, Samuel Y.K.; Burmeister, Bryan H.; Fisher, Richard; Rischin, Danny; Schache, David J.; Kneebone, Andrew; MacKay, John R.; Joseph, David; Bell, Andrew; Goldstein, David

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity and the efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy with continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had newly diagnosed localized adenocarcinoma of the rectum within 12 cm of the anal verge, Stage T3-4, and were suitable for curative resection. Eighty-two patients were treated with radiotherapy--50.4 Gy in 28 fractions in 5.6 weeks, given concurrently with continuous infusion 5-FU, using either 96-h/week infusion at 300 mg/m 2 /day or 7-days/week infusion at 225 mg/m 2 /day. Results: The median age was 59 years (range, 27-87), and 67% of patients were male. Pretreatment stages of the rectal cancer were T3, 89% and resectable T4, 11%, with endorectal ultrasound confirmation in 67% of patients. Grade 3 acute toxicity occurred in 5 of 82 patients (6%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2-14%). Types of surgical resection were anterior resection, 61%; abdominoperineal resection, 35%; and other procedures, 4%. There was no operative mortality. Anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection occurred in 3 of 50 patients (6%; 95% CI, 1-17%). The pathologic complete response rate was 16% (95% CI, 9-26%). Pathologic Stages T2 or less occurred in 51%. Conclusion: Preoperative radiotherapy with continuous infusion 5-FU for locally advanced rectal cancer is a safe regimen, with a significant downstaging effect. It does not seem to lead to a significant increase in serious surgical complications

  13. Tumor lymphocyte immune response to preoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer: The LYMPHOREC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirjolet, C; Charon-Barra, C; Ladoire, S; Arbez-Gindre, F; Bertaut, A; Ghiringhelli, F; Leroux, A; Peiffert, D; Borg, C; Bosset, J F; Créhange, G

    2018-01-01

    Introduction : Some studies have suggested that baseline tumor-infiltrating-lymphocytes (TILs), such as CD8+ and FoxP3+ T-cells, may be associated with a better prognosis in colorectal cancer. We sought to investigate modulation of the immune response by preoperative radiotherapy (preopRT) and its impact on survival in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Materials & Methods : We analyzed data for 237 patients with LARC who received RT. Density of TILS (CD8+ and FoxP3+) in intraepithelial (iTILs) and stromal compartments (sTILs) were evaluated from surgery pathological specimens and biopsies performed at baseline. The primary endpoint was to assess the impact of infiltration of the tumor or tumor site after preopRT on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints were the impact of dose fractionation scheme on TILs. Results : In univariate analysis, several factors significantly correlated (pguide physicians in adjuvant treatment decision-making.

  14. Clinical target volume delineation including elective nodal irradiation in preoperative and definitive radiotherapy of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caravatta Luciana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy (RT is widely used in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Currently, recommendation has been given for the delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV in adjuvant RT. Based on recently reviewed pathologic data, the aim of this study is to propose criteria for the CTV definition and delineation including elective nodal irradiation (ENI in the preoperative and definitive treatment of pancreatic cancer. Methods The anatomical structures of interest, as well as the abdominal vasculature were identified on intravenous contrast-enhanced CT scans of two different patients with pancreatic cancer of the head and the body. To delineate the lymph node area, a margin of 10 mm was added to the arteries. Results We proposed a set of guidelines for elective treatment of high-risk nodal areas and CTV delineation. Reference CT images were provided. Conclusions The proposed guidelines could be used for preoperative or definitive RT for carcinoma of the head and body of the pancreas. Further clinical investigations are needed to validate the defined CTVs.

  15. Expression of PRL proteins at invasive margin of rectal cancers in relation to preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, Asa R.; Svanvik, Joar; Adell, Gunnar; Sun Xiaofeng

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: PRL-3 (phosphatase of regenerating liver) is involved in metastasis of colorectal cancer; however, its therapeutic implication in cancer patients has not been studied. We investigated the relationships of PRL expression to radiotherapy (RT) in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 36) and adjacent (n = 82) normal mucosa, primary tumor (n = 125), biopsy specimens (n = 96), and lymph node metastasis (n = 30) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Results: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was increased from the distant to adjacent mucosa and to the primary tumor (p < 0.05). PRL was highly expressed at the invasive margin in 28% of the primary tumors and 26% of the metastases. In the RT group, strong PRL expression at the invasive margin was related to distant recurrence (p 0.006) and poor survival (p = 0.01), but not in the non-RT group. The survival significance remained even after adjusting for Dukes' stage and differentiation (p = 0.02). Additional multivariate analyses showed that the correlation with prognostic significance of PRL differed between the RT and non-RT groups (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression (rather than PRL-3 alone) at the invasive margin predicted resistance to RT and unfavorable survival in rectal cancer patients with preoperative RT

  16. Livin expression is an independent factor in rectal cancer patients with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Olsson, Birgit; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression significance of Livin in relation to radiotherapy (RT), clinicopathological and biological factors of rectal cancer patients. This study included 144 primary rectal cancer patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Tissue microarray samples from the excised primary rectal cancers, normal mucosa and lymph node metastases were immunostained with Livin antibody. The proliferation of colon cancer cell lines SW620 and RKO was assayed after Livin knock-down. The expression of Livin was significantly increased from adjacent (P = 0.051) or distant (P = 0.028) normal mucosa to primary tumors. 15.4% (2/13) and 39.7% (52/131) patients with Livin-negative and positive tumors died at 180 months after surgery, and the difference tended to be statistically significant (P = 0.091). In multivariate analyses, the difference achieved statistical significance, independent of TNM stage, local and distant recurrence, grade of differentiation, gender, and age (odds ratio = 5.09, 95% CI: 1.01-25.64, P = 0.048). The in vitro study indicated colon cancer cells with Livin knock-down exhibited decreased proliferation compared with controls after RT. The expression of Livin was was independently related to survival in rectal cancer patients, suggesting Livin as a useful prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients

  17. Expression of FXYD-3 is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Rectal Cancer Patients With Preoperative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loftas, Per; Onnesjoe, Sofia; Widegren, Emma; Adell, Gunnar; Kayed, Hany; Kleeff, Joerg; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Sun Xiaofeng

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: FXYD-3 (MAT-8) is overexpressed in several types of cancers; however, its clinical relevance in rectal cancers has not been studied. Therefore, we examined FXYD-3 expression in rectal cancers from the patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) to determine whether FXYD-3 was overexpressed in rectal cancers and correlated with RT, survival, and other clinicopathologic variables. Methods and Materials: The study included 140 rectal cancer patients who participated in a clinical trial of preoperative RT, 65 with and 75 without RT before surgery. FXYD-3 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 70) and adjacent (n = 101) normal mucosa, primary tumors (n = 140), and lymph node metastasis (n = 36). Results: In the whole cohort, strong FXYD-3 expression was correlated with infiltrative tumor growth (p = 0.02). In the RT group, strong FXYD-3 expression alone (p = 0 .02) or combined with phosphatase of regenerating liver was associated with an unfavorable prognosis (p = 0.02), independent of both TNM stage and tumor differentiation. In tumors with strong FXYD-3 expression, there was less tumor necrosis (p = 0.02) and a trend toward increased incidence of distant metastasis (p = 0.08) after RT. None of these effects was seen in the non-RT group. FXYD-3 expression in the primary tumors tended to be increased compared with normal mucosa regardless of RT. Conclusion: FXYD-3 expression was a prognostic factor independent of tumor stage and differentiation in patients receiving preoperative RT for rectal cancer.

  18. Overview of different available chemotherapy regimens combined with radiotherapy for the neoadjuvant and definitive treatment of esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Gianluca; Ghidini, Michele; Barni, Sandro; Passalacqua, Rodolfo; Petrelli, Fausto

    2017-06-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CTRT) is the current standard of care for treatment of locally advanced cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction. Many efforts have been made over the last years to identify the best chemotherapy and radiotherapy combination regimen, but specific randomized trials addressing this issue are still lacking. Areas covered: A systematic review of the literature was performed searching in PubMed all published studies of combinations CTRT regimens for operable or unresectable esophageal cancer to describe activity and toxicity. Studies considered were prospective series or clinical phase II-III trials including at least 40 patients and published in English language. Expert commentary: Long-term results of CROSS trial have established RT combined with carboplatin plus paclitaxel chemotherapy as the preferred neoadjuvant treatment option for both squamous and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. More effective multimodal treatment strategies integrating novel biological agents including immunotherapy and based on an extensive molecular tumor characterization are eagerly awaited.

  19. Phase I Trial of Preoperative Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy with Incorporated Boost and Oral Capecitabine in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, Gary M.; Meropol, Neal J.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Hoffman, John; Callahan, Elaine; Price, Robert; Cheng, Jonathan; Cohen, Steve; Lewis, Nancy; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Rogatko, Andre; Konski, Andre

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of preoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and an incorporated boost with concurrent capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The eligibility criteria included adenocarcinoma of the rectum, T3-T4 and/or N1-N2 disease, performance status 0 or 1, and age ≥18 years. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost were used to treat the whole pelvis to 45 Gy and the gross tumor volume plus 2 cm to 55 Gy in 25 treatments within 5 weeks. The study was designed to escalate the dose to the gross tumor volume in 5-Gy increments in 3-patient cohorts. Capecitabine was given orally 825 mg/m 2 twice daily for 7 days each week during RT. The primary endpoint was the maximal tolerated radiation dose, and the secondary endpoints were the pathologic response and quality of life. Results: Eight patients completed RT at the initial dose level of 55 Gy. The study was discontinued because of toxicity-six Grade 3 toxicities occurred in 3 (38%) of 8 patients. All patients went on to definitive surgical resection, and no patient had a pathologically complete response. Conclusion: This regimen, using hypofractionated RT with an incorporated boost, had unacceptable toxicity despite using standard doses of capecitabine and IMRT. Additional research is needed to determine whether IMRT is able to reduce the side effects during and after pelvic RT with conventional dose fractionation

  20. Spatial and volumetric changes of retroperitoneal sarcomas during pre-operative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Philip; Dickie, Colleen; Lee, David; Chung, Peter; O’Sullivan, Brian; Letourneau, Daniel; Xu, Wei; Swallow, Carol; Gladdy, Rebecca; Catton, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the positional and volumetric changes of retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPS) during pre-operative external beam radiotherapy (PreRT). Material and methods: After excluding 2 patients who received chemotherapy prior to PreRT and 15 RPS that were larger than the field-of-view of cone-beam CT (CBCT), the positional and volumetric changes of RPS throughout PreRT were characterized in 19 patients treated with IMRT using CBCT image guidance. Analysis was performed on 118 CBCT images representing one image per week of those acquired daily during treatment. Intra-fraction breathing motions of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and kidneys were measured in 22 RPS patients simulated using 4D-CT. Fifteen other patients were excluded whose tumors were incompletely imaged on CBCT or who received pre-RT chemotherapy. Results: A GTV volumetric increase (mean: 6.6%, p = 0.035) during the first 2 weeks (CBCT1 vs. CBCT2) of treatment was followed by GTV volumetric decrease (mean: 4%, p = 0.009) by completion of radiotherapy (CBCT1 vs. CBCT6). Internal margins of 8.6, 15 and 15 mm in the lateral, anterior/posterior and superior/inferior directions would be required to account for inter-fraction displacements. The extent of GTV respiratory motion was significantly (p < 0.0001) correlated with more superiorly positioned tumors. Conclusion: Inter-fraction CBCT provides important volumetric and positional information of RPS which may improve PreRT quality and prompt re-planning. Planning target volume may be reduced using online soft-tissue matching to account for interfractional displacements of GTVs. Important breathing motion occurred in superiorly placed RPS supporting the utility of 4D-CT planning

  1. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancers: a phase I-II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, Abdelkarim S.; Bieri, Sabine; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Soravia, Claudio; Gertsch, Philippe; Bernier, Jacques; Morel, Philippe; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity, pathologic response rates, type of surgery, and oncologic results in a prospective Phase I-II trial using pure hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) preoperatively in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1997 and April 2000, 50 patients with T3-T4 or N1 rectal cancers were treated preoperatively with 50 Gy (45 Gy to the pelvis and a 5-Gy tumor boost) in 40 fractions of 1.25 Gy during 4 weeks. The pretreatment tumor stage as determined by CT and endorectal ultrasonography (80% of patients) included 1 Stage T2 (2%), 45 T3 (90%), and 4 T4 (8%). Nodal involvement (N1) was documented in 26 patients (52%). Surgery was performed at a median interval of 45 days (range 26-114 days) after RT completion. Seventeen patients who presented with pT4 or pN1 and/or pM1 received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy postoperatively. Results: All patients completed the RT schedule as planned. Severe acute toxicities included two Grade 3 skin reactions (4%) that did not require a break. The other acute toxicities were Grade 2 or less (skin, diarrhea, urinary, rectal tenesmus, and fatigue). A complete pathologic response was observed in 7 patients (14%), and microscopic residual cancer was found in 10 (20%). Of the 20 patients presenting with tumor located ≤6 cm from the anal verge, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 14 (70%). At 3 years, the actuarial locoregional control rate was 90.5%, and the disease-free survival rate was 74.6%. At a median follow-up of 32 months, 4 patients (8%) presented with severe late complications (Grade 3-4) that might have been RT related (one rectovaginal fistula, two chronic perineal fistulas, and one bilateral ureteral stenosis). Conclusion: In locally advanced rectal cancer, preoperative hyperfractionated RT to a total dose of 50 Gy is feasible, with acceptable acute and late toxicity and an objective downstaging effect. In view of these results, this schedule might be used as a

  2. Sphincter-sparing surgery after preoperative radiotherapy for low rectal cancers: feasibility, oncological results, and quality of life outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, A.S.; Soravia, C.; Gertsch, P.; Bieri, S.; Sprangers, M.A.G.

    1999-01-01

    In cancers of the distal rectum, preoperative radiotherapy is often associated with low anterior resection. This study assesses the choice of surgical procedure, oncological results, and quality of life outcomes in a retrospective cohort of patients with low-lying rectal cancers. The results obtained reinforce the notion of the feasibility, in routine practice, of sphincter-sparing surgery after preoperative radiotherapy in a significant proportion of low rectal cancers. The oncological results seem to be unaffected by the choice of surgical procedure. However, with the possible exception of body image and sexual aspects in males, quality of life parameters were not necessarily better in the restorative surgery group. Prospective studies are mandatory to clarify the putative quality of life advantages of sphincter-conserving procedures in this context. (author)

  3. Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  4. Change of sonographic findings on cervical lymph nodes before and after preoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikui, Toru; Yuasa, Kenji; Tokumori, Kenji; Kanda, Shigenobu [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Dental Science, 3-1-1 Maidashi Higashi-ku, 812-8582, Fukuoka (Japan); Kunitake, Naonobu; Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nagata, Tetsuji [First Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hiraki, Akimitsu [Second Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes in the power Doppler sonographic findings in patients with oral cancer undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We performed US examinations on 187 cervical lymph nodes (71 metastatic and 116 reactive nodes) excised from 52 patients before and after preoperative therapy. On Power Doppler images, we calculated the vascular index (VI) and evaluated the vascular pattern. We also assessed the diagnostic power using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Irradiation caused an increase of the VI and better visualization of the vessels within the lymph node in the reactive nodes; however, in the metastatic nodes, the VI was not significantly different between that before and after irradiation. When the reader observed the images before irradiation, the area under an ROC curve (Az values) observed by B-mode sonography were closely similar to those obtained by B-mode plus power Doppler sonography. With both images before and after irradiation, the Az value obtained by B-mode plus power Doppler sonography was higher than that by B-mode sonography alone. After irradiation, the enhanced Doppler signals contributed to a better visualization of the vessels and a better detection of any vascular abnormalities. (orig.)

  5. Second harmonic generation for collagen I characterization in rectal cancer patients with and without preoperative radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blockhuys, Stéphanie; Agarwal, Nisha Rani; Hildesjö, Camilla; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2017-10-01

    Rectal cancer is treated with preoperative radiotherapy (RT) to downstage the tumor, reduce local recurrence, and improve patient survival. Still, the treatment outcome varies significantly and new biomarkers are desired. Collagen I (Col-I) is a potential biomarker, which can be visualized label-free by second harmonic generation (SHG). Here, we used SHG to identify Col-I changes induced by RT in surgical tissue, with the aim to evaluate the clinical significance of RT-induced Col-I changes. First, we established a procedure for quantitative evaluation of Col-I by SHG in CDX2-stained tissue sections. Next, we evaluated Col-I properties in material from 31 non-RT and 29 RT rectal cancer patients. We discovered that the Col-I intensity and anisotropy were higher in the tumor invasive margin than in the inner tumor and normal mucosa, and RT increased and decreased the intensity in inner tumor and normal mucosa, respectively. Furthermore, higher Col-I intensity in the inner tumor was related to increased distant recurrence in the non-RT group but to longer survival in the RT group. In conclusion, we present a new application of SHG for quantitative analysis of Col-I in surgical material, and the first data suggest Col-I intensity as a putative prognostic biomarker in rectal cancer.

  6. Expression of the p73 protein in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, Daniella; Gao Jingfang; Adell, Gunnar; Sun Xiaofeng

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate p73 expression in normal mucosa, primary tumor, and metastasis in relation to radiotherapy (RT) response and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: p73 was immunohistochemically examined on biopsies (unirradiated, n = 102), distant (from the large bowel, n = 82), and adjacent (adjacent to primary tumor, n = 89) normal mucosa samples, primary tumors (n = 131), and lymph node metastasis (n = 32) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Seventy-four patients received surgery alone and 57 received additional RT. Results: Cytoplasmic p73 was increased in the primary tumor compared with the distant or adjacent mucosa (p ≤ 0.0001). Nuclear (p = 0.02) and cytoplasmic (p = 0.003) p73 was higher in irradiated distant mucosa samples than in unirradiated ones, and nuclear p73 tended to be increased in irradiated primary tumors compared with unirradiated ones (p = 0.06). p73 was positively related to cyclooxygenase-2 expression in irradiated tumors (p = 0.03). p73-negative tumors tended to have a lower local recurrence after RT compared with unirradiated cases (p 0.06). Conclusions: Normal epithelial cells seem more sensitive to RT than tumor cells regarding p73 expression. Patients with p73-negative rectal tumors may have a lower risk of local recurrence after RT

  7. Histomorphological changes of vessel structure in head and neck vessels following preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze-Mosgau, S.; Wehrhan, F.; Wiltfang, J.; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Sauer, R.; Roedel, F.; Radespiel-Troeger, M.

    2002-01-01

    Patients and Methods: In 348 patients (October 1995-March 2002) receiving primarly or secondarily 356 microvascular hard- and soft tissue reconstruction, a total of 209 vessels were obtained from neck recipient vessels and transplant vessels during anastomosis. Three groups were analysed: group 1 (27 patients) treated with no radiotherapy or chemotherapy; group 2 (29 patients) treated with preoperative irradiation (40-50 Gy) and chemotherapy (800 mg/m 2 /day 5-FU and 20 mg/m 2 /day cisplatin) 1.5 months prior to surgery; group 3 (20 patients) treated with radiotherapy (60-70 Gy) (median interval 78.7 months; IQR: 31.3 months) prior to surgery. From each of the 209 vessel specimens, 3 sections were investigated histomorphometrically, qualitatively and quantitatively (ratio media area/total vessel area) by NIH-Image-digitized measurements. To evaluate these changes as a function of age, radiation dose and chemotherapy, a statistical analysis was performed using an analysis of covariance and χ 2 tests (p > 0.05, SPSS V10). Results: In group 3, qualitative changes (intima dehiscence, hyalinosis) were found in recipient arteries significantly more frequently than in groups 1 and 2. For group 3 recipient arteries, histomorphometry revealed a significant decrease in the ratio media area/total vessel area (median 0.51, IQR 0.10) in comparison with groups 1 (p = 0.02) (median 0.61, IQR 0.29) and 2 (p = 0.046) (median 0.58, IQR 0.19). No significant difference was found between the vessels of groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.48). There were no significant differences in transplant arteries and recipient or transplant veins between the groups. Age and chemotherapy did not appear to have a significant influence on vessel changes in this study (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Following irradiation with 60-70 Gy, significant qualitative and quantitative histological changes to the recipient arteries, but not to the recipient veins, could be observed. In contrast, irradiation at a dose of 40-50 Gy

  8. Primary radiotherapy of stage IIA/B-IIIB cervical carcinoma. A comparison of continuous versus sequential regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, A.; Nemeskeri, C.; Petnehazi, C.; Varga, S.; Naszaly, A.; Borgulya, G.

    2004-01-01

    Background: comprehensive literature on cervical cancer demonstrates, even today, the need for optimization of the timing of external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in the treatment of stage IIA/B-IIIB cervical carcinoma. Patients and methods: 210 patients with carcinoma of the cervix were treated in the Municipal Center of Oncoradiology between January 1991 and December 1996 (FIGO IIA: n = 10, FIGO IIB: n = 113, and FIGO IIIB: n = 87). Two regimens were compared: sequential radiation therapy (SRT) with 4 x 8 Gy HDR-BT to point A followed by EBRT, and continuous radiation therapy (CRT) in which 5 x 6 Gy HDR-BT to point A, one session per week, was integrated into the EBRT. A total dose of 68-70 Gy to point A and 52-54 Gy to point B was given in EBRT with SRT, five fractions per week were applied. Four fractions per week were applied in CRT, i.e., no EBRT was performed on the day of HDR-BT. Total doses to points A and B were identical in both regimens. Overall treatment time (OTT) amounted to 56 days for SRT and 35 days for CRT. Median follow-up time was 3.4 (2.5-4.2) years. Results: progression-free 5-year-survival (PFS) was 71% in the CRT and 56% in the SRT group. Nevertheless, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 1.00), and the same was found in a subgroup analysis of the different tumor stages, showing, however, an unequivocal trend. Late bladder and rectal injuries occurred in 13% and 25%, respectively. Late rectal injuries were significantly more frequent with SRT than CRT (35 patients in the SRT and 18 patients in the CRT group; p = 0.037). This was due to the higher doses per fraction of HDR-BT in the SRT group. No difference was found regarding late bladder injuries (p = 0.837). Conclusion: for the patients included in this study, no advantage has been found so far in using CRT, i.e., shortening the OTT by weekly integration of HDR-BT into EBRT. Nevertheless, an obvious trend exists. The dose of 8 Gy per

  9. FDG-PET/CT Imaging for Staging and Target Volume Delineation in Preoperative Conformal Radiotherapy of Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassi, Maria Chiara; Turri, Lucia; Sacchetti, Gianmauro; Loi, Gianfranco; Cannillo, Barbara; La Mattina, Pierdaniele; Brambilla, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Krengli, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential impact of using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) on staging and target volume delineation for patients affected by rectal cancer and candidates for preoperative conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients diagnosed with rectal cancer T3-4 N0-1 M0-1 and candidates for preoperative radiotherapy underwent PET/CT simulation after injection of 5.18 MBq/kg of FDG. Clinical stage was reassessed on the basis of FDG-PET/CT findings. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and the clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated first on CT and then on PET/CT images. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were analyzed and compared with CT-GTV and CT-CTV, respectively. Results: In 4 of 25 cases (24%), PET/CT affected tumor staging or the treatment purpose. In 3 of 25 cases (12%) staged N0 M0, PET/CT showed FDG uptake in regional lymph nodes and in a case also in the liver. In a patient with a single liver metastasis PET/CT detected multiple lesions, changing the treatment intent from curative to palliative. The PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV were significantly greater than the CT-GTV (p = 0.00013) and CT-CTV (p = 0.00002), respectively. The mean difference between PET/CT-GTV and CT-GTV was 25.4% and between PET/CT-CTV and CT-CTV was 4.1%. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT for preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer may lead to a change in staging and target volume delineation. Stage variation was observed in 12% of cases and a change of treatment intent in 4%. The GTV and CTV changed significantly, with a mean increase in size of 25% and 4%, respectively

  10. 11C-CHO PET in optimization of target volume delineation and treatment regimens in postoperative radiotherapy for brain gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fangming; Nie Qing; Wang Ruimin; Chang, Susan M.; Zhao Wenrui; Zhu Qi; Liang Yingkui; Yang Ping; Zhang Jun; Jia Haiwei; Fang Henghu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We explored the clinical values of 11 C-choline ( 11 C-CHO) PET in optimization of target volume delineation and treatment regimens in postoperative radiotherapy for brain gliomas. Methods: Sixteen patients with the pathological confirmation of the diagnosis of gliomas prior to receiving radiotherapy (postoperative) were included, and on whom both MRI and CHO PET scans were performed at the same position for comparison of residual tumors with the two techniques. 11 C-CHO was used as the tracer in the PET scan. A plain T1-weighted, T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging scans were performed in the MRI scan sequence. The gliomas' residual tumor volume was defined as the area with CHO-PET high-affinity uptake and metabolism (V CHO ) and one with MRI T1-weighted imaging high signal intensity (V Gd ), and was determined by a group of experienced professionals and clinicians. Results: (1) In CHO-PET images, the tumor target volume, i.e., the highly metabolic area with a high concentration of isotopes (SUV 1.016–4.21) and the corresponding contralateral normal brain tissues (SUV0.1–0.62), was well contrasted, and the boundary between lesions and surrounding normal brain tissues was better defined compared with MRI and 18 F-FDG PET images. (2) For patients with brain gliomas of WHO Grade II, the SUV was 1.016–2.5; for those with WHO Grades III and IV, SUVs were >26–4.2. (3) Both CHO PET and MRI were positive for 10 patients and negative for 2 patients. The residual tumor consistency between these two studies was 75%. Four of the 10 CHO-PET-positive patients were negative on MRI scans. The maximum distance between V Gd and V CHO margins was 1.8 cm. (4) The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and the ensuing treatment regimens were changed for 31.3% (5/16) of patients based on the CHO-PET high-affinity uptake and metabolism, in which the change rate was 80% (4/5), 14.3 % (1/7) and 0% (0/4) for patients with WHO Grade II III, and IV gliomas

  11. Sphincter Preservation After Short-term Preoperative Radiotherapy for Low Rectal Cancer - Presentation of Own Data and a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujko, Krzysztof; Nowacki, Marek P.; Oldzki, Janusz; Sopyo, Rafa; Skoczylas, Jerzy; Chwaliski, Maciej [The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Inst. of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2001-07-01

    This report is based on a series of 108 patients with clinically staged T2 (9), T3 (94) and T4 (5) rectal cancer treated with preoperative irradiation with 25 Gy, 5 Gy per fraction given for one week. In 77% of patients, the tumour was located within 7 cm of the anal verge and in 15% the anal canal was involved. Surgery was usually undertaken during the week after irradiation. For low tumours, total mesorectal excision was performed, and for middle and upper cancers, the whole circumference of the mesorectum was excised at least 2 cm below the lower pole of a tumour. Tumour was resected in 103 patients, and sphincter-preserving surgery was performed in 73% of them. In the subgroup where the tumour was located higher than 4 cm from the anal verge, sphincter-preserving surgery was performed in 95%. The follow-up period ranged from 10 to 49 months, with a median of 25 months. Local recurrences were observed in 4% of patients. Anorectal dysfunction caused impairment of social life in 40% of patients and 18% admitted that their quality of life was seriously affected - however, none of them stated that they would have preferred a colostomy. These preliminary data suggest that following high dose per fraction short-term preoperative radiotherapy a high rate of sphincter-preserving surgery can be reached, with acceptable anorectal function and an acceptable rate of local failure and late complications. The results of our own data and literature review indicate the need for a randomized clinical trial comparing high dose per fraction preoperative radiotherapy with immediate surgery with conventional preoperative radiochemotherapy with delayed surgery.

  12. WRAP53 is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer- a study of Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Da-Wei; Adell, Gunnar; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Expression of WRAP53 protein has oncogenic properties and it is up regulated in several types of tumors. We examined expression of WRAP53 protein in rectal cancers and analyzed its relationship to the response to preoperative radiotherapy and patient survival. The WRAP53 protein was examined by immunohistochemistry in normal mucosa, primary tumors and lymph node metastases from 143 rectal cancer patients participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Frequency of WRAP53 protein expression was increased in primary rectal cancer compared to the normal mucosa (p < 0.05). In non-radiotherapy group positive WRAP53 in primary tumors (p = 0.03, RR, 3.73, 95% CI, 1.13-11.89) or metastases (p = 0.01, RR, 4.11, 95% CI, 1.25-13.14), was associated with poor prognosis independently of stages and differentiations. In radiotherapy group, positive WRAP53 in the metastasis correlated with better survival (p = 0.04). An interaction analysis showed that the correlations of WRAP53 with the prognostic significance with and without radiotherapy in the metastasis differed (p = 0.01). In the radiotherapy group, expression of WRAP53 in metastases gave a better outcome (p = 0.02, RR, 0.32, 95% CI, 0.13-0.84), and an interaction analysis showed significance between the two groups (p = 0.01). WRAP53 may be a new biomarker used to predict prognosis and to select suitable patients for preoperative radiotherapy

  13. A retrospective comparison of outcome and toxicity of preoperative image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus conventional pelvic radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chun-Ming; Huang, Ming-Yii; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Huang, Ching-Wen; Ma, Cheng-Jen; Lin, Chih-Hung; Huang, Chih-Jen; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare clinical outcomes and toxicity between 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) administered through helical tomotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy. We reviewed 144 patients with Stage II–III rectal cancer receiving preoperative fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy followed by radical resection. Tumor responses following chemoradiotherapy were evaluated using the Dworak tumor regression grade (TRG). Of the 144 patients, 45 received IG-IMRT and 99 received 3DCRT. A significant reduction in Grade 3 or 4 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (IG-IMRT, 6.7%; 3DCRT, 15.1%; P = 0.039) was observed by IG-IMRT. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate did not differ between the IG-IMRT and the 3DCRT group (17.8% vs 15.1%, P = 0.52). Patients in the IG-IMRT group had the trend of favorable tumor regressions (TRG 3 or 4) compared with those in the 3DCRT group (66.7% vs 43.5%, P = 0.071). The median follow-up was 53 months (range, 18–95 months) in the 3DCRT group and 43 months (range, 17–69 months) in the IG-IMRT group. Four-year overall, disease-free, and local failure–free survival rates of the IG-IMRT and 3DCRT groups were 81.6% and 67.9% (P = 0.12), 53.8% and 51.8% (P = 0.51), and 88% and 75.1% (P = 0.031), respectively. LARC patients treated with preoperative IG-IMRT achieved lower acute gastrointestinal adverse effects and a higher local control rate than those treated with 3DCRT, but there was no prominent difference in distant metastasis rate and overall survival between two treatment modalities.

  14. Preoperative external beam radiotherapy and reduced dose brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix: survival and pathological response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacinto, Alexandre A; Maia, Maria AC; Fogaroli, Ricardo C; Castilho, Marcus S; Novaes, Paulo ERS; Novick, Pablo R; Viani, Gustavo A; Salvajoli, João V; Ferrigno, Robson; Pellizzon, Antonio Cássio A; Lima, Stella SS

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the pathologic response of cervical carcinoma to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) and outcome. Between 1992 and 2001, 67 patients with cervical carcinoma were submitted to preoperative radiotherapy. Sixty-five patients were stage IIb. Preoperative treatment included 45 Gy EBRT and 12 Gy HDRB. Patients were submitted to surgery after a mean time of 82 days. Lymphadenectomy was performed in 81% of patients. Eleven patients with residual cervix residual disease on pathological specimen were submitted to 2 additional insertions of HDRB. median follow up was 72 months. Five-year cause specific survival was 75%, overall survival 65%, local control 95%. Complete pelvic pathological response was seen in 40%. Surgery performed later than 80 days was associated with pathological response. Pelvic nodal involvement was found in 12%. Complete pelvic pathological response and negative lymphnodes were associated with better outcome (p = .03 and p = .005). Late grade 3 and 4 urinary and intestinal adverse effects were seen in 12 and 2% of patients. Time allowed between RT and surgery correlated with pathological response. Pelvic pathological response was associated with improved outcome. Postoperative additional HDRB did not improve therapeutic results. Treatment was well tolerated

  15. Late side effects of short-course preoperative radiotherapy combined with total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer: increased bowel dysfunction in irradiated patients--a Dutch colorectal cancer group study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, K.C.; Velde, C.J. van de; Leer, J.W.H.; Martijn, H.; Junggeburt, J.M.; Kranenbarg, E.K.; Steup, W.H.; Wiggers, T.; Rutten, H.J.; Marijnen, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Preoperative short-term radiotherapy improves local control in patients treated with total mesorectal excision (TME). This study was performed to assess the presence and magnitude of long-term side effects of preoperative 5 x 5 Gy radiotherapy and TME. Also, hospital treatment was recorded

  16. A meta-analysis of hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy and combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens in unresected locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budach, W; Hehr, T; Budach, V; Belka, C; Dietz, K

    2006-01-01

    Former meta-analyses have shown a survival benefit for the addition of chemotherapy (CHX) to radiotherapy (RT) and to some extent also for the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) and accelerated radiation therapy (AFRT) in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck. However, the publication of new studies and the fact that many older studies that were included in these former meta-analyses used obsolete radiation doses, CHX schedules or study designs prompted us to carry out a new analysis using strict inclusion criteria. Randomised trials testing curatively intended RT (≥60 Gy in >4 weeks/>50 Gy in <4 weeks) on SCC of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx published as full paper or in abstract form between 1975 and 2003 were eligible. Trials comparing RT alone with concurrent or alternating chemoradiation (5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cisplatin, carboplatin, mitomycin C) were analyzed according to the employed radiation schedule and the used CHX regimen. Studies comparing conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) with either HFRT or AFRT without CHX were separately examined. End point of the meta-analysis was overall survival. Thirty-two trials with a total of 10 225 patients were included into the meta-analysis. An overall survival benefit of 12.0 months was observed for the addition of simultaneous CHX to either CFRT or HFRT/AFRT (p < 0.001). Separate analyses by cytostatic drug indicate a prolongation of survival of 24.0 months, 16.8 months, 6.7 months, and 4.0 months, respectively, for the simultaneous administration of 5-FU, cisplatin-based, carboplatin-based, and mitomycin C-based CHX to RT (each p < 0.01). Whereas no significant gain in overall survival was observed for AFRT in comparison to CFRT, a substantial prolongation of median survival (14.2 months, p < 0.001) was seen for HFRT compared to CFRT (both without CHX). RT combined with simultaneous 5-FU, cisplatin, carboplatin, and mitomycin C as

  17. Simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Bong Kyung; Kang, Min Kyul; Kim, Jae Chul [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Young; Choi, Gyu Seog; Kim, Jong Gwang; Kang, Byung Woog; Kim, Hye Jin; Park, Soo Yeun [Kyungpook National University Chilgok Hospital, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) for preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), by comparing with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Patients who were treated with PCRT for LARC from 2015 January to 2016 December were retrospectively enrolled. Total doses of 45 Gy to 50.4 Gy with 3D-CRT or SIB-IMRT were administered concomitantly with 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin or capecitabine. Surgery was performed 8 weeks after PCRT. Between PCRT and surgery, one cycle of additional chemotherapy was administered. Pathologic tumor responses were compared between SIB-IMRT and 3D-CRT groups. Acute gastrointestinal, genitourinary, hematologic, and skin toxicities were compared between the two groups based on the RTOG toxicity criteria. SIB-IMRT was used in 53 patients, and 3D-CRT in 41 patients. After PCRT, no significant differences were noted in tumor responses, pathologic complete response (9% vs. 7%; p = 1.000), pathologic tumor regression Grade 3 or higher (85% vs. 71%; p = 0.096), and R0 resection (87% vs. 85%; p = 0.843). Grade 2 genitourinary toxicities were significantly lesser in the SIB-IMRT group (8% vs. 24%; p = 0.023), but gastrointestinal toxicities were not different across the two groups. SIB-IMRT showed lower GU toxicity and similar tumor responses when compared with 3D-CRT in PCRT for LARC.

  18. The clinicopathologic relevance and prognostic value of tumor deposits and the applicability of N1c category in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Li; Qiu, Miao-Zhen; Zhou, Yi-Xin; He, Ming-Ming; Luo, Hui-Yan; Wang, Feng-Hua; Zhang, Dong-Sheng; Li, Yu-Hong; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2016-11-15

    The clinicopathologic relevance and prognostic value of tumor deposits in colorectal cancer has been widely demonstrated. However, there are still debates in the prognostic value of tumor deposits and the applicability of N1c category in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy. In this study, rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy followed by resection of primary tumors registered in Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database from 2010-2012 were analyzed. There were 4,813 cases eligible for this study, and tumor deposits were found in 514 (10.7%) cases. The presence of tumor deposits was significantly associated with some aggressive characteristics, including poorer tumor differentiation, more advanced ypT category, ypN category and ypTNM stage, distant metastasis, elevated carcinoembryonic antigen, higher positive rates of circumferential resection margin and perineural invasion (all P < = 0.001). Tumor deposit was also an independent negative prognostic factor for cancer-specific survival in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy (adjusted HR and 95% CI: 2.25 (1.51 - 3.35)). N1c category had significant worse survival compared with N0 category (adjusted HR and 95% CI: 2.41 (1.24 - 4.69)). In conclusion, tumor deposit was a significant and independent prognostic factor, and the N1c category by the 7th edition of AJCC/TNM staging system was applicable in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy.

  19. Impact of short-term preoperative radiotherapy on health-related quality of life and sexual functioning in primary rectal cancer : Report of a multicenter randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnen, CAM; van de Velde, CJH; Putter, H; van den Brink, M; Maas, CP; Martijn, H; Rutten, HJ; Wiggers, T; Kranenbarg, EK; Leer, JWH; Stiggelbout, AM

    2005-01-01

    Background Few prospective studies have been performed about the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) or total mesorectal excision (TME) on health-related quality of life (HRQL) and sexual functioning in patients with resectable rectal cancer. This report describes the HRQL and sexual

  20. Impact of short-term preoperative radiotherapy on health-related quality of life and sexual functioning in primary rectal cancer: report of a multicenter randomized trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnen, C.A.; Velde, C.J. van de; Putter, H.; Brink, M.; Maas, C.P.; Martijn, H.; Rutten, H.J.; Wiggers, T.; Kranenbarg, E.K.; Leer, J.W.H.; Stiggelbout, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few prospective studies have been performed about the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) or total mesorectal excision (TME) on health-related quality of life (HRQL) and sexual functioning in patients with resectable rectal cancer. This report describes the HRQL and sexual

  1. Acute side effects and complications after short-term preoperative radiotherapy combined with total mesorectal excision in primary rectal cancer: report of a multicenter randomized trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnen, C.A.; Kapiteijn, E.; Veld, C.J.H. van de; Martijn, H.; Steup, W.H.; Wiggers, T.; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E.; Leer, J.W.H.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery in the treatment of rectal cancer has been shown to result in a reduction in the number of local recurrences in retrospective studies. Reports on improved local control after preoperative, hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) have led to the

  2. Acute side effects and complications after short-term preoperative radiotherapy combined with total mesorectal excision in primary rectal cancer : Report of a multicenter randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnen, CAM; Kapiteijn, E; van de Velde, CJH; Martijn, H; Steup, WH; Wiggers, T; Kranenbarg, EK; Leer, JWH

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery in the treatment of rectal cancer has been shown to result in a reduction in the number of local recurrences in retrospective studies. Reports on improved local control after preoperative, hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) have led to the

  3. Preoperative radiotherapy for resectable rectal cancer: improved local control is prognostic for distant metastasis occurrence and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlotecki, Robert A.; Mendenhall, William M.; Copeland, Edward M.; Vauthey, Jean-Nicholas; Marsh, Robert D.; McCarley, Dean L.; Million, Rodney R.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate the effect of preoperative external beam radiotherapy (RT) on local control (LC), distant metastasis (DM), survival, and perioperative complications in a 15-year single-institution experience. Disease and treatment variables potentially prognostic for local-regional control and survival were evaluated, and the importance of LC as a determinant of DM and survival was also examined. Materials and Methods: Two hundred ten patients with potentially resectable cancers of the rectum were treated with preoperative external beam RT at a single institution between 1975 and 1990. Excluded were patients with 'fixed' unresectable tumors and those treated with palliative intent only. All patients were treated with megavoltage RT to minimum tumor doses of 30 Gy using multiple-field techniques. Preoperative chemotherapy was not used. Surgical resection was performed 3-5 weeks after completion of RT. Abdominoperineal resection was performed in 175 cases, low anterior resection in 25 cases, and other surgical procedures in 10 cases. Pathologic tumor staging was by the Astler-Coller modification of the Dukes system. Minimum follow-up was 5 years. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method, with univariate and multivariate analysis of disease and treatment variables for prognostic significance. Results: No treatment-specific variables were predictive for LC, DM, absolute survival, or cause-specific survival. Disease-specific variables prognostic for LC were deep tumor infiltration or 'tethering' on digital rectal exam and Dukes pathologic stage. Ten-year LC rates were 91% for freely mobile tumors vs. 82% for tethered lesions (p=.009). LC rates for Dukes A, B, and C stage tumors were 100%, 91%, and 73%, respectively (p=.02). Variables prognostic for DM were tumor length, annular involvement, LC, and Dukes pathologic stage. Absolute survival at 5 and 10 years was 57% and 36%, respectively. Variables prognostic for absolute survival were

  4. Clinico-pathological studies on the effects of preoperative hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for advanced esophageal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Ide, Hiroko; Eguchi, Reiki (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan)) (and others)

    1991-12-01

    We report clinico-pathological studies on the effect of preoperative hyperthermia and chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy (HCR) for progress of the local curability of advanced esophageal carcinoma. The subjects of these studies were 17 patients who underwent subtotal esophagectomy after preoperative irradiation of 40 Gy from 1980 to 1989, of which 8 patients had HCR, 6 patients irradiation only (R), 3 patients both irradiation and chemotherapy (CR). The clinical response rate of the patients with R or CR was 33% (PR 3, MR 3, NC 3), and the histological effective (Ef{sub 3} or Ef{sub 2}) rate was 56% (Ef{sub 3} 1, Ef{sub 2} 4, Ef{sub 1} 4). The clinical response rate of the patients with HCR was 88% (PR 7, MR 1), and the histological effective rate was 100% (Ef{sub 3} 1, Ef{sub 2} 7). HCR was more effective than R or CR for the local lesion of esophageal carcinoma histopathologically (p<0.05). However, the survival rate of patients with HCR was similar to R and CR, respectively. These results suggest that further improvement of the heating methods and the methods of combining hyperthermia with irradiation and chemotherapy is needed. (author).

  5. Clinico-pathological studies on the effects of preoperative hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for advanced esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Ide, Hiroko; Eguchi, Reiki

    1991-01-01

    We report clinico-pathological studies on the effect of preoperative hyperthermia and chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy (HCR) for progress of the local curability of advanced esophageal carcinoma. The subjects of these studies were 17 patients who underwent subtotal esophagectomy after preoperative irradiation of 40 Gy from 1980 to 1989, of which 8 patients had HCR, 6 patients irradiation only (R), 3 patients both irradiation and chemotherapy (CR). The clinical response rate of the patients with R or CR was 33% (PR 3, MR 3, NC 3), and the histological effective (Ef 3 or Ef 2 ) rate was 56% (Ef 3 1, Ef 2 4, Ef 1 4). The clinical response rate of the patients with HCR was 88% (PR 7, MR 1), and the histological effective rate was 100% (Ef 3 1, Ef 2 7). HCR was more effective than R or CR for the local lesion of esophageal carcinoma histopathologically (p<0.05). However, the survival rate of patients with HCR was similar to R and CR, respectively. These results suggest that further improvement of the heating methods and the methods of combining hyperthermia with irradiation and chemotherapy is needed. (author)

  6. Preoperative irradiation and surgery for recurrent rectal cancer. Will intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) be of additional benefit? A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiig, Johan Nicolay; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Poulsen, Jan Peter; Olsen, Dag Rune; Giercksky, Karl-Erik

    2002-01-01

    Background: The therapeutic gain of surgery for recurrent rectal cancer is not clear, particularly with regard to the addition of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Methods: Patients (107) with isolated pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer received preoperative external radiotherapy of 46-50 in 2 Gy fractions. At surgery 59 patients had IORT 12-18 Gy. Survival and local recurrence was analysed with regard to surgical resection stages and IORT. Results: Patients (44) had R0- and 39 R1-resections, 24 R2-resections or exploratory laparotomy. IORT was given most often after R1-resections, least in R0-patients. Estimated 5-year survival was overall around 30%, around 60% in the R0-, around 25% for R1- and 0% in R2-patients. Local recurrence was around 30% in the R0- and around 65% in R1-stage patients. R0-/R1-stage patients survived statistically significantly longer than the R2-group otherwise there was no statistical significant difference between IORT and non-IORT groups in any R-stages regarding overall survival or local recurrence. Conclusions: Macroscopic removal of the recurrence improves survival. Whether R0- is better than R1-resections is not clear. The effect of IORT is not a major one. IORT need be evaluated in randomised controlled trials

  7. MR-guided simultaneous integrated boost in preoperative radiotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer following neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seierstad, Therese; Hole, Knut Hakon; Saelen, Erik; Ree, Anne Hansen; Flatmark, Kjersti; Malinen, Eirik

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) strategy in preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemotherapy using pre- and post-chemotherapy tumor volumes assessed by MRI. Materials and methods: Ten patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, receiving chemotherapy prior to radiotherapy, were included in this study. Pre- and post-chemotherapy MR tumor images were co-registered with CT images for IMRT planning. Three planning target volumes were defined: PTV risk , PTV pre c hemo and PTV post c hemo . For SIB, prescribed mean doses to the PTVs were 46, 50 and 58 Gy, respectively, given in 25 fractions. Organs at risk (OARs) were bladder and intestine. The novel three-volume SIB strategy was compared to a conventional two-volume SIB plan, in which PTV post c hemo was ignored, using dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD). Results: All patients showed tumor shrinkage following chemotherapy. For the novel SIB, population-based mean doses given to PTV risk , PTV pre c hemo and PTV post c hemo were 46.8 ± 0.3, 50.6 ± 0.4 and 58.1 ± 0.4 Gy, respectively. DVHs and gEUDs for PTV risk , PTV pre c hemo , bladder and intestine revealed minimal differences between the two SIB strategies. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction for rectal cancer patients following neoadjuvant chemotherapy allows for increased tumor dose using a SIB strategy without increased OAR toxicity.

  8. The expression of epidermal growth factor receptor results in a worse prognosis for patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy: a multicenter, retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giralt, Jordi; Heras, Manuel de las; Cerezo, Laura; Eraso, Aranzazu; Hermosilla, Edurado; Velez, Dolores; Lujan, Juan; Espin, Eloi; Rossello, Jose; Majo, Joaquin; Benavente, Sergi; Armengol, Manel; Torres, I. de

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is observed in 50-70% of colorectal carcinoma and is associated with poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of EGFR status before radiotherapy in a group of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy. Patients and methods: Eighty-seven patients were studied retrospectively. Treatment consisted of pelvic radiotherapy, in 50 patients with concomitant chemotherapy and surgical resection. Immunohistochemistry for EGFR was determined at the preradiation biopsy and in the resected specimens. Immunohistochemical analysis for EGFR expression was evaluated according to extension and staining intensity. We defined positive staining (EGFR positive), when extension was 5% or more. Results: A total of 52 of 87 tumors showed EGFR positive status at biopsy (60%) and EGFR expression was associated neither with clinical tumor stage nor with clinical nodal stage. EGFR positive expression was linked to a lack of pathologic complete response to preoperative radiotherapy (P=0.006). Disease-free survival was lower among patients with EGFR positive status before radiotherapy (P=0.003). In a multivariate analysis EGFR expression at biopsy was a statistically significant predictor of disease-free survival, RR=2.88 (1.1-7.8), P=0.036. Conclusions: EGFR is expressed in a significant number of rectal tumors. EGFR-positive expression before radiotherapy is an indicator for poor response and low disease-free survival

  9. Pre-operative radiotherapy treatment in uterine cervix voluminous carcinoma clinic phase IB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitto, J.V.

    1989-01-01

    Forty four patients with voluminous tumor of the uterine cervix were selected and submitted to preoperative radiation with radical dosages in pelvis and to radiation therapy alone. Results as to survival in both of the treatments were similar. Complication rates in both of the treatments were not higher than the acceptable levels. Hospitalization periods were not longer than the usual for Wertheim-Meigs surgery. (author)

  10. Clinicopathological studies on preoperative three combined treatments with hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Yuji

    1995-01-01

    To prevent local recurrence of rectal cancer postoperatively, we treated patients using preoperative hyperthermia (5-6 times), irradiation (total 30 Gy) and a 5-Fluorouracil suppository (2000-2500 mg). The subjects were 31 patients given combined preoperative treatments and 28 patients given surgery alone. The results were as follows: Histologically, therapeutic effects were recognized in 80.6% of the combined treatments group. The mean distance from the adventitia to the site of cancer infiltration was 6.44 mm in the combined treatments group and 3.35 mm in the surgery alone group. The difference between the two was significant (p<0.05). The combined treatments produced a reduced tumor infiltration into the anal side, and resulted in making a safe margin for anastomosis. The rate of local recurrence in the combined treatments group was less than that of the surgery alone group. No systematic side effects or severe complications were observed during hospitalization in the combined treatments group. The survival rate of the combined treatments group was higher than that of the surgery alone group. It was considered that combined preoperative treatments for rectal cancer is beneficial to expand indications of super low anterior resection. (author)

  11. Clinicopathological studies on preoperative three combined treatments with hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Yuji [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1995-08-01

    To prevent local recurrence of rectal cancer postoperatively, we treated patients using preoperative hyperthermia (5-6 times), irradiation (total 30 Gy) and a 5-Fluorouracil suppository (2000-2500 mg). The subjects were 31 patients given combined preoperative treatments and 28 patients given surgery alone. The results were as follows: Histologically, therapeutic effects were recognized in 80.6% of the combined treatments group. The mean distance from the adventitia to the site of cancer infiltration was 6.44 mm in the combined treatments group and 3.35 mm in the surgery alone group. The difference between the two was significant (p<0.05). The combined treatments produced a reduced tumor infiltration into the anal side, and resulted in making a safe margin for anastomosis. The rate of local recurrence in the combined treatments group was less than that of the surgery alone group. No systematic side effects or severe complications were observed during hospitalization in the combined treatments group. The survival rate of the combined treatments group was higher than that of the surgery alone group. It was considered that combined preoperative treatments for rectal cancer is beneficial to expand indications of super low anterior resection. (author).

  12. Monitoring of Circulating Tumor Cells and Their Expression of EGFR/Phospho-EGFR During Combined Radiotherapy Regimens in Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinhofer, Ingeborg, E-mail: ingeborg.tinhofer@charite.de [Translational Radiooncology Laboratory, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Charite Campus Mitte, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Hristozova, Tsvetana; Stromberger, Carmen [Translational Radiooncology Laboratory, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Charite Campus Mitte, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); KeilhoIz, Ulrich [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Budach, Volker [Translational Radiooncology Laboratory, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Charite Campus Mitte, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: The numbers of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and their expression/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) during the course of combined chemo- or bioradiotherapy regimens as potential biomarkers of treatment efficacy in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) were determined. Methods and Materials: Peripheral blood samples from SCCHN patients with locally advanced stage IVA/B disease who were treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy or induction chemotherapy followed by bioradiation with cetuximab were included in this study. Using flow cytometry, the absolute number of CTCs per defined blood volume as well as their expression of EGFR and its phosphorylated form (pEGFR) during the course of treatment were assessed. Results: Before treatment, we detected {>=}1 CTC per 3.75 mL blood in 9 of 31 patients (29%). Basal expression of EGFR was detected in 100% and pEGFR in 55% of the CTC+ cases. The frequency of CTC detection was not influenced by induction chemotherapy. However, the number of CTC+ samples significantly increased after radiotherapy. This radiation-induced increase in CTC numbers was less pronounced when radiotherapy was combined with cetuximab compared to its combination with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. The former treatment regimen was also more effective in reducing pEGFR expression in CTCs. Conclusions: Definitive radiotherapy regimens of locally advanced SCCHN can increase the number of CTCs and might thus contribute to a systemic spread of tumor cells. Further studies are needed to evaluate the predictive value of the radiation-induced increase in CTC numbers and the persistent activation of the EGFR signalling pathway in individual CTC+ cases.

  13. Pre-operative radiotherapy in soft tissue tumors: Assessment of response by static post-contrast MR imaging compared to histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einarsdottir, H.; Wejde, J.; Bauer, H.C.F.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate if static post-contrast MR imaging was adequate to assess tumor viability after pre-operative radiotherapy in soft tissue sarcoma. Post-contrast MR imaging of 36 soft tissue sarcomas performed 0 - 54 days (median 13 days) after pre-operative radiotherapy, were retrospectively reviewed and compared to post-operative histopathology reports. The contrast enhancement of the tumor was visually graded as minor, moderate or extensive. From the post-operative histopathology reports, three types of tumor response to radiotherapy were defined: Poor, intermediate or good. The size of the tumors before and after radiation was compared. Even if most viable tumors enhanced more than non-viable tumors, there was major overlapping and significant contrast enhancement could be seen in tumors where histopathological examination revealed no viable tumor tissue. Based on histopathology, there were 12 good responders; 8 of these showed minor, 3 moderate and 1 extensive contrast enhancement on MR imaging. Sixteen tumors had an intermediate response; 3 showed minor, 8 moderate and 5 extensive enhancement. Eight tumors had poor response; none showed minor enhancement, 3 moderate and 5 extensive enhancement. Both increase and Decrease in tumor size was seen in lesions with a good therapy response. Static post-contrast MR imaging cannot reliably assess tumor viability after pre-operative radiotherapy in soft tissue sarcoma. In tumors with no viable tumor tissue, moderate and extensive contrast enhancement can be seen

  14. Daunorubicin, Cytarabine, and Cladribine Regimen Plus Radiotherapy and Donor Lymphocyte Infusion for Extramedullary Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Sanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma is a rare tumor consisting of myeloid blasts that involve anatomic sites outside the bone marrow. Fatal prognosis is inevitable in patients with extramedullary relapse after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, and no standard treatments are available yet. We report the first case of extramedullary relapse after HSCT treated with a combination of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and cladribine (DAC regimen plus radiotherapy and donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI. This treatment induced a new and durable remission in our patient. The favorable toxicity profile and the reduced cost make this combination worthy of further investigations.

  15. Radiological and pathological response following pre-operative radiotherapy for soft-tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberge, David; Skamene, Tanya; Nahal, Ayoub; Turcotte, Robert E.; Powell, Tom; Freeman, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report radiological and pathological response to neo-adjuvant radiotherapy for extremity and trunk soft-tissue sarcomas. Materials/methods: Fifty patients were identified retrospectively. All patients had MRI imaging pre and post neo-adjuvant external beam radiotherapy. Tumor volumes were measured in 3D on T1 Gadolinium enhanced sequences. Pathological treatment response was quantified in terms of percentage of treatment-related necrosis for each case. Results: Histopathologic responses to treatment varied from 0% to 100%. The median pathological treatment response was 67.5% for low-grade sarcomas and 50% for high-grade sarcomas. The median decrease in tumor volume was 13.8% for non-myxoid low-grade sarcomas, 82.1% for myxoid liposarcomas and <1% for high-grade sarcomas. A partial response on MRI (volume reduction ≥ 50%) was highly predictive of a good pathological response (p < 0.001). Patients with stable disease on imaging or volumetric progression had wide ranging pathological responses. Conclusions: Soft-tissue sarcomas show significant pathological treatment responses in the form of hyaline fibrosis, necrosis and granulation tissue. Despite this, there is minimal early volumetric response to radiation, especially for high-grade tumors. Although radiological partial response was predictive of pathological response, the significance of radiological progression was unclear. Myxoid liposarcoma tumor type was predictive of both pathological and radiological tumor response.

  16. Use of A and C vitamins for efficiency of macrofractionated preoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gersamiya, G.K.; Madich, K.K.; Vepkhvadze, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    Two groups of patients with breast carcinoma were examined. The first group includes 55 patients, who were treated before operation using large-fractional telegamma-therapy (5 fractions, integral focus dose 20-25 Gy) at the background of treatment with A and C vitamins. The second group included 50 patients, who were treated before operation using large-fractional radio-therapy without vitamins. Radiation pathomorphism of tumor was studied in both groups after radical mastectomy. It is established that a complex of postirradiation structural changes in mammary gland tumors is aggravated at the background of carrying out vitaminization in patients and it is presented in the form of dystrophic changes depending on the degree of malignant tumor. Violation of mitotic activity in tumor cells is also marked. 14 refs

  17. Preoperative single fraction partial breast radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Yoo, Sua; Adamson, Justus D; Prosnitz, Leonard R; Horton, Janet K

    2012-01-01

    Several recent series evaluating external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) have reported adverse cosmetic outcomes, possibly related to large volumes of normal tissue receiving near-prescription doses. We hypothesized that delivery of external beam PBI in a single fraction to the preoperative tumor volume would be feasible and result in a decreased dose to the uninvolved breast compared with institutional postoperative PBI historical controls. A total of 17 patients with unifocal Stage T1 breast cancer were identified. Contrast-enhanced subtraction magnetic resonance images were loaded into an Eclipse treatment planning system and used to define the target volumes. A "virtual plan" was created using four photon beams in a noncoplanar beam arrangement and optimized to deliver 15 Gy to the planning target volume. The median breast volume was 1,713 cm(3) (range: 1,014-2,140), and the median clinical target volume was 44 cm(3) (range: 26-73). In all cases, 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the clinical target volume. The median conformity index was 0.86 (range: 0.70-1.12). The median percentage of the ipsilateral breast volume receiving 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose was 3.8% (range: 2.2-6.9) and 13.3% (range: 7.5-20.8) compared with 18% (range: 3-42) and 53% (range: 24-65) in the institutional historical controls treated with postoperative external beam PBI (p = .002). The median maximum skin dose was 9 Gy. The median dose to 1 and 10 cm(3) of skin was 6.7 and 4.9 Gy. The doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung were negligible. Preoperative PBI resulted in a substantial reduction in ipsilateral breast tissue dose compared with postoperative PBI. The skin dose appeared reasonable, given the small volumes. A prospective Phase I trial evaluating this technique is ongoing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiotherapy. Non-standard fractionated regimens improving cancer treatment. Part II. Response of normal tissues to fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, A.; Hernandez, M.; Pera, J.; Cambray, M.; Villa, S.; Arnaiz, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    The phenomena participating in the response of tissues to fractionated irradiation are analyzed with special emphasis on the most relevant points influencing the design of non-standard fractionated regimens. (Author)

  19. Results of a Prospective Study of High-Dose or Conventional Anthracycline-Cyclophosphamide Regimen Plus Radiotherapy for Localized Adult Non-Hodgkin’s Primary Bone Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmidt-Tanguy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Primary bone lymphoma (PBL is a rare entity that has only been reviewed in one prospective and small retrospective studies, from which it is difficult to establish treatment guidelines. We prospectively evaluated high-dose or conventional anthracycline-cyclophosphamide dose and radiotherapy for PBL. Patients and Methods. The GOELAMS prospective multicenter study (1986–1998 enrolled adults with localized high-grade PBL according to age and performance status (PS. Patients <60 years received a high-dose CHOP regimen (VCAP and those ≥60 years a conventional anthracycline-cyclophosphamide regimen (VCEP-bleomycin; all received intrathecal chemotherapy and local radiotherapy. Results. Among the 26 patients included (VCAP: 19; VCEP-bleomycin: 7, 39% had poor PS ≥2. With a median follow-up of 8 years, overall survival, event-free survival, and relapse-free survival were 64%, 62%, and 65%, respectively, with no significant difference between treatment groups. Poor PS was significantly associated with shorter OS and EFS. Conclusions. Our results confirm the efficacy of our age-based therapeutic strategy. High-doses anthracycline-cyclophosphamide did not improve the outcome. VCEP-bleomycin is effective and well tolerated for old patients. The intensification must be considered for patients with PS ≥2, a poor prognostic factor.

  20. Preoperative hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy and radical surgery in advanced head and neck cancer: A prospective phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, Paula; Valavaara, Ritva; Aitasalo, Kalle; Kulmala, Jarmo; Laine, Juhani; Elomaa, Liisa; Sillanmaeki, Lauri; Minn, Heikki; Grenman, Reidar

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate whether preoperative hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) combined with major radical surgery is feasible and successful in the treatment of advanced primary head and neck cancer. Patients and methods: Ninety four patients with histologically confirmed head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) in the oral cavity (41/96; 43%), supraglottis (14/96; 15%), glottis (5/96; 5%), oropharynx (16/96; 17%), nasal cavity/paranasal sinuses (8/96; 8%), nasopharynx (3/96; 3%), hypopharynx (7/96; 7%) and two (2%) with unknown primary tumour and large cervical lymph nodes entered into the study. 21/96 patients (22%) had stage II, 17/96 (18%) stage III and 58/96 patients (60%) stage IV disease. The patients received preoperative hyperfractionated RT 1.6 Gy twice a day, 5 days a week to a median tumour dose of 63 Gy with a planned break for 11 days (median) after the median dose of 37 Gy. Then, after a median of 27 days the patients underwent major radical surgery of the primary tumour and metastatic lymph nodes including reconstructions with pedicled or microvascular free flaps when indicated as a part of the scheduled therapy. 12/96 patients had only ipsilateral or bilateral neck dissections. Results: After a median follow-up time of 37.2 mos 77/96 (80.2%) patients had complete locoregional control. All but 2 patients had complete histological remission after surgery. 40/96 pts were alive without disease, two of them after salvage surgery. 32/96 patients had relapsed; 15 had locoregional and 13 distant relapses, 4 patients relapsed both locoregionally and distantly. Fifty patients have died; 29 with locoregional and/or distant relapse, eight patients died of second malignancy, and 19 had intercurrent diseases. Disease-specific and overall survival at 3 years was 67.7 and 51%, respectively. Acute grade three mucosal reactions were common, but transient and tolerable. Late grade 3-4 adverse effects were few. Conclusions: Preoperative

  1. Preoperative Single Fraction Partial Breast Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palta, Manisha; Yoo, Sua; Adamson, Justus D.; Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Horton, Janet K., E-mail: janet.horton@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Several recent series evaluating external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) have reported adverse cosmetic outcomes, possibly related to large volumes of normal tissue receiving near-prescription doses. We hypothesized that delivery of external beam PBI in a single fraction to the preoperative tumor volume would be feasible and result in a decreased dose to the uninvolved breast compared with institutional postoperative PBI historical controls. Methods and Materials: A total of 17 patients with unifocal Stage T1 breast cancer were identified. Contrast-enhanced subtraction magnetic resonance images were loaded into an Eclipse treatment planning system and used to define the target volumes. A 'virtual plan' was created using four photon beams in a noncoplanar beam arrangement and optimized to deliver 15 Gy to the planning target volume. Results: The median breast volume was 1,713 cm{sup 3} (range: 1,014-2,140), and the median clinical target volume was 44 cm{sup 3} (range: 26-73). In all cases, 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the clinical target volume. The median conformity index was 0.86 (range: 0.70-1.12). The median percentage of the ipsilateral breast volume receiving 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose was 3.8% (range: 2.2-6.9) and 13.3% (range: 7.5-20.8) compared with 18% (range: 3-42) and 53% (range: 24-65) in the institutional historical controls treated with postoperative external beam PBI (p = .002). The median maximum skin dose was 9 Gy. The median dose to 1 and 10 cm{sup 3} of skin was 6.7 and 4.9 Gy. The doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung were negligible. Conclusion: Preoperative PBI resulted in a substantial reduction in ipsilateral breast tissue dose compared with postoperative PBI. The skin dose appeared reasonable, given the small volumes. A prospective Phase I trial evaluating this technique is ongoing.

  2. Preoperative Single Fraction Partial Breast Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palta, Manisha; Yoo, Sua; Adamson, Justus D.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Horton, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Several recent series evaluating external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) have reported adverse cosmetic outcomes, possibly related to large volumes of normal tissue receiving near-prescription doses. We hypothesized that delivery of external beam PBI in a single fraction to the preoperative tumor volume would be feasible and result in a decreased dose to the uninvolved breast compared with institutional postoperative PBI historical controls. Methods and Materials: A total of 17 patients with unifocal Stage T1 breast cancer were identified. Contrast-enhanced subtraction magnetic resonance images were loaded into an Eclipse treatment planning system and used to define the target volumes. A “virtual plan” was created using four photon beams in a noncoplanar beam arrangement and optimized to deliver 15 Gy to the planning target volume. Results: The median breast volume was 1,713 cm 3 (range: 1,014–2,140), and the median clinical target volume was 44 cm 3 (range: 26–73). In all cases, 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the clinical target volume. The median conformity index was 0.86 (range: 0.70–1.12). The median percentage of the ipsilateral breast volume receiving 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose was 3.8% (range: 2.2–6.9) and 13.3% (range: 7.5–20.8) compared with 18% (range: 3–42) and 53% (range: 24–65) in the institutional historical controls treated with postoperative external beam PBI (p = .002). The median maximum skin dose was 9 Gy. The median dose to 1 and 10 cm 3 of skin was 6.7 and 4.9 Gy. The doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung were negligible. Conclusion: Preoperative PBI resulted in a substantial reduction in ipsilateral breast tissue dose compared with postoperative PBI. The skin dose appeared reasonable, given the small volumes. A prospective Phase I trial evaluating this technique is ongoing.

  3. Clinical results and toxicity for short-course preoperative radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision in rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra; Debus, Jürgen; Hoehle, Frieder; Ulrich, Alexis; Muenter, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Short-course preoperative radiotherapy (SCPRT) is an alternative method to chemoirradiation for patients with Stage II and III rectal cancer when no downsizing is needed, but there is still widespread reluctance to use this method because of fear of side effects from high-fraction doses. This paper reports on a single institution patient cohort of operated rectal cancer patients after SCPRT, evaluated for chronic adverse effects, local control, progression-free survival and overall survival. Altogether, 257 patients were treated with SCPRT and surgery including total mesorectal excision (92% total mesorectal excision = TME) between 2002 and 2009. Local control and survival were analyzed. Chronic adverse effects for 154 patients without local relapse were evaluated according to the NCI–CTCAE version 4.0 classification, with a median follow-up of 48 months. We found a 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) of 71%. The 5-year estimated local control (LC) rate was 94%. A positive resection margin was found in 4% of the patients and was significantly correlated with decreased DFS, OS and LC. Chronic adverse effects were reported by 58% of the patients, of which 10% were Grade 3 toxicities. The most frequent Grade 2 toxicity was stool incontinence (13%). Sexual dysfunction was found in 36% of the patients (31% Grade 1 or 2, and only 5% Grade 3). SCPRT combined with TME produced excellent LC rates together with a low rate of high-grade chronic adverse effects. (author)

  4. Preoperative radiotherapy and local excision of rectal cancer with immediate radical re-operation for poor responders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujko, Krzysztof; Richter, Piotr; Kolodziejczyk, Milena; Nowacki, Marek P.; Kulig, Jan; Popiela, Tadeusz; Gach, Tomasz; Oledzki, Janusz; Sopylo, Rafal; Meissner, Wiktor; Wierzbicki, Ryszard; Polkowski, Wojciech; Kowalska, Teresa; Stryczynska, Grazyna; Paprota, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report an early analysis of prospective study exploring preoperative radiotherapy and local excision in rectal cancer. Materials and methods: Mucosa at tumour edges was tattooed. Patients with cT1-3N0 tumour <3-4 cm were treated with either 5 x 5 Gy + 4 Gy boost (N = 31) or chemoradiation (50.4 Gy + 5.4 Gy boost, 1.8 Gy per fraction + 5-fluorouracyl and leucovorin; N = 13). Thirteen patients from the short-course group were unfit for chemotherapy. The interval from radiation to full-thickness local excision was 6 weeks. The protocol called for conversion to a transabdominal surgery in case of ypT2-3 disease or positive margin. Results: The postoperative complications requiring hospitalization were recorded in 9% of patients. The rate of pathological complete response was 41%. The rate of patients requiring conversion was 34%; however, 18% actually underwent conversion and the remaining 16% refused or were unfit. During the 14 months of median follow-up, local recurrence was detected in 7% of patients and all underwent salvage surgery. Of 19 patients in whom initially anterior resection was likely, 16% had abdominoperineal resection performed for a conversion or as a rescue procedure. Conclusion: Our study suggests that the short-course radiation prior to local excision is a treatment option for high-risk patients.

  5. Autonomic nerve-sparing surgery with preoperative or intraoperative radiotherapy for advanced lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Norio; Ono, Masato; Sugifuji, Masanori; Kawashima, Kiyotaka; Arai, Tatsuo; Koda, Keishi; Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Oda, Kenji; Nakajima, Nobuyuki

    2000-01-01

    Autonomic-nerve-sparing surgery was performed for advanced lower rectal cancer, and the results in patients who had undergone preoperative irradiation plus chemotherapy (RCT group) and intraoperative irradiation (IORT group) were compared. The autonomic nerves of 76 of the 84 patients in the RCT group were conserved. The radiation dose was 42.6 Gy, and surgery was performed 2 weeks after the irradiation. Their curability was A. Urinary function was maintained. The results for sexual function were better in the cases in which the autonomic nerves were completely conserved. The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 84.1%. The local recurrence rate was 7.9% and was no higher after treatment by the conventional method. The autonomic nerves of all 61 patients in the IORT group, were conserved. Patients were irradiated with 15 Gy (5 MeV) to the pelvic nerve plexuses and peripheral region with a cone 4 cm in diameter. Irradiation depth was estimated to be approximately 15 mm. The results for urinary function and sexual function were equivalent to those in the RCT group. The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 79%. The local recurrence rate was 9.8%. The autonomic nerve conservation rate was increased in both groups but the results in terms of QOL, such as sexual function, were inadequate. Further development and improvement of treatment methods for advanced lower rectal cancer are needed. (K.H.)

  6. Effectiveness of gene expression profiling for response prediction of rectal cancer to preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojima, Eiki; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Miki, Chikao; Kusunoki, Masato; Mori, Masaki

    2007-01-01

    Our aim was to determine whether the expression levels of specific genes could predict clinical radiosensitivity in human colorectal cancer. Radioresistant colorectal cancer cell lines were established by repeated X-ray exposure (total, 100 Gy), and the gene expressions of the parent and radioresistant cell lines were compared in a microarray analysis. To verify the microarray data, we carried out a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis of identified genes in clinical samples from 30 irradiated rectal cancer patients. A comparison of the intensity data for the parent and three radioresistant cell lines revealed 17 upregulated and 142 downregulated genes in all radioresistant cell lines. Next, we focused on two upregulated genes, PTMA (prothymosin α) and EIF5a2 (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A), in the radioresistant cell lines. In clinical samples, the expression of PTMA was significantly higher in the minor effect group than in the major effect group (P=0.004), but there were no significant differences in EIF5a2 expression between the two groups. We identified radiation-related genes in colorectal cancer and demonstrated that PTMA may play an important role in radiosensitivity. Our findings suggest that PTMA may be a novel marker for predicting the effectiveness of radiotherapy in clinical cases. (author)

  7. Wound healing morbidity in STS patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy in relation to in vitro skin fibroblast radiosensitivity, proliferative capacity and TGF-β activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akudugu, John M.; Bell, Robert S.; Catton, Charles; Davis, Aileen M.; Griffin, Anthony M.; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John N.; Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Hill, Richard P.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: In a recent study, we demonstrated that the ability of dermal fibroblasts, obtained from soft tissue sarcoma (STS) patients, to undergo initial division in vitro following radiation exposure correlated with the development of wound healing morbidity in the patients following their treatment with preoperative radiotherapy. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is thought to play an important role in fibroblast proliferation and radiosensitivity both of which may impact on wound healing. Thus, in this study we examined the interrelationship between TGF-β activity, radiosensitivity and proliferation of cultured fibroblasts and the wound healing response of STS patients after preoperative radiotherapy to provide a validation cohort for our previous study and to investigate mechanisms. Patients and methods: Skin fibroblasts were established from skin biopsies of 46 STS patients. The treatment group consisted of 28 patients who received preoperative radiotherapy. Eighteen patients constituted a control group who were either irradiated postoperatively or did not receive radiation treatment. Fibroblast cultures were subjected to the colony forming and cytokinesis-blocked binucleation assays (low dose rate: ∼0.02 Gy/min) and TGF-β assays (high dose-rate: ∼1.06 Gy/min) following γ-irradiation. Fibroblast radiosensitivity and initial proliferative ability were represented by the surviving fraction at 2.4 Gy (SF 2.4 ) and binucleation index (BNI), respectively. Active and total TGF-β levels in fibroblast cultures were determined using a biological assay. Wound healing complication (WHC), defined as the requirement for further surgery or prolonged deep wound packing, was the clinical endpoint examined. Results: Of the 28 patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy, 8 (29%) had wound healing difficulties. Fibroblasts from patients who developed WHC showed a trend to retain a significantly higher initial proliferative ability after

  8. Comparison of Acute and Late Toxicity of Two Regimens of 3- and 5-Week Concomitant Boost Prone IMRT to Standard 6-Week Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raza, Shahzad; Lymberis, Stella C.; Ciervide, Raquel [Department of Radiation Oncology and Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Axelrod, Deborah [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Magnolfi, Chiara; Rosenstein, Barry; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology and Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-05-08

    Purpose: Limited information is available comparing toxicity of accelerated radiotherapy (RT) to that of standard fractionation RT for early stage breast cancer. We report early and late toxicities of two prone regimens of accelerated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a concomitant boost (CB) to the tumor bed delivered over 3 or 5 weeks as compared to standard 6 week RT with a sequential electron boost. Methods: From 2/2003 to 12/2007, 169 consecutive patients with Stage I–II breast cancer were offered the choice to undergo prone RT with either: a 6-week standard RT regimen of 46 Gy/23 fractions (fx) to the whole breast (WB), followed by a14 Gy sequential boost (SB) to the tumor bed (6wSB), a 5-week regimen of 50 Gy to WB with an IMRT CB of 6.25 Gy in 25 fx (5wCB); or a 3-week protocol of 40.5 Gy to WB with an IMRT CB of 7.5 Gy in 15 fx (3wCB). These regimens were estimated as biologically equivalent, based on alpha/beta = 4 for tumor control. Toxicities were reported using RTOG and LENT/SOMA scoring. Results: 51/169 patients chose standard 6wSB, 28 selected 5wCB, and 90 enrolled in 3wCB protocol. Maximum acute toxicity was Grade 3 dermatitis in 4% of the patients in the 6wSB compared 1% in 3wCB. In general, acute complications (breast pain, fatigue, and dermatitis) were significantly less in the 3wCB than in the other schedules (P < 0.05). With a median follow-up of 61 months, the only Grade 3 late toxicity was telangiectasia in two patients: one in 3wCB and one in 5wCB group. Notably, fibrosis was comparable among the three groups (P = NS). Conclusion: These preliminary data suggest that accelerated regimens of breast RT over 3 or 5 weeks in the prone position, with an IMRT tumor bed CB, result in comparable late toxicity to standard fractionation with a sequential tumor boost delivered over 6 weeks. As predicted by radiobiological modeling the shorter regimen was associated with less acute effects.

  9. Prospective trial of preoperative concomitant boost radiotherapy with continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janjan, Nora A.; Crane, Christopher N.; Feig, Barry W.; Cleary, Karen; Dubrow, Ronelle; Curley, Steven A.; Ellis, Lee M.; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Lenzi, Renato; Lynch, Patrick; Wolff, Robert; Brown, Thomas; Pazdur, Richard; Abbruzzese, James; Hoff, Paulo M.; Allen, Pamela; Brown, Barry; Skibber, John

    2000-01-01

    Rationale: To evaluate the response to a concomitant boost given during standard chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Concomitant boost radiotherapy was administered preoperatively to 45 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer in a prospective trial. Treatment consisted of 45 Gy to the pelvis with 18 mV photons at 1.8 Gy/fraction using a 3-field belly board technique with continuous infusion 5FU chemotherapy (300mg/m 2 ) 5 days per week. The boost was given during the last week of therapy with a 6-hour inter-fraction interval to the tumor plus a 2-3 cm margin. The boost dose equaled 7.5 Gy/5 fractions (1.5 Gy/fraction); a total dose of 52.5 Gy/5 weeks was given to the primary tumor. Pretreatment tumor stage, determined by endorectal ultrasound and CT scan, included 29 with T3N0 [64%], 11 T3N1, 1 T3Nx, 2 T4N0, 1 T4N3, and 1 with TxN1 disease. Mean distance from the anal verge was 5 cm (range 0-13 cm). Median age was 55 years (range 33-77 years). The population consisted of 34 males and 11 females. Median time of follow-up is 8 months (range 1-24 months). Results: Sphincter preservation (SP) has been accomplished in 33 of 42 (79%) patients resected to date. Three patients did not undergo resection because of the development of metastatic disease in the interim between the completion of chemoradiation (CTX/XRT) and preoperative evaluation. The surgical procedures included proctectomy and coloanal anastomosis (n = 16), low anterior resection (n = 13), transanal resection (n = 4). Tumor down-staging was pathologically confirmed in 36 of the 42 (86%) resected patients, and 13 (31%) achieved a pathologic CR. Among the 28 tumors (67%) located <6 cm from the anal verge, SP was accomplished in 21 cases (75%). Although perioperative morbidity was higher, toxicity rates during CTX/XRT were comparable to that seen with conventional fractionation. Compared to our contemporary experience with conventional CTX/XRT (45Gy; 1.8 Gy per

  10. Quality of life, anorectal and sexual functions after preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer: Report of a randomised trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak, Lucyna; Bujko, Krzysztof; Nowacki, Marek P.; Kepka, Lucyna; Oledzki, Janusz; Rutkowski, Andrzej; Szmeja, Jacek; Kladny, Jozef; Dymecki, Dariusz; Wieczorek, Andrzej; Pawlak, Mariusz; Lesniak, Tadeusz; Kowalska, Teresa; Richter, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients (N = 316) with resectable cT3-4 low-lying and mid-rectal cancer were randomised to receive either preoperative 5 x 5 Gy irradiation with subsequent surgery performed within 7 days or chemoradiation (50.4, 1.8 Gy per fraction plus boluses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin) followed by surgery after 4-6 weeks. No differences were found in sphincter preservation, survival, local control and late complications. Early complications were less frequent in the short-course group. The aim of this report is to find out whether large doses per fraction of short-course schedule result in more severe anorectal and sexual dysfunction and quality of life (QoL) impairment. Materials and method: Patients who were free of disease were asked to answer the QLQ-C30 and those without stoma were, additionally, asked to fill in a questionnaire of anorectal (19 items) and sexual function (1 item). Results: Two hundred and twenty-two patients (86% response rate) completed the QLQ-C30 and 118 (86% response rate) the anorectal-sexual function questionnaire. The median time from surgery to filling in the QLQ-C30 questionnaire was 12 months, and to filling in the anorectal-sexual function questionnaire - 13 months. We did not find significant differences between the randomised groups regarding QoL and the anorectal and sexual functions. Approximately two-thirds of patients had anorectal function impairment. Approximately 20% of patients stated that this considerably influenced their QoL. Conclusions: QoL and the anorectal and sexual functioning did not differ in patients receiving short-course radiotherapy, as compared to those receiving chemoradiation

  11. Effect of time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy on local recurrence-free survival in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Jang, Se Jin; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Sik [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The concentration of capecitabine peaks at 1–2 hours after administration. We therefore assumed that proper timing of capecitabine administration and radiotherapy would maximize radiosensitization and influence survival among patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 223 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent preoperative chemoradiation, followed by surgery from January 2002 to May 2006. All patients underwent pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy/25 fractions) and received capecitabine twice daily at 12-hour intervals (1,650 mg/m2/day). Patients were divided into two groups according to the time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy. Patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy were classified as Group A (n = 109); all others were classified as Group B (n = 114). The median follow-up period was 72 months (range, 7 to 149 months). Although Group A had a significantly higher rate of good responses (44% vs. 25%; p = 0.005), the 5-year local recurrence-free survival rates of 93% in Group A and 97% in Group B did not differ significantly (p = 0.519). The 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were also comparable between the groups. Despite the better pathological response in Group A, the time interval between capecitabine and radiotherapy administration did not have a significant effect on survivals. Further evaluations are needed to clarify the interaction of these treatment modalities.

  12. Prognostic value of p53 in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Catherine S; Pollack, Alan; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Chyle, Valerian; Zagars, Gunar K; Dinney, Colin P; Benedict, William F

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: The overexpression of mutated and/or wild type p53 has been associated with poorer prognosis in patients with bladder cancer. However, most studies have involved a mixed patient population, including those with superficial and muscle-invasive disease, and some patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. In this study we examine the prognostic significance of p53 detected immunohistochemically in a cohort of patients with muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder treated relatively uniformly with preoperative radiotherapy 4-6 weeks prior to radical cystectomy. Materials and Methods: Of 301 patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy (50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer between 1960-1983, adequate material for immunohistochemical analysis of p53 was obtained in 107. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tissue was stained using monoclonal anti-p53 antibody D01 (Oncogene Science, Manhasset, NY). The immunostaining of p53 was considered positive if greater than 20% of the tumor nuclei were stained. There were 82 men and 25 women with a mean age of 61 yr and no patient received neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. All patients were without distant metastasis prior to treatment initiation. The median follow-up for those living (n=32) was 88 mo. The number of patients by clinical stage was 48 for T2, 30 for T3a, and 29 for T3b. Results: Overall, 46% of the patients were p53 positive, with 42% in Stage T2, 57% in Stage T3a, and 41% in Stage T3b. The distributions of potential patient prognostic factors by p53 positivity were investigated and the only association was with lymphatic-vascular invasion (p=0.04, chi-square). No correlation was seen between p53 staining and pathologic complete response (seen in 47%), clinical-to-pathologic downstaging (seen in 69%), clinical stage, tumor grade, tumor morphology, tumor number, tumor size, gender, patient age, pretreatment hemoglobin levels, BUN

  13. Preoperative intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost in locally advanced rectal cancer: Report on late toxicity and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, Benedikt; Platteaux, Nele; Van den Begin, Robbe; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The addition of chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy has been established as the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. As an alternative strategy, we explored intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT–IGRT) with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in a prospective phase II study. Here, we report outcome and late toxicity after a median follow-up of 54 months. Methods and materials: A total of 108 patients were treated preoperatively with IMRT–IGRT, delivering a dose of 46 Gy in fractions of 2 Gy. Patients (n = 57) displaying an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm based on magnetic resonance imaging received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Results: The absolute incidence of grade ⩾3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity was 9% and 4%, respectively, with a 13% rate of any grade ⩾3 late toxicity. The actuarial 5-year local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 97%, 57%, and 68%. On multivariate analysis, R1 resection and pN2 disease were associated with significantly impaired OS. Conclusions: The use of preoperative IMRT–IGRT with a SIB resulted in a high 5-year LC rate and non-negligible late toxicity

  14. Long-term quality of life in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative (chemo)-radiotherapy within a randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiv, M.; Puyraveau, M.; Mercier, M.; Bosset, J.F.; Puyraveau, M.; Mineur, L.; Calais, G.; Maingon, P.; Bardet, E.; Mercier, M.; Bosset, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Few studies have evaluated the quality of life (QoL) of patients with rectal cancer. This report describes the quality of life of French patients who entered the 22921 EORTC trial that investigated the role and place of chemotherapy (CT) added to preoperative radiotherapy (preop-RT). Patients and Methods: Patients without recurrences were evaluated with EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR38 questionnaires, after a median time of 4.6 years from randomization. Results: All the scores of QLQ-C30 functions were high, from 78 up to 88, with those of global health quality of life scale (GHQL) status being 73. The mean scores of symptoms were low except for diarrhea. For QLQ-CR38, the mean scores for 'body image' and 'future perspective' were high at 79.6 and 69.7 respectively. The scores for 'sexual functioning' and 'enjoyment' were low. Men had more sexual problems than females (62.5 vs 25 mean scores respectively). Chemotherapy was associated with more diarrhea complaints, lower 'role', lower 'social functioning' and lower global health quality of life scale. Conclusion: The overall quality of life of patients with rectal cancer is quite good 4.6 years after the beginning preoperative treatments. However, adding chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy has a negative effect on diarrhea complaints and some quality of life dimensions. (authors)

  15. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosnitz, L.R.; Kapp, D.S.; Weissberg, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  16. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision: a Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) randomized phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breugom, A J; van Gijn, W; Muller, E W; Berglund, Å; van den Broek, C B M; Fokstuen, T; Gelderblom, H; Kapiteijn, E; Leer, J W H; Marijnen, C A M; Martijn, H; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E; Nagtegaal, I D; Påhlman, L; Punt, C J A; Putter, H; Roodvoets, A G H; Rutten, H J T; Steup, W H; Glimelius, B; van de Velde, C J H

    2015-04-01

    The discussion on the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated according to current guidelines is still ongoing. A multicentre, randomized phase III trial, PROCTOR-SCRIPT, was conducted to compare adjuvant chemotherapy with observation for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision (TME). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial recruited patients from 52 hospitals. Patients with histologically proven stage II or III rectal adenocarcinoma were randomly assigned (1:1) to observation or adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME. Radiotherapy consisted of 5 × 5 Gy. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of 25 × 1.8-2 Gy combined with 5-FU-based chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of 5-FU/LV (PROCTOR) or eight courses capecitabine (SCRIPT). Randomization was based on permuted blocks of six, stratified according to centre, residual tumour, time between last irradiation and surgery, and preoperative treatment. The primary end point was overall survival. Of 470 enrolled patients, 437 were eligible. The trial closed prematurely because of slow patient accrual. Patients were randomly assigned to observation (n = 221) or adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 216). After a median follow-up of 5.0 years, 5-year overall survival was 79.2% in the observation group and 80.4% in the chemotherapy group [hazard ratio (HR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62-1.39; P = 0.73]. The HR for disease-free survival was 0.80 (95% CI 0.60-1.07; P = 0.13). Five-year cumulative incidence for locoregional recurrences was 7.8% in both groups. Five-year cumulative incidence for distant recurrences was 38.5% and 34.7%, respectively (P = 0.39). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial could not demonstrate a significant benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidine monotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME on overall survival, disease-free survival, and recurrence rate. However, this trial did not complete

  17. Comparison of preoperative short-course radiotherapy and long-course radiochemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, M.; Saur, G.; Wehner, D.; Sweeney, R.A.; Flentje, M.; Thalheimer, A.; Germer, C.T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this work was to perform a single institution comparison between preoperative short-course radiotherapy (SC-RT) and long-course radiochemotherapy (LC-RCHT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: A total of 225 patients with clinical stage UICC II-III rectal cancer were treated with SC-RT (29 Gy in 10 twice daily fractions followed by immediate surgery; n = 108) or LC-RCHT (54 Gy in 28 fractions with simultaneous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) ± oxaliplatin chemotherapy followed by delayed surgery; n = 117). All patients in the LC-RCHT cohort and patients in the SC-RT with pathological UICC stage ≥ II received adjuvant chemotherapy. Before 2004, the standard of care was SC-RT with LC-RCHT reserved for patients where downstaging was considered as required for sphincter preservation or curative resection. In the later period, SC-RT was practiced only for patients unfit for radiochemotherapy. Results: Patients in the LC-RCHT cohort had a significantly higher proportion of cT4 tumors, clinical node positivity, and lower tumor location. The 5-year local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were 91% and 66% without differences between the SC-RT and LC-RCHT groups. Acute toxicity was increased during LC-RCHT (grade ≥ II 1% vs. 33%) and there were no differences in postoperative complications. Severe late toxicity grade ≥ III was increased after SC-RT (12% vs. 3%). Of patients aged > 80 years, 7 of 7 patients and 4 of 9 patients received curative surgery after SC-RT and LC-RCHT, respectively. Conclusion: Despite the fact that patients with worse prognostic factors were treated with LC-RCHT, there were no significant differences in LC and OS between the SC-RT and LC-RCHT group. Age > 80 years was identified as a significant risk factor for LC-RCHT and these patients could be treated preferably with SC-RT. (orig.)

  18. Non-randomized study on the effects of preoperative radiotherapy and daily administration of low-dose cisplatin against those of radiotherapy alone for oral cancer. Effects on local control, control of metastases, and overall survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Hiroshi; Ohtsuka, Akiko; Kobayashi, Hiroichi; Kurashina, Kenji; Shikama, Naoto; Oguchi, Masahiko

    2000-01-01

    Cisplatin is a known radiation modifier. Our previous study suggested that daily administration of low-dose cisplatin enhanced the efficacy of radiotherapy against primary oral squamous carcinoma. In this paper, we follow the patients who participated in the previous study and survey the benefit of combination low-dose cisplatin in improving local control, prevention of metastases, and overall survival. This study included patients with surgically resectable advanced oral tumors. Ten patients underwent preoperative radiotherapy of 30-40 Gy/15-20 days with concomitant daily administration of low-dose cisplatin (5 mg/body or 5 mg/m 2 ). Ten other patients received external radiotherapy alone. All patients then underwent a planned radical tumor resection. No significant difference was see in loco-regional control rates (primary: 86 vs. 88%, neck: 83 vs. 78% at 48 months) or incidence of metastasis (70 vs. 64%) between the two groups. Nor was there a significant difference in the overall survival rate (60 vs. 66%). The results of this study suggest that the concomitant use of daily administration of low-dose cisplatin with preoperative radiation brings no statistically significant benefit in improving local control and survival rate in patients with advanced resectable oral cancer. (author)

  19. Concurrent radiotherapy with temozolomide vs. concurrent radiotherapy with a cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy regimen. Acute toxicity in pediatric high-grade glioma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, Clemens; Kortmann, Rolf D.; Bueren, Andre O. von; Bojko, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Marion; Kramm, Christof M.; Pietsch, Torsten; Gielen, Gerrit H.; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Bison, Brigitte

    2018-01-01

    As the efficacy of all pediatric high-grade glioma (HGG) treatments is similar and still disappointing, it is essential to also investigate the toxicity of available treatments. Prospectively recorded hematologic and nonhematologic toxicities of children treated with radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D and HIT-HGG-2007 trials were compared. Children aged 3-18 years with histologically proven HGG (WHO grade III and IV tumors) or unequivocal radiologic diagnosis of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) were included in these trials. The HIT-HGG-2007 protocol comprised concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, while cisplatinum/etoposide (PE) and PE plus ifosfamide (PEI) in combination with weekly vincristine injections were applied during radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D protocol. Regular blood counts and information about cellular nadirs were available from 304 patients (leukocytes) and 306 patients (thrombocytes), respectively. Grade 3-4 leukopenia was much more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 88, 52%) vs. HIT-HGG-2007 (n = 13, 10%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 thrombopenia was also more likely in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 21, 12% vs. n = 3,2%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 leukopenia appeared more often in children aged 3-7 years (n = 38/85, 45%) than in children aged 8-12 years (n = 39/120, 33%) and 13-18 years (24/100, 24%; P =0.034). In addition, sickness was more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (grade 1-2: 44%, grade 3-4: 6% vs. grade 1-2: 28%, grade 3-4: 1%; P <0.001). Radiochemotherapy involving cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy is more toxic than radiotherapy in combination with temozolomide. Without evidence of differences in therapeutic efficacy, the treatment with lower toxicity, i. e., radiotherapy with temozolomide should be used. (orig.) [de

  20. Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema Jyothirmayi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conservative treatment in the form of limited surgery and post-operative radiotherapy is controversial in hand and foot sarcomas, both due to poor radiation tolerance of the palm and sole, and due to technical difficulties in achieving adequate margins.This paper describes the local control and survival of 41 patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the hand or foot treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. The acute and late toxicity of megavoltage radiotherapy to the hand and foot are described. The technical issues and details of treatment delivery are discussed. The factors influencing local control after radiotherapy are analysed.

  1. Preoperative Capecitabine and Pelvic Radiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer-Is it Equivalent to 5-FU Infusion Plus Leucovorin and Radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Alexander K.; Wong, Alfred O.; Jenken, Daryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this retrospective case-matching study was to compare the treatment outcomes and acute toxicity of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) with capecitabine vs. preoperative RT with intermittent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) infusion, leucovorin, and mitomycin C in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We matched 34 patients who were treated with preoperative concurrent capecitabine and 50 Gy of RT by their clinical T stage (T3 or T4) and the tumor location (≤7 cm or >7 cm from the anal verge) with another 68 patients who were treated with preoperative intermittent 5-FU infusion, leucovorin, mitomycin C, and 50 Gy of RT for a comparison of the pathologic tumor response, local control, distant failure, and survival rates. Results: The pathologic complete response rate was 21% with capecitabine and 18% with 5-FU and leucovorin (p = 0.72). The rate of T downstaging after chemoradiation was 59% for both groups. The rate of sphincter-sparing resection was 38% after capecitabine plus RT and 43% after 5-FU plus RT (p = 0.67). At 3 years, there was no significant difference in the local control rate (93% for capecitabine and 92% for 5-FU and leucovorin), relapse-free rate (74% for capecitabine and 73% for 5-FU and leucovorin), or disease-specific survival rate (86% for capecitabine and 77% for 5-FU and leucovorin). The acute toxicity profile was comparable, with little Grade 3 and 4 toxicity. Conclusions: When administered with concurrent preoperative RT, both capecitabine and intermittent 5-FU infusion with leucovorin modulation provided comparable pathologic tumor response, local control, relapse-free survival, and disease-specific survival rates in rectal cancer.

  2. Concurrent radiotherapy with temozolomide vs. concurrent radiotherapy with a cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy regimen : Acute toxicity in pediatric high-grade glioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Clemens; von Bueren, André O; Bojko, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Marion; Pietsch, Torsten; Gielen, Gerrit H; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Bison, Brigitte; Kortmann, Rolf-D; Kramm, Christof M

    2018-03-01

    As the efficacy of all pediatric high-grade glioma (HGG) treatments is similar and still disappointing, it is essential to also investigate the toxicity of available treatments. Prospectively recorded hematologic and nonhematologic toxicities of children treated with radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D and HIT-HGG-2007 trials were compared. Children aged 3-18 years with histologically proven HGG (WHO grade III and IV tumors) or unequivocal radiologic diagnosis of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) were included in these trials. The HIT-HGG-2007 protocol comprised concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, while cisplatinum/etoposide (PE) and PE plus ifosfamide (PEI) in combination with weekly vincristine injections were applied during radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D protocol. Regular blood counts and information about cellular nadirs were available from 304 patients (leukocytes) and 306 patients (thrombocytes), respectively. Grade 3-4 leukopenia was much more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 88, 52%) vs. HIT-HGG-2007 (n = 13, 10%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 thrombopenia was also more likely in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 21, 12% vs. n = 3,2%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 leukopenia appeared more often in children aged 3-7 years (n = 38/85, 45%) than in children aged 8-12 years (n = 39/120, 33%) and 13-18 years (24/100, 24%; P =0.034). In addition, sickness was more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (grade 1-2: 44%, grade 3-4: 6% vs. grade 1-2: 28%, grade 3-4: 1%; P <0.001). Radiochemotherapy involving cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy is more toxic than radiotherapy in combination with temozolomide. Without evidence of differences in therapeutic efficacy, the treatment with lower toxicity, i. e., radiotherapy with temozolomide should be used.

  3. Preoperative radiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of stage IIB cervix cancer. A retrospective analysis of histological specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Trippe, N; Novaes, P.E.; Brandani, I.B.; Hanriot, R.; Souza, L.M.; Pellizzon, A.C.; Salvajoli, J.V.; Baraldi, H.E.; Maia, M.A.; Fogaroli, R.C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate the histological specimens of the stage IIB cervix cancer patients who were treated by preoperative radiotherapy with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: From August 1992 to August 1995, 32 patients with stage IIB cervix cancer were underwent to preoperative radiotherapy. All patients received EBRT at the whole pelvis with total dose of 45Gy in 25 fractions of 1,8Gy through a 4 MV linear accelerator. The HDR brachytherapy was realized through a Micro-Selectron device, working with Iridium-192 with initial activity of 10 Ci. The prescribed dose was 6,0Gy at point A, defined by the Manchester, system in 2 weekly insertions during the course of EBRT. The insertions were done by the Fletcher colpostats in association with intrauterine tandem. Four to six weeks after the end of radiotherapy, the patients were underwent to Total Hysterectomy and Salpingoforectomy through Piver second level technique. The uterine specimens were histologically analysed with attention to residual disease at the cervix and lymph nodes status. Results: The histological analysis showed that 19 (59,4%) patients had no residual tumor at the cervix while 13 (40,6%) had microscopic residual tumor. The lymph nodes were negative in 30 (93,8%) patients and positive in 2 (6,3%). All positive lymph nodes patients also had microscopic residual tumor at the cervix. With the follow up ranging from six to 42 months and medium of 21 months, 29 (90,6%) patients are alive with no evidence of disease, one (5,6%) is alive with local recurrence and two (6,2%) have died due to the progression of local disease. Of the 19 patients with negative specimens, 18 (94,7%) are alive with no evidence of disease and of the 13 patients with positive specimens, 11 (84,6%) are alive with no evidence of disease. Local recurrence occurred in two patients with positive specimens and in one with negative. These differences are not

  4. A meta-analysis of hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy and combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens in unresected locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budach V

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Former meta-analyses have shown a survival benefit for the addition of chemotherapy (CHX to radiotherapy (RT and to some extent also for the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT and accelerated radiation therapy (AFRT in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the head and neck. However, the publication of new studies and the fact that many older studies that were included in these former meta-analyses used obsolete radiation doses, CHX schedules or study designs prompted us to carry out a new analysis using strict inclusion criteria. Methods Randomised trials testing curatively intended RT (≥60 Gy in >4 weeks/>50 Gy in Results Thirty-two trials with a total of 10 225 patients were included into the meta-analysis. An overall survival benefit of 12.0 months was observed for the addition of simultaneous CHX to either CFRT or HFRT/AFRT (p Conclusion RT combined with simultaneous 5-FU, cisplatin, carboplatin, and mitomycin C as single drug or combinations of 5-FU with one of the other drugs results in a large survival advantage irrespective the employed radiation schedule. If radiation therapy is used as single modality, hyperfractionation leads to a significant improvement of overall survival. Accelerated radiation therapy alone, especially when given as split course radiation schedule or extremely accelerated treatments with decreased total dose, does not increase overall survival.

  5. Phase II Trial of Preoperative Irinotecan-Cisplatin Followed by Concurrent Irinotecan-Cisplatin and Radiotherapy for Resectable Locally Advanced Gastric and Esophagogastric Junction Adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, Fernando; Galan, Maica; Tabernero, Josep; Cervantes, Andres; Vega-Villegas, M. Eugenia; Gallego, Javier; Laquente, Berta; Rodriguez, Edith; Carrato, Alfredo; Escudero, Pilar; Massuti, Bartomeu; Alonso-Orduna, Vicente; Cardenal, Adelaida; Saenz, Alberto; Giralt, Jordi; Yuste, Ana Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine in a Phase II trial whether preoperative irinotecan-cisplatin (IC) followed by concurrent IC therapy and radiotherapy (IC/RT) improved outcome in patients with resectable, locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma (GC) or esophagogastric junction cancer (EGJC). Patients and Methods: Patients with resectable Stage II-IV, M0 GC or EGJC made up the study population. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR). Two courses of IC (irinotecan, 65mg/m 2 ; cisplatin, 30mg/m 2 on Days 1 and 8 every 21 days) were given. Patients without progression then received IC/RT, consisting of daily radiotherapy (45Gy) with concurrent IC (irinotecan, 65mg/m 2 ; cisplatin, 30mg/m 2 on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22). Surgical resection was performed, if feasible, 5-8 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. Results: Twenty-three patients were included in the study: 10 with EGJC and 13 with GC. Two patients (9%) achieved pCR. The incidences of Grade 3-4 toxicities were as follows: IC: neutropenia 35% (febrile 13%), anemia 22%, diarrhea 22%, emesis 8%; IC/RT: neutropenia 52% (febrile 5%), asthenia 19%, anemia 9%, emesis 9%, diarrhea 5%, cardiotoxicity 5%. No patients died during IC or IC/RT. R0 resection was achieved in 15 patients (65%). Median survival was 14.5 months, and the actuarial 2-year survival rate was 35%. Conclusions: Preoperative IC followed by IC/RT resulted in moderate response and resection rates with mild toxicity in patients with GC and EGJC.

  6. A bladder preservation regimen using intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer. A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyanaga, Naoto; Akaza, Hideyuki; Okumura, Toshiyuki

    2000-01-01

    A prospective study was performed to investigate combined treatment with intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiation therapy for bladder preservation in locally invasive bladder cancer. Patients with invasive bladder cancer, stage T2-3N0M0, were included in the study. lntra-arterial chemotherapy was performed with three injections of methotrexate and cisplatin at 3-week intervals. Simultaneously, the patients underwent X-ray irradiation (40 Gy) of the small pelvic space. Where a post-treatment transurethral resection (TUR) biopsy showed no residual tumor, the tumor site was irradiated by a 30 Gy proton beam and the bladder was preserved. Where tumors remained, radical cystectomy was performed. Between 1990 and 1996, 42 patients were treated according to this protocol. Post-treatment TUR biopsy and urine cytology showed no residual tumors in 39 of 42 cases (93%). The bladder was preserved in accordance with the study protocol in 36 cases. A median follow-up of 38 months showed 3-year non-recurrence in 72% of bladder-preserved patients and the rate of bladder preservation was 84%. The nine recurrences included eight cases of superficial bladder recurrence. One cancer death occurred among the bladder-preservation patients, giving 3-year survival and cause-specific survival rates of 84% and 100%, respectively. Although bladder function decreased slightly in compliance, bladder capacity was retained in almost all cases. This regimen is useful for bladder preservation in T2-3 locally invasive bladder cancer. Information from more cases and the results of more long-term observations are needed, as is an evaluation of appropriate subject selection and factors associated with quality of life issues, particularly regarding bladder function. (author)

  7. Long-term results of preoperative intra-arterial doxorubicin combined with neoadjuvant radiotherapy, followed by extensive surgical resection for locally advanced soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijhuis, P.H.A.; Pras, E.; Sleijfer, D.T.; Molenaar, W.M.; Schraffordt Koops, H.; Hoekstra, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Background and purpose: In the 1980s a combined modality therapy of intraarterial doxorubicin, neoadjuvant radiotherapy and surgery was initiated at the Groningen University Hospital as a limb-saving treatment for locally advanced, primarily irresectable high-grade soft tissue sarcomas (STS) of the extremities. This study presents the short- and long-term results.Patients and methods: Between 1983 and 1987, 11 patients were treated with intraarterial doxorubicin, preoperative radiotherapy (10x3.5 Gy) and surgical resection. Non-radical resections received additional postoperative radiotherapy of 20-30 Gy.Results: The limb-salvage rate was 91%, without local recurrences during a median hollow-up of 84 months. Six patients died (55%); five from metastatic disease (45%). There were five long-term survivors with a median follow-up of 10 years. Three patients (60%) suffered serious late complications, resulting in disabilitating limb function. Conclusion: Although this approach is feasible as a limb-saving treatment for these unfavorable STS, long-term morbidity is high. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  8. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mardynskij, Yu.S.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for roentgenotopometric and medicamentous preparation of patients for radiotherapy has been reported in detail. The features of planning and performing of remote, intracavitary and combined therapy in urinary bladder cancer are considered. The more effective methods of radiotherapy have been proposed taking into account own experience as well as literature data. The comparative evaluation of treatment results and prognosis are given. Radiation pathomorphism of tumors and tissues of urinary bladder is considered in detail. The problems of diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of complications following radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy in patients with urinary bladder cancer are illustrated widely

  9. Concurrent radiotherapy with temozolomide vs. concurrent radiotherapy with a cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy regimen. Acute toxicity in pediatric high-grade glioma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Clemens; Kortmann, Rolf D. [University of Leipzig Medical Center, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Leipzig (Germany); Bueren, Andre O. von [University Medical Center Goettingen, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Geneva, Department of Pediatrics, CANSEARCH Research Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Bojko, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Marion; Kramm, Christof M. [University Medical Center Goettingen, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Pietsch, Torsten; Gielen, Gerrit H. [University of Bonn Medical Center, Department of Neuropathology, Brain Tumor Reference Center of the DGNN, Bonn (Germany); Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Bison, Brigitte [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    As the efficacy of all pediatric high-grade glioma (HGG) treatments is similar and still disappointing, it is essential to also investigate the toxicity of available treatments. Prospectively recorded hematologic and nonhematologic toxicities of children treated with radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D and HIT-HGG-2007 trials were compared. Children aged 3-18 years with histologically proven HGG (WHO grade III and IV tumors) or unequivocal radiologic diagnosis of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) were included in these trials. The HIT-HGG-2007 protocol comprised concomitant radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, while cisplatinum/etoposide (PE) and PE plus ifosfamide (PEI) in combination with weekly vincristine injections were applied during radiochemotherapy in the HIT GBM-C/D protocol. Regular blood counts and information about cellular nadirs were available from 304 patients (leukocytes) and 306 patients (thrombocytes), respectively. Grade 3-4 leukopenia was much more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 88, 52%) vs. HIT-HGG-2007 (n = 13, 10%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 thrombopenia was also more likely in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (n = 21, 12% vs. n = 3,2%; P <0.001). Grade 3-4 leukopenia appeared more often in children aged 3-7 years (n = 38/85, 45%) than in children aged 8-12 years (n = 39/120, 33%) and 13-18 years (24/100, 24%; P =0.034). In addition, sickness was more frequent in the HIT GBM-C/D cohort (grade 1-2: 44%, grade 3-4: 6% vs. grade 1-2: 28%, grade 3-4: 1%; P <0.001). Radiochemotherapy involving cisplatinum-based polychemotherapy is more toxic than radiotherapy in combination with temozolomide. Without evidence of differences in therapeutic efficacy, the treatment with lower toxicity, i. e., radiotherapy with temozolomide should be used. (orig.) [German] Die Wirksamkeit verschiedener Protokolle zur Radiochemotherapie bei Kindern mit hochmalignen Gliomen (''high-grade glioma'', HGG) ist aehnlich und leider noch enttaeuschend. Es

  10. Preoperative treatment with capecitabine, cetuximab and radiotherapy for primary locally advanced rectal cancer : A phase II clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisterer, Wolfgang; de Vries, Alexander; Öfner, Dietmar; Rabl, Hans; Koplmüller, Renate; Greil, Richard; Tschmelitsch, Jöerg; Schmid, Rainer; Kapp, Karin; Lukas, Peter; Sedlmayer, Felix; Höfler, Gerald; Gnant, Michael; Thaler, Josef; Widder, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: To investigate the feasibility and safety of preoperative capecitabine, cetuximab and radiation in patients with MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, cT3/T4). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 31 patients with LARC were treated with cetuximab and capecitabine concomitantly with 45

  11. SU-E-T-311: Dosimetric Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans for Preoperative Radiotherapy Rectal Cancer Using Flattening Filter-Free and Flattening Filter Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W; Zhang, J; Lu, J; Chen, C [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference of volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT) for preoperative radiotherapy rectal cancer using 6MV X-ray flattening filter free(FFF) and flattening filter(FF) modes. Methods: FF-VMAT and FFF-VMAT plans were designed to 15 rectal cancer patients with preoperative radiotherapy by planning treatment system(Eclipse 10.0),respectively. Dose prescription was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. All plans were normalized to 50 Gy to 95% of PTV. The Dose Volume Histogram (DVH), target and risk organ doses, conformity indexes (CI), homogeneity indexes (HI), low dose volume of normal tissue(BP), monitor units(MU) and treatment time (TT) were compared between the two kinds of plans. Results: FF-VMAT provided the lower Dmean, V105, HI, and higher CI as compared with FFF-VMAT. The small intestine of D5, Bladder of D5, Dmean, V40, V50, L-femoral head of V40, R-femoral head of Dmean were lower in FF-VMAT than in FFF-VMAT. FF-VMAT had higher BP of V5, but no significantly different of V10, V15, V20, V30 as compared with FFF-VMAT. FF-VMAT reduceed the monitor units(MU) by 21%(P<0.05), as well as the treatment time(TT) was no significantly different(P>0.05), as compared with FFF-VMAT. Conclusion: The plan qualities of FF and FFF VMAT plans were comparable and both clinically acceptable. FF-VMAT as compared with FFF-VMAT, showing better target coverage, some of OARs sparing, the MUs of FFF-VMAT were higher than FF-VMAT, yet were delivered within the same time. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  12. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannenmacher, M.; Debus, J.; Wenz, F.

    2006-01-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  13. Radiotherapy Does Not Influence the Severe Pulmonary Toxicity Observed With the Administration of Gemcitabine and Bleomycin in Patients With Advanced-Stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma Treated With the BAGCOPP Regimen: A Report by the German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macann, Andrew; Bredenfeld, Henning; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Diehl, Volker; Engert, Andreas; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on the severe pulmonary toxicity observed in the pilot study of BAGCOPP (bleomycin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone, and gemcitabine) for advanced-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III or IV Hodgkin's lymphoma or Stage IIB with risk factors participated in this single-arm, multicenter pilot study. Results: Twenty-seven patients were enrolled on the study before its premature closure as a result of the development of serious pulmonary toxicity in 8 patients. The pulmonary toxicity occurred either during or immediately after the BAGCOPP chemotherapy course. Pulmonary toxicity contributed to one early fatality but resolved in the other 7 patients after cessation of gemcitabine and bleomycin, allowing continuation of therapy. Fifteen patients received consolidative radiotherapy, including 4 who previously had pulmonary toxicity. There were no reported cases of radiation pneumonitis and no exacerbation of pulmonary symptoms in the 4 patients who had had previous pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions: The severe pulmonary toxicity observed in this study has been attributed to an interaction between gemcitabine and bleomycin. Gemcitabine (when administered without bleomycin) remains of interest in Hodgkin's lymphoma and is being incorporated into a new German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group protocol that also includes consolidative radiotherapy. This study supports the concept of the integration of radiotherapy in gemcitabine-containing regimens in Hodgkin's lymphoma if there is an interval of at least 4 weeks between the two modalities and with a schedule whereby radiotherapy follows the chemotherapy

  14. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistenma, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  15. Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braendengen, Morten, E-mail: mortbrae@medisin.uio.no [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Tveit, Kjell Magne [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Bruheim, Kjersti [Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Cancer Centre, Oslo (Norway); Cvancarova, Milada [Department of Clinical Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Berglund, Ake [Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25 {+-} 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

  16. Preoperative Radiotherapy and Wide Resection for Soft Tissue Sarcomas: Achieving a Low Rate of Major Wound Complications with the Use of Flaps. Results of a Single Surgical Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lester Wai Mon; Imanishi, Jungo; Grinsell, Damien Glen; Choong, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Surgery in combination with radiotherapy (RT) has become the standard of care for most soft tissue sarcomas. The choice between pre- and postoperative RT is controversial. Preoperative RT is associated with a 32-35% rate of major wound complications (MWC) and 16-25% rate of reoperation. The role of vascularized soft tissue "flaps" in reducing complications is unclear. We report the outcomes of patients treated with preoperative RT, resection, and flap reconstruction. 122 treatment episodes involving 117 patients were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were treated with 50.4 Gy of external beam radiation. Surgery was performed at 4-8 weeks after completion of RT by the same combination of orthopedic oncology and plastic reconstructive surgeon. Defects were reconstructed with 64 free and 59 pedicled/local flaps. 30 (25%) patients experienced a MWC and 17 (14%) required further surgery. 20% of complications were exclusively related to the donor site. There was complete or partial loss of three flaps. There was no difference in the rate of MWC or reoperation for complications with respect to age, sex, tumor site, previous unplanned excision, tumor grade, depth, and type of flap. Tumor size ≥8 cm was associated with a higher rate of reoperation (11/44 vs 6/78; P  = 0.008) but the rate of MWC was not significant (16/44 vs 14/78; P  = 0.066). The use of soft tissue flaps is associated with a low rate of MWC and reoperation. Our results suggest that a high rate of flap usage may be required to observe a reduction in complication rates.

  17. Tafazzin protein expression is associated with tumorigenesis and radiation response in rectal cancer: a study of Swedish clinical trial on preoperative radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surajit Pathak

    Full Text Available Tafazzin (TAZ, a transmembrane protein contributes in mitochondrial structural and functional modifications through cardiolipin remodeling. TAZ mutations are associated with several diseases, but studies on the role of TAZ protein in carcinogenesis and radiotherapy (RT response is lacking. Therefore we investigated the TAZ expression in rectal cancer, and its correlation with RT, clinicopathological and biological variables in the patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT.140 rectal cancer patients were included in this study, of which 65 received RT before surgery and the rest underwent surgery alone. TAZ expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in primary cancer, distant, adjacent normal mucosa and lymph node metastasis. In-silico protein-protein interaction analysis was performed to study the predictive functional interaction of TAZ with other oncoproteins.TAZ showed stronger expression in primary cancer and lymph node metastasis compared to distant or adjacent normal mucosa in both non-RT and RT patients. Strong TAZ expression was significantly higher in stages I-III and non-mucinious cancer of non-RT patients. In RT patients, strong TAZ expression in biopsy was related to distant recurrence, independent of gender, age, stages and grade (p = 0.043, HR, 6.160, 95% CI, 1.063-35.704. In silico protein-protein interaction study demonstrated that TAZ was positively related to oncoproteins, Livin, MAC30 and FXYD-3.Strong expression of TAZ protein seems to be related to rectal cancer development and RT response, it can be a predictive biomarker of distant recurrence in patients with preoperative RT.

  18. Preoperative Radiotherapy and Wide Resection for Soft Tissue Sarcomas: Achieving a Low Rate of Major Wound Complications with the Use of Flaps. Results of a Single Surgical Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lester Wai Mon Chan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSurgery in combination with radiotherapy (RT has become the standard of care for most soft tissue sarcomas. The choice between pre- and postoperative RT is controversial. Preoperative RT is associated with a 32–35% rate of major wound complications (MWC and 16–25% rate of reoperation. The role of vascularized soft tissue “flaps” in reducing complications is unclear. We report the outcomes of patients treated with preoperative RT, resection, and flap reconstruction.Patients and methods122 treatment episodes involving 117 patients were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were treated with 50.4 Gy of external beam radiation. Surgery was performed at 4–8 weeks after completion of RT by the same combination of orthopedic oncology and plastic reconstructive surgeon. Defects were reconstructed with 64 free and 59 pedicled/local flaps.Results30 (25% patients experienced a MWC and 17 (14% required further surgery. 20% of complications were exclusively related to the donor site. There was complete or partial loss of three flaps. There was no difference in the rate of MWC or reoperation for complications with respect to age, sex, tumor site, previous unplanned excision, tumor grade, depth, and type of flap. Tumor size ≥8 cm was associated with a higher rate of reoperation (11/44 vs 6/78; P = 0.008 but the rate of MWC was not significant (16/44 vs 14/78; P = 0.066.ConclusionThe use of soft tissue flaps is associated with a low rate of MWC and reoperation. Our results suggest that a high rate of flap usage may be required to observe a reduction in complication rates.

  19. Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brændengen, Morten; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Bruheim, Kjersti; Cvancarova, Milada; Berglund, Åke; Glimelius, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy × 25 ± 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

  20. Changes in T-cell count in patients undergoing radiotherapy. With particular reference to preoperative irradiation for gastric carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, K; Sato, S [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1980-01-01

    To know changes in immunological competence of T-cells induced by radiotherapy, T-cells in peripheral blood of patients who underwent radiotherapy were observed before, during, and 6 months after the irradiation. The subjects were 69 patients having malignant tumors including 20 with gastric cancer, 15 with breast cancer, and 9 with colon cancer. 200 rad of an exposure dose was irradiated for successive 5 to 6 days. A total of exposure doses ranged from 2,000 to 10,000 rad. T-cell count decreased markedly until exposure doses reached 3,000 rad, but its decrease was mild after exposure doses were over 3,000 rad. T-cell count decreased slightly in patients whose head and neck were irradiated, but it decreased markedly in patients whose thorax and abdomen were irradiated. Therefore, it was thought that there was a relationship between exposed sites and the decrease in T-cell count. T-cell count decreased markedly when irradiation field was wide. The smaller exposure doses were, the earlier the recovery of T-cell were. T-cells irradiated with over 7,000 rad did not recover within 6 months after the irradiation. The recovery of T-cells in patients with gastric cancer who did not undergo gastrectomy was markedly worse than that in patients who had gastrectomy. Patterns of changes in T-cell count were divided into 4 (ascending curve, U-type curve, flat curve, and descending curve), and prognosis of patients were discussed. There was a clear difference in prognosis of patients among four patterns.

  1. A phase II study of preoperative mFOLFOX6 with short-course radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and liver-only metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Shin, Sang Joon; Cho, Min Soo; Ahn, Joong Bae; Jung, Minkyu; Kim, Tae Il; Park, Young Suk; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Nam Kyu; Koom, Woong Sub

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of upfront mFOLFOX6 followed by short-course radiotherapy (SCRT) and surgery in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and liver-only metastases. This single-arm phase II study involved 32 patients. mFOLFOX6 was administered for four cycles followed by SCRT and another four cycles of mFOLFOX6. Surgery was performed 4-6 weeks after the last chemotherapy cycle. The primary endpoint was complete (R0) resection rate. Secondary endpoints were response rate, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and complication rates. Surgical resection of the rectum and liver was performed in 25 patients (78%) and R0 resection was achieved in 20 patients (63%). Local tumor downstaging was observed in 54% of patients. Median OS and PFS were 38 and 9 months, respectively. One patient discontinued treatment due to toxicity and no treatment-related deaths occurred. Patients who progressed after 4 cycles of mFOLFOX6 were less likely to receive resection. This regimen was safe and effective in inducing local tumor response and achieving R0 resection in this patient population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Which benefits and harms of preoperative radiotherapy should be addressed? A Delphi consensus study among rectal cancer patients and radiation oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunneman, Marleen; Pieterse, Arwen H.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Marijnen, Corrie A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: We previously found considerable variation in information provision on preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) in rectal cancer. Our aims were to reach consensus among patients and oncologists on which benefits/harms of PRT should be addressed during the consultation, and to assess congruence with daily clinical practice. Materials and methods: A four-round Delphi-study was conducted with two expert panels: (1) 31 treated rectal cancer patients and (2) 35 radiation oncologists. Thirty-seven possible benefits/harms were shown. Participants indicated whether addressing the benefit/harm was (1) essential, (2) desired, (3) not necessary, or (4) to be avoided. Consensus was assumed when ⩾80% of the panel agreed. Results were compared to 81 audio-taped consultations. Results: The panels reached consensus that six topics should be addressed in all patients (local control, survival, long term altered defecation pattern and faecal incontinence, perineal wound healing problems, advice to avoid pregnancy), three in male patients (erectile dysfunction, ejaculation disorder, infertility), and four in female patients (vaginal dryness, pain during intercourse, menopause, infertility). On average, less than half of these topics were addressed in daily clinical practice. Conclusions: This study showed substantial overlap between benefits/harms that patients and oncologists consider important to address during the consultation, and at the same time poor congruence with daily clinical practice

  3. Posttreatment TNM staging is a prognostic indicator of survival and recurrence in tethered or fixed rectal carcinoma after preoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Alexander K.P.; Wong, Alfred; Jenken, Daryl; Heine, John; Buie, Donald; Johnson, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of the posttreatment TNM stage as a predictor of outcome in locally advanced rectal cancers treated with preoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Methods and materials: Between 1993 and 2000, 128 patients with tethered (103) or fixed (25) rectal cancers were treated with 50 Gy preoperative pelvic radiotherapy and two cycles of concurrent 5-fluorouracil infusion (20 mg/kg/d) and leucovorin (200 mg/m 2 /d) chemotherapy on Days 1-4 and 22-25 and a single bolus mitomycin C injection (8 mg/m 2 ) on Day 1. Of the 128 patients, 111 had Stage T3 and 17 Stage T4 according to the rectal ultrasound or CT findings and clinical evaluation. All 128 patients underwent surgery 8 weeks after chemoradiotherapy. Postoperatively, the disease stage was determined according to the surgical and pathologic findings using the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system. Results: Of the 128 patients, 32 had postchemoradiotherapy (pCR) Stage 0 (T0N0M0), 37 pCR Stage I, 26 pCR Stage II, 28 pCR Stage III, and 5 pCR Stage IV disease. Of the 128 patients, 79 had pCR Stage T0-T2, 35 pCR Stage T3, and 14 pCR Stage T4. The rate of T stage downstaging was 66% (84 of 128). Of the 128 patients, 25% achieved a pathologic complete response, and 31 (24%) had positive nodal disease. Lymphovascular or perineural invasion was found in 13 patients (10%). The 5-year disease-specific survival rate was 97% for pCR Stage 0, 88% for pCR Stage I, 74% for pCR Stage II, 44% for pCR Stage III, and 0% for pCR Stage IV (p = 0.0000059). The 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 97% for pCR Stage 0, 80% for pCR Stage I, 72% for pCR Stage II, 42% for pCR Stage III, and 0% for pCR Stage IV (p < 0.000001). In univariate analysis, the pretreatment tumor status (fixed vs. tethered tumors), the pCR TNM stage, T stage downstaging, pathologic T4 tumors, node-positive disease after chemoradiotherapy, and lymphovascular or perineural invasion were statistically significant

  4. A third generation regimen VACOP-B with or without adjuvant radiotherapy for aggressive localized non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: report from the Italian Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Co-operative Study Group

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    G. Santini

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this multicenter prospective study was to determine the clinical efficacy and toxicity of a polychemotherapeutic third generation regimen, VACOP-B, with or without radiotherapy as front-line therapy in aggressive localized non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Ninety-three adult patients (47 males and 46 females, median age 45 years with aggressive localized non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 43 in stage I and 50 in stage II (non-bulky, were included in the study. Stage I patients received VACOP-B for 6 weeks plus involved field radiotherapy and stage II patients received 12 weeks VACOP-B plus involved field radiotherapy on residual masses. Eighty-six (92.5% achieved complete remission and 4 (4.3% partial remission. Three patients (3.2% were primarily resistant. Ten-year probability of survival, progression-free survival and disease-free survival were 87.3, 79.9 and 83.9%, respectively. Eighty-four patients are surviving at a median observation time of 57 months (range: 6-126. Statistical analysis showed no difference between stages I and II in terms of response, ten-year probability of survival, progression-free survival or disease-free survival. Side effects and toxicity were negligible and were similar in the two patient groups. The results of this prospective study suggest that 6 weeks of VACOP-B treatment plus radiotherapy may be the therapy of choice in stage I aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Twelve weeks of VACOP-B treatment with or without radiotherapy was shown to be effective and feasible for stage II. These observations need to be confirmed by a phase III study comparing first and third generation protocols in stage I-II aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  5. Dose escalation by image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy leads to an increase in pain relief for spinal metastases: a comparison study with a regimen of 30 Gy in 10 fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinlan; Xiao, Jianghong; Peng, Xingchen; Duan, Baofeng; Li, Yan; Ai, Ping; Yao, Min; Chen, Nianyong

    2017-12-22

    Under the existing condition that the optimum radiotherapy regimen for spinal metastases is controversial, this study investigates the benefits of dose escalation by image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) with 60-66 Gy in 20-30 fractions for spinal metastases. In the dose-escalation group, each D50 of planning gross tumor volume (PGTV) was above 60 Gy and each Dmax of spinal cord planning organ at risk volume (PRV) was below 48 Gy. The median biological effective dose (BED) of Dmax of spinal cord was lower in the dose-escalation group compared with that in the 30-Gy group (69.70 Gy vs. 83.16 Gy, p pain responses were better in the dose-escalation group than those in the 30-Gy group ( p = 0.005 and p = 0.024), and the complete pain relief rates were respectively 73.69% and 34.29% ( p = 0.006), 73.69% and 41.38% ( p = 0.028) in two compared groups. In the dose-escalation group, there is a trend of a longer duration of pain relief, a longer overall survival and a lower incidence of acute radiation toxicities. No late radiation toxicities were observed in both groups. Dosimetric parameters and clinical outcomes, including pain response, duration of pain relief, radiation toxicities and overall survival, were compared among twenty-five metastatic spinal lesions irradiated with the dose-escalation regimen and among forty-four lesions treated with the 30-Gy regimen. Conventionally-fractionated IG-IMRT for spinal metastases could escalate dose to the vertebral lesions while sparing the spinal cord, achieving a better pain relief without increasing radiation complications.

  6. Impact of Preoperative Radiotherapy on General and Disease-Specific Health Status of Rectal Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thong, Melissa S.Y.; Mols, Floortje; Lemmens, Valery E.P.P.; Rutten, Harm J.T.; Roukema, Jan A.; Martijn, Hendrik; Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To date, few studies have evaluated the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (pRT) on long-term health status of rectal cancer survivors. Using a population-based sample, we assessed the impact of pRT on general and disease-specific health status of rectal cancer survivors up to 10 years postdiagnosis. The health status of older (≥75 years old at diagnosis) pRT survivors was also compared with that of younger survivors. Methods and Materials: Survivors identified from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry treated with surgery only (SU) or with pRT between 1998 and 2007 were included. Survivors completed the Short Form-36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Colorectal 38 (EORTC QLQ-CR38) questionnaire. The SF-36 and EORTC QLQ-CR38 (sexuality subscale) scores of the survivors were compared to an age- and sex-matched Dutch normal population. Results: A total of 340 survivors (response, 85%; pRT survivors, 71%) were analyzed. Overall, survivors had similar general health status. Both short-term (<5 years) and long-term (≥5 years) pRT survivors had significantly poorer body image and more problems with gastrointestinal function, male sexual dysfunction, and defecation than SU survivors. Survivors had comparable general health status but greater sexual dysfunction than the normal population. Older pRT survivors had general and disease-specific health status comparable to that of younger pRT survivors. Conclusions: For better survivorship care, rectal cancer survivors could benefit from increased clinical and psychological focus on the possible long-term morbidity of treatment and its effects on health status.

  7. Phase I and II trial on infusional 5-fluorouracil and gefitinib in combination with preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer: 10-years median follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antonietta Gambacorta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the long term survival of the addition of gefitinib to chemoradiotherapy (CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC. Methods and materials: This previously published multicentre, open-label, phase I-II study, enrolled patients (pts with LARC to receive CRT with concurrent 5-fluorouracil continuous intravenous infusion and a dose escalation of orally administered gefitinib, followed 6–8 weeks later by surgery. An intra-operative radiotherapy boost of 10 Gy was planned. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administrated in ypN1-2 pts. After a median f/u of >10 years, we analyzed Local Control (LC, Metastasis Free Survival (MFS, Disease Free Survival (DFS, Disease Specific Survival (DSS and Overall Survival (OS. Predictive endpoints of clinical outcomes were tested by univariate and multivariate analysis. Variables analyzed included: age, gefitinib dose and interruptions, adjuvant CT, surgery type, ypT, ypN, and TRG grade. We have also analyzed late toxicity according to CTCAEv4. Results: Of the 41 initially enrolled pts, 39 were evaluable (27M, 12F. With a median f/u of 133 months, LC, MFS, DFS, OS and DSS at 5 years were 84%; 71%; 64%; 87% and 92%, respectively. The OS and DSS at 10 years were 61,5% and 76%, respectively. Grade 3-4 late toxicity occurred in 38% of pts: sexual (28,2% and gastrointestinal toxicities (10,2%. Conclusion: Long term outcomes and late toxicity were similar to previously reported series. The addition of gefitinib did not improve outcomes in LARC. Gefitinib is not recommended for rectal cancer patients who received 5-FU based preoperative CRT. Further studies may identify if gefitinib is beneficial in selected group of patients. Keywords: Rectal cancer, Gefitinib, Log term follow-up, Chemoradiotherapy

  8. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy as adjuvant regimen after conserving surgery for early breast cancer: interim report of toxicity after a minimum follow up of 3 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Accelerated hypofractionation is an attractive approach for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy. In this study we evaluated the adverse effects at least 3 years post an accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy schedule. Methods From October 2004 to March 2006, 39 consecutive patients aged over 18 years with pTis, pT1-2, pN0-1 breast adenocarcinoma who underwent conservative surgery were treated with an adjuvant accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule consisting of 34 Gy in 10 daily fractions over 2 weeks to the whole breast, followed after 1 week by an electron boost dose of 8 Gy in a single fraction to the tumour bed. Skin and lung radiation toxicity was evaluated daily during therapy, once a week for one month after radiotherapy completion, every 3 months for the first year and from then on every six months. In particular lung toxicity was investigated in terms of CT density evaluation, pulmonary functional tests, and clinical and radiological scoring. Paired t-test, Chi-square test and non-parametric Wilcoxon test were performed. Results After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 36-52 months), all the patients are alive and disease-free. None of the patients showed any clinical signs of lung toxicity, no CT-lung toxicity was denoted by radiologist on CT lung images acquired about 1 year post-radiotherapy, no variation of pulmonary density evaluated in terms of normalised Hounsfield numbers was evident. Barely palpable increased density of the treated breast was noted in 9 out of 39 patients (in 2 patients this toxicity was limited to the boost area) and teleangectasia (radiotherapy schedule investigated in this study (i.e 34 Gy in 3.4 Gy/fr plus boost dose of 8 Gy in single fraction) is a feasible and safe treatment and does not lead to adjunctive acute and late toxicities. A longer follow up is necessary to confirm these favourable results. PMID:20100335

  9. Quality of life assessment in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients undergoing an accelerated radiotherapy regimen: report of ECOG study 4593

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchter, Richard M.; Scholtens, Denise; Adak, Sudeshna; Wagner, Henry; Cella, David F.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the quality of life (QOL) before, at completion, and after therapy for patients receiving an accelerated fractionation schedule of radiotherapy for advanced, unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer in a Phase II multi-institutional trial. Methods and Materials: The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung (FACT-L) patient questionnaire was used to score the QOL in patients enrolled in the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Phase II trial (ECOG 4593) of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer. Radiotherapy (total dose 57.6 Gy in 36 fractions) was delivered during 15 days, with three radiation fractions given each treatment day. The protocol was activated in 1993, and 30 patients had accrued by November 1995. The FACT-L questionnaire was administered at study entry (baseline), on the last day of radiotherapy (assessment 2), and 4 weeks after therapy (assessment 3). The FACT-L includes scores for physical, functional, emotional, and social well-being (33 items), and a subscale of lung cancer symptoms (10 additional items). The summation of the physical, functional, and lung cancer symptom subscales (21 items) constitutes the Trial Outcome Index (TOI), considered the most clinically relevant outcome measure in lung cancer treatment trials. Results: The FACT-L completion rates at the designated study time points were as follows: baseline, 30 of 30 (100%); assessment 2, 29 (97%) of 30; and assessment 3, 24 (80%) of 30. At treatment completion, statistically significant declines in QOL scores were noted, compared with baseline for physical and functional well-being. Emotional well-being scores improved at both assessment 2 and assessment 3. The physical and functional scores returned approximately to baseline values at assessment 3. The change in TOI score was evaluated as a function of the clinical response to treatment, toxicity grade, and survival; no clear association was noted. A trend for the

  10. Long-term quality of life in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative (chemo)-radiotherapy within a randomized trial; Evaluation a long terme de la qualite de vie de patients atteints de cancer rectal apras (chimio) radiotherapie dans un essai controle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiv, M.; Puyraveau, M.; Mercier, M.; Bosset, J.F. [EA3181, Besancon University Hospital, University of Franche-Comte, 25 - Besancon (France); Puyraveau, M. [Clinical Research Management Unit, Besancon University Hospital, 25 - Besancon (France); Mineur, L. [Department of Radiation Therapy, Clinic Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France); Calais, G. [Department of Radiation Therapy, University Francois-Rabelais, 37 - Tours (France); Maingon, P. [Department of Radiation Therapy, Cancer Center Dijon, 21 - Dijon (France); Bardet, E. [Department of Radiation Therapy, centre Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes-Saint-Herblain (France); Mercier, M.; Bosset, J.F. [Department of Radiation Therapy, Besancon University Hospital, 25 - Besancon (France)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Few studies have evaluated the quality of life (QoL) of patients with rectal cancer. This report describes the quality of life of French patients who entered the 22921 EORTC trial that investigated the role and place of chemotherapy (CT) added to preoperative radiotherapy (preop-RT). Patients and Methods: Patients without recurrences were evaluated with EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR38 questionnaires, after a median time of 4.6 years from randomization. Results: All the scores of QLQ-C30 functions were high, from 78 up to 88, with those of global health quality of life scale (GHQL) status being 73. The mean scores of symptoms were low except for diarrhea. For QLQ-CR38, the mean scores for 'body image' and 'future perspective' were high at 79.6 and 69.7 respectively. The scores for 'sexual functioning' and 'enjoyment' were low. Men had more sexual problems than females (62.5 vs 25 mean scores respectively). Chemotherapy was associated with more diarrhea complaints, lower 'role', lower 'social functioning' and lower global health quality of life scale. Conclusion: The overall quality of life of patients with rectal cancer is quite good 4.6 years after the beginning preoperative treatments. However, adding chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy has a negative effect on diarrhea complaints and some quality of life dimensions. (authors)

  11. Radiotherapy of bronchogenic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, H.P.

    1982-01-01

    Radiotherapy of branchogenic carcinoma comprises; palliative treatment, postoperative or pre-operative radiotherapy, radiotherapy as part of a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy of small cell carcinoma and curative radiotherapy of non-operable non-small cell carcinoma. Atelectasis and obstruction are indications for palliative radiotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy is given only in cases of incomplete resection or mediastinal metastases. In the treatment of small cell carcinoma by combined irradiation and chemotherapy the mediastinum and primary tumour are irradiated, generally after chemotherapy, and the C.N.S. receives prophylactic radiotherapy. Curative radiotherapy is indicated in cases of non-operable small cell carcinoma. Irradiation with doses of 60-70 Gy produced 5-years-survival rates of 10-14% in cases classified as T 1 -T 2 N 0 M 0 . (orig.) [de

  12. Treatment planning and delivery of involved field radiotherapy in advanced Hodgkin's disease: results from a questionnaire-based audit for the UK Stanford V regimen vs ABVD clinical trial quality assurance programme (ISRCTN 64141244).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, P; Hoskin, P J; Aird, E G A

    2007-10-01

    This questionnaire forms the basis of the quality assurance (QA) programme for the UK randomized Phase III study of the Stanford V regimen versus ABVD for treatment of advanced Hodgkin's disease to assess differences between participating centres in treatment planning and delivery of involved-field radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma The questionnaire, which was circulated amongst 42 participating centres, consisted of seven sections: target volume definition and dose prescription; critical structures; patient positioning and irradiation techniques; planning; dose calculation; verification; and future developments The results are based on 25 responses. One-third plan using CT alone, one-third use solely the simulator and the rest individualize, depending on disease site. Eleven centres determine a dose distribution for each patient. Technique depends on disease site and whether CT or simulator planning is employed. Most departments apply isocentric techniques and use immobilization and customized shielding. In vivo dosimetry is performed in 7 centres and treatment verification occurs in 24 hospitals. In conclusion, the planning and delivery of treatment for lymphoma patients varies across the country. Conventional planning is still widespread but most centres are moving to CT-based planning and virtual simulation with extended use of immobilization, customized shielding and compensation.

  13. Breast cancer radiotherapy: controversies and prospectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jin-ming; WANG Yong-sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Despite consensus on breast cancer radiotherapy, there are still some controversies over post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), appropriate sequence of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal treatment, and radiotherapy after preoperative systemic therapy.

  14. Preoperative Radiotherapy of Advanced Rectal Cancer With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With or Without Cetuximab: A Pooled Analysis of Three Prospective Phase I-II Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Christian; Arnold, Dirk; Dellas, Kathrin; Liersch, Torsten; Hipp, Matthias; Fietkau, Rainer; Sauer, Rolf; Hinke, Axel; Roedel, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A pooled analysis of three prospective trials of preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) for rectal cancer by using oxaliplatin and capecitabine with or without cetuximab was performed to evaluate the impact of additional cetuximab on pathologic complete response (pCR) rates and tumor regression (TRG) grades. Methods and Materials: Of 202 patients, 172 patients met the inclusion criteria (primary tumor stage II/III, M0). All patients received concurrent RCT, and 46 patients received additional cetuximab therapy. A correlation of pretreatment clinicopathologic factors and cetuximab treatment with early pCR rates (TRG > 50%) was performed with univariate and multivariate analyses. Toxicity data were recorded for all patients. Results: Of 172 patients, 24 (14%) patients achieved a pCR, and 84 of 172 (71%) patients showed a TRG of >50% in the surgical specimen assessment after preoperative treatment. Age, gender, and T/N stages, as well as localization of the tumor, were not associated with pCR or good TRG. The pCR rate was 16% after preoperative RCT alone and 9% with concurrent cetuximab therapy (p = 0.32). A significantly reduced TRG of >50% was found after RCT with cetuximab compared to RCT alone (p = 0.0035). This was validated by a multivariate analysis with all available clinical factors (p = 0.0037). Acute toxicity and surgical complications were not increased with additional cetuximab. Conclusions: Triple therapy with RCT and cetuximab seems to be feasible, with no unexpected toxicity. Early response assessment (TRG), however, suggests subadditive interaction. A longer follow-up (and finally randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates.

  15. A Phase II study of preoperative radiotherapy and concomitant weekly irinotecan in combination with protracted venous infusion 5-fluorouracil, for resectable locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Matilde; Dotor, Emma; Rivera, Fernando; Sanchez-Rovira, Pedro; Vega-Villegas, Maria Eugenia; Cervantes, Andres; Garcia, Jose Luis; Gallen, Manel; Aranda, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with irinotecan (CPT-11) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with resectable rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with resectable T3-T4 rectal cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 2 weekly) and 5-FU (225 mg/m 2 /day continuous infusion, 5 days/week) were concurrently administered with radiation therapy (RT) (45 Gy, 1.8 Gy/day, 5 days/week), during 5 weeks. Results: A total of 74 patients were enrolled: mean age, 59 years (20-74 years; SD, 11.7). Planned treatment was delivered to most patients (median relative dose intensity for both drugs was 100%). Grade 3/4 lymphocytopenia occurred in 35 patients (47%), neutropenia in 5 (7%), and anemia in 2 (3%). Main Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities were diarrhea (14%), asthenia (9%), rectal mucositis (8%), and abdominal pain (8%). Of the 73 resected specimens, 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.8-23.7) had a pathologic complete response and 49.3% (95% CI, 37.4-61.3) were downstaged. Additionally, 66.7% (95% CI, 51.1-80.0) of patients with ultrasound staged N1/N2 disease had no pathologic evidence of nodal involvement after CRT. Conclusions: This preoperative CRT schedule has been shown to be effective and feasible in a large population of patients with resectable rectal cancer

  16. Preoperative evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.H.; Murphy, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    The value of a preoperative chest radiograph is twofold. The examination may reveal unsuspected pathology that would alter the approach to surgery of anesthesia. Secondly, it provides a baseline or reference from which to evaluate subsequent post-operative films. The percentage of detection of unsuspected pathology on preoperative chest radiographs has been shown to be exceedingly small in certain patient populations. The authors do not recommend routine use of preoperative chest radiographs in children or in adults under the age of 40 who do not smoke, unless (1) the surgical disease has chest manifestations; (2) there is historic or clinical evidence of a coexisting disease with chest involvement; or (3) there is a likelihood that post-operative management will require follow-up films

  17. The evaluation of the long term survival and functions in the autonomic nerve-sparing operation with pre-operative radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Norio; Sarashina, Hiromi; Nunomura, Masao; Koda, Keiji; Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Soda, Hiroaki; Ozaki, Kazuyoshi; Sugaya, Yoshiki; Nakajima, Nobuyuki

    1997-01-01

    One hundred and ninety five patients have been received autonomic nerve-sparing operations for rectal cancer in our department since 1984. These patients were classified into two groups, those with preoperative irradiation (irradiated group) and those with surgery alone. The survival rates and the local recurrence rates for these patients were compared, and post-operative urinary and male sexual functions were discussed. The overall cumulative five-year and nine-year survival rates were 80.3% and 66.5%, whereas those in the irradiated group were 84.0% and 77.7%, and those in the surgery alone group were 74.6% and 62.9%. Local recurrence rates were 9.6% all, 5.6% in the irradiated groups, and 11.9% in the surgery alone group. Maintenance of urinary function was successful in almost all patients with bilateral and unilateral pelvic nerve plexus. But the sexual function in males especially ejaculation was preserved in only 54.5% of the patients with bilateral hypogastric nerve and pelvic plexus, and in only 14.3% of the patients with unilateral saving. There was no significant deference in the outcome of the two group, but there was a tendency to obtain the better survival and to decrease the local recurrence in the irradiated group. It was difficult to preserve the sexual function by the nerve-sparing operation with lymphadevectomy. (author)

  18. Low dose combined chemotherapy/radiotherapy in the management of locally advanced urethral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.W.; Kessler, J.F.; Ferrigni, R.G.; Anderson, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    The successful treatment of a patient with bulky squamous cell carcinoma of the urethra using low dose preoperative radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy is described. Dramatic rapid tumor response facilitated surgical resection of the remaining microscopic disease. This clinical behavior is remarkably similar to that seen with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal and esophagus when a similar regimen is used. At the latter tumor sites the successful use of combination radiotherapy and chemotherapy has reduced the morbidity of subsequent surgery, and in selected cases has obviated the need for a radical operation. Further investigation of such combination treatment is warranted for urethral carcinoma

  19. S-1-Based versus capecitabine-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer: a matched-pair analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Su

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to compare the efficacy and safety of S-1-based and capecitabine-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy regimens in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer through a retrospective matched-pair analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between Jan 2010 and Mar 2014, 24 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received preoperative radiotherapy concurrently with S-1 were individually matched with 24 contemporary patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received preoperative radiotherapy concurrently with capecitabine according to clinical stage (as determined by pelvic magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography and age (within five years. All these patients performed mesorectal excision 4-8 weeks after the completion of chemoradiotherapy. RESULTS: The tumor volume reduction rates were 55.9±15.1% in the S-1 group and 53.8±16.0% in the capecitabine group (p = 0.619. The overall downstaging, including both T downstaging and N downstaging, occurred in 83.3% of the S-1 group and 70.8% of the capecitabine group (p = 0.508. The significant tumor regression, including regression grade I and II, occurred in 33.3% of S-1 patients and 25.0% of capecitabine patients (p = 0.754. In the two groups, Grade 4 adverse events were not observed and Grade 3 consisted of only two cases of diarrhea, and no patient suffered hematologic adverse event of Grade 2 or higher. However, the incidence of diarrhea (62.5% vs 33.3%, p = 0.014 and hand-foot syndrome (29.2% vs 0%, p = 0.016 were higher in capecitabine group. Other adverse events did not differ significantly between two groups. CONCLUSIONS: The two preoperative chemoradiotherapy regimens were effective and safe for patients of locally advanced rectal cancer, but regimen with S-1 exhibited a lower incidence of adverse events.

  20. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials.

  1. Results of preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sang Gyu; Kim, Su Ssan; Bae, Hoon Sik [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    We performed a retrospective non-randomized clinical study of locally advanced rectal cancer, to evaluate the anal sphincter preservation rates, down staging rates and survival rates of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. From January 2002 to December 2005, patients with pathologically confirmed rectal cancer with clinical stage T2 or higher, or patients with lymph node metastasis were enrolled in this study. A preoperative staging work-up was conducted in 36 patients. All patients were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy, and curative resection was performed for 26 patients at Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital. Radiotherapy treatment planning was conducted with the use of planning CT for all patients. A total dose of 45.0 {approx} 52.2 Gy conventionally fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy was delivered to the whole pelvis. Chemotherapy was given at the first and fifth week of radiation therapy with continuous infusion i.v. 5-FU (Fluorouracil) and LV (Leucovorine). Surgical resection was performed 2 to 4 weeks after the completion of the chemoradiotherapy regimen. The complete resection rate with negative resection margin was 100% (26/26). However, a pathologically complete response was not seen after curative resection. Surgery was done by LAR (low anterior resection) in 23 patients and APR (abdomino-perineal resection) in 3 patients. The sphincter preservation rate was 88.5% (23/26), down staging of the tumor occurred in 12 patients (46.2%) and down-sizing of the tumor occurred in 19 patients (73%). Local recurrence after surgical resection developed in 1 patient, and distant metastasis developed in 3 patients. The local recurrence free survival rate, distant metastasis free survival rate, and progression free survival rate were 96.7%, 87% and 83.1%, respectively. Treatment related toxicity was minimal except for one grade 3, one grade 4 anemia, one grade 3 leukopenia, and one grade 3 ileus. Preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally

  2. Value of intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferenschild, Floris T. J.; Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J. M. E.; Graveland, Wilfried J.; Marinelli, Andreas W. K. S.; van der Sijp, Joost R.; Wiggers, Theo; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to analyze the results of a multimodality treatment using preoperative radiotherapy, followed by surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: Between 1987 and 2002, 123 patients with initial unresectable

  3. Classifying insulin regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neu, A; Lange, K; Barrett, T

    2015-01-01

    Modern insulin regimens for the treatment of type 1 diabetes are highly individualized. The concept of an individually tailored medicine accounts for a broad variety of different insulin regimens applied. Despite clear recommendations for insulin management in children and adolescents with type 1...

  4. Radiotherapy in digestive tumours in elderly patients; Radiotherapie dans les tumeurs digestives chez le patient age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillerme, F.; Clavier, J.B.; Nehme-Schuster, H.; Schumacher, C.; Noel, G. [Centre de lutte contre le cancer Paul-Strauss, Strasbourg (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors comment the taking into care of a digestive cancer in the case of elderly patient. These patients are treated by radiotherapy, operative radiotherapy with concomitant chemotherapy, or pre-operative radiotherapy, depending on the age, on the cancer type, with an adaptation of the total dose or with a hypo-fractionation of the treatment. Short communication

  5. Clinicopathological outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy using S-1 plus Irinotecan for T4 lower rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beppu, Naohito; Yoshie, Hidenori; Kimura, Fumihiko; Aihara, Tsukasa; Doi, Hiroshi; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Matsubara, Nagahide; Tomita, Naohiro; Yanagi, Hidenori; Yamanaka, Naoki

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the clinicopathological outcomes of patients with T4 lower rectal cancer treated using preoperative chemoradiotherapy with S-1 plus Irinotecan. Between 2005 and 2011, 35 patients with T4M0 lower rectal cancer, diagnosed initially as T4a in 12 and as T4b in 23, were treated with 45 Gy of radiotherapy concomitantly with S-1 plus Irinotecan. The median follow-up period was 50.6 months (range 2-123 months). A total of 32 patients (91.4 %) completed the radiotherapy and 26 (74.3 %) completed the full chemotherapy regimen. Radical surgery was then performed in 33 (94.3 %) of the 35 patients after the exclusion of two patients, who had macroscopic residual disease. The pathological diagnosis was downstaged from T4a to ypT0-3 in all 12 of those patients (100 %) and from T4b to ypT0-4a in 20 of those 23 patients (87.0 %). The tumor regression grade of 1a/1b/2/3 (complete response) was 10/8/15/2, respectively. In terms of long-term survival, the 5-year local relapse-free survival rate was 74.8 % and the recurrence-free survival rate was 52.0 %. This regimen may result in favorable downstaging. Moreover, in this series, pathological evidence of involvement of adjacent organs was rare following preoperative chemoradiotherapy, in the patients with disease diagnosed as T4b at the initial staging.

  6. Systematic overview of preoperative (neoadjuvant) chemoradiotherapy trials in oesophageal cancer: Evidence of a radiation and chemotherapy dose response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geh, J. Ian; Bond, Simon J.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Glynne-Jones, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Numerous trials have shown that pathological complete response (pCR) following preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and surgery for oesophageal cancer is associated with improved survival. However, different radiotherapy doses and fractionations and chemotherapy drugs, doses and scheduling were used, which may account for the differences in observed pCR and survival rates. A dose-response relationship may exist between radiotherapy and chemotherapy dose and pCR. Patients and methods: Trials using a single radiotherapy and chemotherapy regimen (5FU, cisplatin or mitomycin C-based) and providing information on patient numbers, age, resection and pCR rates were eligible. The endpoint used was pCR and the covariates analysed were prescribed radiotherapy dose, radiotherapy dosexdose per fraction, radiotherapy treatment time, prescribed chemotherapy (5FU, cisplatin and mitomycin C) dose and median age of patients within the trial. The model used was a multivariate logistic regression. Results: Twenty-six trials were included (1335 patients) in which 311 patients (24%) achieved pCR. The probability of pCR improved with increasing dose of radiotherapy (P=0.006), 5FU (P=0.003) and cisplatin (P=0.018). Increasing radiotherapy treatment time (P=0.035) and increasing median age (P=0.019) reduced the probability of pCR. The estimated α/β ratio of oesophageal cancer was 4.9 Gy (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5-17 Gy) and the estimated radiotherapy dose lost per day was 0.59 Gy (95% CI 0.18-0.99 Gy). One gram per square metre of 5FU was estimated to be equivalent to 1.9 Gy (95% CI 0.8-5.2 Gy) of radiation and 100 mg/m 2 of cisplatin was estimated to be equivalent to 7.2 Gy (95% CI 2.1-28 Gy). Mitomycin C dose did not appear to influence pCR rates (P=0.60). Conclusions: There was evidence of a dose-response relationship between increasing protocol prescribed radiotherapy, 5FU and cisplatin dose and pCR. Additional significant factors were radiotherapy

  7. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (modified Eilber protocol) versus adjuvant radiotherapy in the treatment of extremity soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehane, Chris; Parasyn, Andrew; Ho, Frederick; Thompson, Stephen R.; Smee, Robert; Links, David; Crowe, Phil; Lewis, Craig; Friedlander, Michael; Williams, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Local control for extremity soft tissue sarcomas (STS) requires surgery combined with radiotherapy, usually given pre-operatively or post-operatively. The modified Eilber protocol, a neoadjuvant chemoradiation regimen, has been reported with excellent local control rates. This retrospective single-centre study compared outcomes for patients treated with the modified Eilber protocol with those treated with standard adjuvant radiotherapy. Twenty-nine patients were treated with modified Eilber protocol. Thirty-four patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. Three patients (10%) in the Eilber group and five patients (15%) in the Adjuvant group developed local recurrence (P = 0.87). Major acute wound complications were noted in four patients in each group (P = 0.55). One patient (3.4%) in the Eilber group developed Grade 3 or 4 late toxicities after 1 year compared with nine patients (27%) in the Adjuvant group (P = 0.02). Patients with a diagnosis of extremity STS were retrospectively reviewed from the Prince of Wales Hospital Sarcoma Database from 1995 to 2012. Sixty-three patients underwent curative surgery with either neoadjuvant Eilber chemoradiotherapy (Eilber) or adjuvant radiotherapy (Adjuvant). Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (Eilber protocol) provided similar rates of local control when compared with adjuvant radiotherapy. Acute wound complication rates were similar but there was less severe late toxicity in the Eilber group.

  8. Adjuvant Chemotherapy Seemed Not to Have Survival Benefit in Rectal Cancer Patients with ypTis-2N0 After Preoperative Radiotherapy and Surgery from a Population-Based Propensity Score Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiang; Li, Ya-Qi; Li, Qing-Guo; Ma, Yan-Lei; Peng, Jun-Jie; Cai, San-Jun

    2018-04-19

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is currently offered routinely, as standard, after radical resection for patients with rectal cancer receiving neo-adjuvant chemoradiation. However, the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with ypTis-2N0M0 has not been documented to the same extent, and the survival benefit remained controversial. The purpose of this work was to determine the role of chemotherapy in patients with ypTis-2N0M0 classification. Data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database ( n  = 4,217). A propensity score model was utilized to balance baseline covariates. Of the 4,217 included patients, 335 with ypTis-2N0M0 did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There were comparable cancer-specific survivals (CSS) between those undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy or not (log-rank test = 0.136, p  = .712) in the overall sample. After propensity score matching, the cancer-specific survival did not differ between the chemotherapy and observation groups (log-rank test = 0.089, p  = .765). Additionally, the Cox model did not demonstrate adjuvant chemotherapy as the prognostic factor, with hazard ratio = 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.69-1.32) for CSS. Furthermore, the 10-year cumulative CSS was 78.7% and 79.4% between the chemotherapy and observation groups, indicating no significance, and no impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on survival was observed in different subgroups stratified by T stage, histological grade, histology, lymph nodes, and tumor size. Patients with ypTis-2N0 rectal cancer did not benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative radiology and radical surgery in this cohort study. These results provided new insight into the routine use of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer with completed neo-adjuvant radiotherapy and curative surgery. Inconsistent recommendations for patients with rectal cancer receiving neo-adjuvant chemoradiation are offered by clinical guidelines. Adjuvant

  9. Customized mold radiotherapy with prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Tadahide; Tsuchiya, Yoshiyuki; Hayasaka, Junichi; Itoh, Hiroto; Jinbu, Yoshinori; Kusama, Mikio; Takahashi, Satoru; Nakazawa, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    Eight patients (6 males, 2 females; median age, 78 years; age range, 31-94 years) were treated by mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers between October 2006 and March 2013. The primary sites were the tongue in 3 cases, hard palate and buccal mucosa in 2 cases each, and oral floor in 1 case. The type of treatment consisted of radical radiotherapy and palliative radiotherapy in 2 cases each, and preoperative radiotherapy, postoperative radiotherapy, additional radiotherapy after external beam radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy in 1 case each. Patients received 40-50 Gy in 8-10 fractions with mold radiotherapy. Two patients who received radical radiotherapy showed no signs of recurrence or metastasis. The present therapy contributed to patients' palliative, postoperative, and preoperative therapy. Mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic appliance was performed safely and was a useful treatment for several types of oral cancer. (author)

  10. Phase III study comparing chemotherapy and radiotherapy with preoperative chemotherapy and surgical resection in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer with spread to mediastinal lymph nodes (N2); final report of RTOG 89-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, David W.; Byhardt, Roger W.; Ettinger, David; Scott, Charles B.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the outcome of treatment of mediastinoscopy-verified N2 non-small-cell lung cancer treated with induction chemotherapy followed by either surgery or radiotherapy (RT), with both options followed by consolidation chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A randomized Phase III trial for Stage IIIA (T1-T3N2M0) non-small cell lung cancer was conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group between April 1990 and April 1994. After documentation of N2 disease by mediastinoscopy or anterior mediastinotomy, patients received induction chemotherapy with cisplatin, vinblastine, and mitomycin-C. Mitomycin-C was later dropped from the induction regimen. Patients were then randomized to surgery or RT (64 Gy in 7 weeks) followed by cisplatin and vinblastine. Results: RTOG 89-01 accrued 75 patients, of whom 73 were eligible and analyzable. Twelve patients received induction chemotherapy but were not randomized to RT or surgery thereafter. Forty-five patients were randomized to postinduction RT or surgery. Of the analyzable patients, 90% had a Karnofsky performance score of 90-100, 18% had weight loss >5%, 37% had squamous cell histologic features, and 54% had bulky N2 disease. The distribution of bulky N2 disease was uniform among the treatment arms. The incidence of Grade 4 toxicity was 56% in patients receiving mitomycin-C and 29% in those who did not. Only 1 patient in each group had acute nonhematologic toxicity greater than Grade 3 (nausea and vomiting). No acute Grade 4 radiation toxicity developed. The incidences of long-term toxicity were equivalent across the arms. Three treatment-related deaths occurred: 2 patients in the surgical arms (one late pulmonary toxicity and one pulmonary embolus), and 1 patient in the radiation arm (radiation pneumonitis). Induction chemotherapy was completed in 78% of the patients. Complete resection was performed in 73% of 26 patients undergoing thoracotomy. Consolidation

  11. Comparison of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin and capecitabine in preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Duck-Woo; Chang, Hee Jin; Jeong, Jun Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Son, Seok-Hyun; Yun, Tak; Hong, Chang Won; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience with a bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL) vs. capecitabine in terms of radiologic and pathologic findings in preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: The study enrolled 278 patients scheduled for preoperative CRT using two protocols with different chemotherapeutic regimens. Pelvic radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) was delivered concurrently with FL (n = 145) or capecitabine (n = 133). Surgery was performed 6 weeks after CRT completion. Tumor responses to CRT were measured using both radiologic and pathologic examination. Magnetic resonance volumetry was performed at the initial workup and just before surgery after completion of preoperative CRT. Post-CRT pathology tests were used to determine tumor stage and regression. Results: Radiologic examination showed that tumor volume decreased by 68.2% ± 20.5% in the FL group and 68.3% ± 22.3% in the capecitabine group (p = 0.970). Postoperative pathologic T stage determination showed that downstaging occurred in 44.3% of FL and 49.9% of capecitabine patients (p = 0.571). The tumor regression grades after CRT were Grade 1 (minimal response) in 22.6% and 21.0%, Grade 2 (moderate response) in 53.2% and 50.0%, Grade 3 (near-complete response) in 12.9% and 12.9%, and Grade 4 (complete response) in 11.3% and 16.1% of the FL and capecitabine groups, respectively (p = 0.758). Conclusion: In the present study, the radiologic and pathologic findings did not reveal significant differences in short-term tumor responses between preoperative FL and capecitabine CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Long-term results and a prospective randomized trial are needed

  12. Short-course radiotherapy followed by neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer – the RAPIDO trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Per J; Marijnen, Corrie AM; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Wiggers, Theo; Glimelius, Bengt; Etten, Boudewijn van; Hospers, Geke AP; Påhlman, Lars; Velde, Cornelis JH van de; Beets-Tan, Regina GH; Blomqvist, Lennart; Beukema, Jannet C; Kapiteijn, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Current standard for most of the locally advanced rectal cancers is preoperative chemoradiotherapy, and, variably per institution, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Short-course preoperative radiation with delayed surgery has been shown to induce tumour down-staging in both randomized and observational studies. The concept of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy has been proven successful in gastric cancer, hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer and is currently tested in primary colon cancer. Patients with rectal cancer with high risk features for local or systemic failure on magnetic resonance imaging are randomized to either a standard arm or an experimental arm. The standard arm consists of chemoradiation (1.8 Gy x 25 or 2 Gy x 25 with capecitabine) preoperatively, followed by selective postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy is optional and may be omitted by participating institutions. The experimental arm includes short-course radiotherapy (5 Gy x 5) followed by full-dose chemotherapy (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in 6 cycles before surgery. In the experimental arm, no postoperative chemotherapy is prescribed. Surgery is performed according to TME principles in both study arms. The hypothesis is that short-course radiotherapy with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy increases disease-free and overall survival without compromising local control. Primary end-point is disease-free survival at 3 years. Secondary endpoints include overall survival, local control, toxicity profile, and treatment completion rate, rate of pathological complete response and microscopically radical resection, and quality of life. Following the advances in rectal cancer management, increased focus on survival rather than only on local control is now justified. In an experimental arm, short-course radiotherapy is combined with full-dose chemotherapy preoperatively, an alternative that offers advantages compared to concomitant chemoradiotherapy with or without postoperative

  13. Efficacy and short-term outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with intermittent oral tegafur-uracil plus leucovorin in Japanese rectal cancer patients: a single center experience retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Ryosuke; Inoue, Yuji; Ohki, Takeshi; Kaneko, Yuka; Maeda, Fumi; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2017-05-31

    Various types of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) have been established for rectal cancer; thus, Physicians will need to refine the selection of appropriate preoperative CRT for different patients since there are various treatment regimens. Oral tegafur-uracil (UFT) plus leucovorin (LV) is commonly used to treat rectal cancer in Japan. Oral chemotherapy offers patients many potential advantages. Since 2008, we have been performing preoperative CRT with intermittent oral UFT plus LV in locally advanced rectal cancer patients to prevent postoperative local recurrence. Here, in a retrospective analysis, we evaluated the efficacy and short-term outcomes of preoperative CRT with intermittent oral UFT plus LV. We analyzed data from 62 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, including 31 patients who underwent preoperative CRT between 2009 and 2013 (the CRT group) and 31 patients who were treated with surgery alone between 2001 and 2008 (the non-CRT group). Clinicopathologically, both groups included patients with rectal cancer at clinical tumor stages III-IV or clinical node stages 0-III. In the CRT group, curative operations were performed ≥8 weeks after CRT. Patients were concomitantly treated with 2 cycles of oral UFT (300 mg/m 2 /day, days 1-14 and 29-42) plus LV (75 mg/day, days 1-14 and 29-42) and 45 Gy of radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was repeated every 28 days, followed by a 2-week break. The completion rate of CRT was high at 94% (n = 29/31). The downstaging rate of CRT was 61% (n = 19/31). The pathological complete response rate was 6.5% (n = 2/31). Significant differences were observed in the 3-year local recurrence rate between the two groups (P rectal cancer. A further investigation of a diversification of preoperative CRT for Japanese rectal cancer patients is required.

  14. What are the benefits and the pitfalls of preoperative fasting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Katherine

    Preoperative fasting has been a traditional practice for many years to reduce the risk of aspiration while the patient is under general anaesthetic and to eliminate the risk of postoperative nausea and vomiting. Although it is generally accepted that fasting is beneficial, the fasting regimens that patients undergo are not dependent on the individual patient or the timing of their operation.

  15. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  16. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Irinotecan and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Jeong, Jun Yong; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Jae-Gahb; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer has shown benefit over postoperative CRT; however, a standard CRT regimen has yet to be defined. We performed a prospective concurrent CRT Phase II study with irinotecan and capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to investigate the efficacy and safety of this regimen. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid-to-lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8-Gy daily fractions for a total of 45 Gy in 25 fractions, followed by a coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of 40 mg/m 2 of irinotecan per week for 5 consecutive weeks and 1,650 mg/m 2 of capecitabine per day for 5 days per week (weekdays only) from the first day of radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 ± 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were included for the study endpoints. Results: In total, 48 patients were enrolled; 33 (68.7%) were men and 15 (31.3%) were women, and the median age was 59 years (range, 32-72 years). The pathologic complete response rate was 25.0% (11 of 44; 95% confidence interval, 12.2-37.8) and 8 patients (18.2% [8 of 44]) showed near-total tumor regression. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 75.0% and 93.6%, respectively. Grade 3 toxicities included leukopenia (3 [6.3%]), neutropenia (1 [2.1%]), infection (1 [2.1%]), alanine aminotransferase elevation (1 [2.1%]), and diarrhea (1 [2.1%]). There was no Grade 4 toxicity or treatment-related death. Conclusions: Preoperative CRT with irinotecan and capecitabine with treatment-free weekends showed very mild toxicity profiles and promising results in terms of survival.

  17. Effects of preoperative irradiation on primary tracheal anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, N.; Simpson, W.J.; Van Nostrand, A.W.P.; Pearson, F.G.

    1975-01-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy was used in the management of selected patients with cancer of the lung or trachea who might subsequently require segmental resection of bronchus or trachea and reconstruction by primary anastomosis. This study was designed to determine the effects of varying dosages of preoperative irradiation on anastomotic healing. Two rings were resected from the cervical trachea of 20 dogs following irradiation with varying doses of cesium. There were no important adverse effects on healing of the trachea or adjacent organs in dogs receiving up to 3,500 rads. All dogs receiving a higher dose than this developed some anastomotic stenosis, which was severe in 6 of 8 animals. Similar adverse effects were observed in 2 patients managed by preoperative radiotherapy (4,000 rads in three weeks) and tracheal resection with primary anastomosis

  18. Effects of preoperative irradiation on primary tracheal anastomosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsubota, N.; Simpson, W.J.; Van Nostrand, A.W.P.; Pearson, F.G.

    1975-08-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy was used in the management of selected patients with cancer of the lung or trachea who might subsequently require segmental resection of bronchus or trachea and reconstruction by primary anastomosis. This study was designed to determine the effects of varying dosages of preoperative irradiation on anastomotic healing. Two rings were resected from the cervical trachea of 20 dogs following irradiation with varying doses of cesium. There were no important adverse effects on healing of the trachea or adjacent organs in dogs receiving up to 3,500 rads. All dogs receiving a higher dose than this developed some anastomotic stenosis, which was severe in 6 of 8 animals. Similar adverse effects were observed in 2 patients managed by preoperative radiotherapy (4,000 rads in three weeks) and tracheal resection with primary anastomosis.

  19. Radiotherapy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Lyman, J.T.; Pitluck, S.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiotherapy Physics Group works on the physical and biophysical aspects of charged particle radiotherapy. Our activities include the development of isosurvival beams (beams of uniform biological effect), computerized treatment planning development for charged particle radiotherapy, design of compensation to shape dose distributions, and development of dosimetry techniques to verify planned irradiations in both phantoms and patients

  20. Preoperative blood transfusions for sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is one of the commonest severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. Sickle cell disease can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Surgical interventions are more common in people with sickle cell disease, and occur at much younger ages than in the general population. Blood transfusions are frequently used prior to surgery and several regimens are used but there is no consensus over the best method or the necessity of transfusion in specific surgical cases. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001. Objectives To determine whether there is evidence that preoperative blood transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery reduces mortality and perioperative or sickle cell-related serious adverse events. To compare the effectiveness of different transfusion regimens (aggressive or conservative) if preoperative transfusions are indicated in people with sickle cell disease. Search methods We searched for relevant trials in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980), and ongoing trial databases; all searches current to 23 March 2016. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register: 18 January 2016. Selection criteria All randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing preoperative blood transfusion regimens to different regimens or no transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery. There was no restriction by outcomes examined, language or publication status. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and the risk of bias and extracted data. Main results Three trials with 990 participants were eligible for inclusion in the review. There were no

  1. Radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yoshiyuki

    1978-01-01

    Methods of treating bladder cancer include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, as well as various combinations of these. The author investigated clinically and histopathologically the therapeutic results of preoperative irradiation in cases of bladder cancer. 1. The survival rates (crude survival rates) in forty cases of bladder cancer were 90% after one year, 62.5% after three years and 46% after five years from the treatment. 2. As the result of irradiation, urogram improved in 25%, which was comparatively remarkable in high stage cases. There were no cases of deterioration of urogram findings caused by irradiation. Cystoscopy revealed disappearance or remarkable shrinkage of the tumors in 35% of the total cases and effects of the irradiation was observed not correlated to the stage and grade. 3. With respect to the histopathological changes, the changes became greater as the dosage increased and the higher the stage and grade were the more remarkable tendency was observed. 4. From our clinical observations such as urogram, cystoscopy and histopathologically, we estimated the optimum dosage of preoperative irradiation for bladder cancer is 3000 - 4000 rad. Thus, we concluded that the radiotherapy is effective in reducing both surgical invasion and postoperative recurrence. (author)

  2. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-02-01

    This presentation first defines the radiotherapy and brachytherapy techniques, indicates the used ionizing radiations (electromagnetic and particles), describes the mechanisms and processes of action of ionizing radiations: they can be physical by photon-matter interactions (Compton effect and photoelectric effect) or due to electron-matter interactions (excitation, ionization), physical-chemical by direct or indirect action (DNA damage), cellular (mitotic or apoptotic death), tissue (sane and tumorous tissues and differential effect). It discusses the biological efficiency of these treatments which depends on different parameters: intrinsic radio-sensitivity, time (session fractioning and organisation in time), oxygen, radiation quality, cellular cycle, dose rate, temperature. It presents the different types of radiotherapy: external radiotherapy (general sequence, delineation, dosimetry, protection of critical organs, treatment session, quality control, monitoring consultation) and briefly presents some specific techniques (total body irradiation, total cutaneous electron therapy, pre-operation radiotherapy, radio-surgery, hadron-therapy). It proposes an overview of the main indications for this treatment: brain tumours, upper aero digestive tract tumours, bronchial tumours, oesophagus, stomach and pancreas tumours, breast tumours, cervix cancer, rectum tumour, and so on, and indicates the possible associated treatments. The next part addresses brachytherapy. It presents the principles and comments the differences with radiotherapy. It indicates the used radio-elements (Caesium 137, Iridium 192, Iodine 125), describes the implementation techniques (plastic tubes, use of iodine 125, intracavitary and endo-luminal radiation therapy). It proposes an overview of the different treated tumours (skin, breast, prostates, bronchial, oesophagus, ENT) and indicates possible early and late secondary effects for different organs

  3. Radiotherapy in primary cerebral lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legros, L.; Benezery, K.; Lagrange, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Primary cerebral lymphoma is a rare disease with an unfavorable prognosis. Whole brain radiotherapy has been the standard treatment, but neither the optimal radiation fields nor optimal dose level of the regimen are as yet firmly establisheD. From this review of the literature, it seems that the whole brain must be treated, and a boost to the area of the primary site must be discussed. With regard to dose, the radiation dose-response relationship is not clearly proven. Yet, a minimum dose of 40 Gy is necessary, and the maximum dose is set at 50 Gy because of late neurological sequelae. Because of the poor prognosis of this disease and the risk of late sequelae, other avenues have been explored. Chemotherapy has been studied, seem to have a survival advantage and combinations of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, especially with high-dose methotrexate. Because primary cerebral lymphoma is an uncommon disease, randomized clinical trials that compare radiotherapy alone to chemotherapy plus radiotherapy may not be feasible. Finally, even if chemotherapy seems to have a survival advantage, the regimen of chemotherapy is still a matter of debate. (authors)

  4. Radiological diagnostics and radiotherapy in Wilms' tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutzner, J

    1981-01-01

    The possibilities of diagnosing Wilms' tumor correctly have been greatly extended by the introduction of computerised tomography and ultrasonic examination. In view of the fact that Wilms' tumor is subjected to combined treatment involving chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy, it appears justified to reduce the dose to 20-30 Gy, depending upon the age of the child and the extension of the tumor. It is believed that preoperative radiotherapy will yield better surgical possibilities in large tumours. Radiotherapy can be omitted in infants in the stages I and II as well as in children in stage I.

  5. [Preoperative structured patient education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, D

    1993-04-01

    This article describes the factors that motivated the nursing staff of the cardiac surgery unit at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, to revise their preoperative teaching program. The motivating factors described are the length of the preoperative waiting period; the level of preoperative anxiety; the decreased length of hospital stay; the dissatisfaction of the nursing staff with current patient teaching practices; and the lack of available resources. The reorganization of the teaching program was based upon the previously described factors combined with a review of the literature that demonstrated the impact of preoperative anxiety, emotional support and psycho-educational interventions upon the client's recovery. The goals of the new teaching program are to provide the client and the family with cognitive and sensory information about the client's impending hospitalization, chronic illness and necessary lifestyle modifications. The program consists of a system of telephone calls during the preoperative waiting period; a videotape viewing; a tour of the cardiac surgery unit; informal discussion groups; and the availability of nursing consultation to decrease preoperative anxiety. The end result of these interventions is more time for client support and integration of necessary information by the client and family. This kind of program has the potential to provide satisfaction at many levels by identifying client's at risk; increasing client knowledge; increasing support; decreasing anxiety during the preoperative waiting period; and decreasing the length of hospital stay. The nursing staff gained a heightened sense of accomplishment because the program was developed according to the nursing department's philosophy, which includes primary nursing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Whither radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, W M

    1987-03-01

    The 1986 Glyn Evans Memorial Lecture, given at the Joint Provincial Meeting of the Royal College of Radiologists, Sheffield, September 1986, sketches an outline of the history of radiotherapy and discusses the future development of the art. Topics included are siting of centres, training needs, the relationship of radiotherapy to other medical specialities, and the advantages and disadvantages of radiotherapy practitioners forming a separate medical College. (U.K.)

  7. Role of radiotherapy in the complex treatment for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, A S; Datsenko, V S [Tsentral' nyj Inst. Usovershenstvovaniya Vrachej, Moscow (USSR)

    1978-01-01

    Preoperational irradiation of a primary focus and all the areas of regional metastatic spreading turned out to be most effective in the case of mammary gland cancer complex treating. Postoperational radiotherapy is a less effective version of radiotherapy justified in the case of metastatic affection of lymph nodes and deliberate disturbance of ablastics during the operation. Time interval between the ending of preoperational radiotherapy and the operation must not exceed 3 weeks, as, otherwise, the biological potential of undamaged cancer cells is recovered and the hazard of appearing remote metastases increases. Additional courses of chemotherapy in the case of multiple of lymphogenic metastases improe prognosis for patients with mammary gland cancer.

  8. Immediate preoperative enteral nutrition (preoperative enteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lađević Nebojša

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional support of surgical patients is a necessary part of the treatment. It alone cannot cure the disease but it significantly affects the recovery of patients and supports surgical interventions. Patients in malnutrition have shown to have significantly more postoperative infectious and non-infectious complications. This significantly prolongs treatment time and increases costs. However, there is one fact that cannot be expressed in money, which is the patient's impression of the surgical intervention. Adequate preoperative patient support, based on the intake of liquid nutritive solutions, reduces preoperative stress and deflects the metabolic response. Now, it is recommended for adults and children older than one year to drink clear liquid up to 2 hours before induction in anesthesia. Appropriate enteral nutrition has a significant place in the postoperative recovery of patients. Enteral nutrition is reducing complications, mainly infectious complications because the function of the digestive system as one large immune system is preserved. Perioperative enteral nutrition is a necessary part of the modern treatment of surgical patients. In addition to the significant effect on the occurrence of postoperative complications, it is also important that this type of diet improves the psychological status of patients.

  9. Effect of practical use of preoperative immunonutrition with Impact on prevention of postoperative pneumonia after esophagectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Masayuki; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Akutsu, Yasunori; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Uesato, Masaya; Miyazawa, Yukimasa; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2009-01-01

    To clarify the clinical benefits of administering immune-enhancing diet, Impact, we examined retrospectively the effect of preoperative immunonutrition with Impact on prevention of postoperative pneumonia after esophagectomy. In 47 patients without preoperative radiotherapy, no patient who preoperatively administered Impact ≥2,250 mL failed to develop pneumonia. The patients whose postoperative hospital stay was more than 30 days were administered Impact ≤2,000 mL except for one case. These results suggest that even preoperative administration of less amount of Impact than an estimated maximum dose, depending on patients' condition, may be beneficial to prevent postoperative pneumonia and a long hospital stay after surgery. (author)

  10. Hepatic metabolic derangement following preoperative irradiation gastric neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdov, B A; D' yakova, A M; Stefani, N V; Senokosov, N I [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Obninsk. Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Meditsinskoj Radiologii

    1980-08-01

    Preoperative irradiation of gastric cancer results in glycogene buildup in the heratic cells and activation of a number of tissue enzymes such as glutamate-and lactate dehydrogenases, hexogenase, choline esterase and aspartate aminotransferase in the left lobe of the liver which is included in a zone of direct irradiation. The enzyme activation is observed on the 4-7th day after the course of radiotherapy, glycogene maximum content - on the 5th day. The enzyme activity and glycogene content on the 11th day after irradiation decreases to the level of their content in the patients who have not been subjected to radiotherapy.

  11. NEOADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY FOR BLADDER CARCINOMA IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To evaluate the impact of preoperative accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of bladder carcinoma in Egyptian patients. Patients and Methods Between December 1996 and February 2000, 104 Egyptian patients with pathologically proven infiltrative bladder carcinoma were enrolled in ...

  12. Role of radiotherapy fractionation in head and neck cancers (MARCH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacas, Benjamin; Bourhis, Jean; Overgaard, Jens

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Meta-Analysis of Radiotherapy in squamous cell Carcinomas of Head and neck (MARCH) showed that altered fractionation radiotherapy is associated with improved overall and progression-free survival compared with conventional radiotherapy, with hyperfractionated radiotherapy showing...... the greatest benefit. This update aims to confirm and explain the superiority of hyperfractionated radiotherapy over other altered fractionation radiotherapy regimens and to assess the benefit of altered fractionation within the context of concomitant chemotherapy with the inclusion of new trials. METHODS......: For this updated meta-analysis, we searched bibliography databases, trials registries, and meeting proceedings for published or unpublished randomised trials done between Jan 1, 2009, and July 15, 2015, comparing primary or postoperative conventional fractionation radiotherapy versus altered fractionation...

  13. [Preoperative fasting. An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, C D; Breuer, J P; Gust, R; Wichmann, M; Adolph, M; Senkal, M; Kampa, U; Weissauer, W; Schleppers, A; Soreide, E; Martin, E; Kaisers, U; Falke, K J; Haas, N; Kox, W J

    2003-11-01

    In Germany the predominant standard of preoperative care for elective surgery is fasting after midnight, with the aim of reducing the risk of pulmonary aspiration. However, for the past several years the scientific evidence supporting such a practice has been challenged. Experimental and clinical studies prove a reliable gastric emptying within 2 h suggesting that, particularly for limited intake of clear fluids up to 2 h preoperatively, there would be no increased risk for the patient. In addition, the general incidence of pulmonary aspiration during general anaesthesia (before induction, during surgery and during recovery) is extremely low, has a good prognosis and is more a consequence of insufficient airway protection and/or inadequate anaesthetic depth rather than due to the patient's fasting state. Therefore, primarily to decrease perioperative discomfort for patients, several national anaesthesia societies have changed their guidelines for preoperative fasting. They recommend a more liberal policy regarding per os intake of both liquid and solid food, with consideration of certain conditions and contraindications. The following article reviews the literature and gives an overview of the scientific background on which the national guidelines are based. The intention of this review is to propose recommendations for preoperative fasting regarding clear fluids for Germany as well.

  14. Daily concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intra-arterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for advanced oral cancer. Histological evaluation of metastatic cervical lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsudo, Kenji; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Shigetomi, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    Superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy via a superficial temporal artery has become feasible for daily concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with oral cancer. In this study, histopathological effects on metastatic cervical lymph nodes in cases of advanced oral cancer using superselective intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy were evaluated. Thirty-seven oral cancer patients with cervical lymph node metastasis were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intra-arterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. The treatment consisted of superselective intra-arterial infusions (docetaxel, total 60 mg/m 2 ; cisplatin, total 100-150 mg/m 2 ) and concurrent radiotherapy (total 40-60 Gy) for 4-6 weeks, followed by surgery. In cases in which the catheter was inserted into the facial artery, grade III or IV (Oboshi-Shimosato classification) in the cervical lymph node metastasis was obtained in 20 (83.3%) of 24 patients. And, forty-six (88.5%) of 52 metastatic lymph nodes showed grade III or IV. This method was an effective regimen for oral cancer with cervical lymph node metastasis. (author)

  15. Pre-operative radiochemotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Nan Sun; Qi-Chu Yang; Jian-Bin Hu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate results of pre-operative radiochemotherapy followed by surgery for 15 patients with locally advanced un-resectable rectal cancer.METHODS: 15 patients with advanced non-resectable rectal cancer were treated with pre-operative irriadiation of 40-46 Gy plus concomitant chemotherapy (5-FU+LV and 5′-DFuR) (RCS group). For comparison, 27 similar patients,treated by preoperative radiotherapy (40-50 Gy) plus surgery were served as control (RS group).RESULTS: No radiochemotherapy or radiotherapy was interrupted and then was delayed because of toxicities in both groups. The radical resectability rate was 73.3% in the RCS group and 37.0% (P=0.024) in RS group. Sphincter preservation rates were 26.6% and 3.7% respectively (P=0.028). Sphincter preservation rates of lower rectal cancer were 27.3 % and 0.0 % respectively (P=0.014). Response rates of RCS and RS groups were 46.7 % and 18.5 %(P=0.053). The tumor downstage rates were 8 (53.3%)and 9 (33.3%) in these groups (P=0.206). The 3-year overall survival rates were 66.7 % and 55.6% (P=0.485), and the disease free survival rates were 40.1% and 33.2%(P=0.663). The 3-year local recurrent rates were 26.7%and 48.1% (P=0.174). No obvious late effects were found in either groups.CONCLUSION: High resectability is possible following preoperative radiochemotherapy and can have more sphincters preserved. It is important to improve the quality of the patients′ life even without increasing the survival or local control rates. Preoperative radiotherapy with concomitant full course chemotherapy (5-Fu+LV and 5′-DFuR) is effective and safe.

  16. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, A; Villebro, N

    2005-01-01

    Smokers have a substantially increased risk of intra- and postoperative complications. Preoperative smoking intervention may be effective in decreasing this incidence. The preoperative period may be a well chosen time to offer smoking cessation interventions due to increased patient motivation....

  17. Results of the patterns of care study for esophageal cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomi, Kohtaro; Oguchi, Masahiko; Yamashita Takashi

    2001-01-01

    A Patterns of Care Study examined the records of patients with thoracic esophageal cancer treated with radiotherapy and surgery in 1995 through 1997. Thirty-one percent of patients received preoperative radiotherapy; 61% of these received chemotherapy. Sixty six percent of patients received postoperative radiotherapy. Significant variables for overall survival in multivariate analysis include presence of macroscopic residual tumors (risk ratio=2.66), sex female (0.49), photon energy higher than 4 MV (0.50), Karnofsky performance status greater than 70 (0.55) and the use of chemotherapy (1.64). The value of preoperative concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy should be tested in a randomized trial. (author)

  18. Preoperative bone scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charkes, N.D.; Malmud, L.S.; Caswell, T.; Goldman, L.; Hall, J.; Lauby, V.; Lightfoot, W.; Maier, W.; Rosemond, G.

    1975-01-01

    Strontium nitrate Sr-87m bone scans were made preoperatively in a group of women with suspected breast cancer, 35 of whom subsequently underwent radical mastectomy. In 3 of the 35 (9 percent), the scans were abnormal despite the absence of clinical or roentgenographic evidence of metastatic disease. All three patients had extensive axillary lymph node involvement by tumor, and went on to have additional bone metastases, from which one died. Roentgenograms failed to detect the metastases in all three. Occult bone metastases account in part for the failure of radical mastectomy to cure some patients with breast cancer. It is recommended that all candidates for radical mastectomy have a preoperative bone scan. (U.S.)

  19. Estimating the Risks of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Carolyn; Correa, Candace; Duane, Frances K

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy reduces the absolute risk of breast cancer mortality by a few percentage points in suitable women but can cause a second cancer or heart disease decades later. We estimated the absolute long-term risks of modern breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods First, a systematic literature...... review was performed of lung and heart doses in breast cancer regimens published during 2010 to 2015. Second, individual patient data meta-analyses of 40,781 women randomly assigned to breast cancer radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy in 75 trials yielded rate ratios (RRs) for second primary cancers...... and cause-specific mortality and excess RRs (ERRs) per Gy for incident lung cancer and cardiac mortality. Smoking status was unavailable. Third, the lung or heart ERRs per Gy in the trials and the 2010 to 2015 doses were combined and applied to current smoker and nonsmoker lung cancer and cardiac mortality...

  20. Preoperative radio-chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Forecasting the next steps through ongoing and forthcoming studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crehange, G.; Maingon, P.; Bosset, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Protracted preoperative radio-chemotherapy with a 5-FU-based scheme, or a short course of preoperative radiotherapy without chemotherapy, are the standard neo-adjuvant treatments for resectable stage II-III rectal cancer. Local failure rates are low and reproducible, between 6 and 15% when followed with a 'Total Meso-rectal Excision'. Nevertheless, the therapeutic strategy needs to be improved: distant metastatic recurrence rates remain stable around 30 to 35%, while both sphincter and sexual sequels are still significant. The aim of the present paper was to analyse the ongoing trials listed on the following search engines: the Institut National du Cancer in France, the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Health in the United States, and the major cooperative groups. Keywords for the search were: 'rectal cancer', 'preoperative radiotherapy', 'phase II-III', 'preoperative chemotherapy', 'adjuvant chemotherapy' and 'surgery'. Twenty-three trials were selected and classified in different groups, each of them addressing a question of strategy: (1) place of adjuvant chemotherapy; (2) optimization of preoperative radiotherapy; (3) evaluation of new radiosensitization protocols and/or neo-adjuvant chemotherapy; (4) optimization of techniques and timing of surgery; (5) place of radiotherapy for non resectable or metastatic tumors. (authors)

  1. Gene expression levels of gamma-glutamyl hydrolase in tumor tissues may be a useful biomarker for the proper use of S-1 and tegafur-uracil/leucovorin in preoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadahiro, Sotaro; Suzuki, T; Tanaka, A; Okada, K; Saito, G; Miyakita, H; Ogimi, T; Nagase, H

    2017-06-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy is the standard of care for rectal cancer. The effect of additional chemotherapy during the period between the completion of radiotherapy and surgery remains unclear. Predictive factors for CRT may differ between combination chemotherapy with S-1 and with tegafur-uracil/leucovorin (UFT/LV). The subjects were 54 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received preoperative CRT with S-1 or UFT/LV. The pathological tumor response was assessed according to the tumor regression grade (TRG). The expression levels of 18 CRT-related genes were determined using RT-PCR assay. A pathological response (TRG 1-2) was observed in 23 patients (42.6%). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis for pathological response, the overall expression levels of four genes, HIF1A, MTHFD1, GGH and TYMS, were significant, and the accuracy rate of the predictive model was 83.3%. The effects of the gene expression levels of GGH on the response differed significantly according to the treatment regimen. The total pathological response rate of both high-GGH patients in the S-1 group and low-GGH patients in the UFT/LV group was 58.3%. Additional treatment with 5-FU-based chemotherapy during the interval between radiotherapy and surgery is not beneficial in patients who have received 5-FU-based CRT. The expression levels of four genes, HIF1A, MTHFD1, GGH and TYMS, in tumor tissues can predict the response to preoperative CRT including either S-1 or UFT/LV. In particular, the gene expression level of GGH in tumor tissues may be a useful biomarker for the appropriate use of S-1 and UFT/LV in CRT.

  2. Intolerable toxicity of simultaneous 5-fluorouracil-radiotherapy in the treatment of advanced gastrointestinal tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higi, M.; Arndt, D.; Schmidt, C.; Schmitt, G.

    1983-01-01

    Simultaneous application of 5-fluorouracil and radiotherapy is generally accepted in the treatment of gastrointestinal tumours. However, in 10 patients with metastatic gastrointestinal tumours we oberseved intolerable toxicity during this combined treatment regimen. Because of gastrointestinal and haematological toxicity the combined modality was interrupted in all patients. Given sequentially, this regimen was tolerated. Our experience indicates that an intolerable high rate of toxicity has to be taken into consideration in case of the simultaneous combination of 5-fluorouracil and radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  3. Radiotherapy for the prophylaxis of heterotopic ossification: A systematic review and meta-analysis of published data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, Marko; Agarwal, Arnav; Zhang, Liying; Yip, Cheryl; Kreder, Hans J.; Nousiainen, Markku T.; Jenkinson, Richard; Tsao, May; Lam, Henry; Milakovic, Milica; Wong, Erin; Chow, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Following surgery, the formation of heterotopic ossification (HTO) can limit mobility and impair quality of life. Radiotherapy has been proven to provide efficacious prophylaxis against HTO, especially in high-risk settings. Purpose: The current review aims to determine the factors influencing HTO formation in patients receiving prophylactic radiotherapy. Methods: A systematic search of the literature was conducted on Ovid Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Studies were included if they reported the percentage of sites developing heterotopic ossification after receiving a specified dose of prophylactic radiotherapy. Weighted linear regression analysis was conducted for continuous or categorical predictors. Results: Extracted from 61 articles, a total of 5464 treatment sites were included, spanning 85 separate study arms. Most sites were from the hip (97.7%), from United States patients (55.2%), and had radiation prescribed postoperatively (61.6%) at a dose of 700 cGy (61.0%). After adjusting for radiation site, there was no statistically significant relationship between the percentage of sites developing HTO and radiation dose (p = 0.1) or whether radiation was administered preoperatively or postoperatively (p = 0.1). Sites with previous HTO formation were more likely to develop recurrent HTO than those without previous HTO formation (p = 0.04). There was a statistically significant negative relationship between the HTO development and the cohort mean year of treatment (p = 0.007). Conclusion: Decreases in rates of HTO over time in this patient population may be a function of more efficacious surgical regimens and prophylactic radiotherapy

  4. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy for advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujinaka, Toshimasa; Murotani, Masahiro; Iihara, Keisuke

    1997-01-01

    Preoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin was applied for advanced rectal cancer. Eligible criteria were as follows: no previous treatment, more than hemicircular occupation, T 3 or more, invasion to adjacent organs or lymph node metastasis on CT scan, tumor fixation by digital examination. Eleven patients were enrolled with this regimen consisting of 5-FU; 500 mg/day x 5/w x 4, CDDP; 10 mg/day x 5/w x 4 and radiation; 2 Gy x 5/w x 4. As a toxicity, grade 2 leukopenia in 2 cases, grade 2 GI symptoms in one case and radiation dermatitis was observed in 8 cases. As a local response, there were PR in 10 cases and NC in 1 case. Surgical resection was performed on 8 patients. Histological responses in the resected specimens were grade 2, 5 cases; grade 1b, 1 case; and grade 1a, 2 cases. Operative radicalities were grade A, 3 cases; grade B, 3 cases; and grade C, 2 cases. Preoperative chemoradiation is one of the effective options in multimodal treatment for advanced rectal cancer. (author)

  5. The effectiveness of radiotherapy for Merkel cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakisaka, Masaki; Mori, Hiromu; Monzen, Yoshio; Aikawa, Hisayuki; Miyake, Hidetoshi; Ashizawa, Akira; Okamoto, Osamu; Yoshiyama, Masako; Takayasu, Susumu

    1992-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a high-grade malignant tumor of the skin that tends to extend locally and metastasize to regional lymph nodes. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice, and the effectiveness of radiotherapy for this disease has not yet been established. We report two cases of biopsy-proven Merkel cell carcinoma effectively treated with radiotherapy. Histopathological examination of the resected specimens after radiotherapy of 50 Gy and 38 Gy, respectively, using 6∼15 MeV electrons showed no malignant cells in either case. No evidence of recurrence or metastasis has been noted in 11 to 21 months after radiotherapy. To our knowledge, no case of Merkel cell carcinoma in which complete cure was obtained by radiotherapy alone has been reported previously. It is considered that preoperative radiotherapy would contribute to the management of this locally invasive but radiosensitive tumor. (author)

  6. Radiotherapy; Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannenmacher, M. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Debus, J. [Univ. Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Wenz, F. (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2006-07-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy.

  7. Preoperative evaluation of locally spreaded pelvic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baramia, M.; Todua, F.; Gotsadze, D.; Khutulashvili, N.; Lashkhi, K.; Nadareishvili, A.

    1998-01-01

    Am of the study: preoperative evaluation of patients with locally advanced pelvic tumors subjected to pelvic exenteration. Determine operability to avoid explorative laparatomies, which cause serious complications in these patients. Evaluate condition of urinary system in case of this pathology. Materials and methods: 34 patients with locally advanced pelvic tumors where pelvic exenteration was attempted were studied. Along with other methods of diagnostic CT and MRI were performed. Results: In all patients secondary involvement of the urinary bladder was noted. In 30 patients CT and MR findings were confirmed (88,2%) intraoperatively and different types of pelvic organs exenteration were performed. In 1 case spread of tomoruos infiltrate to the pelvic wall and common iliac vessels was detected intraoperatively (patient had history of radiation therapy). In 2 cases carcinomatosis of the peritoneum was found. In 1 case involvement of urinary bladder was simulated by close attachment of enlarged uterus. Conclusion: Obtained results show, that CT and MR are highly informative methods of disease spread evaluation and thus determining operability. Radiotherapy performed prior to operation sets difficulties in differentiation for tumourous infiltrate and post-radiotherapy changes in pelvis. (Full text)

  8. Radiotherapy apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, P.M.; Webb, H.P.J.

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to apparatus for applying intracavitary radiotherapy. In previously-known systems radioactive material is conveyed to a desired location within a patient by transporting a chain of balls pneumatically to and from an appropriately inserted applicator. According to this invention a ball chain for such a purpose comprises several radioactive balls separated by non-radioactive tracer balls of radiographically transparent material of lower density and surface hardness than the radioactive balls. The invention also extends to radiotherapy treatment apparatus comprising a storage, sorting and assembly system

  9. Variability in Antibiotic Regimens for Surgical Necrotizing Enterocolitis Highlights the Need for New Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Brian P; Hunter, Catherine J; Grabowski, Julia

    Necrotizing enterocolitis or NEC is the most common gastrointestinal emergency in the newborn. The etiology of NEC remains unknown, and treatment consists of antibiotic therapy and supportive care with the addition of surgical intervention as necessary. Unlike most surgical diseases, clear guidelines for the type and duration of peri-operative antibiotic therapy have not been established. Our aim was to review the antibiotic regimen(s) applied to surgical patients with NEC within a single neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and to evaluate outcomes and help develop guidelines for antibiotic administration in this patient population. A single-center retrospective review was performed of all patients who underwent surgical intervention for NEC from August 1, 2005 through August 1, 2015. Relevant data were extracted including gestational age, age at diagnosis, gender, pre-operative antibiotic treatment, post-operative antibiotic treatment, development of stricture, and mortality. Patients were excluded if there was incomplete data documentation. A total of 90 patients were identified who met inclusion criteria. There were 56 male patients and 34 female patients. The average gestational age was 30 5/7 wks and average age of diagnosis 16.7 d. A total of 22 different pre-operative antibiotic regimens were identified with an average duration of 10.6 d. The most common pre-operative regimen was ampicillin, gentamicin, and metronidazole for 14 d. A total of 15 different post-operative antibiotic regimens were identified with an average duration of 6.6 d. The most common post-operative regimen was ampicillin, gentamicin, and metronidazole for two days. There were 26 strictures and 15 deaths. No regimen or duration proved superior. We found that there is a high degree of variability in the antibiotic regimen for the treatment of NEC, even within a single NICU, with no regimen appearing superior over another. As data emerge that demonstrate the adverse effects of

  10. Therapeutic Results of Radiotherapy in Rectal Carcinoma -Comparison of Sandwich Technique Radiotherapy with Postoperative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Gil Cha; Suh, Hyun Suk; Lee, Hyuk Sang; Kim, Re Hwe; Kim, Chul Soo; Kim, Hong Yong; Kim, Sung Rok

    1996-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the potential advantage for 'sandwich' technique radiotherapy compared to postoperative radiotherapy in respectable rectal cancer. Between January 1989 and May 1994, 60 patients with respectable rectal cancer were treated at Inje University Seoul and Sanggye Paik Hospital.Fifty one patients were available for analysis : 20 patients were treated with sandwich technique radiotherapy and 31 patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. In sandwich technique radiotherapy(RT), patients were treated with preoperative RT 1500 cGy/5fx followed by immediate curative resection. Patients staged as Astler-Coller B2, C were considered for postoperative RT with 2500-4500 cGy. In postoperative RT, total radiation dose of 4500-6120 cGy, 180 cGy daily at 4-6 weeks was delivered. Patients were followed for median period of 25 months. Results : The overall 5-year survival rates for sandwich technique RT group and postoperative RT group were 60% and 71%, respectively(p>0.05). The 5-year disease free survival rates for each group were 63%. There was no difference in local failure rate between two groups(11% versus 7%). Incidence of distant metastasis was 11%(2/20) in the sandwich technique RT group and 20%(6/31) in the postoperative RT group(p>0.05). The frequencies of acute and chronic complications were comparable in both groups. Conclusion : The sandwich technique radiotherapy group shows local recurrence and survival similar to those of postoperative RT alone group but reduced distant metastasis compared to postoperative RT group. But long term follow-up and large number of patients is needed to make an any firm conclusion regarding the value of this sandwich technique RT

  11. The effects of low-dose radiotherapy on fresh osteochondral allografts: An experimental study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur Gönç

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: In osteochondral massive allograft transplantations, the immune reaction of the host could be precluded with radiotherapy, and the side-effects can be prevented by low-dose fractionated regimen. The total dose of fractionated radiotherapy for an immune suppression should be adjusted not to damage the cartilage tissue, but to avoid articular degeneration in the long term.

  12. Adopting preoperative fasting guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Megan; Comrie, Rhonda

    2009-07-01

    In 1999, the American Society of Anesthesiologists adopted preoperative fasting guidelines to enhance the quality and efficiency of patient care. Guidelines suggest that healthy, non-pregnant patients should fast six hours from solids and two hours from liquids. Although these guidelines are in place, studies suggest that providers are still using the blanket statement "NPO after midnight" without regard to patient characteristics, the procedure, or the time of the procedure. Using theory to help change provider's beliefs may help make change more successful. Rogers' Theory of Diffusion of Innovations can assist in changing long-time practice by laying the groundwork for an analysis of the benefits and disadvantages of proposed changes, such as changes to fasting orders, while helping initiate local protocols instead of additional national guidelines.

  13. Results of radiotherapy and vitamin E in the treatment of peyronie's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Cristine I.; Njo, K. Hian; Karim, Abdul B. M. F.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis of 38 patients with Peyronie's disease treated with primary radiotherapy in the period of 1975-1993. Methods and Materials: Important complaints were curvature of the penis during erection for 92% of the patients, painful erection for 68%, and problems with sexual intercourse for 37.5%. Average size of all indurated plaques was 2.5 cm. The average pretreatment duration of symptoms was 9.5 months. All 38 patients were irradiated with orthovoltage radiotherapy (200 and 250 kV photons) with a total dose of 9 Gy in 5 alternating days (regimen A). Because of minimal response, 16 patients were irradiated again with another 9 Gy in 5 days and finally received 18 Gy (regimen B). Results: With regimen A, a satisfying improvement was achieved for the majority of the patients: 65% experienced less penile pain during erection, 40% reported less curvature of the penis, and 47% experienced an improvement of their sex life. With the higher dose of regimen B there was an additional improvement for a minority of the patients: 25% reported less pain during erection, 21% had less curvature, and 29% experienced an improved sex life. With regimen A, pain improvement was statistically significantly superior when compared to regimen B. For all other improvements (curvature, sexual intercourse, and induration) no dose-response relation could be demonstrated between regimen A and the higher dose regimen B. No patient experienced any radiation-induced morbidity. After evaluating regimen A and regimen B, the overall result was that 76% experienced less pain, 60% reported an improved sex life, and 48% had a diminished curvature during erection. Conclusion: From this analysis it can be concluded that the distressing symptoms of Peyronie's disease can be treated successfully with radiotherapy. Radiotherapy proves to be a safe, noninvasive treatment method without causing morbidity. Low-dose radiotherapy with only a few fractions is recommended for an effective

  14. Results of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for T4 rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Harunobu; Maeda, Koutarou; Masumori, Koji; Koide, Yoshikazu; Noro, Tomohito; Honda, Katsuyuki; Shiota, Miho; Matsuoka, Shinji; Toyama, Kunihiro

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed clinical records of 11 cases with preoperative chemoradiotherapy to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of chemoradiotherapy for T4 rectal cancer. The preoperative radiotherapy consisted of 40-50 Gy delivered in fractions of 1.8-2.0 Gy per day, five days per week. A treatment of 5-fluorouracil, 500 mg/body per day intravenously, or oral tegafur-uracil (UFT)-E (300 mg/m 2 ) with l-leucovorin (75 mg) per day, or oral S-1 (80 mg/m 2 ) per day five days per week, was given during radiotherapy. One patient died due to pelvic abscess in 63 days after chemoradiotherapy. Invasive findings to the adjacent organs identified by CT and MRI disappeared in 6 cases with complete or partial response 1 month after chemoradiotherapy. Curative surgery was performed in 7 patients. Although the adjacent organs were also removed during surgery in 7 patients, there was no histological invasion to the adjacent organs in 4 patients, and one patient had histological complete disappearance of tumor. Although complications after surgery were found in all of the patients, they were improved by conservative treatment. Two of 7 patients with curative surgery had recurrence, but the rest of them survived without recurrence. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy was expected to be an effective treatment to improve the resection rate and prognosis for T4 rectal cancer. However, it was thought that it was necessary to be careful about severe toxicity, such as pelvic abscess. (author)

  15. Radiotherapy-induced emesis. An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feyer, P.; Buchali, A.; Hinkelbein, M.; Budach, V.; Zimmermann, J.S.; Titlbach, O.J.

    1998-01-01

    Background: A significant number of patients receiving radiotherapy experience the distressing side effects of emesis and nausea. These symptoms are some of the most distressing problems for the patients influencing their quality of life. Methods: International study results concerning radiotherapy-induced emesis are demonstrated. A German multicenter questionnaire examining the strategies to prevent or to treat radiotherapy-induced nausea and emesis is presented. An international analysis concerning incidence of emesis and nausea in fractionated radiotherapy patients is discussed. Finally the consensus of the consensus conference on antiemetic therapy from the Perugia International Cancer Conference V is introduced. Results: Untreated emesis can lead to complications like electrolyte disorders, dehydration, metabolic disturbances and nutrition problems with weight loss. Prophylactic antiemetics are often given to patients receiving single high-dose radiotherapy to the abdomen. A survey has revealed that antiemetic prophylaxis is not routinely offered to the patients receiving fractionated radiotherapy. However, there is a need for an effective treatment of emesis for use in this group of patients, too. In 20% of patients nausea and emesis can cause a treatment interruption because of an inadequate control of symptoms. Like in chemotherapy strategies there exist high, moderate, and low emetogenic treatment regimens in radiotherapy as well. The most emetogenic potential has the total body irradiation followed by radiotherapy to the abdomen. Radiotherapy induced emesis can be treated effectively with conventional antiemetics up to 50%. Conclusions: Studies with total body irradiation, fractionated treatment and high-dose single exposures have cleary demonstrated the value of 5-HT3-receptor antagonist antiemetics. There is a response between 60 and 97%. There is no difference in the efficacy of the different 5-HT3-antagonists. High-risk patients should be prophylactic

  16. A study to determine the optimum romurtide regimen to prevent radiation-induced leukopenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Toshihiko; Teshima, Teruki; Ohtani, Masatoshi

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the best dose of romurtide to counter radiation-induced leukopenia, two romurtide regimens have been studied in 69 patients undergoing radiation therapy, said patients divided into two groups. Those assigned to Group A, consisting of 33 patients, received a daily subcutaneous injection of 200 μg of romurtide for 10 consecutive days, and those assigned to Group B, consisting of 36 patients, received the same injection dose of romurtide every other day. Three weeks after the start of this study, it was found that both the leukocyte count and neutrophil count were significantly higher in the Group B patients (p<0.05). These results suggest that leukopenia resulting from exposure to radiotherapy can be prevented from developing over a longer period by the every other day romurtide injection regimen, compared to the daily romurtide injection regimen. (author)

  17. Role of Radiotherapy in Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio L. Faria

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy has had important role in the palliation of NSCLC. Randomized trials tend to suggest that, in general, short regimens give similar palliation and toxicity compared to longer regimens. The benefit of combining chemotherapy to radiosensitize the palliative radiation treatment is an open question, but so far it has not been proved to be very useful in NSCLC. The addition of molecular targeted drugs to radiotherapy outside of approved regimens or clinical trials warrants careful consideration for every single case and probably should not be used as a routine management.Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT are modern techniques being used each time more frequently in the treatment of single or oligometastases. In general, they offer good tumour control with little toxicity (with a more expensive cost compared to the traditionally fractionated radiotherapy regimens.

  18. Interstitial radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardino, P.T.; Bretas, F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors now have 20 years of experience with modern techniques of brachytherapy. The large number of patients treated in medical centers around the world and the widespread use of this type of radiotherapy have provided us with substantial information about the indications and contraindications, advantages and disadvantages, pitfalls and complications, as well as the results of these techniques. Although the focus of this review is the experience at Baylor using the combined technique of gold seed implantation plus external beam irradiation, the alternative forms of brachytherapy will be described and compared. The authors' intention is to provide the busy clinician with a succinct and informative review indicating the status of modern interstitial radiotherapy and describing day-to-day approach and results

  19. NOVP: a novel chemotherapeutic regimen with minimal toxicity for treatment of Hodgkin's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagemeister, F.B.; Cabanillas, F.; Velasquez, W.S.; Meistrich, M.L.; Liang, J.C.; McLaughlin, P.; Redman, J.R.; Romaguera, J.E.; Rodriguez, M.A.; Swan, F. Jr. (Univ. of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Patients with early-staged Hodgkin's disease have had a higher relapse rate following radiotherapy alone if they have B symptoms, large mediastinal masses, hilar involvement, or stage III disease. From June 1988 to December 1989, 27 previously untreated patients with early-staged Hodgkin's disease with adverse features for disease-free survival received combined-modality therapy. Seventeen patients had stage I or II disease, 10 had stage III, 5 had B symptoms, 13 had large mediastinal masses, and 6 had peripheral masses measuring 10 cm or more in diameter. All patients initially received three cycles of a novel chemotherapeutic regimen combining Novantrone (mitoxantrone, American Cyanamid Company), vincristine, vinblastine, and prednisone (NOVP). Twenty-four patients with clinically staged I or II disease with adverse features or stage III disease did not undergo laparotomy; three patients had favorable stage I or II disease and at laparotomy had stage III disease. Radiotherapy-treatment fields depended on the extent of nodal involvement. Twenty-six patients completed all therapy as planned to complete remission (CR) and one of these has had progression; she is in second CR following additional radiotherapy. With a median follow-up of 12 months, all patients are alive. Tolerance to treatment was excellent with only grade 1 or 2 nausea, alopecia and myalgias, and brief myelosuppression. NOVP is an effective adjuvant chemotherapy regimen for inducing responses, with minimal toxicity, prior to definitive radiotherapy for patients with early-staged Hodgkin's disease.

  20. Palliative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, J.

    2003-01-01

    Palliative care does not attempt to prolong survival but to the achieve the highest quality of life both for the patient and their family covering their physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. Radiotherapy (RT), one of the most important therapeutic modalities, has a great significance in palliative medicine for cancer since it attempts to reduce as much as possible the acute reaction associated with the treatment for the patient. (Author)

  1. Palliative care in patients who receive whole brain radiotherapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Brain Metastases is a devastating complication of Cancer affecting 10-50% of patients with systemic disease. It by far outnumbers primary Brain tumor in a 10:1 ratio. Aims and Objective: To determine the age distribution, gender distribution, tumor of origin, commonest radiotherapy regimen and median survival ...

  2. [Preoperative fasting period of fluids in bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, P; Pietsch, U-C; Oesemann, R; Dietrich, A; Wrigge, H

    2017-07-01

    Aspiration of stomach content is a severe complication during general anaesthesia. The DGAI (German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine) guidelines recommend a fasting period for liquids of 2 h, with a maximum of 400 ml. Preoperative fasting can affect the patients' recovery after surgery due to insulin resistance and higher protein catabolism as a response to surgical stress. The aim of the study was to compare a liberal fasting regimen consisting of up to 1000 ml of liquids until 2 h before surgery with the DGAI recommendation. The prospective observational clinical study was approved by the ethics committee of the University of Leipzig. In the liberal fasting group (G lib ) patients undergoing bariatric surgery were asked to drink 1000 ml of tea up to 2 h before surgery. Patients assigned to the restrictive fasting group (G res ) who were undergoing nonbariatric abdominal surgery were asked to drink no more than 400 ml of water up to 2 h preoperatively. Right after anaesthesia induction and intubation a gastric tube was placed, gastric residual volume was measured and the pH level of gastric fluid was determined. Moreover, the occurrence of aspiration was monitored. In all, 98 patients with a body mass index (BMI) of G lib 51.1 kg/m 2 and G res 26.5 kg/m 2 were identified. The preoperative fasting period of liquids was significantly different (G lib 170 min vs. G res 700 min, p fasting regimen (1000 ml of fluid) in the preoperative period is safe in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

  3. Late effects of various dose-fractionation regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turesson, I.; Notter, G.

    1983-01-01

    These clinical investigations of various dose-fractionation regimens on human skin show that: The late reactions cannot be predicted from the early reactions; The dose-response curves for late reactions are much steeper than for early reactions; Equivalent doses for various fractionation schedules concerning late effects can be calculated by means of a corrected CRE (NSD) formula; the correction must be considered preliminary because further follow-up is needed. A clinical fractionation study of this type requires: Extremely careful dosimetry; Study of the same anatomical region; Very long follow-up; Studies at different effect levels; Skin reaction is the only end point we have studied systematically for different fractionation regimens. Experience with the CRE formula as a model for calculating isoeffect doses for different fractionation schedules in routine clinical use can be summarized as follows: The CRE formula has been used prospectively since 1972 in all patients; CRE-equivalent weekly doses to 5 x 2.0 Gy per week has been used. (Although the fractionation schedule is changed, the overall treatment time is still the same); The CRE range was 18 to 21 for curative radiotherapy on carcinomas; No irradiation was applied during pronounced acute reactions. No unexpected complications have been observed under these conditions

  4. Accelerated split course regimen in the treatment of brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franchin, G.; Minatel, E.; Roncadin, M.; Trovo, M.G.; De Paoli, A.; Bortolus, R.; Arcicasa, M.; Boz, G.; Gobitti, C.; Grigoletto, E.; Bassignano, G.

    1988-01-01

    63 patients, with brain metastases were treated with an accelerated split course regimen; irradiation was given to the whole brain in 3 daily fractions of 160 cGy each for 5 days a week. The cycle was repeated after 2 weeks to a total dose of 4800 cGy. Male-female ratio was 3:1. Median age was 58 years. The most frequent site of primary tumor was lung (41 patients), breast in 6 patients, melanoma in 3 patients, other sites in 8 patients and unknown cancer in 5 patients. Thirty-five patients had multiple brain metastases localizations. Two patients failed to complete the scheduled treatment: one because of early death and the other by refusal of therapy during treatment. Complete remission was obtained in 4 patients and partial remission in 24 patients. The median survival time was 21 weeks. The overall response rate was 42.5%. Toxicity was not considerable. The treatment results were not influenced by the site of primary tumor or by disease spreading; only the neurologic status before radiotherapy and the response to treatment influenced survival. The results obtained are similar to those reported by others; however, with the accelerated split course regimen the treatment time was reduced and a shorter period of hospitalization was required. 36 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  5. Conformation radiotherapy and conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo

    1999-01-01

    In order to coincide the high dose region to the target volume, the 'Conformation Radiotherapy Technique' using the multileaf collimator and the device for 'hollow-out technique' was developed by Prof. S. Takahashi in 1960. This technique can be classified a type of 2D-dynamic conformal RT techniques. By the clinical application of this technique, the late complications of the lens, the intestine and the urinary bladder after radiotherapy for the maxillary cancer and the cervical cancer decreased. Since 1980's the exact position and shape of the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues can be easily obtained by the tremendous development of the CT/MRI imaging technique. As a result, various kinds of new conformal techniques such as the 3D-CRT, the dose intensity modulation, the tomotherapy have been developed since the beginning of 1990'. Several 'dose escalation study with 2D-/3D conformal RT' is now under way to improve the treatment results. (author)

  6. Preoperative concurrent chemo-radiation in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Kirscher, S.; Felix-Faure, C.; Chauvet, B.; Vincent, P.; Brewer, Y.; Reboul, F.

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate retrospectively treatment-related morbidity of concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy for rectal cancer. Between 1992 and 1995, 38 patients (median age: 60) were treated for locally advanced resectable rectal cancer. Median dose of radiotherapy was 45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks. Chemotherapy consisted of two courses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin administered during the first and the fifth weeks of radiotherapy. Median dose of 5-fluorouracil was 350 mg/m 2 /day, and median dose of leucovorin was 350 mg/m 2 /day, day 1 to day 5. Surgery was performed 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Before surgery, one patient died of febrile neutropenia and sepsis after two cycles of chemotherapy and 45 Gy. Main pre-operative grade 3-4 toxicities were respectively: neutropenia: 3% ; nausea/vomiting: 3%; diarrhea: 3%; proctitis: 5%; radiation dermatitis: 8%. Twenty-six patients underwent a low anterior resection and 11 an abdomino-perineal resection. A temporary colostomy was performed in 12 patients. Pathologic complete response rate was 27 %. There was one post-operative death due to thrombo-embolic disease. Major post-operative grade 3-4 complications were: pelvic infection: 14 %; abdominal infection : 5%; perineal sepsis: 8%; anastomotic dehiscence: 8%; cardiac failure: 5%. Delayed perineal wound healing was observed in six patients. No significant prognostic factor of post-operative complications has been observed. Median duration of hospitalization was 22 days. With a median follow-up of 24 months, 2-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 82 and 64%. Tolerance of preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy was acceptable. Ongoing controlled studies will assess the impact of this combined treatment on survival. (authors)

  7. Histologic assessment of treatment effect of preoperative chemo-radiation in patients presenting with resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma; Chimioradiotherapie preoperatoire des adenocarcinomes du pancreas: evaluation anatomopathologique de l'efficacite therapeutique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Scodan, R. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Rene-Huguenin, 35, rue Dailly, 92210 Saint-Cloud (France); Mornex, F. [Departement de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Benite cedex (France); Partensky, C. [Service de chirurgie digestive, hopital edouard-Herriot, 5, place Arsonval, 69003 Lyon (France); Mercier, C. [Departement de statistiques medicales, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Benite cedex (France); Valette, P.J. [Service de radiologie digestive, hopital edouard-Herriot, 5, place Arsonval, 69003 Lyon (France); Ychou, M. [Departement d' oncologie medicale, centre Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 208, rue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Bibeau, F. [Departement de pathologie, centre Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 208, rue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Scoazec, J.Y. [Laboratoire d' anatomie et de cytologie pathologiques, hopital edouard-Herriot, 5, place Arsonval, 69003 Lyon (France)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose. - Several phase II studies have shown the feasibility of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation regimens for resectable localized pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, there is to date no completed phase III study to validate this approach and treatment effects evaluation still remains an active area of investigation. From the mature results of the SFRO-FFCD 9704 trial, we explored the anti-tumoral effect of a 5-fluoro-uracil and cisplatin-based preoperative chemo-radiation regimen, with a special highlight on the histopathological response and performed a literature review. Patients and methods. - Treatment consisted of concurrent radiotherapy (50 Gy within five weeks) and chemotherapy with 5-fluoro-uracil (300 mg/m{sup 2}/day, five days/week, weeks 1-5) and cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day, days 1-5 and 29-33), followed by surgical resection of the pancreatic tumour in patients without progression. Results. - In all, 41 patients were enrolled, 26 patients (63%) underwent surgical resection with curative intent and 21 (80.7%) had R0 resection. A total of 13 of 26 specimens (50%) presented a major pathologic response (=80% of severely degenerative cancer cells), with one complete pathologic response. The local recurrence and two-year survival rates were 4 and 32%, respectively, for the 26 operated patients. Conclusion. - Our results suggest that preoperative chemo-radiation provides anti-tumoral effect associated with major histopathological response in 50% of patients and a high R0 resection rate. Evaluation of histopathological response to neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation may serve as a surrogate marker for treatment efficacy and further research is needed to determine new prognostic and predictive factors of treatment response. (authors)

  8. Hepatectomized case of hepatocellular carcinoma after fast neutron irradiation therapy. A trial of the new preoperative treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, Tohru; Ryu, Takamasa; Watanabe, Yoshiji

    1985-08-01

    A 51-year-old male patient with hepatocellular carcinoma was treated preoperatively by fast neutron radiotherapy (910 rad/7 fractions/15 days) with a field of 8 x 6 cm. Radiation-associated liver function disturbance was scarcely observed. No side effect, such as loss of appetite and general fatigue, was encountered. According to the classification of Ohoshi and Shimosato, histological effect of radiation was graded as II sub(A). There is no preoperative fast neutron radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma in Japan in the literature.

  9. Preoperative alcoholism and postoperative morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, H; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative risk assessment has become part of daily clinical practice, but preoperative alcohol abuse has not received much attention. METHODS: A Medline search was carried out to identify original papers published from 1967 to 1998. Relevant articles on postoperative morbidity...... in alcohol abusers were used to evaluate the evidence. RESULTS: Prospective and retrospective studies demonstrate a twofold to threefold increase in postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers, the most frequent complications being infections, bleeding and cardiopulmonary insufficiency. Wound complications...... to postoperative morbidity. CONCLUSION: Alcohol consumption should be included in the preoperative assessment of likely postoperative outcome. Reduction of postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers may include preoperative alcohol abstinence to improve organ function, or perioperative alcohol administration...

  10. Postmastectomy radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikama, Naoto; Koguchi, Masahiko; Sasaki, Shigeru; Kaneko, Tomoki; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Since there have been few reports on postmastectomy radiotherapy having a high evidence level in Japan, the significance of postoperative radiotherapy and the irradiation techniques were reviewed based on reports from Western countries. Authors focused on the indications for postoperative irradiation, irradiation methods (irradiation sites, irradiation techniques; prosthetics, methods of irradiating the chest wall and lymph nodes, timing of irradiation), and complications, and discuss them. The factors thought to be adaptable to postmastectomy radiotherapy have been listed. Axillary lymph node metastasis and the size of the primary focus are thought to be important factors in locoregional recurrence. The chest wall and the supraclavicular lymph nodes are the usual sites of irradiation after mastectomy. The irradiation method consists of tangential irradiation of the chest wall and single-field irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes, with 46-50 Gy in fractional doses of 1.8-2 Gy x 5/w is administered for 4.5-5.5 weeks. The timing of irradiation in the West is generally after chemotherapy. Adverse radiation effects include ischemic heart disease, pneumonitis, arm edema, rib fractures, and brachial plexus paralysis. The frequency of these complications is increased by the combined use of chemotherapy or surgery. The breast cancer cure rate in Japan is generally better than in the West. It remains to be determined whether the clinical data from Europe and America are applicable to the treatment of breast cancer in Japan. To address this issue, a clinical investigation should be performed in Japan with close cooperation between surgeons, physicians, pathologists, and radiotherapists. (K.H.)

  11. Preoperative treatment of rectum cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineur, L.; Serin, D.; Chauvet, B.; Reboul, F.; Molinari, N.; Guyot, T.; Ciornea, D.; Leignel, D.L.; Chapet, L.C.; Garaud, P.G.; Calais, G.C.; Calan, L.D.C. de; Viguier, J.V.; Boukerche, A.; Bechekat, C.; Dali-Youcef, A.F.; Larbaoui, B.; Djellali, L.; Safir, A.; Albarghach, M.N.; Malhaire, J.P.; Bouchekoua, M.; Muller, M.; Metges, J.P.; Pradier, O.; Robaszkiewicz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Five articles treat the question of rectum carcinoma through a combined therapy that associates radiotherapy ( pre or post operative), chemotherapy (concomitant before surgery) and surgery. The local control is also considered. (N.C.)

  12. Primary chemotherapy and preoperative-dose irradiation for patients with stage II larger than 3 CM or locally advanced non inflammatory breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touboul, E.; Lefranc, J.P.; Blondon, J.; Deniaud, E.; Buffat, L.; Benmiloud, M.; Laugier, A.; Schlienger, M.

    1995-01-01

    wide excision and axillary dissection followed by a booster dose of 20 Gy to the excision site by iridium 192 implant. After completion of local therapy all patients received a sixth course of chemotherapy. A maintenance adjuvant chemotherapy regimen without anthracycline was prescribed (12 monthly cycles). Results: The overall response rate to induction chemotherapy was 59 % with 9 % complete tumor regression. After induction chemotherapy and preoperative-dose irradiation, the overall response rate was 74% with 40% complete tumor regression. Four percent of the patients experienced grade 3 or 4 chemotherapy toxic effects which were all reversible. The 5- and 10- year overall, disease-free survival, isolated local relapse and locoregional relapse with or without metastases rates were 79% and 66%, 66% and 60%, 4.2% and 7.5%, 12% and 17%, respectively. The 5- and 10- year locoregional relapse rates with or without metastases were 15% and 20% after radiotherapy alone, 14% and 22.5% after wide excision and radiotherapy and 6% and 6% after mastectomy, respectively. The 5- and 10- year locoregional relapse rate seemed higher after wide excision and radiotherapy or after radiotherapy alone than after mastectomy but the difference was not significant, p=0.067 and p=0.08, respectively. After conservative local treatment, the 5- and 10- year breast conserving rates with locoregional disease-free were 85.5% and 78.5%, respectively. For all patients included in this study, the 5- and 10- year breast conserving rates with locoregional disease-free were 55% and 50.5%, respectively. In univariate analysis, the possibility of breast conservative treatment was significantly related to initial tumor size (< 6 cm vs ≥ 6 cm in diameter, p < 0.0001), tumor response after induction chemotherapy (p < 0.0001), tumor response after induction chemotherapy and preoperative-dose irradiation (p < 0.0001) and T-stage (p=0.016). In multivariate analysis, two factors had a significant impact on the

  13. Leptomeningeal enhancement on preoperative brain MRI in patients with glioblastoma and its clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hakyoung; Lim, Do Hoon; Kim, Tae Gyu; Lee, Jung-Il; Nam, Do-Hyun; Seol, Ho Jun; Kong, Doo-Sik; Choi, Jung Won; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Kim, Sung Tae

    2018-02-23

    Leptomeningeal enhancement (LME) on preoperative brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) does not always indicate leptomeningeal seeding (LMS). With Stupp's regimen, authors have treated glioblastoma patients with LME on preoperative brain MRI but here we tried to find the clinical impact of LME. From 2005 to 2015, 290 patients with glioblastoma have been treated with Stupp's regimen at Samsung Medical Center. Among these, 33 patients showed LME on preoperative brain MRI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the patients with or without LME on preoperative brain MRI and analyzed the clinical results according to changes of LME at following MRI. The median survival was 23 months, and 2-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 46.3% and 19.6%, respectively. Prognostic factors for OS and DFS were Karnofsky performance status, extent of resection and adjuvant chemotherapy. MGMT promoter methylation status was a significant prognostic factor for DFS. However, LME was not a significant prognostic factor for OS (P = 0.156) or DFS (P = 0.193). Among the 33 patients with LME on preoperative MRI, 21 (63.6%) showed persistent LME at the next MRI. A statistically significant difference in 2-year survival was evident between patients with and without persistent LME (OS, 17.3% and 70.1%, respectively, P = 0.044; DFS, 5.3% and 54.0%, respectively, P = 0.006). The most common pattern of failure was local recurrence. However, patients with persistent LME displayed a higher incidence of LMS than patients without LME. LME on preoperative brain MRI did not affect the clinical results in glioblastoma patients treated with the Stupp's regimen. However, persistence of LME was associated with poor survival and high possibility of LMS. For these patients, the postoperative adjuvant treatment should focus on palliative aim or more aggressive treatment scheme should be followed to overcome the disastrous results. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Preoperative cryotherapy use in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyonos, Loukas; Owsley, Kevin; Vollmer, Emily; Limpisvasti, Orr; Gambardella, Ralph

    2014-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may impair rehabilitation, compromise functional outcomes, and lead to patient dissatisfaction. Preemptive multimodal analgesic techniques may improve outcomes after surgery. We hypothesized that patients using preoperative cryotherapy plus a standardized postoperative treatment plan will have lower pain scores and require less pain medication compared with patients receiving a standardized postoperative treatment plan alone after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). A total of 53 consecutive patients undergoing arthroscopically assisted ACLR performed by one of seven surgeons were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group 1 received no preoperative cryotherapy and group 2 received 30 to 90 minutes of preoperative cryotherapy to the operative leg using a commercial noncompressive cryotherapy unit. Visual analog scale pain scores and narcotic use were recorded for the first 4 days postoperatively. Total hours of cold therapy and continuous passive motion (CPM) use and highest degree of flexion achieved were recorded as well. Group 1 consisted of 26 patients (15 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft bone patellar tendon bone [BPTB]), and group 2 consisted of 27 patients (16 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft BPTB). Group 2 patients reported less pain (average 1.3 units, p cryotherapy, hours of CPM use, or maximum knee flexion achieved. Complications did not occur in either group. This is the first report we are aware of showing the postoperative effects of preoperative cryotherapy. Our results support the safety and efficacy of preoperative cryotherapy in a multimodal pain regimen for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Agreement between pre-operative and intra-operative bacteriological samples in 85 chronic peri-prosthetic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter-Parrat, V; Ronde-Oustau, C; Boéri, C; Gaudias, J; Jenny, J-Y

    2017-04-01

    Whether pre-operative microbiological sampling contributes to the management of chronic peri-prosthetic infection remains controversial. We assessed agreement between the results of pre-operative and intra-operative samples in patients undergoing single-stage prosthesis exchange to treat chronic peri-prosthetic infection. Agreement between pre-operative and intra-operative samples exceeds 75% in patients undergoing single-stage exchange of a hip or knee prosthesis to treat chronic peri-prosthetic infection. This single-centre retrospective study included 85 single-stage prosthesis exchange procedures in 82 patients with chronic peri-prosthetic infection at the hip or knee. Agreement between pre-operative and intra-operative sample results was evaluated. Changes to the initial antibiotic regimen made based on the intra-operative sample results were recorded. Of 149 pre-operative samples, 109 yielded positive cultures, in 75/85 cases. Of 452 intra-operative samples, 354 yielded positive cultures, in 85/85 cases. Agreement was complete in 54 (63%) cases and partial in 9 (11%) cases; there was no agreement in the remaining 22 (26%) cases. The complete agreement rate was significantly lower than 75% (P=0.01). The initial antibiotic regimen was inadequate in a single case. Pre-operative sampling may contribute to the diagnosis of peri-prosthetic infection but is neither necessary nor sufficient to confirm the diagnosis and identify the causative agent. The spectrum of the initial antibiotic regimen cannot be safely narrowed based on the pre-operative sample results. We suggest the routine prescription of a probabilistic broad-spectrum antibiotic regimen immediately after the prosthesis exchange, even when a pathogen was identified before surgery. IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiotherapy in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozan, R.

    1992-01-01

    In 1992, the problem of the vesical radiotherapy is not resolved. The author presents the situation and the different techniques of radiotherapy in bladder cancers: external radiotherapy, only and associated with surgery, interstitial curietherapy and non-classical techniques as per operative radiotherapy, neutron therapy and concurrent radiotherapy with chemotherapy. In order to compare their efficiency, the five-year survival are given in all cases.(10 tabs)

  17. Integrated preoperative irradiation and radical cystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagerman, R.H.; Yu, W.S.; Ryoo, M.C.; King, G.A.; Chung, C.T.; Emmanuel, I.G.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty patients with stage B 2 -C-D 1 and/or grade III-IV transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder were entered into a pilot study of integrated surgery and radiotherapy. Staging laparotomy with formation of an ileal loop preceded the delivery of 4000 to 5000 rad in 4 to 5 weeks to the pelvis; cystectomy was accomplished in 26 patients 4 to 8 weeks after completion of irradiation. The program was accomplished without undue difficulty and resulted in a lowering of the clinical stage in 22 of 26 patients; no residual invasive cancer was seen histologically in 8 patients. Although it was formidable, the morbidity rate was not significantly different than it was after cystectomy without preoperative irradiation. The short term survival rate, in conjunction with an analysis of sites of failure, suggests that a prospective study be accomplished to document the validity of this therapeutic approach to bladder cancer; patient selection, surgical technique, and time-dose-volume radiation factors should also be considered

  18. Initial experience of single fraction radiotherapy (8 Gy x 1) in the treatment of painful bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Kosuke; Ikeda, Hiroko; Chigusa, Satoshi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Katayama, Hirofumi; Takeda, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen patients with painful bone metastases received single fraction radiotherapy of 8 Gy. Single fraction radiotherapy was effective in providing pain relief with response rate of 88.8%. There were no severe acute side effects. The therapeutic regimen was also safe and effective in patients with poor performance status and poor prognosis. Therefore single fraction radiotherapy should be considered to treat pain arising from bone metastases. (author)

  19. Preoperative chemoradiation with capecitabine, irinotecan and cetuximab in rectal cancer: significance of pre-treatment and post-resection RAS mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollins, Simon; West, Nick; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Myint, Arthur Sun; Saunders, Mark; Susnerwala, Shabbir; Quirke, Phil; Essapen, Sharadah; Samuel, Leslie; Sizer, Bruce; Worlding, Jane; Southward, Katie; Hemmings, Gemma; Tinkler-Hundal, Emma; Taylor, Morag; Bottomley, Daniel; Chambers, Philip; Lawrie, Emma; Lopes, Andre; Beare, Sandy

    2017-10-24

    The influence of EGFR pathway mutations on cetuximab-containing rectal cancer preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) is uncertain. In a prospective phase II trial (EXCITE), patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined non-metastatic rectal adenocarinoma threatening/involving the surgical resection plane received pelvic radiotherapy with concurrent capecitabine, irinotecan and cetuximab. Resection was recommended 8 weeks later. The primary endpoint was histopathologically clear (R0) resection margin. Pre-planned retrospective DNA pyrosequencing (PS) and next generation sequencing (NGS) of KRAS, NRAS, PIK3CA and BRAF was performed on the pre-treatment biopsy and resected specimen. Eighty-two patients were recruited and 76 underwent surgery, with R0 resection in 67 (82%, 90%CI: 73-88%) (four patients with clinical complete response declined surgery). Twenty-four patients (30%) had an excellent clinical or pathological response (ECPR). Using NGS 24 (46%) of 52 matched biopsies/resections were discrepant: ten patients (19%) gained 13 new resection mutations compared to biopsy (12 KRAS, one PIK3CA) and 18 (35%) lost 22 mutations (15 KRAS, 7 PIK3CA). Tumours only ever testing RAS wild-type had significantly greater ECPR than tumours with either biopsy or resection RAS mutations (14/29 [48%] vs 10/51 [20%], P=0.008), with a trend towards increased overall survival (HR 0.23, 95% CI 0.05-1.03, P=0.055). This regimen was feasible and the primary study endpoint was met. For the first time using pre-operative rectal CRT, emergence of clinically important new resection mutations is described, likely reflecting intratumoural heterogeneity manifesting either as treatment-driven selective clonal expansion or a geographical biopsy sampling miss.

  20. Effective preoperative irradiation of highly vascular cerebellopontine angle neurinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, K.; Ito, H.; Kashihara, K.; Fujisawa, H.; Yamamoto, S.

    1988-01-01

    Three cases of large cerebellopontine angle neurinoma with marked vascularity and tumor staining on the angiogram were treated with effective preoperative irradiation. The radiotherapy was given before the second operation in two cases and before the first operation in the other case. Irradiation doses administered with a linear accelerator were 2.34 to 3.0 Gy for 3 to 3.5 weeks, and radical operations were done 1.5 to 2 months after irradiation. After the irradiation, vertebral angiography showed moderate to marked decrease of the hypervascular capsular stain and disappearance of the early draining vein. Computed tomographic scan showed enlargement of the central necrotic area within the heterogeneously enhanced tumor, which was unchanged in size. Radical operations, which had been impossible because of uncontrollable massive bleeding, were successful without any intraoperative bleeding after radiotherapy. Postirradiation radiological findings corresponded well with those of histopathological examination, which showed decrease in cellularity and in vascularity and diffuse coagulation necrosis around the collapsed tumoral vessels as radiation effects. Preoperative irradiation of the hypervascular neurinoma was though to facilitate radical surgery by abolishing or diminishing the risk of intraoperative bleeding

  1. New Treatment Regimen for Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses the December 9, 2011 CDC guidelines for the use of a new regimen for the treatment of persons with latent tuberculosis infection.

  2. Postoperative radiotherapy in the rectal cancers patterns of care study for the years of 1998 ∼ 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hoon; Oh, Do Hoon; Kang, Ki Moon

    2005-01-01

    To conduct a nationwide survey on the principles in radiotherapy for rectal cancer, and produce a database of Korean Patterns of Care Study. We developed web-based Patterns of Care Study system and a national survey was conducted using random sampling based on power allocation methods. Eligible patients were who had postoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer without gross residual tumor after surgical resection and without previous history of other cancer and radiotherapy to pelvis. Data of patients were inputted to the web based PCS system by each investigators in 19 institutions. Information on 309 patients with rectal cancer who received radiotherapy between 1998 and 1999 were collected. Male to female ratio was 59:41, and the most common location of tumor was lower rectum (46%). Preoperative CEA was checked in 79% of cases and its value was higher than 6 ng/ml in 32%. Pathologic stage were I in 1.6%, II in 32%, III in 63%, and IV in 1.6%. Low anterior resection was the most common type of surgery and complete resection was performed in 95% of cases. Distal resection margin was less than 2 cm in 30%, and number of lymph node dissected was less than 12 in 31%. Chemotherapy was performed in 91% and most common regiment was 5-FU and leucovorine (69%). The most common type of field arrangement used for the initial pelvic field was the four field box (Posterior-Right-Left) technique (65.0%), and there was no AP-PA parallel opposing field used. Patient position was prone in 81.2%, an the boost field was used in 61.8%. To displace bowel outward, pressure modulating devices or bladder filling was used in 40.1%. Radiation dose was prescribed to isocenter in 45.3% and to isodose line in 123 cases (39.8%). Percent delivered dose over 90% was achieved in 92.2%. We could find the Patterns of Care for the radiotherapy in Korean rectal cancer patients was similar to that of US national survey. The type of surgery and the regimen of chemotherapy were variable according to

  3. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Villebro, Nete; Møller, Ann Merete

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Smokers have a substantially increased risk of postoperative complications. Preoperative smoking intervention may be effective in decreasing this incidence, and surgery may constitute a unique opportunity for smoking cessation interventions. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this review...... are to assess the effect of preoperative smoking intervention on smoking cessation at the time of surgery and 12 months postoperatively, and on the incidence of postoperative complications. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register in January 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA......: Randomized controlled trials that recruited people who smoked prior to surgery, offered a smoking cessation intervention, and measured preoperative and long-term abstinence from smoking or the incidence of postoperative complications or both outcomes. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The review authors...

  4. Role of signal dose preoperative antibiotic in acute nonperforated appendicitics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, S.A.; Rasheed, M.; Abbasi, A.S.; Iqbal, R.A.; Mian, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of a single dose of preoperative antibiotic in preventing post operative infective complications in patients undergoing appendicectomy for non perforated acute appendicitis. Study Design: Randomized controlled trials. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical unit I and II, department of General Surgery, Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Lahore from 1st June to 31st October 2010. Patients and Methods: Seventy patients with acute appendicitis scheduled for appendicectomy were included in the study and randomly divided into two groups of 35 each using random numbers table. Group A received single dose preoperative antibiotic and group B received three-dose regimens of cefuroxime. Postoperative infective complications were the primary endpoint. Results: The rate of postoperative wound infection was not statistically insignificantly different among the groups; (8.57%) group A and (5.71%) group B at 1st post operative week and (5.71%) group A and (5.71%) group B at 2nd post operative week. None of the patients from either group showed any signs of intra abdominal abscess formation. Conclusion: Single dose of preoperative antibiotics is adequate for prevention of postoperative infective complications in patients with non-perforated appendicitis undergoing open appendicectomy. (author)

  5. Preoperative fasting: a clinical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    This clinical audit examines the adherence to guidelines suggested by the Royal College of Nursing (2005); the results uphold previous studies of a preoperative starving period for patients undergoing elective surgical procedures. Patients excessively starved of food or fluids report problems relating to their health. These include hunger, distress and complaints of nausea.

  6. Comparison of isoeffect relationships in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, O.V.; Yi, P.N.

    1990-01-01

    Irradiation affects numerous physiological processes within cells and tissues and can lead to damage or death. If the damage is not too severe, cells have the ability to repair and regenerate. Many small injuries are repaired more easily than ones causing extensive damage and, consequently, tissues typically respond differently to one large dose of radiation than to many small doses, separated in time. In the radiotherapy of tumors, the choice of the fractionation regimen of dose over time is therefore as crucial as the total radiation dose. The interdependence between total dose, fractionation regimen, and radiation effect has been described mathematically with various isoeffect relationships. These relationships appear to be fundamentally distinct and have been considered unrelated; some even claim that one class of isoeffect relationships is appropriate whereas other relationships are rather useless. We examine how alternative isoeffect models relate to each other and test the reliability of estimating parameter values of one model from the other. (author)

  7. National arrangements for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    After a presentation of several letters exchanged between the French health ministry and public agencies in charge of public health or nuclear safety after a radiotherapy accident in Epinal, this report comments the evolution of needs in cancerology care and the place given to radiotherapy. It outlines the technological and organisational evolution of radiotherapy and presents the distribution of radiotherapy equipment, of radio-therapists and other radiotherapy professionals in France. Within the context of radiotherapy accidents which occurred in 2007, it presents the regulatory arrangements which aimed at improving the safety, short term and middle term arrangements which are needed to support and structure radiotherapy practice quality. It stresses the fact that the system will deeply evolve by implementing a radiotherapy vigilance arrangement and a permanent follow-on and adaptation plan based on surveys and the creation of a national committee

  8. Radiotherapy of malignant lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kujawska, J [Instytut Onkologii, Krakow (Poland)

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses current views on the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of patients with malignant lymphomas. Principles of radiotherapy employed in the Institute of Oncology in Cracow in case of patients with malignant lymphomas are also presented.

  9. [The role of magnetic resonance imaging to select patients for preoperative treatment in rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödel, Claus; Sauer, Rolf; Fietkau, Rainer

    2009-08-01

    Traditionally, the decision to apply preoperative treatment for rectal cancer patients has been based on the T- and N-category. Recently, the radial distance of the tumor to the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has been identified as an important risk factor for local failure. By magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) this distance can be measured preoperatively with high reliability. Thus, selected groups have started to limit the indication for preoperative therapy to tumors extending to - or growing within 1 mm from - the mesorectal fascia (CRM+). Pros and cons of this selected approach for preoperative treatment and first clinical results are presented. Prerequisites are the availability of modern high-resolution thin-section MRI technology as well as strict quality control of MRI and surgical quality of total mesorectal excision (TME). By selecting patients with CRM-positive tumors on MRI for preoperative therapy, only approximately 35% patients will require preoperative radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). However, with histopathologic work-up of the resected specimen after primary surgery, the indication for postoperative RCT is given for a rather large percentage of patients, i.e., for pCRM+ (5-10%), intramesorectal or intramural excision (30-40%), pN+ (30-40%). Postoperative RCT, however, is significantly less effective and more toxic than preoperative RCT. A further point of concern is the assertion that patients, in whom a CRM-negative status is achieved by surgery alone, do not benefit from additional RT. Data of the Dutch TME trial and the British MRC (Medical Research Council) CR07 trial, however, suggest the reverse. To omit preoperative RT/RCT for CRM-negative tumors on MRI needs to be further investigated in prospective clinical trials. The German guidelines for the treatment of colorectal cancer 2008 continue to indicate preoperative RT/RCT based on the T- and N-category.

  10. The role of magnetic resonance imaging to select patients for preoperative treatment in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedel, Claus; Sauer, Rolf; Fietkau, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, the decision to apply preoperative treatment for rectal cancer patients has been based on the T- and N-category. Recently, the radial distance of the tumor to the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has been identified as an important risk factor for local failure. By magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) this distance can be measured preoperatively with high reliability. Thus, selected groups have started to limit the indication for preoperative therapy to tumors extending to - or growing within 1 mm from - the mesorectal fascia (CRM+). Methods: Pros and cons of this selected approach for preoperative treatment and first clinical results are presented. Prerequisites are the availability of modern high-resolution thin-section MRI technology as well as strict quality control of MRI and surgical quality of total mesorectal excision (TME). Results: By selecting patients with CRM-positive tumors on MRI for preoperative therapy, only approximately 35% patients will require preoperative radiotherapy (RT) or radiochemotherapy (RCT). However, with histopathologic work-up of the resected specimen after primary surgery, the indication for postoperative RCT is given for a rather large percentage of patients, i.e., for pCRM+ (5-10%), intramesorectal or intramural excision (30-40%), pN+ (30-40%). Postoperative RCT, however, is significantly less effective and more toxic than preoperative RCT. A further point of concern is the assertion that patients, in whom a CRM-negative status is achieved by surgery alone, do not benefit from additional RT. Data of the Dutch TME trial and the British MRC (Medical Research Council) CR07 trial, however, suggest the reverse. Conclusion: To omit preoperative RT/RCT for CRM-negative tumors on MRI needs to be further investigated in prospective clinical trials. The German guidelines for the treatment of colorectal cancer 2008 continue to indicate preoperative RT/RCT based on the T- and N-category. (orig.)

  11. Prophylactic antibiotic regimens in tumour surgery (PARITY)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Michael Mørk; Hettwer, Werner H; Grum-Schwensen, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    -day regimen of post-operative antibiotics, in comparison to a 24-hour regimen, decreases surgical site infections in patients undergoing endoprosthetic reconstruction for lower extremity primary bone tumours. METHODS: We performed a pilot international multi-centre RCT. We used central randomisation...... to conceal treatment allocation and sham antibiotics to blind participants, surgeons, and data collectors. We determined feasibility by measuring patient enrolment, completeness of follow-up, and protocol deviations for the antibiotic regimens. RESULTS: We screened 96 patients and enrolled 60 participants......% at one year (the remainder with partial data or pending queries). In total, 18 participants missed at least one dose of antibiotics or placebo post-operatively, but 93% of all post-operative doses were administered per protocol. CONCLUSIONS: It is feasible to conduct a definitive multi-centre RCT of post...

  12. A randomised controlled trial to evaluate both the role and the optimal fractionation of radiotherapy in the conservative management of early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, D; Stocken, D D; Jordan, S; Bathers, S; Dunn, J A; Jevons, C; Dodson, L; Morrison, J M; Oates, G D; Grieve, R J

    2012-12-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy is routinely used in early breast cancer employing either 50 Gy in 25 daily fractions (long course) or 40 Gy in 15 daily fractions (short course). The role of radiotherapy and shorter fractionation regimens require validation. Patients with clinical stage I and II disease were randomised to receive immediate radiotherapy or delayed salvage treatment (no radiotherapy). Patients receiving radiotherapy were further randomised between long (50 Gy in 25 daily fractions) or short (40 Gy in 15 daily fractions) regimens. The primary outcome measure was time to first locoregional relapse. Reported results are at a median follow-up of 16.9 years (interquartile range 15.4-18.8). In total, 707 women were recruited between 1985 and 1992: median age 59 years (range 28-80), 68% postmenopausal, median tumour size 2.0 cm (range 0.12-8.0); 271 patients have relapsed: 110 radiotherapy, 161 no radiotherapy. The site of first relapse was locoregional158 (64%) and distant 87 (36%). There was an estimated 24% reduction in the risk of any competing event (local relapse, distant relapse or death) with radiotherapy (hazard ratio = 0.76; 95% confidence interval 0.65, 0.88). The benefit of radiotherapy treatment for all competing event types was statistically significant (X(Wald)(2) = 36.04, P < 0.001). Immediate radiotherapy reduced the risk of locoregional relapse by 62% (hazard ratio = 0.38; 95% confidence interval 0.27, 0.53), consistent across prognostic subgroups. No differences were seen between either radiotherapy fractionation schedules. This study confirmed better locoregional control for patients with early breast cancer receiving radiotherapy. A radiotherapy schedule of 40 Gy in 15 daily fractions is an efficient and effective regimen that is at least as good as the international conventional regimen of 50 Gy in 25 daily fractions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buatti, John M.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Friedman, William A.; Bova, Francis J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: Between April 1985 and June 1994, 70 adult patients with pathologically confirmed malignant glioma (75% glioblastoma multiforme, 25% anaplastic astrocytoma) suitable for high-dose therapy were selected for treatment with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy, 1.5 Gy twice daily to a total target dose of 60 Gy. Two patients were excluded from analysis (one patient had a fatal pulmonary embolism after 18 Gy; one patient discontinued therapy after 28.5 Gy against medical advice and without sequelae or progression). The 68 patients in the study group had a median age of 52 years and a median Karnofsky performance status of 90. Stereotactic implant ( 125 I) or stereotactic radiosurgery boosts were delivered to 16 patients (24%) in the study group. Minimum follow-up was 6 months. Results: Median survival was 13.8 months and median progression-free survival was 7.4 months. The absolute Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 16% at 2 years and 4% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis for the prognostic impact of age, gender, histology, Karnofsky performance status, symptomatology, surgical resection vs. biopsy, and boost vs nonboost therapy revealed that Karnofsky performance status ≥ 90, boost therapy, and surgical excision predicted significantly improved outcome. No severe toxicity occurred in patients treated with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy alone, although 5% required steroids temporarily for edema. Progression occurred during treatment in one patient (1.5%). Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy is well tolerated and leads to results comparable with those of standard therapy. The rate of disease progression during treatment is significantly better (p = 0.001) than is reported for patients treated with standard fractionation, with or without chemotherapy. This regimen is a reasonable starting point

  14. Hyperthermia and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitspatrick, C.

    1990-01-01

    Hyperthermia and radiotherapy have for long been used to assist in the control of tumours, either as separate entities, or, in a combined treatment scheme. This paper outlines why hyperthermia works, thermal dose and the considerations required in the timing when hyperthermia is combined with radiotherapy. Previously reported results for hyperthermia and radiotherapy used together are also presented. 8 refs., 8 tabs

  15. Preoperative chemoradiation using oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun-Sang; Kim, Jae-Sung; Cho, Moon-June; Song, Kyu-Sang; Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Capecitabine (Xeloda) is a new orally administered fluoropyrimidine carbamate that was rationally designed to exert its effect by tumor-selective activation. We attempted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of preoperative chemoradiation using capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between July 1999 and March 2001, 45 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3/T4 or N+) were treated with preoperative chemoradiation. Radiation of 45 Gy/25 fractions was delivered to the pelvis, followed by a 5.4 Gy/3 fractions boost to the primary tumor. Chemotherapy was administered concurrent with radiotherapy and consisted of 2 cycles of 14-day oral capecitabine (1650 mg/m 2 /day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m 2 /day), each of which was followed by a 7-day rest period. Surgery was performed 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: Thirty-eight patients received definitive surgery. Primary tumor and node downstaging occurred in 63% and 90% of patients, respectively. The overall downstaging rate, including both primary tumor and nodes, was 84%. A pathologic complete response was achieved in 31% of patients. Twenty-one patients had tumors located initially 5 cm or less from the anal verge; among the 18 treated with surgery, 72% received sphincter-preserving surgery. No Grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities developed. Other Grade 3 toxicities were as follows: hand-foot syndrome (7%), fatigue (4%), diarrhea (4%), and radiation dermatitis (2%). Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that preoperative chemoradiation with capecitabine is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective neoadjuvant treatment modality for locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition, this preoperative treatment has a considerable downstaging effect on the tumor and can increase the possibility of sphincter preservation in distal rectal cancer

  16. Pre-operative evaluation for thorax surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Luis, Saenz; Morales, Oscar Alberto

    2002-01-01

    A pre-operative analysis of the function of the breathing system is made in the patient that will be taken to thorax surgery. The paper includes risk factors, pre-operative clinical evaluation and of breathing and cardiovascular system

  17. Palonosetron and prednisolone for the prevention of nausea and emesis during fractionated radiotherapy and 5 cycles of concomitant weekly cisplatin-a phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhlmann, Christina H; Belli, Charlotte; Dahl, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Recommendations for antiemetic prophylaxis supportive to radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy are not evidence-based. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the antiemetic regimen concurrent to fractionated radiotherapy and concomitant weekly cisplatin in two Danish depart...

  18. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, A.O.; Baumann, T.; Pache, G.; Langer, M.; Wiech, T.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate preoperative staging of rectal cancer is crucial for therapeutic decision making, as local tumor extent, nodal status, and patterns of metastatic spread are directly associated with different treatment strategies. Recently, treatment approaches have been widely standardized according to large studies and consensus guidelines. Introduced by Heald, total mesorectal excision (TME) is widely accepted as the surgical procedure of choice to remove the rectum together with its enveloping tissues and the mesorectal fascia. Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy also plays a key role in the treatment of locally advanced stages, while the use of new drugs will lead to a further improvement in oncological outcome. Visualization of the circumferential resection margin is the hallmark of any preoperative imaging and a prerequisite for high-quality TME surgery. The aim of this article is to present an overview on current cross-sectional imaging with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging. Future perspectives in rectal cancer imaging are addressed. (orig.)

  19. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Villebro, N.; Møller, Ann Merete

    2010-01-01

    Background Smokers have a substantially increased risk of postoperative complications. Preoperative smoking intervention may be effective in decreasing this incidence, and surgery may constitute a unique opportunity for smoking cessation interventions. Objectives The objective of this review...... was to assess the effect of preoperative smoking intervention on smoking cessation at the time of surgery and 12 months postoperatively and on the incidence of postoperative complications. Search strategy The specialized register of the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group was searched using the free text...... and keywords (surgery) or (operation) or (anaesthesia) or (anesthesia). MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL were also searched, combining tobacco- and surgery-related terms. Most recent search April 2010. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that recruited people who smoked prior to surgery, offered...

  20. FFTF preoperational survey. Program report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twitty, B.L.; Bicehouse, H.J.

    1980-12-01

    The FFTF will become operational with criticality early in 1980. This facility is composed of the test reactor, fuel examination cells, expended fuel storage systems and fuel handling systems. The reactor and storage systems are sodium-cooled with the heat load dumped to the ambient air through heat exchangers. In order to assure that the operation of the FFTF has minimal impact on the environment, a monitoring program has been established. Prior to operation of a new facility, a preoperational environmental survey is required. It is the purpose of this report to briefly describe the environmental survey program and to provide the background data obtained during the preoperational phase of the survey program. Nine stations in the program of particular importance to FFTF are discussed in detail with results of monitoring given. No unexplained trends were noted

  1. The value of preoperative planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Matt L

    2013-10-01

    "Better to throw your disasters into the waste paper basket than to consign your patients to the scrap heap" has been a proverb of Jeff Mast, one of the greatest fracture and deformity surgeons in the history of our specialty. Stated slightly more scientifically, one of the major values of simulation is that it allows one to make mistakes in a consequence-free environment. Preoperative planning is the focus of this article. The primary goal is not to provide you with a recipe of how to steps. Rather, the primary goal of this article is to explain why preoperative planning should be standard, to clarify what should be included, and to provide examples of what can happen when planning is ignored. At the end of this, we should all feel the need to approach fracture care more intellectually with forethought, both in our own practices and in our educational system.

  2. [Preoperative fasting guidelines: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Muñoz, A C; Busto Aguirreurreta, N; Tomás Braulio, J

    2015-03-01

    Anesthesiology societies have issued various guidelines on preoperative fasting since 1990, not only to decrease the incidence of lung aspiration and anesthetic morbidity, but also to increase patient comfort prior to anesthesia. Some of these societies have been updating their guidelines, as such that, since 2010, we now have 2 evidence-based preoperative fasting guidelines available. In this article, an attempt is made to review these updated guidelines, as well as the current instructions for more controversial patients such as infants, the obese, and a particular type of ophthalmic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Preoperative nutrition therapy - novel developments

    OpenAIRE

    Ljungqvist, Olle; Nygren, Jonas; Hausel, Jonatan; Thorell, Anders

    2000-01-01

    Elective surgery has until recently been performed in the overnight fasted state in order to reduce the risk of aspiration of gastric content during the induction of anaesthesia. However, in order to increase the preoperative well-being of surgical patients, most western countries have changed their routines during the last 10-15 years, allowing intake of clear fluids up to 2 hours before anaesthesia in most patients. Animal studies have demonstrated that undergoing different situations of st...

  4. Hypofractionated Adjuvant Whole Breast Radiotherapy: Progress and Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarnold, John; Haviland, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Published results of randomised trials involving >7000 women confirm the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated schedules of adjuvant radiotherapy for women with early breast cancer using fraction sizes between 2 and 3 Gy assuming appropriate downward adjustments to total dose. Unnecessary concerns relating to heart tolerance, suboptimal dose distribution and duration of follow up need not discourage the routine adoption of 15- or 16-fraction schedules in women treated by breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer. Regardless of fractionation regimen, dose escalation to the index quadrant in high risk subgroups will result in a greater relative increase in late adverse effects than tumour control, a therapeutic disadvantage that can only be overcome by exploiting a marked dose-volume effect. A 15-fraction schedule of whole breast radiotherapy is unlikely to represent the lower limits of hypofractionation, and the preliminary results of a 5-fraction regimen are encouraging

  5. A prospective and randomized study of radiotherapy, sequential chemotherapy radiotherapy and concomitant chemo therapy-radiotherapy in unresectable non small cell carcinoma of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasgupta Anirban

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Treatment of advanced Non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC often produces dismal results. Combination of available treatment modalities has reportedly improved the outcome. A prospectively randomized trial was conducted, comparing combined treatment modalities versus radiotherapy alone, in treatment of unresectable NSCLC. Materials and Methods: A total of 103 patients were randomized to three groups. In group ′A′, 32 patients received radiotherapy alone (6500 cGy/30 fraction. In group ′B′, 35 patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (Cisplatin 80 mg/m2 on day 1 and Etoposide 100 mg/m day 1-3 intravenously q3 weeks for 3 cycles, followed by radiotherapy (6000 cGy/30 fractions and 3 more cycles of Chemotherapy, with the same regimen. In group ′C′, 36 patients received radiotherapy (5000 cGy/25 fractions with concurrent chemotherapy (ciplatin 20 mg/m2 + Etoposide 75 mg/m2 intravenously on day 1-5 and day 22-26, followed by 2 more cycles of chemotherapy,q3 weeks with the same regimen. Results: Initial treatment responses were significantly higher in group ′B′ ( P P Conclusion: Addition of chemotherapy with radiation in unresectable NSCLC improves response rates, time to tumour progression and disease free survival, though the same effect is not translated in overall survival.

  6. Phase I trial of cetuximab in combination with capecitabine, weekly irinotecan, and radiotherapy as neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Horisberger, Karoline; Woernle, Christoph; Wenz, Frederik; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Kaehler, Georg; Dinter, Dietmar; Grobholz, Rainer; Heeger, Steffen; Post, Stefan; Hochhaus, Andreas; Willeke, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the feasibility and efficacy of chemotherapy with capecitabine, weekly irinotecan, cetuximab, and pelvic radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and materials: Twenty patients with rectal cancer (clinical Stage uT3-T4 or N+) received a standard dosing regimen of cetuximab (400 mg/m 2 on Day 1 and 250 mg/m 2 on Days 8, 15, 22, and 29) and escalating doses of irinotecan and capecitabine according to phase I methods: dose level I, irinotecan 40 mg/m 2 on Days 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29 and capecitabine 800 mg/m 2 on Days 1-38; dose level II, irinotecan 40 mg/m 2 and capecitabine 1000 mg/m 2 ; and dose level III, irinotecan 50 mg/m 2 and capecitabine 1000 mg/m 2 . Radiotherapy was given to a dose of 50.4 Gy (45 Gy plus 5.4 Gy). Resection was scheduled 4-5 weeks after termination of chemoradiotherapy. Results: On dose level I, no dose-limiting toxicities occurred; however, Grade 3 diarrhea affected 1 of 6 patients on dose level II. Of 5 patients treated at dose level III, 2 exhibited dose-limiting toxicity (diarrhea in 2 and nausea/vomiting in 1). Therefore, dose level II was determined as the recommended dose for future studies. A total of 10 patients were treated on dose level II and received a mean relative dose intensity of 100% of cetuximab, 94% of irinotecan, and 95% of capecitabine. All patients underwent surgery. Five patients had a pathologically complete remission and six had microfoci of residual tumor only. Conclusion: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with cetuximab, capecitabine, and weekly irinotecan is feasible and well tolerated. The preliminary efficacy is very promising. Larger phase II trials are ongoing

  7. Effects of radiotherapy on non-specific immunological parameters in patients with malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Junkoh; Iwaki, Kazuo; Ohtsuka, Shin-ichi; Yamasaki, Toshiki; Gi, Hidefuku

    1983-01-01

    The non-specific immunological parameters of 37 patients with malignant brain tumors were analysed by means of 1) purified protein derivative (PPD) skin test, 2) lymphocyte counts, and 3) phytohemagglutinin (PHA) blastogenesis. The PPD skin reaction and PHA blastogenesis were already depressed preoperatively in patients with malignant brain tumors as compared to those in normal controls. When radiotherapy was confined to the head, lymphocyte counts and PHA blastogenesis were further depressed, but gradually recovered to preoperative levels within 6 months after the completion of radiotherapy. In the cases with medulloblastoma and germinoma who received whole cerebrospinal axis irradiation, lymphocyte counts and PHA blastogenesis were more markedly depressed and took more than 6 months after completion of the radiotherapy to recover to their preoperative levels. The result of the PPD skin test, on the other hand, was not affected and was rather enhanced by radiotherapy, showing a marked dissociation from the changes in lymphocyte counts and PHA blastogenesis. The results of PPD skin test on discharge from hospital were relatively well correlated with the prognosis of the patients. The profound immunosuppressive influence of radiotherapy and the natural course of recovery should be taken into consideration if any immunological treatments are to be undertaken with or after the course of radiotherapy. (author)

  8. The role of radiotherapy in the management of extrahepatic bile duct cancer: an analysis of 145 consecutive patients treated with intraluminal and/or external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Tadashi; Saitou, Hiroya; Takamura, Akio; Nojima, Takayuki; Okushiba, Shun-Ichi

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of high dose radiotherapy and to evaluate its role in the management of extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1983 and 1991, 145 consecutive patients with EHBD cancer were treated by low dose rate intraluminal 192 Ir irradiation (ILRT) either alone or in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Among the primarily irradiated, 77 patients unsuitable for surgical resection, 54 were enrolled in radical radiotherapy, and 23 received palliative radiotherapy. Fifty-nine received postoperative radiotherapy, and the remaining 9 preoperative radiotherapy. The mean radiation dose was 67.8 Gy, ranging from 10 to 135 Gy. Intraluminal 192 Ir irradiation was indicated in 103 patients, and 85 of them were combined with EBRT. Expandable metallic biliary endoprosthesis (EMBE) was used in 32 primarily irradiated patients (31 radical and 1 palliative radiotherapy) after the completion of radiotherapy. Results: The 1-, 3-, and 5-year actuarial survival rates for all 145 patients were 55%, 18%, and 10%, for the 54 patients treated by radical radiotherapy (mean 83.1 Gy), 56%, 13%, and 6% [median survival time (MST) 12.4 months], and for the 59 patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy (mean 61.6 Gy), 73%, 31%, and 18% (MST 21.5 months), respectively. Expandable metallic biliary endoprosthesis was useful for the early establishment of an internal bile passage in radically irradiated patients and MST of 14.9 months in these 31 patients was significantly longer than that of 9.3 months in the remaining 23 patients without EMBE placement (p < 0.05). Eighteen patients whose surgical margins were positive in the hepatic side bile duct(s) showed significantly better survival compared with 15 patients whose surgical margins were positive in the adjacent structure(s) (44% vs. 0% survival at 3 years, p < 0.001). No survival benefit was obtained in patients given palliative or preoperative radiotherapy

  9. Palliative radiotherapy for lung cancer: two versus five fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, G.J.G.; Devrell, C.E.; Barley, V.L.; Newman, H.F.V. [Bristol Oncology Centre (United Kingdom)

    1997-09-01

    The aim of this prospective randomized trial was to compare the symptomatic effects of two different regimens of palliative radiotherapy for lung cancer. Two hundred and sixteen patients needing palliation were randomized to receive either a 17 Gy mid-point dose in two fractions 1 week apart or 22.5 gy in five daily fractions. Both toxicity and efficacy were evaluated by postal questionnaires. This small study was intended to identify any clinically important differences in toxicity of efficacy between the two regimens. We detected no such difference, although there was a tendency for iatrogentic dysphagia and improvement in chest pain and cough to be more common with the two fraction regimen. The only symptom that was improved in over 50% for 8 or more was haemoptysis. Haemoptysis and chest pain appeared to be the best indications for treatment. The relief of other symptoms was disappointing in both degree and duration. (author).

  10. The metabolic radiotherapy. La radiotherapie metabolique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begon, F.; Gaci, M. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 86 - Poitiers (France))

    In this article, the authors recall the principles of the metabolic radiotherapy and present these main applications in the treatment of thyroid cancers, hyperthyroidism, polycythemia, arthritis, bone metastases, adrenergic neoplasms. They also present the radioimmunotherapy.

  11. Australian survey on current practices for breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Kylie L; Pogson, Elise M; Batumalai, Vikneswary; Boxer, Miriam M; Yap, Mei Ling; Delaney, Geoff P; Metcalfe, Peter; Holloway, Lois

    2015-12-01

    Detailed, published surveys specific to Australian breast radiotherapy practice were last conducted in 2002. More recent international surveys specific to breast radiotherapy practice include a European survey conducted in 2008/2009 and a Spanish survey conducted in 2009. Radiotherapy techniques continue to evolve, and the utilisation of new techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), is increasing. This survey aimed to determine current breast radiotherapy practices across Australia. An online survey was completed by 50 of the 69 Australian radiation therapy treatment centres. Supine tangential beam whole breast irradiation remains the standard of care for breast radiotherapy in Australia. A growing number of institutions are exploring prone positioning and IMRT utilisation. This survey demonstrated a wide variation in the benchmarks used to limit and report organ at risk doses, prescribed dose regimen, and post-mastectomy bolus practices. This survey also indicated, when compared with international literature, that there may be less interest in or uptake of external beam partial breast irradiation, prone positioning, simultaneous integrated boost and breath hold techniques. These are areas where further review and research may be warranted to ensure Australian patients are receiving the best care possible based on the best evidence available. This survey provides insight into the current radiotherapy practice for breast cancer in Australia. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  12. A Phase II Study of Methotrexate, Etoposide, Dexamethasone and Pegaspargase Sandwiched with Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed, Stage IE to IIE Extranodal Natural-Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma, Nasal-Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Peng Xu

    2017-11-01

    Interpretation: MESA sandwiched with radiotherapy is an effective and safe regimen for early-stage ENKTL. AspM score may be a promising prognostic index of serum metabolites in addition to clinical prognostic index in ENKTL.

  13. Lymphopenia caused by cranial irradiation in children receiving craniospinal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harisiadis, L.; Kopelson, G.; Chang, C.H.

    1977-01-01

    The peripheral blood changes were studied in 67 children who received craniospinal irradiation for posterior fossa tumors. At the completion of a cranial dose of about 3500 rad to the whole brain port, the lymphocytes were reduced to 858/mm 3 from 3084/mm 3 preoperatively. The counts of the remaining leukocytes stayed at a level somewhat higher than preoperatively; the eosinophils rose to 288/mm 3 from 125/mm 3 . With the initiation of the spinal field irradiation, which included a large proportion of the total bone marrow, the numbers of all the leukocytes decreased rapidly; the observed leukopenia was mainly secondary to neutropenia. A mechanism that was operating to restore the number of leukocytes became manifest immediately after the completion of radiotherapy, though the number of lymphocytes had not been totally restored to the preoperative level 6 years later. Irradiation of the lymphocytes that circulate through the vascular bed can explain the lymphopenia observed during cranial radiotherapy. Mild leukopenia observed in patients receiving radiotherapy through a relatively small port may be secondary to lymphopenia, and this does not necessarily indicate impaired bone marrow reserves

  14. New Treatment Regimen for Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-15

    In this podcast, Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses the December 9, 2011 CDC guidelines for the use of a new regimen for the treatment of persons with latent tuberculosis infection.  Created: 3/15/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/15/2012.

  15. Preoperative fasting time in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adeel, S

    2012-02-01

    The aim of preoperative fasting is to prevent regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration while limiting potential problems of thirst, dehydration and hypoglycaemia. The American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) has suggested guidelines for preoperative fasting for children undergoing elective surgery. We did a postal survey to determine the current practice regarding these guidelines amongst all specialist registrars in anaesthesia in Ireland. A questionnaire was sent to all specialist registrars in anaesthesia (90 in total), 60 (67%) were returned and analysed. The question asked was how long children should be kept fasting before elective surgery. The results of our survey suggest that most of the respondents are following the ASA guidelines for clear fluids and solids however there were differing opinion regarding the duration of fasting for formula milk and breast milk. In conclusion, we would recommend greater awareness and collaboration between anaesthetists, nurses and surgeons to ensure that fasting instructions are consistent with the ASA guidelines and that patient and their parents understand these directives as well.

  16. Preoperative irradiation of hypernephroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbar, D.

    1982-01-01

    Since 1969, preoperative irradiation of hypernephiroid carcinoma has been a routine measure at the Steglitz medical clinic: It consists in the application of a focal dose of 30 Gy, fractionated into doses of 2.5 Gy, as Betatron pendulum irradiation (42 MeV photons) covering the para-aortic lymph nodes. After a treatment-free interval of 3 weeks, radical nephrectomy is carried through. Of 178 patients, 47 were in tumor stage I, 15 in stage II, 83 in stage III and 33 in stage IV. In 99 patients the treatment dated back longer than 5 years; the survival rate was 52%. 67% of the patients had survived longer than 3 years. Operation lethality was 3%. The preoperative irradiation pursues the following aims: 1. Devitalization of potentially proliferating cells in the tumor periphery, and thus prevention of displaced tumor cells growing on and postoperative local recidivations; 2. Shrinking of the tumor, facilitating the surgical intervention. In a third of the cases a measurable alteration of the tumor was confirmed by X-ray. The low operation lethality of 3% is attributed to this. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Preoperative embolization of gigantic meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongsheng; Chen Huaqun; Dong Congsong; Li Wenhui; Dai Zhenyu; Chen Guozhi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of preoperative embolization in treatment of patients with gigantic meningioma. Methods: Fourteen cases of gigantic meningioma diameter from 6 to 11 cm were measured by CT and MRI scan. DSA manifested that they are vascularizd meningioma and showed the mainly feeding arteries. We used getation sponge to superselectively embilized the feeding arteries. All tumors were performed surgical excision 3-7 days after the embolization. Results: DSA showed the blood supplies in the tumors in 9 cases were completely blocked, and that in 5 cases were dramatically eliminated. All patients were operated 3-7 days after the embolization. During the operations the bleeding were dramatically decreased and the operation time was shortened compared with those in unembolized cases. It helps us remove the tumors easy and quickly from the attachments. No complication occurred during and after the operations. Conclusion: Preoperative embolization of gigantic meningioma is a useful and relatively safe method in helping surgicaly and completely excised of tumor with significant reduction of blood loss and operation time. (authors)

  18. Preoperative embolization of facial angiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causmano, F.; Bruschi, G.; De Donatis, M.; Piazza, P.; Bassi, P.

    1988-01-01

    Preoperative embolization was performed on 27 patients with facial angiomas supplied by the external carotid branches. Sixteen were males and 11 females; 13 of these angiomas were high-flow arterio-venous (A-V), 14 were low-flow capillary malformations. Fourteen patients underwent surgical removal after preoperative embolization; in this group embolization was carried out with Spongel in 3 cases and with Lyodura in 11 cases. In 12 of these patients the last angiographic examination was performed 3-6 years later: angiography evidenced no recurrence in 8 cases (67%), while in 3 cases (25%) there was capillary residual angioma of negligible size. Treatment was unsuccessful in one patient only, due to the large recurrent A-V angioma. Thirteen patients underwent embolization only, which was carried out with Lyodura in 10 cases, and with Ivalon in 3 cases. On 12 of these patients the last angiographic study was performed 2-14 months later: there was recurrent A-V angioma in 5 patients (42%), who underwent a subsequent embolization; angiography evidenced no recurrence in the other 7 patients (58%). In both series, the best results were obtained in the patients with low-flow capillary angiomas. Embolization and subsequent surgical removal are the treatment of choice for facial angiomas; embolization alone is useful in the management of surgically inacessible vascular malformations, and it can be the only treatment in patients with small low-flow angiomas when distal occlusion of the feeding vessel with Lyodura or Ivalon particles is performed

  19. The potential biomarkers in predicting pathologic response of breast cancer to three different chemotherapy regimens: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chaoyang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preoperative chemotherapy (PCT has become the standard of care in locally advanced breast cancer. The identification of patient-specific tumor characteristics that can improve the ability to predict response to therapy would help optimize treatment, improve treatment outcomes, and avoid unnecessary exposure to potential toxicities. This study is to determine whether selected biomarkers could predict pathologic response (PR of breast tumors to three different PCT regimens, and to identify a subset of patients who would benefit from a given type of treatment. Methods 118 patients with primary breast tumor were identified and three PCT regimens including DEC (docetaxel+epirubicin+cyclophosphamide, VFC (vinorelbine/vincristine+5-fluorouracil+cyclophosphamide and EFC (epirubicin+5-fluorouracil+cyclophosphamide were investigated. Expression of steroid receptors, HER2, P-gp, MRP, GST-pi and Topo-II was evaluated by immunohistochemical scoring on tumor tissues obtained before and after PCT. The PR of breast carcinoma was graded according to Sataloff's classification. Chi square test, logistic regression and Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel assay were performed to determine the association between biomarkers and PR, as well as the effectiveness of each regimen on induction of PR. Results There was a clear-cut correlation between the expression of ER and decreased PR to PCT in all three different regimens (p p Conclusion ER is an independent predictive factor for PR to PCT regimens including DEC, VFC and EFC in primary breast tumors, while HER2 is only predictive for DEC regimen. Expression of PgR, Topo-II, P-gp, MRP and GST-pi are not predictive for PR to any PCT regimens investigated. Results obtained in this clinical study may be helpful for the selection of appropriate treatments for breast cancer patients.

  20. Assessment of non-standard HIV antiretroviral therapy regimens at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-06

    Mar 6, 2016 ... Most patients were transitioned to standard regimens, ... In cases of first-line regimen treatment failure, ..... tute; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; National. Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; National Insti-.

  1. Acute mucositis in the stimulated oral mucosa of patients during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Zajusz, A.; Pilecki, B.; Swiatnicka, J.; Skladowski, K.; Trott, K.R.

    1991-01-01

    In 16 patients treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity or oropharynx with an accelerated split course regimen, acute mucosal reactions were significantly less in the left buccal mucosa which had been repeatedly painted with 2% silver-nitrate solution for several days before radiotherapy than in the unpainted right buccal mucosa. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Radiotherapy in small countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Michael B; Zubizarreta, Eduardo H; Polo Rubio, J Alfredo

    2017-10-01

    To examine the availability of radiotherapy in small countries. A small country was defined as a country with a population less than one million persons. The economic status of each country was defined using the World Bank Classification. The number of cancers in each country was obtained from GLOBOCAN 2012. The number of cancer cases with an indication or radiotherapy was calculated using the CCORE model. There were 41 countries with a population of under 1 million; 15 were classified as High Income, 15 Upper Middle Income, 10 Lower Middle Income and one Low Income. 28 countries were islands. Populations ranged from 799 (Holy See) to 886450 (Fiji) and the total number of cancer cases occurring in small countries was 21,043 (range by country from 4 to 2476). Overall the total number of radiotherapy cases in small countries was 10982 (range by country from 2 to 1239). Radiotherapy was available in all HIC islands with 80 or more new cases of cancer in 2012 but was not available in any LMIC island. Fiji was the only LMIC island with a large radiotherapy caseload. Similar caseloads in non-island LMIC all had radiotherapy services. Most non-island HIC did not have radiotherapy services presumably because of the easy access to radiotherapy in neighbouring countries. There are no radiotherapy services in any LMIC islands. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Preoperative preparation of patients with pituitary gland disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenković, Vesna; Gvozdenović, Ljiljana; Milaković, Branko; Sabljak, Vera; Ladjević, Nebojsa; Zivaljević, Vladan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the most common disorders of pituitary function: acromegaly, hypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus and syndrome similar to diabetes insipidus, in terms of their importance in preoperative preparation of patients. Pituitary function manages almost the entire endocrine system using the negative feedback mechanism that is impaired by these diseases. The cause of acromegaly is a pituitary adenoma, which produces growth hormone in adults. Primary therapy of acromegaly is surgical, with or without associated radiotherapy. If a patient with acromegaly as comorbidity prepares for non-elective neurosurgical operation, then it requires consultation with brain surgeons for possible delays of that operation and primary surgical treatment of pituitary gland. If operative treatment of pituitary gland is carried out, the preoperative preparation (for other surgical interventions) should consider the need for perioperative glucocorticoid supplementation. Panhypopituitarism consequences are different in children and adults and the first step in diagnosis is to assess the function of target organs. Change of electrolytes and water occurs in the case of pituitary lesions in the form of central or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus as a syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). Preoperative preparation of patients with pituitary dysfunction should be multidisciplinary, whether it is a neurosurgical or some other surgical intervention. The aim is to evaluate the result of insufficient production of pituitary hormones (hypopituitarism), excessive production of adenohypophysis hormones (acromegaly, Cushing's disease and hyperprolactinemia) and the influence of pituitary tumours in surrounding structures (compression syndrome) and to determine the level of perioperative risk. Pharmacological suppressive therapy of the hyperfunctional pituitary disorders can have significant interactions with drugs used in the perioperative period.

  4. Long-term results of radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas. Evaluation of tumor control and hypopituitarism after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Emiko; Sakai, Kunio; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Sugita, Tadashi; Sasamoto, Ryuta

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the results of conventional radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas assessed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Endpoints include tumor control, normalization of hormone levels in functioning adenomas, and hypopituitarism after radiotherapy as an adverse effect. Forty-two patients were treated with radiotherapy from 1982 to 1995 at Niigata University Hospital. Forty patients were irradiated after surgery because of residual adenomas in 33 patients and tumor regrowth in 7 patients. One patient was treated with radiotherapy alone, and the remaining 1 patient was treated with preoperative radiotherapy. Tumor size and extension were evaluated using CT or MRI, and all tumors were macroadenomas. They consisted of 18 non-functioning and 24 functioning adenomas (growth hormone (GH)-secreting: 11, prolactinomas: 7, concomitant GH and prolactin (PRL)-secreting: 5, gonadotropin-secreting: 1). Treatment was given in 200 cGy daily fraction size and a total dose of 50 Gy was given to most patients. Sixteen patients with GH- and/or PRL-secreting adenomas received bromocriptine. Tumor progression was determined by increase in tumor size as shown by CT or MRI. Hypopituitarism after radiotherapy was evaluated using the functions of corticotropin (ACTH), thyrotropin (TSH), and gonadotropin. Median follow-up time from the end of radiotherapy was 103 months. Tumor progression occurred in 2 out of 42 patients and 10-year progression-free rate for all patients was 93.7%. Normalization of GH levels was obtained in 12 of 16 GH-secreting adenomas with a mean time of 27 months after radiotherapy, and 9 of 12 PRL-secreting adenomas achieved normalization of PRL levels with a mean time of 34 months. One gonadotropin-secreting adenoma achieved normalization of gonadotropin level at 21 months after radiotherapy. The incidence of hypopituitarism after radiotherapy increased with time, and cumulative risk of deficiencies of ACTH, TSH, and gonadotropin at 10

  5. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose-volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the "RadoncSpace") in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches.

  6. Preoperative patient education: evaluating postoperative patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, B J

    1994-04-01

    Preoperative teaching is an important part of patient care and can prevent complications, as well as promote patient fulfillment during hospitalization. A study was conducted at Alton Ochsner Medical Foundation in New Orleans, LA, in 1989, to determine the impact of a preoperative teaching program on the incidence of postoperative atelectasis and patient satisfaction. Results showed no significant difference of postoperative complications and patient gratification after participating in a structured preoperative teaching program. As part of this study, it was identified that a patient evaluation tool for a preoperative teaching class needed to be developed. The phases of this process are explained in the following article.

  7. Treatment Guidelines for Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma: Preliminary Consensus of an International Expert Panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, Elizabeth H., E-mail: ebaldini@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wang, Dian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Haas, Rick L.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Catton, Charles N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Indelicato, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Medical Center, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Roberge, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Salerno, Kilian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (United States); Deville, Curtiland [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Washington, DC (United States); Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); O' Sullivan, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Petersen, Ivy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Le Pechoux, Cecile [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Evidence for external beam radiation therapy (RT) as part of treatment for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) is limited. Preoperative RT is the subject of a current randomized trial, but the results will not be available for many years. In the meantime, many practitioners use preoperative RT for RPS, and although this approach is used in practice, there are no radiation treatment guidelines. An international expert panel was convened to develop consensus treatment guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS. Methods and Materials: An expert panel of 15 academic radiation oncologists who specialize in the treatment of sarcoma was assembled. A systematic review of reports related to RT for RPS, RT for extremity sarcoma, and RT-related toxicities for organs at risk was performed. Due to the paucity of high-quality published data on the subject of RT for RPS, consensus recommendations were based largely on expert opinion derived from clinical experience and extrapolation of relevant published reports. It is intended that these clinical practice guidelines be updated as pertinent data become available. Results: Treatment guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS are presented. Conclusions: An international panel of radiation oncologists who specialize in sarcoma reached consensus guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS. Many of the recommendations are based on expert opinion because of the absence of higher level evidence and, thus, are best regarded as preliminary. We emphasize that the role of preoperative RT for RPS has not been proven, and we await data from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study of preoperative radiotherapy plus surgery versus surgery alone for patients with RPS. Further data are also anticipated pertaining to normal tissue dose constraints, particularly for bowel tolerance. Nonetheless, as we await these data, the guidelines herein can be used to establish treatment uniformity to aid future assessments of efficacy

  8. Oxaliplatin added to fluorouracil-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer (the German CAO/ARO/AIO-04 study): final results of the multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödel, Claus; Graeven, Ullrich; Fietkau, Rainer; Hohenberger, Werner; Hothorn, Torsten; Arnold, Dirk; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Ghadimi, Michael; Wolff, Hendrik A; Lang-Welzenbach, Marga; Raab, Hans-Rudolf; Wittekind, Christian; Ströbel, Philipp; Staib, Ludger; Wilhelm, Martin; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G; Hoffmanns, Hans; Lindemann, Fritz; Schlenska-Lange, Anke; Folprecht, Gunnar; Sauer, Rolf; Liersch, Torsten

    2015-08-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with infusional fluorouracil, total mesorectal excision surgery, and postoperative chemotherapy with fluorouracil was established by the German CAO/ARO/AIO-94 trial as a standard combined modality treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Here we compare the previously established regimen with an investigational regimen in which oxaliplatin was added to both preoperative chemoradiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy. In this multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 study we randomly assigned patients with rectal adenocarcinoma, clinically staged as cT3-4 or any node-positive disease, to two groups: a control group receiving standard fluorouracil-based combined modality treatment, consisting of preoperative radiotherapy of 50·4 Gy in 28 fractions plus infusional fluorouracil (1000 mg/m(2) on days 1-5 and 29-33), followed by surgery and four cycles of bolus fluorouracil (500 mg/m(2) on days 1-5 and 29); or to an investigational group receiving preoperative radiotherapy of 50·4 Gy in 28 fractions plus infusional fluorouracil (250 mg/m(2) on days 1-14 and 22-35) and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, 22, and 29), followed by surgery and eight cycles of oxaliplatin (100 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 15), leucovorin (400 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 15), and infusional fluorouracil (2400 mg/m(2) on days 1-2 and 15-16). Randomisation was done with computer-generated block-randomisation codes stratified by centre, clinical T category (cT1-3 vs cT4), and clinical N category (cN0 vs cN1-2) without masking. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival, defined as the time between randomisation and non-radical surgery of the primary tumour (R2 resection), locoregional recurrence after R0/1 resection, metastatic disease or progression, or death from any cause, whichever occurred first. Survival and cumulative incidence of recurrence analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle; toxicity analyses included all patients treated. Enrolment of

  9. Radiotherapy-induced emesis. An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feyer, P.; Buchali, A.; Hinkelbein, M.; Budach, V. [Department Radiotherapy, Humboldt-University Berlin (Germany); Zimmermann, J.S. [Department Radiotherapy, Christian Albrechts-University Kiel (Germany); Titlbach, O.J. [Department of Medicine I, Hospital Friedrichshain, Berlin (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Background: A significant number of patients receiving radiotherapy experience the distressing side effects of emesis and nausea. These symptoms are some of the most distressing problems for the patients influencing their quality of life. Methods: International study results concerning radiotherapy-induced emesis are demonstrated. A German multicenter questionnaire examining the strategies to prevent or to treat radiotherapy-induced nausea and emesis is presented. An international analysis concerning incidence of emesis and nausea in fractionated radiotherapy patients is discussed. Finally the consensus of the consensus conference on antiemetic therapy from the Perugia International Cancer Conference V is introduced. Results: Untreated emesis can lead to complications like electrolyte disorders, dehydration, metabolic disturbances and nutrition problems with weight loss. Prophylactic antiemetics are often given to patients receiving single high-dose radiotherapy to the abdomen. A survey has revealed that antiemetic prophylaxis is not routinely offered to the patients receiving fractionated radiotherapy. However, there is a need for an effective treatment of emesis for use in this group of patients, too. In 20% of patients nausea and emesis can cause a treatment interruption because of an inadequate control of symptoms. Like in chemotherapy strategies there exist high, moderate, and low emetogenic treatment regimens in radiotherapy as well. The most emetogenic potential has the total body irradiation followed by radiotherapy to the abdomen. Radiotherapy induced emesis can be treated effectively with conventional antiemetics up to 50%. Conclusions: Studies with total body irradiation, fractionated treatment and high-dose single exposures have cleary demonstrated the value of 5-HT3-receptor antagonist antiemetics. There is a response between 60 and 97%. There is no difference in the efficacy of the different 5-HT3-antagonists. High-risk patients should be prophylactic

  10. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Villebro, Nete; Møller, Ann Merete

    2010-01-01

    a smoking cessation intervention, and measured preoperative and long-term abstinence from smoking and/or the incidence of postoperative complications. Data collection and analysis The authors independently assessed studies to determine eligibility. Results were discussed between the authors. Main results...... Eight trials enrolling a total of 1156 people met the inclusion criteria. One of these did not report cessation as an outcome. Two trials initiated multisession face to face counselling at least 6 weeks before surgery whilst six used a brief intervention. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) was offered......; pooled RR 10.76 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.55 to 25.46, two trials) and RR 1.41 (95% CI 1.22 to 1.63, five trials) respectively. Four trials evaluating the effect on long-term smoking cessation found a significant effect; pooled RR 1.61 (95% CI 1.12 to 2.33). However, when pooling intensive...

  11. PLANNING NATIONAL RADIOTHERAPY SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo eRosenblatt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Countries, states and island nations often need forward planning of their radiotherapy services driven by different motives. Countries without radiotherapy services sponsor patients to receive radiotherapy abroad. They often engage professionals for a feasibility study in order to establish whether it would be more cost-beneficial to establish a radiotherapy facility. Countries where radiotherapy services have developed without any central planning, find themselves in situations where many of the available centres are private and thus inaccessible for a majority of patients with limited resources. Government may decide to plan ahead when a significant exodus of cancer patients travel to another country for treatment, thus exposing the failure of the country to provide this medical service for its citizens. In developed countries the trigger has been the existence of highly visible waiting lists for radiotherapy revealing a shortage of radiotherapy equipment.This paper suggests that there should be a systematic and comprehensive process of long-term planning of radiotherapy services at the national level, taking into account the regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection, planning of centres, equipment, staff, education pr

  12. Outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer with invasion to the adjacent organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Harunobu; Koide, Yoshikazu; Shiota, Miho; Endo, Tomoyoshi; Matsuoka, Shinji; Hatta, Kouhei; Mizuno, Masahiro; Maeda, Koutarou; Toyama, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed the clinical records of 13 patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of CRT for T4b rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy consisted of 40-50 Gy delivered in fractions of 1.8-2.0 Gy per day, 5 days per week. Treatment with intravenous 5-fluorouracil, oral tegafur-uracil (UFT-E) with l-leucovorin, oral S-1, or intravenous irinotecan (CPT-11) with oral S-1 was administered during radiotherapy. At 63 days after CRT, 1 patient died because of pelvic abscess. Complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) was observed in 7 patients, 1 month after CRT. Curative surgery was performed in 9 patients. Among 10 patients who underwent surgery 70 days after CRT, 5 who showed PR 1 month after CRT underwent curative surgery; both urinary and anal function were preserved in 4 of these patients. Histological invasion to the adjacent organs was not observed in 6 patients, and 1 patient achieved histological CR. Of the 9 patients who underwent curative surgery, recurrence was observed in 2; however, the other patients survived without recurrence. Preoperative CRT was considered to be effective in improving the resection rate and prognosis in patients with T4b rectal cancer. However, careful attention should be paid to the severe toxicities associated with CRT, such as pelvic abscess. (author)

  13. To understand radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Dealing with the use of radiotherapy for adults, this guide indicates when a radiotherapy is suggested, how it acts, how the treatment is chosen, which are the professionals involved. It describes how an external radiotherapy takes place and its various techniques, the different types of side effects (general, specific to the treated zone, late effects). It indicates which organs can be treated by curie-therapy, the different curie-therapy treatment modalities, how a curie-therapy takes place and which are its side effects. It outlines how to better cope with radiotherapy (how to be supported, the important role of relatives, everyday life questions, rights). It indicates and comments the different measures adopted for the safety and quality of radiotherapy

  14. Preoperative Smoking Status and Postoperative Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Grønkjær; Eliasen, Marie; Skov-Ettrup, Lise Skrubbeltrang

    2014-01-01

    To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type.......To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type....

  15. Preoperative breast radiation therapy: Indications and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lightowlers, S V; Boersma, L J; Fourquet, A

    2017-01-01

    Preoperative breast radiation therapy (RT) is not a new concept, but older studies failed to change practice. More recently, there has been interest in revisiting preoperative RT using modern techniques. This current perspective discusses the indications, summarises the published literature and t...

  16. Quality assurance in radiotherapy: analysis of the causes of not starting or early radiotherapy withdrawal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, Meritxell; Sabater, Sebastià; Gascón, Marina; Henríquez, Ivan; Bueno, M José; Rius, Àngels; Rovirosa, Àngels; Gómez, David; Lafuerza, Anna; Biete, Albert; Colomer, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the reasons for not starting or for early of radiotherapy at the Radiation Oncology Department. All radiotherapy treatments from March 2010 to February 2012 were included. Early withdrawals from treatment those that never started recorded. Clinical, demographic and dosimetric variables were also noted. From a total of 3250 patients treated and reviewed, 121 (4%) did not start or complete the planned treatment. Of those, 63 (52%) did not receive any radiotherapy fraction and 58 (48%) did not complete the course, 74% were male and 26% were female. The mean age was 67 ± 13 years. The most common primary tumour was lung (28%), followed by rectum (16%). The aim of treatment was 62% radical and 38% palliative, 44% of patients had metastases; the most common metastatic site was bone, followed by brain. In 38% of cases (46 patients) radiotherapy was administered concomitantly with chemotherapy (10 cases (22%) were rectal cancers). The most common reason for not beginning or for early withdrawal of treatment was clinical progression (58/121, 48%). Of those, 43% died (52/121), 35 of them because of the progression of the disease and 17 from other causes. Incomplete treatment regimens were due to toxicity (12/121 (10%), of which 10 patients underwent concomitant chemotherapy for rectal cancer). The number of patients who did not complete their course of treatment is low, which shows good judgement in indications and patient selection. The most common reason for incomplete treatments was clinical progression. Rectal cancer treated with concomitant chemotherapy was the most frequent reason of the interruption of radiotherapy for toxicity

  17. Retrospective case-control study of surgical treatment of stage IB-IIA cervical carcinomas after neoadjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigriejiene, V. M.; Kajenas, S.; Balnys, M.; Mikuckaite, L.

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate if preoperative radiotherapy influences course of operation (radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy) and postoperative period in series of stage IB-IIA cervical carcinomas. Retrospective comparative study was performed. During the study we analyzed 101 case histories of patients who underwent radical type II hysterectomy with lymphadenectomy in Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital and Kaunas Hospital of Oncology between 1995 and 2002. Mean operation time was shorter, hemoglobin and hematocrit values after operation were better, stay in hospital was longer, demand for narcotic analgetics was bigger, function of ovaries was maintained more rarely (p 0.05). In our study, preoperative radiotherapy did not seem to complicate course of radical hysterectomy. (author)

  18. Effect of combined treatment with preoperative. gamma. -therapy on function of gastrin producing cells in patients with gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdov, B A; Vedzizheva, T B; Bassalyk, L S; Zagrebin, V M [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Obninsk. Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Meditsinskoj Radiologii; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Onkologicheskij Nauchnyj Tsentr)

    1982-04-01

    It is stated that preoperative irradiation with the dose of 20 Gy doesn't produce any considerable effect on function of the extragastric gastrin producing cells. Despite the decrease of reserve potentialities of gastrin producing cells in patients with stomach cancer the basal level of gastrin in the group of gastric cancer patients on the whole is higher than in practically healthy people. Radiotherapy results in the pronounced inhiibition of gastrin synthesis and secretion of gastrin producing cells.

  19. Historical review of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onai, Yoshio

    1993-01-01

    The techniques of radiotherapy have been improved by development of particle accelerators, radionuclides and computers. This paper presents a historical review of the physical and technical aspects of radiotherapy in Japan. Changes in the kinds of radiation, such as X-rays, gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and protons used for external radiotherapy, and the equipment involved are described chronologically, and historical changes in the quality of radiotherapy apparatus are outlined. Patient data acquisition equipment, such as X-ray simulator and X-ray CT, beam modifying devices, patient setup devices, and devices to verify treatment fields and patient doses are reviewed historically. Radiation sources for brachytherapy and internal radiotherapy, and remotely controlled afterloading systems are reviewed chronologically. Historical changes in methods to evaluate absorbed doses, dose monitor systems and beam data acquisition systems are outlined. Changes in methods of calculating dose distributions for external X-ray and electron therapy, brachytherapy and internal radiotherapy by unsealded radionuclides are described and calculation techniques for treatment planning system are reviewed. Annual figures in the numbers of radiotherapy equipment, such as telecobalt and telecesium units, linear accelerators, betatrons, microtrons, stereotactic gamma units, conformation radiotherapy units, remotely controlled afterloading systems, and associated equipment such as X-ray simulators and treatment planning systems are provided, as are changes in the number of accelerators by maximum X-ray energy and maximum electron energy, and in the number of licensed hospitals and clinics using small sealed sources. Changes in techniques of external radiotherapy and brachytherapy are described briefly from the point of view of dose distributions. (author)

  20. Radiological incidents in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobzova, L.; Novotny, J.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries a reporting system of radiological incidents to national regulatory body exists and providers of radiotherapy treatment are obliged to report all major and/or in some countries all incidents occurring in institution. State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) is providing a systematic guidance for radiotherapy departments from 1997 by requiring inclusion of radiation safety problems into Quality assurance manual, which is the basic document for obtaining a license of SONS for handling with sources of ionizing radiation. For that purpose SONS also issued the recommendation 'Introduction of QA system for important sources in radiotherapy-radiological incidents' in which the radiological incidents are defined and the basic guidance for their classification (category A, B, C, D), investigation and reporting are given. At regular periods the SONS in co-operation with radiotherapy centers is making a survey of all radiological incidents occurring in institutions and it is presenting obtained information in synoptic communication (2003 Motolske dny, 2005 Novy Jicin). This presentation is another summary report of radiological incidents that occurred in our radiotherapy institutions during last 3 years. Emphasis is given not only to survey and statistics, but also to analysis of reasons of the radiological incidents and to their detection and prevention. Analyses of incidents in radiotherapy have led to a much broader understanding of incident causation. Information about the error should be shared as early as possible during or after investigation by all radiotherapy centers. Learning from incidents, errors and near misses should be a part of improvement of the QA system in institutions. Generally, it is recommended that all radiotherapy facilities should participate in the reporting, analyzing and learning system to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge throughout the whole country to prevent errors in radiotherapy.(authors)

  1. Choanal stenosis: a rare complication of radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonfils, P.; Preobrajenski, N. de; Florent, A.; Bensimon, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Choanal stenosis is usually a congenital anomaly in children. Acquired choanal stenosis after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a very rare pathology; only two publications report seven cases in the literature. We describe the clinical history, preoperative evaluation, surgical treatment and outcome of a case of acquired choanal stenosis after radiotherapy. The patient, a 56-year-old woman, presented with a history of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (T2- NO-MO) one year before that had been successful treated with radiotherapy (68 Gy). At the end of radiotherapy, she complained of complete nasal obstruction, anosmia and hearing loss due to a bilateral serous otitis media. Bilateral complete choanal stenosis was confirmed by endoscopy and CT scan. Functional endoscopic surgery was performed, and nasal stents were left in place for 3 weeks. One year after, the patient have good airflow, and a patent nasopharynx without choanal stenosis. In conclusion, choanal stenosis is an unusual complication of radiotherapy that can be successfully treated with trans-nasal endoscopic resection. (authors)

  2. Radiotherapy indications - rectum cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-05-01

    This document is addressed to oncologists radiotherapists and to any health professional concerned by rectum cancer treatment. Rectum cancer therapy is based on various technical procedures including surgery, radiotherapy and systemic treatments defined for each patient according to his clinical situation. This document precises the specific situations where radiotherapy can be employed. However, the radiotherapy decision must be taken with respect to other therapeutic alternatives. Such a decision must be validated and must be the object of a discussion in the framework of a pluri-disciplinary consultation. (J.S.)

  3. Radiotherapy injuries in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalifa, G.; Bennet, J.; Couanet, D.; Masselot, J.

    1985-01-01

    Side effects of radiotherapy in pediatrics are reviewed including bone injuries and radio-induced bone tumors; nervous system injuries with emphasis on hypothalamus, pituitary gland, brain and spinal cord; lung, digestive system and urinary tract injuries [fr

  4. The metabolic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begon, F.; Gaci, M.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, the authors recall the principles of the metabolic radiotherapy and present these main applications in the treatment of thyroid cancers, hyperthyroidism, polycythemia, arthritis, bone metastases, adrenergic neoplasms. They also present the radioimmunotherapy

  5. Preoperative concurrent chemo-radiation in rectal cancer; Radiochimiotherapie concomitante preoperatoire pour cancer du rectum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, C.; Kirscher, S.; Felix-Faure, C.; Chauvet, B.; Vincent, P.; Brewer, Y.; Reboul, F. [Clinique Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France)

    1998-05-01

    To evaluate retrospectively treatment-related morbidity of concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy for rectal cancer. Between 1992 and 1995, 38 patients (median age: 60) were treated for locally advanced resectable rectal cancer. Median dose of radiotherapy was 45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks. Chemotherapy consisted of two courses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin administered during the first and the fifth weeks of radiotherapy. Median dose of 5-fluorouracil was 350 mg/m{sup 2}/day, and median dose of leucovorin was 350 mg/m{sup 2}/day, day 1 to day 5. Surgery was performed 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Before surgery, one patient died of febrile neutropenia and sepsis after two cycles of chemotherapy and 45 Gy. Main pre-operative grade 3-4 toxicities were respectively: neutropenia: 3% ; nausea/vomiting: 3%; diarrhea: 3%; proctitis: 5%; radiation dermatitis: 8%. Twenty-six patients underwent a low anterior resection and 11 an abdomino-perineal resection. A temporary colostomy was performed in 12 patients. Pathologic complete response rate was 27 %. There was one post-operative death due to thrombo-embolic disease. Major post-operative grade 3-4 complications were: pelvic infection: 14 %; abdominal infection : 5%; perineal sepsis: 8%; anastomotic dehiscence: 8%; cardiac failure: 5%. Delayed perineal wound healing was observed in six patients. No significant prognostic factor of post-operative complications has been observed. Median duration of hospitalization was 22 days. With a median follow-up of 24 months, 2-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 82 and 64%. Tolerance of preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy was acceptable. Ongoing controlled studies will assess the impact of this combined treatment on survival. (authors)

  6. Clinical practice of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    After describing the recent advances in radiotherapy, this brief article presents in tabular form the changing indications for radiotherapy for tumours of the skin, head and neck, adult CNS, lung, thyroid, thymus, breast, female genital tract, soft tissue sarcoma, genitourinary tract, bone sarcoma, Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, leukemia and paediatric malignancy. For each tumour type, information is provided for the radiosensitivity, the radiocurability, complications and five-year survival. Combined modality treatment is also briefly discussed. (UK)

  7. Nanoparticle-guided radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and nano-sized particles for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of a target tissue. More specifically, the invention relates to nano-sized particles comprising X-ray-imaging contrast agents in solid form with the ability to block x-rays, allowing for simult...... for simultaneous or integrated external beam radiotherapy and imaging, e.g., using computed tomography (CT)....

  8. Clinical practice of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Junichi; Masaki, Norie; Onoyama, Yasuto

    1987-01-01

    This chapter presents in greater detail radiotherapy used in each clinical setting. The descriptions are given under the following sections: the tongue and oral cavity; the maxilla, larynx, and pharynx; brain tumors; the eyes and orbit; pediatric tumors; lung cancer; the esophagus; breast cancer; the abdominal digestive system; the urogenital system; the uterine cervix; the ovaries and vulva; bone and soft tissues; the skin; hematopoietic tumors; lymph node metastases; and radiotherapy as palliative treatment. (Namekawa, K.)

  9. Patients and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eardley, A.

    1986-01-01

    The results of interviews with thirty discharged patients who had undergone radical radiotherapy for cancer of the head and neck are presented. Patients were asked whether their side-effects had got worse or had stayed the same, what effect their side effects had had on eating and drinking and whether they had felt depressed during this period. Measures which could be taken to improve patients' experiences of radiotherapy are discussed. (U.K.)

  10. Radiotherapy and oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sealy, R [Cape Town Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    1982-08-01

    A general review article for the non-radiotherapist. The historical, physical and biological background is briefly reviewed. Mention is made of the effects of fraction size, hyperbaric oxygen, neutron beams and radiation sensitizers. The use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is discussed, as well as the selection of patients for radiotherapy and the treatment of neck nodes. The author suggests a therapeutic approach to the various disease sites and finally reviews some of the literature on radiation caries and jaw necrosis.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of modern radiotherapy techniques in locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, James D; Chang, Daniel T; Abelson, Jon; Daly, Megan E; Yeung, Heidi N; Nelson, Lorene M; Koong, Albert C

    2012-02-15

    Radiotherapy may improve the outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer but at an increased cost. In this study, the authors evaluated the cost-effectiveness of modern radiotherapy techniques in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. A Markov decision-analytic model was constructed to compare the cost-effectiveness of 4 treatment regimens: gemcitabine alone, gemcitabine plus conventional radiotherapy, gemcitabine plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT); and gemcitabine with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Patients transitioned between the following 5 health states: stable disease, local progression, distant failure, local and distant failure, and death. Health utility tolls were assessed for radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatments and for radiation toxicity. SBRT increased life expectancy by 0.20 quality-adjusted life years (QALY) at an increased cost of $13,700 compared with gemcitabine alone (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio [ICER] = $69,500 per QALY). SBRT was more effective and less costly than conventional radiotherapy and IMRT. An analysis that excluded SBRT demonstrated that conventional radiotherapy had an ICER of $126,800 per QALY compared with gemcitabine alone, and IMRT had an ICER of $1,584,100 per QALY compared with conventional radiotherapy. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the probability of cost-effectiveness at a willingness to pay of $50,000 per QALY was 78% for gemcitabine alone, 21% for SBRT, 1.4% for conventional radiotherapy, and 0.01% for IMRT. At a willingness to pay of $200,000 per QALY, the probability of cost-effectiveness was 73% for SBRT, 20% for conventional radiotherapy, 7% for gemcitabine alone, and 0.7% for IMRT. The current results indicated that IMRT in locally advanced pancreatic cancer exceeds what society considers cost-effective. In contrast, combining gemcitabine with SBRT increased clinical effectiveness beyond that of gemcitabine alone at a cost potentially acceptable by

  12. Enhanced pulmonary toxicity with bleomycin and radiotherapy in oat cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einhorn, L.; Krause, M.; Hornback, N.; Furnas, B.

    1976-01-01

    In a recently completed study, combination chemotherapy consisting of bleomycin, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, and vincristine was given to 29 patients with oat cell lung cancer. There were no cases of pulmonary fibrosis in these 29 patients. Although several of these patients had prior radiotherapy, none had concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This same four-drug chemotherapy regimen was combined with concomitant radiotherapy in 13 patients with oat cell lung cancer. There were three cases of fatal pulmonary fibrosis and two other cases of clinically significant pulmonary fibrosis. All five cases of pulmonary fibrosis occurred several weeks after completion of a six-week course of bleomycin (total dosage 90 units). It is concluded that bleomycin cannot be safely administered while patients are receiving radiotherapy of the lung

  13. Preoperative radio-chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Forecasting the next steps through ongoing and forthcoming studies; Chimioradiotherapie preoperatoire des cancers du rectum: ce que laissent presager les etudes en cours et a venir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crehange, G.; Maingon, P. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Georges-Francois-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, 21000 Dijon (France); Bosset, J.F. [Service d' oncologie radiotherapie, CHU Jean-Minjoz, boulevard Flemming, 25000 Besancon (France)

    2011-10-15

    Protracted preoperative radio-chemotherapy with a 5-FU-based scheme, or a short course of preoperative radiotherapy without chemotherapy, are the standard neo-adjuvant treatments for resectable stage II-III rectal cancer. Local failure rates are low and reproducible, between 6 and 15% when followed with a 'Total Meso-rectal Excision'. Nevertheless, the therapeutic strategy needs to be improved: distant metastatic recurrence rates remain stable around 30 to 35%, while both sphincter and sexual sequels are still significant. The aim of the present paper was to analyse the ongoing trials listed on the following search engines: the Institut National du Cancer in France, the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Health in the United States, and the major cooperative groups. Keywords for the search were: 'rectal cancer', 'preoperative radiotherapy', 'phase II-III', 'preoperative chemotherapy', 'adjuvant chemotherapy' and 'surgery'. Twenty-three trials were selected and classified in different groups, each of them addressing a question of strategy: (1) place of adjuvant chemotherapy; (2) optimization of preoperative radiotherapy; (3) evaluation of new radiosensitization protocols and/or neo-adjuvant chemotherapy; (4) optimization of techniques and timing of surgery; (5) place of radiotherapy for non resectable or metastatic tumors. (authors)

  14. Better compliance with hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Results of a single, institutional, retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, Alaa; Hammoud, Mohamed; Abou Ghaida, Salam

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify factors significantly associated with the occurrence of unintended treatment interruptions in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy of the breast or chest wall between March 2014 and August 2016 were evaluated. The radiotherapy regimens and techniques applied were either conventional fractionation (CF; 28 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy or 25 fractions of 2.0 Gy) or hypofractionation (HF; 15 daily fractions of 2.67 Gy) with inverse planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or three-dimensional planned conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with noncompliance. Noncompliance was defined as the missing of at least one scheduled radiotherapy fraction. In all, 19 of 140 (13.6%) patients treated with HF and 39 of 146 (26.7%) treated with CF experienced treatment interruptions. Of 23 factors tested, the fractionation regimen emerged as the only independent significant prognostic factor for noncompliance on multivariate analysis (CF; p = 0.007; odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-4.2). No statistically significant differences concerning the reasons for treatment interruptions could be detected between patients treated with CF or HF. HF is significantly associated with a better patient compliance with the prescribed radiotherapy schedule compared with CF. The data suggest that this finding is basically related to the shorter overall treatment time of HF. (orig.) [de

  15. 16. PRE-OPERATIVE BLADDER IRRIGATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    effectiveness of using preoperative bladder irrigation with 1% povidone iodine in reducing ... consenting patient who presented to the department of surgery for open ..... infections in a tertiary care center in south-western. Nigeria. International ...

  16. Preoperative bowel preparation in children: Polyethylene glycol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preoperative bowel preparation in children: Polyethylene glycol versus normal saline. ... In children, (is this standard of care?: this method is mostly followed) this is usually ... Patients and Methods: Thirty patients, admitted in the Department of ...

  17. Preoperative Alcohol Consumption and Postoperative Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Marie; Grønkjær, Marie; Skov-Ettrup, Lise Skrubbeltrang

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To systematically review and summarize the evidence of the association between preoperative alcohol consumption and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type. BACKGROUND:: Conclusions in studies on preoperative alcohol consumption and postoperative complications have...... been inconsistent. METHODS:: A systematic review and meta-analysis based on a search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO citations. Included were original studies of the association between preoperative alcohol consumption and postoperative complications occurring within 30 days of the operation.......30-2.49), prolonged stay at the hospital (RR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.18-1.31), and admission to intensive care unit (RR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.03-1.61). Clearly defined high alcohol consumption was associated with increased risk of postoperative mortality (RR = 2.68; 95% CI: 1.50-4.78). Low to moderate preoperative alcohol...

  18. Radiosensitivity in Fanconi anaemia: application to the conditioning regimen for bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluckman, E.; Devergie, A.; Dutreix, J.

    1983-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia, an autosomal recessive constitutional aplastic anaemia, seems to be related to a DNA repair mechanism defect. Bone marrow transplantation is the only treatment which can cure these patients. Previous attempts at BMT have shown an increased sensitivity to Cyclophosphamide used for the conditioning. Such a sensitivity has also been observed in vitro when Fanconi anaemia cells were incubated with alkylating agents. We have tested the in vivo radiosensitivity and cell repair after skin contact radiotherapy to calculate the irradiation dose which could be tolerated by FA patients. Eight patients have been tested and the results confirmed the suspected increased radiosensitivity in the majority of patients. Following these results, four patients were conditioned with low dose Cyclophosphamide (20 mg/kg) associated with 5 Grays thoraco-abdominal irradiation. all had a take and no major complication of the conditioning regimen. All are alive in good condition from day 51 to day 330 after transplant. Oesophagitis was one major unexpected complication. This study confirms the possibility of curing FA patients with BMT when the conditioning regimen is modified according to the pathophysiology of the disease. (author)

  19. Radiosensitivity in Fanconi anaemia: application to the conditioning regimen for bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluckman, E.; Devergie, A. (Hopital Saint-Louis, 75 - Paris (France)); Dutreix, J. (Institut Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France))

    1983-07-01

    Fanconi anaemia, an autosomal recessive constitutional aplastic anaemia, seems to be related to a DNA repair mechanism defect. Bone marrow transplantation is the only treatment which can cure these patients. Previous attempts at BMT have shown an increased sensitivity to Cyclophosphamide used for the conditioning. Such a sensitivity has also been observed in vitro when Fanconi anaemia cells were incubated with alkylating agents. We have tested the in vivo radiosensitivity and cell repair after skin contact radiotherapy to calculate the irradiation dose which could be tolerated by FA patients. Eight patients have been tested and the results confirmed the suspected increased radiosensitivity in the majority of patients. Following these results, four patients were conditioned with low dose Cyclophosphamide (20 mg/kg) associated with 5 Grays thoraco-abdominal irradiation. All had a take and no major complication of the conditioning regimen. All are alive in good condition from day 51 to day 330 after transplant. Oesophagitis was one major unexpected complication. This study confirms the possibility of curing FA patients with BMT when the conditioning regimen is modified according to the pathophysiology of the disease.

  20. Nutritional assistance to patients during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Maria C.G.; Nadalin, Wladimir; Baxter, Yara C.; Faintuch, Joel; Waitzberg, Dan L.; Maculevicius, Janete

    1996-01-01

    With the aim of assessing the possible benefits of nutritional therapy , 140 patients were prospectively studied during radiotherapy of the head and neck (81%) and esophageal cancer (19%). Mean age was 56.0 (17-80), with 114 males and 26 females. Duration of both nutrition and radiotherapy was 78.0 ± 45 days. Tube feeding was the primary modality in 50.7% of the population, and oral regimens in the remaining 49.3%, but associations between the methods were also used. Enteral diets were supplied under the supervision of a specialized tem for home alimentation (PROSNED). Compliance to the program was 100% and a lymphocyte count diminished along this period (1933 ± 1033 vs 1265 ± 688, p.0.001). A subjective improvement was reported by 84% of the population, and total calorie intake, that was below 60% of estimated needs in 100% of the cases initially, significantly improved to just 40% inadequate at the end of the observations. Radiotherapy was associated with mucositis in 21% of the patients, taste changes in 79%, xerostomy in 81%, anorexia in 66% and odinophagia in 59%. In the individuals selected for enteral feeding, side effects were represented by technical problems (20%) and gastrointestinal disorders (13%). All patients completed the nutritional support program and there was no mortality in this series. It is conclude that: early nutritional support during radiotherapy was able to maintain or improve the nutritional status; tube feeding, alone or in combination with oral diets, was indicated whenever appropriate and contributed to fulfillment of the energy requirements; reduction of total lymphocytes could not be prevented by the mentioned therapy; complications of enteral alimentation were mild and affected a small proportion of the population; troubles induced by radiotherapy were as frequent as expected, and tended to disturb the intake of the food; the compliance of the therapeutic plan was excellent and can be attributed to the efforts of the

  1. Appropriate fluid regimens to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammela, O K

    1995-01-01

    Pulmonary oedema is an important problem in premature neonates with surfactant deficiency because of fluid accumulation in the lung interstitium and reduced urine output. Some retrospective reports suggest that excessive early hydration might increase the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Only three prospective studies evaluating low or conventional fluid administration regimens to very low birth weight infants have been published. According to their results no significant differences in the incidence of BPD have been shown. However, fluid restriction seems to improve the outcome of the infants because of decreased incidence of haemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus, necrotizing enterocolitis, pulmonary air leaks and decreased mortality. The appropriate amount of sodium in the intravenous fluids during the first days of life needs further evaluation. In tiny infants with birth weights from 500 to 800g intensive monitoring of fluid balance is essential to control the extremely high fluid losses due to evaporation. Undernutrition is a risk factor of BPD and therefore it is important to start parenteral nutrition early. The benefit of the use of colloids as volume expanders is controversial. According to some retrospective reports there might be an association with increased use of colloidal fluids during the first days of life and the development of BPD. Early excessive fluid administration might constitute a potential risk for low birth weight infants with hyaline membrane disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Combined preoperative therapy for oral cancer with nedaplatin and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Masatoshi; Shibata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Munehiro [Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Hospital] (and others)

    2002-03-01

    We performed preoperative combined therapy using nedaplatin (CDGP) and radiation in 12 patients with squamous cell carcinoma originating from the oral cavity and maxillary sinus, and examined for any adverse events that may have occurred during this therapeutic regimen. Regarding the irradiation, external irradiation utilizing a 6 MV linac (linear accelerator) at a dose of 2.0 Gy/day was performed 5 times a week, with the target total radiation dose set at 40 Gy. In addition, CDGP was intravenously administered 30 minutes before irradiation at a dose of 5 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Mucositis was observed in all 12 subjects, however, the severity was observed to be grade 1-2 with no major differences in comparison to the patients given standard radiation monotherapy. Two subjects developed grade 3 leucopenia and were thus given granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). In addition, grade 2 and grade 3 thrombocytopenia were both observed in one subject each. The subject with grade 3 thrombocytopenia required a platelet transfusion during surgery. No marked changes in serum creatinine levels were noted. These findings are therefore considered to provide evidence supporting the safety of this combination therapy. (author)

  3. The Sex Res Non Naturales and the Regimen of Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Frank Juul

    The paper discusses the ethical and social soundness of the classical idea of diaita/regimen vis-à-vis the contemporary focus on healthy lifestyle......The paper discusses the ethical and social soundness of the classical idea of diaita/regimen vis-à-vis the contemporary focus on healthy lifestyle...

  4. Variation in training regimens in professional showjumping yards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lönnell, A C; Bröjer, J; Nostell, K; Hernlund, E; Roepstorff, L; Tranquille, C A; Murray, R C; Oomen, A; van Weeren, René; Bitschnau, C; Montavon, S; Weishaupt, M A; Egenvall, A

    2014-01-01

    REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Training regimens of showjumping horses under field conditions are largely undocumented. OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to quantify and compare training regimens used in professional-level showjumping yards, with respect to time exercised and type of activity.

  5. Inappropriate Tuberculosis Treatment Regimens in Chinese Tuberculosis Hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue He, Guang; van den Hof, Susan; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Guo, Hui; Hu, Yuan Lian; Fan, Ji Huan; Zhang, Wei Min; Tostado, Christopher P.; Borgdorff, Martien W.

    2011-01-01

    This investigation of tuberculosis (TB) treatment regimens in 6 TB hospitals in China showed that only 18% of patients with new cases and 9% of patients with retreatment cases were prescribed standard TB treatment regimens. Adherence to treatment guidelines needs to be improved in TB hospitals to

  6. Sequential hemi-body radiotherapy in advanced multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, J.P.; Bosch, A.; Raich, P.C.

    1979-01-01

    Eleven patients with advanced multiple myeloma refractory to standard chemotherapy were treated with a regimen of sequential hemi-body radiotherapy consisting of 800 rad midplane in a single dose to each half. 9/10 patients experienced significant relief of skeletal pain and there were 5/11 objective tumor responses with one complete remission. Treatment-related morbidity was significant and consisted primarily of nausea and emesis, bone marrow suppression, and pneumonitis. This therapy is helpful in the management of advanced myeloma, and should be studied earlier in the course of the disease

  7. Advice concerning radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Dutch National cancer incidence figures were calculated by using the reliable data on cancer incidence in the Eindhoven area and population forecasts and information obtained from the Central Bureau of Statistics. Several radiotherapy departments suffer from under capacity (a lack of resources and understaffing). Data have also shown that 35% of cancer patients receive radiotherapy, instead of 50%. Calculations have been made by the committee on the present and future needs with regard to equipment and staff. In 1983, the number of megavoltage therapy units amounted to 38, but should have been 65. It should be 80 in 1990 and 90 in 2000. Since building and installing such equipment is a lengthy process a considerable effort is needed to make up for the arrears. The committee advocates the extension of the system of regional cooperation in cancer care (comprehensive cancer centres), in which radiotherapy departments play a crucial role. Working parties from the committee provided a comprehensive description of current radiotherapy practice with reference to physical, technical, clinical and management aspects. Another working party assessed the results of cancer treatment with regard to many different tumour sites. Recent and expected developments were analysed or indicated. The Radiotherapy Committee commissioned an external team to conduct a project to achieve a picture of future developments using methods different to those of the committee's. An interim advice has been added on this subject. (Auth.)

  8. Patient reported outcomes in NRG Oncology RTOG 0938, evaluating two ultrahypofractionated regimens for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukka, Himanshu R; Pugh, Stephanie L; Bruner, Deborah W; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Lawton, Colleen A F; Efstathiou, Jason A; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Ponsky, Lee E; Seaward, Samantha A; Dayes, Ian S; Gopaul, Darindra D; Michalski, Jeff M; Delouya, Guila; Kaplan, Irving D; Horwitz, Eric M; Roach, Mack; Pinover, Wayne H; Beyer, David C; Amanie, John O; Sandler, Howard M; Kachnic, Lisa A

    2018-06-15

    There is considerable interest in very short (ultrahypofractionated) radiotherapy regimens to treat prostate cancer based on potential radiobiological advantages, patient convenience and resource allocation benefits. To demonstrate that detectable changes in health related quality of life measured by the bowel and urinary domains of the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC-50) were not substantially worse than baseline. XXXX is a non-blinded randomized phase II study of NCCN low risk prostate cancer where each arm is compared to a historical control. Patients were randomized to five fractions (7.25Gy in two weeks), or twelve fractions (4.3Gy in 2.5 weeks). The co-primary endpoints were the proportion of patients with a change in EPIC bowel score at one year (baseline to one-year) >five points and in EPIC urinary score >two points tested with a one-sample binomial test. and Limitations: 127 patients were enrolled to five fractions (121 analyzed) and 128 to twelve fractions (125 analyzed). Median follow-up for all patients at the time of analysis was 3.8 years. The one year frequency for >five point change in bowel score for five and twelve fractions were 29.8%(ptwo point change in urinary score for five and twelve fractions were 45.7%(p<0.001) and 42.2%(p<0.001) respectively. For five and twelve fractions 32.9% of patients had a drop in 1 year EPIC sexual score ≥ 11 points (p=0.34) while 30.9% of patients had a drop in 1 year EPIC sexual score ≥11 points (p=0.20) in the twelve fraction arm respectively. DFS at two years is 93.3% (95% CI: 88.8, 97.8) and 88.3% (95% CI: 82.5, 94.0) in the five and twelve fraction arms, respectively. There was no late grade 4 or 5 treatment-related urinary or bowel toxicity. This study confirms that based on changes in bowel and urinary domains and toxicity (acute and late) the five and twelve fractions regimens are well tolerated. These ultrahypofractionated approaches need to be compared to current standard radiotherapy

  9. Effect of bleomycin-radiotherapy combination in management of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, P.M.; Shukla, S.N.; Patel, K.M.; Patel, N.L.; Baboo, H.A.; Patel, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma were treated with bleomycin-radiotherapy protocol, 15 mg bleomycin I.V. on alternate days followed by radiation within half an hour. The average total dose of bleomycin was 150 mg. Radiotherapy was given daily. Two patients were lost to follow-up very early in the course of the treatment and were removed from the study for statistical purposes. Thirty-six patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who were treated with radiotherapy alone during the same period were used as controls. The patients were followed for two years. The incidence of response rate did not differ significantly between regimens; however, the incidence of side effects with bleomycin-radiotherapy, 82.61%, is significantly more than that of radiotherapy alone (52.78%). Median survial time (MST) of those responding to bleomycin-radiotherapy protocol was seven months and 12 days and for radiotherapy responders was six months. Neither the response rate nor the MST improve significantly after pretreatment with bleomycin. On the contrary, the incidence of side effects increased significantly

  10. The value of radiotherapy for the treatment of meningeal melanocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, D.; Karstens, J.H.; Tatagiba, M.; Brandis, A.; Dubben, H.H.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Meningeal melanocytoma is described as rare benign lesion with a high risk of recurrence. There are no well-substantiated treatment recommendations in the literature. Only case reports have been published by now. Patients and Methods: In 1997 a patient was irradiated for a recurrent spinal meningeal melanocytoma and 2 years later for brain metastases indicating malignant transformation. This case gave rise to a literature review for therapeutic options. All sufficiently documented cases published since 1972, when the term meningeal melanocytoma was established, were evaluated. Based on published and on original data recurrence and overall survival rates up to 5 years were calculated for three different therapeutic approaches, namely complete tumor resection, incomplete resection with subsequent radiotherapy, and incomplete resection alone. Statistical evaluation was performed using the χ 2 test and Kaplan-Meier-analysis. Results: 53 patients (including our patient) met selection criteria. Complete tumor resection was superior to incomplete resection alone with lower recurrence (4-38% versus 50-92%) and better overall survival rates (86-95% versus 30-58%). After incomplete resection radiotherapy seemed to improve prognosis (recurrence 15-45%; overall survival 91-92%). Between complete resection and incomplete resection plus radiotherapy no significant differences were observed. Conclusions: For meningeal melanocytoma complete resection must be regarded as the best of the modalities compared. After incomplete resection radiotherapy should be considered, although a specific radiotherapeutic regimen cannot be recommended at present. However, for multiple cranial or spinal lesions total cranial irradiation or craniospinal irradiation is indicated. (orig.) [de

  11. Radiotherapy combined with aclarubicin and neocarzinostatin for cancer of the gallbladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Shin-ichi; Mishina, Hitoshi; Funaki, Ken-ichi; Mori, Toshihiko

    1991-01-01

    Cancer of the gallbladder is radioresistant. When it was found inoperable, she was subjected to radiotherapy combined with aclarubicin and neocarzinostatin. Therapeutic effectiveness was confirmed at autopsy as she later succumbed to uterine cervical cancer. Thus, the present radiochemotherapeutic regimen would probably provide a means of overcoming those radioresistant inoperable malignancies. Intravenous administrations of appropriate antibiotics such as azthreonam and reniran may probably be helpful in the prevention and treatment of septic peritonitis possible during the course of reinforced radiotherapy of the abdomen. (author)

  12. [Efficacy of PVD regimen combined with IMRT for early-stage extranodal nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Huang, Y H; Hu, Y F; Liu, Q L; Wu, T

    2017-07-11

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of PVD chemo-regimen (Pegaspargase, vincristine and dexamethasone) combined with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for patients with early-stage extranodal nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma (ENKL). Methods: Clinical data of 52 patients with early-stage ENKL were collected during May 2010 and June 2015 in Department of Lymphoma, Cancer Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, and these patients firstly received a concurrent chemoradiotherapy of two-cycle of PVD and IMRT (gross tumor volume primary: 12.6-59.4 Gy) and then 2 to 4 cycles of PVD as subsequent chemotherapy, the efficacy and adverse responses were retrospectively analyzed and observed. Results: Follow-up stopped until December 2015, complete remission was seen in 44 cases (84.6%) and partial remission 7 cases (13.5%), out of 52 cases. A total of 1 case died of progression disease during treatment and within 1 year after treatment, 1 case died of pulmonary infection within 1 week after treatment, 2 cases survived with tumor; so the objective response rate and clinical benefit rate were both 98.1%, 1-year, 2-year and 3-year overall survival rates and progression free survival rates were all 93.6%, 1-year and 2-year disease free survival rates were both 90.3%; the correlation analysis showed that the radiotherapy dose was related to the curative effect ( P PVD regimen and IMRT have a good therapeutic effect and adverse response can be tolerated.

  13. Comparative evaluation of multiple fractions per day radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy in squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrabi, W.H.; Akhtar, S.; Kharadi, M.Y.; Mushtaq, G.; Zargar, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    Dose fractionated is important in radiotherapy in order to achieve the desired results. There are regimes which are accepted and followed worldwide. Five fractions per week for a full course of treatment is regarded as standard fractionation regimen. Interest has lately been developed to alter this and try regimes like hyper and accelerated fractionations. In the former, smaller doses per fraction than usual are given in several fractions on each treating day, with no change in overall time. In the latter, conventionally sized fractions are given as two or three per day with a shortening of overall time. As the dose fraction in our case is high, we spilt the full course of treatment introducing a gap of one week between the treatment schedules. The results obtained are fairly good in comparison with conventional radiotherapy regimes. (author)

  14. Influence of preoperative (hyperthermic) radiochemotherapy on manometric anal sphincter function in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzmann, J.; Huenerbein, M.; Slisow, W.; Rau, B.; Gellermann, J.; Wust, P.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) followed by curative surgery is a well-accepted therapeutic option in the treatment of advanced rectal cancer. Usually, the anal sphincter is located in the irradiation area of a preoperative RCT regime. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of preoperative RCT on anal sphincter function. Patients and methods: between 1994 and 2000, 102 patients with rectal cancer stage uT3/uT4 were analyzed. All patients underwent radiotherapy with 45 Gy (5 x 1.8 Gy) including two cycles of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin (folinic acid) chemotherapy. 46 patients were treated additionally with up to five sessions of locoregional hyperthermia. The sphincter function was analyzed by perfusion manometry before preoperative therapy and 4 weeks after pretreatment had been finished. For statistics, the Wilcoxon signed rank test and mann-whitney U-test were used (SPSS 9.0 for Windows trademark). Results: the mean value of all 102 patients showed a significant reduction of the mean maximum resting pressure from 97 to 89 mmHg (p = 0.02). For the mean maximal squeeze pressure no significant difference could be shown (178 vs. 176 mmHg). For patients with distal (≤ 7.5 cm from anal verge) tumors the difference was highly significant (92 vs. 79 mmHg). Locoregional hyperthermia had no additional influence on sphincter function. Conclusion: preoperative RCT impairs sphincter function especially in patients with distal tumors. In addition, RCT could have a negative influence on the continence of patients who received sphincter-preserving surgery. (orig.) [de

  15. Chemotherapy disruption of efficient radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nervi, C.; Friedman, M.

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the use of chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy are reviewed. Some topics discussed are: indications for the use of combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy; improvement of the therapeutic ratio following the use of methotrexate; advantages of preirradiation and postirradiation chemotherapy; side effects following simultaneous chemotherapy and radiotherapy; and effects of chemotherapy on cure rate of radiosensitive and radioresistant tumors. (U.S.)

  16. Radiotherapy of pineal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danoff, B.; Sheline, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radiotherapy has universally been used in the treatment of pineal tumors and suprasellar germinomas. Recently however, major technical advances related to the use of the operating microscope and development of microsurgical techniques have prompted a renewed interest in the direct surgical approach for biopsy and/or excision. This interest has resulted in a controversy regarding the role of surgery prior to radiotherapy. Because of the heterogeneity of tumors occurring in the pineal region (i.e., germ cell tumors, pineal parenchymal tumors, glial tumors, and cysts) and their differing biological behavior, controversy also surrounds aspects of radiotherapy such as: the optimal radiation dose, the volume to be irradiated, and indications for prophylactic spinal irradiation. A review of the available data is presented in an attempt to answer these questions

  17. Cancer research and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1978-01-01

    An actual condition of cancer, and the basis and a future view of radiotherapy were described by adding generally established biological and biochemical knowledge to the author's research. It was described that the relapse of cancer after irradiation was induced from outside of cancerous mass, and the nature of relapsed cancerous cells group was also stated. The histological structure of cancer from a view of cell movement and radioresistant cancerous cells group were described. The differentiation of cancerous cells were described, and a study of inhibition of cancer by redifferentiation was considered. It is important to grasp characteristics and a limit of radiotherapy for cancer, to systematize and materialize reasonable therapy which uses drug and immunotherapy together with surgery, and to use radiotherapy reasonably together with redifferentiation therapy of cancerous cells by extracting characteristics and a limit of radiationtherapy from an actual condition of cancer. (Serizawa, K.)

  18. A case of small bowel injury induced by preoperative irradiation for rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Noguchi, Tomoyoshi; Akimoto, Shin

    1988-01-01

    A 54-year-old man underwent anterior resection with intraoperative radiation following preoperative irradiation for carcinoma of the rectum in August 1984, and subsequently was suffering from severe diarrhea and abdominal pain. One year and two months later he was admitted to our hospital with a sudden onset of lower abdominal pain, nausea and vomitting. The symptoms were so severe that emergency laparotomy was performed. There was no evidence of recurrent tumor, but the terminal ileum, from a point 30 cm. proximal to the cecum was found to be dark red, constricted and fixed to the urinary bladder. In addition, another two parts of the ileum from a point 50 cm. to that segment showed dark red. These damaged ileum were resected. Pathological examination revealed that there was thickness of the endothelium of arteriole and thromboses of the venule and mucosal damage (ie, ulceration, necroses). These vascular changes had resulted in radiation enteritis induced by preoperative radiotherapy. After the operation severe diarrhea continued until March 1986, when the granning diarrhea and pain became unbearable. At reoperation, another part of ileum was found to be dark red and constricted. There was a recurrent episode of radiation injury of small intestine. We report this case for the recognition of high-risk clinical factors and attention to careful selection or preparation of the patients with cancer for radiotherapy. (author)

  19. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer, a phase I/II feasibility and efficacy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trip, Anouk K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Poppema, Boelo J. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van [Department of Surgical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Siemerink, Ester [Department of Internal Medicine, Ziekenhuisgroep Twente, Hengelo (Netherlands); Beukema, Jannet C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Plukker, John T.M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Richel, Dick J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sandick, Johanna W. van [Department of Surgical Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cats, Annemieke [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jansen, Edwin P.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hospers, Geke A.P., E-mail: g.a.p.hospers@umcg.nl [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: This study was initiated to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin in locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods: In a prospective study, patients with locally advanced gastric cancer stage IB-IV(M0) were treated with chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery 4–6 weeks after the last irradiation. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of radiation to a total dose of 45 Gy given in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy, combined with concurrent weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel. Results: Between December 2007 and January 2012, 25 patients with cT3 (64%) or cT4 (36%) gastric cancer were included. One patient discontinued concurrent chemotherapy in the 4th week due to toxicity, but completed radiotherapy. Another patient discontinued chemoradiotherapy after the 3rd week due to progressive disease. Grade III adverse events of chemoradiotherapy were: gastrointestinal 12%, haematological 12% and other 8%. All patients, except one who developed progressive disease, were operated. Surgical complications were: general/infectious 48%, anastomotic leakage 12%, and bowel perforation 8%. Postoperative mortality was 4%. Microscopically radical resection rate was 72%. Pathological complete response rate was 16% and near complete response rate 24%. Conclusions: In this study, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer was associated with manageable toxicity and encouraging pathological response rates.

  20. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer, a phase I/II feasibility and efficacy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trip, Anouk K.; Poppema, Boelo J.; Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van; Siemerink, Ester; Beukema, Jannet C.; Verheij, Marcel; Plukker, John T.M.; Richel, Dick J.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Sandick, Johanna W. van; Cats, Annemieke; Jansen, Edwin P.M.; Hospers, Geke A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was initiated to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin in locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods: In a prospective study, patients with locally advanced gastric cancer stage IB-IV(M0) were treated with chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery 4–6 weeks after the last irradiation. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of radiation to a total dose of 45 Gy given in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy, combined with concurrent weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel. Results: Between December 2007 and January 2012, 25 patients with cT3 (64%) or cT4 (36%) gastric cancer were included. One patient discontinued concurrent chemotherapy in the 4th week due to toxicity, but completed radiotherapy. Another patient discontinued chemoradiotherapy after the 3rd week due to progressive disease. Grade III adverse events of chemoradiotherapy were: gastrointestinal 12%, haematological 12% and other 8%. All patients, except one who developed progressive disease, were operated. Surgical complications were: general/infectious 48%, anastomotic leakage 12%, and bowel perforation 8%. Postoperative mortality was 4%. Microscopically radical resection rate was 72%. Pathological complete response rate was 16% and near complete response rate 24%. Conclusions: In this study, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer was associated with manageable toxicity and encouraging pathological response rates

  1. Combined modality treatment including intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveit, Kjell Maque; Wiig, Johan N.; Olsen, Dag Rune; Storaas, Andreas; Poulsen, Jan Peter; Giercksky, Karl-Erik

    1997-01-01

    Background: Treatment of locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer usually has a high local recurrence rate and poor survival. Promising results have been reported by combined external radiotherapy, extensive surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Methods: One hundred fifteen patients with locally advanced rectal cancers fixed to the pelvic wall or locally recurrent rectal cancers underwent preoperative external radiotherapy with 46-50 Gy. Six to 8 weeks later radical pelvic surgery was attempted, and was combined with intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (15-20 Gy) in 66 patients. The patients were followed closely to evaluate complication rate, local and distant recurrence rate and survival. Results: Surgery with no macroscopic tumour remaining was obtained in 65% of the patients with no postoperative deaths. Pelvic infection was the major complication (21%). Although the observation time is short (3-60 months), the local recurrence rate seems low (22%) and survival seems promising (about 60% at 4 years) in patients with complete tumour resection, in contrast to patients with residual tumour (none living at 4 years). Conclusions: The combined modality treatment with preoperative external radiotherapy and extensive pelvic surgery with IORT is sufficiently promising to start a randomized trial on the clinical value of IORT as a boost treatment in the multidisciplinary approach to this disease

  2. The current role of radiotherapy in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman, B.M.P.; Bartelink, H.; Gunderson, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    During the last two decades, radiotherapy has become an integral part of the multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Currently, radiotherapy is seen mainly as an adjuvant therapy, sometimes in combination with chemotherapy, in a pre- or post-operative setting. Adjuvant radiotherapy alone leads to a significant reduction of local recurrence rates, but an impact on survival is seen only in subset analyses. Combined modality treatment can reduce local recurrence rates even further, and can also reduce the rate of distant relapses and increase survival. The acute toxicity of combined modality is considerably higher. Local radiation can also be used as a component of organ conserving local treatment for selected early lesions. Radiotherapy has been an important palliative treatment modality, diminishing symptoms in cases of inoperable primary rectal cancers or pelvic recurrences. The timing of radiation, surgery and chemotherapy has been under evaluation for years. For patients with locally advanced primary or recurrent malignancies (unresectable due to fixation), the preferred sequence is pre-operative irradiation with or without chemotherapy, followed by surgical resection. For mobile resectable lesions, sequencing issues are being tested in phase III randomised trials. (author)

  3. Radiation-induced myelopathy in long-term surviving metastatic spinal cord compression patients after hypofractionated radiotherapy: a clinical and magnetic resonance imaging analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Bellavita, Rita; Floridi, Piero; Celani, Grazia; Righetti, Enrico; Lupattelli, Marco; Panizza, Bianca Moira; Frattegiani, Alessandro; Pelliccioli, Gian Piero; Latini, Paolo

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy is often administered in metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC), but no studies have been published on the incidence of radiation-induced myelopathy (RIM) in long-term surviving patients. Our report addresses this topic. Patients and methods: Of 465 consecutive MSCC patients submitted to radiotherapy between 1988 and 1997, 13 live patients (seven females, six males, median age 69 years, median follow-up 69 months) surviving for 2 years or more were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate RIM. All patients underwent radiotherapy. Eight patients underwent a short-course regimen of 8 Gy, with 7 days rest, and then another 8 Gy. Five patients underwent a split-course regimen of 5 Gy x3, 4 days rest, and then 3 Gy x5. Only one patient also underwent laminectomy. Full neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. Results: Of 12 patients submitted to radiotherapy alone, 11 were ambulant (eight without support and three with support) with good bladder function. In nine of these 11 patients, MRI was negative; in one case MRI evidenced an in-field relapse 30 months after the end of radiotherapy, and in the other, two new MSCC foci outside the irradiated spine. In the remaining patient RIM was suspected at 18 months after radiotherapy when the patient became paraplegic and cystoplegic, and magnetic resonance images evidenced an ischemic injury in the irradiated area. The only patient treated with surgery plus postoperative radiotherapy worsened and remained paraparetic. Magnetic resonance images showed cord atrophy at the surgical level, explained as an ischemic necrosis due to surgery injury. Conclusions: On the grounds of our data regarding RIM in long-term surviving MSCC patients, we believe that a hypofractionated radiotherapy regimen can be used for the majority of patients. For a minority of patients, more protracted radiation regimens could be considered

  4. Optimal duration of preoperative therapy in unilateral and nonmetastatic Wilms' tumor in children older than 6 months: results of the Ninth International Society of Pediatric Oncology Wilms' Tumor Trial and Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tournade, M. F.; Com-Nougué, C.; de Kraker, J.; Ludwig, R.; Rey, A.; Burgers, J. M.; Sandstedt, B.; Godzinski, J.; Carli, M.; Potter, R.; Zucker, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the optimal duration of preoperative chemotherapy to further increase the proportion of stage I tumors by comparison of two regimens in the treatment of patients older than 6 months who have unilateral Wilms' tumor. Eligible patients (n = 382) initially received four weekly doses of

  5. A phase II clinical trial evaluating the use of two sequential, four-drug combination chemotherapy regimens in ambulatory bronchogenic adenocarcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broder, L E; Sridhar, K S; Selawry, O S; Charyulu, K N; Rao, R K; Saldana, M J; Lenz, C

    1992-12-01

    Forty-three ambulatory patients with locally advanced or metastatic bronchogenic adenocarcinoma were sequentially treated with two potentially mutually non-cross-resistant chemotherapy regimens. A new regimen, MVPF (mitomycin-c, vinblastine, procarbazine, and 5-fluorouracil), was given until progressive disease occurred. Then, a second regimen--MOCC (methotrexate, vincristine [Oncovin], cyclophosphamide, and CCNU)--was initiated. At further progression, regional disease patients received radiotherapy, whereas extensive disease patients received Phase II agents. Of the 43 patients entered on the study, 40 were evaluable. Three patients withdrew early due to poor tolerance of the regimen. The response rate for MVPF was 33% (12 of 40 PR, 1 of 40 CR) compared to a 4% (1 of 23 PR) response for MOCC (difference: p < or = .03), for a total response rate of 35%. Although there was an initial improvement in survival for responders (31.7 weeks) versus nonresponders (15.7 weeks) at the 75th percentile (p < or = .05), there was no significant difference in median survival. The hematologic toxicity was equivalent for both groups, whereas nonhematologic toxicity revealed a high incidence of nausea and vomiting in the MVPF group. It is concluded that this approach lent itself well to ambulatory care, and MVPF could be considered an alternative to cyclophosphamide-based regimens. However, the absence of a meaningful CR rate and lack of influence of response on median survival were factors limiting its effectiveness.

  6. Radiotherapy for the medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gose, Kyuhei; Imajo, Yoshinari; Imanaka, Kazufumi

    1983-01-01

    Eighteen patients with medulloblastoma, treated between 1972 and 1981, at Kobe University School of Medicine, were retrospectively studied. Of those completing post operative irradiation, 50% have survived for 2 years, 15% for 5 years and mean survival periods was 22.2 months. 13 out of 18 patients developed local recurrence and spinal dissemination. The mean time from the initial radiotherapy to recurrence was 8.5 months. It was suggested that posterior fossa should recieve 5,000 rad, the spine should 2,000 rad and recurrences should be treated by the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. (author)

  7. Arterial disease after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, J.M.; Mathieu, D.; Reizine, D.

    1983-01-01

    Disease of the large arterial vessels is a relatively unknown complication of radiotherapy. However, it should be considered in the same manner as the other complications of irradiation when a tumour recurrence is suspected. The experimental studies of Kirkpatrick and Konings, demonstrating the synergy between irradiation and hypercholesterolemia in the precocity and gravity of vascular complications are recalled. The different localisations reported in the litterature are discussed: coronary, pulmonary, thoracic aorta, supra aortic, renal, digestive and ilio-femoral arteries. Finally, the difficulty of diagnosis of post-radiotherapy without clinical, radiological or anatomopathological confirmation, is underlined [fr

  8. Second cancers following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1983-01-01

    Published reports have shown that there is an increased incidence of second malignancies, particularly sarcomas, following high dose radiotherapy in cancer treatment. However, this increased risk is very small and is relatively negligeable when one considers the beneficial effects of radiotherapy in cancer treatment. This incidence of radiation induced cancer appears to be higher in certain groups of patients, such as children and patients with Hodgkin's disease. In view of scarcity of published data, controlled surveys remain necessary for the quantitative assessment of the cancer risk in various subgroups of irradited patients [fr

  9. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimi D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have residual salivary gland function. Unfortunately, it is well established that in most cases radiotherapy destroys most of the salivary gland and associated salivary secretions.     

  10. A phase II study of preoperative capecitabine in women with operable hormone receptor positive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolaney, Sara M; Jeong, Joon; Guo, Hao; Brock, Jane; Morganstern, Daniel; Come, Steven E; Golshan, Mehra; Bellon, Jennifer; Winer, Eric P; Krop, Ian E

    2014-01-01

    Conventional preoperative chemotherapy regimens have only limited efficacy in hormone receptor positive (HR+) breast cancer and new approaches are needed. We hypothesized that capecitabine, which is effective in metastatic breast cancer, may be an active preoperative treatment for HR+ breast cancer. Women with HR+, HER2-negative operable breast cancer received capecitabine, 2000 mg/m 2 daily in divided doses for 14 days, followed by a 7-day rest period. Treatment was repeated every 21 days for a total of four cycles. The primary endpoint of the study was to determine the rate of pathological complete response (pCR). Because of slow accrual, the study was closed after 24 patients were enrolled. Three patients had a complete clinical response, and eight patients had a partial clinical response, for an overall clinical response rate of 45.8%. There were no cases of pCR. Of the 22 patients who had pathological response assessment by the Miller–Payne grading system, there were six grade 3 responses, and no grade 4 or 5 responses. Toxicity was manageable: the only grade 3 toxicities observed were one case each of diarrhea, palmar plantar erythrodysesthesia, hypokalemia, and mucositis. There was no association between baseline levels, or change in level from baseline to cycle 1, or from baseline to time of surgery, of thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP), thymidylate synthase (TYMS), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD), or Ki67 and pathological, clinical, or radiographic response. Preoperative capecitabine is a well-tolerated regimen, but appears not lead to pCR when used as monotherapy in HR+ breast cancer

  11. Catawba nuclear station preoperational ALARA review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deal, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the particular emphasis placed on preoperational as los as reasonably achievable (ALARA) considerations at Duke Power's Catawba Nuclear Station. A strong station commitment to the ALARA philosophy, and review of existing capabilities, led to development of an aggressive two-part ALARA program. Capabilities consisted of sufficient numbers of available personnel, lengthy lead time during construction, a very detailed plastic model, and a sister plant of similar design. The program, as developed, consisted of a preoperational program, which looked at design and construction aspects of ALARA, and the operational program, dealing with the ALARA committee and operational problems. MAnagement's philosophy of holding everyone responsible for ALARA provided the motivation to organize the preoperational program to use that resource. The Health Physics group accepted responsibility for development, coordination, and reviewer training. The problem provided a base to build on as station personnel gained experience in their own crafts and radiation protection in general

  12. Erythropoietin and radiotherapy; Erythropoietine et radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Fur, E.; Albarghach, M.N.; Pradier, O. [CHU de Morvan, Dept. de radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2010-01-15

    Erythropoietin (E.P.O.) is a glycoprotein hormone. This hormone is a growth factor for red blood cells precursors in the bone marrow. The decrease of oxygen partial pressure, a reduced number of erythrocytes caused by bleeding or excessive destruction, or increased tissues oxygen requirements lead to increased secretion of E.P.O.. Its action takes place on bone marrow erythroblastic cells through specific receptors. E.P.O. stimulates the proliferation of red cell precursors stem cells in the bone marrow, thus increasing their production in one to two weeks. The effectiveness of E.P.O. at increasing haemoglobin and improving patients quality of life has been demonstrated by several studies. However, its use in radiotherapy remains controversial. While tumour hypoxia caused by anaemia is a factor of radio resistance and thus a source of local failure, tumour expression of E.P.O. receptors presents a significant risk for tumour progression and neo-angiogenesis, which would be increased during the administration of E.P.O.. The purpose of this article is to answer the question: is there a place for E.P.O. in combination with radiotherapy in the management of cancer?

  13. Pre-operative fasting guidelines: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søreide, E; Eriksson, L I; Hirlekar, G

    2005-01-01

    Liberal pre-operative fasting routines have been implemented in most countries. In general, clear fluids are allowed up to 2 h before anaesthesia, and light meals up to 6 h. The same recommendations apply for children and pregnant women not in labour. In children......Liberal pre-operative fasting routines have been implemented in most countries. In general, clear fluids are allowed up to 2 h before anaesthesia, and light meals up to 6 h. The same recommendations apply for children and pregnant women not in labour. In children...

  14. Phase II Study of Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy With a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, Benedikt; Tournel, Koen; Everaert, Hendrik; Hoorens, Anne; Sermeus, Alexandra; Christian, Nicolas; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The addition of concomitant chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with cT3–4 rectal cancer. The combined treatment modality increases the complete response rate and local control (LC), but has no impact on survival or the incidence of distant metastases. In addition, it is associated with considerable toxicity. As an alternative strategy, we explored prospectively, preoperative helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Methods and Materials: A total of 108 patients were treated with intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art II system. A dose of 46 Gy, in daily fractions of 2 Gy, was delivered to the mesorectum and draining lymph nodes, without concomitant chemotherapy. Patients with an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm, based on magnetic resonance imaging, received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Acute and late side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: A total of 102 patients presented with cT3–4 tumors; 57 patients entered the boost group and 51 the no-boost group. One patient in the no-boost group developed a radio-hypersensitivity reaction, resulting in a complete tumor remission, a Grade 3 acute and Grade 5 late enteritis. No other Grade ≥3 acute toxicities occurred. With a median follow-up of 32 months, Grade ≥3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity were observed in 6% and 4% of the patients, respectively. The actuarial 2-year LC, progression-free survival and overall survival were 98%, 79%, and 93%. Conclusions: Preoperative helical tomotherapy displays a favorable acute toxicity profile in patients with cT3–4 rectal cancer. A SIB can be safely administered in patients with a narrow CRM and resulted in a promising LC.

  15. Preoperative irradiation for prevention of heterotopic ossification following prosthetic total hip replacement. Results of a prospective study in 462 hips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koelbl, O.; Seufert, J.; Pohl, F.; Flentje, M. [Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany). Klinik and Poliklinik for Radiotherapy; Tauscher, A.; Springorum, H.W. [Caritas Hospital, Bad Mergentheim (Germany). Orthopedic Clinic; Lehmann, H. [Caritas Hospital, Bad Mergentheim (Germany). Inst. of Radiology

    2003-11-01

    Background: The effectiveness of pre- or postoperative radiotherapy for prevention of heterotopic ossification (HO) following total hip replacement (THR) has already been demonstrated in the past. Thereby, in most studies using preoperative radiotherapy patients were irradiated < 6 h before surgery. The purpose of this prospective study was to analyze the effectiveness of preoperative irradiation on the evening before surgery and to identify risk factors for HO in a homogeneous collective of patients. Patients and Methods: From July 1997 to July 2001, 416 patients (462 hips; 235 males, 227 females) received preoperative radiotherapy of the hip on the evening before surgery with a 7-Gy single fraction. The patients' median age was 67.1 years. The most frequent indication for radiotherapy was hypertrophic osteoarthritis (383 hips, 82.9%). Treatment results were assessed by comparison of pre- and postoperative hip X-rays (immediately and 6 months after surgery). The analysis of radiographs was performed according to the Brooker score. Results: The overall incidence of HO was 18.1% (n = 84), Brooker score 1 12.3% (n = 57), score 2 3.9% (n = 18), score 3 1.5% (n = 7), and score 4 0.4% (n = 2). Sex, body height, hypertrophic osteoarthritis of higher degree, size of the femoral component of the prosthesis, previous ipsi- or contralateral HO, and short course of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (diclofenac) therapy significantly influenced the HO rate in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, an interdependence of prosthesis size, sex and patient's height was found. From these three variables, only prosthesis size was statistically significant in multivariate analysis. The cumulative dose of diclofenac ({<=} 300 mg or > 300 mg) within the first 7 postoperative days and previous ipsi- or contralateral HO influenced the incidence of HO in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Preoperative radiotherapy on the evening before surgery is an effective treatment

  16. Multileaf collimator in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeraj, M.; Robar, V.

    2004-01-01

    Background. Basic goal of radiotherapy treatment is the irradiation of a target volume while minimizing the amount of radiation absorbed in healthy tissue. Shaping the beam is an important way of minimizing the absorbed dose in healthy tissue and critical structures. Conventional collimator jaws are used for shaping a rectangular treatment field; but, as usually treatment volume is not rectangular, additional shaping is required. On a linear accelerator, lead blocks or individually made Cerroben TM blocks are attached onto the treatment head under standard collimating system. Another option is the use of multileaf collimator (MLC). Conclusions. Multileaf collimator is becoming the main tool for beam shaping on the linear accelerator. It is a simple and useful system in the preparation and performance of radiotherapy treatment. Multileaf collimators are reliable, as their manufacturers developed various mechanisms for their precision, control and reliability, together with reduction of leakage and transmission of radiation between and through the leaves. Multileaf collimator is known today as a very useful clinical system for simple field shaping, but its use is getting even more important in dynamic radiotherapy, with the leaves moving during irradiation. This enables a precise dose delivery on any part of a treated volume. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the therapy of the future, is based on the dynamic use of MLC. (author)

  17. [Radiotherapy of oropharynx carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servagi Vernat, S; Tochet, F; Vieillevigne, L; Pointreau, Y; Maingon, P; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for oropharynx carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Quality indicators in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cionini, Luca; Gardani, Gianstefano; Gabriele, Pietro; Magri, Secondo; Morosini, Pier Luigi; Rosi, Antonella; Viti, Vincenza

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is a widespread and increasing tendency to develop hospital performance indicators in the field of accreditation/certification systems and quality benchmarking. A study has been undertaken to develop a set of performance indicators for a typical radiotherapy Centre and to evaluate their ability to provide a continuous quality improvement. Materials and methods: A working group consisting of radiation oncologists, medical physicists and radiation technologists under the coordination of experts in health technology assessment has elaborated a set of general indicators able to monitor performances and the quality level of a typical radiotherapy Centre. The work has been carried out through four steps: a preliminary set of indicators was selected; data on these indicators were collected in a number of Italian radiotherapy Centres and medical physics Services; problems in collection and analysis of data were discussed; a final set of indicators was developed. Results: A final set of 13 indicators is here presented. They concern general structural and/or operational features, health physics activities and accuracy and technical complexity of the treatment. Conclusions: The indicators tested in a few Italian Centres of radiotherapy and medical physics Services are now ready to be utilized by a larger community

  19. Bowel disease after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schofield, P.F.; Holden, D.; Carr, N.D. (Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (UK))

    1983-06-01

    The clinical presentation, operative findings and outcome in 40 patients who required surgery for bowel disease after radiotherapy are presented. The type of presentation varied according to the time after radiotherapy. In the first month, many patients had a proctitis but none required surgery. Five patients were operated on within one month, 2 for radiation-induced acute ileitis and 3 for exacerbations of pre-existing disease (diverticular disease 2, ulcerative colitis 1). The commonest time of presentation was between 3 and 18 months after radiotherapy, when 20 patients needed surgery for bowel disease caused by radiation-induced local ischaemia. Twelve of these patients had chronic perforation, 6 had severe rectal bleeding and 2 had painful anorectal ulceration. Fifteen patients presented between 2 and 24 years after radiotherapy, usually with incomplete intestinal obstruction due to a fibrous stricture, but 2 patients had rectal carcinoma. Wide resection of the involved bowel was the principal method of treatment but any anastomosis was protected by a proximal defunctioning stoma. There was no operative mortality but 10 patients have died subsequently. The danger of dismissing these patients as having incurable malignancy is stressed because, although the condition is infrequent, it is usually amenable to adequate surgery.

  20. Radiotherapy of breast fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heibel, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    In a retrospective study radiotherapy of breast fibrosis in hormone-treated men with histologically confirmed prostate carcinoma was examined. 10 patients had received hormones even before irradiation, 113 obtained hormone administration only after irradiation. The objective size of the glandular body and the overall size of the breast were measured with a special method developed by the author. 46 patients indicated complaints. With hypertrophic mamma and hypertrophic mamilla in 67 examined patients, 127 different symptoms resulted in total. Four patients of the group who had obtained hormones before irradiation, suffered from subjective symptoms. It resulted that radiotherapy of breast fibrosis carried out during hormone treatment is no gynecomastia prophylaxis, that already existent mamma hypertrophies are irreversible, but that existent sensations were notably reduced within 6 months after irradiation therapy. These results indicate the necessity of a radiotherapy of the mamma fibrosis before the hormone treatment is begun. Particularly in cases of higher operative risks, also the possibility of preferring radiotherapy to mastectomy should be fully utilized, in view of adequate or even better therapeutic results. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Gamma apparatuses for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sul'kin, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    Scientific and technical achievements in development and application of gamma therapeutic apparatuses for external and intracavity irradiations are generalized. Radiation-physical parameters of apparatuses providing usability of progressive methods in radiotherapy of onclogical patients are given. Optimization of main apparatus elements, ensurance of its operation reliability, reduction of errors of irradiation plan reproduction are considered. Attention is paid to radiation safety

  2. Four R's of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withers, H.R.

    1975-01-01

    Radiotherapy given as multiple doses can be effective in sterilizing cancers, but the processes whereby the neoplasm is eradicated and the normal tissues are preserved are not fully understood. The differential between normal tissue and tumor response is enhanced by dose fractionation, single doses resulting in severe normal tissue injury when the dose is sufficient to control a proportion of treated tumors. Data are reviewed from radiobiological studies on laboratory animals and cultured cells that have thrown some light on four of the phenomena that influence the outcome of fractionated-dose radiotherapy, one or more of which may account for the relative sparing of normal tissues. These are repair of sublethal injury in normal and neoplastic cells, reoxygenation of the tumor, redistribution through the division cycle, and regeneration of surviving normal and malignant cells between dose fractions. These have been called the four R's of fractionated radiotherapy. Other factors are involved in the outcome of multifraction radiotherapy, including maintenance of the architectural integrity of the normal tissues, the volume of tissue irradi []ted, the tumor bed, and the immunocompetence of the host. (90 references) (CH)

  3. Multiagent chemotherapy in the salvage cure of ocular lymphoma relapsing after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plowman, P.N.; Montefiore, D.S. (Saint Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)); Lightman, S. (Moorfields Eye Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-01

    The eye has traditionally been regarded as a sanctuary site for drugs, but recent publications have shown evidence of penetration by drugs and subsequent clinical response of intraocular lymphomas. In this report, a chemotherapy regimen, including high dose methotrexate and cytosine arabinoside, was used to re-induce remission in a patient with intraocular lymphoma relapsing locally after prior radiotherapy. She remains disease free 18 months later. (author).

  4. Analysis of clinical factors for pathological complete response after preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayiguli Hare; Palida Apizi; Iskandar Abulimiti; Zhang Jinrong; Tian Hanhan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical factors associated with pathological complete response (pCR) after preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 116 patients with rectal cancer, who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by radical surgery from January 2009 to December 2012. All patients received pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (50 Gy/25 fractions) with concurrent fluorouracil based chemotherapy and then underwent radical surgery 4-8 weeks later. The clinical factors associated with pCR or non-pCR were analyzed by Logistic regression. Results: Of the 116 patients, 20 (17.2%) achieved a pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The univariate analysis showed that percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor, preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, T stage, N stage, distance from the anal verge, degree of tumor differentiation, and maximum tumor diameter were associated with pCR or non-pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. The multivariate analysis revealed that percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor, preoperative serum CEA level,and T stage were predictive factors for pCR or non-pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Conclusions: Non-circumferential tumor (percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor <75 %), low CEA level, and early T stage before treatment may be associated with pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. (authors)

  5. Quality assurance in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    Good radiotherapy results and safety of treatment require the radiation to be optimally applied to a specified target area and the correct dose. According to international recommendations, the average uncertainty in therapeutic dose should not exceed 5%. The need for high precision in therapeutic dose requires quality assurance covering the entire radiotherapy process. Besides the physical and technical characteristics of the therapy equipment, quality assurance must include all radiotherapy equipment and procedures that are significant for the correct magnitude and precision of application of the therapeutic dose. The duties and responsibilities pertaining to various stages of treatment must also be precisely defined. These requirements may be best implemented through a quality system. The general requirements for supervision and quality assurance of medical radiation apparatus are prescribed in section 40 of the Radiation Act (592/1991, amendment 1142/1998) and in sections 18 and 32 of the Decree of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health on the medical use of radiation (423/2000). Guide ST 2.2 imposes requirements on structural radiation shielding of radiotherapy equipment and the premises in which it is used, and on warning and safety arrangements. Guide ST 1.1 sets out the general safety principles for radiation practices and regulatory control procedure for the use of radiation. Guide ST 1.6 provides general requirements for operational measures in the use of radiation. This Guide sets out the duties of responsible parties (the party running a radiation practice) in respect of arranging and maintaining radiotherapy quality assurance. The principles set out in this Guide and Guide ST 6.3 may be applied to radionuclide therapy

  6. Radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, S.; Herfarth, K.

    2011-01-01

    With the development of modern radiation techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a dose escalation in the definitive radiotherapy of prostate cancer and a consecutive improvement in biochemical recurrence-free survival (BFS) could be achieved. Among others, investigators at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) saw 5-year BFS rates of up to 98%. A further gain in effectiveness and safety is expected of hypofractionation schedules, as suggested by data published by Kupelian et al., who saw a low 5-year rate of grade ≥2 rectal side-effects of 4.5%. However, randomized studies are just beginning to mature. Patients with intermediate or high-risk tumors should receive neoadjuvant (NHT) and adjuvant (AHT) androgen deprivation. Bolla et al. could show an increase in 5-year overall survival from 62-78%. The inclusion of the whole pelvis in the treatment field (WPRT) is still controversial. The RTOG 94-13 study showed a significant advantage in disease-free survival after 60 months but long-term data did not yield significant differences between WPRT and irradiation of the prostate alone. The German Society of Urology strongly recommends adjuvant radiotherapy of the prostate bed for pT3 N0 tumors with positive margins. In a pT3 N0 R0 or pT2 N0 R+ situation, adjuvant radiotherapy should at least be considered. So far, no randomized data on NHT and AHT have been published, so androgen deprivation remains an individual decision in the postoperative setting. In a retrospective analysis Spiotto et al. reported a positive effect for adjuvant WPRT and biochemical control. This article summarizes the essential publications on definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy and discusses the additional use of androgen deprivation and WPRT. (orig.) [de

  7. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  8. Adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced squamous carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradier, Olivier; Christiansen, Hans; Schmidberger, Heinz; Martin, Alexios; Jaeckel, Martin C.; Steiner, Wolfgang; Ambrosch, Petra; Kahler, Elke; Hess, Clemens F.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of an adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and to show that a less invasive surgery with organ preservation in combination with radiotherapy is an alternative to a radical treatment. Patients and Methods: Between 1987 and 2000, 208 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with postoperative radiotherapy after surgical CO 2 laser resection. Primary sites included oral cavity, 38; oropharynx, 88; larynx, 36; hypopharynx, 46. Disease stages were as follows: Stage III, 40 patients; Stage IV, 168 patients. Before 1994, the treatment consisted of a split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum (Treatment A). After 1994, the patients received a conventional radiotherapy (Treatment B). Results: Patients had 5-year locoregional control and disease-specific survival (DSS) rates of 68% and 48%, respectively. The 5-year DSS was 70% and 44% for Stages III and IV, respectively (p = 0.00127). Patients treated with a hemoglobin level greater or equal to 13.5 g/dL before radiotherapy had a 5-year DSS of 55% as compared with 39% for patients treated with a hemoglobin level greater than 13.5 g/dL (p = 0.0054). Conclusion: In this series of patients with advanced head-and-neck tumors, transoral laser surgery in combination with adjuvant radiotherapy resulted in locoregional control and DSS rates similar to those reported for radical surgery followed by radiotherapy. Treatment B has clearly been superior to Treatment A. A further improvement of our treatment regimen might be expected by the combination of adjuvant radiotherapy with concomitant platinum-based chemotherapy

  9. Capecitabine and oxaliplatin in the preoperative multimodality treatment of rectal cancer: surgical end points from National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project trial R-04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Michael J; Colangelo, Linda H; Beart, Robert W; Petrelli, Nicholas J; Allegra, Carmen J; Sharif, Saima; Pitot, Henry C; Shields, Anthony F; Landry, Jerome C; Ryan, David P; Parda, David S; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Arora, Amit; Evans, Lisa S; Bahary, Nathan; Soori, Gamini S; Eakle, Janice; Robertson, John M; Moore, Dennis F; Mullane, Michael R; Marchello, Benjamin T; Ward, Patrick J; Wozniak, Timothy F; Roh, Mark S; Yothers, Greg; Wolmark, Norman

    2014-06-20

    The optimal chemotherapy regimen administered concurrently with preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for patients with rectal cancer is unknown. National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project trial R-04 compared four chemotherapy regimens administered concomitantly with RT. Patients with clinical stage II or III rectal cancer who were undergoing preoperative RT (45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks plus a boost of 5.4 Gy to 10.8 Gy in three to six daily fractions) were randomly assigned to one of the following chemotherapy regimens: continuous intravenous infusional fluorouracil (CVI FU; 225 mg/m(2), 5 days per week), with or without intravenous oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2) once per week for 5 weeks) or oral capecitabine (825 mg/m(2) twice per day, 5 days per week), with or without oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2) once per week for 5 weeks). Before random assignment, the surgeon indicated whether the patient was eligible for sphincter-sparing surgery based on clinical staging. The surgical end points were complete pathologic response (pCR), sphincter-sparing surgery, and surgical downstaging (conversion to sphincter-sparing surgery). From September 2004 to August 2010, 1,608 patients were randomly assigned. No significant differences in the rates of pCR, sphincter-sparing surgery, or surgical downstaging were identified between the CVI FU and capecitabine regimens or between the two regimens with or without oxaliplatin. Patients treated with oxaliplatin experienced significantly more grade 3 or 4 diarrhea (P < .001). Administering capecitabine with preoperative RT achieved similar rates of pCR, sphincter-sparing surgery, and surgical downstaging compared with CVI FU. Adding oxaliplatin did not improve surgical outcomes but added significant toxicity. The definitive analysis of local tumor control, disease-free survival, and overall survival will be performed when the protocol-specified number of events has occurred. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-01-01

    This represents a preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System

  11. Preoperative biliary drainage for pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heek, N. T.; Busch, O. R.; van Gulik, T. M.; Gouma, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    This review is to summarize the current knowledge about preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer. Most patients with pancreatic carcinoma (85%) will present with obstructive jaundice. The presence of toxic substances as bilirubin and bile

  12. PREOPERATIVE ENDOSCOPIC MARKING OF UNPALPABLE COLONIC TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Goncharov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of small colon lesions is one of the major problems in laparoscopic colonic resection.Research objective: to develop a technique of visualization of small tumors of a colon by preoperative endoscopic marking of a tumor.Materials and methods. In one day prior to operation to the patient after bowel preparation the colonoscopy is carried out. In the planned point near tumor on antimesentery edge the submucous infiltration of marking solution (Micky Sharpz blue tattoo pigment, UK is made. The volume of entered solution of 1–3 ml. In only 5 months of use of a technique preoperative marking to 14 patients with small (the size of 1–3 cm malignant tumors of the left colon is performed.Results. The tattoo mark was well visualized by during operation at 13 of 14 patients. In all cases we recorded no complications. Time of operation with preoperative marking averaged 108 min, that is significantly less in comparison with average time of operation with an intra-operative colonoscopy – 155 min (р < 0.001.Conclusions. The first experience of preoperative endoscopic marking of non palpable small tumors of a colon is encouraging. Performance of a technique wasn't accompanied by complications and allowed to reduce significantly time of operation and to simplify conditions of performance of operation.

  13. Preoperative exercise training to improve postoperative outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenet, K.

    2017-01-01

    It is common knowledge that better preoperative physical fitness is associated with better postoperative outcomes. However, as a result of aging of the population and improved surgical and anaesthesia techniques, the proportion of frail patients with decreased physical fitness levels undergoing

  14. Interdisciplinary preoperative patient education in cardiac surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, J. van; Dulmen, S. van; Bar, P.; Venus, E.

    2003-01-01

    Patient education in cardiac surgery is complicated by the fact that cardiac surgery patients meet a lot of different health care providers. Little is known about education processes in terms of interdisciplinary tuning. In this study, complete series of consecutive preoperative consultations of 51

  15. Preoperative diagnosis of malignant hyperthermia | Brand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 1 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Preoperative diagnosis of malignant ...

  16. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  17. Ampullopancreatic carcinoma: preoperative TNM classification with endosonography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tio, T. L.; Tytgat, G. N.; Cikot, R. J.; Houthoff, H. J.; Sars, P. R.

    1990-01-01

    Endosonography (ES) was used for the preoperative TNM (1987) staging of tumors in 43 patients with pancreatic cancer and 24 patients with ampullary carcinomas. These results were correlated with the histologic findings of resected specimens. Early-stage tumors could be distinguished from advanced

  18. Preoperative screening: value of previous tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, D S; Snow, R; Lofgren, R P

    1990-12-15

    To determine the frequency of tests done in the year before elective surgery that might substitute for preoperative screening tests and to determine the frequency of test results that change from a normal value to a value likely to alter perioperative management. Retrospective cohort analysis of computerized laboratory data (complete blood count, sodium, potassium, and creatinine levels, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time). Urban tertiary care Veterans Affairs Hospital. Consecutive sample of 1109 patients who had elective surgery in 1988. At admission, 7549 preoperative tests were done, 47% of which duplicated tests performed in the previous year. Of 3096 previous results that were normal as defined by hospital reference range and done closest to the time of but before admission (median interval, 2 months), 13 (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.2% to 0.7%), repeat values were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery. Most of the abnormalities were predictable from the patient's history, and most were not noted in the medical record. Of 461 previous tests that were abnormal, 78 (17%; CI, 13% to 20%) repeat values at admission were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery (P less than 0.001, frequency of clinically important abnormalities of patients with normal previous results with those with abnormal previous results). Physicians evaluating patients preoperatively could safely substitute the previous test results analyzed in this study for preoperative screening tests if the previous tests are normal and no obvious indication for retesting is present.

  19. Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-01-01

    This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System

  20. Preoperative evaluation : risk management and implementation aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, W.A. van

    2002-01-01

    In preoperative risk management the anesthesiologist uses diagnostic information to estimate the probability of outcomes and to decide on the anesthetic strategy in a particular patient. The aim of this thesis was explore to what extent simple patient characteristics, particularly obtained from

  1. Genital lesions: An indication for changing ART regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S Arun; Kumar, N; Kumarasamy, N

    2011-01-01

    Genital lesions are common in HIV positive patients and aetiology for these are mainly due to HSV, HPV or bacterial. They usually respond to HAART, antiviral or antimicrobials. We are presenting a young patient on HAART with non-healing genital ulcer lesions for sixteen months. He responded well to a change in ART regimen within a period of 15 days. This happened after a change to a more potent ART regimen.

  2. A comparative study of preoperative B-V-M-M chemotherapy and irradiation in advanced squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olasz, L.; Kwashie, F.; Herzegh, P.; Bruncsics, Z.; Hrovath, A.; Kiralyfalvi, L.

    1996-01-01

    From January 1976, 50 patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck were treated with telecobalt preoperative irradiation followed by appropriate surgery. Another group of 50 patients, who matched in risk factors and stage of disease, were treated with preoperative chemotherapy and surgery. Chemotherapy consisted of bleomycin, vincristine, mitolactol and methotrexate. All patients received 3 courses. Surgery was performed 2-3 weeks post-chemotherapy or 4-6 weeks post-radiotherapy. Forty four percent of the patients in the radiotherapy group showed recurrences, while 30% of the patients had recurrence in the chemotherapy group. The overall 3-year survival rate was 66% in the chemotherapy group and 57% in the radiation therapy group, with no statistical difference. (author)

  3. Second malignancies after chemotherapy and radiotherapy for Hodgkin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronowski, Gregory M; Wilder, Richard B; Levy, Larry B; Atkinson, Edward N; Ha, Chul S; Hagemeister, Fredrick B; Barista, Ibrahim; Rodriguez, Maria A; Sarris, Andreas H; Hess, Mark A; Cabanillas, Fernando; Cox, James D

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine the incidence of second malignancies after combined-modality therapy for adults with Hodgkin disease and relate it to the details of initial treatment. We retrospectively studied 286 patients ranging in age from 16 to 88 years with stage I or II Hodgkin disease who were treated between 1980 and 1995 with chemotherapy followed 3 to 4 weeks later by radiotherapy. Patients received a median of three cycles of induction chemotherapy. Mitoxantrone, vincristine, vinblastine, and prednisone was used in 161 cases, mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (MOPP) in 67 cases, Adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine in 19 cases, lomustine, vinblastine, procarbazine, and prednisone/doxorubicin, bleomycin, dacarbazine, and lomustine in 18 cases, and other chemotherapeutic regimens in the remaining 21 cases. The median radiotherapy dose was 40 Gy given in 20 daily 2-Gy fractions. Median follow-up of surviving patients was 7.4 years. There were 2,230 person-years of observation. Significantly increased relative risks (RR) were observed for acute myeloid leukemia (RR, 69.3; 95% CI, 14.3-202.6) and melanoma (RR, 7.3; 95% CI, 1.5-21.3). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year actuarial risks of acute myeloid leukemia were 0.8%, 1.3%, and 1.3%, respectively. Patients treated with MOPP had the highest 15-year actuarial risk of leukemia (1.6%). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year actuarial risks of solid tumors were 1.9%, 9.3%, and 16.8%, respectively. Consolidative radiotherapy to both sides of the diaphragm resulted in a trend toward an increased risk of solid tumors relative to radiotherapy to only one side of the diaphragm (p = 0.08). In an effort to reduce the risk of second malignancies, we have stopped using the alkylating agents nitrogen mustard and procarbazine and elective paraaortic and splenic radiotherapy after chemotherapy.

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mansfield, Paul F. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Das, Prajnan, E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92-1.01). The median V{sub 30} (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V{sub 20} (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V{sub 40} (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam; Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92–1.01). The median V 30 (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V 20 (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V 40 (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate pathologic

  6. Radiation injury in the digestive system after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, Yoshiaki; Mishima, Yoshio; Hara, Kosuke; Tomiyama, Jiro; Nakano, Haruo

    1975-01-01

    This paper described the investigation of 18 patients with injury in the digestive system who received surgical procedure after radiotherapy of cancer for the past ten years. The patients consisted of 6 males and 12 females with the age ranging 21 to 66 years old. Primary diseases were 9 cancers of the cervix of the uterus, seminoma and cancer of the ovary, the rectum and the other regions. Radiotherapy was applicable to each of the diseases, and more than 3,000 rads of irradiation given for over a month. Symptoms developed 3 months to 4 and a half years after irradiation and the mean period was about a year except one patient in whom cancer of the colon occurred after 13 years. Operation was performed about several months after the onset of disease in the average. Of 18 patients who received operation, cancer was suspected at preoperative diagnosis in all of 3 patients in whom gastric lesion was resected, 3 of 4 in whom the colon was resected, 1 with small intestine lesion and 1 of 4 with rectum lesion. It was characteristic of these lesions that recurrence of cancer was preoperatively suspected in most of the patients. In the patient with rectum lesion, steroids suppository was given postoperatively. In addition, historical background of radiation injury, difference in period of the occurrence of radiation injury, local injury in delayed period, predisposing cause, classification, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of radiation injury were also mentioned. (Kanao, N.)

  7. Radiation injury in the digestive system after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horie, Y; Mishima, Y; Hara, K; Tomiyama, J; Nakano, H [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-03-01

    This paper described the investigation of 18 patients with injury in the digestive system who received surgical procedure after radiotherapy of cancer for the past ten years. The patients consisted of 6 males and 12 females with the age ranging 21 to 66 years old. Primary diseases were 9 cancers of the cervix of the uterus, seminoma and cancer of the ovary, the rectum and the other regions. Radiotherapy was applicable to each of the diseases, and more than 3,000 rads of irradiation given for over a month. Symptoms developed 3 months to 4 and a half years after irradiation and the mean period was about a year except one patient in whom cancer of the colon occurred after 13 years. Operation was performed about several months after the onset of disease in the average. Of 18 patients who received operation, cancer was suspected at preoperative diagnosis in all of 3 patients in whom gastric lesion was resected, 3 of 4 in whom the colon was resected, 1 with small intestine lesion and 1 of 4 with rectum lesion. It was characteristic of these lesions that recurrence of cancer was preoperatively suspected in most of the patients. In the patient with rectum lesion, steroids suppository was given postoperatively. In addition, historical background of radiation injury, difference in period of the occurrence of radiation injury, local injury in delayed period, predisposing cause, classification, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of radiation injury were also mentioned.

  8. Patient costs associated with external beam radiotherapy treatment for localized prostate cancer: the benefits of hypofractionated over conventionally fractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethukavalan, Perakaa; Cheung, Patrick; Tang, Colin I; Quon, Harvey; Morton, Gerard; Nam, Robert; Loblaw, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    To estimate the out-of-pocket costs for patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and calculate the patient-related savings of being treated with a 5-fraction versus a standard 39-fraction approach. Seventy patients accrued to the pHART3 (n = 84) study were analyzed for out-of-pocket patient costs as a result of undergoing treatment. All costs are in Canadian dollars. Using the postal code of the patient's residence, the distance between the hospital and patient home was found using Google Maps. The Canada Revenue Agency automobile allowance rate was then applied to determine the cost per kilometer driven. The average cost of travel from the hospital and pHART3 patient's residence was $246 per person after five trips. In a standard fractionation regimen, pHART3 patients would have incurred an average cost of $1921 after 39 visits. The patients receiving hypofractionated radiotherapy would have paid an average of $38 in parking while those receiving conventional treatment would have paid $293. The difference in out-of-pocket costs for the patients receiving a standard versus hypofractionated treatment was $1930. Medium term prospective data shows that hypofractionated radiotherapy is an effective treatment method for localized prostate cancer. Compared to standard EBRT, hypofractionated radiotherapy requires significantly fewer visits. Due to the long distance patients may have to travel to the cancer center and the expense of parking, the short course treatment saves each patient an average of $1900. A randomized study of standard versus hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy should be conducted to confirm a favorable efficacy and tolerability profile of the shorter fractionation scheme.

  9. Preoperative Chemotherapy Versus Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III (N2) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Kristin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chino, Junzo P [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Marks, Lawrence B [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Ready, Neal [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); D' Amico, Thomas A [Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Clough, Robert W; Kelsey, Chris R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University of Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To compare preoperative chemotherapy (ChT) and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (ChT-RT) in operable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed all patients with pathologically confirmed Stage III (N2) non-small-cell lung cancer who initiated preoperative ChT or ChT-RT at Duke University between 1995 and 2006. Mediastinal pathologic complete response (pCR) rates were compared using a chi-square test. The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was also performed. Results: A total of 101 patients who initiated preoperative therapy with planned resection were identified. The median follow-up was 20 months for all patients and 38 months for survivors. The mediastinal lymph nodes were reassessed after preoperative therapy in 88 patients (87%). Within this group, a mediastinal pCR was achieved in 35% after preoperative ChT vs. 65% after preoperative ChT-RT (p = 0.01). Resection was performed in 69% after ChT and 84% after ChT-RT (p = 0.1). For all patients, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rate at 3 years was 40%, 27%, and 66%, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found in the clinical endpoints between the ChT and ChT-RT subgroups. On multivariate analysis, a mediastinal pCR was associated with improved disease-free survival (p = 0.03) and local control (p = 0.03), but not overall survival (p = 0.86). Conclusion: Preoperative ChT-RT was associated with higher mediastinal pCR rates but not improved survival.

  10. Preoperative Chemotherapy Versus Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III (N2) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, Kristin; Chino, Junzo P.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Ready, Neal; D'Amico, Thomas A.; Clough, Robert W.; Kelsey, Chris R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare preoperative chemotherapy (ChT) and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (ChT-RT) in operable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed all patients with pathologically confirmed Stage III (N2) non-small-cell lung cancer who initiated preoperative ChT or ChT-RT at Duke University between 1995 and 2006. Mediastinal pathologic complete response (pCR) rates were compared using a chi-square test. The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was also performed. Results: A total of 101 patients who initiated preoperative therapy with planned resection were identified. The median follow-up was 20 months for all patients and 38 months for survivors. The mediastinal lymph nodes were reassessed after preoperative therapy in 88 patients (87%). Within this group, a mediastinal pCR was achieved in 35% after preoperative ChT vs. 65% after preoperative ChT-RT (p = 0.01). Resection was performed in 69% after ChT and 84% after ChT-RT (p = 0.1). For all patients, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rate at 3 years was 40%, 27%, and 66%, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found in the clinical endpoints between the ChT and ChT-RT subgroups. On multivariate analysis, a mediastinal pCR was associated with improved disease-free survival (p = 0.03) and local control (p = 0.03), but not overall survival (p = 0.86). Conclusion: Preoperative ChT-RT was associated with higher mediastinal pCR rates but not improved survival.

  11. Radiotherapy and local hyperthermia plus androgen suppression in locally advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maluta, S.; Marciai, N.; Gabbani, M.; Palazzi, M.; Dall'Oglio, S.; Grandinetti, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In advanced prostatic cancer, hyperthermia may be useful in order to enhance irradiation efficacy so to avoid delivering of too high dose of radiotherapy which increases acute and late sequelae. A multi-centric phase II study is warranted to give hyperthermia a level 3 evidence in prostate cancer treatment. A randomized phase III study to demonstrate efficacy of hyperthermia is not available because of the optimal results obtained by using radiotherapy combined with androgen suppression. To evaluate hyperthermia gain, LHT should be combined with radiotherapy alone in patients refusing androgen suppression or affected by hormone refractory prostate carcinoma (HRPC). Patients with HRPC have multiple possibilities of treatment improving performance status and median survival, as chemotherapy regimens, and new agents. All these treatments modalities need to be confirmed by phase III trials. Also hyperthermia may be considered among these promising approaches. (author)

  12. Chemotherapy alone versus chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for early stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Christine; Rehan, Fareed Ahmed; Skoetz, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combined modality treatment (CMT) consisting of chemotherapy followed by localised radiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). However, due to long term adverse effects such as secondary malignancies, the role of radiotherapy has been...... chemotherapy regimen plus radiotherapy. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials comparing chemotherapy alone with CMT in patients with early stage HL. Trials in which the chemotherapy differed between treatment arms were excluded. Trials with more than 20% of patients in advanced stage were also...... excluded. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Effect measures used were hazard ratios (HR) for tumour control and OS as well as relative risks for response rates. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed quality of trials. We contacted study authors to obtain missing information. Since none...

  13. External audit in radiotherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thwaites, D.I.; Western General Hospital, Edinburgh

    1996-01-01

    Quality audit forms an essential part of any comprehensive quality assurance programme. This is true in radiotherapy generally and in specific areas such as radiotherapy dosimetry. Quality audit can independently test the effectiveness of the quality system and in so doing can identify problem areas and minimize their possible consequences. Some general points concerning quality audit applied to radiotherapy are followed by specific discussion of its practical role in radiotherapy dosimetry, following its evolution from dosimetric intercomparison exercises to routine measurement-based on-going audit in the various developing audit networks both in the UK and internationally. Specific examples of methods and results are given from some of these, including the Scottish+ audit group. Quality audit in radiotherapy dosimetry is now well proven and participation by individual centres is strongly recommended. Similar audit approaches are to be encouraged in other areas of the radiotherapy process. (author)

  14. Radiotherapy of lymphogranulomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roettinger, E.M.; Sack, H.

    1976-01-01

    Increased knowledge about the course of lymphogranulomatosis and technological progress in radiotherapy during the past 20 years have brought permanent recovery for a major part of patients from this disease which had been infaust before. The supplementation of the local radiotherapy by the systematic effects of chemotherapy enables us at the same time to control the infiltrations and disseminations which cannot be manifested clinically especially in malignant forms and later stages. The good healing results obtained presuppose careful clinical examination of the patient and attentive care during the therapy with regard to the potential complications of radio- and chemotherapy. As potential complications which may occur according to the method used we may name damage to the kidneys, radiopneumonia or pulmonal fibrosis, myocarditis or pericarditis, oeosophagitis, enteritis, and hepatitis. Relatively seldom we see the permanent depression of the bone marrow, induction of leucaemia, and myxoedema. All these complications can occure more frequently in the case of additional chemotherapy. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the clinically confirmed benefits of combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy. They have been found in a small group of diseases that respond to chemotherapy alone. According to the author, only when a drug or drug combination has the ability to eradicate occult disease or substantially to reduce the size of objectively measurable disease is there likely to be an demonstrable benefit from its use in conjunction with radiotherapy. It is the author's belief that the immediate future lies in selecting drugs and patients in which a good chemotherapeutic response can be expected, avoiding drugs that seriously enhance radiation damage to normal tissues and keeping drug and radiation treatments far enough apart in time to minimize interactions

  16. Use of sequential endorectal US to predict the tumor response of preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Dou, Lizhou; Zhang, Yueming; Jin, Jing; Wang, Guiqi; Xiao, Qin; Li, Yexiong; Wang, Xin; Ren, Hua; Fang, Hui; Wang, Weihu; Wang, Shulian; Liu, Yueping; Song, Yongwen

    2017-03-01

    Accurate prediction of the response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) potentially assists in the individualized selection of treatment. Endorectal US (ERUS) is widely used for the pretreatment staging of rectal cancer, but its use for preoperatively predicting the effects of CRT is not well evaluated because of the inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis induced by CRT. This study assessed the value of sequential ERUS in predicting the efficacy of preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Forty-one patients with clinical stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled prospectively. Radiotherapy was delivered to the pelvis with concurrent chemotherapy of capecitabine and oxaliplatin. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 to 8 weeks later. EUS measurements of primary tumor maximum diameter were performed before (ERUS1), during (ERUS2), and 6 to 8 weeks after (ERUS3) CRT, and the ratios of these were calculated. Correlations between ERUS values, tumor regression grade (TRG), T down-staging rate, and pathologic complete response (pCR) rate were assessed, and survival was analyzed. There was no significant correlation between ERUS2/ERUS1 and TRG. The value of ERUS3/ERUS1 correlated with pCR rate and TRG but not T down-staging rate. An ERUS3 value of 6.3 mm and ERUS3/ERUS1 of 52% were used as the cut-off for predicting pCR, and patients were divided into good and poor prognosis groups. Although not statistically significant, 3-year recurrence and survival rates of the good prognosis group were better than those of the poor prognosis group. Sequential ERUS may predict therapeutic efficacy of preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. (Clinical trial registration number: NCT01582750.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Survival after radiotherapy in gastric cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Francesco; Minsky, Bruce D.; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Balducci, Mario; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Elisa; Dinapoli, Nicola; Nicolotti, Nicola; Valentini, Chiara; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess the impact of radiotherapy on both 3- and 5-year survival in patients with resectable gastric cancer. Methods: Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs) in which radiotherapy, (preoperative, postoperative and/or intraoperative), was compared with surgery alone or surgery plus chemotherapy in resectable gastric cancer were identified by searching web-based databases and supplemented by manual examination of reference lists. Meta-analysis was performed using Risk Ratios (RRs). Random or fixed effects models were used to combine data. The methodological quality was evaluated by Chalmers' score. Results: Radiotherapy had a significant impact on 5-year survival. Using an intent to treat (ITT) and a Per Protocol (PP) analysis, the overall 5-year RR was 1.26 (95% CI: 1.08-1.48; NNT = 17) and 1.31 (95% CI: 1.04-1.66; NNT = 13), respectively. Although the quality of the studies was variable, the data were consistent and no clear publication bias was found. Conclusion: This meta-analysis showed a statistically significant 5-year survival benefit with the addition of radiotherapy in patients with resectable gastric cancer. Radiotherapy remains a standard component in the treatment of resectable gastric cancer and new RCTs need to address the impact of new conformal radiotherapy technologies.

  18. Efficacy and toxicity of (chemo)radiotherapy for primary subglottic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, M.; Koike, I.; Odagiri, K.; Minagawa, Y.; Inoue, T. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Taguchi, T.; Nishimura, G.; Takahashi, M.; Komatsu, M.; Sano, D. [Yokohama City Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology

    2013-01-15

    Background and purpose: Primary subglottic cancer is a rare malignancy. We investigated the efficacy and toxicity of radiotherapy for subglottic cancer. Patients and methods: Nineteen patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the subglottis received radiotherapy, 14 of whom also underwent chemotherapy. Of the 19 patients, 15 received definitive radiotherapy to the gross tumors with total doses of 70-70.2 Gy in 35-39 fractions, and 4 underwent preoperative radiotherapy with total doses of 37.8-55.8 Gy in 21-31 fractions, followed by total laryngectomy. Results: Of the 19 patients, 5 developed local progression and 2 developed distant metastasis at the median follow-up period of 5 years. The 5-year local control and disease-free rates were 74 and 63%, respectively. Three patients died of tumor progression, and the 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 80 and 63%, respectively. Regarding acute toxicities, transient mucositis and dermatitis of grade 3 or lower were observed in all patients, but there were no late toxicities of grade 3 or higher. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the subglottis. The use of chemotherapy together with radiotherapy may enhance treatment efficacy and contribute to larynx preservation through good local control. (orig.)

  19. Conformal radiotherapy: a glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubray, B.; Giraud, P.; Beaudre, A.

    1999-01-01

    Most of the concepts and terms related to conformal radiotherapy were produced by English-speaking authors and eventually validated by international groups of experts, whose working language was also English. Therefore, a significant part of this literature is poorly accessible to the French-speaking radiation oncology community. The present paper gathers the 'official' definitions already published in French, along with propositions for the remaining terms which should be submitted to a more formal and representative validation process. (author)

  20. Imagination in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourrez, A.; Truc, G.; Santona, M.; Crehange, G.; Peignaux, K.; Martin, E.; Maingon, P.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a questionnaire given to the patients of a radiotherapy department and to the personnel of a centre of struggle against cancer, the study aimed at revealing imagination and representations about such an advanced medical technology, radio-physics and radioactivity. The patients and personnel were asked to answer the questionnaire with free words, images, or by expressing their own intimate or cultural visions of this environment. Implications on patients' anguish are foreseen. Short communication

  1. The pioneer of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilleri, J.P.; Coursaget, J.

    2005-09-01

    This work narrates the history of the birth of a new field, the radiology and its application to radiotherapy for these multiform pathologies that are the cancers. Two leading figures will favour this field: Marie Curie, physicist and twice awarded by nobel price, and Claudius Regaud, histologist and become a specialist of the action of ionizing radiations on tissues. They will create the Curie Institute, in relation with the Radium Institute and the support of the Pasteur Institute in 1920. (N.C.)

  2. Quality control in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batalla, A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors discuss the modalities and periodicities of internal quality control on radiotherapy installations. They indicate the different concerned systems and the aspects and items to be controlled (patient and personnel security, apparatus mechanical characteristics, beam quality, image quality, isodose and irradiation duration calculation, data transfer). They present the measurement instruments and tools used for the mechanical controls, dose measurement, beam homogeneity and symmetry, anatomic data acquisition systems, and dose distribution and control imagery calculation

  3. Radiotherapy of endocrine orbitopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weischedel, U.; Wieland, C.

    1985-01-01

    After a review of the history and a discussion of recent theories about pathogenesis of endocrine ophthalmopathy the authros give a report on their radiotherapeutical treatment results with cobalt-60-γ-rays in 50 patients. Amelioration was achieved in 50% of the cases, in the other 50% no progression was seen. Radiotherapy is of antiphlogistic and functional effectivity and should be integrated in the treatment regime in early stages. (orig.) [de

  4. Surveillance after prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supiot, S.; Rio, E.; Clement-Colmou, K.; Bouchot, O.; Rigaud, J.

    2011-01-01

    Follow-up after prostate cancer radiotherapy aims at detecting local or metastatic relapse, as well as long-term toxicity, requiring adapted treatments. Several scientific societies have published guidelines including clinical, biological and imaging recommendations. More data suggest a role for aggressive salvage therapy in case of local failure following radiotherapy. An adequate follow-up is required for the sake of patients' safety, i.e. to a posteriori validate dose constraints and radiation technique in each radiotherapy department. (authors)

  5. Radiotherapy of vertebral hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Kohichi; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atushi; Sido, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tamakawa, Mituharu; Akiba, Hidenari; Morita, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1996, 14 patients (11 females, 3 males) with vertebral hemangioma received treatment with radiotherapy. Thirteen patients had a history of back pain or lumbago and 2 patients had neurological symptoms such as sensory impairment or paraplegia. The standard dose administered was 36 Gy in 18 fractions (five treatments per week). In the 13 patients with pain, this was completely or partially relieved. The condition of a man with hypesthesia of the legs deteriorated and a woman with paraplegia who was treated with decompressive laminectomy followed by radiotherapy recovered completely after irradiation. CT scan before irradiation showed thickened trabeculae as small punctate areas of sclerosis in all patients. At MR imaging before irradiation, T2-weighted MR images showed areas of high intensity in all patients and MR images demonstrated lesion enhancement. However, none of the patients who were treated successfully with radiation demonstrated any changes of the affected vertebra in the conventional radiographic films, CT scan or MR imaging, even 5 years after irradiation. Radiological imaging is indispensable for the diagnosis of vertebral hemangiomas but does not appear to be useful for evaluating the effects of radiotherapy. (orig.)

  6. Radiotherapy in Cancer Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Wahab, M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy has been used for curative or palliative treatment of cancer, either alone or increasingly as part of a multimodality approach in conjunction with chemotherapy, immunotherapy or surgery. Radiation must be delivered in the safest and most effective way. The use of radiologic and nuclear medicine diagnostic techniques, e.g., the use of CT (Computerized Tomography) and PET/CT allow better detection and staging of diseases by displaying both morphological and functional abnormalities within the affected organs and are essential in the process of radiotherapy planning. Technical advances in radiotherapy have allowed better targeting of tumors, sparing of normal tissue and, in the case of radiosurgery, a decrease in the number of treatments. The IAEA Programme in Human Health aims to enhance the capabilities in Member States to address needs related to the treatment of diseases, including cancer, through the application of nuclear techniques. The Programme supports quality assurance in radiation medicine; DIRAC, the only radiation oncology-specific resource database world-wide; significant, innovative education and training programmes through telemedicine and e-learning accessible via the human health campus website. Technical expertise for country– and region–specific technical cooperation radiation-medicine projects is provided to establish or enhance radiation medicine worldwide. (author)

  7. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Young; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seok Ah; Lee, Keun Seok; Yun, Tak; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Choi, Hyo Seong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Chang, Hee Jin; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid- to lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of an initial dose of cetuximab of 400 mg/m 2 1 week before radiotherapy, and then cetuximab 250 mg/m 2 /week, irinotecan 40 mg/m 2 /week for 5 consecutive weeks and capecitabine 1,650 mg/m 2 /day for 5 days a week (weekdays only) from the first day during radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 ± 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were evaluated as study endpoints, and an additional KRAS mutation analysis was performed. Results: In total, 39 patients completed their planned preoperative chemoradiation and underwent R0 resection. The pathologic complete response rate was 23.1% (9/39), and 3 patients (7.7%) showed near total regression of tumor. The 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 80.0% and 94.7%, respectively. Grade 3/4 toxicities included leukopenia (4, 10.3%), neutropenia (2, 5.1%), anemia (1, 2.6%), diarrhea (2, 5.1%), fatigue (1, 2.6%), skin rash (1, 2.6%), and ileus (1, 2.6%). KRAS mutations were found in 5 (13.2%) of 38 patients who had available tissue for testing. Clinical outcomes were not significantly correlated with KRAS mutation status. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine was active and well tolerated. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor for pathologic response in this study.

  8. Dosimetric Feasibility of Hypofractionated Proton Radiotherapy for Neoadjuvant Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Adams, Judith C; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Alexander, Brian M.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos; Ryan, David P.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor and normal tissue dosimetry of a 5 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) x 5 fraction proton radiotherapy schedule, before initiating a clinical trial of neoadjuvant, short-course proton radiotherapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: The first 9 pancreatic cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (1.8 Gy x 28) at the Massachusetts General Hospital had treatment plans generated using a 5 CGE x 5 fraction proton regimen. To facilitate dosimetric comparisons, clinical target volumes and normal tissue volumes were held constant. Plans were optimized for target volume coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Hypofractionated proton and conventionally fractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans both provided acceptable target volume coverage and dose homogeneity. Improved dose conformality provided by the hypofractionated proton regimen resulted in significant sparing of kidneys, liver, and small bowel, evidenced by significant reductions in the mean doses, expressed as percentage prescribed dose, to these structures. Kidney and liver sparing was most evident in low-dose regions (≤20% prescribed dose for both kidneys and ≤60% prescribed dose for liver). Improvements in small-bowel dosimetry were observed in high- and low-dose regions. Mean stomach and duodenum doses, expressed as percentage prescribed dose, were similar for the two techniques. Conclusions: A proton radiotherapy schedule consisting of 5 fractions of 5 CGE as part of neoadjuvant therapy for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas seems dosimetrically feasible, providing excellent target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, and normal tissue sparing. Hypofractionated proton radiotherapy in this setting merits Phase I clinical trial investigation

  9. Prognostic value of pathological response to chemo radiotherapy of locally advanced low rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannura C, Guillermo; Vargas N, Claudio; Barrera E, Alejandro; Melo L, Carlos; Illanes F, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Background: Preoperative chemo radiotherapy improves the prognosis of locally advanced low rectal cancer and induces a pathological response in the tumor, which may have prognostic value. Aim: To assess the results of rectal cancer treatment according to the degree of pathological response of the tumor after chemo radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: All patients with a locally advanced rectal cancer located within 11 cm of the rectal margin, subjected to preoperative chemo radiotherapy followed by surgical treatment in a period of 13 years, were included. Pathological response was classified as complete, intermediate and poor. The tumor was staged according to TNM 2002 classification. Survival was analyzed with Kaplan Meier curves and Cox regression. Results: Patients were followed for a mean of 50 months (range 18-156). Exclusive and global local relapse was observed in 3 and 9.6% of patients, respectively. Pathological response was complete in 13 patients (none died), intermediate in 23 (three died) and poor in 68 (22 died). Global five years survival was 74%. There was a concordance of 0.64 between survival and pathological response. The concordance between survival and TNM classification was 0.69. Conclusions: The pathological response of the tumor to chemo radiotherapy has a good concordance with prognosis, although it is not superior to the final pathological status

  10. Pre-operative haematological investigations in paediatric orofacial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pre-operative haematological investigations in paediatric orofacial cleft repair: Any relevance to management outcome? ... Aim and Objectives: To determine the value of routine pre-operative haematologic investigations in children undergoing orofacial cleft repair. Background: Although routine pre-operative laboratory ...

  11. Preoperative modifiable risk factors in colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Rooijen, Stefanus; Carli, Francesco; Dalton, Susanne O

    2017-01-01

    in higher mortality rates and greater hospital costs. The number and severity of complications is closely related to patients' preoperative performance status. The aim of this study was to identify the most important preoperative modifiable risk factors that could be part of a multimodal prehabilitation...... program. METHODS: Prospectively collected data of a consecutive series of Dutch CRC patients undergoing colorectal surgery were analyzed. Modifiable risk factors were correlated to the Comprehensive Complication Index (CCI) and compared within two groups: none or mild complications (CCI ... complications (CCI ≥20). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was done to explore the combined effect of individual risk factors. RESULTS: In this 139 patient cohort, smoking, malnutrition, alcohol consumption, neoadjuvant therapy, higher age, and male sex, were seen more frequently in the severe...

  12. Association of preoperative radiation effect with tumor angiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintani, Satoru; Kiyota, Akihisa; Mihara, Mariko; Nakahara, Yuuji; Terakado, Nagaaki; Ueyama, Yoshiya; Matsumura, Tomohiro

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between tumor angiogenesis and the radiation-induced response, evaluated based on pathological changes, in oral squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with preoperative radiation therapy. Forty-one cases of squamous cell carcinoma treated with preoperative radiation therapy were investigated. Tumor angiogenesis was assessed by scoring the intratumor microvessel density (IMVD). Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was also evaluated before and after preoperative radiotherapy. There was no correlation between IMVD in the specimens before therapy and the pathological response to radiation therapy. However, radiation therapy decreased IMVD in the specimens after therapy. A significant association was observed between VEGF expression and resistance to radiation therapy: only 4 of the 21 patients whose tumors exhibited a high level (2+ or 3+) of VEGF staining experienced a major (3+ or 4+) pathological response to radiation therapy. Furthermore, an increasing level of VEGF expression after radiation therapy was observed in non-effective (0 to 2+) response cases. These results suggest that VEGF expression and the induction of this protein are related to radiosensitivity and could be used to predict the effects of preoperative radiation therapy on oral squamous cell carcinoma. (author)

  13. Nodal tumor response according to the count of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations during preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Jae Sung; Oh, Young Tae; Noh, O Kyu; Chun, Mi Son; Park, Jun Eun; Cho, Sung Ran [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the relationship between the circulating lymphocyte subpopulation counts during preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and tumor response in locally advanced rectal cancer. From August 2015 to June 2016, 10 patients treated with preoperative CRT followed by surgery were enrolled. Patients received conventional fractionated radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) with fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Surgical resection was performed at 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of preoperative CRT. The absolute blood lymphocyte subpopulation was obtained prior to and after 4 weeks of CRT. We analyzed the association between a tumor response and change in the lymphocyte subpopulation during CRT. Among 10 patients, 2 (20%) had evidence of pathologic complete response. In 8 patients with clinically node positive, 4 (50%) had nodal tumor response. All lymphocyte subpopulation counts at 4 weeks after CRT were significantly lower than those observed during pretreatment (p < 0.01). A high decrease in natural killer (NK) cell, count during CRT (baseline cell count - cell count at 4 weeks) was associated with node down staging (p = 0.034). Our results suggest that the change of lymphocyte subset to preoperative CRT may be a predictive factor for tumor response in rectal cancer.

  14. Phase II study of preoperative radiation plus concurrent daily tegafur-uracil (UFT) with leucovorin for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellier, Patrice; Burtin, Pascal; Campion, Loïc; Boisdron-Celle, Michèle; Morel, Alain; Berger, Virginie; Gamelin, Erick; Leduc, Bernard; Martin, Laurent; Vié, Brigitte; Chevelle, Christian; Vendrely, Véronique; Salemkour, Augustin; Carrie, Christian; Calais, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Considerable variation in intravenous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) metabolism can occur due to the wide range of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) enzyme activity, which can affect both tolerability and efficacy. The oral fluoropyrimidine tegafur-uracil (UFT) is an effective, well-tolerated and convenient alternative to intravenous 5-FU. We undertook this study in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of UFT with leucovorin (LV) and preoperative radiotherapy and to evaluate the utility and limitations of multicenter staging using pre- and post-chemoradiotherapy ultrasound. We also performed a validated pretherapy assessment of DPD activity and assessed its potential influence on the tolerability of UFT treatment. This phase II study assessed preoperative UFT with LV and radiotherapy in 85 patients with locally advanced T3 rectal cancer. Patients with potentially resectable tumors received UFT (300 mg/m/ 2 /day), LV (75 mg/day), and pelvic radiotherapy (1.8 Gy/day, 45 Gy total) 5 days/week for 5 weeks then surgery 4-6 weeks later. The primary endpoints included tumor downstaging and the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Most adverse events were mild to moderate in nature. Preoperative grade 3/4 adverse events included diarrhea (n = 18, 21%) and nausea/vomiting (n = 5, 6%). Two patients heterozygous for dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene (DPYD) experienced early grade 4 neutropenia (variant IVS14+1G > A) and diarrhea (variant 2846A > T). Pretreatment ultrasound TNM staging was compared with postchemoradiotherapy pathology TN staging and a significant shift towards earlier TNM stages was observed (p < 0.001). The overall downstaging rate was 42% for primary tumors and 44% for lymph nodes. The pCR rate was 8%. The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound for staging was poor. Anal sphincter function was preserved in 55 patients (65%). Overall and recurrence-free survival at 3 years was 86.1% and 66

  15. Development of antibiotic regimens using graph based evolutionary algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corns, Steven M; Ashlock, Daniel A; Bryden, Kenneth M

    2013-12-01

    This paper examines the use of evolutionary algorithms in the development of antibiotic regimens given to production animals. A model is constructed that combines the lifespan of the animal and the bacteria living in the animal's gastro-intestinal tract from the early finishing stage until the animal reaches market weight. This model is used as the fitness evaluation for a set of graph based evolutionary algorithms to assess the impact of diversity control on the evolving antibiotic regimens. The graph based evolutionary algorithms have two objectives: to find an antibiotic treatment regimen that maintains the weight gain and health benefits of antibiotic use and to reduce the risk of spreading antibiotic resistant bacteria. This study examines different regimens of tylosin phosphate use on bacteria populations divided into Gram positive and Gram negative types, with a focus on Campylobacter spp. Treatment regimens were found that provided decreased antibiotic resistance relative to conventional methods while providing nearly the same benefits as conventional antibiotic regimes. By using a graph to control the information flow in the evolutionary algorithm, a variety of solutions along the Pareto front can be found automatically for this and other multi-objective problems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevention of heterotopic ossification about the hip: final results of two randomized trials in 410 patients using either preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich; Keilholz, Ludwig; Martus, Peter; Goldmann, Axel; Woelfel, Rainer; Henning, Friedrich; Sauer, Rolf

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Experimental and clinical data support effectiveness of perioperative radiotherapy to prevent heterotopic ossification after hip surgery or trauma. Since 1987, two prospectively randomized trials were performed in patients with high-risk factors to develop heterotopic ossification: the first (HOP 1) to assess the prophylactic efficacy of postoperative low vs. medium dose radiotherapy, and the second (HOP 2) to assess the prophylactic efficacy of pre vs. postoperative radiotherapy. Methods and Material: 410 patients with high risk to develop heterotopic ossifications about the hip following hip surgery were recruited. Between June 1987 and June 1992, 249 patients were randomized in HOP 1 to postoperative 'low dose' (5 x 2 Gy; total: 10 Gy) or 'medium dose' (5 x 3.5 Gy; total: 17.5 Gy) radiotherapy. Between July 1992 and December 1995, 161 patients were randomized in HOP 2 to either 1 x 7 Gy preoperatively (≤4 h before surgery) or 5 x 3.5 Gy (total: 17.5 Gy) postoperatively (≤96 h after surgery). With exception of age and type of implant (cemented vs. uncemented prosthesis) all confounding patient variables (gender, prior surgery) and predisposing risk factors were similarly distributed between both trials and treatment arms. Portals encompassed the peri acetabular and intertrochanteric soft tissues. Radiographs were obtained prior and immediately after surgery and at least 6 months after surgery to assess the extent of ectopic bone formation about the hip. Modified Brooker grading was used to score the extent of heterotopic ossification. Harris scoring was applied to evaluate the functional hip status. If the scores decreased from immediate post or preoperative status, respectively, to the last follow-up, radiological or functional failures were assumed. Results: Effective prophylaxis was achieved in 227 (91%) hips of HOP 1 and in 142 (88%) of HOP 2. In HOP 1, 15 (11%) radiological failures were observed in the low-dose group compared to 7 (6%) in the

  17. Evaluation of preoperative embolization of meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Tae; Suh, Dae Chul; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Lee, Myung Jun; Ji, Eun Kyung; Shin, Byung Suck; Kim, Chang Jin; Kim, Jong Uk; Whang, C. Jin

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative embolization of intrancranial meningioma.Materials and Methods : We retrospectively reviewed intrancranial meningioma patients (n=37) who underwent preoperative embolization. They were categorized into two groups, skull base lesions (n=22) and non-skull base lesions (n=15), according to tumor location. In addition, embolization results were classified by comparison between pre- and post-embolization angiography as complete (residual tumor staining 10 or 30%). In each group, estimated blood loss (EBL) was estimated by amount of intraoperative transfusion with pre- and post-operative hemoglobin level. Tumor resectability was evaluated by follow-up computed tomography. New symptoms occurring within 24 hours of embolization were considered to be those associated with embolization ; symptoms improved by conservative treatment were regarded as mild, while those resulting in new deficits were considered severe. Results : In the group with skull base lesions (n=22), complete embolization with the criteria of residual tumor staining of less than 30% was performed in 14 patients(EBL=1770ml;complete surgical removal in nine patients and incomplete removal four). Incomplete embolization was performed in eight patients (EBL=3210ml; complete and incomplete removal each in four patients). In the group with non-skull base lesions, complete embolization with the criteria of residual tumor staining of less than 10% was performed in five patients (EBL=970ml) and incomplete embolization in ten (EBL=2260ml). Complete tumor removal was possible in this group regardless of the completeness of preoperative tumor embolization. In a case of intraventricular meningioma (3%), intratumoral hemorrhage occurred on the day following embolization. Other mild post-embolization complications occurred in three cases (8%). Conclusion : Preoperative embolization can be an effective and safe procedure for meningioma and may reduce intraoperative blood

  18. Religiousness and preoperative anxiety: a correlational study

    OpenAIRE

    Aghamohammadi Kalkhoran, Masoomeh; Karimollahi, Mansoureh

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Major life changes are among factors that cause anxiety, and one of these changes is surgery. Emotional reactions to surgery have specific effects on the intensity and velocity as well as the process of physical disease. In addition, they can cause delay in patients recovery. This study is aimed at determining the relationship between religious beliefs and preoperative anxiety. Methods This survey is a correlational study to assess the relationship between religious belief...

  19. Implications of preoperative hypoalbuminemia in colorectal surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Truong, A; Hanna, MH; Moghadamyeghaneh, Z; Stamos, MJ

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin has traditionally been used as a quantitative measure of a patient’s nutritional status because of its availability and low cost. While malnutrition has a clear definition within both the American and European Societies for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition clinical guidelines, individual surgeons often determine nutritional status anecdotally. Preoperative albumin level has been shown to be the best predictor of mortality after colorectal cancer surgery. Specifically in colorect...

  20. Choanal stenosis: a rare complication of radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma; Stenose choanale post-radique: une complication rare de la radiotherapie des carcinomes nasopharynges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfils, P.; Preobrajenski, N. de [Universite Rene-Descartes, Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service d' ORL et de Chirurgie Cervicofaciale, Faculte de Medecine Paris-Descartes, 75 - Paris (France); Florent, A. [Cabinet d' ORL, 75 - Paris (France); Bensimon, J.L. [Cabinet de radiologie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2007-05-15

    Choanal stenosis is usually a congenital anomaly in children. Acquired choanal stenosis after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a very rare pathology; only two publications report seven cases in the literature. We describe the clinical history, preoperative evaluation, surgical treatment and outcome of a case of acquired choanal stenosis after radiotherapy. The patient, a 56-year-old woman, presented with a history of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (T2- NO-MO) one year before that had been successful treated with radiotherapy (68 Gy). At the end of radiotherapy, she complained of complete nasal obstruction, anosmia and hearing loss due to a bilateral serous otitis media. Bilateral complete choanal stenosis was confirmed by endoscopy and CT scan. Functional endoscopic surgery was performed, and nasal stents were left in place for 3 weeks. One year after, the patient have good airflow, and a patent nasopharynx without choanal stenosis. In conclusion, choanal stenosis is an unusual complication of radiotherapy that can be successfully treated with trans-nasal endoscopic resection. (authors)

  1. The effects of sequential versus concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy on survival and toxicity in patients with newly diagnosed high-grade astrocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinberg, Lawrence; Grossman, Stuart A.; Piantadosi, Steven; Zeltzman, Michel; Wharam, Moody

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of sequential versus concurrent administration of cranial radiotherapy and cisplatin/carmustine (BCNU) chemotherapy on survival and toxicity in newly diagnosed high-grade astrocytomas. Methods and Materials: From 1988 to 1996, 101 patients were treated on 2 therapeutic protocols for malignant glioma that used the identical chemotherapy regimen but differed in the timing of cranial radiotherapy. The eligibility criteria for the 2 protocols were identical. In the first protocol (1988-1991, 52 patients), cisplatin 120 mg/BCNU 120 mg i.v. over 72 h, was given for 3 monthly cycles prior to cranial radiotherapy. After a response rate of 42%, with a median survival of 13 months was achieved with this sequential regimen, a successor protocol (1992-1996, 49 patients) was developed in which cranial radiotherapy began concurrently with the start of the identical chemotherapy regimen. Chemotherapy was delayed but not discontinued if prolonged grade III/IV hematologic toxicity was experienced, but protocol therapy was discontinued if disease progression or thromboembolic events occurred. Survival outcome and hematologic toxicity were compared for the patients treated on these protocols. Results: Seventy-seven percent of sequentially-treated patients and 68% of concurrently-treated patients completed all planned therapy. Kaplan-Meier survival was similar to concurrent or sequential administration of chemotherapy and radiotherapy (median 12.8 months vs. 13.8 months, respectively). Hematologic toxicity was significantly less in sequentially- versus concurrently-treated patients, with median nadir per cycle (2.9 vs. 1.8 x 10 3 /mm 3 ) (p < 0.001), and incidence of grade 3/4 leukopenia 40% versus 77% (p = 0.002). There was also an increase in platelet transfusion requirements in concurrently-treated patients, but no significant worsening of anemia. We postulate that the worsened leukopenia results from the effects of concurrent radiotherapy on

  2. Patient repositioning in prostate conformal radiotherapy by image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betrouni, Nacim

    2004-01-01

    This research thesis first proposes an overview of imaging modalities which are generally used in radiotherapy, and briefly presents operation principles for ultrasound scans, scanners and MRI. The issue of patient repositioning in radiotherapy is then introduced, and already proposed solutions are presented. In the next part, the author addresses space location and ultrasound-based location, with a brief overview of methods used to track the displacements of a mobile object, in this case an ultrasound probe, and calibration. Then, after a presentation of the adopted method, and a discussion of published works related to contour extraction and to filtering and noise reduction methods in ultrasound imagery, the author addresses the issue of prostate segmentation based on ultrasound images. The next part deals with image registration with an overview of available methods and tools. A method of registration of pre-operation images obtained by MRI or scanner, and of intra-operation ultrasound images is proposed for a real-time registration. This method is aimed at supporting patient repositioning during prostate conformal radiotherapy

  3. Survival and prognostic factors after moderately hypofractionated palliative thoracic radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oorschot, B. van; Assenbrunner, B.; Beckmann, G.; Flentje, M.; Schuler, M.

    2014-01-01

    Survival and prognostic variables in patients with advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) requiring thoracic palliative radiotherapy using a moderately hypofractionated regime (13-15 x 3 Gy) were evaluated. From March 2006 to April 2012, 120 patients with a physician estimated prognosis of 6-12 months were treated with this regime using CT-based 3D conformal radiotherapy. We collected data on patient characteristics, comorbidities, toxicity, and treatment parameters. Radiotherapy was completed as prescribed in 114 patients (95.0 %, premature termination 5.0 %). Acute grade 3 toxicity was seen in 6.4 % of patients. The median survival of all patients was 5.8 months. Nonmetastatic patients survived significantly longer than patients with metastatic disease (median 11.7 months vs 4.7 months, p = 0.0001) and 18.6 % of nonmetastatic patients survived longer than 2 years. In 12.7 % radiotherapy started less than 30 days before death and 14.2 % of patients received radiotherapy within 14 days before death. In the multivariate analysis, good general condition, nonmetastatic disease, and a stable or improved general condition at the end of radiotherapy were significant. The treatment parameters, age, and comorbidities were not statistically significant. Our data confirm considerable effectiveness of 13 x 3 Gy with conformal radiotherapy for patients with locally confined NSCLC not fit for radical treatment and raise doubt for this regimen in metastatic patients and ECOG ≥ 2 when burden, acute toxicity, and resources are considered. (orig.) [de

  4. Characteristics of HIV antiretroviral regimen and treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia da Silveira

    Full Text Available The relationship between characteristics of HIV antiretroviral regimens and treatment adherence was studied in adolescent and adult patients who underwent antiretroviral therapy from January 1998 to September 2000, at the Service for Specialized Assistance in Pelotas. The patients were interviewed on two occasions, and the use of antiretrovirals during the previous 48 hours was investigated by a self-report. Adherence was defined as use of 95% or more of the prescribed medication. Social-demographic variables were collected through direct questionnaires. The antiretroviral regimen and clinical data were copied from the patients' records. Associations between the independent variables and adherence were analyzed by means of logistic regression. The multivariate analysis included characteristics of the antiretroviral regimens, social-demographic variables, as well as perception of negative effects, negative physiological states, and adverse effects of the treatment. Among the 224 selected patients, 194 participated in our study. Their ages varied from 17 to 67 years; most patients were men, with few years of schooling and a low family income. Only 49% adhered to the treatment. Adherence to treatment regimens was reduced when more daily doses were indicated: three to four doses (odds ratio of adherence to treatment (OR=0.47, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.22-1.01 and five to six (OR=0.24, 95% CI 0.09-0.62; two or more doses taken in a fasting state (OR=0.59, 95% CI 0.11-0.68, and for patients who reported adverse effects to the treatment (OR=0.39, 95% CI 0.19-0.77. Most of the regimens with more than two daily doses of medication included at least one dose apart from mealtimes. The results suggest that, if possible, regimens with a reduced number of doses should be chosen, with no compulsory fasting, and with few adverse effects. Strategies to minimize these effects should be discussed with the patients.

  5. Demand for radiotherapy in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A; Borrás, J M; López-Torrecilla, J; Algara, M; Palacios-Eito, A; Gómez-Caamaño, A; Olay, L; Lara, P C

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the demand for radiotherapy in Spain based on existing evidence to estimate the human resources and equipment needed so that every person in Spain has access to high-quality radiotherapy when they need it. We used data from the European Cancer Observatory on the estimated incidence of cancer in Spain in 2012, along with the evidence-based indications for radiotherapy developed by the Australian CCORE project, to obtain an optimal radiotherapy utilisation proportion (OUP) for each tumour. About 50.5 % of new cancers in Spain require radiotherapy at least once over the course of the disease. Additional demand for these services comes from reradiation therapy and non-melanoma skin cancer. Approximately, 25-30 % of cancer patients with an indication for radiotherapy do not receive it due to factors that include access, patient preference, familiarity with the treatment among physicians, and especially resource shortages, all of which contribute to its underutilisation. Radiotherapy is underused in Spain. The increasing incidence of cancer expected over the next decade and the greater frequency of reradiations necessitate the incorporation of radiotherapy demand into need-based calculations for cancer services planning.

  6. Zagreb regimen, an abbreviated intramuscular schedule for rabies vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiangping; Yao, Linong; Sun, Jimin; Gong, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    The Zagreb regimen, an abbreviated intramuscular schedule for rabies vaccination, was developed by I. Vodopija and colleagues of the Zagreb Institute of Public Health in Croatia in the 1980s. It was recommended by WHO as one of the intramuscular (IM) schedules for rabies vaccination in 2010. We reviewed the literature on the immunogenicity, safety, economic burden, and compliance of the Zagreb 2-1-1 regimen. Compared to Essen, another IM schedule recommended by WHO, Zagreb has higher compliance, lower medical cost, and better immunogenicity at an early stage. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Eruptive furunculosis following the soak and smear regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martires, Kathryn; Sukhdeo, Kumar; Meinhardt, Eric

    2015-02-18

    The 'soak and smear' regimen is a highly effective method for localised topical therapy employed by dermatologists for widespread inflammatory skin conditions. The regimen involves application of topical medication under occlusion after soaking in water. Complications from this treatment method are rare. We present a case of multiple, generalised methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-positive furuncles arising in a patient as an unexpected consequence of therapy. The case highlights an unanticipated risk of a commonly employed treatment amid an epidemic of MRSA in the community. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Radiotherapy and receptor of epidermal growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deberne, M.

    2009-01-01

    chemoradiotherapy association is for the moment kept to the clinical research. Several tests are running in France: the cetuxicol test concerning the locally evolved uterine cervix carcinomas with pelvis irradiation associated to cisplatin, the anal duct cancers in chemoradiotherapy association, rectum cancers in preoperative situation or O.R.L. carcinomas in chemoradiotherapy association from the oncology group of head and neck radiotherapy. Among the expected data of these tests, besides the elements of tumor response, the data on sane tissues toxicity will be key elements. (N.C.)

  9. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  10. Radiotherapy and pulmonary fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sone, S; Miyata, Y; Tachiiri, H [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-04-01

    Clinical findings of radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis were outlined, and the relationship between occurence of these disorders and radiotherapy, clinical findings and X-ray picture were studied. Standard radiation dose as cell lethal response of carcinoma of the lung were 4,500 to 5,500 rad in 4 to 5.5 weeks in undifferentiated carcinoma, 6,000 to 7,000 rad in 6 to 7 weeks in squamous cell carcinoma, 7,000 to 9,000 rad in 7 to 9 weeks in adenocarcinoma, 4,500 to 5,000 rad in 4 to 5 weeks in the large sized cancer of the esophagus, 6,500 to 7,000 rad in 5 to 7 weeks in the small sized cancer of the esophagus, and irradiation of these amount of dose caused hazards in pulmonary function. Pathological and clinical findings of pulmonary hazards within 6 month period after irradiation, factors causing them and changes in X-ray pictures before and after irradiation were observed and discussed in clinical cases: the case of breast cancer in which 3,000 R/6 times/18 days of 5.5 MeV Liniac electron was irradiated to the chest wall, and the case of pulmonary cancer in which 5,000 rad/25 times/34 days of 6 MeV Liniac X-ray was irradiated in opposite 2 ports radiation beam treatment. The former revealed alveolar lesion and interlobular pleuritis at 4 month later, and remarkable lesion of pulmonary fibrosis was followed at 9 month after radiotherapy. The later developed radiation pneumonitis 1 month after radiotherapy, of which lesion extended to the upper part by 3 months later, and cancer recurred 6.5 month later.

  11. Radiotherapy for eyelid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saika, Kazumi

    2001-01-01

    Some studies on radiotherapy for eyelid cancer have been reported, but the optimal radiation doses for different histological types and tumor sizes have not been detailed. So I studied the optimal radiation doses in radiotherapy for eyelid cancer. The patients were fourteen and histological diagnoses were made on the basis of biopsies or surgery before radiotherapy. Surgical cut margins were positive in 10 cases. In 5 of these cases, tumors were visible. There were 9 sebaceous adenocarcinomas (SAC), 4 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and 1 basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In 13 of 14 cases, radiation was applied to eyelids in which tumor-surgical cut margin distances were 3 mm or less. The eyeballs were covered with lead or tungsten shields, and the eyelids were irradiated with a total dose of 50 to 66.6 Gy. In 5 cases, radiation was applied prophylactically for ipsilateral pre-auricle lymph node areas. 11 of 13 cases were locally controlled. I gave greater radiation doses for SAC than for SCC or BCC. I also gave greater doses for in visible tumors than for invisible ones. In the acute phase dermatitis, inflammation of the cornea, conjunctivitis, etc. occurred but they were mild. Later reactions were decreased cilia, dry eye, inflammation of cornea, conjunctivitis, discomfort of the scar, etc. Cataracts were also seen, but they were of senile origen. Because 81.8% of the tumors were controlled, this radiation method was useful with salvage therapies to select an optimal radiation dose according to the differences among histological types and tumor sizes. 60% of visible tumors were also controlled so I think that radical therapy using radiation alone is possible. (author)

  12. [Clinical efficacy of alternating chemo-radiotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xi; Yang, Yucheng

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effective of alternating Chemo-radiotherapy for locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. Retrospective analysis 106 cases of patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma between November 2005 and March 2007. All patients received cisplatin-based chemotherapy but 15 patients received radiotherapy(RT) alone. Inducing chemotherapy (IC) + RT + adju-vant chemotherapy (AC) regimen in 36 patients, IC+RT regimen was delivered in 25 patients and AC + RT regimen in 30 patients. 61 patients received 1 to 2 cycles of inducing chemotherapy and 66 patients received 3 to 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy after radiotherapy. Chemotherapy started on the first day after the end of the induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy begun after radiotherapy for a week. All patients were treated by radiotherapy using 60 Co r-ray, the nasophyarynx primary site was given a total does of 68 -74 Gy. The lymph nodes of the neck was given 60 to 70 Gy. The prophylactic irradiation does of the neck was 48-50 Gy. RESCULT: The median follow up time was 51 months. A total of 58 patients died, the overall survival rate was 45% in whole groups. The 5-year overall survival rates were 33%, 63%, 60% and 50% in RT, IC + RT + AC, IC + RT and RT+AC group, respectively. The 5-year disease-free survival rates were 13%, 56%, 48% and 40% in RT, IC + RT + AC, IC + RT and RT + AC group, respectively. The 5-year relapse-free survival rates were 13%, 53%, 48% and 50% in RT, IC + RT + AC, IC + RT and RT + AC group, respectively. The 5-year metastasis-free survival rates were 6%, 50%, 44% and 47% in RT, IC + RT + AC, IC+ RT and RT + AC group, respectively. There was significant difference in all groups (P 0.05). IC + RT + AC group had heavier acute toxicity effects than other groups, but it did not affect the treatment process, all patients could be tolerated. This retrospective study has demonstrated that alternating Chemo-radiotherapy and early

  13. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for stage III, IV oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Shigetomi, Toshio [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Hayashi, Yasushi [Nagoya Second Red Cross Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-03-01

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy) and chemotherapy using CBDCA (total dose: 460 mg/m{sup 2}) were performed daily, followed by surgery. Catheter-insertion of 34 patients was done successfully. Four catheter insertions were not done successfully because of the anomaly of the artery such as common trunk of the lingual artery and the facial artery. The clinical effects were CR in 9 patients (26.5%) and PR in 25 (73.5%), and histopathological effects after surgery were grade III, IV in 10 (29.4%), grade IIb in 23 (67.6%), and grade IIa in 2 (5.8%). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 67.8%. This superselective intra arterial infusion method could be the technique of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  14. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for stage III, IV oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Shigetomi, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy) and chemotherapy using CBDCA (total dose: 460 mg/m 2 ) were performed daily, followed by surgery. Catheter-insertion of 34 patients was done successfully. Four catheter insertions were not done successfully because of the anomaly of the artery such as common trunk of the lingual artery and the facial artery. The clinical effects were CR in 9 patients (26.5%) and PR in 25 (73.5%), and histopathological effects after surgery were grade III, IV in 10 (29.4%), grade IIb in 23 (67.6%), and grade IIa in 2 (5.8%). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 67.8%. This superselective intra arterial infusion method could be the technique of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  15. PET/CT and histopathologic response to preoperative chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, C.; Loft, A.; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using positron emission tomography/computer tomography to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. METHODS: The study included 30 patients with locally...... is not able to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer. There is an obvious need for other complementary methods especially with respect to the low sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computer tomography Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1...... advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with a combination of radiotherapy and concurrent Uftoral (uracil, tegafur) and leucovorine. All patients were evaluated by positron emission tomography/computer tomography scan seven weeks after end of chemoradiation, and the results were compared to histopathologic...

  16. PET/CT and Histopathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Charlotte; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne K

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using positron emission tomography/computer tomography to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiation. METHODS: The study included 30 patients with locally...... of chemoradiation is not able to predict the histopathologic response in locally advanced rectal cancer. There is an obvious need for other complementary methods especially with respect to the low sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computer tomography....... advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with a combination of radiotherapy and concurrent Uftoral(R) (uracil, tegafur) and leucovorine. All patients were evaluated by positron emission tomography/computer tomography scan seven weeks after end of chemoradiation, and the results were compared...

  17. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, W.

    1982-01-01

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent sudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. synringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine. (MG) [de

  18. Large field radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanasek, J.; Chvojka, Z.; Zouhar, M.

    1984-01-01

    Calculations may prove that irradiation procedures, commonly used in radiotherapy and represented by large-capacity irradiation techniques, do not exceed certain limits of integral doses with favourable radiobiological action on the organism. On the other hand integral doses in supralethal whole-body irradiation, used in the therapy of acute leukemia, represent radiobiological values which without extreme and exceptional further interventions and teamwork are not compatible with life, and the radiotherapeutist cannot use such high doses without the backing of a large team. (author)

  19. Microplanar beams for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Company, F.Z.; Allen, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in synchrotron generated X-ray beams with high fluence rate permit the investigation of the application of an array of closely spaced, parallel or converging microbeams in radiotherapy. The proposed technique takes advantage of the hypothesised repair mechanism of capillary cells between alternate microbeam zones, which replaces the lethally irradiated endothelial cells. In this study using the Monte Carlo method, the lateral and depth dose of a single planar microbeam of 100 keV in a tissue/lung/tissue phantom is investigated. Poster 195. (author)

  20. Once-daily dose regimen of ribavirin is interchangeable with a twice-daily dose regimen: randomized open clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balk JM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jiska M Balk,1 Guido RMM Haenen,1 Özgür M Koc,2 Ron Peters,3 Aalt Bast,1 Wim JF van der Vijgh,1 Ger H Koek,4 1Department of Toxicology, NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, 2Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, 3DSM Resolve, Geleen, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands Background: The combination of ribavirin (RBV and pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN is effective in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C infection. Reducing the frequency of RBV intake from twice to once a day will improve compliance and opens up the opportunity to combine RBV with new and more specific direct-acting agents in one pill. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profile of RBV in a once-daily to twice-daily regimen. The secondary aim was to determine tolerability as well as the severity and differences in side effects of both treatment regimens. Methods: In this randomized open-label crossover study, twelve patients with chronic type 1 hepatitis C infection and weighing more than 75 kg were treated with 180 µg of PEG-IFN weekly and 1,200 mg RBV daily for 24 weeks. The patients received RBV dosed as 1,200 mg once-daily for 12 weeks followed by RBV dosed as 600 mg twice-daily for 12 weeks, or vice versa. In addition to the pharmacokinetic profile, the hematological profile and side effects were recorded. The RBV concentrations in plasma were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Eight of twelve patients completed the study. Neither the time taken for RBV to reach peak plasma concentration nor the AUC0-last (adjusted for difference in dose was significantly different between the two groups (P>0.05. Furthermore, the once-daily regimen did not give more side effects than the twice-daily regimen (P>0

  1. Treatment of primary brain lymphoma without immune deficiency, The importance of chemotherapy before radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keihani M

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find a more efficacious treatment for patients with primary central nervous system Lymphoma using chemotherapy. The objective was to determine the optimal time for radiotherapy treatment in relation to chemotherapy. Retrospective evaluation in patients with brain lymphoma was conducted from 1992 to 1998. Twenty-three patients were evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups based on the timing of radiotherapy in relation to the chemotherapy. The first group of patients (n=13 initially received radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy. Five of these patients receied classic CHOP (cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicine, Vincistine and Prednisone, six patients received Cis-platin (60 Megs/M2 and Etoposide (120 Megs/M2 and two patients received Cis-platin (60 Megs/M2, Etoposide (120 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine (600 Megs/M2 every 2 to 3 weeks. The second group of patients (Group II, n=10 received the followeing treatment regimen: a course of BCNU 120 Megs/M2 with Ifosfamide 1200 Megs/M2, Mesna and Etoposide 120 Megs/M2 on the first day of treatment (course A. Two weeks later, treatment was continued with a course of Cis-platin 35 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine 600 Megs/M2 (course B. The treatment was continued 14 days later with a course of Mitoxantron 12 Megs/M2, Ifosfamide 1200 Megs/M2 puls Mesna (course C. After the fourth week of chemotherapy, these patients received radiotherapy to the brain (5000 RADS in 4 weeks. During radiotherapy and at the beginning of course chemotherapy, intrathecal therapy with Methorexate 12 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine 60 Megs/M2 was given. Immediately after radiotherapy, the same chemothotrexate 12 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine 60 Megs/M2 was given. Immediately after radiotherapy, the same chemotherapy treatment was repeated to a total of 3 times. After complete clearance of the tumor determined by MRI and absence of tumor cells in the spinal fluid, the chemotherapeutic regimen was repeated one last time. The

  2. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for stage 2 or 3 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Takaharu; Kochi, Mitsugu; Fujii, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this retrospective study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (NACR) in patients with Stage 2 or Stage 3 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Between 2004 and 2014, a total of 86 patients underwent surgical resection in conjunction with NACR for esophageal SCC at our institute. Thirty-one patients (36.0%) had Stage 2 disease and 55 patients (64.0%) had Stage 3 disease. The median age was 64 (43-81) years. A total of 78 patients received the full NACR regimen. The most common major Grade 3 hematologic toxic effects of NACR were leukopenia and neutropenia (48 cases), while the most common major Grade 3 non-hematologic toxic effect was anorexia (12 cases). One patient died in the hospital and no patients died within 30 days after surgery. A pathological complete response was achieved in 23 cases. Pathological staging (number of cases) was Stage 0 (23), Stage 1 (8), Stage 2 (28), Stage 3 (25), and Stage 4 (2). The 5-year overall survival rate (OS) was 51.0%, and was 83.2% in Stage 2 patients and 29.9% in Stage 3 patients. Preoperative NACR is safe and may improve OS and down-staging rates in patients with esophageal SCC. (author)

  3. Radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshitani, Takashi; Kuwata, Yoichiro; Kano, Kyoko

    1988-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma were treated by high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation using specially designed balloon application at Hyogo medical Center for Adults. 32 patients were treated from January 1982 through July 1986. According to the stage of UICC (1978), 10 patients were classified into stage I, 7 into II, 13 into III and 2 into IV. Acturial 5 year survival rate was 17.9 % in all 32 patients and that of 23 patients who received radical radiotherapy was 24 %. Local CR rate was 66 %. However, since 9 (53 %) of 17 CR patients were relapsed, local control rate for 2 years was 25 %. Mild adverse effects were experienced in 9 (47 %) of 19 CR patients. Our balloon applicator was easily fixed, could have an adequate space from esophageal mucosa and clarify the tumor site by filling with 20 % gastrografin. It is concluded that high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation with our balloon applicator is an effective boost therapy and decline a lethal adverse effect in radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. (author)

  4. Radiotherapy in free practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelz, H.P.

    1974-01-01

    Relating the X-ray ordinance cases of the fourth quarter 1971 to the whole year a total surface and incident dose of 2,107,656 R was administered in 2,189 cases (1,881 patients) in the course of 16,574 sessions. During the same period, 364 patients were treated in the 14 consultation rooms by radiotherapy because of malignant diseases. The genetically significant dose of 0,6 mrem/a is composed of the GSD of 0,194 in practice and 0,407 mrem in clinics and corresponds in its proportions to the GSD calculated and estimated in recent times. Compared with GSD values from other spheres of the application of ionizing radiation in medical practice, the calculated GSD of 0,6 mrem/a in radiotherapy for benign diseases corresponds to the GSD of approximately 0,5 mrem/a for the nuclear medicine in West-Berlin as stated by Hinz and Weil. It corresponds to 1% of the GSD of approximately/a as estimated recently for X-ray diagnostic applications. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  6. General principles of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easson, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The daily practice of any established branch of medicine should be based on some acceptable principles. This chapter is concerned with the general principles on which the radiotherapy of the Manchester school is based. Though many radiotherapists in other centres would doubtless accept these principles, there are sufficiently wide differences in practice throughout the world to suggest that some therapists adhere to a fundamentally different philosophy. The authors believe it is important, especially for those beginning their formal training in radiotherapy, to subscribe to an internally consistent school of thought, employing methods of treatment for each type of lesion in each anatomical site that are based on accepted principles and subjected to continuous rigorous scrutiny to test their effectiveness. Not only must each therapeutic technique be evaluated, but the underlying principles too must be questioned if and when this seems indicated. It is a feature of this hospital that similar lesions are all treated by the same technique, so long as statistical evidence justifies such a policy. All members of the staff adhere to the accepted policy until or unless reliable reasons are adduced to change this policy

  7. Fertility impairment in radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Biedka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Infertility as a result of antineoplastic therapy is becoming a very important issue due to the growing incidence of neoplastic diseases. Routinely applied antineoplastic treatments and the illness itself lead to fertility disorders. Therapeutic methods used in antineoplastic treatment may cause fertility impairment or sterilization due to permanent damage to reproductive cells. The risk of sterilization depends on the patient’s sex, age during therapy, type of neoplasm, radiation dose and treatment area. It is known that chemotherapy and radiotherapy can lead to fertility impairment and the combination of these two gives an additive effect. The aim of this article is to raise the issue of infertility in these patients. It is of growing importance due to the increase in the number of children and young adults who underwent radiotherapy in the past. The progress in antineoplastic therapy improves treatment results, but at the same time requires a deeper look at existential needs of the patient. Reproductive function is an integral element of self-esteem and should be taken into account during therapy planning.

  8. Transverse tomography and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leer, J.W.H.

    1982-01-01

    This study was intended to delineate the indications for radiotherapy treatment-planning with the help of computerized axial tomography (C.T.) and transverse analog tomography (T.A.T.). Radiotherapy localisation procedures with the conventional method (simulator), with the CT-scanner and with the transverse analog tomograph (T.A.T., Simtomix, Oldelft) were compared. As criterium for evaluation differences in reconstruction drawing based on these methods were used. A certain method was judged ''superior'' to another if the delineation of the target volume was more accurate, if a better impression was gained of the site of (for irradiation) organs at risk, or if the localisation could only be performed with that method. The selected group of patients consisted of 120 patients for whom a reconstruction drawing in the transverse plane was made according to the treatment philosophy. In this group CT-assisted localisation was judged on 68 occasions superior to the conventional method. In a number of cases it was found that a ''standard'' change in a standard target volume, on the base of augmented anatomical knowledge, made the conventional method sufficient. The use of CT-scanner for treatment planning was estimated. For ca. 270/1000 new patients a CT-scan is helpful (diagnostic scan), for 140 of them the scan is necessary (planning scan). The quality of the anatomical information obtained with the T.A.T. does not yet fall within acceptable limits, but progress has been made. (Auth.)

  9. Concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, K.K.

    1985-01-01

    The principal objective of combining chemotherapy with radiotherapy (XRT) for the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer is to improve the therapeutic ratio through the enhancement of local control and reduction of distant metastases without excessively enhancing normal tissue effects. Improved tumour control can result from sole additivity of either therapy or direct interactions between drug and radiation leading to increased tumour cell kill. Chemotherapy may sensitize the cells to radiation, interfere with repair of sublethal or potentially lethal radiation damage, induce cell synchrony, and reduce tumour mass leading to reoxygenation and decreased fraction of resistant hypoxic cells. Radiation may improve drug accessibility to tumour cells and reduce tumour volume leading to increased cell proliferation and chemosensitivity. If the enhanced effects of combined therapy are purely additive, then the two modalities can be administered either sequentially or concurrently with the same results. However, if the enhanced effects result from the direct interaction between drug and radiation, it is necessary that the two modalities be administered concurrently and in close temporal proximity. This review summarizes the results of clinical studies in which chemotherapy was administered concurrently during the course of radiotherapy for patients with previously untreated advanced squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck

  10. Erythropoietin and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Fur, E.; Albarghach, M.N.; Pradier, O.

    2010-01-01

    Erythropoietin (E.P.O.) is a glycoprotein hormone. This hormone is a growth factor for red blood cells precursors in the bone marrow. The decrease of oxygen partial pressure, a reduced number of erythrocytes caused by bleeding or excessive destruction, or increased tissues oxygen requirements lead to increased secretion of E.P.O.. Its action takes place on bone marrow erythroblastic cells through specific receptors. E.P.O. stimulates the proliferation of red cell precursors stem cells in the bone marrow, thus increasing their production in one to two weeks. The effectiveness of E.P.O. at increasing haemoglobin and improving patients quality of life has been demonstrated by several studies. However, its use in radiotherapy remains controversial. While tumour hypoxia caused by anaemia is a factor of radio resistance and thus a source of local failure, tumour expression of E.P.O. receptors presents a significant risk for tumour progression and neo-angiogenesis, which would be increased during the administration of E.P.O.. The purpose of this article is to answer the question: is there a place for E.P.O. in combination with radiotherapy in the management of cancer?

  11. Gonzalez Regimen (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gonzalez regimen is a specialized diet that uses enzymes, supplements, and other factors in cancer management. It is based on a theory that involves the use of pancreatic enzymes to help the body get rid of toxins that lead to cancer. Read about existing clinical data in this expert-reviewed summary.

  12. What to Start: Selecting a First HIV Regimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CCR5 antagonists Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) Post-attachment inhibitors In general, a person's first HIV regimen includes two NRTIs plus an INSTI, an NNRTI, or a PI boosted with cobicistat (brand name: Tybost) or ritonavir (brand name: Norvir). Cobicistat ...

  13. Efficacy of Some Combination Regimens of Oral Hypoglycaemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To examine the efficacy of selected oral hypoglycaemic agent (OHA) regimens in a small group of patients receiving such treatment. Methods: This was a retrospective, observational study that involved patients who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and undergoing routine follow-up at a teaching ...

  14. Preoperational test report, recirculation ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-01-01

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102 and supports the ability to exhaust air from each tank. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a fan, condenser, and moisture separator; equipment is located inside each respective tank farm in its own hardened building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System

  15. Preoperational test report, raw water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-10-29

    This represents the preoperational test report for the Raw Water System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system supplies makeup water to the W-030 recirculation evaporative cooling towers for tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. The Raw Water pipe riser and associated strainer and valving is located in the W-030 diesel generator building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  16. Preoperational test report, recirculation ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-11

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102 and supports the ability to exhaust air from each tank. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a fan, condenser, and moisture separator; equipment is located inside each respective tank farm in its own hardened building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  17. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation condensate system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-01-29

    Preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Condensate System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides a collection point for condensate generated by the W-030 primary vent offgas cooling system serving tanks AYIOI, AY102, AZIOI, AZI02. The system is located inside a shielded ventilation equipment cell and consists of a condensate seal pot, sampling features, a drain line to existing Catch Tank 241-AZ-151, and a cell sump jet pump. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  18. Preoperational test report, raw water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-01-01

    This represents the preoperational test report for the Raw Water System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system supplies makeup water to the W-030 recirculation evaporative cooling towers for tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. The Raw Water pipe riser and associated strainer and valving is located in the W-030 diesel generator building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System

  19. Preoperative steroid in abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Brøndum, Tina Lee; Belhage, Bo

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative administration of high-dose glucocorticoid leads to improved recovery and decreased length of stay after abdominal surgery. Even so, studies on administration of glucocorticoids for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) for giant ventral hernia repair...... defect exceeding 10 cm will be randomised for intravenous administration of either 125 mg methylprednisolone or saline at the induction of anaesthesia. The primary endpoint is pain at rest on the first post-operative day. Patients will be followed until 30 days post-operatively, and secondary outcomes...

  20. Advances in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, T.R.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation therapy is in the midst of a rebirth largely driven by the use of computers for treatment planning and beam delivery. The first edge of this renaissance was the advent of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT). This was enabled by the widespread availability and utilization of three-dimensional imaging such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance scanning, themselves products of the computer revolution. For the first time this allowed radiation oncologists to segment and visualize the tumor in association with it neighboring sensitive soft-tissue structures. Software tools to visualize the beam paths through the body enabled the beam directions and beam shapes to be manually optimized. Simultaneously, improved dose calculations utilizing the CT images of the patient anatomy produced more accurate distributions of dose. The dose was delivered with custom-shaped blocks or recently collimators with multiple leaves that allow complex shaped fields to be delivered without the need for block fabrication. In the last couple of decades new treatment delivery methodologies have emerged. The first has been stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which is the purview of neurosurgeons (who call it SRS) as well as radiation oncologists (who usually call it SRT). SRS and SRT are premised on multiple beams focusing on one location typically with circular aperture collimators but increasingly with fields shaped by multi-leaved collimators. Often only a single treatment session (the usual for SRS) is used when the treatment volume is small, but for larger lesions several treatment sessions, or fractions, are used (most often for SRT) to allow for normal tissue repair. The new equipment market for SRS and SRT is about 10% of the total for radiation therapy. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the latest treatment methodology and its adoption has been extremely rapid, particularly in the United States. IMRT uses

  1. Aggressive Regimens for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Reduce Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Molly F.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Mitnick, Carole D.; Furin, Jennifer J.; Bayona, Jaime; Chalco, Katiuska; Shin, Sonya; Murray, Megan; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Recurrent tuberculosis disease occurs within 2 years in as few as 1% and as many as 29% of individuals successfully treated for multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis. A better understanding of treatment-related factors associated with an elevated risk of recurrent tuberculosis after cure is urgently needed to optimize MDR tuberculosis therapy. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among adults successfully treated for MDR tuberculosis in Peru. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to examine whether receipt of an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion from positive to negative was associated with a reduced rate of recurrent tuberculosis. Results. Among 402 patients, the median duration of follow-up was 40.5 months (interquartile range, 21.2–53.4). Receipt of an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion was associated with a lower risk of recurrent tuberculosis (hazard ratio, 0.40 [95% confidence interval, 0.17–0.96]; P = .04). A baseline diagnosis of diabetes mellitus also predicted recurrent tuberculosis (hazard ratio, 10.47 [95% confidence interval, 2.17–50.60]; P = .004). Conclusions. Individuals who received an aggressive MDR tuberculosis regimen for ≥18 months following sputum conversion experienced a lower rate of recurrence after cure. Efforts to ensure that an aggressive regimen is accessible to all patients with MDR tuberculosis, such as minimization of sequential ineffective regimens, expanded drug access, and development of new MDR tuberculosis compounds, are critical to reducing tuberculosis recurrence in this population. Patients with diabetes mellitus should be carefully managed during initial treatment and followed closely for recurrent disease. PMID:23223591

  2. Fluid regimens for colostomy irrigation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarondo, Lucylynn; Aye Gyi, Aye; Schultz, Tim

    2008-09-01

    Background  Various techniques for managing faecal evacuation have been proposed; however, colostomy irrigation is favoured as it leads to better patient outcomes. Alternative fluid regimens for colostomy irrigation have been suggested to achieve effective evacuation. Aim  The objective of this review was to summarise the best available evidence on the most effective fluid regimen for colostomy irrigation. Search strategy  Trials were identified by electronic searches of CINAHL, PubMed, MEDLINE, Current Contents, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE. Unpublished articles and references lists from included studies were also searched. Selection criteria  Randomised controlled trials and before-and-after studies investigating any fluid regimen for colostomy irrigation were eligible for inclusion. Outcomes measured included fluid inflow time, total wash-out time, haemodynamic changes during irrigation, cramps, leakage episodes, quality of life and level of satisfaction. Data collection and analysis  Trial selection, quality appraisal and data extraction were carried out independently by two reviewers. Differences in opinion were resolved by discussion. Main results  The systematic literature search strategy identified two cross-over trials that compared water with another fluid regimen. Owing to the differences in irrigating solutions used, the results were not pooled for analysis. Both the polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution and glyceryl trinitrate performed significantly better than water. Conclusion  There is some evidence to support the effectiveness of fluid regimens other than water, such as polyethylene glycol electrolyte and glyceryl trinitrate, for colostomy irrigation. Further well-designed clinical trials are required to establish solid evidence on the effectiveness of other irrigating solutions that might enhance colonic irrigation. © 2008 The Authors. Journal Compilation © Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Combination With Panitumumab for Patients With Resectable Esophageal Cancer: The PACT Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordes, Sil [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van [Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten C. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bergman, Jacques J.G.H.M. [Department of Gastroenterology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vliet, Hans J. van der [Department of Medical Oncology, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kapiteijn, Ellen [Department of Medical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Laarhoven, Hanneke W.M. van; Richel, Dick J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Klinkenbijl, Jean H.G. [Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meijer, Sybren L. [Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wilmink, Johanna W. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has become the standard treatment strategy for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. This multicenter phase 2 study investigated the efficacy of the addition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor panitumumab to a preoperative CRT regimen with carboplatin, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy in patients with resectable esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with resectable cT1N1M0 or cT2-3N0 to -2M0 tumors received preoperative CRT consisting of panitumumab (6 mg/kg) on days 1, 15, and 29, weekly administrations of carboplatin (area under the curve [AUC] = 2), and paclitaxel (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for 5 weeks and concurrent radiation therapy (41.4 Gy in 23 fractions, 5 days per week), followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. We aimed at a pCR rate of more than 40%. Furthermore, we explored the predictive value of biomarkers (EGFR, HER 2, and P53) for pCR. Results: From January 2010 until December 2011, 90 patients were enrolled. Patients were diagnosed predominantly with adenocarcinoma (AC) (80%), T3 disease (89%), and were node positive (81%). Three patients were not resected due to progressive disease. The primary aim was unmet, with a pCR rate of 22%. Patients with AC and squamous cell carcinoma reached a pCR of 14% and 47%, respectively. R0 resection was achieved in 95% of the patients. Main grade 3 toxicities were rash (12%), fatigue (11%), and nonfebrile neutropenia (11%). None of the biomarkers was predictive for response. Conclusions: The addition of panitumumab to CRT with carboplatin and paclitaxel was safe and well tolerated but could not improve pCR rate to the preset criterion of 40%.

  4. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Combination With Panitumumab for Patients With Resectable Esophageal Cancer: The PACT Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordes, Sil; Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van; Hulshof, Maarten C.; Bergman, Jacques J.G.H.M.; Vliet, Hans J. van der; Kapiteijn, Ellen; Laarhoven, Hanneke W.M. van; Richel, Dick J.; Klinkenbijl, Jean H.G.; Meijer, Sybren L.; Wilmink, Johanna W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has become the standard treatment strategy for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. This multicenter phase 2 study investigated the efficacy of the addition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor panitumumab to a preoperative CRT regimen with carboplatin, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy in patients with resectable esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with resectable cT1N1M0 or cT2-3N0 to -2M0 tumors received preoperative CRT consisting of panitumumab (6 mg/kg) on days 1, 15, and 29, weekly administrations of carboplatin (area under the curve [AUC] = 2), and paclitaxel (50 mg/m 2 ) for 5 weeks and concurrent radiation therapy (41.4 Gy in 23 fractions, 5 days per week), followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. We aimed at a pCR rate of more than 40%. Furthermore, we explored the predictive value of biomarkers (EGFR, HER 2, and P53) for pCR. Results: From January 2010 until December 2011, 90 patients were enrolled. Patients were diagnosed predominantly with adenocarcinoma (AC) (80%), T3 disease (89%), and were node positive (81%). Three patients were not resected due to progressive disease. The primary aim was unmet, with a pCR rate of 22%. Patients with AC and squamous cell carcinoma reached a pCR of 14% and 47%, respectively. R0 resection was achieved in 95% of the patients. Main grade 3 toxicities were rash (12%), fatigue (11%), and nonfebrile neutropenia (11%). None of the biomarkers was predictive for response. Conclusions: The addition of panitumumab to CRT with carboplatin and paclitaxel was safe and well tolerated but could not improve pCR rate to the preset criterion of 40%

  5. A phase II study evaluating neo-/adjuvant EIA chemotherapy, surgical resection and radiotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Thomas; Lehner, Burkhard; Kasper, Bernd; Bischof, Marc; Roeder, Falk; Dietrich, Sascha; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Strauss, Ludwig G; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Wuchter, Patrick; Ho, Anthony D; Egerer, Gerlinde

    2011-12-07

    The role of chemotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma is controversial. Though many patients undergo initial curative resection, distant metastasis is a frequent event, resulting in 5-year overall survival rates of only 50-60%. Neo-adjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy (CTX) has been applied to achieve pre-operative cytoreduction, assess chemosensitivity, and to eliminate occult metastasis. Here we report on the results of our non-randomized phase II study on neo-adjuvant treatment for high-risk STS. Patients with potentially curative high-risk STS (size ≥ 5 cm, deep/extracompartimental localization, tumor grades II-III [FNCLCC]) were included. The protocol comprised 4 cycles of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (EIA, etoposide 125 mg/m(2) iv days 1 and 4, ifosfamide 1500 mg/m2 iv days 1 - 4, doxorubicin 50 mg/m(2) day 1, pegfilgrastim 6 mg sc day 5), definitive surgery with intra-operative radiotherapy, adjuvant radiotherapy and 4 adjuvant cycles of EIA. Between 06/2005 and 03/2010 a total of 50 subjects (male = 33, female = 17, median age 50.1 years) were enrolled. Median follow-up was 30.5 months. The majority of primary tumors were located in the extremities or trunk (92%), 6% originated in the abdomen/retroperitoneum. Response by RECIST criteria to neo-adjuvant CTX was 6% CR (n = 3), 24% PR (n = 12), 62% SD (n = 31) and 8% PD (n = 4). Local recurrence occurred in 3 subjects (6%). Distant metastasis was observed in 12 patients (24%). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) at 2 years was 83% and 68%, respectively. Multivariate analysis failed to prove influence of resection status or grade of histological necrosis on OS or DFS. Severe toxicities included neutropenic fever (4/50), cardiac toxicity (2/50), and CNS toxicity (4/50) leading to CTX dose reductions in 4 subjects. No cases of secondary leukemias were observed so far. The current protocol is feasible for achieving local control rates, as well as OS and DFS comparable to previously published

  6. A phase II study evaluating neo-/adjuvant EIA chemotherapy, surgical resection and radiotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of chemotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma is controversial. Though many patients undergo initial curative resection, distant metastasis is a frequent event, resulting in 5-year overall survival rates of only 50-60%. Neo-adjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy (CTX has been applied to achieve pre-operative cytoreduction, assess chemosensitivity, and to eliminate occult metastasis. Here we report on the results of our non-randomized phase II study on neo-adjuvant treatment for high-risk STS. Method Patients with potentially curative high-risk STS (size ≥ 5 cm, deep/extracompartimental localization, tumor grades II-III [FNCLCC] were included. The protocol comprised 4 cycles of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (EIA, etoposide 125 mg/m2 iv days 1 and 4, ifosfamide 1500 mg/m2 iv days 1 - 4, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 day 1, pegfilgrastim 6 mg sc day 5, definitive surgery with intra-operative radiotherapy, adjuvant radiotherapy and 4 adjuvant cycles of EIA. Result Between 06/2005 and 03/2010 a total of 50 subjects (male = 33, female = 17, median age 50.1 years were enrolled. Median follow-up was 30.5 months. The majority of primary tumors were located in the extremities or trunk (92%, 6% originated in the abdomen/retroperitoneum. Response by RECIST criteria to neo-adjuvant CTX was 6% CR (n = 3, 24% PR (n = 12, 62% SD (n = 31 and 8% PD (n = 4. Local recurrence occurred in 3 subjects (6%. Distant metastasis was observed in 12 patients (24%. Overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS at 2 years was 83% and 68%, respectively. Multivariate analysis failed to prove influence of resection status or grade of histological necrosis on OS or DFS. Severe toxicities included neutropenic fever (4/50, cardiac toxicity (2/50, and CNS toxicity (4/50 leading to CTX dose reductions in 4 subjects. No cases of secondary leukemias were observed so far. Conclusion The current protocol is feasible for achieving local control rates, as well as OS

  7. Sympathoadrenal and hypophyseal-adrenal systems in preoperative irradiation of patients with esophageal and cardiac cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarutinov, V.I.; Starosel'skij, I.V.; Gol'dshmidt, B.Ya.; Shmal'ko, Yu.P.; Levchenko, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of 74 patients with esophageal and cardiac cancer. Stages 3 and 4. The excretion of catecholamines, corticosteroids and their precursors was studied, tests with adrenalin before and after preoperative irradiation at a summary dose of 30 Gy were done. It has been shown that before the start of radiation therapy the excretion of catecholamines and corticosteroids is lowered, the reaction to adrenalin administration is negative in most patients, the phase syndrome of cardiac hypodynamics associated with disturbed function of the sympathoadrenal system was revealed. Preoperative irradiation in patients with esophageal and cardiac cancer results in an incres ased excretion of 17-ketosteroids (17-KS) and 17-ketogenic steroids, however 17-KS excretion does not reach the normal level. For better tolerance of irradiation and for a radiosensitization effect testenate is administered to patients before and during radiation therapy. The administration of testenate 7-10 days before the start and during radiotherapy proved to be effective Which was confirmed by noticeable necrobiotic and necrotic changes of cancer cells

  8. Radiotherapy and 'new' drugs-new side effects?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Maihoefer, Cornelius; Krause, Mechthild; Rödel, Claus; Budach, Wilfried; Belka, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Targeted drugs have augmented the cancer treatment armamentarium. Based on the molecular specificity, it was initially believed that these drugs had significantly less side effects. However, currently it is accepted that all of these agents have their specific side effects. Based on the given multimodal approach, special emphasis has to be placed on putative interactions of conventional cytostatic drugs, targeted agents and other modalities. The interaction of targeted drugs with radiation harbours special risks, since the awareness for interactions and even synergistic toxicities is lacking. At present, only limited is data available regarding combinations of targeted drugs and radiotherapy. This review gives an overview on the current knowledge on such combined treatments. Using the following MESH headings and combinations of these terms pubmed database was searched: Radiotherapy AND cetuximab/trastuzumab/panitumumab/nimotuzumab, bevacizumab, sunitinib/sorafenib/lapatinib/gefitinib/erlotinib/sirolimus, thalidomide/lenalidomide as well as erythropoietin. For citation crosscheck the ISI web of science database was used employing the same search terms. Several classes of targeted substances may be distinguished: Small molecules including kinase inhibitors and specific inhibitors, antibodies, and anti-angiogenic agents. Combination of these agents with radiotherapy may lead to specific toxicities or negatively influence the efficacy of RT. Though there is only little information on the interaction of molecular targeted radiation and radiotherapy in clinical settings, several critical incidents are reported. The addition of molecular targeted drugs to conventional radiotherapy outside of approved regimens or clinical trials warrants a careful consideration especially when used in conjunction in hypo-fractionated regimens. Clinical trials are urgently needed in order to address the open question in regard to efficacy, early and late toxicity

  9. Radiotherapy gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldock, C.

    2002-01-01

    In radiotherapy, the primary objective is to deliver a prescribed dose of radiation to a tumour or lesion within a patient while minimising the dose delivered to the surrounding healthy tissue. Traditional radiotherapy treatments usually involve simple external or internal irradiations of a tumour. External irradiations are normally achieved in the clinic with photon or electron beams produced by high energy linear accelerators. The photon or electron beams are collimated into regular shapes as they emerge from the treatment head of the unit which is supported by a gantry that can be rotated isocentrically to any position. A discrete number of photon or electron beams with different angles of incidence that intersect at the iso-centre are used to produce a region of high dose around the tumour volume (positioned at the iso-centre). Internal irradiations are normally achieved in the clinic by implanting radioactive sources in and around the tumour or lesion. Such irradiations are characterised by very high doses local to the tumour. Radioactive sources are also used to prevent post-angioplasty restenosis by inserting sources into arteries. Usually when treating a tumour, a compromise is made between tumour control and complications arising from normal tissue damage. One measure of this compromise, the therapeutic ratio, is defined as the radiation dose producing complications in 50% of patients divided by the dose providing tumour control in 50% of the patients. The therapeutic ratio depends on the radiobiological characteristics of the cancerous tissue and surrounding healthy tissues and on the radiation dose distribution achieved by the radiotherapy treatment. It is generally believed that the therapeutic ratio can be minimised by optimising the conformation of the radiation dose distribution to the target volume. This is difficult with traditional radiotherapy techniques since they do not produce dose distributions that adequately cover tumour volumes of complex

  10. Clinical trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy for primary intracranial germinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Kei; Suzuki, Keishiro; Shirato, Hiroki; Kagei, Kenji; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Sawamura, Yutaka; Ikeda, Jun; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Since 1992, we have been using neoadjuvant chemotherapy to reduce the radiation dose and irradiated volume in the treatment of intracranial germinomas. This study evaluates the initial response and complications of the treatment and also the IQ score and pituitary function of patients before radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with histologically confirmed intracranial germinomas were treated between 1992 and 1997. Six patients with solitary pure germinoma received 3 to 4 courses of etoposide and cisplatin (EP regimen) followed by localized irradiation of 24Gy (in 12 fractions within 3 weeks). Three patients with germinoma with syncytiotrophoblastic giant cells (STGC) and 4 patients with multifocal pure germinoma received 3 to 5 courses of ifosfamide, cisplatin and etoposide (ICE regimen), followed by localized irradiation of 24 Gy. Two patients with disseminated pure germinoma received 2 to 4 courses of ICE regimen followed by craniospinal irradiation of 24 Gy. In the planning of localized irradiation, the treatment field was determined so as to cover the tumor with a margin of 2cm. The IQ score and pituitary function before radiotherapy were also examined. MRI was performed in all patients one month after the completion of treatment and every 6 months in the follow-up study. The treatment data of our institute before 1991, as historical control, was analyzed and compared to that of the present study. Results: Complete remission (CR) was obtained in all patients after the treatment. One patient with germinoma with STGC experienced recurrence out of the field at 39 months after surgery. He was re-treated with salvage therapy including the ICE regimen and obtained a second complete remission. All patients are alive without disease with a median follow-up period of 29 months. The examination of IQ score and pituitary function before radiotherapy revealed mental retardation in 2 patients (22%) and hypopituitarism in 13 patients (86

  11. Dose-response relationship between probability of pathologic tumor control and glucose metabolic rate measured with FDG PET after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Noah C.; Fischman, Alan J.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Lynch, Thomas; Wain, John; Wright, Cameron; Fidias, Panos; Mathisen, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship between the probability of tumor control on the basis of pathologic tumor response (pTCP) and the residual metabolic rate of glucose (MRglc) in response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and to define the level of residual MRglc that corresponds to pTCP 50% and pTCP ≥95%. Methods and Materials: Quantitative dynamic 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography was performed to measure regional MRglc at the primary lesion before and 2 weeks after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in an initial group of 13 patients with locally advanced NSCLC. A simplified kinetic method was developed subsequently from the initial dynamic study and used in the subsequent 16 patients. The preoperative radiotherapy programs consisted of (1) a split course of 42 Gy in 28 fractions within a period of 28 days using a twice-daily treatment schedule for Stage IIIA(N2) NSCLC (n=18) and (2) standard once-daily radiation schedule of 45-63 Gy in 25-35 fractions during a 5-7-week period (n=11). The preoperative chemotherapy regimens included two cycles of cisplatin, vinblastine, and 5-fluorouracil (n=24), cisplatin and etoposide (n=2), and cisplatin, Taxol, and 5-fluorouracil (n=3). Patients free of tumor progression after preoperative chemoradiotherapy underwent surgery. The degree of residual MRglc measured 2 weeks after preoperative chemoradiotherapy and 2 weeks before surgery was correlated with the pathologic tumor response. The relationship between MRglc and pTCP was modeled using logistic regression. Results: Of 32 patients entered into the study, 29 (16 men and 13 women; 30 lesions) were evaluated for the correlation between residual MRglc and pathologic tumor response. Three patients did not participate in the second study because of a steady decline in general condition. The median age was 60 years (range 42-78). One of the 29 patients had two separate lesions, and

  12. Acute small bowel toxicity and preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: Investigating dose-volume relationships and role for inverse planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tho, Lye Mun; Glegg, Martin; Paterson, Jennifer; Yap, Christina; MacLeod, Alice; McCabe, Marie; McDonald, Alexander C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The relationship between volume of irradiated small bowel (VSB) and acute toxicity in rectal cancer radiotherapy is poorly quantified, particularly in patients receiving concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Using treatment planning data, we studied a series of such patients. Methods and Materials: Details of 41 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were reviewed. All received 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, 3-4 fields three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with daily 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid during Weeks 1 and 5. Toxicity was assessed prospectively in a weekly clinic. Using computed tomography planning software, the VSB was determined at 5 Gy dose intervals (V 5 , V 1 , etc.). Eight patients with maximal VSB had dosimetry and radiobiological modeling outcomes compared between inverse and conformal three-dimensional planning. Results: VSB correlated strongly with diarrheal severity at every dose level (p 5 and V 15 . Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists between VSB and acute diarrhea at all dose levels during preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Our constructed model may be useful in predicting toxicity, and this has