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Sample records for preoperative infant orthopedics

  1. Preoperative Planning of Orthopedic Procedures using Digitalized Software Systems.

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    Steinberg, Ely L; Segev, Eitan; Drexler, Michael; Ben-Tov, Tomer; Nimrod, Snir

    2016-06-01

    The progression from standard celluloid films to digitalized technology led to the development of new software programs to fulfill the needs of preoperative planning. We describe here preoperative digitalized programs and the variety of conditions for which those programs can be used to facilitate preparation for surgery. A PubMed search using the keywords "digitalized software programs," "preoperative planning" and "total joint arthroplasty" was performed for all studies regarding preoperative planning of orthopedic procedures that were published from 1989 to 2014 in English. Digitalized software programs are enabled to import and export all picture archiving communication system (PACS) files (i.e., X-rays, computerized tomograms, magnetic resonance images) from either the local working station or from any remote PACS. Two-dimension (2D) and 3D CT scans were found to be reliable tools with a high preoperative predicting accuracy for implants. The short learning curve, user-friendly features, accurate prediction of implant size, decreased implant stocks and low-cost maintenance makes digitalized software programs an attractive tool in preoperative planning of total joint replacement, fracture fixation, limb deformity repair and pediatric skeletal disorders.

  2. Influence of preoperative emotional state on postoperative pain following orthopedic and trauma surgery

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    Gemma Robleda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to analyze the relationship between preoperative emotional state and the prevalence and intensity of postoperative pain and to explore predictors of postoperative pain.METHOD: observational retrospective study undertaken among 127 adult patients of orthopedic and trauma surgery. Postoperative pain was assessed with the verbal numeric scale and with five variables of emotional state: anxiety, sweating, stress, fear, and crying. The Chi-squared test, Student's t test or ANOVA and a multivariate logistic regression analysis were used for the statistical analysis.RESULTS: the prevalence of immediate postoperative pain was 28%. Anxiety was the most common emotional factor (72% and a predictive risk factor for moderate to severe postoperative pain (OR: 4.60, 95% CI 1.38 to 15.3, p<0.05, AUC: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.62 to 0.83. Age exerted a protective effect (OR 0.96, 95% CI: 0.94-0.99, p<0.01.CONCLUSION: preoperative anxiety and age are predictors of postoperative pain in patients undergoing orthopedic and trauma surgery.

  3. Infant orthopedics in UCLP: effect on feeding, weight, and length: a randomized clinical trial (Dutchcleft).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prahl, C.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Prahl-Andersen, B.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of infant orthopedics (IO) on feeding, weight, and length. DESIGN: Prospective two-arm randomized controlled trial in three academic Cleft Palate Centers. Treatment allocation was concealed and performed by means of a computerized balanced allocation method. SETTING:

  4. Modified technique of presurgical infant maxillary orthopedics for complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

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    Choo, Hyeran; Maguire, Meg; Low, David W

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a modified device fabrication and facial taping method that increases the efficiency and efficacy of presurgical infant maxillary orthopedic therapy for babies born with complete cleft lip and palate. Interarch and intra-arch relationships of the maxillary and mandibular dental arches were evaluated on mounted stone models before and after treatment. The palatal plate device was custom-fabricated in a manner that bypassed the need for periodic acrylic addition and removal, thereby eliminating the risk of natural maxillary growth restriction during therapy. Elastic labial tapes were fabricated and applied in a configuration that mimicked normal function of the orbicularis oris muscle. A nasal stent wire was utilized from the initiation of therapy to enhance intraoral retention and stability of the device. Examples of infants undergoing a unilateral complete cleft lip and palate treatment protocol are presented. Treatment objectives were achieved within 7 to 8 weeks of therapy for patients who had an initial alveolar cleft size more than 10 to 12 mm. The modified protocol of presurgical infant maxillary orthopedic therapy is an effective and efficient treatment modality in reversing the pre-existing orofacial dysmorphism by redirecting the infant's natural growth.

  5. Presurgical orthopedics by drink plates does not significantly normalize deglutition in infants with cleft lip and palate.

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    Knösel, Michael; Fendel, Christine; Jung, Klaus; Sandoval, Paulo; Engelke, Wilfried G

    2016-03-01

    To test the null hypothesis of no significant difference between intraoral pressure characteristics in infants with cleft lip and palate (CLP) with or without presurgical orthopedic (PSO) plates (groups CLP and CLP-PSO), compared with noncleft infants. Intraoral atmospheric pressure assessments were performed on 17 subjects with preoperative CLP (m/f, 11/6; mean/SD, 4.76/0.92 months) and a matched control group (n = 24; m/f, 15/9; mean/SD, 4.88/0.9 months), for 200 seconds, simultaneously at the vestibulum (vestibular space [VS]) and at the palate (subpalatal space [SPS]), using a prepared pacifier connected to a digital manometer. Areas under the pressure curves (AUC), frequencies, durations, and magnitudes of swallowing peaks and pressure resting plateaus were compared between trial groups and locations (VS, SPS) using a two-factor analysis of variance for repeated measures, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Mann-Whitney U-test (α = .05). The null hypothesis was rejected: Globally, there were statistically significant differences in intraoral pressure characteristics between groups CLP, CLP-PSO, and control (all P < .01), with significantly higher negative pressures (AUC) in the control subjects compared with those of CLP or CLP-PSO. There were significant effects by the location of pressure recordings (VS, SPS) and their interaction with all treatment groups. Differences between noncleft and CLP subjects were more pronounced in the VS than in the SPS. There was no significant effect by PSO. PSO does not improve deviated swallowing characteristics during suction in CLP infants.

  6. Diagnosis and presurgical orthopedics in infants with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fundagul Bilgic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip and palate are one of the most common congenital craniofacial malformations. While preoperative treatment for infants with cleft lip and palate is still a scientific debate, patients with this malocclusion usually have to be treated from infancy to adulthood. Orthodontist plays an important role in the treatment of patients with cleft lip and palate. The purpose of this review is to give information about cleft lip and palate and presurgical nasoalveolar molding.

  7. Language skills of young children with unilateral cleft lip and palate following infant orthopedics: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konst, E.M.; Rietveld, T.; Peters, H.F.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of infant orthopedics (IO) on the language skills of children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). DESIGN: In a prospective randomized clinical trial (Dutchcleft), two groups of children with complete UCLP were followed up longitudinally: one

  8. Effect of infant orthopedics on facial appearance of toddlers with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (Dutchcleft).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaarts, C.A.M.; Prahl-Andersen, B.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Mulder, J.W.; Vaandrager, J.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of infant orthopedics (IO) on facial appearance of 54 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), aged 4 and 6 years. DESIGN: Prospective two-arm randomized controlled clinical trial in three Cleft Palate Centers in the Netherlands (Dutchcleft-trial).

  9. Effect of infant orthopedics on facial appearance of toddlers with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (Dutchcleft)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaarts, C.A.M.; Prahl-Andersen, B.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Mulder, J.W.; Vaandrager, J.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of infant orthopedics (IO) on facial appearance of 54 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), aged 4 and 6 years. Design: Prospective two-arm randomized controlled clinical trial in three Cleft Palate Centers in the Netherlands (Dutchcleft-trial).

  10. Language skills of young children with unilateral cleft lip and palate following infant orthopedics: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konst, E.M.; Rietveld, T.; Peters, H.F.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of infant orthopedics (IO) on the language skills of children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). DESIGN: In a prospective randomized clinical trial (Dutchcleft), two groups of children with complete UCLP were followed up longitudinally: one gr

  11. An Intelligibility Assessment of Toddlers with Cleft Lip and Palate Who Received and Did Not Receive Presurgical Infant Orthopedic Treatment.

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    Konst, Emmy M.; Weersink-Braks, Hanny; Rietveld, Toni; Peters, Herman

    2000-01-01

    The influence of presurgical infant orthopedic treatment (PIO) on speech intelligibility was evaluated with 10 toddlers who used PIO during the first year of life and 10 who did not. Treated children were rated as exhibiting greater intelligibility, however, transcription data indicated there were not group differences in actual intelligibility.…

  12. An Intelligibility Assessment of Toddlers with Cleft Lip and Palate Who Received and Did Not Receive Presurgical Infant Orthopedic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konst, Emmy M.; Weersink-Braks, Hanny; Rietveld, Toni; Peters, Herman

    2000-01-01

    The influence of presurgical infant orthopedic treatment (PIO) on speech intelligibility was evaluated with 10 toddlers who used PIO during the first year of life and 10 who did not. Treated children were rated as exhibiting greater intelligibility, however, transcription data indicated there were not group differences in actual intelligibility.…

  13. Treatment modalities of infants with upper airway obstruction--review of the literature and presentation of novel orthopedic appliances.

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    Kochel, Janka; Meyer-Marcotty, Philipp; Wirbelauer, Johannes; Böhm, Hartmut; Kochel, Michael; Thomas, Wolfgang; Bareis, Ute; Hebestreit, Helge; Speer, Christian; Stellzig-Eisenhauer, Angelika

    2011-01-01

    To present a new orthopedic method for treatment of infants with Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) and upper airway obstruction (UAO) as an alternative to other established nonsurgical and surgical techniques such as positioning, nasopharyngeal or endotracheal intubation, tongue-lip adhesion, extension, distraction, or tracheostomy. Review of the literature and presentation of novel orthopedic appliances. Department of Orthodontics, Dental Clinic, Medical Faculty of the University of Wuerzburg, Germany, Department and Clinic of Pediatrics, Medical Faculty of the University of Wuerzburg, Germany, 2005 to 2008. Seven patients with significant respiratory and feeding difficulties between 0 and 6 months of age. Both patients with nonsyndromic PRS and patients with syndromic PRS were included. The type of respiratory tract obstruction was defined by nasopharyngoscopy. Patients with type 1 obstruction received a plate with an epiglottic spur; whereas, patients with obstruction type 2, 3, or 4 received a plate with a pharyngeal tube. All patients were successfully treated with orthopedic appliances alone. Under plate therapy they showed good oxygen saturation and could consequently be better nourished orally. The presented novel method is a noninvasive technique in treatment of infants with UAO.

  14. An evaluation of preoperative and postoperative ventilation and perfusion lung scintigraphy in the screening for pulmonary embolism after elective orthopedic surgery

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    Keenan, A.M.; Palevsky, H.I.; Steinberg, M.E.; Hartman, K.M.; Alavi, A.; Lotke, P.A. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA))

    1991-01-01

    One hundred two patients undergoing elective knee or hip arthroplasty were studied with radionuclide ventilation scans (V) and perfusion scans (Q) preoperatively (preop) and postoperatively (postop) to assess their relative value in the diagnosis of asymptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) after orthopedic surgery. Postop Q were read in combination with preop V and Q and postop V using prospective investigation of pulmonary embolism diagnosis (PIOPED) criteria. Of 25 postop Q interpreted as either high or intermediate probability for PE, preop Q were judged useful in 96%; the postop V were useful in 78%; and the preop V were not helpful in any of the cases. Of 63 postop Q interpreted as low probability, preop Q were useful in 74%; the postop V were useful in only 33%; and the preop V were useful in only one case. When postop Q were read as normal (14 cases), none of the three auxiliary studies were found to be useful. Overall, postop V were more helpful than preop Q in only 2%, and preop V contributed significantly in only 1%. This experience suggests that preop Q alone is the most useful adjunct to the postop Q in the postoperative evaluation for PE. The authors conclude that to screen for asymptomatic PE after elective orthopedic surgery, preop Q should be performed in all cases, preop V are not necessary, and postop V need be performed only if a baseline preop Q is not available.

  15. Infant orthopedics has no effect on maxillary arch dimensions in the deciduous dentition of children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (Dutchcleft).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaarts, C.A.M.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Prahl-Andersen, B.; Dirks, I.V.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the effect of infant orthopedics on maxillary arch dimensions in the deciduous dentition in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate. DESIGN: Prospective two-arm randomized controlled clinical trial with three participating cleft palate centers. SETTING: Cleft palate

  16. Use of a perceptual evaluation instrument to assess the effects of infant orthopedics on the speech of toddlers with cleft lip and palate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konst, E.M.; Rietveld, T.; Peters, H.F.M.; Weersink-Braks, H.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of infant orthopedics (IO) administered in the first year of life on the speech characteristics of 2.5-year-old children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) using a perceptual evaluation instrument with equal-appearing interval (EAI) scales. DES

  17. The effect of infant orthopedics on the occlusion of the deciduous dentition in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (Dutchcleft).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaarts, C.A.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Prahl-Andersen, B.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the effect of infant orthopedics (IO) on the occlusion of the deciduous dentition in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). DESIGN: Prospective, two-arm, randomized, controlled clinical trial with three participating cleft palate centers (Dutchcleft). SETTING:

  18. Phonological development of toddlers with unilateral cleft lip and palate who were treated with and without infant orthopedics: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konst, E.M.; Rietveld, T.; Peters, H.F.M.; Prahl-Andersen, B.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the phonological development of toddlers from 2 to 3 years of age with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) treated during the first year of life with and without infant orthopedics (IO). DESIGN: In a randomized clinical trial (Dutchcleft), two groups of children

  19. [Locomotor development in infants with developmental dysplasia of the hip or idiopathic clubfoot undergoing orthopedic treatment. Prospective comparative study].

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    Masquijo, J J; Campos, L; Torres-Gómez, A; Allende, V

    2013-10-01

    Several disorders of early childhood, such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and clubfoot, requires orthopedic treatment that limits active mobility of the lower extremities for a period of time. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact on locomotor development of the orthopedic treatment in infants less than one year-old. The study included a prospective cohort of consecutive patients diagnosed with developmental dysplasia of the hip (Group A, 24 patients), and clubfoot (Group B, 32 patients) treated from January 2007 to June 2009. A third group (Group C) of 50 healthy children was used as control. The variables evaluated were: months with a brace, age to sit without support, age at the start of crawling, and age at the beginning of walking. The results obtained were analyzed. Comparisons between the three groups were performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. We chose a value of P<.05 as level of statistical significance. The analysis of independent samples showed that the mean age at which the patients began to sit were similar: 6.12, 6.42 and 6.19 months, respectively (P=.249). The mean age for crawling was similar, although with a slight trend toward statistical significance: 8.84, 9.38 and 9.17 months, respectively (P=.08). The age at which they started walking was different between the three groups: 12.14, 13.21 and 12.41 months, respectively (P<.001). Orthopedic treatment of DDH and clubfoot in children less than one year-old slightly slows down the course of normal locomotor development. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Preoperative screening/decolonization for Staphylococcus aureus to prevent orthopedic surgical site infection: prospective cohort study with 2-year follow-up.

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    Rao, Nalini; Cannella, Barbara A; Crossett, Lawrence S; Yates, Adolph J; McGough, Richard L; Hamilton, Cindy W

    2011-12-01

    We quantified surgical site infections (SSIs) after preoperative screening/selective decolonization before elective total joint arthroplasty (TJA) with 2-year follow-up and 2 controls. Concurrent controls (n = 2284) were patients of surgeons not participating in screening/decolonization. Preintervention controls (n = 741) were patients of participating surgeons who underwent TJA the previous year. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriers (321/1285 [25%]) used intranasal mupirocin and chlorhexidine baths as outpatients. Staphylococcal SSIs occurred in no intervention patients (0/321) and 19 concurrent controls. If all SSIs occurred in carriers and 25% of controls were carriers, staphylococcal SSI rate would have been 3.3% in controls (19/571; P = .001). Overall SSI rate decreased from 2.7% (20/741) in preintervention controls to 1.2% (17/1440) in intervention patients (P = .009). Preoperative screening/selective decolonization was associated with fewer SSIs after elective TJA.

  1. Orthopedic evaluation

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    Walden, T.

    1978-01-01

    The clinical performance of the Lixiscope in orthopedics was compared with routine radiography. Portability and size were the major advantages of the Lixiscope. The main disadvantage at this point in time was the Lixiscope's inability to study large areas.

  2. Orthopedic trauma in pregnancy.

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    Desai, Pratik; Suk, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Trauma sustained during pregnancy can trigger uncertainty and anxiety for patient and orthopedic surgeon alike. In particular, orthopedic-related injuries raise concerns about preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care. In this article, we review common concerns about radiation exposure, leukemia, pain management, anticoagulation, and anesthesia. One finding is that radiation risk is minimal when obtaining x-rays for operative planning, provided that the cumulative dose is within 5 rad. We also address safety concerns about patient positioning and staff radiation exposure. In addition, we found that most anesthetics used in pregnancy are category C (ie, safe). Perioperative opioid use for pain management is recommended with little risk. Regarding anticoagulation, low-molecular-weight heparin and fondaparinux are the safest choices. Last, pregnancy is not a contraindication to operative management of pelvic and acetabular fractures.

  3. Transverse dental arch relationship at 9 and 12 years in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate treated with infant orthopedics: a randomized clinical trial (DUTCHCLEFT).

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    Noverraz, R L M; Disse, M A; Ongkosuwito, E M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Prahl, C

    2015-12-01

    A long-term evaluation to assess the transverse dental arch relationships at 9 and 12 years of age in unilateral cleft lip and palate treated with or without infant orthopedics (IO). The hypothesis is that IO has no effect on the transverse dental arch relationship. A prospective two-arm randomized controlled trial (DUTCHCLEFT) in three academic cleft palate centers (Amsterdam, Nijmegen and Rotterdam, the Netherlands). Fifty-four children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate and no other malformations were enrolled in this evaluation. One group wore passive maxillary plates (IO+) during the first year of life, and the other group did not (IO-). Until the age of 1.5, all other interventions were the same. Hard palate was closed simultaneously with bone grafting according to protocol of all teams. Orthodontic treatment was performed when indicated. The transverse dental arch relationship was assessed on dental casts using the modified Huddart/Bodenham score to measure the maxillary arch constriction at 9 and 12 years of age. No significant differences were found between the IO+ and IO- groups. Differences between the centers increased from 9 to 12 years of age. Transverse dental arch relationships at 9 and 12 years of age do not differ between children with UCLP treated with or without IO. There is no orthodontic need to perform IO as applied in this study in children with UCLP.

  4. Preoperative echocardiographic measures of left ventricular mechanics are associated with postoperative vasoactive support in preterm infants undergoing patent ductus arteriosus ligation.

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    Gray, Margaret A; Graham, Eric M; Atz, Andrew M; Bradley, Scott M; Kavarana, Minoo N; Chowdhury, Shahryar M

    2017-07-05

    Preoperative risk factors associated with poor outcomes after patent ductus arteriosus ligation in preterm infants have not been well defined. The aim of this study was to determine the association between preoperative echocardiographic measures of left ventricular mechanics and postoperative clinical outcomes after patent ductus arteriosus ligation. Preterm infants less than 90 days of age with no other significant congenital anomalies who underwent patent ductus arteriosus ligation between 2007 and 2015 were considered for retrospective analysis. The primary outcome was peak postoperative vasoactive inotropic score. Conventional echocardiographic measures of ventricular size, function, and patent ductus arteriosus size were performed. Echocardiographic single-beat, pressure-volume loop analysis estimates of contractility (end-systolic elastance) and afterload (arterial elastance) were calculated. Ventriculoarterial coupling was assessed using the arterial elastance/end-systolic elastance ratio. Multivariable linear regression was performed using clinical and echocardiographic data. Echocardiograms from 101 patients (42.5% male) were analyzed. We found a statistically significant association between vasoactive inotropic score and both end-systolic elastance and arterial elastance. No patient with arterial elastance/end-systolic elastance greater than 0.78 (n = 32) had a vasoactive inotropic score 20 or greater. Analysis of our secondary outcomes found associations between preoperative end-systolic elastance and postoperative urine output less than 1 mL/kg/h at 24 hours, creatinine change greater than 0.5 mg/dL, and time to first extubation. End-systolic elastance and arterial elastance were the only predictors of postoperative vasoactive inotropic score after patent ductus arteriosus ligation in preterm infants. Those neonates with increased contractility and low afterload were at highest risk for elevated inotropic support. These findings suggest a role

  5. Comparison of MR and fluoroscopic mucous fistulography in the pre-operative evaluation of infants with anorectal malformation: a pilot study

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    Alves, Jose C.G.; Lotz, Jan W.; Pitcher, Richard D. [Stellenbosch University, Division of Radiodiagnosis, Department of Medical Imaging and Clinical Oncology, Tygerberg Academic Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Sidler, Daniel [Stellenbosch University, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Tygerberg Academic Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2013-08-15

    Anorectal malformations are often associated with rectal pouch fistulas. Surgical correction requires accurate evaluation of the presence and position of such fistulas. Fluoroscopy is currently the chosen modality for the detection of fistulas. The role of MRI is unexplored. To compare the diagnostic accuracy of MR versus fluoroscopic fistulography in the pre-operative evaluation of infants with anorectal malformation. We conducted a pilot study of infants requiring defunctioning colostomy for initial management of anorectal malformation. Dynamic sagittal steady-state free-precession MRI of the pelvis was acquired during introduction of saline into the mucous fistulas. Findings were compared among MR fistulography, fluoroscopic fistulography and intraoperative inspection. Eight children were included. Median age at fistulography was 15 weeks, inter-quartile range 13-20 weeks; all were boys. There was full agreement among MR fistulography, fluoroscopic fistulography and surgical findings. The pilot data suggest that MR fistulography is promising in the pre-operative evaluation of children with anorectal malformation. (orig.)

  6. Treatment outcomes of pre-surgical infant orthopedics in patients with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Non-syndromic clefts lip and/or palate (CL/P) defects may have manifold significant and detrimental consequences for the affected individuals and their family environment. Although the use of pre-surgical infant orthopedics (PSIO) was introduced as a means to improve management and treatment outcomes, there still remains a controversy. Objective To investigate the effectiveness of PSIO in patients with non-syndromic CL/P and evaluate the quality of the available evidence. Search methods Search without restrictions, together with hand searching, until May 2016. Selection criteria Randomized clinical trials investigating the effects of pre-surgical infant orthopedic appliances. Data collection and analysis Following study retrieval and selection, data extraction and individual study risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool took place. The overall quality of the available evidence was assessed with the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. Results Finally 20 papers (3 unique trials) were identified, involving a total of 118 patients with unilateral complete CL/P and 16 with cleft of the soft and at least two thirds of the hard palate. Eight publications were considered as being of low, four of unclear and eight of high risk of bias. In general, the investigated appliances did not present significant effects when compared to each other or to no treatment in terms of feeding and general body growth, facial esthetics, cephalometric variables, maxillary dentoalveolar variables and dental arch relationships, speech and language evaluation, caregiver-reported outcomes, economic evaluation, as well as, adverse effects and problems. Overall, the quality of the available evidence was considered low. Conclusions The aforementioned findings could provide initial guidance in the clinical setting. However, given the multitude of parameters, which may have affected the results, good practice would suggest further

  7. [Psychosomatic aspects in orthopedics].

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    Köllner, V; Rupp, S

    2012-02-01

    Psychosomatic disease patterns are a common differential diagnosis for orthopedic symptoms. Furthermore, mental factors, such as the method of disease processing or mental comorbidities, such as depression or somatization disorders have a great influence on the chronification of orthopedic complaints and the outcome following orthopedic interventions. The aim of this article is to present the psychosomatic pathomechanisms and disease patterns relevant for orthopedics and to derive recommendations for physician-patient communication, diagnostics, therapy and assessment.

  8. Three-Dimensional Printing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Nguyen, Eric; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically promising technology for rapid prototyping of surgically implantable products. With this commercially available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used to create graspable objects from 3D reconstructed images. Models can enhance patients' understanding of their pathology and surgeon preoperative planning. Customized implants and casts can be made to match an individual's anatomy. This review outlines 3D printing, its current applications in orthopedics, and promising future directions.

  9. Orthobiologics in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Robert F; Mooney, James F

    2017-07-01

    Orthobiologics are biologic devices or products used in orthopedic surgery to augment or enhance bone formation. The use of orthobiologics in pediatric orthopedics is less frequent than in other orthopedic subspecialties, mainly due to the naturally abundant healing potential and bone formation in children compared with adults. However, orthobiologics are used in certain situations in pediatric orthopedics, particularly in spine and foot surgery. Other uses have been reported in conjunction with specific procedures involving the tibia and pelvis. The use of bioabsorable implants to stabilize children's fractures is an emerging concept but has limited supporting data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Preoperative Nutritional Status of the Surgical Patients in Jeju

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    Moon, Myung-Sang; Kim, Sung-Soo; Lee, Sang-Yup; Jeon, Dal-Jae; Yoon, Min-Geun; Kim, Sung-Sim; Moon, Hanlim

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess the preoperative nutritional status of patients with various disorders and to provide data for pre- and postoperative patient management plans, particularly in the elderly. There is no published information on age-matched and disease-matched preoperative nutritional/immunologic status for orthopedic patients, especially in the elderly, in Jeju. Methods In total, 331 patients with four categories of orthopedic conditions were assessed: 92 elective surgery patients, 59 arth...

  11. [Orthopedic approach to asymmetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardinet, Etienne; Duhart, Anne-Marie

    2002-06-01

    Asymmetry being a clinical manifestation of various pathologies, the orthopedic attitude greatly varies from one practitioner to another. Thanks to a better knowledge of the etiopathogenesis, the orthopedic approach in some particular cases reveals very effective, either alone or together with other therapeutics. In mandibular laterodeviations most often consecutive to a maxillary contraction, the best treatment is to expand maxilla which will allow a mandibular centric repositioning. This therapy is often achieved early to limit the asymmetric expression of growth and normalize the dental eruption. In unilateral condylar hypoplasias of variable extension, from a simple defect in condylar growth to a hemifacial microsomia, the therapeutic attitude has mostly evolved. A surgical orthodontic protocol can integrate an increasingly significant orthopedic phase in the course of time. Some authors show that a surgical case may be treated originally only with the help of orthopedics. The devices used are of activator or hyperpropulsor type. In unilateral condylar hyperplasias, orthopedic therapy must be considered with reservations.

  12. The observation of the curative effect on post-operation pian by using loxoprofen sodium preoperation In trauma orthopedics%骨科创伤患者术前使用洛索洛芬钠对术后疼痛的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓霞; 贺文; 王艳

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究骨科创伤患者术前使用洛索洛芬钠对术后疼痛的疗效.方法 将86例骨科创伤患者随机分成实验组(45例)和对照组(41例),实验组术前采用在常规护理干预的基础上使用洛索洛芬钠止痛,对照组术前采用常规护理干预方法止痛,分别观察两组术后疼痛值的改变.结果 实验组术后疼痛值明显低于对照组,经x2检验差异有统计学意义,x2=52.022,P <0.05,实验组术后使用止痛药明显低于对照组,经x2检验差异有统计学意义,x2=13.702,P<0 05.结论 术前使用洛索洛芬钠的患者术后疼痛值降低,减少了术后止痛药物的使用量.%Objective To explore the curative effect on post-operation pian by using loxoprofen sodium preoperation in trauma orthopedics. Methods 86 patients of trauma orthopedics are divided randomly into 2 groups, the experimental group (45cases) , the control group(41cases). Regular nursing intervene and loxoprofen sodium are combine used in the experimental group, and regular nursing intervene is used in the comtrol group, the pain threshold changes were recorded before and after operations , and the differences between the two groups were compared. Results The pain threshold of experimental group is lower than that of control group, and the difference is significant by X2 test( X2 =52. 022,P<0. 05) ; The amount of painkiller used in the experimental group is lower than in the control group, and the difference is significant by X2 test(X2 = 13. 702, P<0.05). Conclusion Using loxoprofen sodium before operation can reduce the pain threshold of patients in trauma orthopedics, and may decrease the quantity of using painkiller after operation .

  13. Rabbit orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Gregory A

    2002-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery in rabbits poses several unique parameters for the veterinary surgeon. It is imperative for the veterinarian to be knowledgeable about the anatomic features of the surgical repair site and to become familiar with a rabbit's pain and discomfort often associated with orthopedic injuries. Handling the perioperative and postoperative pain and potential GI disturbances are crucial for a successful outcome of the surgical case. This article is designed to help the veterinary surgeon prepare for the orthopedic surgical procedure and the peripheral physiologic needs of the rabbit from presentation through recovery.

  14. [Thermoformed orthopedic splints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoric, M

    1990-12-01

    Initially used to make simple splints, thermoforming has led to the development of a new means of application of orthopedic forces. Here we have presented splints which allow the treatment of Class III, Class II and cases of endomaxillitis.

  15. Application of self-efficacy theory in preoperative education on self-controlled analgesia for orthopedic patients%自我效能理论在骨科自控镇痛患者术前教育中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄苑芬; 管玉梅; 赖文娟; 蒋小蓉; 杨毅华; 李丽娟; 黄小红

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of self-efficacy theory applied in preoperative education on self-controlled analgesia (PCA)for orthopedic patients.Methods Totally, 100 patients selecting PCA after a surgery were divided into a control group and an observation group,with 50 cases in each group.The control group received conventional nursing education.Two days before the operation, nurses gave systematic preoperative education on factors affecting self-efficacy formation and changing variables to the observation group by using self-efficacy theory.One day before the operation, education was intensified: patients were asked to operate the PCA pump; they were inspired by good examples; nurses helped them build up confidence of fighting the diseases, and told them how to utilize their support system.Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores at 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours after operation and satisfaction degree were evaluated.Results The pain scores in the observation group at 6th, 12th, 24th and 48th postoperative hour were significantly lower than those in the control group(P<0.01 for all).The observation group also had higher satisfaction with analgesic effect than the control group did (P<0.01).Conclusion Application of self-efficacy theory in preoperative education on self-controlled analgesia helps postoperative orthopedic patients fully mobilize their self-efficacy, decreases the level of postoperative pain, and improves analgesic effect.%目的 观察自我效能理论在骨科自控镇痛患者术前教育中的应用效果.方法 将100例拟于手术后采用自控镇痛的患者随机分为观察组和对照组,各50例.对照组于术前2 d按常规护理模式进行术前教育;观察组于术前2 d运用自我效能理论,根据影响自我效能感形成与改变的因素实施术前教育,术前1 d再次进行强化教育,具体包括让患者亲自操作PCA泵、利用榜样影响激励、帮助患者树立战胜疾病的信心、启

  16. Lasers in orthopedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherk, Henry H.; Rhodes, Anthony L.; Meller, Menachem M.

    1990-06-01

    Orthopedic Surgery is that surgical discipline which deals with the musculoskeletal system. Orthopedists therefore operate on joints, the spine and long bones and engage in such subsecialities as sports medicine, hand surgery, trauma surgery, and joint replacements. Since they must cut and shape bone, cartilage, tendon, and ligament, orthopedists have developed a number of mechanical techniques to achieve these ends and surgical lasers have found few applications in orthopedics because until now they have not been useful for cutting bone. In the past several years, however, there has been considerable interest in several areas within the field of orthopedic surgery that do not entail actual bone surgery and it is expected that as newer and more powerful lasers become available laser osteotomy may become feasible and even routine.

  17. Relationship between optimum preoperative fasting time and intervals between eating and trauma in pediatric patients undergoing emergency orthopedic surgery%急诊骨科患儿术前禁食的适宜时间与进食-创伤间期的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙可; 金梅; 杨庆国

    2013-01-01

    目的 通过超声测量胃窦部横截面积(CSA),探讨急诊骨科患儿术前禁食的适宜时间与进食-创伤间期的关系.方法 择期骨科手术患儿50例,年龄2~7岁,ASA分级Ⅰ或Ⅱ级,体重10 ~ 25 kg,采用随机数字表法,将其分为2组(n=25):禁食6h组(CA组)和禁食8h组(CB组);急诊骨科手术患儿75例,年龄2~7岁,ASA分级Ⅰ或Ⅱ级,体重10~ 25 kg,根据进食-创伤间期分3组:进食-创伤间期≤1h组(TA组,n=22)、进食-创伤间期>1h且≤4h(TB组,n=26),进食-创伤间期>4h(TC组,n=27).CA组于距末次进食6 h(T1)时、CB组于距末次进食8 h(T2)时测量CSA,TA、TB、TC组于T1、T2时测量CSA.结果 CA组与CB组CSA比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).与CA组比较,TA组和TB组CSA增大(P<0.05),TC组差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);与CB组比较,TA组CSA增大(P<0.05),TB组和TC组差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);与TA组比较,TC组T1时、TB组和TC组T2时CSA减小(P<0.05),TB组T1时差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);与TB组比较,L时TC组CSA减小(P<0.05),T2时差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);与T1时比较,T2时TB组CSA减小(P<0.05),TA组和TC组差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 对于急诊骨科患儿,进食-创伤间期1~4h之间建议术前禁食时间达到8h;进食-创伤间期<1h时,即使禁食8h仍不能达到禁食目的,应做好应对返流误吸的措施;进食-创伤间期>4h时者可适当缩短术前禁食时间至6h.%Objective To evaluate the relationship between the optimum preoperative fasting time and in tervals between eating and trauma in pediatric patients undergoing emergency orthopedic surgery by measuring the gastric antral cross-sectional area (CSA) using ultrasound.Methods Fifty ASA physical status Ⅰ or Ⅱ pediatric patients,aged 2-7 yr,weighing 10-25 kg,undergoing elective orthopedic surgery,were randomly divided into 2 groups (n =25 each) using a random number table:6-h fast group (group CA) and 8-h fast group

  18. Elevated prothrombin time on routine preoperative laboratory results in a healthy infant undergoing craniosynostosis repair: Diagnosis and perioperative management of congenital factor VII deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareen L. Jones

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: A thorough history and physical examination with a high clinical suspicion are vital in preventing hemorrhage during surgeries in children with coagulopathies. Abnormal preoperative lab values should always be confirmed and addressed before proceeding with high-risk surgery. A multidisciplinary discussion is essential to optimize the risk-benefit ratio during the perioperative period.

  19. Sarcopenia in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokshan, Steven L; DePasse, J Mason; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a loss of skeletal muscle mass in the elderly that is an independent risk factor for falls, disability, postoperative complications, and mortality. Although its cause is not completely understood, sarcopenia generally results from a complex bone-muscle interaction in the setting of chronic disease and aging. Sarcopenia cannot be diagnosed by muscle mass alone. Diagnosis requires 2 of the following 3 criteria: low skeletal muscle mass, inadequate muscle strength, and inadequate physical performance. Forty-four percent of elderly patients undergoing orthopedic surgery and 24% of all patients 65 to 70 years old are sarcopenic. Although dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and bioelectrical impedance analysis may be used to measure sarcopenia and are relatively inexpensive and accessible, they are generally considered less specific for sarcopenia compared with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Sarcopenia has been shown to predict poor outcomes within the medical and surgical populations and has been directly correlated with increases in taxpayer costs. Strengthening therapy and nutritional supplementation have become the mainstays of sarcopenia treatment. Specifically, the American Medical Directors Association has released guidelines for nutritional supplementation. Although sarcopenia frequently occurs with osteoporosis, it is an independent predictor of fragility fractures. Initiatives to diagnose, treat, and prevent sarcopenia in orthopedic patients are needed. Further investigation must also explore sarcopenia as a predictor of surgical outcomes in orthopedic patients.

  20. [Shock waves in orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, G

    1997-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock waves have revolutionized urological stone treatment. Nowadays shock waves are widely used in orthopedics, too. This article reviews the applications of extracorporeal shock waves on bone and adjacent soft tissue. The osteoneogenetic effect of extracorporeal shock waves has been proven and can be used to treat pseudarthrosis with a success rate of around 75%. Shock waves have a positive effect in tennis and golfer's elbow, calcaneal spur, and the complex called "periarthritis humero-scapularis." The mechanism for this is not yet known, and results from large prospective and randomized studies are still lacking. However, the treatment has been performed many thousands of times. In patients in whom conservative treatment has failed surgery used to be the only choice, but its success rate barely exceeds that of shock wave therapy and surgery can still be done if shock wave therapy fails. Extracorporeal shock waves will have an impact on orthopedics comparable to its effect in urology. Scientific evaluations, professional certifications, quality assurance and reimbursement issues present great challenges.

  1. Soluble Thrombomodulin and Major Orthopedic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina P. Antropova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: A high level of soluble thrombomodulin (sTM is associated with a lower risk of thrombosis but can cause severe bleeding after operations. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT and blood loss are serious threats after orthopedic surgery. The aim of our pilot study was to evaluate the effect of the preoperative level of sTM on coagulation and inflammation as well as the blood loss and the development of symptomatic DVT after total large joint replacement. Methods and Results: In all patients (n=50 who underwent total hip or knee replacement, sTM, PrC, D-dimer, vWF, CRP, and platelets were determined before and after the operation. According to the preoperative sTM level, patients were divided into 2 groups: the thrombomodulin low (TML group (n=25 and thrombomodulin high (TMH group (n=25. The concentration of sTM was 4.4 [3.4, 4.7] ng/ml in the TML-group and 8.7[7.3, 10.6] ng/ml in the TMH-group. After surgery, D-dimer, vWF, platelet count and CRP were higher and total blood loss was lower in the TML group. In the TML-group, a symptomatic DVT was detected in 3(12% patients; in the TMH-group, a symptomatic DVT was identified only in 1(4% case. Conclusion: These findings support the important role of sTM in coagulation, inflammation, bleeding, and presumably in venous thrombosis after major orthopedic surgery.

  2. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  3. Advances in regenerative orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Christopher H

    2013-11-01

    Orthopedic injuries are common and a source of much misery and economic stress. Several relevant tissues, such as cartilage, meniscus, and intra-articular ligaments, do not heal. And even bone, which normally regenerates spontaneously, can fail to mend. The regeneration of orthopedic tissues requires 4 key components: cells, morphogenetic signals, scaffolds, and an appropriate mechanical environment. Although differentiated cells from the tissue in question can be used, most cellular research focuses on the use of mesenchymal stem cells. These can be retrieved from many different tissues, and one unresolved question is the degree to which the origin of the cells matters. Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are also under investigation. Morphogenetic signals are most frequently supplied by individual recombinant growth factors or native mixtures provided by, for example, platelet-rich plasma; mesenchymal stem cells are also a rich source of trophic factors. Obstacles to the sustained delivery of individual growth factors can be addressed by gene transfer or smart scaffolds, but we still lack detailed, necessary information on which delivery profiles are needed. Scaffolds may be based on natural products, synthetic materials, or devitalized extracellular matrix. Strategies to combine these components to regenerate tissue can follow traditional tissue engineering practices, but these are costly, cumbersome, and not well suited to treating large numbers of individuals. More expeditious approaches make full use of intrinsic biological processes in vivo to avoid the need for ex vivo expansion of autologous cells and multiple procedures. Clinical translation remains a bottleneck. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Biomechanical performance of orthopedic gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, E M; Neal, J G; Williams, F M; Stern, C A; Suber, F; Thacker, J G; Edlich, R F

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical performance of commercially available orthopedic gloves to that of a single surgical glove, as well as a double glove system. The orthopedic gloves were found to be thicker than the single surgical glove. This increased thickness of the orthopedic glove was associated with a greater resistance to glove puncture. The thickest orthopedic gloves also had reduced tactile sensitivity when compared to the single surgical glove. In addition, the glove donning forces and glove hydration rates varied considerably. These latter biomechanical performance parameters were not significantly related to glove thickness. The double glove systems tested in this study had similar performance characteristics in regard to many of the orthopedic gloves. The glove donning forces for the double glove systems were the lowest of the gloves tested. In addition, the double glove systems displayed the greatest resistance to glove hydration of the gloves tested. Their performance in the glove hydration tests and the force required to don the double glove systems were much more desirable than any of the orthopedic gloves. The results of this study indicate that the double glove systems may provide a desirable alternative to the use of the single orthopedic gloves.

  5. Orthopedic Health: Targeting Musculoskeletal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Orthopedic Health Targeting Musculoskeletal Pain Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... Ph.D., Chief of the Cartilage Biology and Orthopaedics Branch, holds a vial containing knee cartilage that ...

  6. Plasma Biomedicine in Orthopedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Satsohi

    2012-10-01

    Various effects of plasmas irradiation on cells, tissues, and biomaterials relevant for orthopedic applications have been examined. For direct application of plasmas to living cells or tissues, dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) with helium flows into ambient air were used. For biomaterial processing, on the other hand, either helium DBDs mentioned above or low-pressure discharges generated in a chamber were used. In this presentation, plasma effects on cell proliferation and plasma treatment for artificial bones will be discussed. First, the conditions for enhanced cell proliferation in vitro by plasma applications have been examined. The discharge conditions for cell proliferation depend sensitively on cell types. Since cell proliferation can be enhanced even when the cells are cultured in a plasma pre-treated medium, long-life reactive species generated in the medium by plasma application or large molecules (such as proteins) in the medium modified by the plasma are likely to be the cause of cell proliferation. It has been found that there is strong correlation between (organic) hydroperoxide generation and cell proliferation. Second, effects of plasma-treated artificial bones made of porous hydroxyapatite (HA) have been examined in vitro and vivo. It has been found that plasma treatment increases hydrophilicity of the surfaces of microscopic inner pores, which directly or indirectly promotes differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells introduced into the pores and therefore causes faster bone growth. The work has been performed in collaboration with Prof. H. Yoshikawa and his group members at the School of Medicine, Osaka University.

  7. Orthopedic workforce planning in Germany - an analysis of orthopedic accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jan; Müller, Peter; Maier, Werner; Groneberg, David A

    2017-01-01

    In Germany, orthopedic workforce planning relies on population-to-provider-ratios represented by the 'official degree of care provision'. However, with geographic information systems (GIS), more sophisticated measurements are available. By utilizing GIS-based technologies we analyzed the current state of demand and supply of the orthopedic workforce in Germany (orthopedic accessibility) with the integrated Floating Catchment Area method. The analysis of n = 153,352,220 distances revealed significant geographical variations on national scale: 5,617,595 people (6.9% of total population) lived in an area with significant low orthopedic accessibility (average z-score = -4.0), whereas 31,748,161 people (39.0% of total population) lived in an area with significant high orthopedic accessibility (average z-score = 8.0). Accessibility was positively correlated with the degree of urbanization (r = 0.49; p<0.001) and the official degree of care provision (r = 0.33; p<0.001) and negatively correlated with regional social deprivation (r = -0.47; p<0.001). Despite advantages of simpler measures regarding implementation and acceptance in health policy, more sophisticated measures of accessibility have the potential to reduce costs as well as improve health care. With this study, significant geographical variations were revealed that show the need to reduce oversupply in less deprived urban areas in order to enable adequate care in more deprived rural areas.

  8. Value and clinical application of orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm in CT scans after orthopedic metal implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yi; Pan, Shinong; Zhao, Xudong; Guo, Wenli; He, Ming; Guo, Qiyong [Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm (O-MAR) in CT orthopedic metal artifact reduction at different tube voltages, identify an appropriate low tube voltage for clinical practice, and investigate its clinical application. The institutional ethical committee approved all the animal procedures. A stainless-steel plate and four screws were implanted into the femurs of three Japanese white rabbits. Preoperative CT was performed at 120 kVp without O-MAR reconstruction, and postoperative CT was performed at 80–140 kVp with O-MAR. Muscular CT attenuation, artifact index (AI) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were compared between preoperative and postoperative images (unpaired t test), between paired O-MAR and non-O-MAR images (paired Student t test) and among different kVp settings (repeated measures ANOVA). Artifacts' severity, muscular homogeneity, visibility of inter-muscular space and definition of bony structures were subjectively evaluated and compared (Wilcoxon rank-sum test). In the clinical study, 20 patients undertook CT scan at low kVp with O-MAR with informed consent. The diagnostic satisfaction of clinical images was subjectively assessed. Animal experiments showed that the use of O-MAR resulted in accurate CT attenuation, lower AI, better SNR, and higher subjective scores (p < 0.010) at all tube voltages. O-MAR images at 100 kVp had almost the same AI and SNR as non-O-MAR images at 140 kVp. All O-MAR images were scored ≥ 3. In addition, 95% of clinical CT images performed at 100 kVp were considered satisfactory. O-MAR can effectively reduce orthopedic metal artifacts at different tube voltages, and facilitates low-tube-voltage CT for patients with orthopedic metal implants.

  9. Medical photography: principles for orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Metin; Bülbül, Murat; Toker, Serdar; Beksaç, Burak; Kara, Adnan

    2014-04-05

    Medical photography is used clinically for patient evaluation, treatment decisions, and scientific documentation. Although standards for medical photography exist in many branches of medicine, we have not encountered such criteria in publications in the area of orthopedics. This study aims to (1) assess the quality of medical images used in an orthopedic publication and (2) to propose standards for medical photography in this area. Clinical photographs were reviewed from all issues of a journal published between the years 2008 and 2012. A quality of clinical images was developed based on the criteria published for the specialties of dermatology and cosmetic surgery. All images were reviewed on the appropriateness of background, patient preparation, and technique. In this study, only 44.9% of clinical images in an orthopedic publication adhered to the proposed conventions. Standards have not been established for medical photography in orthopedics as in other specialty areas. Our results suggest that photographic clinical information in orthopedic publications may be limited by inadequate presentation. We propose that formal conventions for clinical images should be established.

  10. Moral Dilemmas in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, John J; Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Otsuka, Norman Y

    2015-12-01

    All orthopedic surgeons face moral dilemmas on a regular basis; however, little has been written about the moral dilemmas that are encountered when providing orthopedic care to pediatric patients and their families. This article aims to provide surgeons with a better understanding of how bioethics and professionalism apply to the care of their pediatric patients. First, several foundational concepts of both bioethics and professionalism are summarized, and definitions are offered for 16 important terms within the disciplines. Next, some of the unique aspects of pediatric orthopedics as a subspecialty are reviewed before engaging in a discussion of 5 common moral dilemmas within the field. Those dilemmas include the following: (1) obtaining informed consent and assent for either surgery or research from pediatric patients and their families; (2) performing cosmetic surgery on pediatric patients; (3) caring for pediatric patients with cognitive or physical impairments; (4) caring for injured pediatric athletes; and (5) meeting the demand for pediatric orthopedic care in the United States. Pertinent considerations are reviewed for each of these 5 moral dilemmas, thereby better preparing surgeons for principled moral decision making in their own practices. Each of these dilemmas is inherently complex with few straightforward answers; however, orthopedic surgeons have an obligation to take the lead and better define these kinds of difficult issues within their field. The lives of pediatric patients and their families will be immeasurably improved as a result. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. [Preoperative fasting guidelines: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Muñoz, A C; Busto Aguirreurreta, N; Tomás Braulio, J

    2015-03-01

    Anesthesiology societies have issued various guidelines on preoperative fasting since 1990, not only to decrease the incidence of lung aspiration and anesthetic morbidity, but also to increase patient comfort prior to anesthesia. Some of these societies have been updating their guidelines, as such that, since 2010, we now have 2 evidence-based preoperative fasting guidelines available. In this article, an attempt is made to review these updated guidelines, as well as the current instructions for more controversial patients such as infants, the obese, and a particular type of ophthalmic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. [The beginnings of orthopedic surgery in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Chanan

    2013-08-01

    In early mandatory Israel, orthopedics was mainly conservative, The first modern orthopedic surgeon was Ernst Spira from Czechoslovakia who established an orthopedic service at the Beilinson Hospital in Petah Tikva and left in 1948 to establish the Orthopedic Department and the Rehabilitation Center in Tel Hashomer, which treated the War of Independence casualties including amputees and victims of spinal cord injuries. A second orthopedic department was opened in Tel Hashomer by Shmuel Weissman who left in 1961 to open the Orthopedic Department at the Ichilov hospital in Tel Aviv. Shmuel Weissman became the first Chairman of Orthopedic Surgery at the Tel Aviv University medical school. In 1955, Myer Makin opened a modern orthopedic department in the Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem and the Alyn Hospital for crippled children. In 1951, Assaf Harofeh Hospital opened the Department of Orthopedic Surgery headed by Anatol Axer who specialized in the treatment and rehabilitation of polio patients. The majority of the second generation of orthopedic department directors was trained by these four surgeons. Major developments in the 1960s and 1970s were the introduction of the AO system revolutionizing fracture treatment from conservative to operative treatment, the advent of total hip and knee replacements, Harrington instrumentation in spinal surgery and arthroscopy were major advances in orthopedic patient care brought to Israel by the aforementioned second generation of orthopedic surgeons. Hand surgery became an independent subspecialty of orthopedics and was lead by the internationally renowned hand surgeon, Isidore Kessler.

  13. Decision making in ruminant orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, J F; Adams, S B

    1996-03-01

    Decision making in ruminant orthopedics is determined by many factors, the most of important of which is age, size, and value of the patient, the nature of the injury, the prognosis for effective treatment and satisfactory healing, the intentions of the client, and the experiences of the veterinarian. Ruminant orthopedics currently is expanding to include the treatment of llamas and small ruminants as companion animals in addition to the treatment of valuable livestock. The future promises increasing sophistication in treatments and an ever higher quality of patient care.

  14. Diagnostic imaging in bovine orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Johann; Geissbühler, Urs; Steiner, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Although a radiographic unit is not standard equipment for bovine practitioners in hospital or field situations, ultrasound machines with 7.5-MHz linear transducers have been used in bovine reproduction for many years, and are eminently suitable for evaluation of orthopedic disorders. The goal of this article is to encourage veterinarians to use radiology and ultrasonography for the evaluation of bovine orthopedic disorders. These diagnostic imaging techniques improve the likelihood of a definitive diagnosis in every bovine patient but especially in highly valuable cattle, whose owners demand increasingly more diagnostic and surgical interventions that require high-level specialized techniques.

  15. Treatment of severe orthopedic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dernell, W S

    1999-09-01

    Severe infections are uncommon following orthopedic surgery, yet they can be frustrating for the veterinarian and owner to treat and can result in devastating consequences for the patient. This article reviews the common causes for postoperative infection, reviews established treatment, and introduces newer methods for treatment and control. A thorough understanding of the pathogenesis, application of appropriate diagnostic procedures, the institution of aggressive treatment regimens, with adherence to established principles, will often result in satisfactory outcomes even with severe orthopedic infections. For those more refractory to treatment, the use of newer treatment methods, specifically locally implantable materials for sustained release of antimicrobials can improve success in the treatment of these more difficult cases.

  16. Imaging of orthopedic sports injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhoenacker, F.M.; Gielen, J.L. (eds.) [University Hospital Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Maas, M. [Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology

    2007-07-01

    This volume provides an updated review of imaging abnormalities in orthopedic sports injuries. The first part of the book contains background information on relevant basic science and general imaging principles in sports traumatology. The second part comprises a topographic discussion of sports injuries. Each chapter highlights the merit of different imaging techniques, focused on a specific clinical problem. In the third part, natural history, monitoring and follow-up by imaging are discussed. This well-illustrated book will be of value for musculoskeletal radiologists, orthopedic surgeons, sports physicians and everyone else involved in sports medicine. (orig.)

  17. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN OPHTHALMOLOGY AND ORTHOPEDICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazac, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Although orthopedics and ophthalmology seem to be two different medical specialties, numerous studies that have been conducted in the past 35 years have shown a tight connection between several ocular pathologies and an increased risk of hip fractures due to falling. This article aims to review the ocular pathologies that have been proven to be associated with an increased risk of falling, to integrate the results of several studies showing a direct relationship between ocular pathologies and an increased risk of falling and finally to suggest ways in which the incidence of traumatic orthopedic injuries can be reduced by applying ophthalmologic principles.

  18. [Vertical control and orthopedic therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardinet, E; Bazert, C; Boileau, M J; Carat, T; Darqué, F; de Brondeau, F; Dorignac, D; Duhart, A M; El Amrani Darqué, K; Pujol, A; Rzadkiewicz, A; Sampeur, M

    2003-09-01

    Control of the vertical development of the face is a key element in assuring the success of orthopedic treatment, as much for its effects on anterior vertical dimension as for its influence on correction of the sagittal discrepancy between the jaws. An effective management of this control demands respect for the equilibrium between posterior and anterior face, as described by Schudy. The authors review the details of the application of orthopedic therapy on the different elements of this equilibrium and then, present the modalities of vertical control appropriate to each appliance.

  19. Growth factors in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharia, Comeliu; Niculescu, Marius; Despa, Nicoleta; Simionescu, Maya; Jinga, Victor; Fleseriu, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Growth factors have represented an essential issue of interest for the researchers and clinicians in orthopedics and trauma over the last 40 years. In the last 10 to 15 years, the advances registered in this field have permitted the identification of the most active cellular and humoral factors as well as the improvement of their use in the orthopedic and trauma surgery. Their domain of application has been continuously enlarged and the results have been visible from the beginning. The authors present their appreciation on the actual state of this subject as well as their experience with results and related conclusions.

  20. Orthopedic Management of Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Jeffrey D.; Segal, Lee S.

    2010-01-01

    The management of orthopedic problems in spina bifida has seen a dramatic change over the past 10 years. The negative effects of spasticity, poor balance, and the tethered cord syndrome on ambulatory function are better appreciated. There is less emphasis on the hip radiograph and more emphasis on the function of the knee and the prevention of…

  1. Humanism and sciences of orthopedics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Gui-xing

    2011-01-01

    Ten years have silently passed by since the beginning of the 21st century.Looking back upon the history of Chinese Orthopedics development,we cannot but feel amazed at its great progressions and remarkable achievements in such broad fields.

  2. Financial debt of orthopedic residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, John S; Beebe, Kathleen S; Benevenia, Joseph; Karanfilian, Briette; Berberian, Wayne S

    2012-04-01

    Many orthopedic residents accrue considerable debt by residency graduation. These debts for graduating medical students continue to increase due to the yearly increase of medical school tuition. The purpose of this study was to examine the causes of financial debt, as well the effects of debt on orthopedic residents.Orthopedic residents from postgraduate years 1 to 5 (N=27) completed an anonymous, optional financial survey. The survey asked questions regarding the characteristics of the residents' debt and their concern caused by their debt. All residents from our institute (N=27) voluntarily participated in the survey. The residents consisted of 4 (15%) women and 23 (85%) men, with 14 (56%) single residents and 12 (44%) married residents. No statistically significant difference existed in total debt >$100,000 between single and married residents or men and women. Forty-eight percent (n=13) of the residents had medical educational debt >$100,000, whereas 45% (n=12) had total debt >$200,000. Residents with total debt >$100,000 were concerned about their debt, whereas 1 of 4 residents with orthopedic residents financially and may cause stress and hinder their medical training. Appropriate measures should be taken to help residents properly manage their debt and to provide supplemental assistance with their financial struggles.

  3. Orthopedic Management of Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Jeffrey D.; Segal, Lee S.

    2010-01-01

    The management of orthopedic problems in spina bifida has seen a dramatic change over the past 10 years. The negative effects of spasticity, poor balance, and the tethered cord syndrome on ambulatory function are better appreciated. There is less emphasis on the hip radiograph and more emphasis on the function of the knee and the prevention of…

  4. Presurgical orthopedics and satisfaction in motherhood: a randomized clinical trial (Dutchcleft).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prahl, C.; Prahl-Andersen, B.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of infant orthopedics on satisfaction in motherhood. DESIGN: Prospective two-arm randomized controlled trial in parallel with three participating academic cleft palate centers. Treatment allocation was concealed and was performed by means of a computerized balanced all

  5. Feasibility study of preoperative timing for fasting drink for infant with critical congenital heart disease%危重先天性心脏病小婴儿术前禁食禁饮时间可行性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海霞; 付勤; 潘晓兰; 李博; 马超

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the ways of shortening fasting drink time for infant with critical congenital heart disease. Method 556 infants with critical congenital heart disease was randomly divided into two groups, 264 patients in control group, 292 patients in experimental group. Patients in control group was given traditional fasting drink scheme, include fasting eight hours and drinking 6 hours before anesthesia. Patients in experimental group was given conventional fast 4~6 hours and drinking 2 hours. The indicators, including thirsty, sense of hungry, fatigue, crying, vomiting and aspiration, body temperature, oxygen attack and heart failure, gastric liquid pH and blood sugar, was observed and compared between the two groups. Result The incidence of thirsty, hungry, fatigue, crying,body temperature more than 38. 0 ℃ , oxygen attack and heart failure in experimental group was significantly lower than that of in control group(P0. 05). Conclusion Preoperative fast 4~6 hours and the drinking 2 hours for selective surgery infant with critical congenital heart and disease was safe. It didn't increase gastric pH level, vomiting and aspiration during operation, and can reduce adverse reactions.%目的 探讨缩短危重先天性心脏病小婴儿术前禁食禁饮时间.方法 将择期手术的556例危重先天性心脏病小婴儿随机分为两组,对照组264例,实验组292例.对照组采用传统的禁食、禁饮方案,麻醉前常规禁食8h,禁饮6h.实验组术前常规禁食4~6 h,禁饮2h,观察比较两组患儿的口渴、饥饿感、疲乏无力、哭闹、术中呕吐及误吸、体温、缺氧发作和心力衰竭的发生率,测量胃液pH值及血糖值.结果 与对照组比较,实验组的口渴、饥饿感、疲乏无力程度、哭闹、体温≥38.0℃、缺氧发作和心力衰竭的发生率均显著低于对照组,差异有显著意义(P<0.05);两组血糖值的差异也有显著意义(P<0.05);胃液pH值差异无显著意义(P>0

  6. Validity of subjective smoking status in orthopedic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bender D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Bender,* Patrick Haubruck,* Sonja Boxriker, Sebastian Korff, Gerhard Schmidmaier, Arash Moghaddam Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Center for Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: In this level 1 diagnostic study, we analyzed the validity of subjective smoking status and, as secondary research question, the smoking cessation adherence in orthopedic patients during a routine hospital stay of nonunion patients by measuring serum cotinine.  Methods: We included patients undergoing revision surgery due to nonunion of long bones. Patients were interviewed about their smoking status. Blood samples were taken from all the patients prior to surgery and for an additional 6 weeks following surgery. Serum levels of cotinine were measured, and coherence between subjective smoking status and objective cotinine analysis was evaluated.  Results: Between March 2012 and August 2014, we enrolled 136 patients. Six of the 26 “previous smokers” (23% and four of the 65 “nonsmokers” (6% had serum cotinine above cutoff levels. In self-labeled smokers, serum cotinine levels averaged at 2,367.4±14,885.9 ng/mL (with a median of 100 ng/mL, whereas in previous smokers the levels averaged at 4,270±19,619.4 ng/mL (with a median of 0 ng/mL and in the nonsmokers group the levels averaged at 12±53.9 ng/mL (with a median of 0.03 ng/mL. Overall, the subjective smoking status matched serum cotinine testing in 88% of the cases. Sensitivity was 79.6% and specificity was 93.1%. Ninety-one percent of the patients with preoperative positive serum values were still positive at follow-up.  Conclusion: In this study, we could show that subjective smoking status in orthopedic patients is predominantly reliable as validated by objective cotinine measurements; however, patients who declare themselves as “previous smokers” are at elevated risk

  7. Diagnosis and management of reptile orthopedic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mark A

    2002-01-01

    As veterinarians expand their understanding of the specific husbandry requirements for captive reptiles, nutritionally associated orthopedic injuries should decrease. Orthopedic injuries in wild reptiles, however, will continue to increase as new infrastructure encroaches on the habitats of these animals. Research should be pursued that focuses on improving our understanding of pain management in reptiles, on developing techniques to expedite bone healing, and on creating new orthopedic techniques that provide rigid stabilization without the use of temperature-sensitive materials.

  8. Orthopedic conditions of the avian head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheler, Colette L

    2002-01-01

    Orthopedic problems of the avian head generally fall into two main categories: congenital and traumatic. Congenital lesions of the beak are not uncommon in psittacine birds but are extremely rare in raptors. Trauma accounts for most of the remaining orthopedic problems seen in the area of the body. This article discusses the most common conditions and injuries causing orthopedic problems of the beak, eye, and skull of avian patients.

  9. Wholistic orthopedics: Is this the right way to treat geriatric orthopedic patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebnezar, John; Bali, Yogita; John, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Geriatric orthopedic problems poses different challenges in their management. Conventional treatment methods like drugs, physiotherapy and surgeries are inadequate. A Geriatric orthopedic patient suffers as a whole and not in isolation. This article highlights the importance of managing geriatric orthopedic patients as a whole and outlines the various steps of wholistic management. PMID:28149067

  10. Vascular Injury in Orthopedic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Panagopoulos, George N; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Mantas, George; Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Sfyroeras, George S; Lazaris, Andreas; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2016-07-01

    Vascular injury in orthopedic trauma is challenging. The risk to life and limb can be high, and clinical signs initially can be subtle. Recognition and management should be a critical skill for every orthopedic surgeon. There are 5 types of vascular injury: intimal injury (flaps, disruptions, or subintimal/intramural hematomas), complete wall defects with pseudoaneurysms or hemorrhage, complete transections with hemorrhage or occlusion, arteriovenous fistulas, and spasm. Intimal defects and subintimal hematomas with possible secondary occlusion are most commonly associated with blunt trauma, whereas wall defects, complete transections, and arteriovenous fistulas usually occur with penetrating trauma. Spasm can occur after either blunt or penetrating trauma to an extremity and is more common in young patients. Clinical presentation of vascular injury may not be straightforward. Physical examination can be misleading or initially unimpressive; a normal pulse examination may be present in 5% to 15% of patients with vascular injury. Detection and treatment of vascular injuries should take place within the context of the overall resuscitation of the patient according to the established principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Advances in the field, made mostly during times of war, have made limb salvage the rule rather than the exception. Teamwork, familiarity with the often subtle signs of vascular injuries, a high index of suspicion, effective communication, appropriate use of imaging modalities, sound knowledge of relevant technique, and sequence of surgical repairs are among the essential factors that will lead to a successful outcome. This article provides a comprehensive literature review on a subject that generates significant controversy and confusion among clinicians involved in the care of trauma patients. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):249-259.].

  11. Locking mechanism for orthopedic braces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, J. I.; Epps, C. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An orthopedic brace locking mechanism is described which under standing or walking conditions cannot be unlocked, however under sitting conditions the mechanism can be simply unlocked so as to permit bending of the patient's knee. Other features of the device include: (1) the mechanism is rendered operable, and inoperable, dependent upon the relative inclination of the brace with respect to the ground; (2) the mechanism is automatically locked under standing or walking conditions and is manually unlocked under sitting conditions; and (3) the mechanism is light in weight and is relatively small in size.

  12. Using Aerospace Technology To Design Orthopedic Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Technology originally developed to optimize designs of composite-material aerospace structural components used to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants. Development effort focused on designing knee implants, long-term goal to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants in general.

  13. ANALYSIS OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS AFTER ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY: A CASE-CONTROL STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas, Mariana de Queiroz Leite; Costa, Ana Maria Magalhães; Mendes, Pedro Henrique Barros; Gomes, Saint Clair

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To describe the rate of surgical site infections in children undergoing orthopedic surgery in centers of excellence and analyze the patients’ profiles. Methods: Medical records of pediatric patients undergoing orthopedic surgery in the Jamil Haddad National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics from January 2012 to December 2013 were analyzed and monitored for one year. Patients diagnosed with surgical site infection were matched with patients without infection by age, date of admission, field of orthopedic surgery and type of surgical procedure. Patient, surgical and follow-up variables were examined. Descriptive, bivariate and correspondence analyses were performed to evaluate the patients’ profiles. Results: 347 surgeries and 10 surgical site infections (2.88%) were identified. There was association of infections with age - odds ratio (OR) 11.5 (confidence interval - 95%CI 1.41-94.9) -, implant - OR 7.3 (95%CI 1.46-36.3) -, preoperative period - OR 9.8 (95%CI 1.83-53.0), and length of hospitalization - OR 20.6 (95%CI 3.7-114.2). The correspondence analysis correlated the infection and preoperative period, weight, weight Z-score, age, implant, type of surgical procedure, and length of hospitalization. Average time to diagnosis of infection occurred 26.5±111.46 days after surgery. Conclusions: The rate of surgical site infection was 2.88%, while higher in children over 24 months of age who underwent surgical implant procedures and had longer preoperative periods and lengths of hospitalization. This study identified variables for the epidemiological surveillance of these events in children. Available databases and appropriate analysis methods are essential to monitor and improve the quality of care offered to the pediatric population.

  14. Orthopedic Prosthetic Infections: Plastic Surgery Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaike, Jesse D; Kaufman, Matthew G; Izaddoost, Shayan A

    2016-05-01

    Orthopedic prosthetic infections are potentially devastating complications. Plastic surgeons are frequently consulted to aid in the management of the soft tissue defects that are created by these infections. A review of the existing literature was performed to identify established treatment methods for soft tissue coverage of orthopedic hardware infections for a variety of anatomic locations. The following treatment guidelines and soft tissue reconstructive options were identified as viable options for the management of exposed or infected orthopedic hardware. This review provides descriptions of the various soft tissue reconstructive options available as well as adjunctive treatment methods.

  15. Physical modification of polyetheretherketone for orthopedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ya-Wei; Zhang, Li-Nan; Hou, Zeng-Tao; Ye, Xin; Gu, Hong-Sheng; Yan, Guo-Ping; Shang, Peng

    2014-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is regarded as one of the most potential candidates for replacing current implant applications. To obtain good bone-implant interfaces, many modification methods have been developed to enable PEEK and PEEK-based composites from bio-inert to bioactive. Among them, physical methods have aroused significant attention and been widely used to modify PEEK for orthopedic implants. This review summarizes current physical modification techniques of PEEK for orthopedic applications, which include composite strategies, surface coating methods and irradiation treatments. The positive consequences of those modification methods will encourage continuing investigations and stimulate the wide range of applications of PEEK-based implants in orthopedics.

  16. Applied Nanotechnology and Nanoscience in Orthopedic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvidou, Olga D; Bolia, Ioanna K; Chloros, George D; Goumenos, Stavros D; Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Galanis, Evanthia C; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2016-09-01

    Nanomedicine is based on the fact that biological molecules behave similarly to nanomolecules, which have a size of less than 100 nm, and is now affecting most areas of orthopedics. In orthopedic oncology, most of the in vitro and in vivo studies have used osteosarcoma or Ewing sarcoma cell lineages. In this article, tumor imaging and treatment nanotechnology applications, including nanostructure delivery of chemotherapeutic agents, gene therapy, and the role of nano-selenium-coated implants, are outlined. Finally, the potential role of nanotechnology in addressing the challenges of drug and radiotherapy resistance is discussed. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):280-286.].

  17. 21 CFR 888.4540 - Orthopedic manual surgical instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Orthopedic manual surgical instrument. 888.4540... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4540 Orthopedic manual surgical instrument. (a) Identification. An orthopedic manual surgical instrument is a nonpowered hand-held...

  18. Value of 3-D CT in classifying acetabular fractures during orthopedic residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Jeffrey; Halvorson, Jason; Carroll, Eben; Webb, Lawrence X

    2012-05-01

    The complex anatomy of the pelvis and acetabulum have historically made classification and interpretation of acetabular fractures difficult for orthopedic trainees. The addition of 3-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography (CT) scan has gained popularity in preoperative planning, identification, and education of acetabular fractures given their complexity. Therefore, the authors examined the value of 3-D CT compared with conventional radiography in classifying acetabular fractures at different levels of orthopedic training. Their hypothesis was that 3-D CT would improve correct identification of acetabular fractures compared with conventional radiography.The classic Letournel fracture pattern classification system was presented in quiz format to 57 orthopedic residents and 20 fellowship-trained orthopedic traumatologists. A case consisted of (1) plain radiographs and 2-dimensional axial CT scans or (2) 3-D CT scans. All levels of training showed significant improvement in classifying acetabular fractures with 3-D vs 2-D CT, with the greatest benefit from 3-D CT found in junior residents (postgraduate years 1-3).Three-dimensional CT scans can be an effective educational tool for understanding the complex spatial anatomy of the pelvis, learning acetabular fracture patterns, and correctly applying a widely accepted fracture classification system.

  19. Antimicrobial technology in orthopedic and spinal implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltorai, Adam EM; Haglin, Jack; Perera, Sudheesha; Brea, Bielinsky A; Ruttiman, Roy; Garcia, Dioscaris R; Born, Christopher T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Infections can hinder orthopedic implant function and retention. Current implant-based antimicrobial strategies largely utilize coating-based approaches in order to reduce biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion. Several emerging antimicrobial technologies that integrate a multidisciplinary combination of drug delivery systems, material science, immunology, and polymer chemistry are in development and early clinical use. This review outlines orthopedic implant antimicrobial technology, its current applications and supporting evidence, and clinically promising future directions. PMID:27335811

  20. Core Concepts: Orthopedic Intern Curriculum Boot Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Mark A; Kazarian, Erick; King, Brandon; Biermann, Janet S; Carpenter, James E; Caird, Michelle S; Irwin, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic surgical interns must gain a broad array of clinical skills in a short time. However, recent changes in health care have limited resident-patient exposures. With the reported success of simulation training in the surgical literature, the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) and Residency Review Committee for Orthopaedic Surgery have required that surgical simulation training be a component of the intern curricula in orthopedic surgical residencies. This study examined the short-term effectiveness of an orthopedic "intern boot camp" covering 7 of 17 simulation training concept modules published by the ABOS. Eight orthopedic post-graduate year 1 (PGY-1) residents (study group) completed a structured 3-month curriculum and were compared with 7 post-graduate year 2 (PGY-2) residents (comparison group) who had just completed their orthopedic surgical internship. Seven core skills were assessed using both task-specific and global rating scales. The PGY-1 residents demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in all 7 modules with respect to their task-specific pre-test scores: sterile technique (P=.001), wound closure (P<.001), knot tying (P=.017), casting and splinting (P<.001), arthrocentesis (P=.01), basics of internal fixation (P<.001), and compartment syndrome evaluation (P=.004). After the camp, PGY-1 and -2 scores in task-specific measures were not significantly different. A 3-month simulation-based boot camp instituted early in orthopedic internship elevated a variety of clinical skills to levels exhibited by PGY-2 residents.

  1. Clinical and Cost Implications of Inpatient Versus Outpatient Orthopedic Surgeries: A Systematic Review of the Published Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Dennis C; Li, Chuan Silvia; Sprague, Sheila; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-12-28

    The number of outpatient orthopedic surgeries performed within North America continues to increase. The impact of this change in services on patient outcomes is largely unknown. The objective of this review is to compare patient outcomes and associated costs for outpatient orthopedic surgeries traditionally performed in hospital to inpatient surgeries, as well as to summarize the eligibility and preoperative education requirements for outpatient orthopedic surgery in North America. We performed a systematic review of Medline, Pubmed and Embase databases for articles comparing the clinical and economic impact of outpatient orthopedic surgical procedures versus inpatient procedures in North America. We reported on requirements for inpatient versus outpatient care, preoperative education requirements, complications and patient outcomes, patient satisfaction, and when available total mean costs. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria for this review. Eligibility requirements for outpatient orthopedic surgery within the included studies varied, but generally included: patient consent, a caregiver at home following surgery, close proximity to an outpatient center, and no history of serious medical problems. Preoperative education programs were not always compulsory and practices varied between outpatient centers. All of the reviewed studies reported that outpatient surgeries had similar or improved level of pain and rates of nausea. Outpatients reported increased satisfaction with the care they received. As expected, outpatient procedures were less expensive than inpatient procedures. This review found that outpatient procedures in North America appear to be less expensive and safe alternatives to inpatient care for patients who are at lower risk for complications and procedures that do not necessarily require close hospital level care monitoring following same day surgery.

  2. Clinical and cost implications of inpatient versus outpatient orthopedic surgeries: a systematic review of the published literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis C. Crawford

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The number of outpatient orthopedic surgeries performed within North America continues to increase. The impact of this change in services on patient outcomes is largely unknown. The objective of this review is to compare patient outcomes and associated costs for outpatient orthopedic surgeries traditionally performed in hospital to inpatient surgeries, as well as to summarize the eligibility and preoperative education requirements for outpatient orthopedic surgery in North America. We performed a systematic review of Medline, Pubmed and Embase databases for articles comparing the clinical and economic impact of outpatient orthopedic surgical procedures versus inpatient procedures in North America. We reported on requirements for inpatient versus outpatient care, preoperative education requirements, complications and patient outcomes, patient satisfaction, and when available total mean costs. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria for this review. Eligibility requirements for outpatient orthopedic surgery within the included studies varied, but generally included: patient consent, a caregiver at home following surgery, close proximity to an outpatient center, and no history of serious medical problems. Preoperative education programs were not always compulsory and practices varied between outpatient centers. All of the reviewed studies reported that outpatient surgeries had similar or improved level of pain and rates of nausea. Outpatients reported increased satisfaction with the care they received. As expected, outpatient procedures were less expensive than inpatient procedures. This review found that outpatient procedures in North America appear to be less expensive and safe alternatives to inpatient care for patients who are at lower risk for complications and procedures that do not necessarily require close hospital level care monitoring following same day surgery.

  3. Orthopedic Management of Scoliosis by Garches Brace and Spinal Fusion in SMA Type 2 Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catteruccia, Michela; Vuillerot, Carole; Vaugier, Isabelle; Leclair, Danielle; Azzi, Viviane; Viollet, Louis; Estournet, Brigitte; Bertini, Enrico; Quijano-Roy, Susana

    2015-11-21

    Scoliosis is the most debilitating issue in SMA type 2 patients. No evidence confirms the efficacy of Garches braces (GB) to delay definitive spinal fusion. Compare orthopedic and pulmonary outcomes in children with SMA type 2 function to management. We carried out a monocentric retrospective study on 29 SMA type 2 children who had spinal fusion between 1999 and 2009. Patients were divided in 3 groups: group 1-French patients (12 children) with a preventive use of GB; group 2-French patients (10 children) with use of GB after the beginning of the scoliosis curve; and group 3-Italian patients (7 children) with use of GB after the beginning of the scoliosis curve referred to our centre to perform orthopedic preoperative management. Mean preoperative and postoperative Cobb angle were significantly lower in the group 1 of proactively braced than in group 2 or 3 (Anova p = 0.03; Kruskal Wallis test p = 0.05). Better surgical results were observed in patients with a minor preoperative Cobb angle (r = 0.92 p SMA type 2. Further prospective studies comparing SMA management are needed to confirm these results. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions to Authors on jbjs.org for a complete description of levels of evidence (Retrospective comparative study).

  4. New biomaterials for orthopedic implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong KL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kevin L Ong, Brian Min Yun, Joshua B WhiteExponent, Inc., Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: With the increasing use of orthopedic implants worldwide, there continues to be great interest in the development of novel technologies to further improve the effective clinical performance of contemporary treatment modalities and devices. Continuing research interest also exists in developing novel bulk biomaterials (eg, polycarbonate urethanes, silicon or novel formulations of existing but less widely used biomaterials (eg, polyaryletherketones, polyetheretherketone. There is also growing focus on customizing the material properties of bioabsorbables and composite materials with fillers such as bioactive ceramics. In terms of tissue engineering, more recent developments have focused on basic engineering and biological fundamentals to use cells, signaling factors, and the scaffold material itself to better restore tissue and organ structure and function. There has also been recent controversy with the use of injectables as a nonsurgical approach to treat joint disorders, but more attention is being directed toward the development of newer formulations with different molecular weights. The industry has also continuously sought to improve coatings to supplement the function of existing implants, with the goal of improving their osseointegrative qualities and incorporating antimicrobial properties. These include the use of bone morphogenetic protein, bisphosphonates, calcium phosphate, silicon nitride, and iodine. Due to the widespread use of bone graft materials, recent developments in synthetic graft materials have explored further development of bioactive glass, ceramic materials, and porous titanium particles. This review article provides an overview of ongoing efforts in the above research areas.Keywords: coatings, scaffolds, bioabsorbables, bone graft, injectables

  5. Preoperative preparation of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Reshma Aranha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is a stressful and anxiety provoking experience for children. Millions of children undergo surgery every year. The majority of children experience significant preoperative anxiety which intern can affect their recovery. Preoperative anxiety may bring about physical and physiological changes in children, which can be particularly evident in terms of increased heart rate and blood pressure. To identify various strategies used to minimize the preoperative anxiety of children and update their clinical effectiveness among children undergoing surgery, the authors searched PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Cochrane Library for identifying the relevant studies and retrieved available literature. It is concluded that utilization of the strategies available to reduce the preoperative anxiety of children will be a promising intervention to reduce anxiety, to promote relaxation, satisfaction, and speedy recovery. Many of these techniques are simple, cost-effective and can be easily carried out by nurses. It is essential to use the age appropriate and individualized methods in preparing children for surgery. Further research is required to strengthen the evidence.

  6. Orthopedic Management of Scoliosis by Garches Brace and Spinal Fusion in SMA Type 2 Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catteruccia, Michela; Vuillerot, Carole; Vaugier, Isabelle; Leclair, Danielle; Azzi, Viviane; Viollet, Louis; Estournet, Brigitte; Bertini, Enrico; Quijano-Roy, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scoliosis is the most debilitating issue in SMA type 2 patients. No evidence confirms the efficacy of Garches braces (GB) to delay definitive spinal fusion. Objective: Compare orthopedic and pulmonary outcomes in children with SMA type 2 function to management. Method: We carried out a monocentric retrospective study on 29 SMA type 2 children who had spinal fusion between 1999 and 2009. Patients were divided in 3 groups: group 1-French patients (12 children) with a preventive use of GB; group 2-French patients (10 children) with use of GB after the beginning of the scoliosis curve; and group 3-Italian patients (7 children) with use of GB after the beginning of the scoliosis curve referred to our centre to perform orthopedic preoperative management. Results: Mean preoperative and postoperative Cobb angle were significantly lower in the group 1 of proactively braced than in group 2 or 3 (Anova p = 0.03; Kruskal Wallis test p = 0.05). Better surgical results were observed in patients with a minor preoperative Cobb angle (r = 0.92 p <  0.0001). Fewer patients in the group 1 proactively braced required trunk casts and/or halo traction and an additional anterior fusion in comparison with patients in the group 2 and 3. Moreover, major complications tend to be less in the group 1 proactively braced. No significant differences were found between groups in pulmonary outcome measures. Conclusions: A proactive orthotic management may improve orthopedic outcome in SMA type 2. Further prospective studies comparing SMA management are needed to confirm these results. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions to Authors on jbjs.org for a complete description of levels of evidence (Retrospective comparative study). PMID:27858747

  7. Current concepts of shared decision making in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klifto, Kevin; Klifto, Christopher; Slover, James

    2017-06-01

    The Shared Decision Making (SDM) model, a collaborative decision making process between the physician and patient to make an informed clinical decision that enhances the chance of treatment success as defined by each patient's preferences and values, has become a new and promising tool in the healthcare process; however, minimal data exists on its application in the orthopedic surgical specialty. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that this once novel idea can be implemented successfully in the orthopedic setting to improve patient outcomes. SDM can be applied without significant increases in the office length. Patients report that a physician that takes the time to listen to them is among the most important factors in their care. When time was focused on the SDM process, there was a direct correlation between the time spent with a patient and patient satisfaction. Patients exposed to a decision aid prior to surgery gained a greater knowledge from baseline to make a higher quality decision that was consistent with their values. Involving family members preoperatively can help all patients adhere to postoperative regimens. Exposing patients to a decision aid can reduce expensive elective surgeries, in favor of non-operative management. Incorporating patient goals into the decision-making process has increased satisfaction, compliance, and outcomes. SDM is a two-way exchange of information that attempts to correct the inequality of power between the patient and physician. Decision-aids are helpful tools that facilitate the decision-making process. Treatment decisions are consistent with patient preferences and values when there may be no "best" therapy. A good patient-physician relationship is essential during the process to reduce decisional conflict and increase overall patient outcomes.

  8. Bibliometric analysis of the orthopedic literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Zhaoyang; Yi, Zhongmei; Peng, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Bibliometric indicators are used to assess research performance. The goal of this study was to explore publication output to construct a picture of orthopedics that may be beneficial to researchers and orthopedic specialists. All orthopedics articles published in 61 journals from 2000 to 2011 were retrieved from the Science Citation Index Expanded database. The numbers of articles, citations, authors, institutions, and journals were analyzed and subjected to quantitative and qualitative comparisons. The number of published orthopedics articles increased between 2000 and 2011. Articles published by authors from the United States always ranked first in number, although the United States' share is decreasing in the world literature. Authors from the United States published the most-cited articles and the most articles in journals with top-10 impact factors; moreover, the United States also had the greatest share of experts and highly ranked institutions. The United Kingdom, Germany, and Japan were always within the world's top 4 in terms of numbers of articles and citations. The shares of Germany, South Korea, and China among total orthopedics articles increased, especially that of China. In 2011, China ranked the fifth in the world, with its world share increasing from 0.64% in 2000 to 5.05% in 2011. However, China lags behind in average citations per article, top research institutions, and most prolific authors. According to the total citations per article, the University of Pittsburgh, Harvard University, and the Hospital for Special Surgery were the most prolific institutions.

  9. Artificial intelligence for analyzing orthopedic trauma radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak, Jakub; Fahlberg, Niklas; Maki, Atsuto; Razavian, Ali Sharif; Jilert, Anthony; Stark, André; Sköldenberg, Olof; Gordon, Max

    2017-07-06

    Background and purpose - Recent advances in artificial intelligence (deep learning) have shown remarkable performance in classifying non-medical images, and the technology is believed to be the next technological revolution. So far it has never been applied in an orthopedic setting, and in this study we sought to determine the feasibility of using deep learning for skeletal radiographs. Methods - We extracted 256,000 wrist, hand, and ankle radiographs from Danderyd's Hospital and identified 4 classes: fracture, laterality, body part, and exam view. We then selected 5 openly available deep learning networks that were adapted for these images. The most accurate network was benchmarked against a gold standard for fractures. We furthermore compared the network's performance with 2 senior orthopedic surgeons who reviewed images at the same resolution as the network. Results - All networks exhibited an accuracy of at least 90% when identifying laterality, body part, and exam view. The final accuracy for fractures was estimated at 83% for the best performing network. The network performed similarly to senior orthopedic surgeons when presented with images at the same resolution as the network. The 2 reviewer Cohen's kappa under these conditions was 0.76. Interpretation - This study supports the use for orthopedic radiographs of artificial intelligence, which can perform at a human level. While current implementation lacks important features that surgeons require, e.g. risk of dislocation, classifications, measurements, and combining multiple exam views, these problems have technical solutions that are waiting to be implemented for orthopedics.

  10. [Research and analysis to Shui nationality medicine treatment orthopedics & traumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian-Shan; Li, Pu; Yang, Yong; Chen, Xin-Chun; Lin, Li

    2013-05-01

    To investigated Shui nationality folk medicine's awareness to orthopedics & traumatology, the history of orthopedics & traumatology treatment, Shui nationality folk doctors' practicing medicine, heritage, diagnosis and treatment methods and tools, etc, through investigated drug resources category and distribution characteristics of Shui nationality medicine to orthopedics & traumatology treatment, explored and finished Shui nationality medicine orthopedics & traumatology treatment theoretical system. After more than 5 years' exploration and finishing, preliminarily formed the theoretical system framework and medicine application characteristics of Shui nationality medicine treating orthopedics & traumatology. Shui nationality medicine treatment orthopedics & traumatology has distinctive national style, and worthy to further exploration and research.

  11. CPR - infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breathing and chest compressions - infant; Resuscitation - cardiopulmonary - infant; Cardiopulmonary resuscitation - infant ... CPR is best done by someone trained in an accredited CPR course. The newest techniques emphasize compression ...

  12. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, A; Villebro, N

    2005-01-01

    Smokers have a substantially increased risk of intra- and postoperative complications. Preoperative smoking intervention may be effective in decreasing this incidence. The preoperative period may be a well chosen time to offer smoking cessation interventions due to increased patient motivation....

  13. Infant Vomiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco Treatments Injuries & ...

  14. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment. 1308... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.12 Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment. (a) A child is classified as having an orthopedic impairment if the condition is severe enough to...

  15. [Principle and application of orthopedic ESWT apparatus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Jiang, Fengqing

    2010-07-01

    The paper introduced the principle of extracorporeal shock wave therapy(ESWT) for orthopedics diseases including 60 cases of periarthritis of shoulder, 60 cases of tennis elbow and each compared with 60 control cases. The cure rate of ESWT for periarthritis of shoulder and tennis elbow is more than 93%, higher than the control group.

  16. Neonatal maxillary orthopedics: past to present

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Prahl, C.; Berkowitz, S.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal maxillary orthopedics was introduced in the treatment protocol for cleft lip and palate in the 1950s of the last century. A wide range of appliances has been designed with pin-retained active appliances at one end of the spectrum and passive appliances at the other. Although neonatal

  17. Prosthesis infections after orthopedic joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Zhijun; Borgwardt, Lotte; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Prosthesis-related infection is a serious complication for patients after orthopedic joint replacement, which is currently difficult to treat with antibiotic therapy. Consequently, in most cases, removal of the infected prosthesis is the only solution to cure the infection. It is, therefore...

  18. Program Guidelines for Severely Orthopedically Impaired Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Winnie

    This document contains California's guidelines for serving students with severe orthopedic impairments in the public schools. Elements characteristic of well-designed programs are described in the guide's three chapters, and each description is followed by a series of questions for program evaluation. The first chapter addresses approaches to…

  19. Neonatal maxillary orthopedics: past to present

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Prahl, C.; Berkowitz, S.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal maxillary orthopedics was introduced in the treatment protocol for cleft lip and palate in the 1950s of the last century. A wide range of appliances has been designed with pin-retained active appliances at one end of the spectrum and passive appliances at the other. Although neonatal maxill

  20. Pre-operative anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, B; Richards, T

    2015-01-01

    Pre-operative anaemia is a relatively common finding, affecting a third of patients undergoing elective surgery. Traditionally associated with chronic disease, management has historically focused on the use of blood transfusion as a solution for anaemia in the peri-operative period. Data from large series now suggest that anaemia is an independent risk associated with poor outcome in both cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. Furthermore, blood transfusion does not appear to ameliorate this risk, and in fact may increase the risk of postoperative complications and hospital length of stay. Consequently, there is a need to identify, diagnose and manage pre-operative anaemia to reduce surgical risk. Discoveries in the pathways of iron metabolism have found that chronic disease can cause a state of functional iron deficiency leading to anaemia. The key iron regulatory protein hepcidin, activated in response to inflammation, inhibits absorption of iron from the gastrointestinal tract and further reduces bioavailability of iron stores for red cell production. Consequently, although iron stores (predominantly ferritin) may be normal, the transport of iron either from the gastrointestinal tract or iron stores to the bone marrow is inhibited, leading to a state of 'functional' iron deficiency and subsequent anaemia. Since absorption from the gastrointestinal tract is blocked, increasing oral iron intake is ineffective, and studies are now looking at the role of intravenous iron to treat anaemia in the surgical setting. In this article, we review the incidence and impact of anaemia on the pre-operative patient. We explain how anaemia may be caused by functional iron deficiency, and how iron deficiency anaemia may be diagnosed and treated.

  1. [Orthopedic aspects of congenital insensitivity to pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfen, C; Bensahel, H; Teule, J G

    1985-01-01

    The congenital insensitivity to pain regroups some rare diseases which are mainly 5: congenital insensitivity to pain; congenital sensitive neuropathies; distal sensitive neuropathies; Riley-Day syndrome or hereditary dysautonomia; at last, miscellaneous troubles. Three different cases are reported in children: true congenital insensitivity to pain; hereditary dysautonomia or Riley-Day syndrome; congenital insensitivity to pain localised to a lower limb joined to amniotic disease and abnormality of this limb. The orthopedic symptoms (osteomyelitis, arthropathies as Charcot type, dislocations, fractures) lead often to diagnosis and they are an important step of the prognosis. Scoliosis seems to be frequent in this disease. The orthopedic and surgical treatment, according to each localization, is difficult and must emphasize the prevention of bones and joints injuries.

  2. Evaluation of the clinical effect of presurgical nasoalveolar molding preoperative orthodontic in infants with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate%婴儿单侧完全性唇腭裂使用鼻-牙槽突矫治器术前正畸的效果评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文莉; 庞雪晶; 张玉萍; 韩秀丽; 兰柳萍

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe of presurgical nasoalveolar molding (PNAM) in infants with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate surgery treatment for infants with nasal labial ministry and the effect of the alveolar cleft of correction. Methods Choose 56 cases as experimental group with PNAM cleft lip surgery shape treatment, compared the experimental group infants use PNAM process shaping and compare the experimental group and control group before and after the treatment of infants with cleft palate preoperative labial ministry fracture, width of alveolar cleft, alar width, columella deviation, columella height. The data were analyzed with spss15.0 software. Results The experimental group after treatment with PNAM infants lip crack and width of alveolar cleft, alar width decrease obviously, columella highly increased signiifcantly, columella deviation decreases, and significant difference compared with before treatment and the control group, and significantly improve the bilateral symmetry of the nasal. Conclusion Through the PNAM treatment, reduce the lip crack and the width of the alveolar cleft, improve the nasal proifle, create good conditions for the operation, it is worth clinical promotion by treatment of cleft lip and palate sequence.%目的:观察婴儿单侧完全性唇腭裂术前行鼻-牙槽突塑形治疗对患儿鼻唇部和牙槽突部矫治的效果。方法:选用56例患儿做为实验组进行唇裂手术前鼻-牙槽突塑形治疗,比较实验组患儿使用鼻-牙槽突塑形治疗前后及实验组和对照组患儿唇裂术前的唇部裂隙,牙槽突裂隙,鼻翼宽度,鼻小柱倾斜度,鼻小柱高度。采用spss15.0软件包对数据进行统计学分析。结果:实验组患儿经鼻-牙槽突塑形治疗后唇部裂隙及牙槽突裂隙,鼻翼宽度明显减小,鼻小柱高度明显增加,鼻小柱倾斜度减小,与治疗前及对照组相比均具有显著性差异,且明显改善了双侧鼻部

  3. Methods of orthopedic treatment of dentition defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konnov V.V.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the methods of orthopedic treatment of dentition defects. To restore the functionality and individual aesthetic standards of dental system, with different types of partial loss of teeth, depending on the anatomical and topographical conditions, various kinds of dental prosthesis designs are used in the oral cavity: non-removable (bridges, cantilever, adhesive dentures and removable (laminar and clasp dental prostheses, as well as their combinations.

  4. Level of evidence gap in orthopedic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Keith D; Bernstein, Joseph; Ahn, Jaimo; McKay, Scott D; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    2012-09-01

    Level of evidence is the most widely used metric for the quality of a publication, but instances exist in which a Level I study is neither feasible nor desirable. The goal of this study was to evaluate the level of evidence gap in current orthopedic research, which the authors defined as the disparity between the level of evidence that would be required to optimally answer the primary research question and the level of evidence that was actually used. Five orthopedic surgeons (K.D.B., J.B., J.A., S.D.M., W.N.S.) evaluated blinded articles from the first 6 months of 2010 in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American Volume) (JBJS-Am), classifying the study type and design and extracting a primary research question from each article. Each evaluator then defined the study type and method, along with the level of evidence that would ideally be used to address the primary research question. The level of evidence gap was then calculated by subtracting the actual level of evidence of the manuscript from the level of evidence of the idealized study. Of the 64 JBJS-Am manuscripts eligible for analysis, the average level of evidence was between Level II and III (mean, 2.73). The average level of evidence gap was 1.06 compared with the JBJS-Am-designated level of evidence and 1.28 compared with the evaluators' assessment. Because not all questions require Level I studies, level of evidence alone may not be the best metric for the quality of orthopedic surgery literature. Instead, the authors' concept of a level of evidence gap may be a better tool for assessing the state of orthopedic research publications.

  5. Chinese Orthopedic Surgeons' Practice Regarding Postoperative Thromboembolic Prophylaxis after Major Orthopedic Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-jian Sun; Gui-xing Qiu; Xi-sheng Weng; Yu Zhao; Jin Jin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess Chinese surgeon practice of thromboprophylaxis following major orthopedic surgery.Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted amongst Chinese orthopedic surgeons.A total of 293 surgeons were surveyed concerning five key aspects of thromboembolic prophylaxis after major orthopedic surgery at the proseminar of Chinese guidelines for prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after major orthopedic surgery in January of 2009.Results Totally,208 surgeons (71.0%) responded,successfully completing the questionnaire.Of them,57.6% respondents selected combined basic,mechanical,and pharmacologic methods for thromboprophylaxis; 51.0% respondents prefer starting prophylaxis 12-24 hours after surgery; 60.3% surgeons would use chemoprophylaxis for 7-10 days; 47.6% respondents prefer VTE prevention based on patients'special conditions and needs upon discharge."Safety" was the most repeated and emphasized factor during VTE prophylaxis.Conclusions Multimodal thromboprophylaxis is frequently used after major orthopedic surgery.Half surgeons prefer to start chemoprophylaxis 12-24 hours after surgery.Thromboprophylaxis regimen varies for discharged patients.

  6. Orthopedic workforce planning in Germany – an analysis of orthopedic accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Peter; Maier, Werner; Groneberg, David A.

    2017-01-01

    In Germany, orthopedic workforce planning relies on population-to-provider-ratios represented by the ‘official degree of care provision’. However, with geographic information systems (GIS), more sophisticated measurements are available. By utilizing GIS-based technologies we analyzed the current state of demand and supply of the orthopedic workforce in Germany (orthopedic accessibility) with the integrated Floating Catchment Area method. The analysis of n = 153,352,220 distances revealed significant geographical variations on national scale: 5,617,595 people (6.9% of total population) lived in an area with significant low orthopedic accessibility (average z-score = -4.0), whereas 31,748,161 people (39.0% of total population) lived in an area with significant high orthopedic accessibility (average z-score = 8.0). Accessibility was positively correlated with the degree of urbanization (r = 0.49; p<0.001) and the official degree of care provision (r = 0.33; p<0.001) and negatively correlated with regional social deprivation (r = -0.47; p<0.001). Despite advantages of simpler measures regarding implementation and acceptance in health policy, more sophisticated measures of accessibility have the potential to reduce costs as well as improve health care. With this study, significant geographical variations were revealed that show the need to reduce oversupply in less deprived urban areas in order to enable adequate care in more deprived rural areas. PMID:28178335

  7. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haaker G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gerrit Haaker, Albert Fujak Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective "survival motor neuron" (SMN protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Keywords: spinal muscular atrophy, scoliosis, contractures, fractures, lung function, treatment, rehabilitation, surgery, ventilation, nutrition, perioperative management

  8. Undergraduate orthopedic education: Is it adequate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Jagdish

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Basic musculoskeletal knowledge is essential to the practice of medicine. The purpose of this study was to assess the adequacy of musculoskeletal knowledge of medical students. Materials and Methods : The validated basic competency examination in musculoskeletal medicine devised by Freidman and Bernstein was administered to final year medical students just prior to their final professional examination. Participants were also required to assess their confidence at making a musculoskeletal physical examination and diagnosis as well as comment on the adequacy of time in the curriculum devoted to Orthopedics. Results : The response rate was 83% (40/48. The average cognitive examination score was 48.3%. Two participants (5% obtained a score of ≥ 73.1%, the recommended mean passing score. Seventeen students (42.5% felt orthopedic clinical cases were the most difficult to perform a physical examination and diagnose. Thirteen students (32.5% felt that the time devoted to orthopedics in the medical curriculum was inadequate. Conclusions : Ninety-five percent of the students failed to show basic musculoskeletal competency. A change in medical curriculum and teaching methods is required to address this problem.

  9. Preoperative anxiety in neurosurgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perks, Anna; Chakravarti, Sucharita; Manninen, Pirjo

    2009-04-01

    Anxiety is common in surgical patients, with an incidence of 60% to 92%. There is little information on the incidence and severity of preoperative anxiety in patients scheduled for neurosurgery. The aim of this study was to measure the level of preoperative anxiety in neurosurgical patients and to assess any influencing factors. After the Institutional Review Board approval and informed written consent, 100 patients booked for neurosurgery were interviewed preoperatively. Each patient was asked to grade their preoperative anxiety level on a verbal analog scale, Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale, and a set of specific anxiety-related questions. The anxiety scores and the responses to the questions were compared between the sex, age, weight, diagnosis, and history of previous surgery. The mean age (+/-SD) was 50+/-13 years. The preoperative diagnosis was tumor (n=64), aneurysm (n=14), and other (n=22). Overall verbal analog scale was 5.2+/-2.7; the score was higher for female (5.8+/-2.8) than male patients (4.6+/-2.5) (PAmsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale anxiety and knowledge scores were greater for surgery than for anesthesia. Questionnaire results showed that the most common anxieties were waiting for surgery, physical/mental harm, and results of the operation. In conclusion, our study showed that neurosurgical patients have high levels of anxiety, with a higher incidence in females. There was a moderately high need for information, particularly in patients with a high level of preoperative anxiety.

  10. Prevention of VTE in orthopedic surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Spandonaro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE is defined as the obstruction, partial or complete, of one or more veins of deep circulation. It is a condition that can lead to a deterioration in his state of health until death, manifesting as deep vein thrombosis (DVT or pulmonary embolism (PE. The major orthopedic surgery and the surgical oncology are frequently associated with thromboembolic complications, because of conditions that are often critical in these patients. It is estimated that in Italy DVT has an incidence that varies between 50 and 150 new cases per 100,000 population, while the prevalence would be between 2.5 and 5%. In the absence of thromboprophylaxis, the orthopedic surgery lead to a high increased risk of VTE. In elective hip replacement, in the absence of prophylaxis, the incidence of DVT and of fatal PE is about 50% and 2% respectively. In elective knee arthroplasty the risk of venous thromboembolic complications is even higher. It is estimated that 56.2% of the costs of prophylaxis with Low Molecular Weight Heparin (LMWH in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery are attributable to the cost of drugs (about € 200, followed (with 44.8% by the cost of administration (approximately € 159. The average total cost/day was estimated at € 8 per patient. In Italy, it has been estimated an annual cost for new cases between 215 and 260 million €. The clinical advantages of the New Oral Anticoagulants (NOA appear to be substantially clear, the major concern with regard to their reimbursement is therefore linked to the financial impact, due to the higher cost per day of the NOA compared with LMWH. To this end, it was built a model of budget impact, in the perspective of the Italian NHS, from the data related to cases of major surgical orthopedic procedures and a meta-analysis on the pivotal RCT, which aims to measure the differential effects in terms of prevention of VTE. The results show that the financial impact of the NOA in the

  11. Nanotechnology-enhanced orthopedic materials fabrications, applications and future trends

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology-Enhanced Orthopedic Materials provides the latest information on the emergence and rapid development of nanotechnology and the ways it has impacted almost every aspect of biomedical engineering. This book provides readers with a comprehensive overview of the field, focusing on the fabrication and applications of these materials, presenting updated, practical, and systematic knowledge on the synthesis, processing, and modification of nanomaterials, along with the rationale and methodology of applying such materials for orthopedic purposes. Topics covered include a wide range of orthopedic material formulations, such as ceramics, metals, polymers, biomolecules, and self-assemblies. Final sections explore applications and future trends in nanotechnology-enhanced orthopedic materials. Details practical information on the fabrication and modification of new and traditional orthopedic materials Analyzes a wide range of materials, designs, and applications of nanotechnology for orthopedics Investigate...

  12. Orthopedic Manifestations of Mobius Syndrome: Case Series and Survey Study

    OpenAIRE

    Philip McClure; David Booy; Julia Katarincic; Craig Eberson

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mobius Syndrome is a rare disease defined by bilateral congenital 7th nerve palsy. We focus on reporting the prevalence of orthopedic disease in this population. Methods. Twenty-three individuals with Mobius Syndrome underwent orthopedic physical examination, and additional 96 patients filled out a survey for self-reported orthopedic diagnoses. Results. Clubfoot was present in 60% of individuals in the physical exam series and 42% of those in the survey. Scoliosis was present in 2...

  13. [Study on the application of Aconitum in clinical orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hong-Ting; Shen, Yan; Xiao, Lu-Wei; Tong, Pei-Jian

    2008-12-01

    Aconitum is important in clinical orthopedics. From ancient times to the present day,there were many famous doctors who used this herb to cure many diseases in orthopedics. However, the toxicity always connect with its effect. This will limit its application in clinics. So now the important thing is how to use this herb correctly. This article will give some suggestions about how to use aconitum in orthopedics and to make sure it can be used correctly in future. It has four parts: application in orthopedics, pharmacology, factors related to toxicity and the prospect of the use of aconitum.

  14. Urinary protein profiles in ketorolac-associated acute kidney injury in patients undergoing orthopedic day surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano F

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Filippo Mariano,1 Chiara Cogno,1 Fulvia Giaretta,2,3 Ilaria Deambrosis,2,3 Simona Pozza,4 Maurizio Berardino,5 Giuseppe Massazza,6 Luigi Biancone1,3 1Department of General and Specialist Medicine, Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation Unit, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 2Department of General and Specialist Medicine, Laboratory of Nephrology and Immunopathology, City of Health and Science, Molinette Hospital, Turin, 3Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, 4Department of Radiology and Radiotherapy, CTO Radiology, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 5Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care 5, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 6Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Week Hospital Unit, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, and University of Turin, Turin, Italy Background: Parenteral administration of ketorolac is very effective in controlling postoperative pain for orthopedic surgery. Ketorolac can induce clinically relevant renal alterations in elderly patients, whereas its short course is considered safe for young adults with normal preoperative renal function. In this study, of a cohort of young adults undergoing elective orthopedic day surgery, we sought cases complicated by readmission due to acute kidney injury (AKI.Patients and methods: Among 1397 young adults, aged 18–32 years who were admitted to undergo orthopedic day surgery from 2013 to 2015, four patients (0.29%, three males/one female treated in postprocedure with ketorolac (from 60 to 90 mg/day for 1–2 days were readmitted for suspected severe AKI. We evaluated functional outcome, urinary protein profiles and kidney biopsy (1 patient.Results: After day surgery discharge, they experienced gastrointestinal disturbances, flank pain and fever. Readmitted on post-surgery days 3–4, they presented with oliguric AKI (creatinine range 158.4–466.4 µmol/L and

  15. Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course: A Collaboration between Anatomists and Orthopedic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFriez, Curtis B.; Morton, David A.; Horwitz, Daniel S.; Eckel, Christine M.; Foreman, K. Bo; Albertine, Kurt H.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for new residents and senior residents preparing for board examinations is refreshing their knowledge of basic science disciplines, such as human gross anatomy. The Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine has for many years held an annual Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course during the summer months…

  16. Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course: A Collaboration between Anatomists and Orthopedic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFriez, Curtis B.; Morton, David A.; Horwitz, Daniel S.; Eckel, Christine M.; Foreman, K. Bo; Albertine, Kurt H.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for new residents and senior residents preparing for board examinations is refreshing their knowledge of basic science disciplines, such as human gross anatomy. The Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine has for many years held an annual Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course during the summer months…

  17. Redundant publications in the orthopedic literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Jason C; Nachtigall, Dean; Hodges, Scott D; Humphreys, S Craig

    2007-01-01

    Rates of redundant publications in the general surgery literature are approximately 14%. This article identifies the rate of redundant publications in the orthopedic literature. All original articles published during the year 2000 in The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American Volume), Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, Journal of Spinal Disorders, and Spine were searched using PubMed. Redundancy rate was 4 (3.15%) of 127 for The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American volume), zero (0%) of 70 for Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, 2 (2.90%) of 69 for Journal of Spinal Disorders, and 11 (3.12%) of 353 for Spine.

  18. Imaging of orthopedic trauma and surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on imaging techniques for diagnosis of trauma of bones. A comparative evaluation is presented for planning of proper diagnosis and treatment. Various techniques discussed are routine radiography; computerized tomography, NMR imaging, angiography, ultrasonography; and use of radioisotopes. The mechanism of injury of bone joints of upper and lower limbs and spine is discussed after discussing the anatomy of each in the beginning of each paper. Topics titled are healing of fractures; fractures of pelvis; knee; shoulder; foot and ankle; fractures of humerus; stress fractures; and orthopedic radiology. Prosthesis use and plastic surgery of joints is also discussed.

  19. Preoperative alcoholism and postoperative morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, H; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative risk assessment has become part of daily clinical practice, but preoperative alcohol abuse has not received much attention. METHODS: A Medline search was carried out to identify original papers published from 1967 to 1998. Relevant articles on postoperative morbidity...... in alcohol abusers were used to evaluate the evidence. RESULTS: Prospective and retrospective studies demonstrate a twofold to threefold increase in postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers, the most frequent complications being infections, bleeding and cardiopulmonary insufficiency. Wound complications...... to postoperative morbidity. CONCLUSION: Alcohol consumption should be included in the preoperative assessment of likely postoperative outcome. Reduction of postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers may include preoperative alcohol abstinence to improve organ function, or perioperative alcohol administration...

  20. Blog and Podcast Watch: Orthopedic Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grock, Andrew; Rezaie, Salim; Swaminathan, Anand; Min, Alice; Shah, Kaushal H; Lin, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch presents high quality open-access educational blogs and podcasts in emergency medicine (EM) based on the ongoing ALiEM Approved Instructional Resources (AIR) and AIR-Professional series. Both series critically appraise resources using an objective scoring rubric. This installment of the Blog and Podcast Watch highlights the topic of orthopedic emergencies from the AIR series. The AIR series is a continuously building curriculum that follows the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) annual testing schedule. For each module, relevant content is collected from the top 50 Social Media Index sites published within the previous 12 months, and scored by eight AIR board members using five equally weighted measurement outcomes: Best Evidence in Emergency Medicine (BEEM) score, accuracy, educational utility, evidence based, and references. Resources scoring ≥30 out of 35 available points receive an AIR label. Resources scoring 27-29 receive an honorable mention label, if the executive board agrees that the post is accurate and educationally valuable. A total of 87 blog posts and podcasts were evaluated. Key educational pearls from the three AIR posts and the 14 honorable mentions are summarized. The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch series is based on the AIR and AIR-Pro series, which attempts to identify high quality educational content on open-access blogs and podcasts. This series provides an expert-based, post-publication curation of educational social media content for EM clinicians with this installment focusing on orthopedic emergencies.

  1. RAPID MANUFACTURING SYSTEM OF ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relvas, Carlos; Reis, Joana; Potes, José Alberto Caeiro; Fonseca, Fernando Manuel Ferreira; Simões, José Antonio Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    This study, aimed the development of a methodology for rapid manufacture of orthopedic implants simultaneously with the surgical intervention, considering two potential applications in the fields of orthopedics: the manufacture of anatomically adapted implants and implants for bone loss replacement. This work innovation consists on the capitation of the in situ geometry of the implant by direct capture of the shape using an elastomeric material (polyvinylsiloxane) which allows fine detail and great accuracy of the geometry. After scanning the elastomeric specimen, the implant is obtained by machining using a CNC milling machine programmed with a dedicated CAD/CAM system. After sterilization, the implant is able to be placed on the patient. The concept was developed using low cost technology and commercially available. The system has been tested in an in vivo hip arthroplasty performed on a sheep. The time increase of surgery was 80 minutes being 40 minutes the time of implant manufacturing. The system developed has been tested and the goals defined of the study achieved enabling the rapid manufacture of an implant in a time period compatible with the surgery time. PMID:27004181

  2. Analysis of NHSLA claims in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Irfan H; Jamil, Wiqqas; Lynn, Sam Mathew; Khan, Osman H; Markland, Kate; Giddins, Grey

    2012-05-01

    National Health Service (NHS) statistics in the United Kingdom demonstrate an increase in clinical negligence claims over the past 30 years. Reasons for this include elements of a cultural shift in attitudes toward the medical profession and the growth of the legal services industry. This issue affects medical and surgical health providers worldwide.The authors analyzed 2117 NHS Litigation Authority (NHSLA) orthopedic surgery claims between 1995 and 2001 with respect to these clinical areas: emergency department, outpatient care, surgery (elective or trauma operations), and inpatient care. The authors focused on the costs of settling and defending claims, costs attributable to clinical areas, common causes of claims, and claims relating to elective or trauma surgery. Numbers of claims and legal costs increased most notably in surgery (elective and trauma) and in the emergency department. However, claims are being defended more robustly. The annual cost for a successful defense has remained relatively stable, showing a slight decline. The common causes of claims are postoperative complication; wrong, delayed, or failure of diagnosis; inadequate consent; and wrong-site surgery. Certain surgical specialties (eg, spine and lower-limb surgery) have the most claims made during elective surgery, whereas upper-limb surgery has the most claims made during trauma surgery.The authors recommend that individual trusts liaise with orthopedic surgeons to devise strategies to address areas highlighted in our study. Despite differences in health care systems worldwide, the underlying issues are common. With improved understanding, physicians can deliver the service they promise their patients.

  3. Disparities in internet use among orthopedic outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kenneth P; Rehman, Saqib; Goldhirsh, Jessie

    2014-02-01

    Internet access has lagged behind for patients with lower incomes and from certain ethnic groups. This study investigated the possible improvement of access to health-related information on the Internet for all patients in an urban outpatient setting, regardless of socioeconomic background. A 28-question survey was completed by 100 orthopedic outpatients evaluating associations between their age, ethnicity, income, or education level and their access to the Internet. The survey also examined how patients used the Internet to obtain information about their medical condition, their privacy concerns when conducting online research, and their use of mobile phones as a primary means of Internet access. The Internet was used by 57% of orthopedic outpatients in this urban setting. Internet access decreased with advancing age but increased with increasing income and education, findings consistent with similar studies. Despite the inability to identify an association between ethnicity and Internet access in this patient population, fewer Latinos (33%) than whites (67%) or African Americans (77%) sought information about their medical condition. Among patients who used a mobile phone as the primary method for online access, 74% were African American or Latino and 26% were white. This difference in mobile phone use for online access suggests that mobile phones have provided ethnic minorities with greater Internet access and thus may have narrowed the digital divide among the races.

  4. Improving Response Rates among Students with Orthopedic and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Christian P.; Kuntzler, Patrice M.; Cardenas, Shaun; O'Malley, Eileen; Phillips, Carolyn; Singer, Jacqueline; Stoeger, Alex; Kindler, Keith

    2014-01-01

    One challenge teachers of students with orthopedic and multiple disabilities face is providing sufficient time and opportunity to communicate. This challenge is universal across countries, schools, and settings: teachers want students to communicate because communication lies at the core of what makes us human. Yet students with orthopedic and…

  5. Computed tomography for preoperative planning in total hip arthroplasty: what radiologists need to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huppertz, Alexander [Charite - University Hospitals Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Imaging Science Institute Charite, Berlin (Germany); Radmer, Sebastian [Proendo, Orthopedic Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Wagner, Moritz; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Hospitals Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Roessler, Torsten [Klinikum Ernst von Bergmann, Department of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, Potsdam (Germany); Sparmann, Martin [Proendo, Orthopedic Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Charite - University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    The number of total hip arthroplasties is continuously rising. Although less invasive surgical techniques, sophisticated component design, and intraoperative navigation techniques have been introduced, the rate of peri- and postoperative complications, including dislocations, fractures, nerve palsies, and infections, is still a major clinical problem. Better patient outcome, faster recovery and rehabilitation, and shorter operation times therefore remain to be accomplished. A promising strategy is to use minimally invasive techniques in conjunction with modular implants, aimed at independently reconstructing femoral offset and leg length on the basis of highly accurate preoperative planning. Plain radiographs have clear limitations for the correct estimation of hip joint geometry and bone quality. Three-dimensional assessment based on computed tomography (CT) allows optimizing the choice and positions of implants and anticipating difficulties to be encountered during surgery. Postoperative CT is used to monitor operative translation and plays a role in arthroplastic quality management. Radiologists should be familiar with the needs of orthopedic surgeons in terms of CT acquisition, post-processing, and data transfer. The CT protocol should be optimized to enhance image quality and reduce radiation exposure. When dedicated orthopedic CT protocols and state-of-the-art scanner hardware are used, radiation exposure can be decreased to a level just marginally higher than that of conventional preoperative radiography. Surgeons and radiologists should use similar terminology to avoid misunderstanding and inaccuracies in the transfer of preoperative planning. (orig.)

  6. Computed tomography for preoperative planning in total hip arthroplasty: what radiologists need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Alexander; Radmer, Sebastian; Wagner, Moritz; Roessler, Torsten; Hamm, Bernd; Sparmann, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The number of total hip arthroplasties is continuously rising. Although less invasive surgical techniques, sophisticated component design, and intraoperative navigation techniques have been introduced, the rate of peri- and postoperative complications, including dislocations, fractures, nerve palsies, and infections, is still a major clinical problem. Better patient outcome, faster recovery and rehabilitation, and shorter operation times therefore remain to be accomplished. A promising strategy is to use minimally invasive techniques in conjunction with modular implants, aimed at independently reconstructing femoral offset and leg length on the basis of highly accurate preoperative planning. Plain radiographs have clear limitations for the correct estimation of hip joint geometry and bone quality. Three-dimensional assessment based on computed tomography (CT) allows optimizing the choice and positions of implants and anticipating difficulties to be encountered during surgery. Postoperative CT is used to monitor operative translation and plays a role in arthroplastic quality management. Radiologists should be familiar with the needs of orthopedic surgeons in terms of CT acquisition, post-processing, and data transfer. The CT protocol should be optimized to enhance image quality and reduce radiation exposure. When dedicated orthopedic CT protocols and state-of-the-art scanner hardware are used, radiation exposure can be decreased to a level just marginally higher than that of conventional preoperative radiography. Surgeons and radiologists should use similar terminology to avoid misunderstanding and inaccuracies in the transfer of preoperative planning.

  7. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

  8. Application of Stem Cells in Orthopedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Andreas; van Griensven, Martijn; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Buchmann, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell research plays an important role in orthopedic regenerative medicine today. Current literature provides us with promising results from animal research in the fields of bone, tendon, and cartilage repair. While early clinical results are already published for bone and cartilage repair, the data about tendon repair is limited to animal studies. The success of these techniques remains inconsistent in all three mentioned areas. This may be due to different application techniques varying from simple mesenchymal stem cell injection up to complex tissue engineering. However, the ideal carrier for the stem cells still remains controversial. This paper aims to provide a better understanding of current basic research and clinical data concerning stem cell research in bone, tendon, and cartilage repair. Furthermore, a focus is set on different stem cell application techniques in tendon reconstruction, cartilage repair, and filling of bone defects. PMID:22550505

  9. Orthopedic manifestations of the Lowe (oculocerebrorenal) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgrewe, J L; Kalen, V

    1986-01-01

    Lowe oculocerebrorenal syndrome (OCRS), as previously described in the literature, consists of a well-defined constellation of clinical findings involving the eyes, cerebrum, and kidneys. However, the only musculoskeletal abnormalities reported in patients with OCRS have been joint hypermobility, recurrent fractures, rickets, tenosynovitis, and joint effusions. No other specific orthopedic problems have been described. This study presents new clinical findings of scoliosis, kyphosis, platyspondyly, dislocated and/or subluxed hips, and cervical spine abnormalities in six patients with OCRS treated at Carrie Tingley Hospital (Albuquerque, NM, U.S.A.). This study further supports an X-linked recessive mode of inheritance and adds clinical support to the published work that suggests that Lowe syndrome may be due to biochemical abnormalities in glycosaminoglycan metabolism.

  10. Blog and Podcast Watch: Orthopedic Emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Grock

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch presents high quality open-access educational blogs and podcasts in emergency medicine (EM based on the ongoing ALiEM Approved Instructional Resources (AIR and AIR-Professional series. Both series critically appraise resources using an objective scoring rubric. This installment of the Blog and Podcast Watch highlights the topic of orthopedic emergencies from the AIR series. Methods: The AIR series is a continuously building curriculum that follows the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD annual testing schedule. For each module, relevant content is collected from the top 50 Social Media Index sites published within the previous 12 months, and scored by eight AIR board members using five equally weighted measurement outcomes: Best Evidence in Emergency Medicine (BEEM score, accuracy, educational utility, evidence based, and references. Resources scoring ≥30 out of 35 available points receive an AIR label. Resources scoring 27-29 receive an honorable mention label, if the executive board agrees that the post is accurate and educationally valuable. Results: A total of 87 blog posts and podcasts were evaluated. Key educational pearls from the three AIR posts and the 14 honorable mentions are summarized. Conclusion: The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch series is based on the AIR and AIR-Pro series, which attempts to identify high quality educational content on open-access blogs and podcasts. This series provides an expert-based, post-publication curation of educational social media content for EM clinicians with this installment focusing on orthopedic emergencies. [West J Emerg Med. 2017;18(3531-538.

  11. [Infant botulism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Absalom; Afriat, Amichay; Hubary, Yechiel; Herzog, Lior; Eisenkraft, Arik

    2014-01-01

    Infant botulism is a paralytic syndrome which manifests as a result of ingesting spores of the toxin secreting bacterium Clostridium botulinum by infants. As opposed to botulism in adults, treating infant botulism with horse antiserum was not approved due to several safety issues. This restriction has led to the development of Human Botulism Immune Globulin Intravenous (BIG-IV; sells under BabyBIG). In this article we review infant botulism and the advantages of treating it with BIG-IV.

  12. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Villebro, Nete; Møller, Ann Merete

    2014-01-01

    : Randomized controlled trials that recruited people who smoked prior to surgery, offered a smoking cessation intervention, and measured preoperative and long-term abstinence from smoking or the incidence of postoperative complications or both outcomes. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The review authors......BACKGROUND: Smokers have a substantially increased risk of postoperative complications. Preoperative smoking intervention may be effective in decreasing this incidence, and surgery may constitute a unique opportunity for smoking cessation interventions. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this review...... are to assess the effect of preoperative smoking intervention on smoking cessation at the time of surgery and 12 months postoperatively, and on the incidence of postoperative complications. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register in January 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA...

  13. Necrotizing fasciitis in a pediatric orthopedic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancevski, Aleksandar; Bono, Kenneth; Willis, Leisel; Klingele, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    Few studies have analyzed necrotizing fasciitis in children, and all have relied on cases of necrotizing fasciitis in the abdomen, head, and neck region. The authors sought to correlate the preoperative values of several laboratory tests previously validated in the adult literature, such as the Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis, with surgically confirmed necrotizing fasciitis in children to provide clinical guidance for the preoperative laboratory workup of necrotizing fasciitis. A retrospective chart review was performed on consecutive patients younger than 18 years with a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. A total of 13 patients with an average age of 7.9 years (range, 9 months-16 years) were included. Ten (76.9%) infections were found in the lower extremity and 3 (23.1%) in the upper extremity. Seven (53.8%) patients had ecchymosis on examination. All patients presented with an elevated white blood cell count. No amputations were performed, and no mortality occurred. All patients underwent surgery within 24 hours of presentation. Elevated temperature, white blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein values are typically seen in pediatric patients with necrotizing fasciitis; however, no correlation existed between other the preoperative laboratory values with the previously described scoring systems, such as the Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis. Aggressive monitoring of signs and symptoms is suggested, even if a patient does not meet all conventional diagnostic criteria. The authors recommend prompt surgical debridement and early administration of antibiotics, which should include clindamycin.

  14. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials.

  15. A New Culture of Transparency: Industry Payments to Orthopedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Joseph; Ahmed, Rizwan; Bae, Sunjae; Hicks, Caitlin W; El Dafrawy, Mostafa; Osgood, Greg M; Segev, Dorry L

    2016-11-01

    Under the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, "payments or transfers of value" by biomedical companies to physicians must be disclosed through the Open Payments Program. Designed to provide transparency of financial transactions between medication and device manufacturers and health care providers, the Open Payments Program shows financial relationships between industry and health care providers. Awareness of this program is crucial because its interpretation or misinterpretation by patients, physicians, and the general public can affect patient care, clinical practice, and research. This study evaluated nonresearch payments by industry to orthopedic surgeons. A retrospective cross-sectional review of the first wave of Physician Payments Sunshine Act data (August through December 2013) was performed to characterize industry payments to orthopedic surgeons by subspecialty, amount, type, origin, and geographic distribution. During this 5-month period, orthopedic surgeons (n=14,828) received $107,666,826, which included 3% of those listed in the Open Payments Program and 23% of the total amount paid. Of orthopedic surgeons who received payment, 45% received less than $100 and 1% received $100,000 or more. Median payment (interquartile range) was $119 ($34-$636), and mean payment was $7261±95,887. The largest payment to an individual orthopedic surgeon was $7,849,711. The 2 largest payment categories were royalty or license fees (68%) and consulting fees (13%). During the study period, orthopedic surgeons had substantial financial ties to industry. Of orthopedic surgeons who received payments, the largest proportion (45%) received less than $100 and only 1% received large payments (≥$100,000). The Open Payments Program offers insight into industry payments to orthopedic surgeons. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1058-e1062.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Twitter as a communication tool for orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Orrin I

    2011-11-01

    Twitter is a social networking Web site that has changed the way information is communicated. This study involved identifying, categorizing, and reviewing orthopedic Twitter profiles. A total of 412 profiles were identified. Of those, 176 (50.3%) were surgeons; 89 (50.5%) were based in the United States and 77 (43.8%) were not (10 unclassified). Most surgeons were young; 66% of surgeons were board certified within the past 10 years. Only a small percentage of orthopedic surgeons and practices currently use Twitter, but the use of social networking for orthopedic communication is likely to play an increasing role in future clinical practice.

  17. Insights into Avicenna's knowledge of the science of orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalfardi, Behnam; Yarmohammadi, Hassan; Meibodi, Mohammad Kalantari

    2014-01-18

    The art of orthopedics traces its history back to ancient civilizations like those of the Egyptians. The evolution of this branch of medicine is indebted to investigations of many scientists, including Greek, Roman and Persian scholars. The Persian physician Avicenna (980-1037 AD) is one such scientist who investigated different aspects of orthopedics. It is possible to analyze Avicenna's knowledge of orthopedics and his contributions to this branch of medicine by an examination of his epic encyclopedia of medicine, Al-Qanun fi al-Tibb (The Canon of Medicine).

  18. Use of Hardware Battery Drill in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish, Bhava R J; Shahdi, Masood; Ramarao, Duddupudi; Ranganadham, Atmakuri V; Kalamegam, Sundaresan

    2017-03-01

    Among the power drills (Electrical/Pneumatic/Battery) used in Orthopedic surgery, battery drill has got several advantages. Surgeons in low resource settings could not routinely use Orthopedic battery drills (OBD) due to the prohibitive cost of good drills or poor quality of other drills. "Hardware" or Engineering battery drill (HBD) is a viable alternative to OBD. HBD is easy to procure, rugged in nature, easy to maintain, durable, easily serviceable and 70 to 75 times cheaper than the standard high end OBD. We consider HBD as one of the cost effective equipment in Orthopedic operation theatres.

  19. 78 FR 61383 - Certain Thermal Support Devices For Infants, Infant Incubators, Infant Warmers, and Components...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Certain Thermal Support Devices For Infants, Infant Incubators, Infant Warmers, and Components... United States after importation of certain thermal support devices for infants, infant incubators, infant... certain thermal support devices for infants, infant incubators, infant warmers, and components thereof...

  20. Anxiety in preoperative anesthetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela Millán, Jaquelyn; Barrera Serrano, José René; Ornelas Aguirre, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Preoperative anxiety is a common and poorly evaluated condition in patients who will undergo an anesthetic and surgical intervention. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of anxiety in a group of patients undergoing elective surgery, as assessed by the Amsterdam Anxiety Preoperative and Information (AAPI) scale. We studied 135 patients scheduled for elective surgery applying the AAPI scale 24 h before the surgical procedure to evaluate the presence of anxiety and patient characteristics. A descriptive analysis with mean +/- standard deviation for categorical variables was done. For intragroup differences, chi(2) test was used. Pearson correlation for the association between anxiety and postoperative complications was carried out. A value of p =0.05 was considered significant. One hundred six patients were surgically treated, 88% were female (average age 44 +/- 12 years). Some degree of preoperative anxiety was present in 72 patients (76%; p = 0.001) with a grade point average on the AAPI scale equal to 17 +/- 7 points, of which 95 (70%, OR = 5.08; p = 0.002) were females. Results of this study suggest the presence of high levels of preoperative anxiety in patients scheduled for elective surgery. The origin of the anxiety appears to be related to many factors that can be evaluated in pre-anesthetic consultation. Further study is needed to prevent the presence of this disorder.

  1. 21 CFR 888.5850 - Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.5850 Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. (a) Identification. A nonpowered orthopedic traction...

  2. Management of ovarian cysts in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xue-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To discuss the experience of diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cyst in infants. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was conducted on 20 infants who suffered from ovarian cyst. Results: There were no dysplasia ovarian was found in children which were preoperatively diagnosed simplex cyst. Within thirteen children preoperatively detected mixed cystic-solid lesion, six cases ovarian cysts disappeared and two cases underwent poor blood supply in the following time. Conclusion: Adverse effects for ovarian cyst in infants can be prevented by agressive surgical intervention. Harmful effects of ovarian cyst can be prevented by positive surgical intervention despite the diagnostic difficulties in children with clinical symptoms of this condition.

  3. 3D-printed patient-specific applications in orthopedics

    OpenAIRE

    Wong KC

    2016-01-01

    Kwok Chuen Wong Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong Abstract: With advances in both medical imaging and computer programming, two-dimensional axial images can be processed into other reformatted views (sagittal and coronal) and three-dimensional (3D) virtual models that represent a patients’ own anatomy. This processed digital information can be analyzed in detail by orthopedic surgeons to perform p...

  4. PATIENT SATISFACTION WITH ORTHOPEDIC AND PROSTHETIC MEDICAL DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivona Malovecká

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Collecting information about patient satisfaction with orthopedic and prosthetic medical devices in terms of utility, tolerance, and compliance is essential for verifying and improving the quality of these devices. In addition, such information is useful for improving the patients’ quality of life, and the quality management systems of health care providers. This study assessed patient satisfaction with these devices from a sample of patients with orthopedic, neurologic, and rheumatic diseases at the Specialized Hospital for Orthopedic Prosthetics and at the premises of the Dispenser of Orthopedic and Prosthetic Medical Devices, both in Bratislava in the Slovak Republic. The assessment involved a translated and validated questionnaire about patient satisfaction with orthopedic and prosthetic medical devices to evaluate key factors of weight, fit, appearance, comfort, pain free, free of abrasiveness, ease of application, and durability of each device. The study samples consisted of patients with lower limb problems (42.5%, spine problems (26.9%, and a combination of leg and spine issues (25.9%. Orthopedic disease occurred in 73.6% of these patients, a combination of orthopedic and neurologic disease in 13.5%, and neurologic disease in 7.3%. Orthopedic insoles (36.3%, hip belts (17.6%, and the corset on the spine (5.2% were the most used devices. Overall, the medical devices rated highly, with a high proportion of patients voting “strongly satisfied” in five of the eight key factors (range 51.8 to 63.2%, followed by a moderately lower proportion for durability (43.5%, comfort (37.3%, and appearance (31.1%. The comfort in wearing the device received the greatest patient dissatisfaction (22.8% of patients, followed by appearance (12.4%, and then fit (7.3%.

  5. The importance of regular fitness activities before planned orthopedic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    KOTLABOVÁ, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The bachelor thesis deals with the influence of regular fitness activities before the scheduled orthopedic surgery. The thesis discusses the use of special methods of physiotherapy and physical therapy to help patients prepare for their surgery and post-operative rehabilitation. The most common scheduled orthopedic surgery in the Czech Republic is a total hip joint prosthesis, it is applied up to 10 000 refunds anually. The total hip joint prosthesis is followed by a less frequent knee joint ...

  6. Modern Orthopedic Inpatient Care of the Orthopedic Patient With Diabetic Foot Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Antony H; Bradford, Sara; Hester, Thomas W; Kubelka, Igor; Tremlett, Jennifer; Morris, Victoria; Pendry, Elizabeth; Kavarthapu, Venu; Edmonds, Michael E

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we describe emergency and elective pathways within our orthopedic multidisciplinary inpatient care of patients with diabetic foot problems. We performed a retrospective cohort review of 19 complex patients requiring orthopedic surgical treatment of infected ulceration or Charcot feet or deformity at our institution. A total of 30 admissions (19 emergency, 11 elective) were included. The pathways were coordinated by a multidisciplinary team and comprised initial assessment and investigation and a series of key events, which consisted of emergency and elective surgery together with the introduction, and change of intravenous antibiotics when indicated. Patients had rigorous microbiological assessment, in the form of deep ulcer swabs, operative tissue specimens, joint aspirates, and blood cultures according to their clinical presentation as well as close clinical and biochemical surveillance, which expedited the prompt institution of key events. Outcomes were assessed using amputation rates and patient satisfaction. In the emergency group, there were 5.6 ± 3.0 (mean ± SD) key events per admission, including 4.2 ± 2.1 antibiotic changes. In the elective group, there were 4.8 ± 1.4 key events per inpatient episode, with 3.7 ± 1.3 antibiotic changes. Overall, there were 3 minor amputations, and no major amputations. The podiatric and surgical tissue specimens showed a wide array of Gram-positive, Gram-negative, aerobic and anaerobic isolates and 15% of blood cultures showed bacteremia. When 9 podiatric specimens were compared with 9 contemporaneous surgical samples, there was concordance in 2 out of 9 pairs. We have described the successful modern care of the orthopedic diabetic foot patient, which involves close clinical, microbiological, and biochemical surveillance by the multidisciplinary team directing patients through emergency and elective pathways. This has enabled successful surgical intervention involving debridement, pressure relief, and

  7. Orthopedic surgery postgraduate year 1 intern curriculum improves initial orthopedic in-training examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig S; Nyland, John; Broome, Brandon

    2012-04-01

    To determine the efficacy of an educational curriculum designed for orthopedic surgery postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) interns to improve initial Orthopedic In-Training Examination (OITE) performance. A retrospective cohort study was performed that evaluated the PGY-1 intern OITE performance of one residency training program (n = 55) during 7-year periods before (1996-2002) and after structured curriculum implementation (2003-2009). Linear regression analysis revealed insignificant changes in median PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank during the precurriculum period (R = 0.08, P = 0.53). Postcurriculum period comparisons revealed significantly improving PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank (R = 0.46, P = 0.048). Pre- and postcurriculum median US Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step I scores did not display statistically significant differences (218.2 ± 6.6 vs 229.1 ± 13.8, Mann-Whitney U test, z = -1.5, P = 0.10). Spearman rho correlations revealed a moderate relation (r = 0.61) between postcurriculum PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank and USMLE Step I score, but not during the precurriculum period. A moderate relation (r = 0.50) also was observed between postcurriculum USMLE Step I score and average OITE percentile rank during the 5-year residency program, but not during the precurriculum period. PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank improved significantly with the addition of a specially designed educational curriculum. The stronger USMLE Step I score and PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank relation observed during the postcurriculum period suggests that interns who participated in the educational curriculum were better prepared to translate general medical and patient care knowledge into orthopedic surgery knowledge.

  8. [Technical orthopedics. Importance in an increasingly operatively oriented faculty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitemann, B; Maronna, U

    2013-10-01

    The foundation of the German Society for Orthopedics in 1901 was due to a separation from the faculty of surgery because a surgical approach alone did not adequately deal with the symptoms. Orthopedists were initially considered as a fringe group. The conservative treatment approach was initially at the forefront and operative measures were a side line. The main aim was the rehabilitation of patients into a normal life as best as possible. In the conservative area treatment with orthopedic technical aids and appliances rapidly came to play an important role and a great multitude of technical appliances were developed with sometimes very different possible applications. Despite the clearly improved operative treatment approaches in orthopedics and trauma surgery, technical orthopedics still plays a substantial role even today. Healing and supportive aids and appliances are of decisive importance for the treatment of a multitude of diseases and handicaps. They stabilize and improve operative treatment results and often result in new approaches. This depends on cooperation between technicians, therapists and physicians in a team, even in the scientific field. Evidence-based studies on the effectiveness of technical aids are currently still uncommon but recently some clear evidence for effectiveness could be shown. Scientifically this is a very varied field of work. The demographic development presents new requirements which must be dealt with. Technical solutions are often very promising especially in this field. Technical orthopedics remains an important component of the specialty of orthopedics and trauma surgery and with an increasing tendency due to more recent research and development.

  9. Physician-Hospital Alignment in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Brandon D

    2015-09-01

    The concept of "alignment" between physicians and hospitals is a popular buzzword in the age of health care reform. Despite their often tumultuous histories, physicians and hospitals find themselves under increasing pressures to work together toward common goals. However, effective alignment is more than just simple cooperation between parties. The process of achieving alignment does not have simple, universal steps. Alignment will differ based on individual situational factors and the type of specialty involved. Ultimately, however, there are principles that underlie the concept of alignment and should be a part of any physician-hospital alignment efforts. In orthopedic surgery, alignment involves the clinical, administrative, financial, and even personal aspects of a surgeon's practice. It must be based on the principles of financial interest, clinical authority, administrative participation, transparency, focus on the patient, and mutual necessity. Alignment can take on various forms as well, with popular models consisting of shared governance and comanagement, gainsharing, bundled payments, accountable care organizations, and other methods. As regulatory and financial pressures continue to motivate physicians and hospitals to develop alignment relationships, new and innovative methods of alignment will also appear. Existing models will mature and evolve, with individual variability based on local factors. However, certain trends seem to be appearing as time progresses and alignment relationships deepen, including regional and national collaboration, population management, and changes in the legal system. This article explores the history, principles, and specific methods of physician-hospital alignment and its critical importance for the future of health care delivery.

  10. Preferred use of polyhexanide in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhner, Eric; Seeger, Jörn B; Hoff, Paula; Pfitzner, Tilman; Preininger, Bernd; Andreas, Kristin; Buttgereit, Frank; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-10-05

    In orthopedic and trauma surgery, the most frequently used antiseptic is polyhexanide. Its favored application is based on prepossessing tissue compatibility in contrast to various antiseptics and a high antimicrobiological effect. Recent studies showed toxic effects of this antiseptic on human chondrocytes. The aim of this study was to further analyze the toxic and apoptotic effects of polyhexanide on primary human chondrocytes. The hypothesis of this study was that polyhexanide induces apoptosis on human chondrocytes. Primary human chondrocytes were isolated and cultured from human donors with osteoarthritis of the knee who underwent total arthroplasty and had no indication of infection. Polyhexanide at a standard concentration of 0.04% was added to the monolayer cultures. Early and late apoptotic cells were analyzed by flow cytometric detection of annexin V, active caspases, and 7AAD, and by fluorescence microscopy using annexin V and propidium iodide staining. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an increase of annexin V and active caspases expression of human chondrocytes after incubation with polyhexanide. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated a high number of annexin V positive and propidium iodide negative early apoptotic cells. The data show that polyhexanide promotes apoptosis on primary human chondrocytes in vitro, which may indicate the use of polyhexanide in septic joint surgery. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Regional anesthesia techniques for ambulatory orthopedic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to present advances in the use of regional anesthetic techniques in ambulatory orthopedic surgery. New findings regarding the use of both neuraxial anesthesia and peripheral nerve block are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuraxial anesthesia: The use of short-acting local anesthetic agents such as mepivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and articaine permits rapid onset intrathecal anesthesia with early recovery profiles. Advantages and limitations of these agents are discussed.Peripheral nerve block: Peripheral nerve blocks in limb surgery have the potential to transform this patient cohort into a truly ambulatory, self-caring group. Recent trends and evidence regarding the benefits of regional anesthesia techniques are presented.Continuous perineural catheters permit extension of improved perioperative analgesia into the ambulatory home setting. The role and reported safety of continuous catheters are discussed. SUMMARY: In summary, shorter acting, neuraxial, local anesthetic agents, specific to the expected duration of surgery, may provide superior recovery profiles in the ambulatory setting. A trend towards more peripheral and selective nerve blocks exists. The infrapatellar block is a promising technique to provide analgesia following knee arthroscopy. Improved analgesia seen in the perioperative period can be safely and effectively extended to the postoperative period with the use of perineural catheters.

  12. Infant botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polin, R A; Brown, L W

    1979-05-01

    Infant botulism is a unique neuromuscular disease affecting infants less than six months old. It is the result of intraintestinal toxin production by C. botulinum (toxi-infection). Characteristic symptoms include constipation, lethargy, and decreased feeding. Physical examination often reveals generalized hypotonia with cranial nerve impairment. Recovery is dependent on supportive care in an intensive care setting. The relationship of this disease to the sudden infant death syndrome requires further study.

  13. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Villebro, Nete; Møller, Ann Merete

    2010-01-01

    and keywords (surgery) or (operation) or (anaesthesia) or (anesthesia). MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL were also searched, combining tobacco- and surgery-related terms. Most recent search April 2010. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that recruited people who smoked prior to surgery, offered......Background Smokers have a substantially increased risk of postoperative complications. Preoperative smoking intervention may be effective in decreasing this incidence, and surgery may constitute a unique opportunity for smoking cessation interventions. Objectives The objective of this review...... was to assess the effect of preoperative smoking intervention on smoking cessation at the time of surgery and 12 months postoperatively and on the incidence of postoperative complications. Search strategy The specialized register of the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group was searched using the free text...

  14. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Villebro, N.; Møller, Ann Merete;

    2010-01-01

    Background Smokers have a substantially increased risk of postoperative complications. Preoperative smoking intervention may be effective in decreasing this incidence, and surgery may constitute a unique opportunity for smoking cessation interventions. Objectives The objective of this review...... was to assess the effect of preoperative smoking intervention on smoking cessation at the time of surgery and 12 months postoperatively and on the incidence of postoperative complications. Search strategy The specialized register of the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group was searched using the free text......; pooled RR 10.76 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.55 to 25.46, two trials) and RR 1.41 (95% CI 1.22 to 1.63, five trials) respectively. Four trials evaluating the effect on long-term smoking cessation found a significant effect; pooled RR 1.61 (95% CI 1.12 to 2.33). However, when pooling intensive...

  15. The Institute for Global Orthopedics and Traumatology: A Model for Academic Collaboration in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Devin James; Coughlin, Richard; Caldwell, Amber; Shearer, David

    2017-01-01

    In 2006, surgeons at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) established the Institute for Global Orthopedics and Traumatology (IGOT), an initiative within the department of orthopedic surgery. The principal aim of IGOT is to create long-term, sustainable solutions to the growing burden of musculoskeletal injury in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) through academic partnership. IGOT currently has relationships with teaching hospitals in Ghana, Malawi, Tanzania, Nicaragua, and Nepal. The organizational structure of IGOT is built on four pillars: Global Surgical Education (GSE), Global Knowledge Exchange (GKE), Global Research Initiative (GRI), and Global Leadership and Advocacy. GSE focuses on increasing surgical knowledge and technical proficiency through hands-on educational courses. The GKE facilitates the mutual exchange of surgeons and trainees among IGOT and its partners. This includes a global resident elective that allows UCSF residents to complete an international rotation at one of IGOT's partner sites. The GRI strives to build research capacity and sponsor high-quality clinical research projects that address questions relevant to local partners. The fourth pillar, Global Leadership and Advocacy aims to increase awareness of the global impact of musculoskeletal injury through national and international courses and events, such as the Bay Area Global Health Film Festival. At the core of each tenet is the collaboration among IGOT and its international partners. Over the last decade, IGOT has experienced tremendous growth and maturation in its partnership model based on cumulative experience and the needs of its partners.

  16. [Postoperative fever in orthopedic and urologic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Federico; Myburg, Cristina; Lanfranconi, Marisa B; Urtasun, Martin; De Oca, Luis Montes; Silberman, Andres; Lambierto, Alberto; Gnocchi, Cesar A

    2008-01-01

    Post-operative fever incidence varies widely. In clean and clean-contaminated surgery the non-infectious fever is more frequent than the infectious fever. We performed a prospective study including 303 patients who underwent orthopedic and urologic elective surgery. The aims of our study were to investigate the incidence of post-operative fever, its etiology, the relationship between time of onset and the etiology, and the usefulness of extensive fever work-up to determine post-operative infection. The incidence of post-operative fever was 14% (42/303) of which 81% (34/42) was noninfectious and 19% (8/42) was infectious. The etiology of the fever in the first 48 hours after surgery was always non-infectious (p fever work-up was performed in patients who presented fever only after the initial 48 hours of surgery with normal physical examination (n = 19) consisting of chest x-ray, blood (2) and urine cultures. The chest x-ray was normal in all the patients, the urine cultures were positive in four cases (21%, IC 95%: 6-45) and the blood cultures in only one case (5%, IC 95%: 0.1-26). Seven patients had post-operative infections without fever as a clinical sign. The most frequently observed etiology of post-operative fever was non-infectious, related to the normal inflammatory host response to surgery. Based on the present results, the extensive fever work-up performed to investigate post-operative infection does not seem to be a useful tool. The diagnosis of post-operative infection was based on clinical follow up and the correct interpretation of the patient's symptoms and signs.

  17. Premature infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are many support groups for parents of premature babies. Ask the social worker in the neonatal intensive care unit. ... Prematurity used to be a major cause of infant deaths. Improved ... Prematurity can have long-term effects. Many premature infants ...

  18. Do psychological interventions reduce preoperative anxiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Tessa; Leary, Alison; Wiseman, Theresa

    The systematic review investigates whether, during preoperative assessments, nurse-delivered psychological interventions reduce anxiety levels preoperatively for patients undergoing elective surgery. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria for data extraction and in-depth critiquing. Of these, two were discarded due to lack of validity, while the remaining studies were organised thematically in a narrative synthesis, generating two principal results: patients' preoperative anxieties were lowered by nurse-delivered general preoperative psychological interventions; and patients valued individualised preoperative interventions delivered by nurses. However, the single oncology study in the review showed an elevation in preoperative anxiety, regardless of intervention, and highlights the need for more research in this under-reviewed area. In the meantime, the authors believe that service improvements should be implemented to ensure that, where possible, psychological preoperative interventions are individualised.

  19. 3D-printed patient-specific applications in orthopedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong KC

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Kwok Chuen Wong Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong Abstract: With advances in both medical imaging and computer programming, two-dimensional axial images can be processed into other reformatted views (sagittal and coronal and three-dimensional (3D virtual models that represent a patients’ own anatomy. This processed digital information can be analyzed in detail by orthopedic surgeons to perform patient-specific orthopedic procedures. The use of 3D printing is rising and has become more prevalent in medical applications over the last decade as surgeons and researchers are increasingly utilizing the technology’s flexibility in manufacturing objects. 3D printing is a type of manufacturing process in which materials such as plastic or metal are deposited in layers to create a 3D object from a digital model. This additive manufacturing method has the advantage of fabricating objects with complex freeform geometry, which is impossible using traditional subtractive manufacturing methods. Specifically in surgical applications, the 3D printing techniques can not only generate models that give a better understanding of the complex anatomy and pathology of the patients and aid in education and surgical training, but can also produce patient-specific surgical guides or even custom implants that are tailor-made to the surgical requirements. As the clinical workflow of the 3D printing technology continues to evolve, orthopedic surgeons should embrace the latest knowledge of the technology and incorporate it into their clinical practice for patient-specific orthopedic applications. This paper is written to help orthopedic surgeons stay up-to-date on the emerging 3D technology, starting from the acquisition of clinical imaging to 3D printing for patient-specific applications in orthopedics. It 1 presents the necessary steps to prepare the medical images that are

  20. Oral breathing: dentomaxillofacial irregularities associated with nasorespiratory and orthopedic dysfunctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clotilde de la Caridad Mora Pérez

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human beings are conditioned to breathe through the nose and feed through the mouth, when this physiological mechanism is interrupted facial and general growth is also affected. Objective: To characterize Angle´s Class II malocclusions in oral breathers with nasorespiratory and orthopedic dysfunctions. Method: A correlational, observational and descriptive study was developed from December 2004 to November 2005 including clinical examination of 833 children out of which 60 were selected to take part in this study. Each case was analyzed in Orthodontia, Orthopedics and Otolaryngology consultations. The studied variables were: age, sex, nasorespiratory disorders, orthopedic dysfunctions, dental-maxillofacial irregularities. Results: The mot frequent dental-maxillofacial irregularities were: bilabial incompetence, transversal micrognathism, vestibular version, overjet and overbite. The most important nasorespiratory dysfunctions found in these children were adenoiditis, and tonsil hypertrophy. The most outstanding orthopedic dysfunction was ciphosis. Conclusion: It is conclusive to state that there is a high relationship between dentomaxillofacial anomalies and nasorespiratory and orthopedic dysfunctions.

  1. Orthopedic injury in electric bicycle-related collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxuan; Yun, Zhe; Li, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Yucai; Yang, Tongtao; Zheng, Lianhe; Qian, Jixian

    2017-05-19

    Although electric bicycle-related injuries have become the most common reason for hospitalization due to a road crash in China, no study has comprehensively investigated electric bicycle collisions and their impact on orthopedic injuries; such a study may provide evidence to support a new road safety policy. A retrospective review of orthopedic injuries from electric bicycle collisions was performed in an urban trauma center. We collected variables including age, gender, location of fracture, presence of open or closed fractures, concomitant vascular, and neurologic injuries. A total of 2,044 cases were involved in electric bicycle collisions. The orthopedic injury victims were predominantly male and middle aged. The most common orthopedic injury was a femur fracture. Open fractures frequently involved the forearm and tibia/fibula. Male patients were more likely to suffer from multiple fractures and associated injuries than female patients. Fewer patients age 60 years old or older wore helmets at the time of the accident compared to those in other age groups. Orthopedic injuries from electric bicycle-related accidents cause patients substantial suffering that could lead to serious social consequences. Helmet use and protective clothing or similar safety gear, especially for electric bicycle users, should be required to provide greater protection.

  2. Does thromboprophylaxis prevent venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Eylem Akpinar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary embolism (PE is an important complication of major orthopedic surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE and factors influencing the development of VTE in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery in a university hospital. METHODS: Patients who underwent major orthopedic surgery (hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty, or femur fracture repair between February of 2006 and June of 2012 were retrospectively included in the study. The incidences of PE and deep vein thrombosis (DVT were evaluated, as were the factors influencing their development, such as type of operation, age, and comorbidities. RESULTS: We reviewed the medical records of 1,306 patients. The proportions of knee arthroplasty, hip arthroplasty, and femur fracture repair were 63.4%, 29.9%, and 6.7%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of PE and DVT in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery was 1.99% and 2.22%, respectively. Most of the patients presented with PE and DVT (61.5% and 72.4%, respectively within the first 72 h after surgery. Patients undergoing femur fracture repair, those aged ≥ 65 years, and bedridden patients were at a higher risk for developing VTE. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that VTE was a significant complication of major orthopedic surgery, despite the use of thromboprophylaxis. Clinicians should be aware of VTE, especially during the perioperative period and in bedridden, elderly patients (≥ 65 years of age.

  3. Preoperative localization in primary hyperparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sanson; Kitamura, Hiroyuki; Takagita, Shin-ichi; Maetani, Toshiki; Iwahashi, Yuka; Miyazaki, Masakazu; Yamamoto, Norio [Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    Between 1992 and 1996, 31 cases (8 men and 23 women) with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) were treated in our department. In this study, we compared which of the preoperative localization methods was most useful in the detection of PHPT. The sensitivity for detection of abnormal parathyroid glands was 88.6% on ultrasonography (US), 76.9% on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 74.3% on Tl-Tc subtraction scintigraphy and 68.8% on computed tomography. We concluded that US should be performed first, with MRI as a supplementary method, for the detection of abnormal parathyroid glands and the evaluation of invasion within the body. (author)

  4. Preoperative Evaluation for Noncardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Steven L

    2016-12-06

    This issue provides a clinical overview of preoperative evaluation for noncardiac surgery, focusing on risk factors, elements of evaluation, medication management, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  5. 骨科手术后病人谵妄的护理进展%Nursing progress of patients with delirium after orthopedics operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏清; 张广清

    2015-01-01

    从术前、术中、术后等多方面综述骨科术后病人谵妄的护理研究进展,旨在为临床护理工作提供参考依据。%To overview the nursing research progress of patients with delirium after orthopedics opera-tion from the preoperative,intraoperative,postoperative aspect and so on,so as to provide the reference for clini-cal nursing working.

  6. Is orthopedics more competitive today than when my attending matched? An analysis of National Resident Matching Program data for orthopedic PGY1 applicants from 1984 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnes, Jonathan M; Mayerson, Joel L; Scharschmidt, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated supply and demand trends for orthopedic postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) positions from 1984 to 2011 for the purpose of estimating national intercandidate competition over time. National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) data for orthopedic surgery from 1984 to 2011 were collected. Proxy variables including (total number of orthopedic applicants/number of orthopedic PGY1 positions), (number of US senior applicants to orthopedics/number of orthopedic PGY1 positions), (number of US seniors matching into orthopedics/number of US senior orthopedic applicants), (total number of matched orthopedic applicants/total number of orthopedic applicants), and (total number of US applicants who fail to match into orthopedics/total number of US senior applicants into orthopedics) as well as average United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 scores were used to gauge the level of competition between candidates and were compared over time. Academic medical center in the Midwestern United States. Medical professors and medical students. The NRMP data suggested that the number of positions per applicant decreased or remained stable since 1984 and that the percentage of applicants who did not match was no higher now than in the past. This finding was primarily because of the relative decrease in the ratio of applicants to available PGY1 positions, which stems from the number of positions increasing more rapidly than the number of applicants. The NRMP data from 1984 to 2011 supported our hypothesis that intercandidate competition intensity for orthopedic PGY1 positions has not increased over time. The misconception that orthopedics is becoming more competitive likely arises from the increased number of applications submitted per candidate and the resulting relative importance placed on objective criteria such as United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 scores when programs select interview cohorts. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in

  7. Evolving trauma and orthopedics training in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaparthy, Praveen K; Sayana, Murali K; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    The ever-growing population of the UK has resulted in increasing demands on its healthcare service. Changes have been introduced in the UK medical training system to avoid loss of training time and make it more focused and productive. Modernizing medical careers (MMC) was introduced in 2005. This promised to reduce the training period for a safe trauma specialist, in trauma and orthopedics, to 10 years. At around the same time, the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) was introduced to reduce the working hours for junior doctors in training, to improve patient safety and also work-life balance of junior doctors. Introduction of the assessment tools from Orthopedic Competency assessment project (OCAP) will help tailor the training according to the needs of the trainee. The aim of this article is to review the changes in the UK orthopedic surgical training over the past two decades. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Therapists, Trainers, and Acupuncturists: Focused Review for the Orthopedic Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domes, Christopher M; Kruger, Cori L

    2015-12-01

    Effective treatment of orthopedic injuries requires a multidisciplinary team, including physical and occupational therapists, athletic trainers, massage therapists, and acupuncturists. Orthopedic surgeons commonly encounter these practitioners but may not be familiar with the training, credentialing, and most importantly, the appropriate use of members of this team. There are general similarities in practice locations as well as types of symptoms addressed by the providers discussed, which include the treatment of physical pain, evaluation and treatment of physical impairment, and some facilitation of adaptation to the limitations caused by injuries. Across the 5 types of providers discussed there are widely varying training and licensing requirements, specializations, and continuing education requirements to maintain licensure. This article provides a focused review of these members of the multidisciplinary team and highlights the current American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommendations for the use of occupational and physical therapists for orthopedic conditions, including hip fractures, total hip arthroplasty, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  9. Preoperative fasting time in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adeel, S

    2012-02-01

    The aim of preoperative fasting is to prevent regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration while limiting potential problems of thirst, dehydration and hypoglycaemia. The American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) has suggested guidelines for preoperative fasting for children undergoing elective surgery. We did a postal survey to determine the current practice regarding these guidelines amongst all specialist registrars in anaesthesia in Ireland. A questionnaire was sent to all specialist registrars in anaesthesia (90 in total), 60 (67%) were returned and analysed. The question asked was how long children should be kept fasting before elective surgery. The results of our survey suggest that most of the respondents are following the ASA guidelines for clear fluids and solids however there were differing opinion regarding the duration of fasting for formula milk and breast milk. In conclusion, we would recommend greater awareness and collaboration between anaesthetists, nurses and surgeons to ensure that fasting instructions are consistent with the ASA guidelines and that patient and their parents understand these directives as well.

  10. Improving surgeon utilization in an orthopedic department using simulation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simwita YW

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Yusta W Simwita, Berit I Helgheim Department of Logistics, Molde University College, Molde, Norway Purpose: Worldwide more than two billion people lack appropriate access to surgical services due to mismatch between existing human resource and patient demands. Improving utilization of existing workforce capacity can reduce the existing gap between surgical demand and available workforce capacity. In this paper, the authors use discrete event simulation to explore the care process at an orthopedic department. Our main focus is improving utilization of surgeons while minimizing patient wait time.Methods: The authors collaborated with orthopedic department personnel to map the current operations of orthopedic care process in order to identify factors that influence poor surgeons utilization and high patient waiting time. The authors used an observational approach to collect data. The developed model was validated by comparing the simulation output with the actual patient data that were collected from the studied orthopedic care process. The authors developed a proposal scenario to show how to improve surgeon utilization.Results: The simulation results showed that if ancillary services could be performed before the start of clinic examination services, the orthopedic care process could be highly improved. That is, improved surgeon utilization and reduced patient waiting time. Simulation results demonstrate that with improved surgeon utilizations, up to 55% increase of future demand can be accommodated without patients reaching current waiting time at this clinic, thus, improving patient access to health care services.Conclusion: This study shows how simulation modeling can be used to improve health care processes. This study was limited to a single care process; however the findings can be applied to improve other orthopedic care process with similar operational characteristics. Keywords: waiting time, patient, health care process

  11. Orthopedic conditions of small ruminants. Llama, sheep, goat, and deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneps, A J

    1996-03-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the foot, infectious arthritis, angular limb deformities, patellar luxation, tendon contracture and injuries, and fractures encountered in sheep, goats, llamas, and deer are reviewed. These species share similar orthopedic problems to cattle, but management conditions, particularly for pet animals, may place special demands on the veterinarian treating these disease conditions. The mild temperament and relatively small body size of these animals make them excellent candidates for treatment of orthopedic problems often not amenable to practical treatment in larger or more fractious animals.

  12. Applications of Metal Additive Manufacturing in Veterinary Orthopedic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrysson, Ola L. A.; Marcellin-Little, Denis J.; Horn, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Veterinary medicine has undergone a rapid increase in specialization over the last three decades. Veterinarians now routinely perform joint replacement, neurosurgery, limb-sparing surgery, interventional radiology, radiation therapy, and other complex medical procedures. Many procedures involve advanced imaging and surgical planning. Evidence-based medicine has also become part of the modus operandi of veterinary clinicians. Modeling and additive manufacturing can provide individualized or customized therapeutic solutions to support the management of companion animals with complex medical problems. The use of metal additive manufacturing is increasing in veterinary orthopedic surgery. This review describes and discusses current and potential applications of metal additive manufacturing in veterinary orthopedic surgery.

  13. Novel nanostructured hydroxyapatite coating for dental and orthopedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huinan; Jiang, Wenping; Malshe, Ajay

    2009-09-01

    A novel hybrid coating process, combining NanoSpray® (built on electrostatic spray coating) technology with microwave sintering process, was developed for synthesizing hydroxyapatite- (HA-) based nanostructured coating with favorable properties for dental and orthopedic implants. Specifically, HA nanoparticles were deposited on commercially pure titanium substrates using NanoSpray technique to produce the HA coating, which was then sintered in a microwave furnace under controlled conditions. The study showed that the use of NanoSpray followed by microwave sintering results in nanoscale HA coating for dental/orthopedic application.

  14. Nanomedicine applications in orthopedic medicine: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Mozhdeh; Eslahi, Niloofar; Ordikhani, Farideh; Tamjid, Elnaz; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    The technological and clinical need for orthopedic replacement materials has led to significant advances in the field of nanomedicine, which embraces the breadth of nanotechnology from pharmacological agents and surface modification through to regulation and toxicology. A variety of nanostructures with unique chemical, physical, and biological properties have been engineered to improve the functionality and reliability of implantable medical devices. However, mimicking living bone tissue is still a challenge. The scope of this review is to highlight the most recent accomplishments and trends in designing nanomaterials and their applications in orthopedics with an outline on future directions and challenges.

  15. CPR: Infant

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Infant (1:52) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home ...

  16. CPR: Infant

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Infant (1:52) Refresher videos only ... Store Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms and Conditions All rights reserved. 2011 American National Red Cross.

  17. Infant Curiosity

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This publication is one in a series that reviews tips parents can use to improve the relationships with their children and the learning that happens within the family. This publication deals in particular with infant development.

  18. Infant Constipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care ... Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Diapers & Clothing > Infant Constipation Ages & Stages Listen Español Text ...

  19. [Daily routine in orthopedics and traumatology - results of a nationwide survey of residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merschin, D; Münzberg, M; Stange, R; Schüttrumpf, J P; Perl, M; Mutschler, M

    2014-10-01

    The subject orthopedics and traumatology suffers by a loss of attractiveness which results in a lack of young blood. The aim of this study of the Youth Forum of the German Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology (DGOU) is to register the working conditions of residents in orthopedics. In the months September and October 2013 we performed a survey on members of the following German societies: German Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology (DGOU), German Society of Traumatology (DGU) and the German Society of Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery (DGOOC), (age orthopedics and traumatology. In order to maintain orthopedics and traumatology as an attractive it is necessary to implement flexible working time models and to reorganize and improve training-concepts. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Preoperative information management system using wireless PDAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Tomohiro; Okahara, Masaharu; Santo, Masayuki; Schmidt, Ulrich; Nakata, Yoshinori; Morita, Shigeho; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2003-01-01

    Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) and wireless communication are currently available in clinical settings. We developed wireless PDA software that assists anesthesiologists in pre-operative patient assessment. The device communicates with the hospital information system through a wireless LAN and is equipped with pre-programmed data entry templates for pre-operative assessment. As a preliminary test of the device, we randomly assigned residents in preoperative assessment to an intervention and a control arm and compared the results.

  1. Treating Bronchiolitis in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco Treatments Injuries & ...

  2. Risk factors for surgical site infection and delayed wound healing after orthopedic surgery in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yasutaka; Nishida, Keiichiro; Hashizume, Kenzo; Nasu, Yoshihisa; Nakahara, Ryuichi; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Ozawa, Masatsugu; Harada, Ryozo; Machida, Takahiro; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and the risk factors of surgical-site infection (SSI) and delayed wound healing (DWH) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) underwent orthopedic surgery. We reviewed the records of 1036 elective orthopedic procedures undertaken in RA patients. Risk factors for SSI and DWH were assessed by logistic regression analysis using age, body mass index, disease duration, pre-operative laboratory data, surgical procedure, corticosteroid use, co-morbidity, and use of conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (csDMARDs) and biological DMARDs (bDMARDs) as variables. SSI and DWH were identified in 19 cases and 15 cases, respectively. One case of SSI and three cases of DWH were recorded among 196 procedures in patients using bDMARDs. Foot and ankle surgery was associated with an increased risk of SSI (odds ratio (OR), 3.167; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.256-7.986; p = 0.015). Total knee arthroplasty (TKA; OR, 4.044; 95% CI, 1.436-11.389; p = 0.008) and disease duration (OR, 1.004; 95% CI, 1.000-1.007; p = 0.029) were associated with an increased risk of DWH. Our results indicated foot and ankle surgery, and TKA and disease duration as risk factors for SSI and DWH, respectively. bDMARDs was not associated with an increased risk of SSI and DWH.

  3. Preoperative evaluation of oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Lauren G; Gress, Frank G

    2015-02-01

    The preoperative evaluation of oesophageal adenocarcinoma involves endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET). With routine Barrett's oesophagus surveillance, superficial cancers are often identified. EUS, CT and PET have a limited role in the staging of superficial tumours. Standard EUS has limited accuracy, but high frequency ultrasound miniprobes are valuable for assessing tumour stage in superficial tumours. However, the best method for determining depth of invasion, and thereby stage of disease, is endoscopic mucosal resection. In contrast, in advanced oesophageal cancers, a multi-modality approach is crucial. Accurate tumour staging is very important since the treatment of advanced cancers involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. EUS is very useful for staging of the tumour and nodes. High frequency ultrasound miniprobes provide the ability to perform staging when the lesion is obstructing the oesophageal lumen. CT and PET provide valuable information regarding node and metastasis staging.

  4. ROLE OF TRANEXAMIC ACID IN REDUCING POSTOPERATIVE BLOOD LOSS AND TRANSFUSION REQUIREMENT IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING LOWER LIMB ORTHOPEDIC SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashwant

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Aim of our study to assess the effects of tranexamic acid (TA in patients undergoing lower limb orthopedic surgeries. OBJECTIVE: Assess the effects of tranexamic acid on prevention of bleeding and requirement of blood transfusion after major lower limb orthopedic surgeries. MATERIAL AND METHOD: 90 patients ASA grade I & II undergoing elective surgery for femoral fracture like open reduction internal fixation, hemiarthroplasty, total hip replacement (THR under anaesthesia were taken. Patients were classified randomly into 2 groups (forty five patients in each group. Group T: Patients received inj. TA 10 mg/kg body weight. Group P: Patients received normal saline 1 ml/kg body weight 15 min before surgery. Postoperative hemoglobin concentration (on day 0 and day 2 and volume of blood in the drain were measured. The number of units of packed red cells transfused during the hospital stay was recorded and any thromboembolic and other complications were documented. RESULT: Analysis revealed that there were no significant differences between the patients with respect to age, sex, duration and type of surgery and preoperative mean hemoglobin concentration. Neither heart rate nor MABP has statistically significant difference or results (P>0.05. The drains were removed in the evening of the first postoperative day. Mean volume of blood in the drain compared to placebo group showing a highly significant reduction in postoperative blood loss (P=0.01. Mean fall in hemoglobin at day 0 and day 2 was 2 less in the study group as compared to the placebo that has P value 0.01 making it significant finding. CONCLUSION: the present paired study demonstrated that the administration of TA given preoperatively reduces the blood loss in the first 24 h by a highly significant degree as well it causes a significant reduction in postoperative anemia and need for transfusion among these patients.

  5. Rivaroxaban for Thromboprophylaxis After Nonelective Orthopedic Trauma Surgery in Switzerland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Simmen, Hanspeter; Jakob, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness and the outcomes of rivaroxaban vs the standard of care for venous thromboembolic prophylaxis in patients undergoing fracture-related surgery. A total of 413 patients undergoing fracture-related surgery from 9 Swiss orthopedic and trauma centers were enro...

  6. [Application of platelet-rich plasma in clinical orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Weili; Li, Qi; Li, Jian

    2014-10-01

    To summarize the application status and progress of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in clinical orthopedics. The recent related literature concerning the application of PRP in clinical orthopedics was extensively reviewed and analyzed. Recently, a large number of clinical studies on PRP have been carried out, which are applied in bone defects or nonunion, spinal fusion, osteoarthritis and cartilage injuries, ligament reconstruction, muscle strain, tendon terminal diseases, and a variety of acute and chronic soft tissue injuries. Some results show certain effectiveness, while others demonstrate invalid. Easily drawing, achieving autologous transplantation, and the biological repair potential of the musculoskeletal tissues make PRP to be widely used in clinical orthopedics. However, there are still no uniform standards accepted and reliable clinical guidelines about the application of PRP. Furthermore, a variety of PRP products and their respective indications are also different. The clinical evidences with the greater sample size and higher quality are still needed to further support the safety and effectiveness of PRP in clinical orthopedics.

  7. Higher Education and Students with Orthopedic Disabilities: A Survey Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Delar K.

    A survey instrument is presented that was used in a national survey of 160 colleges and universities to explore facilities and services to students with orthopedic disabilities. The survey contains 33 items that focus on the following areas: structural accessibility, academic accessibility, dorm-living, and recreational opportunities. The total…

  8. Looking at the Social Activity for Adolescents with Orthopedic Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biastro, Leslie; Frank, Heather; Larwin, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents with identified orthopedic impairments are often less likely to participate in social activities outside of the school setting. However, the adolescents who are able to participate in activities have higher social skills, more academic successes, and show more satisfaction in their roles as family member or friend. The aim of this…

  9. Reviewer agreement in scoring 419 abstracts for scientific orthopedics meetings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, R.W.; Keijser, L.C.M.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Blankevoort, L.; Farrokhyar, F.; Bhandari, M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The selection of presentations at orthopedic meetings is an important process. If the peer reviewers do not consistently agree on the quality score, the review process is arbitrary and open to bias. The aim of this study was: (1) to describe the inter-reviewer agreement of a previously d

  10. Frequency of orthopedic diseases in horses: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovač Milomir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study determined the frequency of orthopedic diseases in horses. It was possible to establish 141 specific orthopedic diagnoses in 1955 horses with lameness. In 14.58 % horses, multiple pathologic orthopedic changes were determined. In 61.84 % cases, the pathologic changes were present on the thoracic limb, 28,86 % on the pelvic limb and other parts of the oganism (neck, spine, muscles in 9.29 % cases. Pathologic changes on the tendons, ligaments, tendon sheats, bursae and muscles were determined in 31.51 % cases. Diseases of the hoof were present in 25.82 % cases. According to our investigation the most frequent orthopedic diseases are: podarthritis (acute, chronic, septic (5.04 %, navicular disease (4.69 %, tendinitis m. flexor digitalis superfacialis (4.51 %, kissing spine syndrom (4.30 % periarthritis et osteoarthrosis tarsi (3.30 %, distal metacarpal/metatarzophalengeal tendovaginitis (3.30 % and high suspensory ligament desmitis (3.12 %. Most frequent fractures were diagnosed on the metacarpal/metatarsal bone II and IV (2.56 %. Osteochondrossis dissecans was most frequently determined in the tarsocrural (1.26 % and the metacarpophalengeal joint (1.56 %.

  11. Left-Handed Preschool Children with Orthopedic Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banham, Katharine M.

    1983-01-01

    The mental development of 332 preschool-age children with orthopedic disabilities was assessed at a children's hospital over a 10-year period, and comparisons were made for right-handed and left-handed. The left-handed children were slower than right-handed children in learning speech and language skills (Author/SEW)

  12. Comparing consensus guidelines on thromboprophylaxis in orthopedic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Struijk-Mulder; H.B. Ettema; C.C. Verheyen; H.R. Büller

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Different guidelines exist regarding the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in orthopedic surgery. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to compare (inter)national guidelines and analyse differences. Methods: MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library and the internet were searched for guidelines on the preve

  13. Socioeconomic value of orthopedic devices: evidence and methodological challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorenson C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Corinna Sorenson,1,2 Michael Drummond2,31LSE Health, London School of Economics, London, UK; 2European Health Technology Institute for Socioeconomic Research, Brussels, Belgium; 3Centre for Health Economics, University of York, York, UKAbstract: With continued technological advances in orthopedic devices and increasingly limited health care resources, greater attention will be placed on substantiating the socioeconomic value of these devices. Therefore, this study focused on a systematic review of available economic evaluations of selected orthopedic devices (n = 33 studies to assess their impact on different clinical and economic outcomes. The existing evidence suggests that they have important benefits to patients, including reduced risk of fractures, increased mobility and functioning, and enhanced quality of life, and do so cost effectively or with cost savings. However, we have identified several methodological obstacles to sufficient ascertainment of value, such as a lack of robust information on health economic outcomes and long-term evidence. We also identify areas where additional research is needed to assess more fully the value of orthopedic devices.Keywords: medical devices, orthopedics, health economic evaluation

  14. CT virtual reality in the preoperative workup of malunited distal radius fractures: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, Michael; Gruber, Hannes; Jaschke, Werner R. [Innsbruck University Hospital, Department of Radiology I, Innsbruck (Austria); Gabl, Markus [Innsbruck University Hospital, Department of Trauma Surgery, Innsbruck (Austria); Mallouhi, Ammar [Innsbruck University Hospital, Department of Radiology II, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2005-04-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of CT virtual preoperative planning in the surgical repositioning of malunited distal radius fracture. Eleven patients with malunited distal radius fracture underwent multislice CT of both wrists. A preoperative workup was performed in a virtual reality environment created from the CT data sets. Virtual planning comprised three main procedures, carrying out the virtual osteotomy of the radius, prediction of the final position of the distal radius after osteotomy and computer-assisted manufacturing of a repositioning device, which was later placed at the surgical osteotomy site to reposition objectively the distal radius fragment before fixation with the osteosynthesis. All patients tolerated the surgical procedure well. During surgery, the orthopedic surgeons were not required in any of the cases to alter the position of the distal radius that was determined by the repositioning device. At postoperative follow-up, the anatomic relationship of the distal radius was restored (radial inclination, 21.4 ; volar tilt, 10.3 ; ulnar variance, 0.5 mm). Clinically, a significant improvement of pronation (P=0.012), supination (P=0.01), flexion (P=0.001) and extension (P=0.006) was achieved. Pain decreased from 54 to 7 points. CT virtual reality is a valuable adjunct for the preoperative workup and surgical reposition of malunited distal radius fractures. (orig.)

  15. Orthopedic evaluation and surgical treatment of the spastic shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdari, Surena; Baldwin, Keith; Horneff, John G; Keenan, Mary Ann

    2013-10-01

    The spastic shoulder can often result from brain injury that causes disruption in the upper motor neuron inhibitory pathways. Patients develop dyssynergic muscle activation, muscle weakness, and contractures and often present with fixed adduction and internal rotation deformity to the limb. This article reviews the importance of a comprehensive preoperative evaluation and discusses appropriate treatment strategies based on preoperative evaluation.

  16. Plasma tissue factor pathway inhibitor levels as a marker for postoperative bleeding after enoxaparin use in deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis in orthopedics and general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakki, S I; Fareed, J; Hoppensteadt, D A; Abdullah, H; Camblin, J; Nasseri, A F; Hamadeh, O; Wright, T

    2000-10-01

    Low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) are widely used as antithrombotic prophylactic pharmaceutical agents in orthopedic and general surgery. Their antithrombotic characteristics are expressed by plasma mediators such as anti-Xa, anti-IIa, and increased release of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) from vascular endothelium. The purpose of this clinical research is to study the relation between plasma levels of these mediators and postoperative bleeding. Forty-one consecutive patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty (n = 36) and colectomy (n = 5) received the standard enoxaparin (a LMWH) dose preoperatively (general surgery) or immediately postoperatively (orthopedic surgery). Major bleeding was defined as a postoperative drop of > or = 5 g/dL) of hemoglobin. The authors observed that there was a linear relationship between an increase in free/total TFPI ratio levels and postoperative bleeding. When that ratio increased by > 60%, the hemoglobin dropped to > 5 g/dL (n = 17). This relationship between free/total TFPI ratio increase and postoperative bleeding was statistically significant (P bleed (hemoglobin drop was less than 5 g/dL) (n = 24) had a ratio increase (if any) of less than 50%. However, the authors did not observe any statistical relationship between anti-Xa, anti-IIa, or prothrombin time and postoperative bleeding in patients receiving LMWH for deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis in orthopedic and general surgery patients. The authors recommend a pre- and postoperative ratio level measurement whenever major bleeding is anticipated, as adjustments of LMWH dose or frequency might be necessary.

  17. Publication Productivity of Early-Career Orthopedic Trauma Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hake, Mark E; Lee, John J; Goulet, James A

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this study were to: (1) define the publication productivity of early-career orthopedic trauma surgeons over time; (2) compare the early-career publication productivity of recent orthopedic trauma fellowship graduates vs their more senior colleagues; and (3) determine the proportion of fellowship graduates who meet the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) publication criteria for active membership early in their careers. Orthopedic trauma fellowship graduates from 1982 to 2007 were analyzed. A literature search was performed for each fellow's publications for the 6-year period beginning the year of fellowship graduation. Publication productivity was compared between early and recent groups of graduates, 1987 to 1991 and 2003 to 2007, respectively. Fulfillment of OTA publication criteria was determined. Seventy-nine percent of graduates contributed to 1 or more publications. The recent group produced more total publications per graduate (4.06 vs 3.29, P=.01) and more coauthor publications (2.60 vs 2.04, P=.019) than the early group. The number of first-author publications did not differ between groups (1.46 vs 1.25, P=.26). A greater percentage of the recent group met current OTA publication criteria compared with the early group (51% vs 35%, P=.04). The findings showed that recent orthopedic trauma graduates had increased publication productivity compared with their more senior colleagues, although a proportion had not qualified for active OTA membership 6 years into their career. Overall, these data are encouraging and suggest that young orthopedic trauma surgeons remain committed to sustaining a high level of academic excellence.

  18. The Orthopedic Trauma Symposium: improving care of orthopedic injuries in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normore, Ryan; Greene, Helena; DeLong, Allison; Furey, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Although single-trip volunteer medical teams can provide much-needed acute trauma care following natural disasters, their ability to leave a legacy of improved care in the region is often limited. One way to improve treatment of traumatic injuries is through conference-based teaching, such as the Orthopedic Trauma Symposium (OTS), which took place in Haiti in 2014. However, there is little research evaluating the effectiveness of such teaching tools. We evaluated the OTS and the potential benefits of future iterations of the course. A survey consisting of 5-point Likert scale questions as well as qualitative open feedback assessed respondents' opinions regarding the value, content and delivery of the OTS. Respondents were classified dichotomously in terms of their role in the OTS (instructor v. participant) to measure any meaningful difference in feedback. In total, 84% of all participants agreed that course content was clearly communicated, and 98% agreed that instructors were knowledgeable in the topics covered. Moreover, 87% of all participants responded that they would apply the training in their medical practices going forward. Haitian physicians, residents and medical students responded favourably to the OTS. Open-ended questions offered concise, attainable improvements for future iterations of the course. Organizations committed to improving medical care in low- and middle-income countries should take note of these findings while continuing to develop the OTS and similar initiatives globally.

  19. The effect of patch testing on surgical practices and outcomes in orthopedic patients with metal implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanaskova Mesinkovska, Natasha; Tellez, Alejandra; Molina, Luciana; Honari, Golara; Sood, Apra; Barsoum, Wael; Taylor, James S

    2012-06-01

    To determine the effect of patch testing on surgical decision making and outcomes in patients evaluated for suspected metal hypersensitivity related to implants in bones or joints. Medical chart review. Tertiary care academic medical center. All patients who had patch testing for allergic contact dermatitis related to orthopedic implants. Patch testing. The surgeon's preoperative choice of metal implant alloy compared with patch testing results and the presence of hypersensitivity complications related to the metal implant on postsurgical follow-up. Patients with potential metal hypersensitivity from implanted devices (N = 72) were divided into 2 groups depending on timing of their patch testing: preimplantation (n = 31) and postimplantation (n = 41). History of hypersensitivity to metals was a predictor of positive patch test results to metals in both groups. Positive patch test results indicating metal hypersensitivity influenced the decision-making process of the referring surgeon in all preimplantation cases (n = 21). Patients with metal hypersensitivity who received an allergen-free implant had surgical outcomes free of hypersensitivity complications (n = 21). In patients who had positive patch test results to a metal in their implant after implantation, removal of the device led to resolution of associated symptoms (6 of 10 patients). The findings of this study support a role for patch testing in patients with a clinical history of metal hypersensitivity before prosthetic device implantation. The decision on whether to remove an implanted device after positive patch test results should be made on a case-by-case basis, as decided by the surgeon and patient.

  20. The study of risk factors of pressure sore for elective orthopedic surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuping ZHOU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:The purposes of the study were to investigate the incidence of pressure ulcer of orthopedics patients undergoing selective operation, and to identify the risk factors of pressure ulcer.Methods: A prospective cohort study was employed in this study. Data were collected concerning the general characteristics as well as preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative indicators probable to induce pressure ulcer and then analyzed in view of the risk factors of pressure ulcer. Results: (1 Pressure ulcers developed in thirty five patients (10.1% on day 0 and the first 3 days following surgery; (2 age, hemoglobin, lymphocyte and getting up late for the first time after surgery were significantly associated with the occurrence of pressure ulcers (odds ratio 1.068,  0.948, 0.293, 1.019, respectively.Conclusions: (1 Patients have higher risk of developing pressure ulcer after operation, the critical period beginning from the operation day to the 3rd day after operation. (2 The age older, the later getting up for the first time after surgery, the liable it is for the patients to develop pressure ulcer postoperatively.

  1. X-ray image calibration and its application to clinical orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Steffen; Thelen, Benedikt; Ballestra, Steven; Nolte, Lutz-P; Büchler, Philippe; Zheng, Guoyan

    2014-07-01

    X-ray imaging is one of the most commonly used medical imaging modality. Albeit X-ray radiographs provide important clinical information for diagnosis, planning and post-operative follow-up, the challenging interpretation due to its 2D projection characteristics and the unknown magnification factor constrain the full benefit of X-ray imaging. In order to overcome these drawbacks, we proposed here an easy-to-use X-ray calibration object and developed an optimization method to robustly find correspondences between the 3D fiducials of the calibration object and their 2D projections. In this work we present all the details of this outlined concept. Moreover, we demonstrate the potential of using such a method to precisely extract information from calibrated X-ray radiographs for two different orthopedic applications: post-operative acetabular cup implant orientation measurement and 3D vertebral body displacement measurement during preoperative traction tests. In the first application, we have achieved a clinically acceptable accuracy of below 1° for both anteversion and inclination angles, where in the second application an average displacement of 8.06±3.71 mm was measured. The results of both applications indicate the importance of using X-ray calibration in the clinical routine. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Preoperative Smoking Status and Postoperative Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønkjær, Marie; Eliasen, Marie; Skov-Ettrup, Lise Skrubbeltrang;

    2014-01-01

    To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type.......To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type....

  3. Can Orthopedic Oncologists Predict Functional Outcome in Patients with Sarcoma after Limb Salvage Surgery in the Lower Limb? A Nationwide Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjoerd Kolk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate predictions of functional outcome after limb salvage surgery (LSS in the lower limb are important for several reasons, including informing the patient preoperatively and, in some cases, deciding between amputation and LSS. This study aimed to elucidate the correlation between surgeon-predicted and patient-reported functional outcome of LSS in the Netherlands. Twenty-three patients (between six months and ten years after surgery and five independent orthopedic oncologists completed the Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS and the RAND-36 physical functioning subscale (RAND-36 PFS. The orthopedic oncologists made their predictions based on case descriptions (including MRI scans that reflected the preoperative status. The correlation between patient-reported and surgeon-predicted functional outcome was “very poor” to “poor” on both scores (r2 values ranged from 0.014 to 0.354. Patient-reported functional outcome was generally underestimated, by 8.7% on the TESS and 8.3% on the RAND-36 PFS. The most difficult and least difficult tasks on the RAND-36 PFS were also the most difficult and least difficult to predict, respectively. Most questions had a “poor” intersurgeon agreement. It was difficult to accurately predict the patient-reported functional outcome of LSS. Surgeons’ ability to predict functional scores can be improved the most by focusing on accurately predicting more demanding tasks.

  4. Characteristics of Orthopedic Publications in High-Impact General Medical Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Lehman, Jason D; Lyman, Stephen; Marx, Robert G

    2017-05-01

    Orthopedic studies are occasionally published in high-impact general medical journals; these studies are often given high visibility and have significant potential to impact health care policy and inform clinical decision-making. The purpose of this review was to investigate the characteristics of operative orthopedic studies published in high-impact medical journals. The number of orthopedic studies published in high-impact medical journals is relatively low; however, these studies demonstrate methodological characteristics that may bias toward nonoperative treatment. Careful analysis and interpretation of orthopedic studies published in these journals is warranted. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(3):e405-e412.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Preoperative factors as a predictor for early postoperative outcomes after repair of congenital transposition of the great arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Won; Gwak, Mijeung; Shin, Won-Jung; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Yu, Jeong Jin; Park, Pyung-Hwan

    2015-03-01

    Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) requires early surgical repair during the neonatal period. Several preoperative factors have been identified for the postoperative poor outcome after arterial switch operation (ASO). However, the data remain uncertain an association. Therefore, we investigated the preoperative factors which affect the early postoperative outcomes. Between March 2005 and May 2012, a retrospective study was performed which included 126 infants with an ASO for TGA. Preoperative data included the vasoactive inotropic score (VIS) and baseline hemodynamics. Early postoperative outcomes included the duration of mechanical ventilation, the length of stay in the intensive care unit and hospital, and early mortality. Multivariate linear regression and receiver operating characteristics analysis were performed. The duration of mechanical ventilation was significantly correlated with the preoperative mechanical ventilator support and VIS, and CPB time. On multivariate linear regression analysis, a higher preoperative VIS, preoperative B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) level, and the CPB time were identified as independent risk factors for delayed mechanical ventilation. Preoperative VIS (OR 1.154, 95 % CI 1.024-1.300) and the CPB time (OR 1.034, 95 % CI 1.009-1.060) were independent parameters predicting early mortality. A preoperative VIS of 12.5 had the best combined sensitivity (83.3 %) and specificity (85.3 %) and an AUC of 0.852 (95 % CI 0.642-1.061) predicted early mortality. Our results suggest that preoperative VIS and BNP can predict the need for prolonged postoperative mechanical ventilation. Moreover, preoperative VIS may be used as a simple and feasible indicator for predicting early mortality.

  6. The effect of a preoperative single-dose methylprednisolone on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabakke, Anna J M; Holst, Lars B; Jørgensen, Jørgen C;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Methylprednisolone has been shown to have analgesic effects after orthopedic surgery. The objective of this trial was to compare the effect of 125 mg methylprednisolone with placebo on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. STUDY DESIGN: In this randomized double......-blinded placebo-controlled trial women scheduled for elective abdominal hysterectomy (n=59) were randomized to preoperatively receive either 125 mg methylprednisolone or saline intravenously. Primary outcome was postoperative pain measured on a 0.0-10.0 visual analog scale and assessed at rest and during...... group (P=0.01). CONCLUSIONS: This trial showed no beneficial effect of methylprednisolone on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. Methylprednisolone significantly lowered postoperative CRP levels. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrial.gov: www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01106547....

  7. Three-dimensional printing for preoperative planning of total hip arthroplasty revision: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerr, Joseph; Chatzinoff, Yonatan; Chopra, Rajiv; Estrera, Kenneth; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2016-10-01

    Three dimensional (3D) printing can be used to create material models to aid preoperative planning of complex orthopedic procedures as exemplified by this case of total hip arthroplasty failure due to infection with resulting severe acetabular bone stock deficiency. The 3D model allowed for trialing of the acetabular component to determine cup size, position, and screw placement. Most importantly, the model confirmed that there was not a pelvic discontinuity and the revision shell would be sufficient for the reconstruction. Previously, the cost and complexity of utilization of 3D printers were prohibitive. Recent improvements in commercially available 3D printers have made rapid prototype model creation a realistic option, which can facilitate difficult surgery.

  8. CPR: Infant

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Infant (1:52) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course Materials Shop Our Store ...

  9. 78 FR 54911 - Certain Thermal Support Devices for Infants, Infant Incubators, Infant Warmers and Components...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Thermal Support Devices for Infants, Infant Incubators, Infant Warmers and Components.... International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Thermal Support Devices for Infants, Infant Incubators, Infant Warmers and Components Thereof, DN 2976; the Commission is soliciting...

  10. Potential utility of liposome bupivacaine in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonner, Jess H; Scuderi, Giles R; Lieberman, Jay R

    2015-03-01

    Management of postsurgical analgesia is an important consideration in orthopedic procedures, including joint arthroplasty. Inadequate postsurgical analgesia is associated with increased hospital length of stay, delayed ambulation, and reduced exercise capacity. In this article, we review the potential contribution of a prolonged-release liposomal formulation of bupivacaine as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen after orthopedic surgery. Controlled studies across multiple surgical settings have demonstrated that, compared with placebo and bupivacaine HCl, liposome bupivacaine in a single administration provides postsurgical analgesia for up to 72 hours, delays use of rescue medication, and reduces postsurgical opioid consumption. Liposome bupivacaine has been well tolerated in clinical studies and has had a low rate of treatment-related adverse events. To date, there has been no signal of cardiac toxicity, chondrolysis, or delayed wound healing associated with liposome bupivacaine.

  11. Radiographic workload and use factors for orthopedic facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushong, S.C.; Glaze, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of technique factors at 9 radiographic installations dedicated to orthopedic radiography have been made. Monthly area radiation measurements with thermoluminescent dosimeters were made at three of these facilities. The results of these observations and measurements suggest that current NCRP recommended assumptions utilized in protective barrier computations result in considerably more shielding than is necessary. We observed an average workload of 224 mA min/wk and a maximum weekly average of 670 mA min/wk. The use factor for the chest wall averaged 5%. That for all other vertical barriers was less than 1%. The average operating potential was 75 kVp. Room radiation measurements confirm the suggestion that at least two of the walls and the control booth barrier in an orthopedic radiographic facility may be considered secondary barriers.

  12. Online reviews of orthopedic surgeons: an emerging trend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Chelsea; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-04-01

    Various websites are dedicated to rating physicians. The goals of this study were to: (1) evaluate the prevalence of orthopedic surgeon ratings on physician rating websites in the United States and (2) evaluate factors that may affect ratings, such as sex, practice sector (academic or private), years of practice, and geographic location. A total of 557 orthopedic surgeons selected from the 30 most populated US cities were enrolled. The study period was June 1 to July 31, 2013. Practice type (academic vs private), sex, geographic location, and years since completion of training were evaluated. For each orthopedic surgeon, numeric ratings from 7 physician rating websites were collected. The ratings were standardized on a scale of 0 to 100. Written reviews were also collected and categorized as positive or negative. Of the 557 orthopedic surgeons, 525 (94.3%) were rated at least once on 1 of the physician rating websites. The average rating was 71.4. The study included 39 female physicians (7.4%) and 486 male physicians (92.6%). There were 204 (38.9%) physicians in academic practice and 321 (61.1%) in private practice. The greatest number of physicians, 281 (50.4%), practiced in the South and Southeast, whereas 276 (49.6%) practiced in the West, Midwest, and Northeast. Those in academic practice had significantly higher ratings (74.4 vs 71.1; P<.007). No significant difference based on sex (72.5 male physicians vs 70.2 female physicians; P=.17) or geographic location (P=.11) were noted. Most comments (64.6%) were positive or extremely positive. Physicians who were in practice for 6 to 10 years had significantly higher ratings (76.9, P<.01) than those in practice for 0 to 5 years (70.5) or for 21 or more years (70.7).

  13. [History of orthopedics in Germany 1945-1990].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holfelder, G

    2001-10-01

    Presentation of a brief history of the scientific society from the end of World War II until the fall of the Iron Curtain, taking into consideration the milieu inside and outside the field of orthopedics. Throughout, the intention was to provide facts and sufficient references for further reading, with special emphasis on the biographies of the public figures mentioned. Attention should be directed in particular to the history of the society published in 1963.

  14. Pediatric orthopedic surgical simulation at Boston Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Donald S; Waters, Peter M

    2016-07-01

    Orthopedic surgical simulation has become an increasing valuable means for optimizing patient care, promoting patient safety, improving education, and fostering clinical research. The purpose of this review was to discuss the rationale for simulation training, describe current simulation efforts within the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Boston Children's Hospital, and provide an example of how these simulation efforts touch both patient care and clinical research.

  15. Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics: certifying excellence

    OpenAIRE

    Lima Filho,Roberto M. A.; VogelI, Carlos Jorge; Zen,Estélio; Bolognese,Ana Maria; Mucha,José Nelson; Araújo,Telma Martins de

    2011-01-01

    p. 148-157 The Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO) is the institution that certifies the standards of clinical excellence in the practice of this specialty. This article describes the history of BBO's creation and the examination structure and phases to obtain the BBO Certification. It also presents a detailed report of the first exam applied in Brazil. Its purpose is to expand the knowledge, among professionals in the area, about the importance of BBO Certificatio...

  16. Current state and use of biological adhesives in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neil V; Meislin, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Bone and tissue adhesives are common and beneficial supplements to standard methods of musculoskeletal tissue suture repair. Knowledge and development of biologically derived or inspired adhesives useful in orthopedic surgery are rapidly advancing. Recent literature demonstrates the increased adjunct or primary use of biological adhesives in the repair of musculoskeletal soft tissues, chondral fractures, and osteochondral fractures. Adhesives offer more benefits and enhancements to tissue healing than current fixation methods afford, including improved biocompatibility, resorbability, and non-immunogenicity. Further investigation is required to determine the extent of the role that these bioadhesives can play in orthopedic surgery. The largest group of biologically derived adhesives and sealants is fibrin sealants, which include first- and second-generation commercially available fibrin sealants, autologous fibrin sealants, and variants. Other groups include gelatin-resorcin aldehydes, protein-aldehyde systems, collagen-based adhesives, polysaccharide- based adhesives, mussel adhesive proteins, and various biologically inspired or biomimetic glues. Potential uses include applications in orthopedic-related blood conservation, arthroplasty, articular cartilage disorders, sports medicine, spine surgery, trauma, and tumors. The development of an adhesive with universal application is likely unfeasible, given the unique characteristics of various musculoskeletal tissues. However, the literature demonstrates the overall underuse of adhesives and indicates the rising probability of the development of a successful variety of bioadhesives for use in orthopedic surgery. As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Describe the difference between adhesives and sealants. 2. Recognize fibrin adhesives commonly used in practice today and identify other biological adhesives with rising potential. 3. Analyze how fibrin sealants work relative to fibrin and

  17. Venous thromboembolism in 13 Indonesian patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmel L. Tambunan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To estimate the incidence of VTE in Indonesian patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery and not receiving thromboprophylaxis.Methods: This was an open clinical study of consecutive Indonesian patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery, conducted in 3 centers in Jakarta. Bilateral venography was performed between days 5 and 8 after surgery to detect the asymptomatic and to confi rm the symptomatic VTE. These patients were followed up to one month after surgery.Results: A total of 17 eligible patients were studied, which a median age of 69 years and 76.5% were females. Sixteen out of the 17 patients (94.1% underwent hip fracture surgery (HFS. The median time from injury to surgery was 23 days (range 2 to 197 days, the median duration of surgery was 90 minutes (range 60 to 255 minutes, and the median duration of immobilization was 3 days (range 1 to 44 days. Thirteen out of the 17 patients were willing to undergo contrast venography. A symptomatic VTE was found in 9 patients (69.2% at hospital discharge. Symptomatic VTE was found in 3 patients (23.1%, all corresponding to clinical signs of DVT and none with clinical sign of PE. These patients were treated initially with a low molecular weight heparin, followed by warfarin. Sudden death did not occur up to hospital discharge. From hospital discharge until 1-month follow-up, there were no additional cases of symptomatic VTE. No sudden death, bleeding complication, nor re-hospitalization was found in the present study.Conclusion: The incidence of asymptomatic (69.2% and symptomatic (23.1% VTE after major orthopedic surgery without thromboprophylaxis in Indonesian patients (SMART and AIDA, and still higher than the results of the Western studies. A larger study is required to establish the true incidence, and more importantly, that the use of thromboprophylaxis in these patients is warranted. (Med J Indones 2009; 18: 249-56Keywords: venous thromboembolism (VTE, orthopedic surgery, Indonesia

  18. Prevalence of Internet and social media usage in orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Curry

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prior studies in other specialties have shown that social networking and Internet usage has become an increasingly important means of patient communication and referral. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of Internet or social media usage in new patients referred to a major academic orthopedics center and to identify new avenues to optimize patient recruitment and communication. New patients were surveyed (n=752 between December 2012 to January 2013 in a major academic orthopedic center to complete a 15-item questionnaire including social media and Internet usage information. Data was collected for all orthopedic sub-specialties and statistical analysis was performed. Fifty percent of patients use social networking sites, such as Facebook. Sports medicine patients tend to be higher social networking users (35.9% relative to other services (9.8-17.9% and was statistically higher when compared to the joints/tumor service (P<0.0001. Younger age was the biggest indicator predicting the use of social media. Patients that travelled between 120 to 180 miles from the hospital for their visits were significantly more likely to be social media users, as were patients that did research on their condition prior to their new patient appointment. We conclude that orthopedic patients who use social media/Internet are more likely to be younger, researched their condition prior to their appointment and undergo a longer average day’s travel (120-180 miles to see a physician. In an increasingly competitive market, surgeons with younger patient populations will need to utilize social networking and the Internet to capture new patient referrals.

  19. Features of Teaching Maxillofacial Orthopedics to Foreign Students

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This article highlights features of the teaching Maxillofacial Orthopedics to foreign students. Prosthetic dentistry consists of general and specialized courses. The anatomical and physiological features of the masticatory apparatus, general and special methods of diagnostics, symptoms and semiotics of the disease, dental materials science, laboratory and prosthetic appliances are taught in general course. A specialized course consists of three main sections – dental prosthetics, maxillofacia...

  20. Clinical conundrums and challenges during geriatric orthopedic emergency surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Despite so many advancements and innovations in anesthetic techniques, expectations and challenges have also grown in plenty. Cardiac, pediatric, obstetric and neuro-anesthesia have perfectly developed to fulfill the desired needs of respective patient population. However, geriatric anesthesia has been shown a lesser interest in teaching and clinical practices over the years as compared with other anesthetic sub-specialties. The large growing geriatric population globally is also associated with an increase number of elderly patients presenting for orthopedic emergency surgeries. Orthopedic emergency surgery in geriatric population is not only a daunting clinical challenge but also has numerous socio-behavioral and economic ramifications. Decision making in anesthesia is largely influenced by the presence of co-morbidities, neuro-cognitive functions and the current socio-behavioral status. Pre-anesthetic evaluation and optimization are extremely important for a better surgical outcome but is limited by time constraints during emergency surgery. The current review aims to highlight comprehensively the various clinical, social, behavioral and psychological aspects during pre-anesthetic evaluation associated with emergency orthopedic surgery in geriatric population.

  1. ONTOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK FOR KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Zdravković

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency and effectiveness of orthopedic surgery can be achieved by enabling proper decision-making in a shortest period of time, based on complete and updated information on the status, type of fracture and fixators used for a particular fracture. In this way, the risk of possible complications caused by a late intervention can be reduced. In such circumstances, there exist critical needs for an effective and efficient knowledge management approach where different domain models are combined and formally interrelated, so that the decisions are based on the consistent and complete information. In this paper, ontologies are used to propose a framework for implementing such an approach in the domain of orthopedic surgery. The framework combines formal models of the generic products and supply chains for their manufacturing and delivery, anatomical elements, e.g. bones, types of their fractures and fixators – the medical products which are used in the fracture treatments. Then the possible uses of this framework for the purpose of knowledge management in orthopedic surgery are discussed in the context of the assumptions of development of Next Generation Enterprise Information Systems.

  2. Orthopedic Manifestations of Mobius Syndrome: Case Series and Survey Study

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    Philip McClure

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mobius Syndrome is a rare disease defined by bilateral congenital 7th nerve palsy. We focus on reporting the prevalence of orthopedic disease in this population. Methods. Twenty-three individuals with Mobius Syndrome underwent orthopedic physical examination, and additional 96 patients filled out a survey for self-reported orthopedic diagnoses. Results. Clubfoot was present in 60% of individuals in the physical exam series and 42% of those in the survey. Scoliosis was present in 26% and 28%, respectively. Poland’s Syndrome was present in 17% and 30%. In addition to these findings, 27% of patients reported having difficulty with anesthesia, including difficulty in intubation and airway problems. Conclusion. An increased prevalence of scoliosis, clubfoot, transverse limb deficiencies, and Poland’s Syndrome is identified in the setting of Mobius Syndrome. In the setting of several deformities often requiring surgical correction, a high incidence of anesthetic difficulty is noted and should be discussed with patients and other providers during surgical planning.

  3. Nanomedicine applications in orthopedic medicine: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazaheri M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mozhdeh Mazaheri,1,* Niloofar Eslahi,1,* Farideh Ordikhani,1,* Elnaz Tamjid,2 Abdolreza Simchi1,3 1Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, 2Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, 3Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The technological and clinical need for orthopedic replacement materials has led to significant advances in the field of nanomedicine, which embraces the breadth of nanotechnology from pharmacological agents and surface modification through to regulation and toxicology. A variety of nanostructures with unique chemical, physical, and biological properties have been engineered to improve the functionality and reliability of implantable medical devices. However, mimicking living bone tissue is still a challenge. The scope of this review is to highlight the most recent accomplishments and trends in designing nanomaterials and their applications in orthopedics with an outline on future directions and challenges. Keywords: orthopedics, nanomedicine, tissue engineering, implantable materials, nanotoxicology

  4. Business and Practice Management Knowledge Deficiencies in Graduating Orthopedic Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D Joshua; Throckmorton, Thomas W; Azar, Frederick M; Beaty, James H; Canale, S Terry; Richardson, David R

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a study to determine the general level of knowledge that orthopedic residents have on business and practice management topics at graduation and to evaluate the level of knowledge that practicing orthopedic surgeons need in order to function effectively in a medical practice. Residency graduates from a single training program were asked to complete a survey that gathered demographic information and had surgeons rate their understanding of 9 general business and practice management skills and the importance of these skills in their current practice situation. The amount of necessary business knowledge they lacked at graduation was defined as a functional knowledge deficiency (FKD) and was calculated as the difference between the reported importance of a topic in current practice and the level of understanding of that topic at graduation (larger FKD indicates greater deficiency). Those in physician-managed practices reported significantly higher levels of understanding of economic analytical tools than those in nonphysician-managed practices. There were no other statistically significant differences among groups. Hospital-employed physicians had the lowest overall FKD (4.0), followed by those in academic practices (5.1) and private practices (5.9). Graduating orthopedic surgeons appear to be inadequately prepared to effectively manage business issues in their practices, as evidenced by the low overall knowledge levels and high FKDs.

  5. Use of Google Scholar public profiles in orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsworth, Kevin; Fraser, Dave; Glatt, Vaida; Hohmann, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the growth of Google Scholar public profiles in orthopedics over a 12-month period and to investigate global patterns. Data was prospectively acquired from June 2013 to June 2014. Google Scholar queries specific to orthopedic surgery were performed at 90-day intervals. Demographic aspects of each user were also compiled, including gender, current location, and primary interests. To determine differences between the growth of Google Scholar public profile registrations and citation counts, as well as differences in growth in different regions, repeated measures of analysis of variance (RMANOVA) were used. RMANOVA revealed statistically significant differences ( p = 0.0001) for regional growth. The largest growth was observed in the United Kingdom ( p = 0.009, 289%), followed by the Asia-Pacific region ( p = 0.004, 177%) and "Other" ( p = 0.006, 172%). The mean growth per 90-day interval is 19.9% ( p = 0.003) and the mean 12-month growth is 107% ( p = 0.05). Statistically significant differences between gender (male vs. female) and basic and clinical sciences ( χ(2) = 22.4, p = 0.0001) were observed. This study suggests an exponential growth in the number of authors in the field of orthopedic surgery creating a Google Scholar public profile, and at the current rate participation doubles every 10.6 months.

  6. Questionable Word Choice in Scientific Writing in Orthopedic Surgery

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    Casey M. O`Connor

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Given the strong influence of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors on musculoskeletal symptoms andlimitations it’s important that both scientific and lay writing use the most positive, hopeful, and adaptive words andconcepts consistent with medical evidence. The use of words that might reinforce misconceptions about preferencesensitiveconditions (particularly those associated with age could increase symptoms and limitations and might alsodistract patients from the treatment preferences they would select when informed and at ease.Methods: We reviewed 100 consecutive papers published in 2014 and 2015 in 6 orthopedic surgery scientific journals.We counted the number and proportion of journal articles with questionable use of one or more of the following words:tear, aggressive, required, and fail. For each word, we counted the rate of misuse per journal and the number of specificterms misused per article per journalResults: Eighty percent of all orthopedic scientific articles reviewed had questionable use of at least one term. Tearwas most questionably used with respect to rotator cuff pathology. The words fail and require were the most commonquestionably used terms overall.Conclusion: The use of questionable words and concepts is common in scientific writing in orthopedic surgery. It’sworth considering whether traditional ways or referring to musculoskeletal illness merit rephrasing.

  7. A fresh look at preoperative body washing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Judith; Gould, Dinah; Jenkins, Philip; Hilliam, Rachel; Mistry, Neetesh; Walsh, Susannah

    2012-01-01

    National guidelines do not support preoperative body washing to reduce surgical site infections, instead recommending bathing or showering with soap. Yet preoperative body washing continues to be widely used in many hospitals across Europe. This paper suggests that existing trials of preoperative body washing, upon which guidelines are based, are dated and proposes a new investigation of preoperative body washing using modern definitions of surgical site infection with standardised patient follow up, modern surgical techniques and well designed trials. This paper provides a critique of existing guidelines and describes a randomised trial with 60 participants to compare the effect of soap and two antiseptic washing products on colony forming units (CFUs) for up to six hours. Chlorhexidine gluconate and octenidine were significantly more effective than soap in reducing CFUs in the underarm, and chlorhexidine was significantly more effective than soap in reducing CFUs in the groin. PMID:22448182

  8. Preoperative steroid in abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Brøndum, Tina Lee; Belhage, Bo

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative administration of high-dose glucocorticoid leads to improved recovery and decreased length of stay after abdominal surgery. Even so, studies on administration of glucocorticoids for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) for giant ventral hernia repair ...

  9. Preoperative alcohol cessation prior to elective surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oppedal, Kristian; Møller, Ann Merete; Pedersen, Bolette

    2012-01-01

    Hazardous drinking has been associated with an increased postoperative complication rate after surgery. Common complications include postoperative infections, cardiopulmonary complications, and bleeding episodes. Preoperative abstinence may to some degree reverse alcohol-induced pathophysiological...

  10. Preoperative steroid in abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Brøndum, Tina Lee; Belhage, Bo;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative administration of high-dose glucocorticoid leads to improved recovery and decreased length of stay after abdominal surgery. Even so, studies on administration of glucocorticoids for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) for giant ventral hernia repair ...

  11. Preoperative education for lumbar surgery for radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Louw, A; Louw, Q; L. Crous

    2009-01-01

    To date no studies have been published on preoperative education forpatients who had lumbar surgery. The aim of this study was to determine if there is a demand for preoperative education for patients who had lumbar surgery for radiculopathy. A convenience sample of 47 patients who had lumbar surgery and a random sample of 141 physiotherapists involved in treating patients who had lumbar surgery completed a newly developed spinal surgery questionnaire. The data were analyzed using descriptive...

  12. Preoperative prediction of severe postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkman, C J; Visser, K; Moen, J; Bonsel, G J; Grobbee, D E; Moons, K G M

    2003-10-01

    We developed and validated a prediction rule for the occurrence of early postoperative severe pain in surgical inpatients, using predictors that can be easily documented in a preoperative setting. A cohort of surgical inpatients (n=1416) undergoing various procedures except cardiac surgery and intracranial neurosurgery in a University Hospital were studied. Preoperatively the following predictors were collected: age, gender, type of scheduled surgery, expected incision size, blood pressure, heart rate, Quetelet index, the presence and severity of preoperative pain, health-related quality of life the (SF-36), Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS). The outcome was the presence of severe postoperative pain (defined as Numeric Rating Scale > or =8) within the first hour postoperatively. Multivariate logistic regression in combination with bootstrapping techniques (as a method for internal validation) was used to derive a stable prediction model. Independent predictors of severe postoperative pain were younger age, female gender, level of preoperative pain, incision size and type of surgery. The area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.71 (95% CI: 0.68-0.74). Adding APAIS scores (measures of preoperative anxiety and need for information), but not STAI, provided a slightly better model (ROC area 0.73). The reliability of this extended model was good (Hosmer and Lemeshow test p-value 0.78). We have demonstrated that severe postoperative pain early after awakening from general anesthesia can be predicted with a scoring rule, using a small set of variables that can be easily obtained from all patients at the preoperative visit. Before this internally validated preoperative prediction rule can be applied in clinical practice to support anticipatory pain management, external validation in other clinical settings is necessary.

  13. [What do orthopedic surgeons need to know from radiologists?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portabella, F; Pablos, O; Agulló, J L

    2012-09-01

    The diagnosis of tumors and pseudotumors depends on three pillars: the clinician, the radiologist, and the pathologist. The first two can establish a presumptive diagnosis on the basis of the clinical presentation and findings on complementary tests, whereas the pathologist will have to reach the definitive diagnosis after analyzing the biopsy specimens. Obviously, the clinician and radiologist should reach a consensus regarding the diagnostic orientation; however, for this to happen there must be a relationship between the two professionals and they must work together for the benefit of the patient. Orthopedic surgeons, like any other group of specialists, would like to have radiologists working in their own center who are dedicated to the organ/system they treat, in this case the locomotor apparatus, and who can provide them with their opinion about the different images obtained. This point is very important and especially so for tumors, because this type of disease is uncommon and few specialists are dedicated to it. For this reason, when faced with a lesion that has the characteristics of a tumor, orthopedic surgeons would like radiologists to give the most accurate description of the images as possible, defining the characteristics of benignity or malignancy of the process as well as indicating the risk of fracture in a metastatic lesion. On the other hand, orthopedic surgeons would ask for a clear and comprehensible description of the images obtained in complementary tests, because orthopedic surgeons have less experience in this type of images and they are often difficult to interpret. Another aspect that is often mentioned in discussions among orthopedic surgeons is the importance of having a radiology department that performs interventional procedures. Radiologists that perform interventional procedures can facilitate our work very much, both in the diagnosis and in the treatment of certain bone tumors. Finally, we would like to stress the importance of

  14. Osteopenia - premature infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neonatal rickets; Brittle bones - premature infants; Weak bones - premature infants; Osteopenia of prematurity ... the baby. This helps the baby grow. A premature infant may not receive the proper amount of ...

  15. Infant Formula and Fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child. Does using infant formula increase risk for dental fluorosis? Because most infant formulas contain low levels of ... I use affect my child’s chance of getting dental fluorosis? Three types of infant formula are available in ...

  16. Modulating Wnt Signaling Pathway to Enhance Allograft Integration in Orthopedic Trauma Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    TITLE: Modulating Wnt Signaling Pathway to Enhance Allograft Integration in Orthopedic Trauma Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Amarjit S...Integration in Orthopedic Trauma Treatment 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-1054 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Amarjit S. Virdi, PhD...practical means of enhancing repair of large bone defects in orthopedic trauma and can be translated into clinical practice in the near future. Figures

  17. Trends in the orthopedic job market and the importance of fellowship subspecialty training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Nathan T; Mercer, Deana M; Moneim, Moheb S

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have examined possible incentives for pursuing orthopedic fellowship training, but we are unaware of previously published studies reporting the trends in the orthopedic job market since the acceptance of certain criteria for fellowship programs by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in 1985. We hypothesized that, since the initiation of accredited postresidency fellowship programs, job opportunities for fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have increased and job opportunities for nonfellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have decreased. We reviewed the job advertisements printed in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, for the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009. We categorized the job opportunities as available for either a general (nonfellowship-trained) orthopedic surgeon or a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon. Based on the advertisements posted in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, a trend exists in the orthopedic job market toward seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons. In the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009, the percentage of job opportunities seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons was 16.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.1%-20.3%), 40.6% (95% CI, 38.1%-43.1%), 52.2% (95% CI, 48.5%-55.9%), and 68.2% (95% CI, 65.0%-71.4%), respectively. These differences were statistically significant (analysis of variance, P<.05). Fellowship training is thus a worthwhile endeavor.

  18. The dangers of damage control orthopedics: a case report of vascular injury after femoral fracture external fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staeheli Gregory R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Placement of external fixation frames is an expedient and minimally invasive method of achieving bone and joint stability in the setting of severe trauma. Although anatomic safe zones are established for placement of external fixation pins, neurovascular structures may be at risk in the setting of severe trauma. Case report We present a case of a 21-year-old female involved in a high speed motorcycle accident who sustained a Type IIIB open segmental femur fracture with significant thigh soft tissue injury. Damage control orthopedic principals were applied and a spanning external fixator placed for provisional femoral stabilization. Intraoperative vascular examination noted absent distal pulses, however an intraoperative angiogram showed arterial flow distal to the trifurcation. Immediately postoperatively the dorsalis pedis pulse was detected using Doppler ultrasound but was then non-detectable over the preceding 12-hours. Femoral artery CT angiogram revealed iatrogenic superficial femoral artery occlusion due to kinking of the artery around an external fixator pin. Although the pin causing occlusion was placed under direct visualization, the degree of soft tissue injury altered the appearance of the local anatomy. The pin was subsequently revised allowing the artery to travel in its anatomic position, restoring perfusion. Conclusion This case highlights the dangers associated with damage control orthopedics, especially when severe trauma alters normal local anatomy. Careful assessment of external fixator pin placement is crucial to avoiding iatrogenic injury. We recommend a thorough vascular examination pre-operatively and prior to leaving the operating room, which allows any abnormalities to be further evaluated while the patient remains in a controlled environment. When an unrecognized iatrogenic injury occurs, serial postoperative neurovascular examinations allow early recognition and corrective actions.

  19. Preoperative education for lumbar surgery for radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Louw

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available To date no studies have been published on preoperative education forpatients who had lumbar surgery. The aim of this study was to determine if there is a demand for preoperative education for patients who had lumbar surgery for radiculopathy. A convenience sample of 47 patients who had lumbar surgery and a random sample of 141 physiotherapists involved in treating patients who had lumbar surgery completed a newly developed spinal surgery questionnaire. The data were analyzed using descriptiveand inferential statistical tests. Results showed that 100% of the patients and 99% of therapists view preoperative education to be an important component for lumbar surgery for radiculopathy. The most important factors identifiedfor inclusion in preoperative educational programs were reason for surgery, risks associated with surgery, limitations following surgery and more education regarding pain. The preferred method of education delivery was verbal one-on-one education. This study demonstrates that there is a demand for preoperative education for patients who had lumbar surgery.

  20. [Preoperative assessment of lung disease patients.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gilson; Ramos Filho, José; Pereira, Edísio; Junqueira, Marcos; Assis, Carlos Henrique C

    2003-02-01

    Lung complications are the most frequent causes of postoperative morbidity-mortality, especially in lung disease patients. So, those patients should be preoperatively carefully evaluated and prepared, both clinically and laboratorially. This review aimed at determining surgical risk and at establishing preoperative procedures to minimize peri and postoperative morbidity-mortality in lung disease patients. Major anesthetic-surgical repercussions in lung function have already been described. Similarly, we tried to select higher-risk patients, submitted or not to lung resection. To that end, clinical and laboratorial propedeutics were used. Finally, a proposal of a preoperative algorithm was presented for procedures with lung resection. Lung disease patients, especially those with chronic evolution, need to be preoperatively thoroughly evaluated. ASA physical status and Goldmans cardiac index are important risk forecasting factors for lung disease patients not candidates for lung resection. Adding to these criteria, estimated postoperative max VO2, FEV1 and diffusion capacity are mandatory for some patients submitted to lung resection. beta2-agonists and steroids should be considered in the preoperative period of these patients.

  1. [Femoral artery pseudoaneurysms encountered in orthopedics and traumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raherinantenaina, F; Rajaonanahary, T M A; Rakoto Ratsimba, H N

    2015-12-01

    Most published articles regarding orthopedic- and trauma-related femoral artery pseudoaneurysms (FAPs) are case reports in English. Reported cases are often associated with a literature review but actually provide little robust data. We wanted to summarize the current knowledge on diagnostic and therapeutic features of these FAPs. A new case of superficial FAP is described followed by a review of the literature. A bibliographic search was performed online (PubMed, ScinceDirect) from 1964 to 2015 using the descriptors "traumatic femoral pseudoaneurysm, orthopedic surgery, osteochondroma". A total of 64 cases of FAPs was analyzed. There were 50 men with an average age of 40.72±26.45 years old. The most common clinical presentation was painful swelling (34%). Arteriography was the commonest radiological investigation used (63%). The main etiologies were orthopedic injuries (47%), surgery of the upper thigh (30%) and femoral osteochondromas (23%). Arterial injuries included superficial femoral (47%) and profunda femoris artery (50%). The treatment was open surgery (56%) or endovascular repair (36%). Deep femoral artery and its branches were embolized (47%) or ligated (38%). Endovascular stenting was performed in 30% of posttraumatic FAPs. All FAPs relating to osteochondromas were repaired surgically. Postoperative courses were uneventful in 95% of patients. Endovascular embolization is preferred in management of postsurgical FAPs which have usually involved the deep femoral artery. Endovascular stenting graft may be proposed for posttraumatic FAPs, for which the superficial femoral trunk is the most often involved vessel. Surgical repair should be performed when endovascular stenting graft is not feasible. Surgical repair is mandatory for all FAPs secondary to traumatic exostoses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. E-learning in orthopedic surgery training: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpada, Sandip P; Morris, Matthew T; Burton, Denver A

    2016-12-01

    E-learning is the use of internet-based resources in education. In the field of surgical education, this definition includes the use of virtual patient cases, digital modeling, online tutorials, as well as video recordings of surgical procedures and lectures. In recent years, e-learning has increasingly been considered a viable alternative to traditional teaching within a number of surgical fields. Here we present (1) a systematic review of literature assessing the efficacy of e-learning modules for orthopedic education and (2) a discussion of their relevance. A systematic search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library was conducted according to the guidelines defined in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement (PRISMA). The search yielded a total of 255 non-duplicate citations that were screened using predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. A total of 9 full text articles met inclusion criteria, which included the use of an objective outcome measure to evaluate an orthopedic e-learning module. Six studies assessed knowledge using a multiple-choice test and 4 assessed skills using a clinical exam. All studies showed positive score improvement pre- to post-intervention, and a majority showed greater score improvement than standard teaching methods in both knowledge (4/6 studies) and clinical skills (3/4 studies). E-learning represents an effective supplement or even alternative to standard teaching techniques within orthopedic education for both medical students and residents. Future work should focus on validating specific e-learning programs using standardized outcome measures and assessing long-term knowledge retention using e-learning platforms.

  3. How do Orthopedic Surgeons Address Psychological Aspects of Illness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Vranceanu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orthopaedic surgeons have a pivotal role in transitioning the care of orthopedic patients from a biomedical to a biopsychosocial model. In an effort to foster this transition, we designed a study aimed to determine surgeons’ attitudes and practice of noticing, screening, discussing psychological illness with patients, as well as making referrals to address psychosocial issues in patients in need. Additionally, we asked surgeons to rank order potential barriers to and reasons for referrals to psychosocial treatment.   Methods: Orthopaedic surgeons members of the Science and Variation Group and Ankle Platform (N =350 completed demographics, and a 4-part survey assessing the degree to which surgeons notice, assess, screen and refer for psychological treatments, as well ranked ordered barriers to engaging in these processes. Results: As a group surgeons were neutral to referral for psychological treatment and formal screening of psychological factors, and somewhat likely to notice and discuss psychological factors. Surgeons were more likely to refer for psychological treatment if they engaged in research, or if they reside in South America as opposed to North America. The highest ranked barriers to screening, noticing, discussing and referring for psychological treatment were lack of time, stigma and feeling uncomfortable. Conclusion: Overall surgeons are likely to notice and discuss psychological factors, but less likely to formally screen or refer for psychological treatment. Transition to biopsychosocial models should focus on problem solving these barriers by teaching surgeons communication skills to increase comfort with discussing psychoemotional factors associated with orthopedic problems. The use of empathic communication can be very helpful in normalizing the difficulty of coping with an orthopedic condition, and may facilitate referral.

  4. A new robot-assisted orthopedic surgery simulation system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Dong-mei; DU Zhi-jiang; JIA Zhi-heng; YANG Donghai; SUN Li-ning

    2006-01-01

    The paper proposes a novel desktop virtual surgical simulation system capable of not only surgical training but also operative planning, surgery rehearsal and telesurgery, which is mainly used on the robot-assisted orthopedic surgery system, HIT-RAOS. The paper first introduces the hardware system: HIT-RAOS. Then presents several major characters of the virtual system: developing tools, building schemes and collision detection algorithm. Additionally, virtual reality based telesurgery is implemented. Based on these works, experiments of locking of intramedullary nails are conducted, and results are content.

  5. RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIALS IN ORTHOPEDICS: DIFFICULTIES AND LIMITATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Imamura, Marta; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) are considered to be the gold standard for evidence-based medicine nowadays, and are important for directing medical practice through consistent scientific observations. Steps such as patient selection, randomization and blinding are fundamental for conducting a RCT, but some additional difficulties are presented in trials that involve surgical procedures, as is common in orthopedics. The aim of this article was to highlight and discuss some difficulties and possible limitations on RCTs within the field of surgery. PMID:27027037

  6. Wear Tests of a Potential Biolubricant for Orthopedic Biopolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Martin; Hunt, Ben; Smith, Alan M.; Joyce, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Most wear testing of orthopedic implant materials is undertaken with dilute bovine serum used as the lubricant. However, dilute bovine serum is different to the synovial fluid in which natural and artificial joints must operate. As part of a search for a lubricant which more closely resembles synovial fluid, a lubricant based on a mixture of sodium alginate and gellan gum, and which aimed to match the rheology of synovial fluid, was produced. It was employed in a wear test of ultra high mole...

  7. Orthopedic cervical headgear in Class II treatment: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enoki Carla

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Early treatment for Class II malocclusion was undertaken with the objective of correcting skeletal disproportion by altering the growth pattern. A case of Class II, Division 1 malocclusion in the mixed dentition was corrected to Class I molar relationship using orthopedic cervical headgear, with nonextraction edgewise therapy. Cephalometric analysis indicated a reduction in the maxillomandibular discrepancy (ANB correcting the Class II malocclusion to Class I malocclusion. The treatment showed that this was achieved by downward displacement and inhibition of the forward growth of the maxilla and growth of the mandible. There was no downward rotation of the mandible nor maxillary first molar extrusion. There was improvement in the jaw relationship.

  8. Surface evaluation of orthopedic hip implants marketed in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, M. M.; Trommer, R. M.; Maru, M. M.; Roesler, C. R. M.; Barros, W. S.; Dutra, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    One of the factors that contribute to the quality of total hip prostheses is the degree of accuracy in the manufacturing of the joint surfaces. The dimensional control of joint components is important because of its direct influence on the durability and, consequently, in the patients’ life quality. This work presents studies on the form and roughness of orthopedic hip prostheses marketed in Brazil. The results provide data for quality control of the surfaces of the femoral heads and acetabular components of hip prostheses and indicate the need of improvement in the procedures used to this control.

  9. Septic arthritis in the newborn and infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajdobranski Đorđe R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Septic arthritis represents an intra-articular infection caused by pyogenic bacteria. During the earliest childhood it is considered to be a systemic septic condition and demands early diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment. Material and methods This is a retrospective analysis of patients with septic arthritis treated at the Department of Orthopedics of the Pediatric Surgery Clinic in Novi Sad, over a 10-year period. We are also presenting a case of a 12-day-old newborn baby, with clear radiological signs of osteoarthritis of the right knee. Results A retrospective study included the period 1991-2000, and showed that 15 patients, aged 10 days - 12 months were treated for osteoarthritis. The most common localization was the hip, in 60% of cases. In 11 patients the causative agent was Staphylococcus aureus while in the 4 remaining patients the bacteriologic finding was negative. One patient died of generalized sepsis. Discussion In neonates and infants septic arthritis is characterized by atypical clinical picture, often causing delayed diagnosis. In the initial phases of the disease ultrasonographic findings were of greater use compared to radiological imaging, due to relatively late appearance of radiological signs of disease. Conclusions Due to possible development of serious and irreversible damage, even lethal outcome, septic arthritis requires early diagnosis, prompt administration of antibiotics and early surgical treatment. It is a quite unique area in Pediatric Orthopedics where missed or delayed diagnosis may have serious consequences.

  10. The Early Years of Organized Chiropractic Orthopedics, 1954–1973: A Social History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bart N.; Johnson, Claire D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This paper presents the origins and development of the organized chiropractic orthopedics movement in the United States from 1954–1973. Methods: Hand searches of early periodicals were performed and information was organized chronologically to create a timeline. Context for the timeline was provided by extracting pertinent information from audio recordings of interviews. Relevant background information was located using the cumulative index of the journal Chiropractic History and searching the MANTIS database. Historical Features: After World War I, The advent of third party reimbursement for health care created a new environment for health care practitioners. For doctors of chiropractic, this event provided the impetus to begin the postgraduate chiropractic orthopedics program over 50 years ago. In 1954, Alvin A. Hancock, DC and F. Maynard Lipe, DC successfully launched an active orthopedics movement after several earlier attempts failed during the 1940s and early 1950s. The movement generated from the desire to train and certify chiropractors to manage personal injury and workers’ compensation low back injuries. In addition to developing interdisciplinary educational programs, the chiropractic orthopedics group was responsible for producing a research agenda, some of the profession’s early orthopedic-focused research, and for starting the National Council on Chiropractic Orthopedics of the National Chiropractic Association, which later became the American Chiropractic Association Council on Orthopedics. These organizations produced thousands of specialists in chiropractic orthopedics, later known as Diplomates of the American Board of Chiropractic Orthopedists. Conclusion: Several orthopedics interest groups were formed and credentialing processes were created to qualify doctors as recognized chiropractic orthopedics specialists. The popularity of this movement resulted in the inclusion of orthopedics into core chiropractic college curricula and

  11. Pre-operative fasting guidelines: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søreide, E; Eriksson, L I; Hirlekar, G

    2005-01-01

    Liberal pre-operative fasting routines have been implemented in most countries. In general, clear fluids are allowed up to 2 h before anaesthesia, and light meals up to 6 h. The same recommendations apply for children and pregnant women not in labour. In children......Liberal pre-operative fasting routines have been implemented in most countries. In general, clear fluids are allowed up to 2 h before anaesthesia, and light meals up to 6 h. The same recommendations apply for children and pregnant women not in labour. In children...

  12. Prognostic Value of Impaired Preoperative Ankle Reflex in Surgical Outcome of Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Omidi-Kashani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several prognostic factors exist influencing the outcome of surgical discectomy in the patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between severity of preoperative impaired ankle reflex and outcomes of lumbar discectomy in the patients with L5-S1 LDH. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 181 patients (108 male and 73 female who underwent simple discectomy in our orthopedic department from April 2009 to April 2013 and followed them up for more than one year. The mean age of the patients was 35.3±8.9 years old. Severity of reflex impairment was graded from 0 to 4+ and radicular pain and disability were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS and Oswestry disability index (ODI questionnaires, respectively. Subjective satisfaction was also evaluated at the last follow-up visit. Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare qualitative variables. Results: Reflex impairment existed in 44.8% preoperatively that improved to 10% at the last follow-up visit. Statistical analyses could not find a significant relationship between the severity of impaired ankle reflex and sex or age (P=0.538 and P=0.709, respectively. There was a remarkable relationship between severity of reflex impairment and preoperative radicular pain or disability (P=0.012 and P=0.002, respectively. Kruskal-Wallis test showed that a more severity in ankle reflex impairment was associated with not only less improvement in postoperative pain and disability but also less satisfaction rate (P Conclusions: In the patients with L5-S1 LDH, more severe ankle reflex impairment is associated with less improvement in postoperative pain, disability, and subjective satisfaction.

  13. Breed susceptibility for developmental orthopedic diseases in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFond, Elizabeth; Breur, Gert J; Austin, Connie C

    2002-01-01

    A large-scale epidemiological study was conducted to determine breeds at risk for 12 developmental orthopedic diseases (DODs). Developmental orthopedic diseases investigated included canine hip dysplasia (CHD); craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO); fragmented coronoid process; hypertrophic osteodystrophy; Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease; osteochondrosis of the medial humeral condyle, caudal humeral head, femoral condyles, and talar trochlear ridges; panosteitis; patella luxation; and ununited anconeal process. Dogs that were diagnosed with any one of the diseases of interest at any of 10 veterinary teaching hospitals participating in the Veterinary Medical Database from 1986 to 1995 were included as cases. Odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated to determine risk. Frequency of diagnosis during the 10-year period ranged from 35 cases (CMO) to 10,637 cases (CHD). The number of breeds at increased risk for a disease ranged from one (CMO) to 35 (CHD). Breed susceptibility for a DOD may suggest a genetic component in the disease etiology. The results of this study serve to increase veterinarians' awareness of breeds susceptible to DODs and may facilitate the control of such diseases by identifying breeds that might benefit from breeding programs or environmental intervention such as dietary modification.

  14. Publication rates of papers presented at the Brazilian Orthopedic Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Gomes, Guilherme Sevá; de Oliveira, Rafael Garcia; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2013-01-01

    To quantify the publication rates of the papers presented at the 2007 Brazilian Orthopedics Meeting (Congresso Brasileiro de Ortopedia - CBOT). Evaluation of the proportion of abstracts submitted by the various orthopedic subspecialties and according to the Brazilian states. Then, a Lilacs and PubMed search was performed in order to determine which presentations generated national or international published papers. São Paulo and the Southeast region were responsible for the greatest number of presentations at the congress (54.1% and 68.3% respectively). Shoulder and Elbow were the subspecialty responsible for more presentations (13.8%). Among the 653 studies presented at the congress, 174 (26.6%) were published. Oral presentations obtained a publication rate 3.58 times higher than posters. The CBOT publication rate is lower than 30%. Many of the papers presented at the CBOT does not pass the scrutiny of scientific journals and therefore should not be the only source of scientific update of the participants: Descriptive Epidemiologic.

  15. Coatings and surface modifications imparting antimicrobial activity to orthopedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargupta, Roli; Bok, Sangho; Darr, Charles M; Crist, Brett D; Gangopadhyay, Keshab; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra; Sengupta, Shramik

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on an orthopedic implant surface is one of the worst possible outcomes of orthopedic intervention in terms of both patient prognosis and healthcare costs. Making the problem even more vexing is the fact that infections are often caused by events beyond the control of the operating surgeon and may manifest weeks to months after the initial surgery. Herein, we review the costs and consequences of implant infection as well as the methods of prevention and management. In particular, we focus on coatings and other forms of implant surface modification in a manner that imparts some antimicrobial benefit to the implant device. Such coatings can be classified generally based on their mode of action: surface adhesion prevention, bactericidal, antimicrobial-eluting, osseointegration promotion, and combinations of the above. Despite several advances in the efficacy of these antimicrobial methods, a remaining major challenge is ensuring retention of the antimicrobial activity over a period of months to years postoperation, an issue that has so far been inadequately addressed. Finally, we provide an overview of additional figures of merit that will determine whether a given antimicrobial surface modification warrants adoption for clinical use.

  16. Aggregate Interview Method of ranking orthopedic applicants predicts future performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Jacqueline; VanHeest, Ann; Tatman, Penny; Gioe, Terence

    2013-07-01

    This article evaluates and describes a process of ranking orthopedic applicants using what the authors term the Aggregate Interview Method. The authors hypothesized that higher-ranking applicants using this method at their institution would perform better than those ranked lower using multiple measures of resident performance. A retrospective review of 115 orthopedic residents was performed at the authors' institution. Residents were grouped into 3 categories by matching rank numbers: 1-5, 6-14, and 15 or higher. Each rank group was compared with resident performance as measured by faculty evaluations, the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE), and American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) test results. Residents ranked 1-5 scored significantly better on patient care, behavior, and overall competence by faculty evaluation (Porthopedic resident candidates who scored highly on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education resident core competencies as measured by faculty evaluations, performed above the national average on the OITE, and passed the ABOS part 1 examination at rates exceeding the national average.

  17. Laser-deposited Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta orthopedic alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, R; Nag, S; Samuel, S; Fraser, H L

    2006-08-01

    The complex quaternary Ti-35Nb-7Zr-5Ta orthopedic alloy has been successfully deposited from a powder feedstock consisting of a blend of elemental titanium, niobium, zirconium, and tantalum powders, using the laser engineered net-shaping (LENStrade mark) process. In the as laser-deposited form, these alloys exhibit a substantially higher tensile strength as compared with more conventionally processed counterparts of similar composition, while maintaining excellent ductility and a low modulus. Furthermore, the as-deposited alloys appear to exhibit a texture, with a substantially large number of grains of the beta phase aligning one of their axes nearly normal to the substrate or parallel to the growth direction. The microstructure of the as-deposited as well as tensile-tested alloys have been characterized in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), orientation microscopy (OM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Formation of a high density of shear bands, possibly arising from slip localization due to precipitates of the omega phase in the beta matrix, is clearly evident in the tensile-tested sample. The enhanced tensile strength and low modulus in these laser-deposited alloys coupled with the ability to form near-net shape components makes LENS an attractive processing technology for orthopedic implants.

  18. Dynamic Patterns of Expertise: The Case of Orthopedic Medical Diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Assaf

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze dynamic patterns for scanning femoroacetabular impingement (FAI radiographs in orthopedics, in order to better understand the nature of expertise in radiography. Seven orthopedics residents with at least two years of expertise and seven board-certified orthopedists participated in the study. The participants were asked to diagnose 15 anteroposterior (AP pelvis radiographs of 15 surgical patients, diagnosed with FAI syndrome. Eye tracking data were recorded using the SMI desk-mounted tracker and were analyzed using advanced measures and methodologies, mainly recurrence quantification analysis. The expert orthopedists presented a less predictable pattern of scanning the radiographs although there was no difference between experts and non-experts in the deterministic nature of their scan path. In addition, the experts presented a higher percentage of correct areas of focus and more quickly made their first comparison between symmetric regions of the pelvis. We contribute to the understanding of experts' process of diagnosis by showing that experts are qualitatively different from residents in their scanning patterns. The dynamic pattern of scanning that characterizes the experts was found to have a more complex and less predictable signature, meaning that experts' scanning is simultaneously both structured (i.e. deterministic and unpredictable.

  19. ANALYSIS OF OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY, ORTHOPEDICS AND THORACIC SURGERY JOURNALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma Terezinha Anselmo Lima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To perform an extensive analysis of journals in Medicine III - CAPES, and specifically those in the areas of Otorhinolaryngology, Orthopedics and Traumatology and Chest Surgery. Method: An active search for the impact factors in the Journal Citation Reports, Scimago, their indexation in Scielo, Lilacs, Scopus and Google Scholar, and their stratification in WebQualis was done. Results: Forty-four journals with measured impact factors ranging from 3.006 to 0.128 were detected in the area of Otorhinolaryngology; however, only 26 of them (60% had a Qualis measured by CAPES; in the stratification, no journal was detected in A1, three were A2 and nine B1. Three journals were located for Chest Surgery, with only one of them having a measured Qualis (A2 with a mean of 3.61. Sixty-seven journals were detected for Orthopedics and Traumatology, with an impact factor ranging from 4.699 to 0.156; Qualis was measured in only 38 of them (60%; there were three journal stratified as A1, seven as A2 and 25 as B1. Conclusion: The search for journals of higher impact induces authors to not publish in journals related to their area and facing more difficulties than investigators from other areas.

  20. Societal impacts of regenerative medicine : reflections on the views of orthopedic professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemansburg, Sophie L.; Tempels, Tjidde H.; Dhert, Wouter J. A.; van Delden, Johannes J. M.; Bredenoord, Annelien L.

    2015-01-01

    As the amount of clinical studies in orthopedic regenerative medicine (RM) is increasing, it is time to take into account its impact on society. A total of 36 biomedical professionals working at the front row of orthopedic RM were interviewed to explore their attitudes, opinions and expectations reg

  1. Factors affecting interest in orthopedics among female medical students: a prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Keith; Namdari, Surena; Bowers, Andrea; Keenan, Mary Ann; Levin, L Scott; Ahn, Jaimo

    2011-12-06

    The field of orthopedics has a limited ability to recruit high-quality female applicants. The purpose of this study was to determine whether early exposure to the field affects a woman's decision to pursue orthopedics. We performed a prospective, nonrandomized cohort study between academic years 2005 and 2009 and compared interest in orthopedic surgery among female (n=271) and male (n=71) medical students at 2 urban teaching institutions. Elective lectures and orthopedic literature were distributed via e-mail to the study participants. These materials included articles published in the medical literature, materials produced and distributed by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, and Web sites providing educational materials. The primary outcome was the likelihood of application for orthopedic residency. We studied the influence of demographics, exposure, and attitudes on interest in pursuing an orthopedic career. Men had a significantly higher baseline level of interest in orthopedic surgery than women (P=.005). Younger age (Porthopedics were significantly related to interest among women. At final follow-up, total personal exposures (P=.003) and total independent exposures (Porthopedic educational resources may be useful in generating female interest. Perceptions and attitudes regarding orthopedic surgery must to be changed to attract the best and brightest minds, regardless of sex. Copyright © 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Societal impacts of regenerative medicine: reflections on the views of orthopedic professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemansburg, S.L.; Tempels, T.H.; Dhert, W.J.; Delden, van J.J.; Bredenoord, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    As the amount of clinical studies in orthopedic regenerative medicine (RM) is increasing, it is time to take into account its impact on society. A total of 36 biomedical professionals working at the front row of orthopedic RM were interviewed to explore their attitudes, opinions and expectations reg

  3. Age, Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, Body Composition, and Incidence of Orthopedic Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Effects of age, physical activity, physical fitness, and body mass index (BMI) on the occurrence of orthopedic problems were examined. For men, physical fitness, BMI, and physical activity were associated with orthopedic problems; for women, physical activity was the main predictor. Age was not a factor for either gender. (JD)

  4. A qualitative and quantitative needs assessment of pain management for hospitalized orthopedic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordts, Grace A; Grant, Marian S; Brandt, Lynsey E; Mears, Simon C

    2011-08-08

    Despite advances in pain management, little formal teaching is given to practitioners and nurses in its use for postoperative orthopedic patients. The goal of our study was to determine the educational needs for orthopedic pain management of our residents, nurses, and physical therapists using a quantitative and qualitative assessment. The needs analysis was conducted in a 10-bed orthopedic unit at a teaching hospital and included a survey given to 20 orthopedic residents, 9 nurses, and 6 physical therapists, followed by focus groups addressing barriers to pain control and knowledge of pain management. Key challenges for nurses included not always having breakthrough pain medication orders and the gap in pain management between cessation of patient-controlled analgesia and ordering and administering oral medications. Key challenges for orthopedic residents included treating pain in patients with a history of substance abuse, assessing pain, and determining when to use long-acting vs short-acting opioids. Focus group assessments revealed a lack of training in pain management and the need for better coordination of care between nurses and practitioners and improved education about special needs groups (the elderly and those with substance abuse issues). This needs assessment showed that orthopedic residents and nurses receive little formal education on pain management, despite having to address pain on a daily basis. This information will be used to develop an educational program to improve pain management for postoperative orthopedic patients. An integrated educational program with orthopedic residents, nurses, and physical therapists would promote understanding of issues for each discipline.

  5. Orthopedic Surgery Resident Debt Load and Its Effect on Career Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joey P; Cassidy, Dale B; Tofte, Josef N; Bariteau, Jason T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Student loan debt has become a topic of discussion and debate among physicians and legislators. This study seeks to assess the level of debt of orthopedic surgery residents and to determine whether debt burden affects the career choice of orthopedic trainees. A 26-question, anonymous survey was distributed via email to resident trainees enrolled in different medical and surgical specialty training programs across the United States. Orthopedic trainees were compared with trainees in other specialties using comparative statistics. Of the approximately 13,503 residents who were sent the survey, a total of 3076 responded, including 167 of an estimated 580 orthopedic residents, for approximate response rates of 22.8% and 28.8%, respectively. On average, orthopedic surgery residents were at a later post-graduate year than overall respondents (Porthopedic surgery residents (57.21% vs 49.08%, respectively; P=.041). More than 50% of all respondents agreed that student loan debt would affect their type or location of practice. The majority of orthopedic residents take student loan debt into consideration when determining their final location and type of practice, although less so for orthopedic trainees compared with other specialties. As medical education continues to become more expensive and the threat of dropping physician reimbursement looms on the horizon, student debt may become a primary driving factor for young American physicians' career plans. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e438-e443.].

  6. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Orthopedic Specialist, Classroom Course 10-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX. Health Care Research Div.

    These military-developed curriculum materials for a course for orthopedic specialists are targeted for students from grades 11 through the adult level. The course is designed to provide a working knowledge of the application of casts, traction, and splints to orthopedic patients and the removal of these devices; a working knowledge of assisting in…

  7. The Orthopedically Disabled Child: Psychological Implications with an Individual Basis. July 1984 Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This study describes the implications of the Individual Psychology of Alfred Adler and field theory associated with Kurt Lewin in understanding orthopedically disabled children and points out that orthopedically disabled youngsters have a remarkable range of individual differences both in type of disability as well as level of adjustment.…

  8. The Orthopedically Disabled Child: Psychological Implications with an Individual Basis. July 1984 Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This study describes the implications of the Individual Psychology of Alfred Adler and field theory associated with Kurt Lewin in understanding orthopedically disabled children and points out that orthopedically disabled youngsters have a remarkable range of individual differences both in type of disability as well as level of adjustment.…

  9. PREOPERATIVE ENDOSCOPIC MARKING OF UNPALPABLE COLONIC TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Goncharov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of small colon lesions is one of the major problems in laparoscopic colonic resection.Research objective: to develop a technique of visualization of small tumors of a colon by preoperative endoscopic marking of a tumor.Materials and methods. In one day prior to operation to the patient after bowel preparation the colonoscopy is carried out. In the planned point near tumor on antimesentery edge the submucous infiltration of marking solution (Micky Sharpz blue tattoo pigment, UK is made. The volume of entered solution of 1–3 ml. In only 5 months of use of a technique preoperative marking to 14 patients with small (the size of 1–3 cm malignant tumors of the left colon is performed.Results. The tattoo mark was well visualized by during operation at 13 of 14 patients. In all cases we recorded no complications. Time of operation with preoperative marking averaged 108 min, that is significantly less in comparison with average time of operation with an intra-operative colonoscopy – 155 min (р < 0.001.Conclusions. The first experience of preoperative endoscopic marking of non palpable small tumors of a colon is encouraging. Performance of a technique wasn't accompanied by complications and allowed to reduce significantly time of operation and to simplify conditions of performance of operation.

  10. Preoperative exercise training to improve postoperative outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenet, K.

    2017-01-01

    It is common knowledge that better preoperative physical fitness is associated with better postoperative outcomes. However, as a result of aging of the population and improved surgical and anaesthesia techniques, the proportion of frail patients with decreased physical fitness levels undergoing majo

  11. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  12. Preoperative evaluation : risk management and implementation aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, W.A. van

    2002-01-01

    In preoperative risk management the anesthesiologist uses diagnostic information to estimate the probability of outcomes and to decide on the anesthetic strategy in a particular patient. The aim of this thesis was explore to what extent simple patient characteristics, particularly obtained from

  13. Pre-operative fasting guidelines: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søreide, E; Eriksson, L I; Hirlekar, G

    2005-01-01

    Liberal pre-operative fasting routines have been implemented in most countries. In general, clear fluids are allowed up to 2 h before anaesthesia, and light meals up to 6 h. The same recommendations apply for children and pregnant women not in labour. In children...

  14. Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  15. Preoperative and intraoperative continuous use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-13

    Sep 13, 2016 ... in clinics to improve patient safety and effectiveness with. Introduction ... and control group according to different use of drugs. The two ... Key words: Anesthesia, dexmedetomidine, effect, intervention, preoperative, recovery, remifentanil .... will lead to postoperative pain in patients and severe agitation after ...

  16. Preoperational test, vent building ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-20

    Preoperational Test Procedure for Vent Building Ventilation System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The Vent Building ventilation system provides ventilation, heating, cooling, and zone confinement control for the W-030 Project Vent Building. The tests verify correct System operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control system.

  17. Preoperative evaluation : risk management and implementation aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, W.A. van

    2002-01-01

    In preoperative risk management the anesthesiologist uses diagnostic information to estimate the probability of outcomes and to decide on the anesthetic strategy in a particular patient. The aim of this thesis was explore to what extent simple patient characteristics, particularly obtained from preo

  18. Fast and Accurate Data Extraction for Near Real-Time Registration of 3-D Ultrasound and Computed Tomography in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brounstein, Anna; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Guy, Pierre; Hodgson, Antony; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2015-12-01

    Automatic, accurate and real-time registration is an important step in providing effective guidance and successful anatomic restoration in ultrasound (US)-based computer assisted orthopedic surgery. We propose a method in which local phase-based bone surfaces, extracted from intra-operative US data, are registered to pre-operatively segmented computed tomography data. Extracted bone surfaces are downsampled and reinforced with high curvature features. A novel hierarchical simplification algorithm is used to further optimize the point clouds. The final point clouds are represented as Gaussian mixture models and iteratively matched by minimizing the dissimilarity between them using an L2 metric. For 44 clinical data sets from 25 pelvic fracture patients and 49 phantom data sets, we report mean surface registration accuracies of 0.31 and 0.77 mm, respectively, with an average registration time of 1.41 s. Our results suggest the viability and potential of the chosen method for real-time intra-operative registration in orthopedic surgery.

  19. Preoperative evaluation of micro-organisms in non-operated cleft in soft palate: impact on use of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roode, G J; Bütow, K-W; Naidoo, S

    2017-02-01

    To identify the pathogenic micro-organisms that had colonised preoperatively in clefts in the soft palate and oro-nasopharynx, we retrospectively studied the preoperative microbiological profiles of 200 infants who had had primary repair of all types of cleft in the soft palate. Data from a private practice that specialises in the repair of facial clefts were extracted randomly from patients' files. We analysed the results of the culture of preoperative swabs taken from clefts in the soft palate and oro-nasopharynx, and the resistance profile of organisms towards various antibiotics. A total of 23 different pathogenic micro-organisms were isolated from 115 (57%) of the sample. Klebsiella pneumoniae most commonly colonised clefts in the lip, alveolus, and palate. This was considerably higher than in other groups. The second most common micro-organism was Staphylococcus aureus, which was found most often in patients with isolated clefts in the hard palate. Those with complete cleft lip and palate presented with more pathogenic micro-organisms in preoperative cultures than those with other types of cleft. We need to find a way to control pathogenic micro-organisms in the oral and oro-nasopharyngeal region preoperatively to limit postoperative complications.

  20. Dominance of foreign citations in Brazilian orthopedics journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Renan Kleber Costa; Yamaki, Vitor Nagai; Rosa, Rita de Cássia Rodrigues; de Barros, Rui Sergio Monteiro; Botelho, Nara Macedo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate whether there is any preference for citing journals from other countries to the detriment of Brazilian journals, in three Brazilian orthopedics journals. All the references of articles published in 2011 by the journals Acta Ortopédica Brasileira, Coluna/Columna and Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia were evaluated to as certain how many of these came from Brazilian journals and how many from foreign journals. 3813 references distributed among 187 articles were analyzed. Out of this total, 306 (8.02%) were from Brazilian journals. There was no difference between the three journals analyzed. There were 76 articles (40.64%) without any citations of articles in Brazilian journals and only two articles (1%) cited more Brazilian articles than articles published elsewhere. There is a need for Brazilian researchers to cite articles from Brazilian journals more often.

  1. Bone drilling haptic interaction for orthopedic surgical simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Dar; Hsieh, Ming-Shium; Tsai, Chiung-Hsin

    2007-12-01

    Drilling procedure is widely used in orthopedic surgery to position reduced fractured bones and prosthetic components. However, successful execution of bone drilling requires a high level of dexterity and experience, because the drilling resistance is large and sometimes vibrates violently to difficultly grasp the hand-piece or even break the slender drill. This paper introduces haptic functions that are added to a volume based surgical simulator to simulate the drilling process. These haptic functions compute drilling forces and torques based on reliable metal removing theorem. Therefore, accurate prediction for the drilling process can be obtained to provide effective surgery training and rehearsal. A simulation example of screw and plate surgery for positioning the hip trochanter fracture illustrates the practicality and versatility of the proposed method.

  2. ADVANCES IN THE USE OF STEM CELLS IN ORTHOPEDICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Narazaki, Douglas Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Primordial cells or stem cells are multipotent undifferentiated cells with the capacity to originate any type of cell in the organism. They may have their origins in the blastocyst and thus are classified as embryonic, or tissues developed in fetuses, newborns or adults and thus are known as somatic stem cells. Bone marrow is one of the main locations for isolating primordial cells, and there are two lineages: hematopoietic and mesenchymal progenitor cells. There are several uses for these undifferentiated cells in orthopedics, going from cartilaginous lesions in osteoarthrosis, osteochondritis dissecans and patellar chondromalacia, to bone lesions like in pseudarthrosis or bone losses, or nerve lesions like in spinal cord trauma. Studying stem cells is probably the most promising field of study of all within medicine, and this is shortly going to revolutionize all medical specialties (both clinical and surgical) and thus provide solutions for diseases that today are difficult to deal with. PMID:27027022

  3. Gallium-containing hydroxyapatite for potential use in orthopedics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, P., E-mail: petrmelnikov@yahoo.com [Department of Clinical Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil); Teixeira, A.R.; Malzac, A. [Department of Clinical Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil); Coelho, M. de B. [Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - EMBRAPA (Brazil)

    2009-09-15

    A novel material that may be recommended for grafts and implants stimulating bone growth has been obtained by introducing gallium ions (up to 11.0 mass%) into crystalline lattice of hydroxyapatite. The doping was carried out using gallium nitrate and sodium gallate solutions. In both cases, lattice parameters of gallium-doped hydroxyapatite are identical to those of pure synthetic hydroxyapatite. Gallium does not replace calcium as a result of heterovalent substitution and consequently produces no distortions in the framework of hydroxyapatite matrix. It remains strongly fixed in the form of solid solution of intercalation. According to scanning electron microscopy images gallium insertion does not cause any morphological alterations in hydroxyapatite structure and the product developed meets physico-chemical criteria for biomaterial to be employed in orthopedic practice and local handling of traumatic injuries. Its future usage opens the opportunity to enhance osteosynthesis and calcium retention in loco.

  4. Medication Review and Patient Outcomes in an Orthopedic Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Marianne; Bonnerup, Dorthe Krogsgaard; Brock, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the health-related effect of systematic medication review performed by a clinical pharmacist and a clinical pharmacologist on nonelective elderly orthopedic patients. METHODS: This is a nonblinded randomized controlled study of 108 patients 65 years or older treated...... with at least 4 drugs. For the intervention, the clinical pharmacist reviewed the participants' medication after completion of the usual medication routine. Information was collected from medical charts, interviews with participants, and database registrations of drug purchase. Results were conferred...... with the clinical pharmacologist, and recommendations were delivered directly to the ward physicians. The control was usual medication routine, that is, physicians prescribing admitting orders. The primary outcome was time to the first unplanned contact to a physician after discharge (i.e., general practitioner...

  5. Regulatory perspective on characterization and testing of orthopedic bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demian, H W; McDermott, K

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides a general regulatory background of acrylic bone cements, chemical composition information on several commercially available bone cements, physical and chemical methods of analyses, mechanical test methods, and risks and failure mechanisms of acrylic bone cements. Suggestions and recommendations presented in Tables 2 and 3 are not mandatory requirements but reflect data and methodologies which the FDA's Orthopedic Devices Branch (ORDB) believes to be acceptable to evaluate most pre-clinical data. FDA may require information in addition to that contained in this paper. In some instances, a sponsor may be able to sufficiently justify the omission of some tests. Although this paper describes certain administrative requirements, it does not take the place of the requirements contained in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR) Parts 801, 807, 812, and 814 or those found in the statute.

  6. Virtual Surgical Planning for Mandibular Distraction in Infants with Robin Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Cory M

    2017-06-01

    Mandibular distraction osteogenesis (MDO) successfully relieves obstructive sleep apnea in many infants with Robin sequence. Preoperative virtual surgical planning and fabrication of three-dimensionally printed cutting guides may lead to further improvements in the MDO technique and decrease the risk for damage to adjacent structures such as developing teeth and the inferior alveolar nerve. This report presents an algorithm for virtual surgical planning and three-dimensionally printing of cutting guides for MDO in infants with RS.

  7. Emergency department orthopedics observation unit as an alternative to admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Amy A; Jones, Jaime; Weiss, Steven J; Silva, Otono

    2014-10-01

    Inclusion of select orthopedic problems in the orthopedics observation unit (OOU) may reduce hospital admissions. Our system allows OOU status for 24 hours, but the effect on admissions is unknown. Our primary hypothesis was that we could predict which OOU patients required admission based on the presence of uncontrolled pain. Data were prospectively collected for all OOU patients in this prospective observational study, including data on extremity cellulitis, fractures, and spine injuries awaiting brace placement.The primary outcome variable was admission to the hospital versus discharge home. The a priori hypotheses were that patients with more persistent or worsening pain would require admission more often and that the OOU would result in fewer patients needing a costlier inpatient admission to the hospital. An a priori power analysis showed adequate power of 80% to detect a difference between admitted and discharged patients. Data were prospectively collected from August 2011 to August 2012 for 199 consecutive OOU patients, 62% of whom were men. Diagnoses included infection (cellulitis or abscess of extremity) in 76%, fracture in 15% and other in 9% of the patients. Sixty-two patients (31%) were admitted and 7 patients (4%) made return visits for the same problem within a 30-day period. No significant relations existed between any of the independent variables and admission on bivariate analysis. Multivariable logistic regression found no significant predictors of hospital admission. Logistic regression was not performed on 30-day returns because of the low event rate (4%). An OOU prevented 138 of 199 (69%) patients from being admitted to a hospital. There were no significant predictors of which patients would require admission. Pain was not a predictor of need for admission. The lack of significant predictors is important in suggesting that without the ability to predict which patients require admission, a system using an OOU can reduce admissions by more than

  8. Hydroxyapatite-nanotube composites and coatings for orthopedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Debrupa

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) has received wide attention in orthopedics, due to its biocompatibility and osseointegration ability. Despite these advantages, the brittle nature and low fracture toughness of HA often results in rapid wear and premature fracture of implant. Hence, there is a need to improve the fracture toughness and wear resistance of HA without compromising its biocompatibility. The aim of the current research is to explore the potential of nanotubes as reinforcement to HA for orthopedic implants. HA- 4 wt.% carbon nanotube (CNT) composites and coatings are synthesized by spark plasma sintering and plasma spraying respectively, and investigated for their mechanical, tribological and biological behavior. CNT reinforcement improves the fracture toughness (>90%) and wear resistance (>66%) of HA for coating and free standing composites. CNTs have demonstrated a positive influence on the proliferation, differentiation and matrix mineralization activities of osteoblasts, during in-vitro biocompatibility studies. In-vivo exposure of HA-CNT coated titanium implant in animal model (rat) shows excellent histocompatibility and neobone integration on the implant surface. The improved osseointegration due to presence of CNTs in HA is quantified by the adhesion strength measurement of single osteoblast using nano-scratch technique. Considering the ongoing debate about cytotoxicity of CNTs in the literature, the present study also suggests boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) as an alternative reinforcement. BNNT with the similar elastic modulus and strength as CNT, were added to HA. The resulting composite having 4 wt.% BNNTs improved the fracture toughness (˜85%) and wear resistance (˜75%) of HA in the similar range as HA-CNT composites. BNNTs were found to be non-cytotoxic for osteoblasts and macrophages. In-vitro evaluation shows positive role of BNNT in osteoblast proliferation and viability. Apatite formability of BNNT surface in ˜4 days establishes its osseointegration

  9. Applications of finite element simulation in orthopedic and trauma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Cegoñino, José; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Puértolas, Sergio; López, Enrique; Mateo, Jesús; Gracia, Luis

    2012-04-18

    Research in different areas of orthopedic and trauma surgery requires a methodology that allows both a more economic approach and the ability to reproduce different situations in an easy way. Simulation models have been introduced recently in bioengineering and could become an essential tool in the study of any physiological unity, regardless of its complexity. The main problem in modeling with finite elements simulation is to achieve an accurate reproduction of the anatomy and a perfect correlation of the different structures, in any region of the human body. Authors have developed a mixed technique, joining the use of a three-dimensional laser scanner Roland Picza captured together with computed tomography (CT) and 3D CT images, to achieve a perfect reproduction of the anatomy. Finite element (FE) simulation lets us know the biomechanical changes that take place after hip prostheses or osteosynthesis implantation and biological responses of bone to biomechanical changes. The simulation models are able to predict changes in bone stress distribution around the implant, so allowing preventing future pathologies. The development of a FE model of lumbar spine is another interesting application of the simulation. The model allows research on the lumbar spine, not only in physiological conditions but also simulating different load conditions, to assess the impact on biomechanics. Different degrees of disc degeneration can also be simulated to determine the impact on adjacent anatomical elements. Finally, FE models may be useful to test different fixation systems, i.e., pedicular screws, interbody devices or rigid fixations compared with the dynamic ones. We have also developed models of lumbar spine and hip joint to predict the occurrence of osteoporotic fractures, based on densitometric determinations and specific biomechanical models, including approaches from damage and fracture mechanics. FE simulations also allow us to predict the behavior of orthopedic splints

  10. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Salman bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P.O. Box 422, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); Habiballah, B.; Abdelaziz, I. [Sudan Univesity of Science and Technology, College of Medical Radiologic Sciences, P.O. Box 1908, Khartoum (Sudan); Alzimami, K. [King Saud University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P.O. Box 10219, 11433 Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Osman, H. [Taif University, College of Applied Medical Science, Radiology Department, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Omer, H. [University of Dammam, Faculty of Medicine, Dammam (Saudi Arabia); Sassi, S. A., E-mail: Abdelmoneim_a@yahoo.com [Prince Sultan Medical City, Department of Medical Physics, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-08-15

    Orthopedists are exposed to considerable radiation dose during orthopedic surgeries procedures. The staff is not well trained in radiation protection aspects and its related risks. In Sudan, regular monitoring services are not provided for all staff in radiology or interventional personnel. It is mandatory to measure staff and patient exposure in order to radiology departments. The main objectives of this study are: to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (Dhs) and (i i) Dynamic Cannula Screw (Dcs); to estimate the risk of the aforementioned procedures and to evaluate entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to specific radiosensitive patients organs. The measurements were performed in Medical Corps Hospital, Sudan. The dose was measured for unprotected organs of staff and patient as well as scattering radiation. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-Gr-200) of lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg, Cu,P) were used for ESD measurements. TLD signal are obtained using automatic TLD Reader model (Plc-3). The mean patients doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 for Dhs and Dcs procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean radiation dose for staff was higher in Dhs compared to Dcs. This can be attributed to the long fluoroscopic exposures due to the complication of the procedures. Efforts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to orthopedic patients, and operating surgeons especially those with high work load. Staff training and regular monitoring will reduce the radiation dose for both patients and staff. (Author)

  11. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Baranowski

    Full Text Available Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES, and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants

  12. Preoperative staging of perforated diverticulitis by computed tomography scanning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.M. Gielens; I.M. Mulder (Irene); E. van der Harst (Erwin); M.P. Gosselink (Martijn Pieter); K.J. Kraal; H.T. Teng; J.F. Lange (Johan); J. Vermeulen (Jefrey)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Treatment of perforated diverticulitis depends on disease severity classified according to Hinchey's preoperative classification. This study assessed the accuracy of preoperative staging of perforated diverticulitis by computerized tomography (CT) scanning. Methods: All patie

  13. The Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moerman, N; Dam, van, F.S.A.M; Muller, M.J; Oosting, H

    1996-01-01

    ... phase.During routine preoperative screening, 320 patients were asked to assess their anxiety and information requirement on a six-item questionnaire, the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS...

  14. Systematic radiographic evaluation of tibial hemimelia with orthopedic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan-List, Katia [Rochester General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Rochester, NY (United States); Klionsky, Nina B. [University of Rochester Medical Center, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States); Golisano Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Rochester, NY (United States); Sanders, James O. [University of Rochester Medical Center, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States); Golisano Children' s Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Rochester, NY (United States); Golisano Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Rochester, NY (United States); Katz, Michael E. [St. Mary' s Medical Center and Palm Beach Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, West Palm Beach, FL (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Tibial hemimelia is a rare lower-extremity pre-axial longitudinal deficiency characterized by complete or partial absence of the tibia. The reported incidence is 1 in 1 million live births. In this pictorial essay, we define tibial hemimelia and describe associated conditions and principles of preoperative imaging assessment for a child with tibial hemimelia. We also indicate the imaging findings that might influence the choice of treatment, describe the most widely used classification systems, and briefly discuss current treatment approaches. (orig.)

  15. Influence of podiatry on orthopedic surgery at a level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakoi, Andre M; Old, Andrew B; O'Neill, Craig A; Stein, Benjamin E; Stander, Eric P; Rosenblatt, Joseph; Herman, Martin J

    2014-06-01

    Level I trauma centers frequently see trauma at or below the ankle, which requires consultation with the orthopedic surgery department. However, as podiatry programs begin to firmly establish themselves in more Level I trauma centers, their consultations increase, ultimately taking those once seen by orthopedic surgery. A review of the literature demonstrates that this paradigm shift has yet to be discussed. The purpose of this study was to determine how many, if any, lower extremity fracture consultations a newly developed podiatry program would take from the orthopedic surgery department. A retrospective review was performed of emergency department records from January 2007 to December 2011. Seventeen different emergency department diagnoses were used to search the database. Ultimately, each patient's emergency department course was researched. Several trends were noted. First, if trauma surgery was involved, only the orthopedic surgery department was consulted for any injuries at or below the ankle. Second, the emergency department tended to consult the podiatry program only between the hours of 8 am and 6 pm. Third, as the podiatry program became more established, their number of consultations increased yearly, and, coincidentally, the orthopedic surgery department's consultations decreased. Finally, high-energy traumas involved only the orthopedic surgery department. Whether the orthopedic surgery department or podiatry program is consulted regarding trauma surgery is likely hospital dependent.

  16. What opportunities are available for resident involvement in national orthopedic and subspecialty societies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Christopher J; Cross, Michael B; Osbahr, Daryl C; Parks, Michael L; Green, Daniel W

    2011-10-05

    As physician involvement in health policy grows, there will be an increasing need for future leaders in orthopedics. Interested orthopedic residents may be unaware of opportunities for leadership involvement in professional and subspecialty organizations. This article investigates whether national and subspecialty organizations offer membership to residents, allow residents to participate in committees, and provide opportunities for scholarly activity and mentorship. The authors surveyed 20 national orthopedic professional and subspecialty societies to evaluate the availability and cost of resident membership, meeting attendance and participation, research funding, committee membership, and mentorship opportunities. Each society's Web site was reviewed, and societies were contacted by phone if further inquiry was needed. Of the 20 orthopedic societies surveyed, 11 allowed resident membership. Five of 20 societies allowed residents to serve on committees, with a total of 14 total positions for residents. Four organizations provided formalized mentorship programs to residents. Although opportunities for resident involvement in subspecialty and professional societies are available in the majority of groups surveyed, the Orthopaedic Trauma Association and American Society for Surgery of the Hand provided the most comprehensive collection of opportunities. Residents should also pursue involvement in other organizations that may be more readily accessible, such as local, state, and regional orthopedic and medical societies. Increased resident participation in these organizations may help in increasing the 14 nationally available committee positions for orthopedic residents. Our orthopedic profession and societies should encourage motivated residents to pursue involvement and leadership at the national level.

  17. [Preoperative assessment of patients with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2010-07-01

    The perioperative morbidity of diabetic patients is related to preoperative end-organ damage. Due to the microvascular pathology, autonomic neuropathy is common and cardiovascular abnormalities such as hypertension, painless myocardial ischemia, and orthostatic hypotension may predispose patients to perioperative cardiovascular instability. Autonomic dysfunction also contributes to delayed gastric emptying, and preoperative administration of a histamine antagonist and a gastric emptying agent is needed. Chronic hyperglycemia leads to glycosylation of tissue proteins and the accumulation of abnormal collagen can cause stiff joint syndrome resulting in difficult tracheal intubation. The primary goal of pre and intraoperative blood glucose control is to avoid hypoglycemia and ketosis. Moreover, the tight glycemic control has been reported to improve survival in critically ill patients who were treated in the intensive care unit.

  18. Preoperatively diagnosed mucocele of the appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojnoveanu, Gh; Ghidirim, Gh; Mishin, I; Vozian, M; Mishina, A

    2014-01-01

    Mucocele of the appendix is an infrequent entity, characterized by distension of the lumen due to accumulation of mucoid substance and is rarely diagnosed preoperatively. If untreated, mucocele may rupture producing a potentially fatal entity known as pseudomyxoma peritonei. The type of surgical treatment is related to the dimensions and the histology of the mucocele. Appendectomy is used for simple mucocele or for cystadenoma. Right hemi-colectomy is recommended for cystadeno carcinoma. In this paper, we report a case of an asymptomatic 37-year-old woman in whom mucocele was found on a routine ultrasound examination and preoperative computed tomography scan. Surgery revealed a big appendix measuring 84 mm in length and 40 mm in diameter. The final pathologic diagnosis was simple mucocele. Celsius.

  19. Preoperative Alcohol Consumption and Postoperative Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Marie; Grønkjær, Marie; Skov-Ettrup, Lise Skrubbeltrang

    2013-01-01

    .30-2.49), prolonged stay at the hospital (RR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.18-1.31), and admission to intensive care unit (RR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.03-1.61). Clearly defined high alcohol consumption was associated with increased risk of postoperative mortality (RR = 2.68; 95% CI: 1.50-4.78). Low to moderate preoperative alcohol...... complications, prolonged stay at the hospital, and admission to intensive care unit....

  20. Value Added: the Case for Point-of-View Camera use in Orthopedic Surgical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Matthew D; Thomas, Geb W; Taylor, Leah; Liu, Xiaoxing; Anthony, Chris A; Anderson, Donald D

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic surgical education is evolving as educators search for new ways to enhance surgical skills training. Orthopedic educators should seek new methods and technologies to augment and add value to real-time orthopedic surgical experience. This paper describes a protocol whereby we have started to capture and evaluate specific orthopedic milestone procedures with a GoPro® point-of-view video camera and a dedicated video reviewing website as a way of supplementing the current paradigm in surgical skills training. We report our experience regarding the details and feasibility of this protocol. Upon identification of a patient undergoing surgical fixation of a hip or ankle fracture, an orthopedic resident places a GoPro® point-of-view camera on his or her forehead. All fluoroscopic images acquired during the case are saved and later incorporated into a video on the reviewing website. Surgical videos are uploaded to a secure server and are accessible for later review and assessment via a custom-built website. An electronic survey of resident participants was performed utilizing Qualtrics software. Results are reported using descriptive statistics. A total of 51 surgical videos involving 23 different residents have been captured to date. This includes 20 intertrochanteric hip fracture cases and 31 ankle fracture cases. The average duration of each surgical video was 1 hour and 16 minutes (range 40 minutes to 2 hours and 19 minutes). Of 24 orthopedic resident surgeons surveyed, 88% thought capturing a video portfolio of orthopedic milestones would benefit their education. There is a growing demand in orthopedic surgical education to extract more value from each surgical experience. While further work in development and refinement of such assessments is necessary, we feel that intraoperative video, particularly when captured and presented in a non-threatening, user friendly manner, can add significant value to the present and future paradigm of orthopedic surgical

  1. Preoperative Arterial Interventional Chemotherapy on Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui; LING HU-Hua; TANG Liang-dan; ZHANG Xing-hua

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To discuss the therapeutic effect of preoperative interventional chemotherapy on cervical cancer.Methods:Preoperative interventional chemotherapy by femoral intubation was performed in 25 patients with bulky cervical cancer.The patients received bleomycin 45 mg and cisplatin or oxaliplatin 80 mg/m2.Results:25 cases(including 8 cases with stage Ⅰ and 17 cases with stage Ⅱ)received one or two courses of preoperative interventional chemotherapy.The size of the focal lesions was decreased greatly and radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy were performed successfully in all the patients.All of the specimens were sent for pathological examination.Lymphocyte infiltration was found more obvious in the cancer tissues as compared with their counterpart before treatment.As a result,relevant vaginal bleeding was stopped completely shortly after the treatment.Conclusion:Arterial interventional chemotherapy was proved to reduce the local size of cervical cancer and thus control the hemorrhage efficiently.The patients with cervical cancer can receive radical hysterectomy therapy after the interventional chemotherapy.

  2. Citrus aurantium blossom and preoperative anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Mahmood; Shabanian, Gholamreza; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Parvin, Neda; Saadat, Mitra; Akhlaghi, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    Reducing anxiety is very important before operation. Preoperative visit and use of premedication are popular methods to achieve this goal, but the role of anxiolytic premedication remains unclear and postoperative side-effects may result from routine premedication. Citrus aurantium is used as an alternative medicine in some countries to treat anxiety, and recently the anxiolytic role of this medicinal plant was established in an animal model study. The aim of this study was to assess the anxiolytic effect of Citrus aurantium blossomon preoperative anxiety. We studied 60 ASA I patients undergoing minor operation. In a randomized double-blind design, two groups of 30 patients received one of the following oral premedication two hours before induction of anesthesia: 1) Citrus aurantium blossom distillate 1mL.kg(-1) (C-group); 2) Saline solution 1mL.kg(-1) as placebo (P-group). Anxiety was measured before and after premedication using the Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI-state) and the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale (APAIS) before operation. After premedication, both the STAI-state and the APAIS scales were decreased in C-group (ppreoperative anxiety before minor operation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Preoperative imaging diagnosis of carotid body tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Ojeda, Luis A; Martínez-Viteri, Miguel A

    2010-01-01

    Carotid body tumors (CBTs) are relatively frequent lesions encountered at high altitudes, such in as the Andean Mountains. A correct preoperative diagnosis is essential for surgical planning and performance. For this reason, we have reviewed the evolution of our experience in the imaging diagnosis of these tumors. Between 1980 and June 2008, 160 CBTs were diagnosed. A total of 138 tumors were operated on, 4 are waiting for surgery, and 18 were not operated on because of age, medical conditions, or patient refusal. We have reviewed retrospectively the modalities of imaging diagnosis in our patients who underwent operation. Among the 138 tumors operated on, a correct preoperative diagnosis was done in 127 cases (92%). The preoperative diagnosis of the remaining 11 patients was unspecified benign tumor for 6 patients and neck lymph node for 5 patients. The imaging methods performed by different radiologists were conventional ultrasound, color Doppler ultrasound, carotid conventional angiography (CA), axial tomography, magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance angiography, and computed tomographic angiography (CTA). Most patients had more than one image study. Review of radiologist reports revealed a correct diagnosis in all carotid CA, magnetic resonance studies, and CTA. Additionally, CTA appeared to be a valuable method to predict the Shamblin group. Clinical suspicion and current image techniques permit a correct diagnosis in practically all cases of CBT.

  4. Implications of preoperative hypoalbuminemia in colorectal surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adam Truong; Mark H Hanna; Zhobin Moghadamyeghaneh; Michael J Stamos

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin has traditionally been used as a quantitative measure of a patient’s nutritional status because of its availability and low cost. While malnutrition has a clear definition within both the American and European Societies for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition clinical guidelines, individual surgeons often determine nutritional status anecdotally. Preoperative albumin level has been shown to be the best predictor of mortality after colorectal cancer surgery. Specifically in colorectal surgical patients, hypoalbuminemia significantly increases the length of hospital stay, rates of surgical site infections, enterocutaneous fistula risk, and deep vein thrombosis formation. The delay of surgical procedures to allow for preoperative correction of albumin levels in hypoalbuminemic patients has been shown to improve the morbidity and mortality in patients with severe nutritional risk. The importance of preoperative albumin levels and the patient’s chronic inflammatory state on the postoperative morbidity and mortality has led to the development of a variety of surgical scoring systems to predict outcomes efficiently. This review attempts to provide a systematic overview of albumin and its role and implications in colorectal surgery.

  5. 类风湿关节炎患者全膝置换术术前评估%Preoperative evaluation of total knee arthroplasty in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘大猛; 周新社

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty ( TKA ) is developing. Rheumatoid arthritis ( RA ) patients, whose knee function is severely affected, have obtained good effects. RA can not only affect the joints, but a systemic and multi-systematic disease. When involving the cervical spine, RA can cause upper cervical instability. It is essential to pay more attention to asymptomatic patients, so as to select appropriate treatment measures. Preoperative heart function rating can assess the risk of surgery and the tolerance of patients. The pulmonary injury often slacks up lung functions too. RA patients also have higher prevalence of oral or periodontal diseases, which is related with artificial joint infection after the surgery. Anemia can lead to increased risk of infection and delayed wound healing. So for each body the comprehensive and systematic preoperative evaluation is necessary. In addition, degree of preoperative rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory indexes such as blood sedimentation, c-reactive protein level are of controversy. The use of clinical drugs to relieve symptoms before surgery or not is worth the attention of orthopedic surgeons. Patients with long-term drug therapy, such as traditional DMARDs and biological agents, cortisol, have the risk of infection after the knee replacement. Researches on biological agents in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis are being conducted in recent years. Foreigners also put forward the guide on the perioperative use of biological agents. Detailed preoperative evaluation and multidisciplinary cooperation are necessary to reduce the risk of surgery.

  6. Pre: Surgical orthopedic pre-maxillary alignment in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient

    OpenAIRE

    Vijaya Prasad Kamavaram Ellore; Naveen Kumar Ramagoni; Mahantesha Taranatha; Asha Nara; Gururaj Gunjalli; Ashwin Devasya Bhat

    2012-01-01

    Pre-surgical orthopedic appliances are mainly used to retract and align the protruded and deviated pre-maxilla and to facilitate initial lip repair. This article presents a case report of a five year old male child patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate in whom a special custom made pre-surgical orthopedic appliance was delivered. Use of a special custom made presurgical orthopedic appliance for repositioning pre-maxilla in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient is discussed in this arti...

  7. Pre: Surgical orthopedic pre-maxillary alignment in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Prasad Kamavaram Ellore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-surgical orthopedic appliances are mainly used to retract and align the protruded and deviated pre-maxilla and to facilitate initial lip repair. This article presents a case report of a five year old male child patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate in whom a special custom made pre-surgical orthopedic appliance was delivered. Use of a special custom made presurgical orthopedic appliance for repositioning pre-maxilla in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient is discussed in this article.

  8. The beginnings of Orthopedic Surgery at the Mayo Clinic: A Review of the First Orthopedic Patients who Presented Over 100 Years Ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Christopher L; Morrey, Bernard F; Trousdale, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Formalized training in the specialty of orthopedic surgery began at the Mayo Clinic nearly 100 years ago, and treatment of patients with musculoskeletal injuries and disease began even earlier. A robust historical patient database provides the opportunity for review of the first recorded orthopedic cases at our institution, which date back to 1907. The first 400 sequential medical charts of the Mayo Clinic's patient record database were comprehensively reviewed in order to identify the first documented orthopedic cases. Of the first 400 patients reviewed, 15 (4%) received specific orthopedic diagnoses. All presented during a three week period in 1907, and they traveled from all over the region for evaluation. The diagnoses included skeletal tuberculosis (n=6), traumatic fracture (n=3), osteomyelitis (n=2), syphilitic pathologic fracture (n=1), syphilitic ostitis of the tibia and radius (n=1), painful flat foot (n=1), and Morton's toe (n=1). Included with the records are patient demographics, diagnoses, symptoms, physical examination findings, radiograph reports, operative reports, and detailed drawings of symptomatology. Although the technology and science has advanced since the early practice of orthopedic surgery that took place over a century ago, we consider ourselves to be merely an extension of those who established the field before us. Just as the past relies on the future for the continuation of what it began so many years ago, we rely on our founders for the groundwork that they laid in creating this field of surgical medicine.

  9. Surgical treatment for cervicomedullary compression among infants with achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimony, Nir; Ben-Sira, Liat; Sivan, Yakov; Constantini, Shlomi; Roth, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of dwarfism. Respiratory failure is responsible for most deaths among these children and is often related to cervicomedullary compression (CMC). We present our experience with early cervicomedullary decompression in infants with achondroplasia. Data was retrospectively collected for infants with achondroplasia who underwent CMC decompression between 1998 and 2013. Data included presurgical and postsurgical neurological examinations, MRI scans, and sleep study results. Ten infants were included. Ages at surgery were 4 to 23 months (12.5 ± 6.88 months). All infants displayed neurological findings prior to surgery, although often subtle. All infants underwent a foramen magnum opening with a wide C1 laminectomy. Following surgery, seven patients (70 %) demonstrated improved neurological status, and one displayed neurological deterioration. Seven patients demonstrated improved sleep quality 1 year after surgery. These patients had a good or improved neurological status following surgery. Preoperative radiological findings included abnormal hyperintense T2 changes in all children (improved following surgery in six children), brainstem distortion in four children (improved in all), and diminished cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces at the level of the foramen magnum in eight children (improved in seven). One child with extensive preoperative T2 changes accompanied by neurological and respiratory decline, deteriorated following surgery, and remains chronically ventilated. Infants with achondroplasia are prone to neurological and respiratory symptoms. We believe that early diagnosis and early surgery for decompression of the foramen magnum and C1 lamina can alleviate respiratory symptoms, improve neurological status, and perhaps prevent sudden infant death in this population.

  10. Infant - newborn development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feeding are good. This is due to immature abdominal muscles used for pushing and does not need to ... holding, rocking, or cuddling. The infant's growth or development does not appear normal. Your infant seems to ...

  11. Auditory Responses of Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrous, Betty Springer; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Forty infants, 3- to 12-months-old, participated in a study designed to differentiate the auditory response characteristics of normally developing infants in the age ranges 3 - 5 months, 6 - 8 months, and 9 - 12 months. (Author)

  12. Infant and Newborn Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It has all the necessary vitamins and minerals. Infant formulas are available for babies whose mothers are not able or decide not to breastfeed. Infants usually start eating solid foods between 4 and ...

  13. Iron therapy for pre-operative anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Oliver; Keeler, Barrie D; Mishra, Amitabh; Simpson, Alastair; Neal, Keith; Brookes, Matthew J; Acheson, Austin G

    2015-12-22

    Pre-operative anaemia is common and occurs in up to 76% of patients. It is associated with increased peri-operative allogeneic blood transfusions, longer hospital lengths of stay and increased morbidity and mortality. Iron deficiency is one of the most common causes of this anaemia. Oral iron therapy has traditionally been used to treat anaemia but newer, safer parenteral iron preparations have been shown to be more effective in other conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, chronic heart failure and post-partum haemorrhage. A limited number of studies look at iron therapy for the treatment of pre-operative anaemia. The aim of this Cochrane review is to summarise the evidence for use of iron supplementation, both enteral and parenteral, for the management of pre-operative anaemia. The objective of this review is to evaluate the effects of pre-operative iron therapy (enteral or parenteral) in reducing the need for allogeneic blood transfusions in anaemic patients undergoing surgery. We ran the search on 25 March 2015. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), Ovid MEDLINE(R), Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE(R) Daily and Ovid OLDMEDLINE(R), EMBASE Classic and EMBASE (Ovid), CINAHL Plus (EBSCO), PubMed, clinical trials registries, conference abstracts, and we screened reference lists. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compared pre-operative iron monotherapy to placebo, no treatment, standard of care or another form of iron therapy for anaemic adults undergoing surgery. Anaemia was defined by haemoglobin values less than 13 g/dL for males and 12 g/dL for non-pregnant females. Data were collected by two authors on the proportion of patients who receive a blood transfusion, amount of blood transfused per patient (units) and haemoglobin measured as continuous variables at pre-determined time-points: pre

  14. Prebiotics in infant formula

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenplas,Yvan; DE GREEF, Elisabeth; Veereman, Gigi

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota of breast-fed babies differ from classic standard formula fed infants. While mother's milk is rich in prebiotic oligosaccharides and contains small amounts of probiotics, standard infant formula doesn’t. Different prebiotic oligosaccharides are added to infant formula: galacto-oligosaccharides, fructo-oligosaccharide, polydextrose, and mixtures of these. There is evidence that addition of prebiotics in infant formula alters the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota ...

  15. C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and orthopedic implant infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerryl E Piper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR have been shown to be useful for diagnosis of prosthetic hip and knee infection. Little information is available on CRP and ESR in patients undergoing revision or resection of shoulder arthroplasties or spine implants. METHODS/RESULTS: We analyzed preoperative CRP and ESR in 636 subjects who underwent knee (n=297, hip (n=221 or shoulder (n=64 arthroplasty, or spine implant (n=54 removal. A standardized definition of orthopedic implant-associated infection was applied. Receiver operating curve analysis was used to determine ideal cutoff values for differentiating infected from non-infected cases. ESR was significantly different in subjects with aseptic failure infection of knee (median 11 and 53.5 mm/h, respectively, p=<0.0001 and hip (median 11 and 30 mm/h, respectively, p=<0.0001 arthroplasties and spine implants (median 10 and 48.5 mm/h, respectively, p=0.0033, but not shoulder arthroplasties (median 10 and 9 mm/h, respectively, p=0.9883. Optimized ESR cutoffs for knee, hip and shoulder arthroplasties and spine implants were 19, 13, 26, and 45 mm/h, respectively. Using these cutoffs, sensitivity and specificity to detect infection were 89 and 74% for knee, 82 and 60% for hip, and 32 and 93% for shoulder arthroplasties, and 57 and 90% for spine implants. CRP was significantly different in subjects with aseptic failure and infection of knee (median 4 and 51 mg/l, respectively, p<0.0001, hip (median 3 and 18 mg/l, respectively, p<0.0001, and shoulder (median 3 and 10 mg/l, respectively, p=0.01 arthroplasties, and spine implants (median 3 and 20 mg/l, respectively, p=0.0011. Optimized CRP cutoffs for knee, hip, and shoulder arthroplasties, and spine implants were 14.5, 10.3, 7, and 4.6 mg/l, respectively. Using these cutoffs, sensitivity and specificity to detect infection were 79 and 88% for knee, 74 and 79% for hip, and 63 and 73% for shoulder arthroplasties, and 79 and

  16. Infant crying and abuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, S.A.; van der Wal, M.F.; Brugman, E.; Hira Sing, R.A.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    Child abuse and neglect are important causes of child morbidity and death. We assessed potentially detrimental parental actions induced by infant crying in 3259 infants aged 1-6 months, in the Netherlands. In infants aged 6 months, 5.6% (95% CI 4.2-7.0) of parents reported having smothered, slapped,

  17. Hip Problems in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hip problems later in life? ResourcesScreening for Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip by LM French, M.D., and FR Dietz, ... 2014 Categories: Family Health, Infants and ToddlersTags: dislocation, dysplasia, external, femoral, hip, infants, internal, problems, socket, torsion Family Health, Infants ...

  18. Craniomaxillary orthopedic correction with en masse dental control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurow, R C

    1975-12-01

    Craniomaxillary (high-pull) traction is a well-established part of today's orthodontic armamentarium. It is useful in a wide range of problems involving excessive anterior and/or downward displacement of one or more components of the maxillary complex. Such growth-related problems are most amenable to correction during the active growing period; in fact, optimum improvement is often attainable only during this period. Attachment of these devices by means of cemented orthodontic appliances is limited in some developmental stages by the teeth available for banding. It is limited at all ages by the tolerance of the periodontal ligament of the attachment teeth. In terms of over-all maxillary change, the locations of the banded teeth further restrict the orientation and application of therapeutic forces. A rigid splint precisely engaging all or part of the upper dentition expands the potential applications of this form of traction in terms of age range, force levels, and force orientation. This is basically an orthopedic applicance with concurrent orthodontic effects. In contrast to the gross destructive effects experienced in early applications of the Milwaukee brace, the application of force with this appliance can be planned to redirect maxillary growth and occlusal relationships from often progressively dysplastic patterns to a more harmonious over-all functional relationship among all facial structures. The resultant interplay of orthopedic and orthodontic effects makes close orthodontic supervision and care essential throughout the treatment and post-treatment periods. This is especially important because some of the orthodontic side effects may be unfavorable. Failure to anticipate and plan for control of these effects could be disastrous. Occasions for its use as the sole therapeutic measure are rare. The nature of treatment with this appliance is such that in most cases it must be used as a discrete stage of a comprehensive treatment plan, either before or

  19. 78 FR 17940 - Certain Computerized Orthopedic Surgical Devices, Software, Implants, and Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ... COMMISSION Certain Computerized Orthopedic Surgical Devices, Software, Implants, and Components Thereof..., Software, Implants, and Components Thereof, DN 2945; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public... devices, software, implants, and components thereof. The complaint names as respondents Stanmore...

  20. [Clinical observation of traumatic ankle arthritis with orthopedics lotion on 60 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Yu, Jie

    2014-02-01

    Observing the clinical curative effect of orthopedics lotion to treat traumatic ankle arthritis, the outpatient department of orthopedics in Guang'anmen Hospital collected 60 cases who were diagnosed as traumatic ankle arthritis. The cases who already met the inclusion criteria, were randomly divided into the treatment group (30 cases) and control group (30 cases). Thirty patients in treatment group were received fumigation treatment with orthopedics lotion; 30 patients in control group were treated by intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate. After 5 weeks treatment, the effects on the both groups would be observed and analysed. Baird-Jackson scoring system was used to assess the overall curative effect. Visual analogue scales (VAS) was used to assess analgesic effect. BJ scores of pre-treatment and post-treatment in both the treatment group and the control group were compared, P orthopedics lotion is a effective way to treat traumatic ankle arthritis, and it has significant effect on analgesic.

  1. Use of orthopedic shoes in patients with degenerative disorders of the foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, Michiel J.; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Karin; Stewart, Roy E.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To study the actual use of orthopedic shoes by patients with degenerative foot disorders and to identify factors associated with use and nonuse, based on the parameters of the International Organization for Standardization definition of usability: effectiveness, efficiency, satisfaction,

  2. High Disparity Between Orthopedic Resident Interest and Participation in International Health Electives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven; Shultz, Paul; Daniels, Alan; Ackelman, Edward; Kamal, Robin N

    2016-07-01

    Few orthopedic surgical residency programs offer international health electives (IHEs). Efforts to expand these programs have been increasing across medical disciplines. Whether orthopedic residents will participate remains unknown. This study quantified and characterized orthopedic resident interest and barriers to IHEs in US residency programs. A web-based survey was administered to residents from 154 US orthopedic residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 2014 to 2015. Questions assessed demographics and program background, previous medical experience abroad, barriers to participation, and level of interest in participating in an international health elective during their training and beyond. Twenty-seven (17.5%) residency programs responded. Chi-square analysis showed that residents who expressed interest in participating were significantly more likely to have experience abroad compared with those who expressed no interest (Porthopedic residencies (POrthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e680-e686.].

  3. Reliability of videotaped observational gait analysis in patients with orthopedic impairments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunnekreef, J.J.; Uden, C. van; Moorsel, S. van; Kooloos, J.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In clinical practice, visual gait observation is often used to determine gait disorders and to evaluate treatment. Several reliability studies on observational gait analysis have been described in the literature and generally showed moderate reliability. However, patients with orthopedic

  4. [Diagnosis and treatment of headache combined with orthopedic disorders in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiduk, A A; Korostovtsev, D D; Gaiduk, Yu V; Ageeva, L Ya

    2013-01-01

    To study characteristics of headache combined with orthopedic disorders in children and adolescents and to develop treatment approaches, we examined 116 patients aged from 5 to 17 years. Headache of tension was found in 89 (77%) and chronic headache in 27 (23%) patients. Along with clinical/neurological and orthopedic examination, all patients were studied using a special device that allowed to quantitatively measure the bearing (in three dimensions) and biomechanic body balance. Electroencephalography, Doppler ultrasound and transcranial tests of neck vessels and ophthalmological examination were carried out. Based on the features of headache characteristic of some groups of patients, the authors suggest using a multidiscipline approach including the day-to-day interaction between neurologist and orthopedist, pharmacological therapy, therapeutic physical training, specific orthopedic inner sole and other rehabilitation methods. This treatment has led to better recovery of patients compared to the treatment using only neurological or orthopedic techniques.

  5. Fentanyl-midazolam vs. midazolam-ketamine regarding patient sedation analgesia for emergency orthopedic procedures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ali Abdolrazaghnejad; Mohsen Banaie

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate two pharmaceutical groups including fentanyl-midazolam and midazolam-ketamine used as patient seda-tion analgesia for the orthopedic emergency procedures...

  6. Using 3D Printing to Create Personalized Brain Models for Neurosurgical Training and Preoperative Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploch, Caitlin C; Mansi, Chris S S A; Jayamohan, Jayaratnam; Kuhl, Ellen

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing holds promise for a wide variety of biomedical applications, from surgical planning, practicing, and teaching to creating implantable devices. The growth of this cheap and easy additive manufacturing technology in orthopedic, plastic, and vascular surgery has been explosive; however, its potential in the field of neurosurgery remains underexplored. A major limitation is that current technologies are unable to directly print ultrasoft materials like human brain tissue. In this technical note, the authors present a new technology to create deformable, personalized models of the human brain. The method combines 3D printing, molding, and casting to create a physiologically, anatomically, and tactilely realistic model based on magnetic resonance images. Created from soft gelatin, the model is easy to produce, cost-efficient, durable, and orders of magnitude softer than conventionally printed 3D models. The personalized brain model cost $50, and its fabrication took 24 hours. In mechanical tests, the model stiffness (E = 25.29 ± 2.68 kPa) was 5 orders of magnitude softer than common 3D printed materials, and less than an order of magnitude stiffer than mammalian brain tissue (E = 2.64 ± 0.40 kPa). In a multicenter surgical survey, model size (100.00%), visual appearance (83.33%), and surgical anatomy (81.25%) were perceived as very realistic. The model was perceived as very useful for patient illustration (85.00%), teaching (94.44%), learning (100.00%), surgical training (95.00%), and preoperative planning (95.00%). With minor refinements, personalized, deformable brain models created via 3D printing will improve surgical training and preoperative planning with the ultimate goal to provide accurate, customized, high-precision treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors involved in selection of a career in surgery and orthopedics for medical students in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollias, C; Banza, L; Mkandawire, N

    2010-03-01

    There is a critical shortage of Orthopedic Surgeons in Malawi as well as all countries in sub-Saharan Africa. To date, there is no published literature that has investigated surgical or Orthopedic career selection amongst African medical trainees. With the goal of facilitating recruitment into Surgery and Orthopedics in Malawi, we explored the key aspects of Malawian Medical Students' choice of careers in surgical disciplines. An on-line survey of all students in clinical years at the College of Medicine in Blantyre, Malawi was performed. The survey was anonymous and constructed de novo by a stringent process including Item Generation, Item reduction, Survey composition, Pre-testing, Assessment of Validity by a recognized survey expert, Pilot testing in on-line format by several Malawian Medical Students, and then formal survey testing. Surgery was the most popular specialty choice among the medical trainees (46%). General Surgery was the popular surgical specialty (27%), followed by Neurosurgery (22%) and Orthopedics (19%). The majority of students (67%) feared occupational exposure to HIV but this did not appear to be a factor in specialty choice (p = 0.9). Students with Orthopedic mentors were significantly more likely to choose Orthopedics as their first choice surgical specialty (p = 0.01). Despite limited resources and surgeons in sub-Saharan Africa, surgical specialties are desirable career choices. This is the first evaluation of factors involved in surgical or Orthopedic career selection in any African context. Future initiatives to improve exposure and mentorship in Orthopedics are fundamental to recruitment into the specialty.

  8. Do Astronauts Havbe a Higher Rate of Orthopedic Shoulder Conditions Than a Cohort of Working Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, M. S.; Murray, J. D.; Young, M.; Wear, M. L.; Van Baalen, M.; Tarver, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational surveillance of astronaut shoulder injuries began with operational concerns at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training. Orthopedic shoulder injury and surgery rates were calculated [1], but classifying the rates as normal, high or low was highly dependent on the comparison group. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify a population of working professionals and compare orthopedic shoulder consultation and surgery rates.

  9. Preoperative urinary tract obstruction in scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Kotani, Toshiaki; Mori, Kazuetsu; Kawamura, Ken; Ohtake, Akira

    2017-01-01

    While the association between scoliosis and cardiac and respiratory function impairments has been well characterized in clinical practice and research, the potential effect of scoliosis on urinary tract structure and renal function has received little attention. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the preoperative clinical characteristics of urinary tract structure and renal function in pediatric patients with idiopathic scoliosis, using a combination of blood tests, urinalysis, and imaging. Preoperative measures of urinary tract structure and renal function were obtained for 16 patients, 13-17 years old, scheduled for corrective surgery for idiopathic scoliosis. Preoperative assessment included blood test and urinalysis, combined with structural imaging on ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance urography (MRU), and radioisotope tracing (RI), using technetium-99 m mercaptoacetyltriglycine ((99m) Tc-MAG3). Differences in blood and urine tests between patients with and without urinary tract obstruction (UTO) were evaluated for significance using Mann-Whitney U test. For all 16 patients, blood tests and MRU were within normal limits. Dilatation of the renal pelvis was identified on US in eight patients (50.0%). UTO was identified on RI in six patients (37.5%). UTO was associated with elevated β2-microglobulin concentration. Urinary β2-microglobulin concentration >0.7 μg/mg Cr differentiated patients with UTO from those without UTO, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 70%. β2-Microglobulin concentration may be a useful marker to screen for asymptomatic UTO in patients with idiopathic scoliosis. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. Preoperative Evaluation: Estimation of Pulmonary Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarasimhachar, Anand; Smetana, Gerald W

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are common after major non-thoracic surgery and associated with significant morbidity and high cost of care. A number of risk factors are strong predictors of PPCs. The overall goal of the preoperative pulmonary evaluation is to identify these potential, patient and procedure-related risks and optimize the health of the patients before surgery. A thorough clinical examination supported by appropriate laboratory tests will help guide the clinician to provide optimal perioperative care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A preoperative checklist in esthetic plastic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Anger,Jaime; Letizio,Nelson; Orel,Maurício; Souza Junior,José Leão de; Santos,Márcio Martines dos

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a checklist to be used at the last stage of a preoperative visit for esthetic plastic surgery composed of 29 yes/no questions, four blank spaces for entering data, and one question for ranking the level of risk of deep vein thrombosis. The criteria are divided into three tables relating to three areas: anesthesia, psychological aspects, and clinical risk factors. The answers are framed in four colors that identify the level of risk and suggest the degree of attention warra...

  12. Preoperational test report, recirculation ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-11

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102 and supports the ability to exhaust air from each tank. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a fan, condenser, and moisture separator; equipment is located inside each respective tank farm in its own hardened building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  13. Preoperational test report, raw water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-10-29

    This represents the preoperational test report for the Raw Water System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system supplies makeup water to the W-030 recirculation evaporative cooling towers for tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. The Raw Water pipe riser and associated strainer and valving is located in the W-030 diesel generator building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  14. Preoperative irradiation and cystectomy for bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J A; Batata, M; Grabstald, H; Sogani, P C; Herr, H; Whitmore, W F

    1982-03-01

    Between 1971 and 1974, 101 patients at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center underwent planned integrated treatment for bladder cancer with 2000 rads by megavoltage delivered to the whole pelvis over five consecutive days followed by radical cystectomy within a week. The overall five-year survival rate was 39%; the hospital mortality rate was 2%. In the pelvis alone tumor recurred in 9% of the patients. These results support other studies demonstrating the efficacy of this and other regimens of preoperative irradiation and cystectomy.

  15. [Prophylaxis of venous thromboembolic disease in high-risk orthopedic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza Reyes, Gilberto Eduardo; Esquivel Gómez, Ricardo; Martínez del Campo Sánchez, Antonio; Espinosa-Larrañaga, Francisco; Martínez Guzmán, Miguel Ángel Enrique; Torres González, Rubén; de la Fuente Zuno, Juan Carlos; Méndez Huerta, Juan Vicente; Villalobos Garduño, Enrique; Cymet Ramírez, José; Ibarra Hirales, Efrén; Díaz Borjón, Efraín; Aguilera Zepeda, José Manuel; Valles Figueroa, Juan Francisco; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a worldwide public health problem, with an annual incidence of 1-2 cases/1,000 individuals in the general population and a 1-5% associated mortality. Orthopedic surgery is a major surgical risk factor for VTE, but the problem is more important for patients with hip and knee joint replacement, multiple traumatisms, severe damage to the spine, or large fractures. Thromboprophylaxis is defined as the strategy and actions necessary to diminish the risk of VTE in high-risk orthopedic surgery. Antithrombotics may prevent VTE. At the end of this paper, we describe a proposal of thromboprophylaxis actions for patients requiring high-risk orthopedic surgery, based on the opinion of specialists in Orthopedics and Traumatology who work with high-risk orthopedic surgery patients. A search for evidence about this kind of surgery was performed and a 100-item inquiring instrument was done in order to know the opinions of the participants. Then, recommendations and considerations were built. In conclusion, this document reviews the problem of VTE in high-risk orthopedic surgery patients and describes the position of the Colegio Mexicano de Ortopedia y Traumatología related to VTE prevention in this setting.

  16. Greater osteoblast functions on multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown from anodized nanotubular titanium for orthopedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Yao, Chang; Xiao, Xingcheng; Sheldon, Brian W.; Webster, Thomas J.

    2007-09-01

    Titanium (Ti) is the most widely implanted orthopedic material. However, current formulations of Ti have an average orthopedic implant functional lifetime of only 10-15 years. While there are many reasons why orthopedic implants fail, one is a lack of initial and sustained integration into juxtaposed bone. To improve the cytocompatibility properties of Ti for orthopedic applications, parallel multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown from the pores of anodized nanotubular Ti by a chemical vapor deposition process in the present study. The results of this study provided evidence, for the first time, that osteoblast (bone forming cell) functions (specifically, alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition) were significantly greater on CNTs grown from anodized Ti than on anodized Ti without CNTs and currently-used Ti in orthopedics for up to 21 days. In summary, this study showed that bone growth could possibly be enhanced on currently-used Ti implants with protruding CNTs and, thus, they should be further studied for orthopedic applications.

  17. II Italian intersociety consensus statement on antithrombotic prophylaxis in orthopedics and traumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rocca, G; Danelli, G; Randelli, F; Romanini, E; Biggi, F; Laurora, N R; Imberti, D; Palaretti, G; Prisco, D

    2013-07-01

    Pharmacological prophylaxis for preventing venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a worldwide established procedure in hip and knee replacement surgery, as well as in the treatment of femoral neck fractures, but few data exist to its regard in other fields of orthopedics and traumatology. Indeed, no guidelines or recommendations are available in the literature, except for a limited number of weak statements about knee arthroscopy and lower limb fractures. The present paper represents the first multidisciplinary effort to provide suggestions on the prophylaxis of VTE in the remaining fields of orthopedic surgery (minor orthopedic surgery and orthopedic trauma). The Italian Society for Studies on Hemostasis and Thrombosis (SISET), the Italian Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology (SIOT) and the association of Orthopedic Traumatology of Italian Hospitals (OTODI) together with the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care (SIAARTI) and the Italian Society of General Medicine (SIMG) have set down quick and easy suggestions for VTE prophylaxis in a number of surgical conditions for which only scarce evidence is available. This inter-society consensus statement aims at simplifying the approach to VTE prophylaxis in the single patient with the goal of improving its clinical application.

  18. Biofilm Disrupting Technology on Orthopedic Implants: What’s on the Horizon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eConnaughton

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of orthopedic implants in joints has revolutionized the treatment of patients with many debilitating chronic musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the introduction of foreign material into the human body predisposes the body to infection. The treatment of these infections has become very complicated since the orthopedic implants serve as a surface for multiple species of bacteria to grow at a time into a resistant biofilm layer. This biofilm layer serves as a protectant for the bacterial colonies on the implant making them more resistant and difficult to eradicate when using standard antibiotic treatment. In some cases the use of antibiotics alone has even made the bacteria more resistant to treatment. (1-2 Thus, there has been surge in the creation of non-antibiotic anti-biofilm agents to help disrupt the biofilms on the orthopedic implants to help eliminate the infections. In this study we discuss infections of orthopedic implants in the shoulder then we review the main categories of anti-biofilm agents that have been used for the treatment of infections on orthopedic implants. Then we introduce some of the newer biofilm disrupting technology that has been studied in the past few years that may advance the treatment options for orthopedic implants in the future.

  19. Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cement for orthopedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cements were synthesized, formulated, and evaluated for orthopedic application. The formulation of different amino acid containing glass-ionomer bone cements was optimized, and conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements were compared. Properties of interest included handling characteristics, physical and chemical properties, and mechanical strength of the bone cement. The study was based on the synthesis of different vinyl containing amino acids, different polyelectrolytes containing these amino acid residues, and different resin-modified polyelectrolytes, as well as formulation and evaluation of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements using these polyelectrolytes. Systematic preparation of polyelectrolytes and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cements were essential features of this work, since we anticipated that the mechanical properties of the glass-ionomer bone cements could be strongly affected by the nature of the polyelectrolytes and formulation. Mechanical properties were evaluated in a screw driven mechanical testing machine, and structure-property relationships were determined by scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation of the fracture surface of the specimens. How the structure of polyelectrolytes, such as different amino acid residues, molecular weight, different modifying resin, and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cement, affected the mechanical properties was also studied.

  20. Presurgical orthopedic premaxillary alignment in cleft lip and palate reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papay, F A; Morales, L; Motoki, D S; Yamashiro, D K

    1994-11-01

    Premaxillary malposition is a difficult problem in cleft lip and palate repair. Orthopedic palatal devices are excellent in positioning the premaxilla, though they are somewhat cumbersome and require complex techniques in adjusting precisely the position of the premaxilla prior to repair. A new technique has been developed for premaxillary repositioning in conjunction with palatal shelf expansion and obturation. The procedure implements microplate fixation anterior to the premaxillary segment and linked to a palatal splint by adjustable elastics. The microplate is inserted through a nasal floor incision and secured by a tight submucosal tunnel through minimal dissection between the prolabium and premaxilla. The last hole of each microplate protrudes through the mucosa and is attached to a pin-retained palatal splint by an elastic chain. Differential tension is applied to the chains to allow gradual repositioning of the protruding maxilla while the splint expands and maintains positioning of the lateral palatal segments. These elastic retractors can be adjusted by staff in the outpatient office. During the past 2 years, this technique has been used successfully in 21 consecutive patients with unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate. Its technical ease and design allows simple adjustments to control premaxillary positioning and growth before definitive surgical closure.

  1. The Top 100 Cited Articles in Clinical Orthopedic Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Suresh K; Dein, Eric J; Spiker, Andrea M; Bernard, Johnathan A; Zikria, Bashir A

    2015-08-01

    Orthopedic sports medicine continues to evolve, owing much of its clinical management and practice to rigorous academic research. In this review, we identify and describe the top 100 cited articles in clinical sports medicine and recognize the authors and institutions driving the research. We collected articles (excluding basic science, animal, and cadaveric studies) from the 25 highest-impact sports medicine journals and analyzed them by number of citations, journal, publication date, institution, country, topic, and author. Mean number of citations was 408 (range, 229-1629). The articles were published in 7 journals, most in the 1980s to 2000s, and represented 15 countries. Thirty topics were addressed, with a heavy emphasis on anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction, knee rating systems, rotator cuff reconstruction, and chondrocyte transplantation. The 3 most cited articles, by Insall and colleagues, Constant and Murley, and Tegner and Lysholm, addressed a knee, a shoulder, and another knee rating system, respectively. Several authors contributed multiple articles. The Hospital for Special Surgery and the University of Bern contributed the most articles (5 each). This study provides a comprehensive list of the past century's major academic contributions to sports medicine. Residents and fellows may use this list to guide their scholarly investigations.

  2. Hydroxyapatite electrodeposition on anodized titanium nanotubes for orthopedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcharoen, Yardnapar; Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat; Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Termsuksawad, Preecha

    2014-08-01

    Nanotubes modification for orthopedic implants has shown interesting biological performances (such as improving cell adhesion, cell differentiation, and enhancing osseointegration). The purpose of this study is to investigate effect of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube feature on performance of hydroxyapatite-coated titanium (Ti) bone implants. TiO2 nanotubes were prepared by anodization using ammonium fluoride electrolyte (NH4F) with and without modifiers (PEG400 and Glycerol) at various potential forms, and times. After anodization, the nanotubes were subsequently annealed. TiO2 nanotubes were characterized by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer. The amorphous to anatase transformation due to annealing was observed. Smooth and highly organized TiO2 nanotubes were found when high viscous electrolyte, NH4F in glycerol, was used. Negative voltage (-4 V) during anodization was confirmed to increase nanotube thickness. Length of the TiO2 nanotubes was significantly increased by times. The TiO2 nanotube was electrodeposited with hydroxyapatite (HA) and its adhesion was estimated by adhesive tape test. The result showed that nanotubes with the tube length of 560 nm showed excellent adhesion. The coated HA were tested for biological test by live/dead cell straining. HA coated on TiO2 nanotubes showed higher cells density, higher live cells, and more spreading of MC3T3-E1 cells than that growing on titanium plate surface.

  3. Production of new titanium alloy for orthopedic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taddei, E.B. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, Sao Jose dos Campos-SP, 12228-904 (Brazil)]. E-mail: elisa@ita.br; Henriques, V.A.R. [AMR-DiviSao de Materiais-Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, Sao Jose dos Campos-SP, 12228-904 (Brazil); Silva, C.R.M. [AMR-DiviSao de Materiais-Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, Sao Jose dos Campos-SP, 12228-904 (Brazil); Cairo, C.A.A. [AMR-DiviSao de Materiais-Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, Sao Jose dos Campos-SP, 12228-904 (Brazil)

    2004-11-01

    The beta titanium alloys is one of the most promising groups of the titanium alloys. This fact is due to the good formability, mechanical properties and potential applications; moreover, these alloys present the highest level of mechanical, fatigue and corrosion resistance. The beta titanium alloys present the lowest elastic modulus, an interesting property for orthopedic implants. A {beta} alloy recently developed for this application is Ti-35Nb-7Zr-5Ta. In this work, the alloy was produced by powder metallurgy, unique available alternative for obtaining parts with porous structure (until 50% of porosity), that is one important characteristic for the osteointegration. The Ti-35Nb-7Zr-5Ta samples were manufactured by blended elemental method from a sequence of uniaxial and cold isostatic pressing with subsequent densification by sintering among 900 at 1700 deg. C, in vacuum. The objective of this work is the analysis of alloy microstructural evolution from the elemental powders dissolution under the increase of the sintering temperature. The alloy was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Vickers microhardness measurements. Density was measured by Archimedes method. The results show that a {beta}-homogeneous microstructure is obtained in the whole sample with the increase of sintering temperature. With the beginning of the {beta}-stabilizers (Nb and Ta) dissolution, at low sintering temperatures, there is the formation of an intermediary Widmanstaetten ({alpha}+{beta}) phase.

  4. Wear Tests of a Potential Biolubricant for Orthopedic Biopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Thompson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Most wear testing of orthopedic implant materials is undertaken with dilute bovine serum used as the lubricant. However, dilute bovine serum is different to the synovial fluid in which natural and artificial joints must operate. As part of a search for a lubricant which more closely resembles synovial fluid, a lubricant based on a mixture of sodium alginate and gellan gum, and which aimed to match the rheology of synovial fluid, was produced. It was employed in a wear test of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene pins rubbing against a metallic counterface. The test rig applied multidirectional motion to the test pins and had previously been shown to reproduce clinically relevant wear factors for ultra high molecular weight polyethylene. After 2.4 million cycles (125 km of sliding in the presence of the new lubricant, a mean wear factor of 0.099 × 10−6 mm3/Nm was measured for the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene pins. This was over an order of magnitude less than when bovine serum was used as a lubricant. In addition, there was evidence of a transfer film on the test plates. Such transfer films are not seen clinically. The search for a lubricant more closely matching synovial fluid continues.

  5. Bioactive, mechanically favorable, and biodegradable copolymer nanocomposites for orthopedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Sunita Prem; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2014-06-01

    We report the synthesis of mechanically favorable, bioactive, and biodegradable copolymer nanocomposites for potential bone applications. The nanocomposites consist of in situ polymerized biodegradable copolyester with hydroxyapatite (HA). Biodegradable copolyesters comprise carboxy terminated poly(propylene fumarate) (CT-PPF) and poly(trimethylol propane fumarate co mannitol sebacate) (TF-Co-MS). Raman spectral imaging clearly reveals a uniform homogenous distribution of HA in the copolymer matrix. The mechanical studies reveal that improved mechanical properties formed when crosslinked with methyl methacrylate (MMA) when compared to N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP). The SEM micrographs of the copolymer nanocomposites reveal a serrated structure reflecting higher mechanical strength, good dispersion, and good interfacial bonding of HA in the polymer matrix. In vitro degradation of the copolymer crosslinked with MMA is relatively more than that of NVP and the degradation decreases with an increase in the amount of the HA filler. The mechanically favorable and degradable MMA based nanocomposites also have favorable bioactivity, blood compatibility, cytocompatibility and cell adhesion. The present nanocomposite is a more promising material for orthopedic applications.

  6. Accuracy study of new computer-assisted orthopedic surgery software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidon, Eli [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Beilinson-Rabin Medical Center, Petach Tikva (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Steinberg, Ely L., E-mail: steinberge@tasmc.health.gov.il [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: The new computerized system is based on image analysis and designed to aid in orthopedic surgeries by virtual trajectory of the guide wire, intra-operative planning and various measurements. Validation of the accuracy and safety of any computer-aided surgery system is essential before implementing it clinically. We examined the accuracy of guide-wire length and angle measurements and fusion of multiple adjacent images (panoramic view image, PVI{sup ®}) of the new software. Methods: This is a 2-part study. Part I: twenty guide wires were drilled to various depths in a synthetic femur model and the results obtained by the software measurements were compared with manual measurements by a caliper and a depth gauge. Part II: a sawbone femur shaft was osteotomized and various inclinations of >10° to the varus or valgus angles were tested. The manually obtained measurements of angles and lengths were compared to the new computerized system software PVI. Results: There was a significant positive linear correlation between all groups of the computerized length and the control measurements (r > 0.983, p < 0.01). There was no significant difference among different distances, angles or positions from the image intensifier. There was a significant positive linear correlation between the angle and length measurement on the PVI and the control measurement (r > 0.993, p < 0.01). Conclusions: The new computerized software has high reliability in performing measurements of length using an aiming, positioning and referring device intra-operatively.

  7. Presurgical cleft lip and palate orthopedics: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzain, Ibtesam; Batwa, Waeil; Cash, Alex; Murshid, Zuhair A

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cleft lip and/or palate go through a lifelong journey of multidisciplinary care, starting from before birth and extending until adulthood. Presurgical orthopedic (PSO) treatment is one of the earliest stages of this care plan. In this paper we provide a review of the PSO treatment. This review should help general and specialist dentists to better understand the cleft patient care path and to be able to answer patient queries more efficiently. The objectives of this paper were to review the basic principles of PSO treatment, the various types of techniques used in this therapy, and the protocol followed, and to critically evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of some of these techniques. In conclusion, we believe that PSO treatment, specifically nasoalveolar molding, does help to approximate the segments of the cleft maxilla and does reduce the intersegment space in readiness for the surgical closure of cleft sites. However, what we remain unable to prove equivocally at this point is whether the reduction in the dimensions of the cleft presurgically and the manipulation of the nasal complex benefit our patients in the long term. PMID:28615974

  8. Current concept review: quality and process improvement in orthopedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinney SJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stephen J Pinney,1 Alexandra E Page,2 David S Jevsevar,3 Kevin J Bozic4 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, St Mary's Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA; 2Orthopaedic Surgery, AAOS Health Care Systems Committee, San Diego, CA, USA; 3Department of Orthopaedics, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth University, Hanover, NH, USA; 4Department of Surgery and Perioperative Care, Dell Medical School at the University of Texas, Austin, TX, USAAbstract: Multiple health care stakeholders are increasingly scrutinizing musculoskeletal care to optimize quality and cost efficiency. This has led to greater emphasis on quality and process improvement. There is a robust set of business strategies that are increasingly being applied to health care delivery. These quality and process improvement tools (QPITs have specific applications to segments of, or the entire episode of, patient care. In the rapidly changing health care world, it will behoove all orthopedic surgeons to have an understanding of the manner in which care delivery processes can be evaluated and improved. Many of the commonly used QPITs, including checklist initiatives, standardized clinical care pathways, lean methodology, six sigma strategies, and total quality management, embrace basic principles of quality improvement. These principles include focusing on outcomes, optimizing communication among health care team members, increasing process standardization, and decreasing process variation. This review summarizes the common QPITs, including how and when they might be employed to improve care delivery. Keywords: clinical care pathway, musculoskeletal care, outcomes, quality management, six sigma, lean thinking

  9. Pre-operative MRI of anorectal anomalies in the newborn period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, K. [Dept. of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Dudley, N.E. [Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Tam, P. [Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1995-11-01

    Nine infants (six boys, three girls) with anorectal anomalies were examined in the immediate newborn period, prior to corrective surgery, with MRI. Three high, one intermediate and five low anomalies were found at MRI - one patient with a `low` lesion was subsequently found at surgery 2 months later to have a high anorectal anomaly. This infant had passed meconium per urethram soon after the MRI study, prompting the need for a protective colostomy and stressing the importance of a thorough clinical examination of babies with anorectal malformations. The MRI results and findings at surgery were in agreement in all other patients (n=8). Hydronephrosis was evident in two and renal agenesis in one patient. Sacrococcygeal hypoplasia was found in two and two hemivertebrae in one infant. No spinal cord lesion was identified. One fistula was evident on MRI but four were later found at surgery. Uniformly hyperintense T1 signal meconium was seen in all nine newborns, allowing for easy differentiation of rectal contents from rectal wall and the adjacent musculature. MRI can provide useful information regarding the development of the puborectal and external anal sphincter muscles, can help guide the pull-through procedure and help predict future continence pre-operatively in the newborn period. (orig.)

  10. Religiousness and preoperative anxiety: a correlational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimollahi Mansoureh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major life changes are among factors that cause anxiety, and one of these changes is surgery. Emotional reactions to surgery have specific effects on the intensity and velocity as well as the process of physical disease. In addition, they can cause delay in patients recovery. This study is aimed at determining the relationship between religious beliefs and preoperative anxiety. Methods This survey is a correlational study to assess the relationship between religious beliefs and preoperative anxiety of patients undergoing abdominal, orthopaedic, and gynaecologic surgery in educational hospitals. We used the convenience sampling method. The data collection instruments included a questionnaire containing the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, and another questionnaire formulated by the researcher with queries on religious beliefs and demographic characteristics as well as disease-related information. Analysis of the data was carried out with SPSS software using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results were arranged in three tables. Results The findings showed that almost all the subjects had high level of religiosity and moderate level of anxiety. In addition, there was an inverse relationship between religiosity and intensity of anxiety, though this was not statistically significant. Conclusion The results of this study can be used as evidence for presenting religious counselling and spiritual interventions for individuals undergoing stress. Finally, based on the results of this study, the researcher suggested some recommendations for applying results and conducting further research.

  11. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepek Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine toxicity and outcomes for patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT for gastric cancer. Methods Patients with gastroesophageal (GE junction (Siewert type II and III or gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant CRT followed by planned surgical resection at Duke University between 1987 and 2009 were reviewed. Overall survival (OS, local control (LC and disease-free survival (DFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results Forty-eight patients were included. Most (73% had proximal (GE junction, cardia and fundus tumors. Median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients (75% underwent surgery. Pathologic complete response and R0 resection rates were 19% and 86%, respectively. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 6%. At 42 months median follow-up, 3-year actuarial OS was 40%. For patients undergoing surgery, 3-year OS, LC and DFS were 50%, 73% and 41%, respectively. Conclusions Preoperative CRT for gastric cancer is well tolerated with acceptable rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In this patient cohort with primarily advanced disease, OS, LC and DFS rates in resected patients are comparable to similarly staged, adjuvantly treated patients in randomized trials. Further study comparing neoadjuvant CRT to standard treatment approaches for gastric cancer is indicated.

  12. Preoperative evaluation for lung cancer resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyratos, Dionysios; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Angelis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Pataka, Athanasia; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andreas; Arikas, Stamatis; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Tsiouda, Theodora; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Siminelakis, Stavros; Argyriou, Michael; Kotsakou, Maria; Kessis, George; Kolettas, Alexander; Beleveslis, Thomas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades lung cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide for both sexes. Even though cigarette smoking has been proved to be the main causative factor, many other agents (e.g., occupational exposure to asbestos or heavy metals, indoor exposure to radon gas radiation, particulate air pollution) have been associated with its development. Recently screening programs proved to reduce mortality among heavy-smokers although establishment of such strategies in everyday clinical practice is much more difficult and unknown if it is cost effective compared to other neoplasms (e.g., breast or prostate cancer). Adding severe comorbidities (coronary heart disease, COPD) to the above reasons as cigarette smoking is a common causative factor, we could explain the low surgical resection rates (approximately 20-30%) for lung cancer patients. Three clinical guidelines reports of different associations have been published (American College of Chest Physisians, British Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society/European Society of Thoracic Surgery) providing detailed algorithms for preoperative assessment. In the current mini review, we will comment on the preoperative evaluation of lung cancer patients. PMID:24672690

  13. The Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale provides a simple and reliable measure of preoperative anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boker, Abdulaziz; Brownell, Laurence; Donen, Neil

    2002-10-01

    To compare three anxiety scales; the anxiety visual analogue scale (VAS), the anxiety component of the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale (APAIS), and the state portion of the Spielburger state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI), for assessment of preoperative anxiety levels in same day admission patients. Patients completed the three anxiety assessment scales both before and after seeing the anesthesiologist preoperatively. The scales used were the STAI, the six-question APAIS, and the VAS. APAIS was further subdivided to assess anxiety about anesthesia (sum A), anxiety about surgery (sum S) and a combined anxiety total (i.e., sum C = sum A + sum S). These scales were compared to one another. Pearson's correlation (pair-wise deletion) was used for validity testing. Cronbach's alpha analysis was used to test internal validity of the various components of the APAIS scale. A correlation co-efficient (r) > or = 0.6 and P scale sets were completed by 197 patients. There was significant and positive correlation between VAS and STAI r = 0.64, P anxiety components of the APAIS (sum C) and desire for information were 0.84 and 0.77 respectively. In addition to VAS, the anxiety component of APAIS (sum C) is a promising new practical tool to assess preoperative patient anxiety levels.

  14. Quantification of respiratory depression during pre-operative administration of midazolam using a non-invasive respiratory volume monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Castro, Luis N.; Mehta, Jaideep H.; Brayanov, Jordan B.; Mullen, Gary J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Pre-operative administration of benzodiazepines can cause hypoventilation—a decrease in minute ventilation (MV)—commonly referred to as “respiratory compromise or respiratory depression.” Respiratory depression can lead to hypercarbia and / or hypoxemia, and may heighten the risk of other respiratory complications. Current anesthesia practice often places patients at risk for respiratory complications even before surgery, as respiratory monitoring is generally postponed until the patient is in the operating room. In the present study we examined and quantified the onset of respiratory depression following the administration of a single dose of midazolam in pre-operative patients, using a non-invasive respiratory volume monitor that reports MV, tidal volume (TV), and respiratory rate (RR). Methods Impedance-based Respiratory Volume Monitor (RVM) data were collected and analyzed from 30 patients prior to undergoing orthopedic or general surgical procedures. All patients received 2.0 mg of midazolam intravenously at least 20 minutes prior to the induction of anesthesia and the effects of midazolam on the patient's respiratory function were analyzed. Results Within 15 minutes of midazolam administration, we noted a significant decrease in both MV (average decrease of 14.3% ± 5.9%, pbenzodiazepines affect primarily TV rather than RR. Such respiratory monitoring data provide the opportunity for individualizing dosing and adjustment of clinical interventions, especially important in elderly patients. With additional respiratory data, clinicians may be able to better identify and quantify respiratory depression, reduce adverse effects, and improve overall patient safety. PMID:28235069

  15. Level of billing as a function of resident documentation and orthopedic subspecialty at an academic multispecialty orthopedic surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, Bobby; Smith, Jordan L

    2012-11-01

    Documentation, coding, and billing for physician-patient encounters have evolved over time and have significant variability. Appropriate and complete documentation of these encounters can contribute to the financial viability of private and academic medical centers. The objectives of this study were to assess the financial effect of documentation on billing and to compare the authors' institution's distribution of billing level compared with Medicare normative data. Four orthopedic surgery subspecialty clinics were evaluated at a university outpatient clinic over a 1-year period. A single full-day clinic per week was used for each subspecialty. Residents dictated the majority of the reports. All reports were transcribed by medical transcriptionists and coded by certified professional coders. The sports medicine subspecialty generated the highest volume of patient clinic visits, followed by foot and ankle, trauma, and spine (Porthopedic practice (P<.01). The estimated loss of revenue from the fewer level 4 reports was $81,281.11 for 1 year. These findings highlight the need for greater educational interventions to improve provider documentation, coding, and billing. The effect of new electronic medical record systems that prompt providers to include key evaluation and management components will likely affect practices and warrant further analysis.

  16. Measuring preoperative anxiety in patients with intracranial tumors: the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Simone; Kaup, Lea; Mehdorn, Hubertus Maximilian

    2011-10-01

    Preoperative anxiety is a major problem in patients with brain tumors and is of high clinical relevance. However, to date no instruments have been validated for the assessment of preoperative anxiety for this patient group. The Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) has shown promising results for the assessment of preoperative anxiety. The aim of this study was to determine its psychometric properties and the optimal cutoff score for patients with intracranial tumors to make it applicable in the neurosurgical setting. The sample totaled 180 neurosurgical patients with intracranial tumors. Patients were administered the APAIS along with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale as the gold standard against which the APAIS was compared. Patients scoring 11 or above in the anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were defined as clinical cases having anxiety. The psychometric properties of the APAIS were evaluated for a postulated 2-factor structure, Cronbach α, and correlations. The postulated 2-factor structure could not be replicated. Instead, we found a 3-factor solution (anxiety about the operation, anxiety about the anesthesia, information requirement). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve ranged from ≥0.65 to ≥0.77. Optimal cutoff scores were calculated. The cutoff score for the anxiety scale was ≥10 for the whole sample and men only, and was ≥11 for women only. Analysis of the psychometric properties yielded satisfactory results (eg. Cronbach α for the anxiety scale >0.84). Despite its brevity, the APAIS is valid and recommendable for the assessment of preoperative anxiety in patients with intracranial tumors. As this is the first validation study focusing on patients with severe diseases and major surgeries, we recommend the application of our cutoff scores also for patients similar to our study population with regard to disease and surgery severity.

  17. The effect of preoperative smoking cessation or preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation on outcomes after lung cancer surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hansen, Mia; Page, Richard; Hasler, Elise

    2013-03-01

    The preferred treatment for lung cancer is surgery if the disease is considered resectable and the patient is considered surgically fit. Preoperative smoking cessation and/or preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation might improve postoperative outcomes after lung cancer surgery. The objectives of this systematic review were to determine the effectiveness of (1) preoperative smoking cessation and (2) preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation on peri- and postoperative outcomes in patients who undergo resection for lung cancer. We searched MEDLINE, PreMedline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Cinahl, BNI, Psychinfo, Amed, Web of Science (SCI and SSCI), and Biomed Central. Original studies published in English investigating the effect of preoperative smoking cessation or preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation on operative and longer-term outcomes in ≥ 50 patients who received surgery with curative intent for lung cancer were included. Of the 7 included studies that examined the effect of preoperative smoking cessation (n = 6) and preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation (n = 1) on outcomes after lung cancer surgery, none were randomized controlled trials and only 1 was prospective. The studies used different smoking classifications, the baseline characteristics differed between the study groups in some of the studies, and most had small sample sizes. No formal data synthesis was therefore possible. The included studies were marked by methodological limitations. On the basis of the reported bodies of evidence, it is not possible to make any firm conclusions about the effect of preoperative smoking cessation or of preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation on operative outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for lung cancer.

  18. ANALYSIS OF OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY, ORTHOPEDICS AND THORACIC SURGERY JOURNALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Wilma Terezinha Anselmo

    2015-01-01

    To perform an extensive analysis of journals in Medicine III - CAPES, and specifically those in the areas of Otorhinolaryngology, Orthopedics and Traumatology and Chest Surgery. An active search for the impact factors in the Journal Citation Reports, Scimago, their indexation in Scielo, Lilacs, Scopus and Google Scholar, and their stratification in WebQualis was done. Forty-four journals with measured impact factors ranging from 3.006 to 0.128 were detected in the area of Otorhinolaryngology; however, only 26 of them (60%) had a Qualis measured by CAPES; in the stratification, no journal was detected in A1, three were A2 and nine B1. Three journals were located for Chest Surgery, with only one of them having a measured Qualis (A2) with a mean of 3.61. Sixty-seven journals were detected for Orthopedics and Traumatology, with an impact factor ranging from 4.699 to 0.156; Qualis was measured in only 38 of them (60%); there were three journal stratified as A1, seven as A2 and 25 as B1. The search for journals of higher impact induces authors to not publish in journals related to their area and facing more difficulties than investigators from other areas. Realizar análise ampla dos periódicos da Medicina III - CAPES e, especificamente, os pertencentes à Otorrinolaringologia, Ortopedia e Traumatologia, e Cirurgia Torácica. Busca ativa do fator de impacto dos periódicos das áreas citadas no Journal Citation Report e Scimago, sua indexação no Scielo, Lilacs, Scopus, Google Scholar e sua estratificação no WebQualis. Para a Otorrinolaringologia foram encontrados 44 periódicos, cujo fator de impacto variou de 3.006 a 0.128; entretanto, apenas 26 deles (60%) tinham Qualis medido pela CAPES; nas estratificações encontrou-se nenhuma revista em A1, três em A2 e nove em B1. Para a Cirurgia Torácica foram localizados três periódicos, sendo que apenas um tinha Qualis medido (A2) com média de 3.61. Os resultados da busca para a Ortopedia e Traumatologia permitiu

  19. Pre-operative pain and sensory function in groin hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske K; Hansen, Jeanette B; Kehlet, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    mechanism. AIMS: To investigate the correlation between pre-operative pain intensity and sensory functions in the groin hernia area. METHODS: Patients with unilateral groin hernia were examined preoperatively by quantitative sensory testing (thermal, mechanical, and pressure [detection and pain thresholds...... pain is not related to findings of hyperalgesia or other changes in sensory function that may support pain-induced pre-operative neuroplasticity as a pathogenic mechanism for the development of persistent postherniotomy pain....

  20. Prediction of bone density around orthopedic implants delivering bisphosphonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Vincent A; Terrier, Alexandre; Gauthier, O; Bouler, J-M; Pioletti, Dominique P

    2009-06-19

    The fixation of an orthopedic implant depends strongly upon its initial stability. Peri-implant bone may resorb shortly after the surgery. This resorption is directly followed by new bone formation and implants fixation strengthening, the so-called secondary fixation. If the initial stability is not reached, the resorption continues and the implant fixation weakens, which leads to implant loosening. Studies with rats and dogs have shown that a solution to prevent peri-implant resorption is to deliver bisphosphonate from the implant surface. The aims of the study were, first, to develop a model of bone remodeling around an implant delivering bisphosphonate, second, to predict the bisphosphonate dose that would induce the maximal peri-implant bone density, and third to verify in vivo that peri-implant bone density is maximal with the calculated dose. The model consists of a bone remodeling equation and a drug diffusion equation. The change in bone density is driven by a mechanical stimulus and a drug stimulus. The drug stimulus function and the other numerical parameters were identified from experimental data. The model predicted that a dose of 0.3 microg of zoledronate on the implant would induce a maximal bone density. Implants with 0.3 microg of zoledronate were then implanted in rat femurs for 3, 6 and 9 weeks. We measured that peri-implant bone density was 4% greater with the calculated dose compared to the dose empirically described as best. The approach presented in this paper could be used in the design and analysis processes of experiments in local delivery of drug such as bisphosphonate.

  1. Hydroxyapatite electrodeposition on anodized titanium nanotubes for orthopedic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parcharoen, Yardnapar [Department of Biological Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok (Thailand); Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat [Center of Excellence on Environmental Research and Innovation, Faculty of Engineering, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok (Thailand); Sirivisoot, Sirinrath [Department of Biological Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok (Thailand); Termsuksawad, Preecha, E-mail: preecha.ter@kmutt.ac.th [Division of Materials Technology, School of Energy, Environment and Materials, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha Uthit Rd., Bang Mod, ThungKhru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • We found that different anodization time of titanium significantly effects on nanotube length which further impacts adhesion strength of hydroxyapatite coating layers. • Adhesion strength of Hydroxyapatite (HA) coated on titanium dioxide nanotubes is better than that of HA coated on titanium plate. • Hydroxyapatite coated on titanium dioxide nanotubes showed higher cell density and better spreading of MC3T3-E1 cells (bone-forming cells) than that coated on titanium plate surface. - Abstract: Nanotubes modification for orthopedic implants has shown interesting biological performances (such as improving cell adhesion, cell differentiation, and enhancing osseointegration). The purpose of this study is to investigate effect of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanotube feature on performance of hydroxyapatite-coated titanium (Ti) bone implants. TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were prepared by anodization using ammonium fluoride electrolyte (NH{sub 4}F) with and without modifiers (PEG400 and Glycerol) at various potential forms, and times. After anodization, the nanotubes were subsequently annealed. TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were characterized by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer. The amorphous to anatase transformation due to annealing was observed. Smooth and highly organized TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were found when high viscous electrolyte, NH{sub 4}F in glycerol, was used. Negative voltage (−4 V) during anodization was confirmed to increase nanotube thickness. Length of the TiO{sub 2} nanotubes was significantly increased by times. The TiO{sub 2} nanotube was electrodeposited with hydroxyapatite (HA) and its adhesion was estimated by adhesive tape test. The result showed that nanotubes with the tube length of 560 nm showed excellent adhesion. The coated HA were tested for biological test by live/dead cell straining. HA coated on TiO{sub 2} nanotubes showed higher cells density, higher live cells, and more spreading of MC3T3-E1 cells than that

  2. Chemokines Associated with Pathologic Responses to Orthopedic Implant Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallab, Nadim J.; Jacobs, Joshua J.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the success in returning people to health saving mobility and high quality of life, the over 1 million total joint replacements implanted in the US each year are expected to eventually fail after approximately 15–25 years of use, due to slow progressive subtle inflammation to implant debris compromising the bone implant interface. This local inflammatory pseudo disease state is primarily caused by implant debris interaction with innate immune cells, i.e., macrophages. This implant debris can also activate an adaptive immune reaction giving rise to the concept of implant-related metal sensitivity. However, a consensus of studies agree the dominant form of this response is due to innate reactivity by macrophages to implant debris danger signaling (danger-associated molecular pattern) eliciting cytokine-based and chemokine inflammatory responses. This review covers implant debris-induced release of the cytokines and chemokines due to activation of the innate (and the adaptive) immune system and how this leads to subsequent implant failure through loosening and osteolysis, i.e., what is known of central chemokines (e.g., IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, MIP-1, CCL9, CCL10, CCL17, and CCL22) associated with implant debris reactivity as related to the innate immune system activation/cytokine expression, e.g., danger signaling (e.g., IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33, etc.), toll-like receptor activation (e.g., IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α, etc.), bone catabolism (e.g., TRAP5b), and hypoxia responses (HIF-1α). More study is needed, however, to fully understand these interactions to effectively counter cytokine- and chemokine-based orthopedic implant-related inflammation.

  3. Sarcopenia and Sarcopenic Obesity in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hyung-Min; Han, Jun; Jin, Dong San; Suh, Hyunseok; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Won, Ye-Yeon

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence of sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity among patients who underwent orthopedic surgery (OS). A total of 222 patients were reviewed immediately after or prior to OS. In the control group, 364 patients from outpatient departments (OPDs) who did not have any OS were enrolled. Whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to analyze body composition. Skeletal muscle mass was adjusted for height squared, total body weight, and height and fat mass (residuals). Obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI) > 25.0 kg/m(2). The prevalence of sarcopenia in the OS group was 25.7%, 44.1%, and 26.6%, respectively, according to the 3 different criteria. The prevalence was significantly lower in the OPD group (6.0%, 33.1%, and 14.8%, respectively). The highest rates of sarcopenia with height-adjusted definition were seen in patients with a femoral neck fracture. In the multivariate analysis, factors associated with sarcopenia were male gender, older age, and lower BMI (odds ratio [OR]: 28.38, 1.03, and 1.83, respectively) when muscle mass was adjusted for height, whereas male gender, older age, and higher BMI were associated with sarcopenia (OR: 1.04, 2.57, and 1.83, respectively) when adjusted for weight. When residuals were used as a cutoff, decreased BMI and total hip bone mineral density (0.1 g/cm(2)) were independent risk factors associated with sarcopenia (OR: 1.09 and 1.05). The prevalence of sarcopenic obesity ranged from 1.8% to 21.2%. Our study demonstrated a high prevalence of sarcopenia among OS patients.

  4. Traumatic elbow injuries: what the orthopedic surgeon wants to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Scott E; Dyer, George S; Sodickson, Aaron D; Patel, Ketankumar I; Khurana, Bharti

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic elbow injuries are commonly encountered in the emergency department setting, but their complexity and clinical significance often go unrecognized at the initial evaluation. Initial imaging in patients with elbow trauma should not only help identify major injuries that require immediate intervention but also allow detection of other, often more subtle injuries that may lead to instability or poor functional outcomes if appropriate treatment is delayed. Awareness and detection of these injuries may be improved by a better-developed and more intuitive understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the most common injury patterns. Ideally, such understanding should prompt appropriate early use of advanced imaging techniques. Traumatic elbow injuries should be described in the radiology report within the context of their clinical significance and their implications for management, information that is often best captured by the injury grading and classification systems used by the orthopedic surgery community. This article reviews the relevant anatomy and functional stability of the elbow and discusses common traumatic elbow injury patterns, including elbow dislocations as well as fractures of the distal humerus, radial head and neck, coronoid process, and olecranon. Less commonly encountered injury constellations that are clinically significant are also described. Injury patterns are explained in the context of the responsible force mechanism by using three-dimensional modeling and animation, with emphasis on the functional impact of associated secondary bone and soft-tissue injuries. The utility of cross-sectional imaging modalities such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the acute care setting is discussed, and specific imaging guidelines are provided. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.333125176/-/DC1.

  5. Machining of a bioactive nanocomposite orthopedic fixation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparnell, Amie; Aniket; El-Ghannam, Ahmed

    2012-08-01

    Bioactive ceramics bond to bone and enhance bone formation. However, they have poor mechanical properties which restrict their machinability as well as their application as load bearing implants. The goal of this study was to machine bioactive fixation screws using a silica-calcium phosphate nanocomposite (SCPC50). The effect of compact pressure, holding time, and thermal treatment on the microstructure, machinability, and mechanical properties of SCPC50 cylinders were investigated. Samples prepared by powder metallurgy technique at compact pressure range of 100-300 MPa and treated at 900°C/1 h scored a poor machinability rating of (1/5) due to the significant formation of amorphous silicate phase at the grain boundaries. On the other hand, lowering of compact pressure and sintering temperature to 30 MPa/3 h and 700°C/2 h, respectively, minimized the formation of the amorphous phase and raised the machinability rating to (5/5). The modulus of elasticity and ultimate strength of machinable SCPC50 were 10.8 ± 2.0 GPa and 72.8 ± 22.8 MPa, respectively, which are comparable to the corresponding values for adult human cortical bone. qRT-PCR analyses showed that bone cells attached to SCPC50 significantly upregulated osteocalcin mRNA expression as compared to the cells on Ti-6Al-4V. Moreover, cells attached to SCPC50 produced mineralized bone-like tissue within 8 days. On the other hand, cells attached to Ti-6Al-4V failed to produce bone mineral under the same experimental conditions. Results of the study suggest that machinable SCPC50 has the potential to serve as an attractive new material for orthopedic fixation devices.

  6. Chitosan for gene delivery and orthopedic tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Rosanne; O'Brien, Fergal J; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2013-05-15

    Gene therapy involves the introduction of foreign genetic material into cells in order exert a therapeutic effect. The application of gene therapy to the field of orthopaedic tissue engineering is extremely promising as the controlled release of therapeutic proteins such as bone morphogenetic proteins have been shown to stimulate bone repair. However, there are a number of drawbacks associated with viral and synthetic non-viral gene delivery approaches. One natural polymer which has generated interest as a gene delivery vector is chitosan. Chitosan is biodegradable, biocompatible and non-toxic. Much of the appeal of chitosan is due to the presence of primary amine groups in its repeating units which become protonated in acidic conditions. This property makes it a promising candidate for non-viral gene delivery. Chitosan-based vectors have been shown to transfect a number of cell types including human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and human cervical cancer cells (HeLa). Aside from its use in gene delivery, chitosan possesses a range of properties that show promise in tissue engineering applications; it is biodegradable, biocompatible, has anti-bacterial activity, and, its cationic nature allows for electrostatic interaction with glycosaminoglycans and other proteoglycans. It can be used to make nano- and microparticles, sponges, gels, membranes and porous scaffolds. Chitosan has also been shown to enhance mineral deposition during osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss the use of chitosan as a gene delivery vector with emphasis on its application in orthopedic tissue engineering.

  7. The impact of patients controlled analgesia undergoing orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aluane Silva Dias

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: The currently common musculoskeletal disorders have been increasingly treated surgically, and the pain can be a limiting factor in postoperative rehabilitation. RATIONALE: Patient controlled analgesia (PCA controls pain, but its adverse effects can interfere with rehabilitation and in the patient discharge process. This study becomes important, since there are few studies evaluating this correlation. OBJECTIVES: To compare the outcomes of patients who used and did not use patient controlled analgesia in postoperative orthopedic surgery with respect to pain, unscheduled need for O2 (oxygen, and time of immobility and in-hospital length of stay. METHODS: This is an observational, prospective study conducted at Hospital Abreu Sodré from May to August 2012. The data was daily obtained through assessments and interviews of patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA and total knee arthroplasty (TKA, thoracolumbar spine arthrodesis (long PVA, cervical spine arthrodesis (cervical AVA and lumbar spine arthrodesis (lumbar PVA. RESULTS: The study showed some differences between groups, namely: the painful level was higher in the group undergoing lumbar PVA without PCA compared with the group with PCA (p = 0.03 and in the group of long PVA without PCA in the early postoperative period. This latter group used O2 for a longer time (p = 0.09. CONCLUSION: In this study, PCA was useful for analgesia in patients undergoing lumbar PVA and probably would have influenced the usage time of O2 in the group of long PVA in face of a larger sample. The use of PCA did not influence the time of leaving the bed and the in-hospital length of stay for the patients studied.

  8. Corrosion behavior of a welded stainless-steel orthopedic implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reclaru, L; Lerf, R; Eschler, P Y; Meyer, J M

    2001-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of combinations of materials used in an orthopedic implant: the spherical part (forged or forged and annealed) constituting the head, the weld (tungsten inert gas (TIG) or electron beam (EB) techniques), and the cylindrical part (annealed) constituting the shaft of a femoral prosthesis - has been investigated. Open-circuit potentials, potentiodynamic curves, Tafel slope, mixed potential theory and susceptibility to intergranular attack are electrochemical and chemical procedures selected for this work. Electrochemical measurements using a microelectrode have been made in the following zones: spherical part, cylindrical part, weld, and weld/sphere, and weld/shaft interfaces. To detect intergranular attack, the Strauss test has been used. At the interfaces, corrosion currents, measured (Icorr) and predicted (Icouple) are low, in the order of the pico- to nanoampere. The electrochemical behavior of the electron beam (EB) weld is better than that of the tungsten inert gas (TIG). Welds at interfaces can behave either anodically or cathodically. It is better if welds, which are sensitive parts of the femoral prosthesis, behave cathodically. In this way, the risk of starting localized corrosion (pitting, crevice or intergranular corrosion) from a galvanic couple, remains low. From this point of view, the sample with the EB weld offers the best behavior. All the other samples containing a TIG type of weld exhibit a less favorable behavior. The mechanical treatments (forged, and forged and annealed) of the steel sphere did not show any difference in the corrosion behavior. No intergranular corrosion has been observed at the weld/steel interface for unsensitized samples. With sensitized samples, however, a TIG sample has exhibited some localized intergranular corrosion at a distance of 500 microm along the weld/stainless steel (sphere) interface.

  9. The prevalence of abnormal preoperative coagulation tests in pediatric patients undergoing spinal surgery for scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Katie M; O'Brien, Kirsty; Regan, Irene; O'Byrne, John M; Moore, David; Kelly, Paula M; Noel, Jacques; Butler, Joseph; Nolan, Beatrice; Kiely, Patrick J

    2015-06-01

    Multilevel spinal fusion surgery for deformity correcting spinal surgery in pediatric patients with scoliosis has typically been associated with significant blood loss. The mechanism of bleeding in such patients is not fully understood. Coagulation abnormalities, which may be associated with scoliosis, are thought to play a role. To document and compare the prevalence of preoperative coagulation abnormalities among patients with scoliosis attending a pediatric orthopedic department for spinal fusion surgery with patients attending for minor surgery. An observational study. All patients were recruited from a pediatric tertiary referral center in Dublin, Ireland. Coagulation profile results were prospectively collected over a 2-year period from 165 spinal surgery patients. In total, 175 patients were included in the non-scoliosis group. These patients attended the day ward for minor procedures and were recruited over a 4-month period. The primary outcome measure was the coagulation profiles, which included prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and thrombin time (TT). Levels of Coagulation Factors II, V, VII, and X were also recorded. All blood samples were sent to the haematology laboratory to establish the coagulation profile. The primary outcome was the presence of an abnormal coagulation screening test (if any of PT, APTT, or TT were abnormal). Prothrombin time, APTT, and TT were also analyzed as individual continuous variables, as well as Coagulation Factors II, V, VII, and X. Regression analysis was used to compare the coagulation profile of scoliosis patients with that of non-scoliosis patients. There were no outside funding sources or any potential conflict of interest associated with this study. The scoliosis patients were more likely to have an abnormal preoperative screening test compared with non-scoliosis patients, with an odds ratio of 2.6. Further analysis showed statistically significant longer clotting times for patients with

  10. Acquired methemoglobinemia in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Mutlu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine the etiologic factors of acquired methemoglobinemia in infants younger than three months in our region. Material and Methods: This study was carried out retrospectively in infants with methemoglobinemia admitted to Karadeniz Technical University, Pediatric Clinic, during the period 2000-2009. Infants with methemoglobinemia were identified according to the medical records or ICD-10 code. Results: Nine infants with acquired methemoglobinemia (8 male, 1 female were included in the study. Seven cases were associated with the use of prilocaine for circumcision, one case with the use of prilocaine-lidocaine for local pain therapy, and one case with neonatal sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus.Conclusion: Prilocaine should not be used in infants less than three months of age because of the risk of methemoglobinemia. Ascorbic acid is an effective therapy if methylene blue is not obtained. It should not be forgotten that sepsis caused by S. aureus may cause methemoglobinemia in infants.

  11. Preoperational test report, recirculation condenser cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Condenser Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The four system provide condenser cooling water for vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a pair of redundant recirculation pumps, a closed-loop evaporative cooling tower, and supporting instrumentation; equipment is located outside the farm on concrete slabs. Piping is routed to the each ventilation condenser inside the farm via below-grade concrete trenches. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  12. Pre-operative antiseptic skin preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murkin, Claire Elizabeth

    Theatre nurses use antiseptic skin preparation products every day, but little thought seems to be given as to why a surgeon has a particular preference for one antiseptic skin preparation over another - whether it is for its efficacy, safety or application properties. Woodhead et al (2004) states that nurses still work in a ritualistic environment. Rituals are 'any action performed according to custom, without understanding the reasons why it is being practised'. Nursing practice should be evidence-based; nurses should understand the rationale behind the choice of a particular antiseptic, and be knowledgable about the clinical effectiveness of antiseptic's use pre-operatively, to achieve optimum results. This article focuses on the main types of antiseptic skin preparation while highlighting each product's activity and the relevant considerations for choosing the appropriate product for each patient. Theatre staff need to emphasize the importance of skin preparation and the correct application techniques, while educating the scrub team and surgeons with respect to skin preparation.

  13. Preoperational test report, recirculation condenser cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Condenser Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The four system provide condenser cooling water for vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a pair of redundant recirculation pumps, a closed-loop evaporative cooling tower, and supporting instrumentation; equipment is located outside the farm on concrete slabs. Piping is routed to the each ventilation condenser inside the farm via below-grade concrete trenches. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  14. Predictors of preoperative anxiety in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollin, S R; Plummer, J L; Owen, H; Hawkins, R M F; Materazzo, F

    2003-02-01

    This study aimed to identify factors contributing to anxiety at induction of anaesthesia in children. One hundred and twenty children aged five to twelve years and scheduled for surgery requiring general anaesthesia were included. Children were interviewed and assessed prior to surgery. Parents completed anxiety measures prior to surgery and were interviewed after the induction of anaesthesia. The level of children's anxiety was determined at the time of induction of anaesthesia by the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale. Factors associated with increased levels of anxiety in the children included increased number of people in the room at induction of anaesthesia; longer waiting time between admission at the hospital and induction of anaesthesia; negative memories of previous hospital experiences; and having a mother who does not practise a religion. Suggestions for implementation of the findings and for future research are provided.

  15. Preoperative information needs of children undergoing tonsillectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Buckley, Aoife

    2012-02-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To identify the information needs of children undergoing tonsillectomy with reference to content of information, method of delivery, information providers and timing of information provision. BACKGROUND: Tonsillectomy can be anxiety provoking for children and preoperative preparation programmes are long recognised to reduce anxiety. However, few have been designed from the perspectives of children and to date little is known about how best to prepare children in terms of what to tell them, how to convey information to them, who can best provide information and what is the best timing for information provision. DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive study. METHOD: Data were collected from nine children (aged 6-9) using interviews supported by a write and draw technique. Data were coded and categorised into themes reflecting content, method, providers and timing of information. RESULTS: Children openly communicated their information needs especially on what to tell them to expect when facing a tonsillectomy. Their principal concerns were about operation procedures, experiencing \\'soreness\\' and discomfort postoperatively and parental presence. Mothers were viewed as best situated to provide them with information. Children were uncertain about what method of information and timing would be most helpful to them. CONCLUSION: Preoperative educational interventions need to take account of children\\'s information needs so that they are prepared for surgery in ways that are meaningful and relevant to them. Future research is needed in this area. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Practical steps towards informing children about having a tonsillectomy include asking them what they need to know and addressing their queries accordingly. Child-centred information leaflets using a question and answer format could also be helpful to children.

  16. Prebiotics in infant formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Yvan; De Greef, Elisabeth; Veereman, Gigi

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota of breast-fed babies differ from classic standard formula fed infants. While mother's milk is rich in prebiotic oligosaccharides and contains small amounts of probiotics, standard infant formula doesn't. Different prebiotic oligosaccharides are added to infant formula: galacto-oligosaccharides, fructo-oligosaccharide, polydextrose, and mixtures of these. There is evidence that addition of prebiotics in infant formula alters the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota resembling that of breastfed infants. They are added to infant formula because of their presence in breast milk. Infants on these supplemented formula have a lower stool pH, a better stool consistency and frequency and a higher concentration of bifidobacteria in their intestine compared to infants on a non-supplemented standard formula. Since most studies suggest a trend for beneficial clinical effects, and since these ingredients are very safe, prebiotics bring infant formula one step closer to breastmilk, the golden standard. However, despite the fact that adverse events are rare, the evidence on prebiotics of a significant health benefit throughout the alteration of the gut microbiota is limited.

  17. Prebiotics in infant formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Yvan; Greef, Elisabeth De; Veereman, Gigi

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota of breast-fed babies differ from classic standard formula fed infants. While mother's milk is rich in prebiotic oligosaccharides and contains small amounts of probiotics, standard infant formula doesn’t. Different prebiotic oligosaccharides are added to infant formula: galacto-oligosaccharides, fructo-oligosaccharide, polydextrose, and mixtures of these. There is evidence that addition of prebiotics in infant formula alters the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota resembling that of breastfed infants. They are added to infant formula because of their presence in breast milk. Infants on these supplemented formula have a lower stool pH, a better stool consistency and frequency and a higher concentration of bifidobacteria in their intestine compared to infants on a non-supplemented standard formula. Since most studies suggest a trend for beneficial clinical effects, and since these ingredients are very safe, prebiotics bring infant formula one step closer to breastmilk, the golden standard. However, despite the fact that adverse events are rare, the evidence on prebiotics of a significant health benefit throughout the alteration of the gut microbiota is limited. PMID:25535999

  18. Postoperative start compared to preoperative start of low-molecular-weight heparin increases mortality in patients with femoral neck fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leer-Salvesen, Sunniva; Dybvik, Eva; Dahl, Ola E; Gjertsen, Jan-Erik; EngesæTer, Lars B

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — Controversies exist regarding thromboprophylaxis in orthopedic surgery. Using data in the nationwide Norwegian Hip Fracture Register (NHFR) with postoperative death and reoperation in the first 6 months after surgery as endpoints in the analyses, we determined whether the thromboprophylaxis in patients who undergo hemiarthroplasty for femoral neck fracture should start preoperatively or postoperatively. Patients and methods — After each operation for hip fracture in Norway, the surgeon reports information on the patient, the fracture, and the operation to the NHFR. Cox regression analyses were performed with adjustments for age, ASA score, gender, type of implant, length of surgery, and year of surgery. Results — During the period 2005–2014, 25,019 hemiarthroplasties as treatment for femoral neck fractures were reported to the registry. Antithrombotic medication was given to 99% of the patients. Low-molecular-weight heparin predominated with dalteparin in 57% of the operations and enoxaparin in 41%. Only operations with these 2 drugs and with known information on preoperative or postoperative start of the prophylaxis were included in the analyses (n = 20,241). Compared to preoperative start of thromboprophylaxis, postoperative start of thromboprophylaxis gave a higher risk of death (risk ratio (RR) = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.06–1.21; p < 0.001) and a higher risk of reoperation for any reason (RR =1.19, 95% CI: 1.01–1.40; p = 0.04), whereas we found no effect on reported intraoperative bleeding complication or on the risk of postoperative reoperation due to hematoma. The results did not depend on whether the initial dose of prophylaxis was the full dosage or half of the standard dosage. Interpretation — Postoperative start of thromboprophylaxis increased the mortality and risk of reoperation compared to preoperative start in femoral neck fracture patients operated with hemiprosthesis. The risks of bleeding and of reoperation due to

  19. Hospital characteristics and patient populations served by physician owned and non physician owned orthopedic specialty hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan-Sarrazin Mary S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of physician owned specialty hospitals focusing on high margin procedures has generated significant controversy. Yet, it is unclear whether physician owned specialty hospitals differ significantly from non physician owned specialty hospitals and thus merit the additional scrutiny that has been proposed. Our objective was to assess whether physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals and non physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals differ with respect to hospital characteristics and patient populations served. Methods We conducted a descriptive study using Medicare data of beneficiaries who underwent total hip replacement (THR (N = 10,478 and total knee replacement (TKR (N = 15,312 in 29 physician owned and 8 non physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals during 1999–2003. We compared hospital characteristics of physician owned and non physician owned specialty hospitals including procedural volumes of major joint replacements (THR and TKR, hospital teaching status, and for profit status. We then compared demographics and prevalence of common comorbid conditions for patients treated in physician owned and non physician owned specialty hospitals. Finally, we examined whether the socio-demographic characteristics of the neighborhoods where physician owned and non physician owned specialty hospitals differed, as measured by zip code level data. Results Physician owned specialty hospitals performed fewer major joint replacements on Medicare beneficiaries in 2003 than non physician owed specialty hospitals (64 vs. 678, P Conclusion Physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals differ significantly from non physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals and may warrant the additional scrutiny policy makers have proposed.

  20. Ambulatory surgery in orthopedics: experience of over 10,000 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Ferrero, M A; Faour-Martín, O; Simon-Perez, C; Pérez-Herrero, M; de Pedro-Moro, J A

    2014-03-01

    The concept of day surgery is becoming an increasingly important part of elective surgery worldwide. Relentless pressure to cut costs may constrain clinical judgment regarding the most appropriate location for a patient's surgical care. The aim of this study was to determine clinical and quality indicators relating to our experience in orthopedic day durgery, mainly in relation to unplanned overnight admission and readmission rates. Additionally, we focused on describing the main characteristics of the patients that experienced complications, and compared the patient satisfaction rates following ambulatory and non-ambulatory procedures. We evaluated 10,032 patients who underwent surgical orthopedic procedures according to the protocols of our Ambulatory Surgery Unit. All complications that occurred were noted. A quality-of-life assessment (SF-36 test) was carried out both pre- and postoperatively. Ambulatory substitution rates and quality indicators for orthopedic procedures were also determined. The major complication rate was minimal, with no mortal cases, and there was a high rate of ambulatory substitution for the procedures studied. Outcomes of the SF-36 questionnaire showed significant improvement postoperatively. An unplanned overnight admission rate of 0.14 % was achieved. Our institution has shown that it is possible to provide good-quality ambulatory orthopedic surgery. There still appears to be the potential to increase the proportion of these procedures. Surgeons and anesthesiologists must strongly adhere to strict patient selection criteria for ambulatory orthopedic surgery in order to reduce complications in the immediate postoperative term.

  1. [Chances and risks of a new residency program for orthopedics and trauma surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The residency program for a specialist in orthopedics and trauma surgery is facing fundamental changes based on an initiative originating from the working group "medical training" of the German Medical Association (GMA). A survey indicated that 50 % of all trainees are dissatisfied with their current situation. It appears important to integrate the ideas and wishes of current orthopedic residents in a novel training concept. To assess this a survey was performed by the Young Forum of the German Society for Orthopedics und Trauma Surgery. The internet-based short survey was conducted in January 2013 among members of the professional societies (DGU, DGOU and DGOOC). 408 physicians participated. The majority of the participating physicians is interested in a career in orthopedics and trauma surgery with primarily operative contents. Accordingly the majority (62 %, n = 253) voted against a reduction of numbers of surgical interventions with 86 % (n = 351) confirming the necessity that these operations must be carried out by the trainee himself. The upcoming changes in residency program for orthopedics and trauma surgery offer the opportunity for a well structured and practical oriented residency program. It could be a further step in increasing satisfaction in this profession. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Mobile Device Trends in Orthopedic Surgery: Rapid Change and Future Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrawis, John P; Muzykewicz, David A; Franko, Orrin I

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly becoming integral communication and clinical tools. Monitoring the prevalence and utilization characteristics of surgeons and trainees is critical to understanding how these new technologies can be best used in practice. The authors conducted a prospective Internet-based survey over 7 time points from August 2010 to August 2014 at all nationwide American Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited orthopedic programs. The survey questionnaire was designed to evaluate the use of devices and mobile applications (apps) among trainees and physicians in the clinical setting. Results were analyzed and summarized for orthopedic surgeons and trainees. During the 48-month period, there were 7 time points with 467, 622, 329, 223, 237, 111, and 134 responses. Mobile device use in the clinical setting increased across all fields and levels of training during the study period. Orthopedic trainees increased their use of Smartphone apps in the clinical setting from 60% to 84%, whereas attending use increased from 41% to 61%. During this time frame, use of Apple/Android platforms increased from 45%/13% to 85%/15%, respectively. At all time points, 70% of orthopedic surgeons believed their institution/hospital should support mobile device use. As measured over a 48-month period, mobile devices have become an ubiquitous tool in the clinical setting among orthopedic surgeons and trainees. The authors expect these trends to continue and encourage providers and trainees to be aware of the limitations and risks inherent with new technology.

  3. Orthopedic Management of Patients with Pompe Disease: A Retrospective Case Series of 8 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Haaker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pompe disease (PD, a lysosomal storage disease as well as a neuromuscular disorder, is a rare disease marked by progressive muscle weakness. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT in recent years allowed longer survival but brought new problems to the treatment of PD with increasing affection of the musculoskeletal system, particularly with a significantly higher prevalence of scoliosis. The present paper deals with the orthopedic problems in patients with PD and is the first to describe surgical treatment of scoliosis in PD patients. Patients and Methods. The orthopedic problems and treatment of eight patients with PD from orthopedic consultation for neuromuscular disorders are retrospectively presented. We analyzed the problems of scoliosis, hip dysplasia, feet deformities, and contractures and presented the orthopedic treatment options. Results. Six of our eight PD patients had scoliosis and two young patients were treated by operative spine stabilization with benefits for posture and sitting ability. Hip joint surgery, operative contracture release, and feet deformity correction were performed with benefits for independent activity. Conclusion. Orthopedic management gains importance due to extended survival and musculoskeletal involvement under ERT. Surgical treatment is indicated in distinct cases. Further investigation is required to evidence the effect of surgical spine stabilization in PD.

  4. Opioid use for chronic pain management in Italy: results from the Orthopedic Instant Pain survey project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Fanelli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a common symptom in orthopedic patients, but is managed sub-optimally, partly due to scarce opioid use in severe cases. The aim of the Orthopedic Instant Pain Survey (POIS was to evaluate changes in pain management in Italian orthopedic practice 2 years after a legislative change (Law 38/2010 simplifying opioid access for pain control. A web-based survey on the knowledge of this law and trends observed in clinical practice for severe pain treatment was administered to 143 Italian orthopedic specialists. In total, 101 (70% respondents showed a high level of knowledge. Nevertheless, 54.5% stated that they do not use opioids for severe osteo-articular pain management. Main barriers to opioid use are fear of adverse events (61.4%, especially nausea/vomiting and constipation, and patient resistance (29.7%. A modest knowledge of pain classification was also demonstrated. Opioid use remains very limited in Italian orthopedic practice. Physicians’ fear of side effects showed poor knowledge of strategies for effective management of opioid-related adverse events, such as combined oral prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone. Continuing educational programs could improve delivery of evidence-based pain management.

  5. The Holy Grail of Orthopedic Surgery: Mesenchymal Stem Cells—Their Current Uses and Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Berebichez-Fridman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Only select tissues and organs are able to spontaneously regenerate after disease or trauma, and this regenerative capacity diminishes over time. Human stem cell research explores therapeutic regenerative approaches to treat various conditions. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are derived from adult stem cells; they are multipotent and exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. They can differentiate into multiple cell types of the mesenchyme, for example, endothelial cells, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, fibroblasts, tenocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells, and sarcomere muscular cells. MSCs are easily obtained and can be cultivated and expanded in vitro; thus, they represent a promising and encouraging treatment approach in orthopedic surgery. Here, we review the application of MSCs to various orthopedic conditions, namely, orthopedic trauma; muscle injury; articular cartilage defects and osteoarthritis; meniscal injuries; bone disease; nerve, tendon, and ligament injuries; spinal cord injuries; intervertebral disc problems; pediatrics; and rotator cuff repair. The use of MSCs in orthopedics may transition the practice in the field from predominately surgical replacement and reconstruction to bioregeneration and prevention. However, additional research is necessary to explore the safety and effectiveness of MSC treatment in orthopedics, as well as applications in other medical specialties.

  6. Collaborative multicenter trials in Latin America: challenges and opportunities in orthopedic and trauma surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Ynoe de Moraes

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Orthopedic research agendas should be considered from a worldwide perspective. Efforts should be planned as the means for obtaining evidence that is valid for health promotion with global outreach. DESIGN AND SETTING Exploratory study conducted at Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp, São Paulo, Brazil, and McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada. METHODS We identified and analyzed collaborative and multicenter research in Latin America, taking into account American and Canadian efforts as the reference points. We explored aspects of the data available from official sources and used data from traffic accidents as a model for discussing collaborative research in these countries. RESULTS The evaluation showed that the proportion of collaborative and multicenter studies in our setting is small. A brief analysis showed that the death rate due to traffic accidents is very high. Thus, it seems clear to us that initiatives involving collaborative studies are important for defining and better understanding the patterns of injuries resulting from orthopedic trauma and the forms of treatment. Orthopedic research may be an important tool for bringing together orthopedic surgeons, researchers and medical societies for joint action. CONCLUSIONS We have indicated some practical guidelines for initiatives in collaborative research and have proposed some solutions with a summarized plan of action for conducting evidence-based research involving orthopedic trauma.

  7. Functional orthopedic magnetic appliance (FOMA) II--modus operandi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardimon, A D; Stutzmann, J J; Graber, T M; Voss, L R; Petrovic, A G

    1989-05-01

    A new functional appliance (FA) to correct Class II dentoskeletal malocclusions is introduced. The functional orthopedic magnetic appliance (FOMA) II uses upper and lower attracting magnetic means (Nd2Fe14B) to constrain the lower jaw in an advanced sagittal posture. In vitro, a special gauge transducer measured the magnetic attractive path and forces. In vivo, 13 prepubertal female Macaca fascicularis monkeys received facial implants and were treated for 4 months with the following appliances: conventional FA (four subjects), FOMA II (five subjects), a combined FOMA II + FA (two subjects), and sham (control) appliance (two subjects). The in vitro results showed the following: vertico-sagitally displaced upper and lower magnets attracted ultimately along an oblique line with a terminal horizonal slide to become fully superimposed; the functional performance improved when the magnetic interface acted as a magnetic inclined plane; and the magnetic force was able to guide and constrain the mandible toward the constructive protrusive closure position (CPCP) (1.2 mm, F = 570 gm) from levels below the habitual rest position (3 mm, F = 219 gm) and the electromyographic (EMG) relaxed position (8.5 mm, F = 45 gm). The in vivo results demonstrated the following: functional performance increased in FOMA II (22%) and in the combined FOMA II + FA (28%) over the conventional FA; mandibular length increased significantly in the treated animals (means = 2.83 +/- 0.70 mm) over the control animals (means = 0.43 +/- 0.08 mm); incisor proclination was lower in magnetic appliances (means = 4.57 +/- 1.76 degrees) than in the conventional FA (means = 8.75 +/- 1.85 degrees); mandibular elongation and condylar posterior inclination resulted from posterosuperior endochondral growth (increased cell proliferation and/or hyperplasia of functional chondroblasts) and by bony remodeling of the condylar neck (apposition posterior border, resorption anterior border), respectively; virtually no

  8. New perspectives and recommendations for anticoagulant therapy post orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Kropf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant therapy is essential for the prevention of risks associated with the formation of thrombus in patients after surgery, especially in orthopedics. Recently, new oral anticoagulants were introduced in the therapeutic arsenal. This fact is important, because the current drug of choice in clinical practice is enoxaparin, a low molecular weight heparin. As all injecting drugs, enoxaparin may reduce patients' adherence to treatment by dissatisfaction with and resistance to the administration. This article reviews the available literature on the overall utility of these innovative medicines, approaching the pharmacology, the compared efficacy in relation to current agents, and the potential targets for new agents, as well as points to new trends in research and development. The article also contributes with a practical guide for use and recommendations to health professionals, especially focusing on the reversibility of hemorrhagic events, and discusses the importance of convenience/satisfaction of use, the cost of treatment, and the risk-benefit profile for patients.A terapia anticoagulante é fundamental para a prevenção de riscos associados à formação de trombos em pacientes pós-cirúrgicos, principalmente em ortopedia. Recentemente, novos anticoagulantes orais foram introduzidos no arsenal terapêutico. Tal fato é importantíssimo, visto que o atual medicamento de primeira escolha na prática clínica é a enoxaparina, uma heparina de baixo peso molecular. Por ser de uso injetável, a enoxaparina pode diminuir a adesão do paciente ao tratamento, devido à insatisfação e à resistência quanto à via de administração. Este artigo revisa a literatura disponível sobre a utilidade total desses medicamentos inovadores ao abordar a farmacologia, a eficácia em comparação com os agentes atuais e os alvos potenciais para novos agentes, bem como aponta as novas tendências em pesquisa e desenvolvimento. O artigo também contribui

  9. [Preoperative information for paediatric patients. The anaesthesiologist's point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orliaguet, G

    2006-04-01

    Medical information is mandatory before any medical procedure, including pediatric anesthesia. Preoperative information covers many aspects, including medico-psychologic and judicial aspects. When the patient is a child, information must be delivered to the parents in priority. However, the French law has given a particular attention to the opinion of the child. In 70% of the cases, preoperative anxiety of the parents is more related to anesthesia than to the surgical procedure itself. We have to explain the most frequent adverse effects, as well as the more severe and well known complications to the parents, even though they are very infrequent. The only cases where preoperative information is not required are: emergency cases and refusal of the patient or the parents to be informed. While information is necessarily oral, it may be completed using a written document. The quality of the preoperative information directly influences the quality of the psychological preoperative preparation of the parents, and thereafter of the child. Preoperative preparation programs have been developed, but controversial results have been observed. The great majority of the studies on preoperative programs were performed in the USA, where the demand for preoperative information is very important. It is far from sure that the results of all these studies may be extrapolated to French parents, and French studies are needed.

  10. The role of anxiolytic premedication in reducing preoperative anxiety.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Jennifer K

    2012-01-01

    Prevention of preoperative anxiety with anxiolytic premedication is associated with improved preoperative outcomes in surgical patients. The objective of the authors\\' study was to evaluate the percentage of surgical patients that are prescribed premedication for preoperative anxiety before their anticipated surgical procedure. A prospective study was carried out by theatre nursing staff in the theatre reception bay of a university teaching hospital. A questionnaire was designed to record the number of patients that described symptoms consistent with preoperative anxiety. The number of patients that had been offered anxiolytic premedication for preoperative anxiety was also recorded. Consent was obtained from 115 consecutive surgical patients (male, n=52; female, n=63). Of these, 66% (n=76) reported anxiety before their surgical procedure (male: n=27, female: n=49). Premedication with a low-dose benzodiazepine was prescribed by an anaesthetist in 4% of cases (n=5). Patients that received premedication preoperatively reported effective relief of their anxiety symptoms This study demonstrates that preoperative patient anxiety is highly prevalent. The authors\\' findings suggest that premedication with anxiolytic pharmacological therapy may be an underused therapeutic resource for managing preoperative patient anxiety.

  11. Preoperative distress predicts persistent pain after breast cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, Mathias Kvist; Mertz, Birgitte Goldschmidt; Bidstrup, Pernille Envold Hansen;

    2015-01-01

    at the Department of Breast Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, were invited to participate in the study. Patients filled out a questionnaire preoperatively, and 4 and 8 months after surgery. Preoperative distress was measured with the Distress Thermometer (DT; 11-point scale, 0-10). We examined the association...

  12. Long-term effects of a preoperative smoking cessation programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villebro, Nete Munk; Pedersen, Tom; Møller, Ann M;

    2008-01-01

    Preoperative smoking intervention programmes reduce post-operative complications in smokers. Little is known about the long-term effect upon smoking cessation.......Preoperative smoking intervention programmes reduce post-operative complications in smokers. Little is known about the long-term effect upon smoking cessation....

  13. [How many generalists and how many specialists does orthopedics and traumatology need?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achatz, G; Perl, M; Stange, R; Mutschler, M; Jarvers, J S; Münzberg, M

    2013-01-01

    The training in orthopedic and trauma surgery has changed significantly with the introduction of the new residency program. The contents taught have already been reduced in breadth and the current developments in the outpatient and particularly in the clinical landscape also contribute to increasing specialization. This trend favors structures in which comprehensive medical care for the population in Germany in orthopedic and trauma surgery appears to be endangered and in which the future efforts for e.g. polytraumatised patients need to be questioned. The Young Forum of the German Society for Orthopedics and Traumatology actively accompanies a discussion about the necessity and value of generalists to ensure the level of care in Germany in addition to the specialists.

  14. [Further training in the faculty of orthopedics and trauma surgery. Outstanding, average or insufficient?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perl, M; Stange, R; Niethard, M; Münzberg, M

    2013-01-01

    A well structured and executed and practical residency program is important to secure a sufficient number of well trained orthopedic surgeons in the future. Some of the residents, however, see substantial shortcomings here. Additionally, orthopedic residency programs struggle to be a valid alternative for graduated medical students when comparing them to residency programs in other medical specialities or alternative job options. In improving the current situation program directors as well as residents must play a key role. A rapid improvement of structural shortcomings of German residency programs does not only provide an advantage in recruiting new residents now, but may also help to maintain the high quality in orthopedic health care in the future.

  15. [Application and research advances of metabolomics in the field of orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhijian; Qiu, Guixing; Zhao, Yu

    2015-06-01

    Metabolomics is a subject of systematic, qualitative and quantitative analysis of all metabolites in all organisms, which is applied to finding biomarkers and studying pathogenesis of diseases. Study procedures of metabolomics include data acquisition by spectroscopic/spectrometric techniques, multivariate statistical analysis and projection of the acquired metabolomic information. In recent years, metabolomics have gained popularity in orthopedic field. Metabolomic study of osteoarthritis was firstly conducted and widely developed. Metabolite profiles of different samples, including serum/plasma, urine, synovial fluid and synovial tissue, were studied and dozens of differential metabolites and several disturbed metabolic pathways were found. In addition, metabolomic studies of osteoporosis, ankylosing spondylitis and bone tumors were also conducted, which identified many potential biomarkers and made further understanding of pathogenesis of corresponding disease. However, metabolomic studies in orthopedic field just begin. More orthopedic diseases will be researched thank to the satisfactory results of previous reports.

  16. Current use of autologous adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction cells for orthopedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Kwang Seung; Park, Moonhee; Kang, Lin-Woo; Lee, Sang Hee

    2017-01-31

    Autologous adipose stromal vascular fractions (SVFs) containing adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are currently being used in clinical settings for various orthopedic applications for human patients. Due to its potential capability of regenerating cartilage, bone, and tendons, autologous adipose SVFs are being tried in treating patients with osteoarthritis (OA), chondromalacia, meniscus tear, osteonecrosis of the femoral head, and tendon injuries. Here, we have reviewed available human clinical studies with regard to patient applications of autologous adipose SVF containing ASCs, specifically assessing effectiveness and safety in the field of orthopedic disorders. All studies reviewed in this article presents potential benefits of autologous adipose SVF in various orthopedic applications without any serious side effects.

  17. Effect of acupressure on preoperative anxiety: a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiee, Sina; Bassampour, Shiva Sadat; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Pouresmaeil, Zahra; Mehran, Abbas

    2012-08-01

    Preoperative anxiety, as an emotional reaction, is common among patients undergoing surgery. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of acupressure on preoperative anxiety before abdominal surgery. The 70 subjects of this clinical trial were randomly assigned into the acupressure group (n=35), which received acupressure at the true points, or the placebo group (n=35), which received acupressure at sham (false) points. Preoperative anxiety and vital signs before and after the intervention were measured in both groups. The findings demonstrated a reduction in the level of preoperative anxiety for both groups (Pacupressure group (Pacupressure at true points (third eye and Shen men) can reduce higher preoperative anxiety of patients before abdominal surgery and that it has had a more clinically beneficial effect than sham points.

  18. Caudal ropivacaine in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Ilett, K F; Reid, C;

    2001-01-01

    Ropivacaine is a new long-acting amino-amide local anesthetic. However, there are no data on its use in infants. In the current study, the authors investigated the pharmacokinetics of caudal ropivacaine in 30 infants younger than 12 months....

  19. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Ultrasound: Infant Hip KidsHealth > For Parents > Ultrasound: Infant Hip A A A What's in this ... en los lactantes What It Is A hip ultrasound is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  20. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Henry L.; And Others

    There is a growing body of evidence that Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) victims are not completely normal and healthy, as was once believed. A variety of new information from several disciplines strongly suggests that the infant who dies suddenly and unexpectedly may do so because of subtle developmental, neurologic, cardiorespiratory, and…

  1. Caudal ropivacaine in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Ilett, K F; Reid, C

    2001-01-01

    Ropivacaine is a new long-acting amino-amide local anesthetic. However, there are no data on its use in infants. In the current study, the authors investigated the pharmacokinetics of caudal ropivacaine in 30 infants younger than 12 months....

  2. Cerebral Asymmetry in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Corballis, Michael C.

    This paper describes two experiments conducted to replicate the reported findings (Entus, 1975) that infants demonstrate a right ear advantage in the perception of dichotically presented syllables. Using the non-nutritive sucking paradigm, 48 infants 1-3 months of age were presented with verbal stimuli contingent upon criterion level sucking.…

  3. Predictive value of orthopedic evaluation and injury history at the NFL combine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Robert H; Chehab, Eric L; Barnes, Ronnie P; Lyman, Stephen; Rodeo, Scott A; Warren, Russell F

    2008-08-01

    The National Football League (NFL) holds an annual combine to evaluate college football athletes likely to be drafted for physical skills, to review their medical history, and to perform a physical examination. The athletes receive an orthopedic grade on their ability to participate in the NFL. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that this orthopedic rating at the combine predicts the percent of athletes who play in the NFL and the length of their careers. A database for all athletes reviewed at the combine by the medical staff of one team from 1987 to 2000 was created and linked to a data set containing the number of seasons and the games played in the NFL for each athlete. Players were grouped by orthopedic grade: high, low, and orthopedic failure. The percent of players who played in the NFL and the mean length of their careers was calculated and compared for these groups. The orthopedic grade assigned at the NFL combine correlated with the probability of playing in the league. Whereas 58% of athletes with a high grade and 55% of athletes with a low grade played at least one game, only 36% of athletes given a failing grade did so (P < 0.001). Players with a high grade had a mean career of 41.5 games compared with 34.2 games for players with a low grade and 19.0 games for orthopedic failures. This is the first study to report on the predictive value of a grading system for college athletes before participation in professional sports. Other professional sports may benefit from using a similar grading system for the evaluation of potential players.

  4. Thirty-day readmission rates in orthopedics: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatz, James T; Tueting, Jonathan L; Anderson, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Hospital readmission rates are being used to evaluate performance. A survey of the present rates is needed before policies can be developed to decrease incidence of readmission. We address three questions: What is the present rate of 30-day readmission in orthopedics? How do factors such as orthopedic specialty, data source, patient insurance, and time of data collection affect the 30-day readmission rate? What are the causes and risk factors for 30-day readmissions? A review was first registered with Prospero (CRD42014010293, 6/17/2014) and a meta-analysis was performed to assess the current 30-day readmission rate in orthopedics. Studies published after 2006 were retrieved, and 24 studies met the inclusion criteria. The 30-day readmission rate was extrapolated from each study along with the orthopedic subspecialty, data source, patient insurance, time of collection, patient demographics, and cause of readmission. A sensitivity analysis was completed on the stratified groups. The overall 30-day readmission rate across all orthopedics was 5.4 percent (95% confidence interval: 4.8,6.0). There was no significant difference between subspecialties. Studies that retrieved data from a multicenter registry had a lower 30-day readmission rate than those reporting data from a single hospital or a large national database. Patient populations that only included Medicare patients had a higher 30-day readmission rate than populations of all insurance. The 30-day readmission rate has decreased in the past ten years. Age, length of stay, discharge to skilled nursing facility, increased BMI, ASA score greater than 3, and Medicare/Medicaid insurance showed statistically positive correlation with increased 30-day readmissions in greater than 75 percent of studies. Surgical site complications accounted for 46 percent of 30-day readmissions. This meta-analysis shows the present rate of 30-day readmissions in orthopedics. Demonstrable heterogeneity between studies underlines the

  5. Multi-detector CT imaging in the postoperative orthopedic patient with metal hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Berg, Bruno; Malghem, Jacques; Maldague, Baudouin; Lecouvet, Frederic

    2006-12-01

    Multi-detector CT imaging (MDCT) becomes routine imaging modality in the assessment of the postoperative orthopedic patients with metallic instrumentation that degrades image quality at MR imaging. This article reviews the physical basis and CT appearance of such metal-related artifacts. It also addresses the clinical value of MDCT in postoperative orthopedic patients with emphasis on fracture healing, spinal fusion or arthrodesis, and joint replacement. MDCT imaging shows limitations in the assessment of the bone marrow cavity and of the soft tissues for which MR imaging remains the imaging modality of choice despite metal-related anatomic distortions and signal alteration.

  6. Noticeable Variations in the Educational Exposure During Residency in Danish Orthopedic Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Eske; Fridberg, Marie; Knudsen, Ulrik Kragegaard;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to examine the educational exposure during residency in Danish orthopedic departments. DESIGN: Questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. SETTING: Data were gathered from January 1, 2014 to April 30, 2014 through a nationwide web-based questionnaire....... CONCLUSIONS: A large variation in the educational exposure was found among the Danish orthopedic departments. Numbers indicate that Danish residents, compared with their US counterparts, operate considerably less during residency. Most residents work overtime and many of them work for free to participate...

  7. [Often an orthopedic problem can manifest as chest pain. Cervical vertebrae syndrome mimics myocardial infarct].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, B

    2002-04-25

    Up to 20% of all patients with pectoral symptoms have an underlying orthopedic problem. The most common orthopedic conditions that may mimic chest pain radiating into the left arm include slipped disc, cervicothoracic tension syndrome, blockage of intervertebral or rib joints, and intercostal neuralgia. Less common causes of such pain are arthrosis of the shoulder, spondylocystitis, osteoporotic fractures or tumors of the bone. Management is oriented to the underlying cause, and treatment extends from physiotherapeutic measures (rest, heat treatment) via medication (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, myotonolytic agents) to operative interventions.

  8. Do Astronauts have a Higher Rate of Orthopedic Shoulder Conditions than a Cohort of Working Professionals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Mitzi S.; Murray, Jocelyn D.; Young, Millenia; Wear, Mary L.; Tarver, W. J.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Occupational surveillance of astronaut shoulder injuries began with operational concerns at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training. NASA has implemented several occupational health initiatives during the past 20 years to decrease the number and severity of injuries, but the individual success rate is unknown. Orthopedic shoulder injury and surgery rates were calculated, but classifying the rates as normal, high or low was highly dependent on the comparison group. The purpose of this study was to identify a population of working professionals and compare orthopedic shoulder consultation and surgery rates.

  9. New strategies for preoperative skin antisepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Miriam; Lademann, Juergen; Patzelt, Alexa; Knorr, Fanny; Kramer, Axel; Koburger, Torsten; Assadian, Ojan; Daeschlein, Georg; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    During the past decades, encouraging progress has been made in the prevention of surgical site infections (SSI). However, as SSI still occur today, strategic prevention measures such as standardized skin antisepsis must be implemented and rigorously promoted. Recent discoveries in skin physiology necessitate the development of novel antiseptic agents and procedures in order to ameliorate their efficacy. In particular, alternate target structures in the skin need to be taken into consideration for the development of the next generation of antiseptics. Recent investigations have shown that a high number of microorganisms are located within and in the close vicinity of the hair follicles. This suggests that these structures are an important reservoir of bacterial growth and activity in human skin. To date, it has not been fully elucidated to what extent conventional liquid antiseptics sufficiently target the hair follicle-related microbial population. Modern technologies such as tissue-tolerable plasma (TTP) have been tested for their potential antiseptic efficiency by reducing the bacterial load in the skin and in the hair follicles. First experiments using liposomes to deliver antiseptics into the hair follicles have been evaluated for their potential clinical application. The present review evaluates these two innovative methods for their efficacy and applicability in preoperative skin antiseptics.

  10. Preoperative optimization of the vascular surgery patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan HT

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Henry T Zhan,1 Seth T Purcell,1,2 Ruth L Bush1 1Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Bryan, 2Baylor Scott and White, Temple, TX, USA Abstract: It is well known that patients who suffer from peripheral (noncardiac vascular disease often have coexisting atherosclerotic diseases of the heart. This may leave the patients susceptible to major adverse cardiac events, including death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and pulmonary edema, during the perioperative time period, in addition to the many other complications they may sustain as they undergo vascular surgery procedures, regardless of whether the procedure is performed as an open or endovascular modality. As these patients are at particularly high risk, up to 16% in published studies, for postoperative cardiac complications, many proposals and algorithms for perioperative optimization have been suggested and studied in the literature. Moreover, in patients with recent coronary stents, the risk of noncardiac surgery on adverse cardiac events is incremental in the first 6 months following stent implantation. Just as postoperative management of patients is vital to the outcome of a patient, preoperative assessment and optimization may reduce, and possibly completely alleviate, the risks of major postoperative complications, as well as assist in the decision-making process regarding the appropriate surgical and anesthetic management. This review article addresses several tools and therapies that treating physicians may employ to medically optimize a patient before they undergo noncardiac vascular surgery. Keywords: perioperative care, intraoperative care, medical management, risk evaluation/stratification, medical treatment

  11. Rising incidence of Enterococcus species in microbiological specimens from orthopedic patients correlates to increased use of cefuroxime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siesing, Peter Christian; Alva-Jørgensen, Jens Peter; Brodersen, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Enterococci are emerging causes of severe infections, including wound and bone infections in orthopedic patients. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether there was a correlation between the incidence of enterococci in tissue samples (biopsies) from orthopedic patients and consumpt...

  12. Costs and utilities of manual therapy and orthopedic standard care for low-prioritized orthopedic outpatients of working age: a cost consequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilje, Stina C; Persson, Ulf B; Tangen, Stine T; Kåsamoen, Stine; Skillgate, Eva

    2014-08-01

    Treatment for musculoskeletal disorders in primary care in Sweden is generally initiated with advice and medication. Second-line therapy is physiotherapy and/or injection and radiography; third-line therapy is referral to an orthopedist. Manual therapy is not routine. It is a challenge to identify patients who benefit from treatment by different specialists. The current referral strategy probably contributes to long waiting lists in orthopedic departments, which is costly and implies prolonged suffering for the patients. The aim of this health economic evaluation was to compare costs and outcomes from naprapathic manual therapy (NMT) with orthopedic standard care for common, low-prioritized, nonsurgical musculoskeletal disorders, after second-line treatment. Diagnose Related Groups were used to define the costs, and the SF-36 was encoded to evaluate the outcomes in cost per quality adjusted life years gained. Results from a 12 months' follow-up showed significantly larger improvement for the NMT than for orthopedic standard care, significantly lower mean cost per patient; 5427 SEK (*Price level 2009; 1 Euro=106,213 SEK; 1 US Dollar=76,457 SEK) (95% confidence interval, 3693-7161) compared to14298 SEK (95% confidence interval, 8322-20,274), and more gains in outcomes in cost per quality adjusted life years per patient (0.066 compared with 0.026). Thus the result is "dominant." It is plausible that improved outcomes and reasonable cost savings for low-prioritized nonsurgical outpatients would be attainable if NMT were available as an additional standard care option in orthopedic outpatient clinics.

  13. Effect of Preoperative Nasal Retainer on Nasal Growth in Patients with Bilateral Incomplete Cleft Lip: A 3-Year Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Chul Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in nasal growth after the implementation of a preoperative nasal retainer in patients with bilateral incomplete cleft lip. Methods Twenty-six infants with bilateral incomplete cleft lip and cleft palate were included in the study. A preoperative nasal retainer was applied in 5 patients from the time of birth to 2.6–3.5 months before primary cheiloplasty. Twenty-one patients who were treated without a preoperative nasal retainer were placed in the control group. Standard frontal, basal, and lateral view photographs were taken 3 weeks before cheiloplasty, immediately after cheiloplasty, and at the 1- and 3-year postoperative follow-up visits. The columella and nasal growth ratio and nasolabial angle were indirectly measured using photographic anthropometry. Results The ratio of columella length to nasal tip protrusion significantly increased after the implementation of a preoperative nasal retainer compared to the control group for up to 3 years postoperatively (P<0.01 for all time points. The ratios of nasal width to facial width, nasal width to intercanthal distance, columellar width to nasal width, and the nasolabial angle, for the two groups were not significantly different at any time point. Conclusions Implementation of a preoperative nasal retainer provided significant advantages for achieving columellar elongation for up to 3 years postoperatively. It is a simple, reasonable option for correcting nostril shape, preventing deformities, and guiding development of facial structures.

  14. Selective laser sintering of calcium phosphate materials for orthopedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Goonhee

    control of micro and macro pore structure, to maximize bone healing and provide sufficient mechanical strength. It also permits the complete removal of the polymeric binders that are resided in the SLS process. In collaboration with the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and BioMedical Enterprises, Inc., porous implants based on anatomical geometry have been successfully implanted in rabbits and dogs. These histologic animal studies reveal excellent biocompatibility and show its great potential for commercial custom-fit implant manufacture. The second research effort involves fabrication of fully dense bone for application in dental restoration and load-bearing orthopedic functions. Calcium phosphate glass melts, proven to be biocompatible in the first effort, were cast into carbon molds. Processes were developed for preparing the molds. These carbon molds of anatomic shape can be prepared from either Computer Numerical Control (CNC) milling of slab stock or SLS processing of thermoset-coated graphite powder. The CNC milling method provides accurate dimension of the molds in a short period of time, however, the capable geometries are limited; generally two pieces of molds are required for complex shapes. The SLS method provides very complex shape green molds. However, they need to go through pyrolysis of thermoset binder to provide the high temperature capability reached at calcium phosphate melt temperatures (1100°C) and noticeable shrinkage was observed during pyrolysis. The cast glass was annealed to develop polycrystalline calcium phosphate. This process also exhibits great potential.

  15. [The construction of a medical discipline and its challenges: Orthopedics in Switzerland during the 19th and 20th centuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaba, Mariama

    2015-07-01

    During the 19th century, numerous figures, with different qualifications, claimed to practice orthopedics: doctors, surgeons, inventors of equipment and instruments, and other empiricists. They performed certain types of techniques, massages, surgical operationsand/or fitted prostheses. The polysemous notion of orthopedics had created conflicts of interest that would reach their height at the end of the 19th century. The integration of orthopedics into the training at the university level enhanced its proximity to surgery, a discipline that has dominated the so-called modern medicine. During the 20th century, various medical branches defend the legitimacy of certain orthopedic practices, thereby threating to a degree the title itself of this specialization. By examining the challenges that have shaped the history of orthopedics in Switzerland, this article also seeks to shed light on the strategies that were implemented in adopting a medical and technical discipline within a transforming society.

  16. When Infants Talk, Infants Listen: Pre-Babbling Infants Prefer Listening to Speech with Infant Vocal Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masapollo, Matthew; Polka, Linda; Ménard, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    To learn to produce speech, infants must effectively monitor and assess their own speech output. Yet very little is known about how infants perceive speech produced by an infant, which has higher voice pitch and formant frequencies compared to adult or child speech. Here, we tested whether pre-babbling infants (at 4-6 months) prefer listening to…

  17. Analysis on Medical Accidents of 32 Cases Nerve Injury in Orthopedics Surgery%32例骨科手术神经损伤医疗事故分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈奕霖; 张锦奇; 许苹; 张玲

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the preoperative condition status, postoperative adverse consequences and the direct cause of nerve injury in the orthopedic operation, and discuss the countermeasures for that. Methods In this study, 32 cases nerve injury of orthopedic medical accident, the data of which were kept in archive in a city health bureau of health supervision from 1999 to 2009, were retrospectively analyzed. Results The major factor of nerve injury occurred in the operation errors. Conclusion The spine was the most prone to nerve injury; surgery operation failure was the main factor causing nerve injury.%目的 分析骨科手术神经损伤的术前病情状况、术后不良后果及神经损伤的直接原因,并探讨防范对策.方法 对1999-2009年某市卫生局卫生监督所所存档的32例骨科中神经损伤医疗事故案例进行回顾性分析.结果 神经损伤主要因素在于手术操作失误.结论 脊椎为最容易发生神经损伤部位;术中操作失误是造成神经损伤主要因素.

  18. Comparison of Pediatric and General Orthopedic Surgeons? Approaches in Management of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip and Flexible Flatfoot: the Road to Clinical Consensus

    OpenAIRE

    Ramin Haj Zargarbashi; Hirbod Nasiri Bonaki; Shayan Zadegan; Taghi Baghdadi; Mohammad Hossein Nabian; Mehdi Ramezan Shirazi

    2017-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and flatfoot are common pediatric orthopedic disorders, being referred to and managed by both general and pediatric orthopedic surgeons, through various modalities. Our study aimed to evaluate their consensus and perspective disagreements in terms of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of the mentioned deformities. Forty participants in two groups of general orthopedic surgeons (GOS) (n=20) and pediatric orthopedic surgeons (POS) (n=20), were asked t...

  19. Recognition and management of preoperative risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierman, E; Zakrzewski, K

    1999-08-01

    Internists are frequently asked to do preoperative consultations and to manage perioperative complications. Realistic goals are to identify patient factors that increase the risk of surgery, to quantify this risk in order to make decisions about the appropriateness of and timing of the surgery, to provide recommendations on how to minimize the risk, to identify and manage coexisting medical conditions and their associated medication requirements, to monitor the patient for perioperative problems, and to make recommendations to deal with these problems when they occur. With few exceptions, nonselective imaging and laboratory screening tests have repeatedly been shown to be of little value when the history and physical do not suggest a problem. The risk associated with the planned surgery can be estimated, with the most common serious complications being cardiac events. Updated versions of Goldman's risk indices are particularly helpful for this. Clinical variables are optimally combined with selective stress testing to discern which patients will benefit from preoperative revascularization. This has been studied best in the setting of vascular surgery. A critical guiding principle is that the value of revascularization must be judged in terms of long term gains rather than just immediate perioperative benefit. Other interventions include the selective use of beta blockers, adequate analgesia for all, control of hypertension, and appropriate volume management, especially in the settings of preexisting CHF or valvular disease. It must also be recognized that perioperative ischemia and CHF often present atypically. An approach that combines aspects of both the ACC/AHA and the ACP guidelines seems optimal. A variety of noncardiac issues must also be addressed. Postoperative pulmonary complications are common, especially with preexisting pulmonary disease, thoracic and upper abdominal surgery, and obesity. PFTs and ABGs are indicated in selected patients. Stopping

  20. Anterior mediastinal paraganglioma: A case for preoperative embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakir Murtaza

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paraganglioma is a rare but highly vascular tumor of the anterior mediastinum. Surgical resection is a challenge owing to the close proximity to vital structures including the heart, trachea and great vessels. Preoperative embolization has been reported once to facilitate surgical treatment. Case presentation We report a case of anterior mediastinal paraganglioma that was embolized preoperatively, and was resected without the need for cardiopulmonary bypass and without major bleeding complications. Conclusion We make a case to further the role of preoperative embolization in the treatment of mediastinal paragangliomas.

  1. Pre-operative investigations: yield and conformity to national guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliana, H; Lim, T A; Inbasegaran, K

    2003-03-01

    Routine ordering of pre-operative investigations yields a low true positive rate and is not cost effective. In this study, case notes of 251 adults who underwent elective surgery were reviewed. Pre-operative investigations were classified as 'indicated' or 'not indicated', based on the national guidelines. Only 56% of all tests done were indicated. The overall rates of expected and unexpected abnormal values from pre-operative blood investigations were 51.1% and 34.4% respectively. This study found that selective testing based on guidelines was beneficial. However, the results also suggest that the local guidelines need to be reviewed.

  2. Stillbirth and Infant Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Ellen Aagaard

    2012-01-01

    mechanisms behind these associations remain largely unknown. Although maternal obesity is associated with a wide range of complications in the mother and neonate that may impair fetal and infant survival, the increased risk of stillbirth and infant mortality is virtually unchanged when accounting...... indicating that some of the excess risk may have a placental origin. To further understand the associations between maternal obesity and late fetal and infant death, we need better and more detailed clinical data, which is difficult to obtain on a population level given the rarity of the outcomes. The best...

  3. Preoperative factors influencing success in pterygium surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Gimeno Ana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify preoperative, perioperative and postoperative risk factors that influence the success of pterygium surgery. Methods This is a prospective study of thirty-six patients with primary or recurrent pterygia. A detailed anamnesis and an ophthalmological examination were performed looking for the following factors: age, race, latitude and altitude of the main place of residence, hours of exposure to the sun, use of protective measures against UV-radiation, classification of pterygium, width of the pterygium at limbus, surgical technique (conjunctival autograft plus suturing versus tissue glue, graft alterations (misapposition, granuloma, haemorrhage, oedema, retraction or necrosis, and postoperative symptoms (foreign-body sensation, pain. The examinations were performed 2 and 7 days and 2, 6 and 12 months after surgery. In addition, recurrence was defined as any growth of conjunctiva into the cornea. Results A logistic regression and a survival analysis have been used to perform data analysis. A total number of 36 patients completed a one year follow-up. A total of 13 patients were born and lived in Spain, and 26 came from other countries, mostly Latin America. A total number of 8 males (no women presented a recurrence, mainly between 2 and 6 months. The hours of sun exposure through their life was independently related to surgical success. Pterygia of less than 5 mm of base width showed a weak positive correlation with recurrence. None of the other factors considered were significantly related to recurrence. Conclusions Male gender and high sun exposure are strongly and independently related to surgical success after the removal of pterygia.

  4. [Spectrum and susceptibility of preoperative conjunctival bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rubio, M E; Cuesta-Rodríguez, T; Urcelay-Segura, J L; Cortés-Valdés, C

    2013-12-01

    To describe the conjunctival bacterial spectrum of our patients undergoing intraocular surgery and their antibiotic sensitivity during the study period. A retrospective study of preoperative conjunctival culture of patients consecutively scheduled for intraocular surgery from 21 February 2011 to 1 April 2013. Specimens were directly seeded onto blood-agar and MacConkey-agar (aerobiosis incubation, 2 days), and on chocolate-agar (6% CO2 incubation, 7 days). The identified bacteria were divided into 3 groups according to their origin; the bacteria susceptibility tests were performed on those more pathogenic and on some of the less pathogenic when more than 5 colonies were isolated. The sensitivity of the exigent growing bacteria was obtained with disk diffusion technique, and for of the non-exigent bacteria by determining their minimum inhibitory concentration. The Epidat 3.1 program was used for statistical calculations. A total of 13,203 bacteria were identified in 6,051 cultures, with 88.7% being typical colonizers of conjunctiva (group 1), 8.8% typical of airways (group 2), and the remaining 2.5% of undetermined origin (group 3). 530 cultures (8.8%) were sterile. The sensitivity of group 1 was: 99% vancomycin, 95% rifampicin, 87% chloramphenicol, 76% tetracycline. Levels of co-trimoxazole, aminoglycosides, quinolones, β-lactams and macrolides decreased since 2007. The group 2 was very sensitive to chloramphenicol, cefuroxime, rifampicin, ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanate. In group 3, to levofloxacin 93%, ciprofloxacin 89%, tobramycin 76%, but ceftazidime 53% and cefuroxime 29% decreased. None of the tested antibiotics could eradicate all possible conjunctival bacteria. Bacteria living permanently on the conjunctiva (group 1) have achieved higher resistance than the eventual colonizers. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Sara; Verscheure, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teaching techniques. Mean scores from written exams, practical exams, and final course evaluations…

  6. Orthopedic Surgery in Rural American Hospitals: A Survey of Rural Hospital Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Rural American residents prefer to receive their medical care locally. Lack of specific medical services in the local community necessitates travel to a larger center which is less favorable. This study was done to identify how rural hospitals choose to provide orthopedic surgical services to their communities. Methods: All hospitals in 5 states…

  7. [Lack of new trainees in trauma surgery and orthopedics. An approach to a solution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, K; Matziolis, D; Perka, C

    2010-12-01

    The reasons for a shortage of young people in trauma surgery and orthopedics have often been discussed. Atypical progression of medical operating levels, antisocial working hours and an inadequate financial compensation for on-call duties have been given as the reasons for a lack of interest in the discipline. Additionally a progressive feminization of the medical profession and rejection of surgical disciplines because of a mismatch with family interests and the demands of advanced surgical training have also been named. Surveys on the choice of medical specialization reveal that experiences during the course of studying have a great influence on future prospects and are immensely important for the further focusing on the future as a medical doctor. In order to increase the attractiveness of the specialization, programs for students were initiated by the heads of the Conventions of Higher Education Lecturers for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery and the management of the German Society for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery. Due to the enormous popularity auxiliary projects were demanded. Consequently a "Trauma Surgery and Orthopedic Day for Students" was organized on 16th February 2010 in the Musculoskeletal Centre of the Charité in Berlin. The aim was to convey practical skills and to inspire the choice of this specialization in the future.

  8. Franciszek Neugebauer's Ichnograms as a Pioneering Diagnostic Method in Orthopedics in the 19th Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowska-Zamachowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an original orthopedic diagnostic method from the late 19th century developed by Franciszek Neugebauer, a distinguished Polish physician. His technique of detecting skeletal abnormalities was an excellent coping method in the time before the first diagnostic imaging method - x-ray imaging - had been invented.

  9. Stem Cells in Orthopedics: A Comprehensive Guide for the General Orthopedist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, Bryan M; Kuhns, Benjamin D; Weber, Alexander E; Yanke, Adam; Nho, Shane J

    2016-01-01

    The use of biologic adjuvants in the treatment of operative and nonoperative orthopedic injuries continues to expand in concert with our understanding of the acute and chronic healing process of musculoskeletal injuries. Stem cell treatments in orthopedics are among the most commonly explored options, and have found varying levels of success in promoting osseous and soft tissue healing. Basic science and translational studies have demonstrated the potential for broad application of stem cells in the treatment of a growing number of musculoskeletal injuries. Emerging clinical studies have also provided promising results, although the vast majority of studies have featured small sample sizes and limited duration of follow-up. In addition, a number of important questions remain regarding the clinical safety, treatment delivery, and overall efficacy of stem cell augmentation of injured tissue in orthopedics. The objective of the current review is to present a broad overview of the current state of stem cell treatments in orthopedic surgery, with an emphasis on soft tissue healing. This review of stem cell treatment covers the basic science behind biologic augmentation, advantages of the various stem cell sources, preclinical results, and current and future clinical applications.

  10. Aging and orthopedics: how a lifespan development model can inform practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautreau, Sylvia; Gould, Odette N; Forsythe, Michael E

    2016-08-01

    Orthopedic surgical care, like all health care today, is in flux owing to an aging population and to chronic medical conditions leading to an increased number of people with illnesses that need to be managed over the lifespan. The result is an ongoing shift from curing acute illnesses to the management and care of chronic illness and conditions. Theoretical models that provide a useful and feasible vision for the future of health care and health care research are needed. This review discusses how the lifespan development model used in some disciplines within the behavioural sciences can be seen as an extension of the biopsychosocial model. We posit that the lifespan development model provides useful perspectives for both orthopedic care and research. We present key concepts and recommendations, and we discuss how the lifespan development model can contribute to new and evolving perspectives on orthopedic outcomes and to new directions for research. We also offer practical guidelines on how to implement the model in orthopedic practice.

  11. High energy devices versus low energy devices in orthopedics treatment modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheiss, Reiner

    2003-10-01

    The orthopedic consensus group defined in 1997 the 42 most likely relevant parameters of orthopedic shock wave devices. The idea of this approach was to correlate the different clinical outcomes with the physical properties of the different devices with respect to their acoustical waves. Several changes in the hypothesis of the dose effect relationship have been noticed since the first orthopedic treatments. The relation started with the maximum pressure p+, followed by the total energy, the energy density; and finally the single treatment approach using high, and then the multiple treatment method using low energy. Motivated by the reimbursement situation in Germany some manufacturers began to redefine high and low energy devices independent of the treatment modality. The OssaTron as a high energy, single treatment electro hydraulic device gained FDA approval as the first orthopedic ESWT device for plantar fasciitis and, more recently, for lateral epicondylitis. Two low energy devices have now also gained FDA approval based upon a single treatment. Comparing the acoustic data, differences between the OssaTron and the other devices are obvious and will be elaborated upon. Cluster analysis of the outcomes and the acoustical data are presented and new concepts will be suggested.

  12. The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Sara; Verscheure, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teaching techniques. Mean scores from written exams, practical exams, and final course evaluations…

  13. Rapid Extremity Pain Relief by Battlefield Acupuncture after Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-21

    FINAL REPORT Project Title: Rapid Extremity Pain Relief by Battlefield Acupuncture after Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial...prevent adverse effects of sedation and decreased job performance. Auricular acupuncture has been evaluated in multiple trials, and although...generally proven to be useful, these trials were not rigorous. This study seeks to determine if modified Battlefield Acupuncture is more effective at

  14. Infection of orthopedic implants and the use of antibiotic-loaded bone cements - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Belt, H; Neut, D; Schenk, W; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2001-01-01

    Infections by bacteria are a serious complication following orthopedic implant surgery, that can usually only be cured by removing the implant, since the biofilm mode of growth of infecting bacteria on an implant surface protects the organisms from the host immune system and antibiotic therapy. Over

  15. Postoperative urinary retention after general and spinal anesthesia in orthopedic surgical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Abdel aziz Niazi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Urinary retention is more common after spinal than general anesthesia in orthopedic patients. Adding narcotics to the local anesthetics intrathecally causes more incidence of postoperative urinary retention, which may delay patients discharge and transabdominal ultrasonography is a reliable, noninvasive, inexpensive and simple method to measure bladder volume postoperatively.

  16. Use of X-ray fluoroscopy in orthopedic operations: The patient’s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zain Ul-Abadin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Zain Ul-Abadin1, Faisal rauf Khan2, Shams Rauf3, Nadia Rauf31Blackpool Victoria Hospital, Blackpool, UK; 2Ysbyty Gwynedd, Bangor, North West Wales, UK; 3Gynaecology LRH, Peshawar, PakistanAbstract: We collected data from 50 patients who had orthopedic trauma surgery involving X-ray fluoroscopy. All patients were interviewed post-operatively. The aim of the study was to find out what patients thought of orthopedic trauma surgery, the radiation involved, and their concerns post-trauma surgery. Were they given information about the procedures? Did the surgery follow the Department of Health, UK guidelines? That is, consent should be informed, etc. Results showed that most of the patients were unaware of the fact that they were X-rayed during the operation; hence the emphasis on informed consent should be stressed. Most of the patients were unaware about the availability of any protective clothing (lead shield. Even some female patients were unaware of the harmful effects of the radiation on the fetus. Hence, we recommend that more information and education be given to orthopedic trauma patients regarding X-rays. Keywords: X-ray use, orthopedic operations, patients, awareness

  17. A Prototype Robotic Arm for Use by Severely Orthopedically Handicapped Students. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Richard

    This 18-month pilot project, which ran from October 1, 1987 to March 31, 1989, developed a prototype robotic arm for educational use by students with severe orthopedic disabilities in the Columbus (Ohio) Public Schools. The developmental effort was intended first, to provide direct access to currently available instructional materials and, second,…

  18. The Effect of Orthopedic Advertising and Self-Promotion on a Naïve Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohney, Stephen; Lee, Daniel J; Elfar, John C

    2016-01-01

    There has been a marked increase in the number of physicians marketing themselves directly to patients and consumers. However, it is unclear how different promotional styles affect patients' perceptions of their physicians. We hypothesized that self-promoting orthopedic surgeons enjoy a more positive impact on nonphysician patients as compared to non-self-promoting surgeons, as well as a corresponding negative impact on their peer-surgeons. Surgeon websites were selected from the 5 largest population centers in the United States. Subjects with varying degrees of familiarity with orthopedic surgery evaluated Internet profiles of surgeons on a forced choice Likert scale to measure the amount of self-promotion. The naïve subjects judged self-promoting surgeons more favorably than the orthopedic surgeons. In contrast, board-certified orthopedic surgeons viewed self-promoting surgeons more negatively than did their nonphysician counterparts. In summary, the present study revealed that the potential for self-promotion to unduly influence potential patients is real and should be a considerable concern to surgeons, patients, and the profession.

  19. Orthopedic Surgery in Rural American Hospitals: A Survey of Rural Hospital Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Rural American residents prefer to receive their medical care locally. Lack of specific medical services in the local community necessitates travel to a larger center which is less favorable. This study was done to identify how rural hospitals choose to provide orthopedic surgical services to their communities. Methods: All hospitals in 5 states…

  20. Qualitative evaluation of a form for standardized information exchange between orthopedic surgeons and occupational physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Faber (Elske); A. Burdorf (Alex); A.L. van Staa (AnneLoes); H.S. Miedema (Harald); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Both occupational physicians and orthopedic surgeons can be involved in the management of work relevant musculoskeletal disorders. These physicians hardly communicate with each other and this might lead to different advice to the patient. Therefore, we evaluated a standardize

  1. Predictive value of B-type natriuretic peptide level on the postoperative course of infants with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Elhanan; Pollak, Uri; Dagan, Ovdi; Amir, Gabriel; Frenkel, George; Birk, Einat

    2013-05-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) has been shown to have prognostic value for morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. Less is known about its prognostic value in infants. To investigate the predictive value of BNP levels regarding the severity of the postoperative course in infants undergoing surgical repair of congenital heart disease. We conducted a prospective comparative study. Plasma BNP levels in infants aged 1-12 months with congenital heart disease undergoing complete repair were measured preoperatively and 8, 24 and 48 hours postoperatively. Demographic and clinical data included postoperative inotropic support and lactate level, duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospitalization stay. Cardiac surgery was performed in 19 infants aged 1-12 months. Preoperative BNP level above 170 pg/ml had a positive predictive value of 100% for inotropic score > or = 7.5 at 24 hours (specificity 100%, sensitivity 57%) and 48 hours (specificity 100%, sensitivity 100%), and was associated with longer ICU stay (P = 0.05) and a trend for longer mechanical ventilation (P = 0.12). Similar findings were found for 8 hours postoperative BNP above 1720 pg/ml. BNP level did not correlate with measured fractional shortening. In infants undergoing heart surgery, preoperative and 8 hour BNP levels were predictive of inotropic support and longer ICU stay. These findings may have implications for preplanning ICU loads in clinical practice. Further studies with larger samples are needed.

  2. Quantitative analysis of the orthodontic and orthopedic effects of maxillary traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; Isaacson, R J; West, E E; Molthen, R

    1983-11-01

    This article analyzes differences in displacement of ANS and of the upper first molar when different vectors of force are delivered to the maxilla in non-full-banded Phase I mixed-dentition treatment of Class II malocclusion. The sample is identical to that for which we have previously reported differences in change in several key measures of mandibular and facial shape. It includes a cervical-traction group, a high-pull-to-upper-molar group, a modified-activator group, and an untreated Class II control group. Using newly developed computer-conducted procedures, which are described, we have been able to partition the orthodontic and orthopedic components of upper molar displacement and also to isolate treatment effects from those attributable to spontaneous growth and development. In the region of ANS, small but statistically significant and clinically meaningful differences were noted between treatments. When the intercurrent effects of growth and development had been factored out (Table III), orthopedic distal displacement of ANS was significantly greater in the high-pull and cervical groups than in the activator group. Orthopedic downward displacement of ANS was seen to be significantly greater in the cervical group than in the high-pull and activator groups. In the region of the first molar cusp, mean distal displacement of the tooth as an orthopedic effect was found to be almost identical in the cervical and high-pull groups (although variability was greater in the cervical group), but the mean orthodontic effect was significantly greater in the high-pull group than in the cervical group. In the cervical group, where relatively light forces were used for relatively long treatment periods on average, more of the total distal displacement of the upper molar was of an orthopedic character than of an orthodontic character. Conversely, in the high-pull group, in which relatively heavier forces tended to be used for briefer treatment periods, most of the distal

  3. Infant Botulism (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for it until their first birthdays. Spores of Clostridium botulinum bacteria, found in dirt and dust, can contaminate ... from the illness. Prevention Like many germs, the Clostridium botulinum spores that cause botulism in infants are everywhere ...

  4. Cow's milk - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002448.htm Cow's milk - infants To use the sharing features on this ... old, you should not feed your baby cow's milk, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). ...

  5. CPR - infant - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100216.htm CPR - infant - series—Check for responsiveness To use the ... yourself to call 911 until you have performed CPR for about 2 minutes. 3. Carefully place the ...

  6. Abbott Infant Formula Recall

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This list includes products subject to recall since September 2010 related to infant formula distributed by Abbott. This list will be updated with publicly...

  7. Infant formulas - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... based formulas. These formulas are made with cow's milk protein that has been changed to be more like ... be helpful for infants who have allergies to milk protein and for those with skin rashes or wheezing ...

  8. Abbott Infant Formula Recall

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This list includes products subject to recall since September 2010 related to infant formula distributed by Abbott. This list will be updated with publicly available...

  9. Feeding tube - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007235.htm Feeding tube - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A feeding tube is a small, soft, plastic tube placed ...

  10. Reflux in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 14 months. What causes reflux and GERD in infants? There is a muscle (the lower esophageal ... contents don't flow back into the esophagus. In babies who have reflux, the lower esophageal sphincter ...

  11. CHEST PHYSIOTHERAPY FOR INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti S. Christian (M.P.T Cardiopulmonary Conditions

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the normal lung, secretions are removed by Mucociliary activity, normal breathing cycles, and cough. In disease, increased secretion viscosity and volume, dyskinesia of the cilia, and ineffective cough combine to reduce the ability to clear secretions, and may increase exacerbations and infections. Many chest physiotherapy techniques like postural drainage, percussion and vibration are used since many years. These techniques are derived from adult studies but these techniques are quite stressful for the infants as the infant respiratory system is different from the adult respiratory system. Advance chest physiotherapy techniques were developed specifically for infants; in accordance with their physiological characteristics. So this review is to introduce some new chest physiotherapy helpful for newborn infants.

  12. Total parenteral nutrition - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007239.htm Total parenteral nutrition - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses ...

  13. Orthopedic surgeons' attitudes to osteoporosis investigation and management after minimal trauma fracture (MTF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Wurf, Jane; McGirr, Joe; Seal, Alexa; Harding, Catherine

    2017-12-01

    A study of orthopedic surgeons in rural and regional Southeast Australia to determine attitudes to investigation and management of osteoporosis found they believe follow-up in regard to osteoporosis after MTF is important; responsibility for follow-up diagnosis and management lies with primary health care and current communication systems are poor. The investigation and treatment of osteoporosis after minimal trauma fracture (MTF) is regarded as sub-optimal. There is strong evidence of the benefit of identifying and treating osteoporosis after MTF, and there has been discussion of the possible role that orthopedic surgeons might play in the management of osteoporosis after MTF. The study surveyed orthopedic surgeons in rural and regional Southeast Australia to determine their attitudes to investigation and management of osteoporosis, the role health professionals should play, and the communication and co-ordination of follow-up care. A survey was developed and piloted prior to being posted to 69 orthopedic surgeons asking for their opinions about the general management of osteoporosis, and the roles and responsibilities of health professionals in dealing with osteoporosis following an MTF. Responses were received from 42 participants (60.8%) with the majority of respondents agreeing that it is important to treat osteoporosis following MTF. Less than 15% of respondents felt that it was their responsibility to initiate discussion or treatment or investigation after MTF. No respondent felt that the coordination of osteoporosis care was good and 45% stated it was poor. Communication after discharge is mostly left to the hospital (30%), while 20% stated they did not follow up at all. This study shows that many rural orthopedic surgeons believe that follow-up in regard to osteoporosis after MTF is important, that responsibility for follow-up diagnosis and management of osteoporosis lies with primary health care and the current communication systems are poor.

  14. Enhanced osteoblast adhesion on nanostructured selenium compacts for anti-cancer orthopedic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phong Tran

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Phong Tran1, Thomas J Webster21Physics Department; 2Division of Engineering and Department of Orthopedics, Brown University, Providence, USAAbstract: Metallic bone implants possess numerous problems limiting their long-term efficacy, such as poor prolonged osseointegration, stress shielding, and corrosion under in vivo environments. Such problems are compounded for bone cancer patients since numerous patients receive orthopedic implants after cancerous bone resection. Unfortunately, current orthopedic materials were not originally developed to simultaneously increase healthy bone growth (as in traditional orthopedic implant applications while inhibiting cancerous bone growth. The long-term objective of the present research is to investigate the use of nano-rough selenium to prevent bone cancer from re-occurring while promoting healthy bone growth for this select group of cancer patients. Selenium is a well known anti-cancer chemical. However, what is not known is how healthy bone cells interact with selenium. To determine this, selenium, spherical or semispherical shots, were pressed into cylindrical compacts and these compacts were then etched using 1N NaOH to obtain various surface structures ranging from the micron, submicron to nano scales. Changes in surface chemistry were also analyzed. Through these etching techniques, results of this study showed that biologically inspired surface roughness values were created on selenium compacts to match that of natural bone roughness. Moreover, results showed that healthy bone cell adhesion increased with greater nanometer selenium roughness (more closely matching that of titanium. In this manner, this study suggests that nano-rough selenium should be further tested for orthopedic applications involving bone cancer treatment.Keywords: selenium, nano-rough, osteoblast, cancer, chemopreventive

  15. Developing a Minimum Data Set of the Information Management System for Orthopedic Injuries in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Mohammadi, Ali; Chraghbaigi, Ramin; Fathi, Taimur; Shojaee Baghini, Mahdieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Orthopedic injuries are the most common types of injuries. To identify the main causes of injuries, collecting data in a standard manner at the national level are needed, which justifies necessity of making a minimum data set (MDS). Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop an MDS of the information management system for orthopedic injuries in Iran. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed in 2013. Data were collected from hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences that had orthopedic department, medical documents centers, legal medicine centers, emergency centers, internet access, and library. Investigated documents were orthopedic injury records in 2012, documents that retrieved from the internet, and printed materials. Records with Random sampling by S22-S99 categories from ICD-10 were selected and the related internet-sourced data were evaluated entirely. Data were collected using a checklist. In order to make a consensus about the data elements, the decision Delphi technique was applied by a questionnaire. The content validity and reliability of the questionnaire were assessed by expert’s opinions and test-retest method, respectively. Results: An MDS of orthopedic injuries were assigned to two categories: administrative category with six classes including 142 data elements, and clinical category with 17 classes including 250 data elements. Conclusions: This study showed that some of the essential data elements included in other country’s MDS or required for organizations and healthcare providers were not included. Therefore, a complete list of an MDS elements was created. Existence of comprehensive data concerning the causes and mechanisms of injuries informs public health policy-makers about injuries occurrence and enables them to take rationale measures to deal with these problems. PMID:25237576

  16. Preoperative physical therapy for elective cardiac surgery patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, E.H.J.; Smit, Y.; Helders, P.P.J.M.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After cardiac surgery, physical therapy is a routine procedure delivered with the aim of preventing postoperative pulmonary complications. OBJECTIVES: To determine if preoperative physical therapy with an exercise component can prevent postoperative pulmonary complications in cardiac sur

  17. An audit of documented preoperative evaluation of surgery patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia 2015; 21(4):23-28 ... The information obtained from the standardised PAR form in each patient's file was audited using a ... inadequate preoperative assessment and management were.

  18. Preoperative preparation of patients with pituitary gland disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Malenković, Vesna; Gvozdenović, Ljiljana; Milaković, Branko; Sabljak, Vera; Ladjević, Nebojsa; Zivaljević, Vladan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the most common disorders of pituitary function: acromegaly, hypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus and syndrome similar to diabetes insipidus, in terms of their importance in preoperative preparation of patients...

  19. Preoperative assessment and optimization in periampullary and pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Myatra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative management of pancreatic and periampullary cancer poses a considerable challenge to the pancreatic surgeon, anesthesiologist, and the intensive care team. The preoperative surgical evaluation of a pancreatic lesion aims to define the nature of the lesion (malignant or benign, stage the tumor, and to determine resectability or other non-surgical treatment options. Patients are often elderly and may have significant comorbidities and malnutrition. Obstructive jaundice may lead to coagulopathy, infection, renal dysfunction, and adverse outcomes. Routine preoperative biliary drainage can result in higher complication rates, and metal stents may be preferred over plastic stents in selected patients with resectable disease. Judicious use of antibiotics and maintaining fluid volume preoperatively can reduce the incidence of infection and renal dysfunction, respectively. Perioperative fluid therapy with hemodynamic optimization using minimally invasive monitoring may help improve outcomes. Careful patient selection, appropriate preoperative evaluation and optimization can greatly contribute to a favorable outcome after major pancreatic resections.

  20. [Prebiotics in infant health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirdo, Fernando G; Menéndez, Ana M; Pita Martín de Portela, María L; Sosa, Patricia; Toca, María del C; Trifone, Liliana; Vecchiarelli, Carmen

    2011-02-01

    The composition of human milk is the main base for the development of infant formulas concerning its macronutrients and micronutrients contents and bioactive compounds. Technological advances in the composition of human milk have identified a great number of bioactive compounds such as prebiotics which are responsible for immunological protection and the prevention of different pathologies. In order to achieve similar benefits, they are part of the contents of infant formulas.

  1. [X-ray in trauma and orthopedic surgery. Physical and biological impact, reasonable use, and radiation protection in the operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresing, K

    2011-02-01

    Orthopedic and especially trauma surgeons' use of x-rays during operations vary extensively, especially in minimally invasive osteosynthesis procedures. Radiation hazards often are neglected. In this paper, a short overview of physical and biological effects of radiation are given. In addition, practical information about how to lower radiation exposure in the daily work in the operating room (OR) is given. The operating team is exposed mainly to scattered radiation. The radiation exposure is 10 times higher on the tube side than on the amplifier side. The distance between tube and surgeon must be as great as possible. The tube should be positioned under the OR table, and the distance between tube and patient should be as short as possible. The positioning of the C-arm device without radiation is important. The use of patient landmarks is used to position the C-arm over the region of interest, but the preoperative training of surgeons and team with virtual learning tools, e.g., virtX, is very effective in reducing radiation hazards.

  2. Association of Preoperative Anemia With Postoperative Mortality in Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goobie, Susan M; Faraoni, David; Zurakowski, David; DiNardo, James A

    2016-09-01

    Neonates undergoing noncardiac surgery are at risk for adverse outcomes. Preoperative anemia is a strong independent risk factor for postoperative mortality in adults. To our knowledge, this association has not been investigated in the neonatal population. To assess the association between preoperative anemia and postoperative mortality in neonates undergoing noncardiac surgery in a large sample of US hospitals. Using data from the 2012 and 2013 pediatric databases of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, we conducted a retrospective study of neonates undergoing noncardiac surgery. Analysis of the data took place between June 2015 and December 2015. All neonates (0-30 days old) with a recorded preoperative hematocrit value were included. Anemia defined as hematocrit level of less than 40%. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to assess the association between preoperative hematocrit and mortality, and the Youden J Index was used to determine the specific hematocrit cutoff point to define anemia in the neonatal population. Demographic and postoperative outcomes variables were compared between anemic and nonanemic neonates. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with postoperative neonatal mortality. An external validation was performed using the 2014 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Neonates accounted for 2764 children (6%) in the 2012-2013 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program databases. Neonates inlcuded in the study were predominately male (64.5%), white (66.3%), and term (69.9% greater than 36 weeks' gestation) and weighed more than 2 kg (85.0%). Postoperative in-hospital mortality was 3.4% in neonates and 0.6% in all age groups (0-18 years). A preoperative hematocrit level of less than 40% was the optimal cutoff (Youden) to predict in-hospital mortality

  3. A randomized trial of preoperative oral carbohydrates in abdominal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sada, Fatos; Krasniqi, Avdyl; Hamza, Astrit; Gecaj-Gashi, Agreta; Bicaj, Besnik; Kavaja, Floren

    2014-01-01

    Background Carbohydrate-rich liquid drinks (CRLDs) have been recommended to attenuate insulin resistance by shortening the preoperative fasting interval. The aim of our study the effect of preoperative oral administration of CRLDs on the well-being and clinical status of patients. Methods A randomized, double blind, prospective study of patients undergoing open colorectal operations (CR) and open cholecyctectomy (CH) was conducted. Patients were divided into three groups: study, placebo, and ...

  4. Preoperative prediction model of outcome after cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borly, L; Anderson, I B; Bardram, Linda

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstone disease 20%-30% of the patients continue to have abdominal pain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether preoperative variables could predict the symptomatic outcome after cholecystectomy. METHODS: One hundred and two patients...... and sonography evaluated gallbladder motility, gallstones, and gallbladder volume. Preoperative variables in patients with or without postcholecystectomy pain were compared statistically, and significant variables were combined in a logistic regression model to predict the postoperative outcome. RESULTS: Eighty...

  5. [Value of preoperative planning in total hip arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Thomasson, E; Mazel, C; Guingand, O; Terracher, R

    2002-05-01

    Preoperative planning enables an assessment of the size of the implants needed before total hip replacement. Eggli and Müller demonstrated the reproduciblity of preoperative planning but did not evaluate its contribution to reducing limb length discrepancy. As femur lateralization and the position of the prosthetic center of rotation affect joint mechanics, it would be useful to assess their contribution to the efficacy of preoperative planning. We reviewed the files of 57 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty for primary joint degeneration or necrosis limited to one hip. The healthy hip served as a control. The surgical plan was elaborated from the preoperative pelvis x-rays (AP and lateral views) and anatomic measurements on films obtained three months postoperatively. In 49 cases, preoperative planning predicted a restoration of the normal anatomy of the operated hip (center of rotation, femur lateralization, length of the operated limb). This objective was achieved in only 22.5% of the cases. Femur lateralization was the most difficult objective to achieve (59.2%). Equal limb length and good position of the center of rotation was achieved in 70% of the cases. For eight patients (14%) preoperative planning was not satisfactory, the implant offset not being adapted to the patient's anatomy. There are limits to preoperative planning, particularly for restitution of adequate femur lateralization. This difficulty appears to be related to three factors: inadequate adaptation of the implant to hip anatomy (14% of the cases in our experience), stiff rotation in degenerative hips inhibiting proper assessment of the length of the femoral neck, and relative imprecision of operative evaluation of femoral anteversion affecting femur lateralization and the level of the femoral cut. Although imperfect, preoperative planning is, in our opinion, essential before total hip arthroplasty in order to avoid major positioning errors and operative difficulties.

  6. Essential elements of the preoperative breast reconstruction evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Angela; Losken, Albert

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of options exist for breast reconstruction and preoperative evaluation must be thorough to lead to a successful outcome. We review multiple components of the preoperative assessment including the patient’s history, goals, imaging, and key elements of the physical exam. Consideration for tumor biology, staging, need or response to chemotherapy or radiation therapy is important in deciding on immediate versus delayed reconstruction. It is also important to consider the patient’s anat...

  7. Preoperative PET/CT in early-stage breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernsdorf, M; Berthelsen, A K; Wielenga, V T;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of preoperative positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer.......The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of preoperative positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer....

  8. Preoperative Chemoradiotheraph for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo Ren; Qi Wang; Yaoxiong Yan; Shaolin Li; Biyou Huang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To observe the effect of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for inflammatory breast cancer.METHODS From December 1996 to December 2000, we received and treated 21 patients with inflammatory breast carcinoma with a combinedmodality treatment. The chemotherapy protocol consisted of cyclophosphamide (CTX), pirarubicin (THP-ADM) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or CTX, 5-Fu and methotrexate (MTX). The same infusion scheme was repeated on day 21. After 3~4 cycles the patients were treated with radiotherapy. When the radiation dose reached 40 Gy, the patients who were unable or unwilling to under go an operation received continued radiotherapy. When the radiation dose to the supra clavicular fossa and internal mammary lymph nodes reached 60 Gy and 50 Gy respectively, the radiotherapy was stopped. Chemotherapy was then continued with the original scheme. Patients who had indications for surgery and were willing to under go an operation received no treatment for 2 weeks, after which a total mastectomy was performed. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy was resumed with the original scheme after the operations. When the radiation dose reached 50 Gy, radiotherapy was stopped.RESULTS All patients were followed-up for more than 5 years with a follow-up rate of 100%. The overall 3 and 5-year survival rates of these patients were 42.9%, and 23.8% respectively. For patients in Stage ⅢB the 3 and 5-year survival rates were 50.0% and 27.8% respectively, and for patients in Stage Ⅳ, the 3 and 5-year survival rates were both 0.0%.There was a significant difference between the 2 stage groups (P<0.05,X2=11.60). For patients who received an operation, the 3 and 5-year survival rates were 80.0% and 33.3% respectively, For patients who were not treated with an operation, the 3 and 5-year survival rates were both0.0%, There was a significant difference between the operated and nonoperated groups (P<0.05, X2=11.64).CONCLUSION The prognosis of inflammatory breast carcinoma is poor

  9. The importance of preoperative diagnosis of blister aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russin, Jonathan J; Kramer, Daniel R; Thomas, Debi; Hasson, Denise; Liu, Charles Y; Amar, Arun P; Mack, William J; Giannotta, Steven L

    2015-09-01

    We describe a series of 14 surgical blister aneurysm (BA) patients and compare outcomes in those with known cerebral BA to those lacking preoperative BA diagnosis/recognition. BA are broad, fragile, pathologic dilatations of the intracranial arteries. They have a low prevalence but are associated with substantially higher surgical morbidity and mortality rates than saccular aneurysms. A confirmed, preoperative BA diagnosis can alter operative management and technique. We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on aneurysm patients undergoing surgery at a major academic institution. All patients from 1990 to 2011 with a postoperative BA diagnosis were included. Chart reviews were performed to identify patients with preoperative BA diagnoses and collect descriptive data. We identified 14 patients, 12 of whom presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. The age of the cohort (mean ± standard deviation: 41.8 ± 13.9 years) was lower than that generally reported for saccular aneurysm populations. Preoperatively diagnosed BA had an intraoperative rupture (IOR) rate of 28.6% (2/7) compared to a 57.1% (4/7) rate in the undiagnosed patients. The mortality rate in the preoperatively diagnosed cohort was 14.3% (1/7) while that of the undiagnosed group was 42.8% (3/7). BA remain a diagnostic and treatment challenge with morbidity and mortality rates exceeding those of saccular aneurysms. Preoperative BA diagnosis may decrease IOR and mortality rates and improve patient outcomes.

  10. Evaluating the effects of preoperative fasting and fluid limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Betül; Yava, Ayla; Açıkel, Cengizhan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of preoperative fasting and fluid limitation in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Although traditional long-term fasting is not recommended in current preoperative guidelines, this is still a common intervention. Visual analogue scale was used to assess hunger, thirst, sleepiness, exhaustion, nausea and pain; State and Trait Anxiety Inventory was used to assess the preoperative anxiety of 99 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Mean time of preoperative fasting and fluid limitation were, respectively, 14.70 ± 3.14 and 11.25 ± 3.74 h. Preoperatively, 58.60% of the patients experienced moderate anxiety. Patients fasting 12 h or longer had higher hunger, thirst, nausea and pain scores. The mean trait anxiety score of patients fasting 12 h or longer was statistically significantly higher. Receiving nothing by mouth after midnight preoperatively is a persisted intervention and results in discomfort of patients. Clinical protocols should be revised and nurses should be trained in current fasting protocols. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Quantification of respiratory depression during pre-operative administration of midazolam using a non-invasive respiratory volume monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Castro, Luis N; Mehta, Jaideep H; Brayanov, Jordan B; Mullen, Gary J

    2017-01-01

    Pre-operative administration of benzodiazepines can cause hypoventilation-a decrease in minute ventilation (MV)-commonly referred to as "respiratory compromise or respiratory depression." Respiratory depression can lead to hypercarbia and / or hypoxemia, and may heighten the risk of other respiratory complications. Current anesthesia practice often places patients at risk for respiratory complications even before surgery, as respiratory monitoring is generally postponed until the patient is in the operating room. In the present study we examined and quantified the onset of respiratory depression following the administration of a single dose of midazolam in pre-operative patients, using a non-invasive respiratory volume monitor that reports MV, tidal volume (TV), and respiratory rate (RR). Impedance-based Respiratory Volume Monitor (RVM) data were collected and analyzed from 30 patients prior to undergoing orthopedic or general surgical procedures. All patients received 2.0 mg of midazolam intravenously at least 20 minutes prior to the induction of anesthesia and the effects of midazolam on the patient's respiratory function were analyzed. Within 15 minutes of midazolam administration, we noted a significant decrease in both MV (average decrease of 14.3% ± 5.9%, pmidazolam administration on clinically significant respiratory parameters (MV, TV and RR) using a non-invasive RVM, uncovering that the respiratory depressive effect of benzodiazepines affect primarily TV rather than RR. Such respiratory monitoring data provide the opportunity for individualizing dosing and adjustment of clinical interventions, especially important in elderly patients. With additional respiratory data, clinicians may be able to better identify and quantify respiratory depression, reduce adverse effects, and improve overall patient safety.

  12. Infant Mandibular Distraction for Upper Airway Obstruction: A Clinical Audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Ashim N.; Heggie, Andrew A.C.; Shand, Jocelyn M.; Bordbar, Patrishia; Pellicano, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mandibular distraction osteogenesis (MDO) is an effective method of treating upper airway obstruction (UAO) in micrognathic infants. The short-term outcomes include relief of UAO, avoidance of tracheostomy, and prompt discharge from hospital. However, it is a significant surgical procedure with potential associated morbidities. This study describes a cohort of infants managed using MDO over a twelve-year period. Methods: A retrospective chart review was undertaken for children who had MDO before the age of 5 years between 2000 and 2012. This was followed by a clinical review of the same cohort specifically looking for dental anomalies, nerve injuries, and scar cosmesis. Results: Seventy-three children underwent MDO at a mean age of 2 months [interquartile range (IQR), 1.7–4.2] for nonsyndromic infants and 3.3 months (IQR, 2.1–7.4) for those with syndromes. Infants were discharged from hospital, on average, 15 days after procedure. After MDO, of the 9 who were previously tracheostomy dependent, 5 (56%) were decannulated within 12 months and none of the nontracheostomy-dependent children required further airway assistance. The majority of children required supplemental feeding preoperatively but, 12 months postoperatively, 97% of the nonsyndromic infants fed orally. Thirty-nine children (53%) were reviewed clinically [median age, 5.1 y (IQR, 3.9–6.5)] with 18 being syndromic. Many of the mandibular first permanent and second primary molars had developmental defects, but there was a low rate of neurosensory deficit and good scar cosmesis. Conclusions: This study contributes further to the evidence base underpinning the management of micrognathic infants with UAO. PMID:27536491

  13. An anaesthetic pre-operative assessment clinic reduces pre-operative inpatient stay in patients requiring major vascular surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, D B

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing major vascular surgery (MVS) require extensive anaesthetic assessment. This can require extended pre-operative stays. AIMS: We investigated whether a newly established anaesthetic pre-operative assessment clinic (PAC) would reduce the pre-operative inpatient stay, avoid unnecessary investigations and facilitate day before surgery (DBS) admissions for patients undergoing MVS. PATIENT AND METHODS: One year following and preceding the establishment of the PAC the records of patients undergoing open or endovascular aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy and infra-inguinal bypass were reviewed to measure pre-operative length of stay (LoS). RESULTS: Pre-operative LoS was significantly reduced in the study period (1.85 vs. 4.2 days, respectively, P < 0.0001). Only 12 out of 61 patients in 2007 were admitted on the DBS and this increased to 33 out of 63 patients (P = 0.0002). No procedure was cancelled for medical reasons. CONCLUSION: The PAC has facilitated accurate outpatient anaesthetic assessment for patients requiring MVS. The pre-operative in-patient stay has been significantly reduced.

  14. Recurrent Wheezing in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhassen, Manon; De Blic, Jacques; Laforest, Laurent; Laigle, Valérie; Chanut-Vogel, Céline; Lamezec, Liliane; Brouard, Jacques; Fauroux, Brigitte; de Pouvourville, Gérard; Ginoux, Marine; Van Ganse, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recurrent wheezing (RW) has a significant impact on infants, caregivers, and society, but morbidity and related medical resource utilization (MRU) have not been thoroughly explored. The burden of RW needs to be documented with population-based data. The objective was to assess the characteristics, medical management, and MRU of RW infants identified from national claims data. Infants aged from 6 to 24 months, receiving ≥2 dispensations of respiratory drugs within 3 months, and presenting a marker of poor control (index date), were selected. During the 6 months after index date, MRU was described in the cohort and among 3 subgroups with more severe RW, defined as ≥4 dispensations of respiratory drugs, ≥3 dispensations of oral corticosteroids (OCS), or ≥1 hospitalization for respiratory symptoms. A total of 115,489 infants had RW, corresponding to 8.2% of subjects in this age group. During follow-up, 68.7% of infants received inhaled corticosteroids, but only 1.8 U (unit) were dispensed over 6 months, suggesting discontinuous use. Control was mostly inadequate: 61.7% of subjects received OCS, 80.2% antibiotics, and 71.2% short-acting beta-agonists, and medical/paramedical visits were numerous, particularly for physiotherapy. Severe RW concerned 39.0% of the cohort; 32.8% and 11.7% of infants had repeated use of respiratory drugs and OCS, respectively, and 5.5% were hospitalized for respiratory symptoms. In this real-life nation-wide study, RW was common and infants had poor control and high MRU. Interventions are needed to support adequate use of controller therapy, and to improve medical care. PMID:27082618

  15. Factors Related to Acute Anxiety and Depression in Inpatients with Accidental Orthopedic Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    WU, Hui; ZHANG, Fang; CHENG, Wenhong; LIN, Ying; WANG, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Background Those injured in accidents commonly have strong emotional reactions to their situation. However, despite the large number of patients who are admitted to general hospitals each year for orthopedic injuries due to an accident, research focusing on psychological disorders due to these injuries is lacking. Objective To investigate the presentation and factors related to depression and acute anxiety among inpatients being treated for injury on a Trauma Orthopedics Unit. Methods 323 patients with orthopedic trauma were evaluated using the Injury Severity Score (ISS), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) and Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD). Results In this study, a total of 323 inpatients (213 males and 110 females) had a mean (sd) age of 44.3 (13.2) years old. Mean (sd) time in the hospital was 11.1 (5.7) days with a range of 2 to 40 days. Among these patients, 299 had mild trauma, 20 had moderate trauma, and 4 had severe trauma. Patients had a mean (sd) score of 8.1 (4.9) with a range of 1 to 38. The top three most reported symptoms from the HAMA were sleep disorder, gastrointestinal symptoms and anxiety. The top three most reported symptoms from the HAMD were sleep disorder, depression and anxiety. Non-conditional logistic regression analysis showed that being female (anxiety: OR=2.738, 95%CI=1.511-4.962; depression: OR=2.622, 95%CI=1.504-4.570) and duration of hospitalization (anxiety: OR=1.091, 95%CI=1.040-1.145; depression: OR=1.093, 95%CI=1.044-1.144) were risk factors for anxiety and depression among these orthopedic trauma patients. Conclusion The main acute symptoms of anxiety and depression in these orthopedic trauma inpatients were sleep disorder, gastrointestinal symptoms, anxious mood and depressed mood. Female patients had stronger emotional reactions to injuries than males. Persistent anxiety and depression symptoms were associated with the duration of hospitalization. All these suggest the need for early psychological assessment and intervention for

  16. Effectiveness of a physiotherapy-initiated telephone triage of orthopedic waitlist patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmore L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Joanne Morris1, Karen Grimmer-Somers2, Saravana Kumar2, Karen Murphy3, Lisa Gilmore1, Bryan Ashman1, Chandima Perera1, Kathryn Vine1, Corinne Coulter11The Canberra Hospital, ACT Government Health Directorate, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 2International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 3ACT Government Health Directorate, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaBackground: There is generally a lengthy wait on outpatient orthopedic waiting lists in Australian public hospitals to consult a specialist. Patients then wait again for surgery, if required. Patients with higher need are rarely prioritized, and there is the potential for increased morbidity for those who wait. There is generally no option of alternative care whilst waiting. This paper compares historical orthopedic outpatient clinic data with the outcomes of a physiotherapy-led initiative in one large Australian tertiary hospital.Methods: Two physiotherapists working within-scope conducted a telephone triage (October to December 2010 using a standard instrument for all new patients on the orthopedic waiting list. They were offered primary treatment options of retaining their appointment, being discharged, referral to a new model of assessment (multidisciplinary specialist clinic, or referral to physiotherapy. The outcomes were costs of the service, waiting time, and percentage of patients taking up management options. This was compared with a historical sample of new patients on the orthopedic waiting list (January to March 2009, whose treatment consumption was tracked longitudinally.Results: The telephone triage resulted in 16.4% patients being discharged directly (compared with 0.1% comparison sample. For approximately AU$17.00 per patient, the telephone triage process released 21 booked appointments on the outpatient clinic waiting list. Moreover, approximately 26% patients were referred directly to physiotherapy, which was not a primary management

  17. Prognostic significance of preoperative fibrinogen in patients with colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhen-Qiang; Han, Xiao-Na; Wang, Hai-Jiang; Tang, Yong; Zhao, Ze-Liang; Qu, Yan-Li; Xu, Rui-Wei; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yu, Xian-Bo

    2014-07-14

    To investigate the prognostic significance of preoperative fibrinogen levels in colon cancer patients. A total of 255 colon cancer patients treated at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University from June 1(st) 2005 to June 1(st) 2008 were enrolled in the study. All patients received radical surgery as their primary treatment method. Preoperative fibrinogen was detected by the Clauss method, and all patients were followed up after surgery. Preoperative fibrinogen measurements were correlated with a number of clinicopathological parameters using the Student t test and analysis of variance. Survival analyses were performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modeling to measure 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). The mean preoperative fibrinogen concentration of all colon cancer patients was 3.17 ± 0.88 g/L. Statistically significant differences were found between preoperative fibrinogen levels and the clinicopathological parameters of age, smoking status, tumor size, tumor location, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, modified Glasgow prognostic scores (mGPS), white blood cell (WBC) count, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. Univariate survival analysis showed that TNM stage, tumor cell differentiation grade, vascular invasion, mGPS score, preoperative fibrinogen, WBC, NLR, PLR and CEA all correlated with both OS and DFS. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and body mass index correlated only with OS. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that both OS and DFS of the total cohort, as well as of the stage II and III patients, were higher in the hypofibrinogen group compared to the hyperfibrinogen group (all P TNM stage, mGPS score, CEA, and AFP levels correlated with both OS and DFS. Preoperative fibrinogen levels can serve as an independent prognostic marker to evaluate patient response to colon cancer treatment.

  18. Preoperative psychological testing--another form of prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, David; Favretti, Franco; Segato, Gianni

    2008-10-01

    Preoperative psychological screening of bariatric surgery candidates has become routine, and a significant proportion of patients have their surgery deferred as a consequence. If psychological testing is being used as a form of preoperative triage, both patients and surgeons are entitled to know whether there is sufficient evidence to justify its use in this way. We define the argument for psychological screening as consisting of four premises (p1-p4) and a conclusion (C) as follows: (p1) A significant minority of obese patients will not be successful in losing weight following bariatric surgery-the "failure" group; (p2) A significant minority of patients will exhibit abnormal psychological profiles during preoperative testing; (p3) The majority of individuals referred to in (p2) will be found in group (p1) i.e., abnormal psychological profiles identified preoperatively predict less favorable weight loss outcomes postoperatively; (p4) Identifying patients with adverse psychological profiles preoperatively would allow either exclusion of those at high risk of failure or provide a more secure rationale for targeted pre- and postoperative support; (C) Psychological screening should be part of the routine preoperative assessment for patients undergoing obesity surgery. We reviewed the literature to find evidence to support the premises and show that (p1) can be justified but that (p2) is problematic and can only be accepted in a heavily qualified version. We find no evidence for (p3) and since (p4) and (C) are predicated on (p3), the argument clearly fails. There is no evidence to suggest that preoperative psychological screening can predict postoperative outcomes and no justification for using such testing as a means of discriminating between candidates presenting themselves for bariatric surgery.

  19. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Infant Deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Infant Deaths (from Linked Birth / Infant Death Records) online databases on CDC WONDER provide counts and rates for deaths of children under 1 year...

  20. Comparative study of scientific publications in orthopedics journals originating from USA, Japan and China (2000-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Li-Feng; Daubs, Michael David; Phan, Kevin H; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-01

    To compare orthopedics publications from USA, Japan and China. Scientific papers belong to ''Orthopedics'' category of Science Citation Index Expanded subject categories were retrieved from the "PubMed'' and ''Web of Knowledge'' online databases. In the field of orthopedics, the annual number increased significantly from 2000 to 2012 in the three countries (porthopedics field and ranked 1st; Japan contributed 5.9% and ranked 4th; China contributed 5.2% and ranked 5th. Publications from USA had the highest accumulated IFs and the highest total citations of articles (USA > Japan > China, porthopedics journals (USA (14355) > Japan (1702) > China (487), porthopedics journals, it still lags far behind USA and Japan in the field of orthopedics in terms of quantity and quality.

  1. Preoperative cryotherapy use in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyonos, Loukas; Owsley, Kevin; Vollmer, Emily; Limpisvasti, Orr; Gambardella, Ralph

    2014-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may impair rehabilitation, compromise functional outcomes, and lead to patient dissatisfaction. Preemptive multimodal analgesic techniques may improve outcomes after surgery. We hypothesized that patients using preoperative cryotherapy plus a standardized postoperative treatment plan will have lower pain scores and require less pain medication compared with patients receiving a standardized postoperative treatment plan alone after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). A total of 53 consecutive patients undergoing arthroscopically assisted ACLR performed by one of seven surgeons were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group 1 received no preoperative cryotherapy and group 2 received 30 to 90 minutes of preoperative cryotherapy to the operative leg using a commercial noncompressive cryotherapy unit. Visual analog scale pain scores and narcotic use were recorded for the first 4 days postoperatively. Total hours of cold therapy and continuous passive motion (CPM) use and highest degree of flexion achieved were recorded as well. Group 1 consisted of 26 patients (15 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft bone patellar tendon bone [BPTB]), and group 2 consisted of 27 patients (16 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft BPTB). Group 2 patients reported less pain (average 1.3 units, p cryotherapy, hours of CPM use, or maximum knee flexion achieved. Complications did not occur in either group. This is the first report we are aware of showing the postoperative effects of preoperative cryotherapy. Our results support the safety and efficacy of preoperative cryotherapy in a multimodal pain regimen for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction.

  2. Preoperative thrombocytosis predicts poor survival in patients with glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Marc A.; Giese, Alf; Mueller, Kathrin; Kaba, Finjap Janvier; Lohr, Frank; Weiss, Christel; Gottschalk, Stefan; Nolte, Ingo; Leppert, Jan; Tuettenberg, Jochen; Groden, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Thrombocytosis, which is defined as a platelet count greater than 400 platelets/nl, has been found to be an independent predictor of shorter survival in various tumors. Release of growth factors from tumors has been proposed to increase platelet counts. Preoperative platelet counts and other clinical and hematological parameters were reviewed from the records of 153 patients diagnosed between 1999 and 2004 with histologically confirmed glioblastoma in order to evaluate the prognostic significance of preoperative thrombocytosis in these patients. The relationship between thrombocytosis and survival was initially analyzed in all patients regardless of further therapy. Univariate log-rank tests showed that the median survival time of 29 patients with preoperative thrombocytosis (19%) was significantly shorter (4 months; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3–6 months) compared to 124 patients with normal platelet counts (11 months; 95% CI, 8–13 months; p = 0.0006). Multivariate analysis (Cox proportional hazards model) confirmed preoperative platelet count, age, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time to be prognostic factors of survival (all p thrombocytosis was diagnosed (6 months; 95% CI, 4–12 months) compared to patients with normal platelet count (13 months; 95% CI, 11–15 months; p = 0.0359). In multivariate analysis, age, platelet count, preoperative prothrombin time, and degree of tumor resection retained significance as prognostic factors of survival (all p thrombocytosis to be a prognostic factor associated with shorter survival time in patients with glioblastoma. PMID:17504931

  3. Significance of preoperative thrombocytosis in epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crasta Julian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reactive thrombocytosis is reported in a variety of solid tumors. A few studies have documented preoperative thrombocytosis in ovarian cancer and identified it as a marker of aggressive tumor biology. Aim: To study the incidence of preoperative thrombocytosis (platelets greater than 400x10 in epithelial ovarian cancer and its association with other clinicopathologic factors. Materials and Methods: Sixty-five patients with invasive ovarian epithelial cancer were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed for the association preoperative thrombocytosis with other clinical and histopathological prognostic factors. Means were analyzed by Student′s t test; proportions were determined by Chi-square analysis. Results: Twenty of 65 (37.5% patients had thrombocytosis at primary diagnosis. Patients with preoperative thrombocytosis were found to have lower hemoglobin (P < 0.0002, more advanced stage disease (P < 0.05 and higher grade tumors (P < 0.02. Patients with thrombocytosis had greater likelihood of subpotimal cytoreduction. Conclusions: Preoperative thrombocytosis is a frequent finding in ovarian carcinomas and their association with advanced stage disease and higher grade denotes that platelets play a role in the tumor growth and progression.

  4. Infants' Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Zarin koob

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available This is a study performed following the study between the years 1980 to 1982 to investigate risk factors and diagnostic and rehabilitative patterns in a group of newborns suffered hearing loss in a city centre. The current findings which have been attained from 1983 to 1988 manifested that just one third of the deaf newborns can be tracked by means of common auditory evaluation tests in the Neonatal Intense Care Unit (NICU. Although these newborns have been followed sooner than the infants in the Well Baby Nursery (WBN. The age for enrolling in the Parent-Infant Program for both groups is approximately 20 month. During these 8 years it has been detected that the common age for taking part in the rehabilitative programs for newborns is 1 year or more greater than that recommended by Joint Committee on infant hearing

  5. Infant death scene investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Pamela D; Ragan, Krista

    2015-01-01

    The sudden unexpected death of an infant is a tragedy to the family, a concern to the community, and an indicator of national health. To accurately determine the cause and manner of the infant's death, a thorough and accurate death scene investigation by properly trained personnel is key. Funding and resources are directed based on autopsy reports, which are only as accurate as the scene investigation. The investigation should include a standardized format, body diagrams, and a photographed or videotaped scene recreation utilizing doll reenactment. Forensic nurses, with their basic nursing knowledge and additional forensic skills and abilities, are optimally suited to conduct infant death scene investigations as well as train others to properly conduct death scene investigations. Currently, 49 states have child death review teams, which is an idea avenue for a forensic nurse to become involved in death scene investigations.

  6. Can Direct Current Electrotherapy Be Used for Patients With Orthopedic Implants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Evangeline; Toledo, Felippe; Korte, Holger

    2017-03-01

    Although electrotherapy appears to have particularly interesting applications in the field of postoperative orthopedic rehabilitation, relatively little scientifically based research has been conducted in the area of electrotherapy with regard to safety involving patients with orthopedic implants. Three electrotherapy forms were tested, such as high-volt stimulation (HVS), transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS), and galvanic current (GAL), using a model system containing a metal implant plate to evaluate whether heating in excess of 3°C would occur. All changes in temperature for HVS, GAL, and TENS therapeutic electrical currents observed in our model system fall below the predefined 3°C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental based observation that prolonged exposure to a direct electrical current at therapeutic strength does not result in heating of metal titanium plates.

  7. Recent advances in the design of titanium alloys for orthopedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, Fabien

    2005-11-01

    To increase an orthopedic implant's lifetime, research trends have included the development of new titanium alloys made of nontoxic elements with suitable mechanical properties (low Young's modulus - high fatigue strength), good workability and corrosion resistance. In accordance with the background on titanium and metallic biomaterials, recent interesting developments in titanium-based biomaterials are reported in this review, with a special emphasis on the design of new metastable beta-titanium alloys for orthopedic applications. In addition, as the concept of titanium alloys can now be regarded as relatively old, having emerged at the beginning of the 1980s, the author suggests some future directions that would permit the emergence of a new generation of titanium implants.

  8. [On practicability of implementing the speciality "podiatry" in traumatology and orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The absence of single opinion concerning the classification of foot and ankle joint pathology does not permit to formulate universal and practical approach to the identification of pathological syndromes in case of patient foot lesion. The situation is aggravated by the unsolved issues related to the terminological definition of podiatry as a direction in orthopedics to solve the issues of foot and ankle joint pathology. In actual conditions the implementation of new technologies into the structure of traumatological orthopedics care is needed. This approach permits to combine the qualities of models of effective and optimized care to patients with foot and ankle joint pathology. The study of issue related to the systematization of podiatric pathology revealed that actually no single universal classification easy-to-use in practice exists. Hence the development of original applied working scheme of foot and ankle joint pathology is proposed.

  9. Clinical applicability of nursing outcomes in the evolution of orthopedic patients with Impaired Physical Mobility

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    Marcos Barragan da Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: to evaluate the clinical applicability of outcomes, according to the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC in the evolution of orthopedic patients with Impaired Physical MobilityMETHOD: longitudinal study conducted in 2012 in a university hospital, with 21 patients undergoing Total Hip Arthroplasty, evaluated daily by pairs of trained data collectors. Data were collected using an instrument containing five Nursing Outcomes, 16 clinical indicators and a five point Likert scale, and statistically analyzed.RESULTS: The outcomes Body Positioning: self-initiated, Mobility, Knowledge: prescribed activity, and Fall Prevention Behavior presented significant increases in mean scores when comparing the first and final evaluations (p<0.001 and (p=0.035.CONCLUSION: the use of the NOC outcomes makes it possible to demonstrate the clinical progression of orthopedic patients with Impaired Physical Mobility, as well as its applicability in this context.

  10. [Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in orthopedics. Positive results in tennis elbow and tendinosis calcarea of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompe, J D; Eysel, P; Hopf, C; Krischek, O; Vogel, J; Bürger, R; Jage, J; Heine, J

    1997-06-30

    Since the beginning of the 1990s scientific investigations on the use of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in the field of orthopedics have been carried out at the Orthopedic Department of the University of Mainz. Prospective studies demonstrated beneficial effects in chronic lateral humeral epicondylitis (tennis elbow), and in calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder in more than 50% of the cases. Additional indications for which positive results of prospective studies have been published during the past 2 years are plantar calcaneodynea and pseudoarthrosis. On the basis of the results achieved, it may be concluded that, for specific indications, extracorporeal shock wave therapy may now be taken out of the clinical testing stage and introduced into routine practice.

  11. Use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of tendinopathy and other orthopedic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushyant Nadar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of tendinopathy and other orthopedic diseases. Patients and methods: 35 patients received shock wave therapy using Econolith 2000 lithotripter 19 patients had isolated lateral epicondylitis, 12 medical epicondylitis and 4 plantar fascitis. A total of 120 shock waves were given in the first sitting. Each patient received a total of three sittings with a gap of one week between each of them. Results: Based on the patients′ self-assessment, about 75% pain relief was observed in 60% of the patients. Fur-ther, in patients having isolated tendinopathies, the pain relief was better. Conclusion: The study indicated that the application of shock waves is not restricted to the fragmentation of urinary calculi. The shock waves can be effectively used for the pain relief in the common orthopedic diseases. Thus, the urologists can widen the application of lithotripters, in a cost-effective manner, to the other medical speciali-ties.

  12. Priming the Surface of Orthopedic Implants for Osteoblast Attachment in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kiat Hwa; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The development of better orthopedic implants is incessant. While current implants can function reliably in the human body for a long period of time, there are still a significant number of cases for which the implants can fail prematurely due to poor osseointegration of the implant with native bone. Increasingly, it is recognized that it is extremely important to facilitate the attachment of osteoblasts on the implant so that a proper foundation of extracellular matrix (ECM) can be laid down for the growth of new bone tissue. In order to facilitate the osseointegration of the implant, both the physical nanotopography and chemical functionalization of the implant surface have to be optimized. In this short review, however, we explore how simple chemistry procedures can be used to functionalize the surfaces of three major classes of orthopedic implants, i.e. ceramics, metals, and polymers, so that the attachment of osteoblasts on implants can be facilitated in order to promote implant osseointegration.

  13. Orthopedic Perioperative Care: viewpoint of the patient, nursing staff and medical residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josilaine Porfírio da Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the actions of perioperative care taken with the orthopedic surgical patient in view of the surgical team and the patient. Qualitative descriptive and exploratory research, conducted with 20 professionals, in the period from October 2009 to July 2011. Data collection took place by means of a semi-structured interview addressing issues related to care and self-care to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. Results were arranged into three categories: (a Meanings of perioperative care: covered integral assistance, prevention of damage and care subjective; (b patients' needs perceived by health team: evidenced basic and specific human needs; (c Actions of care: surgical indication, evaluation revealed the wait, use of special materials and surgical risk. From the perceived needs is that care happens, its meaning is dynamic and timeless. This study showed that the meaning of care remained related to the health-disease process.

  14. Energy-triggered drug release from polymer nanoparticles for orthopedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullan, Jessica E; Pullan, Austin T; Taylor, V Bryce; Brooks, Benjamin D; Ewert, Daniel; Brooks, Amanda E

    2017-01-01

    Sequestra, present in many cancers and orthopedic infections, provide a safe harbor for the development of drug resistance. In the face of burgeoning drug resistance, the importance of nanoscale, microenvironment-triggered drug delivery cannot be overestimated. Such strategies may preserve pharmaceutical efficacy and significantly alter the etiology of many orthopedic diseases. Although temperature-, pH- and redox-responsive nanoparticle-based systems have been extensively studied, local drug delivery from polymeric nanoparticles can be triggered by a variety of energy forms. This review offers an overview of the state of the field as well as a perspective on the safety and efficacy of ultrasound, hyperthermia and radio frequency-triggered internal delivery systems in a variety of applications.

  15. The Medical Education and Best Practice in Orthopedic Patient Care in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2012-07-01

    The leadership organization focuses on education, teamwork, customer relationship and developing strategy which help in building added value, in managing activities, time and quality. Everyday orthopedic experience shows that medical education is a mixture of: specific knowledge, skills and attitudes of people working together, and that creates effective teamwork in a hospital environment. Apart from the main reason of medical education, teaching about disease treatment and health problem solving, medical education should also concentrate on human factors and behavioral aspects of patient treatment in hospital.Assessment of an organization and medical education process by cultural and teamwork criteria, offers a powerful new way to think about performance at the frontlines of healthcare and in the future it could be gold standard for assessing the success of an organization, and standards in medical education, not only in orthopedics.

  16. Efficacy of CT scanning in a group of 174 patients with orthopedic and musculoskeletal problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, H.J.; Hamlin, D.J.; Kiss, S.; Lovelock, J.

    1981-11-01

    One hundred and seventy-four patients with orthopedic and musculoskeletal problems received computed tomography (CT) scans between January 1979 and July 1980. There were 34 trauma patients, 35 patients with known or suspected primary tumors, 20 patients with metastases, 18 patients with suspected spinal stenosis, 25 patients with disc problems, five patients with infections, 13 children with congenital anomalies, and 24 patients with miscellaneous problems. The CT scans proved useful in all the pediatric cases, 97% of the trauma patients, and in the majority of patients with tumors. It appears that absolute indications for CT scanning in orthopedic patients include acute trauma to the spine, pelvis, hip, and shoulder girdles as well as in children with congenital spinal anomalies. Relative indications include determining the extent of the tumor and also aiding in the correct approach for biopsying a lesion.

  17. Examination to assess the clinical examination and documentation of spine pathology among orthopedic residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglin, Jack M; Zeller, John L; Egol, Kenneth A; Phillips, Donna P

    2017-06-13

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) guidelines requires residency programs to teach and evaluate residents in six overarching "core competencies" and document progress through educational milestones. To assess the progress of orthopedic interns' skills in performing a history, physical examination, and documentation of the encounter for a standardized patient with spinal stenosis, an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) was conducted for 13 orthopedic intern residents, following a 1-month boot camp that included communications skills and curriculum in history and physical examination. Interns were objectively scored based on their performance of the physical examination, communication skills, completeness and accuracy of their electronic medical record (EMR), and their diagnostic conclusions gleaned from the patient encounter. The purpose of this study was to meaningfully assess the clinical skills of orthopedic post-graduate year (PGY)-1 interns. The findings can be used to develop a standardized curriculum for documenting patient encounters and highlight common areas of weakness among orthopedic interns with regard to the spine history and physical examination and conducting complete and accurate clinical documentation. A major orthopedic specialty hospital and academic medical center. Thirteen PGY-1 orthopedic residents participated in the OSCE with the same standardized patient presenting with symptoms and radiographs consistent with spinal stenosis. Videos of the encounters were independently viewed and objectively evaluated by one investigator in the study. This evaluation focused on the completeness of the history and the performance and completion of the physical examination. The standardized patient evaluated the communication skills of each intern with a separate objective evaluation. Interns completed these same scoring guides to evaluate their own performance in history, physical examination, and communications

  18. Hope versus hype: what can additive manufacturing realistically offer trauma and orthopedic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, David M R; Vaezi, Mohammad; Yang, Shoufeng; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is a broad term encompassing 3D printing and several other varieties of material processing, which involve computer-directed layer-by-layer synthesis of materials. As the popularity of AM increases, so to do expectations of the medical therapies this process may offer. Clinical requirements and limitations of current treatment strategies in bone grafting, spinal arthrodesis, osteochondral injury and treatment of periprosthetic joint infection are discussed. The various approaches to AM are described, and the current state of clinical translation of AM across these orthopedic clinical scenarios is assessed. Finally, we attempt to distinguish between what AM may offer orthopedic surgery from the hype of what has been promised by AM.

  19. Perioperative Feeding Approaches in Single Ventricle Infants: A Survey of 46 Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slicker, Julie; Sables-Baus, Sharon; Lambert, Linda M; Peterson, Laura E; Woodard, Frances K; Ocampo, Elena C

    2016-12-01

    Background Feeding dysfunction occurs commonly in infants with single ventricle heart disease and impacts growth and long-term outcomes. Little evidence exists to guide safe feeding in this population. This study surveyed centers participating in the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative to assess prevailing feeding practices amongthose caring for single ventricle neonates. Methods Web-based survey of 56 pediatric cardiac surgical centers was conducted. Questions addressed peri-operative feeding approaches and responses were presented and analyzed descriptively. Results Of 56 centers, 46 (82%) completed a survey. Preoperative feeding was common in single ventricle infants (30/46; 65%), routes varied. Centers who did not feed infants preoperatively cited the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (16/16; 100%), presence of umbilical artery catheter (12/16; 75%), and prostaglandin infusion (9/16; 56%) as main concerns. 67% of centers reported no specific vital sign thresholds for withholding enteral feedings. In the postoperative period, most centers used an "internal guideline" (21/46; 46%) or an "informal practice" (15/46; 33%) to determine feeding readiness. Approaches to findings were significantly different among centers. About 40% of centers did not send patients home with feeding tubes, and there was no clear consensus between preferred feeding tube modality at discharge. Conclusion Considerable variation exists in feeding practices for infants with single ventricle congenital heart disease among 46 centers participating in a quality improvement collaborative. Although most centers generally feed infants preoperatively, feeding practices remain center-specific. Variability continues in the immediate post-operative and interstage periods. Further opportunities exist for investigation, standardization and development of best-practice feeding guidelines.

  20. Fluid overload in infants following congenital heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazle, Matthew A; Gajarski, Robert J; Yu, Sunkyung; Donohue, Janet; Blatt, Neal B

    2013-01-01

    To describe postoperative fluid overload patterns and correlate degree of fluid overload with intensive care morbidity and mortality in infants undergoing congenital heart surgery. Prospective, observational study. Fluid overload (%) was calculated by two methods: 1) (Total fluid in - Total fluid out)/(Preoperative weight) × 100; and 2) (Current weight - Preoperative weight)/(Preoperative weight) × 100. Composite poor outcome included: need for renal replacement therapy, upper quartile time to extubation or intensive care length of stay (> 6.5 and 9.9 days, respectively), or death ≤ 30 days after surgery. University hospital pediatric cardiac ICU. Forty-nine infants heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass during the period of July 2009 to July 2010. None. Patients had a median age of 53 days (21 neonates) and mean weight of 4.5 ± 1.3 kg. Forty-two patients (86%) developed acute kidney injury by meeting at least Acute Kidney Injury Network and Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes stage 1 criteria (serum creatinine rise of 50% or ≥ 0.3mg/dL). The patients with adverse outcomes (n = 17, 35%) were younger (7 [5 - 10] vs. 98 [33 - 150] days, p = 0.001), had lower preoperative weight (3.7 ± 0.7 vs. 4.9 ± 1.4 kg, p = 0.0002), higher postoperative mean peak serum creatinine (SCr) (0.9 ± 0.3 vs. 0.6 ± 0.3mg/dL, p = 0.005), and higher mean maximum fluid overload by both method 1 (12% ± 10% vs. 6% ± 4%, p = 0.03) and method 2 (24% ± 15% vs. 14% ± 8%, p = 0.02). Predictors of a poor outcome from multivariate analyses were cardiopulmonary bypass time, use of circulatory arrest, and increased vasoactive medication requirements postoperatively. Early postoperative fluid overload is associated with suboptimal outcomes in infants following cardiac surgery. Because the majority of patients developed kidney injury without needing renal replacement therapy, fluid overload may be an important risk factor for adverse outcomes with all degrees of acute kidney injury.