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Sample records for preoperative disinfection showers

  1. Preoperative sterilization and disinfection of drill guide templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennhenn-Kirchner, Sabine; Weustermann, Sascha; Mergeryan, Hamparsum; Jacobs, Hans Georg; Borg-von Zepelin, Margarete; Kirchner, Bernhard

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the in vitro study was to evaluate the decontamination potential of common antiseptic solutions for heat-sensitive implantological drill guide templates. One hundred implantologists were evaluated on the basis of a questionnaire for their measures of disinfection. On the basis of these results, 80% alcohol, Octenidine 0.1%, and Chlorhexidine 0.12% were tested in an in vitro model for their decontamination efficacy for heat-sensitive plastic material infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans. The microorganisms were selected on the basis of results of environmental testing of dental laboratories. The results of the questionnaire revealed that Chlorhexidine was used by 30%, 80% alcohol by 23%, and Octenidine by 7% of the dentists. Using the in vitro model, with the exception of S. aureus, Chlorhexidine was not able to completely eliminate the microorganisms after 15 min of application. In contrast, the treatment with Octenidine revealed no further growth of the tested microorganisms after that time. The 80% alcohol was more efficient. No growth of microorganisms could be detected in any of the tests after 5 min of incubation. On the basis of our results and due to the fact that suitable installations for sterilization were hardly used by the dental practitioners, the disinfection of templates should be preferentially performed with 80% alcohol or Octenidine using an incubation time of 15 min with ultrasonication.

  2. Pre-operative antiseptic shower and bath policy decreases the rate of S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus surgical site infections in patients undergoing joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colling, Kristin; Statz, Catherine; Glover, James; Banton, Kaysie; Beilman, Greg

    2015-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following joint arthroplasty increases length of stay, hospital cost, and leads to patient and healthcare provider dissatisfaction. Due to the presence of non-biologic implants (the prosthetic joint) in these procedures, infection is often devastating and treatment of the infection is more difficult. For this reason, prevention of SSI is of crucial importance in this population. Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the nares of approximately 30-40% of the population, is the most common pathogen causing SSI, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rate. A pre-operative shower or bath with an antiseptic is an inexpensive and effective method of removal of these transient skin pathogens prior to the procedure and may be used to decrease SSI. We hypothesize that a preoperative antiseptic shower or bath will decrease the rate of SSI. A retrospective review was performed at two affiliated hospitals within the same system, one with a hospital-wide policy enforcing pre-operative antiseptic shower or bath and the other with no policy, with cases included from January 2010 to June 2012. International Classification of Disease-Ninth Revision-Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes and chart review were used to identify patients undergoing joint arthroplasty and to identify those with SSI. Two thousand three-hundred forty-nine arthroplasties were performed at the University of Minnesota Medical Center, a tertiary-care hospital with a pre-operative antiseptic shower or bath policy in place. An additional 1,693 procedures were performed at Fairview Ridges Hospital, a community hospital with no pre-operative policy. There was no difference in the rate of SSI between the two hospitals (1.96% vs. 1.95%; p=1.0). However, the rate of SSI caused by S. aureus was significantly decreased by pre-operative antiseptic shower/bath (17% vs. 61%; p=0.03), as was the rate of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections (2% vs. 24% p=0.002). A pre-operative

  3. A comparative study between the efficacies of betadine scrub (10% versus alcohol based hand rub in preoperative hand disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kadam

    2016-12-01

    Results: From the 100 obtained samples, there was higher number of positive growth in Sterilium as compared to povidone iodine scrub (14% versus 8% though statistically not significant. Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Acinetobacter was the most common organism isolated in both the groups. Conclusions: Povidone-iodine is more efficacious than that of alcohol-based solutions in preoperative hand disinfection. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(12.000: 5141-5143

  4. Are surgical scrubbing and pre-operative disinfection of the skin in orthopaedic surgery reliable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, M; Chelo, C; Caputo, F; Conte, M; Fontana, C; Peddis, G; Velluti, C

    2006-01-01

    This study attempts to establish the actual effectiveness of pre-surgical disinfection of the patient and surgeon's hands. We evaluated bacterial density and composition on the skin of 15 patients undergoing knee arthroscopy and the left hand of two surgeons after standard disinfection with povidone-iodine. Three samples were taken after the first 6-min scrub in the first surgical operation from the periungual space of the 1 degrees finger, from the interdigital space between the 2 degrees and 3 degrees fingers and from the transverse palmar crest of the left hand of two surgeons for seven consecutive surgical sessions, for a total of 42 samples, and two samples from the pre-patellar skin and from the popliteal skin of 15 patients undergoing knee arthroscopy, for a total of 30 samples. Pre-surgical handwashing and disinfection procedures were identical in each case. Pre-surgical disinfection of the patient's skin with povidone-iodine was shown to be completely effective, with 100% of samples negative. Samples taken from the interdigital space and the palmar crest (100% of samples negative) demonstrated the efficacy of disinfection of the surgeon's hands with povidone-iodine, while the periungual space was contaminated in 50% of the samples. The bacterial strains isolated belong to the staphylococcus genus in 100% of the cases, with pathogenic strains in 29.6% of the cases. Standard pre-surgical disinfection of skin in areas easily accessible to the disinfectant is sufficient in itself to guarantee thorough sanitization. Standard scrubbing of the surgeon's hands is insufficient in eliminating bacterial contamination, including pathogenic germs, in the periungual space, where it is probably difficult for the disinfectant to come into contact with the skin.

  5. Disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, J. P.; Haas, C. N.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastewater disinfection for 1978. This review covers areas such as: (1) mechanisms of inactivation of negative microorganisms by chlorine and ozone; and (2) the effects of various treatment on over-all water quality. A list of 61 references is also presented. (HM)

  6. Disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, J. P.; Haas, C. N.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastewater disinfection for 1978. This review covers areas such as: (1) mechanisms of inactivation of negative microorganisms by chlorine and ozone; and (2) the effects of various treatment on over-all water quality. A list of 61 references is also presented. (HM)

  7. Effect of pre-operative octenidine nasal ointment and showering on surgical site infections in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, M; Scherag, A; Forstner, C; Brunkhorst, F M; Harbarth, S; Doenst, T; Pletz, M W; Hagel, S

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of pre-operative octenidine (OCT) decolonization on surgical site infection (SSI) rates. Before-and-after cohort study. Patients undergoing an elective isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) procedure: control group (1(st) January to 31(st) December 2013), N=475; intervention group (1(st) January to 31(st) December 2014), N=428. The intervention consisted of nasal application of OCT ointment three times daily, beginning on the day before surgery, and showering the night before and on the day of surgery with OCT soap. A median sternotomy was performed in 805 (89.1%) patients and a minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass procedure was performed in 98 (10.9%) patients. Overall, there was no difference in SSI rates between the control and intervention groups (15.4% vs 13.3%, P=0.39). The rate of harvest site SSIs was significantly lower in patients in the intervention group (2.5% vs 0.5%, P=0.01). Patients who had undergone a median sternotomy in the intervention group had a significantly lower rate of organ/space sternal SSIs (1.9% vs 0.3%, P=0.04). However, there was a trend towards an increased rate of deep incisional sternal SSIs (1.2% vs 2.9%, P=0.08). Multi-variate analysis did not identify a significant protective effect of the intervention (odds ratio 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.53-1.15, P=0.27). Pre-operative decolonization with OCT did not reduce overall SSI rates in patients undergoing an elective isolated CABG procedure, but significantly decreased harvest site and organ/space sternal SSIs. Randomized controlled trials, including controlled patient adherence to the intervention, are required to confirm these observations and to determine the clinical utility of OCT in pre-operative decolonization. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Meteor showers in review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Recent work on meteor showers is reviewed. New data is presented on the long duration showers that wander in sun-centered ecliptic coordinates. Since the early days of meteor photography, much progress has been made in mapping visual meteor showers, using low-light video cameras instead. Now, some 820,000 meteoroid orbits have been measured by four orbit surveys during 2007-2015. Mapped in sun-centered ecliptic coordinates in 5° intervals of solar longitude, the data show a number of long duration (>15 days) meteor showers that have drifting radiants and speeds with solar longitude. 18 showers emerge from the antihelion source and follow a drift pattern towards high ecliptic latitudes. 27 Halley-type showers in the apex source move mostly towards lower ecliptic longitudes, but those at high ecliptic latitudes move backwards. Also, 5 low-speed showers appear between the toroidal ring and the apex source, moving towards the antihelion source. Most other showers do not last long, or do not move much in sun-centered ecliptic coordinates. The surveys also detected episodic showers, which mostly document the early stages of meteoroid stream formation. New data on the sporadic background have shed light on the dynamical evolution of the zodiacal cloud.

  9. Test results of a shower water recovery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verostko, Charles E.; Price, Donald F.; Garcia, Rafael; Pierson, Duane L.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    A shower test was conducted recently at NASA-JSC in which waste water was reclaimed and reused. Test subjects showered in a prototype whole body shower following a protocol similar to that anticipated for Space Station. The waste water was purified using reverse osmosis followed by filtration through activated carbon and ion exchange resin beds. The reclaimed waste water was maintained free of microorganisms by using both heat and iodine. This paper discusses the test results, including the limited effectiveness of using iodine as a disinfectant and the evaluation of a Space Station candidate soap for showering. In addition, results are presented on chemical and microbial impurity content of water samples obtained from various locations in the water recovery process.

  10. The Vincia Parton Shower

    CERN Document Server

    Giele, Walter T.; Kosower, David A.; Laenen, Eric; Larkoski, Andrew J.; Lopez-Villarejo, Juan J.; Ritzmann, Mathias; Skands, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We summarize recent developments in the VINCIA parton shower. After a brief review of the basics of the formalism, the extension of VINCIA to hadron collisions is sketched. We then turn to improvements of the efficiency of tree-level matching by making the shower history unique and by incorporating identified helicities. We conclude with an overview of matching to one-loop matrix elements.

  11. Resummation and Shower Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Huston, J; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn; Thomé, E

    2004-01-01

    The transverse momentum spectra of the Z and Higgs bosons are studied, as probes of the consequences of multiple parton emissions in hadronic events. Emphasis is put on constraints, present in showers, that go beyond conventional leading log. It is shown that, if such constraints are relaxed, better agreement can be obtained with experimental data and with resummation descriptions.

  12. 不同外科洗手时间和方法对术前消毒效果的影响%Effect of the different time and methods for surgical hand antisepsis on the efifcacy of preoperative disinfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜贻豹; 韩晓东; 张频; 张弘玮; 周玉龙; 李昆; 狄建忠

    2015-01-01

    目的:比较不同外科洗手时间和方法对术前消毒效果的影响,探讨术前外科手消毒的最佳方法。方法:按完全随机的方法把手术医生和器械护士共100人平均分为4组:A组和C组分别揉搓洗手1 min和3 min;B组和D组分别刷洗洗手1 min和3 min,以手细菌培养计数法比较消毒洗手前后手部菌落数、菌落阳性率及不同洗手时间和方法对皮肤的影响。结果:各组外科消毒洗手前后菌落数及阳性率无明显差异(P>0.05);A、C两组洗手后皮肤外观、完整性、感觉HSA评分较本组洗手前无明显变化(P>0.05);B、D两组洗手后皮肤外观、完整性和感觉HSA评分较本组洗手前明显降低(P<0.05);四组洗手后皮肤湿度HSA评分较本组洗手前均明显增加(P<0.05)。结论:洗手时间和方法对消毒效果无明显影响,揉搓法对皮肤损伤小,故临床上推荐1 min揉搓外科洗手法。%Objective:To compare the effects of different time and methods for surgical hand antisepsis on the efifcacy of preoperative disinfection and to investigate its best method. Methods:Total 100 surgeons and nurses were randomly divided into 4 groups based on the method for their surgical hand antisepsis:scrubbing hands for 1 min and 3 min in group A and C, and scrubbing hands with sponge for 1 min and 3 min in group B and D, respectively. The number and positive rate of colonies on hands were compared by colony counts before and after hand antisepsis and the effects of different time and methods on the skin were also investigated. Results:There were no signiifcant differences in the number and positive rate of colonies before and after hand antisepsis among 4 groups (P>0.05). The appearance, intactness and sensation HAS score of the skin had no signiifcant change after hand antisepsis compared with before antisepsis in group A and C (P>0.05), but signiifcantly decreased in group B and D (P<0.05). The HAS

  13. The Orbital Workshop Shower Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    This photograph shows technicians performing a checkout of the Metabolic Analyzer (center background) and the Ergometer (foreground) in the Orbital Workshop (OWS). The shower compartment is at right. The Ergometer (Skylab Experiment M171) evaluated man's metabolic effectiveness and cost of work in space environment. Located in the experiment and work area of the OWS, the shower compartment was a cylindrical cloth enclosure that was folded flat when not in use. The bottom ring of the shower was fastened to the floor and contained foot restraints. The upper ring contained the shower head and hose. To use the shower, the astronaut filled a pressurized portable bottle with heated water and attached the bottle to the ceiling. A flexible hose cornected the water bottle to a handheld shower head. The astronaut pulled the cylindrical shower wall up into position and bathed, using liquid soap. Both soap and water were carefully rationed, having been premeasured for economical use.

  14. Separation and confirmation of showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neslušan, L.; Hajduková, M.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Using IAU MDC photographic, IAU MDC CAMS video, SonotaCo video, and EDMOND video databases, we aim to separate all provable annual meteor showers from each of these databases. We intend to reveal the problems inherent in this procedure and answer the question whether the databases are complete and the methods of separation used are reliable. We aim to evaluate the statistical significance of each separated shower. In this respect, we intend to give a list of reliably separated showers rather than a list of the maximum possible number of showers. Methods: To separate the showers, we simultaneously used two methods. The use of two methods enables us to compare their results, and this can indicate the reliability of the methods. To evaluate the statistical significance, we suggest a new method based on the ideas of the break-point method. Results: We give a compilation of the showers from all four databases using both methods. Using the first (second) method, we separated 107 (133) showers, which are in at least one of the databases used. These relatively low numbers are a consequence of discarding any candidate shower with a poor statistical significance. Most of the separated showers were identified as meteor showers from the IAU MDC list of all showers. Many of them were identified as several of the showers in the list. This proves that many showers have been named multiple times with different names. Conclusions: At present, a prevailing share of existing annual showers can be found in the data and confirmed when we use a combination of results from large databases. However, to gain a complete list of showers, we need more-complete meteor databases than the most extensive databases currently are. We also still need a more sophisticated method to separate showers and evaluate their statistical significance. Tables A.1 and A.2 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  15. Biofilms on Hospital Shower Hoses: Characterization and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the source of drinking water used in hospitals is commonly, biofilms on water pipelines are refuge to bacteria that survive different disinfection strategies. Drinking water (DW) biofilms are well known to harbor opportunistic pathogens, however, these biofilm communities remain poorly characterized by culture-independent approaches that circumvent the limitations of conventional monitoring efforts. Hence, the frequency of pathogens in DW biofilms and how biofilm members withstand high doses of disinfectants and/or chlorine residuals in the water supply remain speculative, but directly impact public health. The aim of this study was to characterize the composition of microbial communities growing on five hospital shower hoses using both culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques. Two different sequence-based methods were used to characterize the bacterial fractions: 16S rRNA gene sequencing of bacterial cultures and next generation sequencing of metagenomes. Based on the metagenomic data, we found that Mycobacterium-like species was the abundant bacterial taxa that overlapped among the five samples. We also recovered the draft genome of a novel Mycobacterium species, closely related to opportunistic pathogenic nontuberculous mycobacteria, M. rhodesiae and M. tusciae, in addition to other, less abundant species. In contrast, the cultured fraction was mostly affiliated to Proteobacteria, such as members of the Sphingomonas, Blastomonas and Porph

  16. Electromagnetic shower counter

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The octogonal block of lead glass is observed by eight photomultiplier tubes. Four or five such counters, arranged in succession, are used on each arm of the bispectrometer in order to detect heavy particles of the same family as those recently observed at Brookhaven and SLAC. They provide a means of identifying electrons. The arrangement of eight lateral photomultiplier tubes offers an efficient means of collecting the photons produced in the showers and determining, with a high resolution, the energy of the incident electrons. The total width at half-height is less than 6.9% for electrons having an energy of 1 GeV.

  17. Extensive air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, M V S

    1997-01-01

    Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays carry information about their sources and the intervening medium apart from providing a beam of particles for studying certain features of high energy interactions currently inaccessible at man-made accelerators. They can at present be studied only via the extensive air showers (EAS's) they generate while passing through the Earth's atmosphere, since their fluxes are too low for the experiments of limited capability flown in balloons and satellites. The EAS is generated by a series of interactions of the primary cosmic ray and its progeny with the atmospheric nucle

  18. Precise determination of muon shower content from shower universality property

    CERN Document Server

    Yushkov, A; Aramo, C; Guarino, F; D'Urso, D; Valore, L

    2009-01-01

    It is shown, that highly accurate estimation of muon shower content can be performed on the basis of knowledge of only vertical depth of shower maximum and total signal in ground detector. The estimate is almost independent on primary energy and particle type and on zenith angle. The study is performed for 21500 showers, generated with CORSIKA~6.204 from spectrum $E^{-1}$ in the energy range $\\log10(E)$ [eV]=18.5--20 and uniformly in $\\cos^2{\\theta}$ in zenith angle interval $\\theta=0^\\circ-65^\\circ$ for QGSJET II/Fluka interaction models.

  19. Meteor showers an annotated catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Kronk, Gary W

    2014-01-01

    Meteor showers are among the most spectacular celestial events that may be observed by the naked eye, and have been the object of fascination throughout human history. In “Meteor Showers: An Annotated Catalog,” the interested observer can access detailed research on over 100 annual and periodic meteor streams in order to capitalize on these majestic spectacles. Each meteor shower entry includes details of their discovery, important observations and orbits, and gives a full picture of duration, location in the sky, and expected hourly rates. Armed with a fuller understanding, the amateur observer can better view and appreciate the shower of their choice. The original book, published in 1988, has been updated with over 25 years of research in this new and improved edition. Almost every meteor shower study is expanded, with some original minor showers being dropped while new ones are added. The book also includes breakthroughs in the study of meteor showers, such as accurate predictions of outbursts as well ...

  20. A fresh look at preoperative body washing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Judith; Gould, Dinah; Jenkins, Philip; Hilliam, Rachel; Mistry, Neetesh; Walsh, Susannah

    2012-01-01

    National guidelines do not support preoperative body washing to reduce surgical site infections, instead recommending bathing or showering with soap. Yet preoperative body washing continues to be widely used in many hospitals across Europe. This paper suggests that existing trials of preoperative body washing, upon which guidelines are based, are dated and proposes a new investigation of preoperative body washing using modern definitions of surgical site infection with standardised patient follow up, modern surgical techniques and well designed trials. This paper provides a critique of existing guidelines and describes a randomised trial with 60 participants to compare the effect of soap and two antiseptic washing products on colony forming units (CFUs) for up to six hours. Chlorhexidine gluconate and octenidine were significantly more effective than soap in reducing CFUs in the underarm, and chlorhexidine was significantly more effective than soap in reducing CFUs in the groin. PMID:22448182

  1. Extensive air showers (HE-4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Ultra high energy (UHE) gamma ray astronomy is an exciting area which has added a new sense of purpose to ground based array work. There is much to be done before UHE gamma ray showers can be understood properly and it is important to remain conservative with claims while the properties of such showers are still not clear. The muon content is only one of the properties that needs to be clarified. It remains to be seen how well progress occurs on the second order problem of detailed interaction parameters once the gross features are clarified. The shower disk thickness has become an area of intense study with interest in Linsley's technique for measuremnts of giant showers and in the study of structure near the core for improving fast timing and studying delayed subshowers. Perhaps the most significant area of promise for the future is individual shower develpments with Cerenkov and, particularly, air fluorescence techniques. The importance and potential of having relatively complete information on a complete set of individual showers can hardly be overestimated. A complete understanding of the observation process is needed to determine whether or not the recorded data set is complete at a given energy, apparent core distance, and zenith angle.

  2. Disinfection, sterilization, and antisepsis: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutala, William A; Weber, David J

    2016-05-02

    All invasive procedures involve contact by a medical device or surgical instrument with a patient's sterile tissue or mucous membranes. The level of disinfection or sterilization is dependent on the intended use of the object: critical (items that contact sterile tissue such as surgical instruments), semicritical (items that contact mucous membrane such as endoscopes), and noncritical (devices that contact only intact skin such as stethoscopes) items require sterilization, high-level disinfection and low-level disinfection, respectively. Cleaning must always precede high-level disinfection and sterilization. Antiseptics are essential to infection prevention as part of a hand hygiene program as well as several other uses such as surgical hand antisepsis and pre-operative skin preparation.

  3. Meteor Shower Forecasting for Spacecraft Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, Althea V.; Cooke, William J.; Campbell-Brown, Margaret D.

    2017-01-01

    Although sporadic meteoroids are a much greater hazard to spacecraft than shower meteoroids in general, meteor showers can significantly increase the risk of damage over short time periods. Because showers are brief, it is sometimes possible to mitigate the risk operationally, which requires accurate predictions of shower activity. NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office generates an annual meteor shower forecast that describes the variations in the near-Earth meteoroid flux produced by meteor showers, which presents the shower flux both in absolute terms and relative to the sporadic ux. The shower forecast incorporates model predictions of annual variations in shower activity and quotes fluxes to several limiting particle kinetic energies. In this work, we describe our forecasting methods, compare them to actual observations, and highlight recent improvements to the temporal pro les based on flux measurements from the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR).

  4. Muonic footprint of simulated extensive air showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erfani, Mona; Risse, Markus; Yushkov, Alexey [University of Siegen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The number of muons at ground is one of the major parameters in extensive air showers to discriminate hadronic showers from photon ones. There are already numerous studies focusing on this matter and on using the muon content in combination with other parameters. In our study, we use CORSIKA showers for photon and proton primaries at E=10{sup 18} eV without thinning of shower muons to analyze the structure of the muonic footprint at different core distances.

  5. LHC data and extensive air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierog Tanguy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently the uncertainty in the prediction of shower observables for different primary particles and energies is dominated by differences between hadronic interaction models. The LHC data on minimum bias measurements can be used to test Monte Carlo generators and these new constraints will help to reduce the uncertainties in air shower predictions. In this article, after a short introduction on air showers we will show the results of the comparison between the updated version of high energy hadronic interaction models EPOS LHC and QGSJETII-04 with LHC data. Results for air shower simulations and their consequences on comparisons with air shower data will be discussed.

  6. Connecting accelerator experiments and cosmic ray showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierog T.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently the uncertainty in the prediction of shower observables for different primary particles and energies is dominated by differences between hadronic interaction models. The LHC data on minimum bias measurements can be used to test Monte Carlo generators and these new constrains will help to reduce the uncertainties in air shower predictions. In this article, after a short introduction on air showers we will show the results of the comparison between the updated version of high energy hadronic interaction models with LHC data. Results for air shower simulations and their consequence on the comparison with air shower data will be discussed.

  7. A new observable in extensive air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Canal, C A García; Masip, M; Sciutto, S J

    2016-01-01

    We find that the ratio r_{mu e} of the muon to the electromagnetic component of an extended air shower at the ground level provides an indirect measure of the depth X_{max} of the shower maximum. This result, obtained with the air-shower code AIRES, is independent of the hadronic model used in the simulation. We show that the value of r_{mu e} in a particular shower discriminates its proton or iron nature with a 98% efficiency. We also show that the eventual production of forward heavy quarks inside the shower may introduce anomalous values of r_{mu e} in isolated events.

  8. A new observable in extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Canal, C. A.; Illana, J. I.; Masip, M.; Sciutto, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    We find that the ratio rμe of the muon to the electromagnetic component of an extended air shower at the ground level provides an indirect measure of the depth Xmax of the shower maximum. This result, obtained with the air-shower code AIRES, is independent of the hadronic model used in the simulation. We show that the value of rμe in a particular shower discriminates its proton or iron nature with a 98% efficiency. We also show that the eventual production of forwardheavy quarks inside the shower may introduce anomalous values of rμe in isolated events.

  9. An analytic initial-state parton shower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, W. [Siegen Univ. (Germany). Dept. Physik; Reuter, J.; Schmidt, S.; Wiesler, D. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    We present a new algorithm for an analytic parton shower. While the algorithm for the final-state shower has been known in the literature, the construction of an initial-state shower along these lines is new. The aim is to have a parton shower algorithm for which the full analytic form of the probability distribution for all branchings is known. For these parton shower algorithms it is therefore possible to calculate the probability for a given event to be generated, providing the potential to reweight the event after the simulation. We develop the algorithm for this shower including scale choices and angular ordering. Merging to matrix elements is used to describe high-energy tails of distributions correctly. Finally, we compare our results with those of other parton showers and with experimental data from LEP, Tevatron and LHC. (orig.)

  10. Genotoxicity of water concentrates from recreational pools after various disinfection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liviac, Danae; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Mitch, William A; Altonji, Matthew J; Plewa, Michael J

    2010-05-01

    Swimming and hot tub bathing are popular exercises and diversions. Disinfection of recreational pools is essential to prevent outbreaks of infectious disease. Recent research demonstrated an association between the application of disinfectants to recreational pools and adverse health outcomes. These pool waters represent extreme cases of disinfection that differ from disinfecting drinking waters. Pool waters are continuously exposed to disinfectants over average residence times extending to months. Disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors include natural humic substances plus inputs from bathers through urine, sweat, hair, skin, and consumer products including cosmetics and sunscreens. This study presents a systematic mammalian cell genotoxicity analysis to evaluate different recreational waters derived from a common tap water source. The data demonstrated that all disinfected recreational pool water samples induced more genomic DNA damage than the source tap water. The type of disinfectant and illumination conditions altered the genotoxicity of the water. Accordingly, care should be taken in the disinfectant employed to treat recreational pool waters. The genotoxicity data suggest that brominating agents should be avoided. Combining chlorine with UV may be beneficial as compared to chlorination alone. During the recycling of pool water the organic carbon could be removed prior to disinfection. Behavior modification by swimmers may be critical in reducing the genotoxicity of pool water. Actions such as showering before entering the water and informing patrons about the potential harm from urinating in a pool could reduce the precursors of toxic DBPs.

  11. Fast Shower Simulation in the ATLAS Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barberio, E.; /Melbourne U.; Boudreau, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Butler, B.; /SLAC; Cheung, S.L.; /Toronto U.; Dell' Acqua, A.; /CERN; Di Simone, A.; /CERN; Ehrenfeld, W.; /Hamburg U. /DESY; Gallas, M.V.; /CERN; Glazov, A.; /DESY; Marshall, Z.; /Caltech /Nevis Labs, Columbia U.; Mueller, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Placakyte, R.; /DESY; Rimoldi, A.; /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia; Savard, P.; /Toronto U.; Tsulaia, V.; /Pittsburgh U.; Waugh, A.; /Sydney U.; Young, C.C.; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    The time to simulate pp collisions in the ATLAS detector is largely dominated by the showering of electromagnetic particles in the heavy parts of the detector, especially the electromagnetic barrel and endcap calorimeters. Two procedures have been developed to accelerate the processing time of electromagnetic particles in these regions: (1) a fast shower parameterisation and (2) a frozen shower library. Both work by generating the response of the calorimeter to electrons and positrons with Geant 4, and then reintroduce the response into the simulation at runtime. In the fast shower parameterisation technique, a parameterization is tuned to single electrons and used later by simulation. In the frozen shower technique, actual showers from low-energy particles are used in the simulation. Full Geant 4 simulation is used to develop showers down to {approx} 1 GeV, at which point the shower is terminated by substituting a frozen shower. Judicious use of both techniques over the entire electromagnetic portion of the ATLAS calorimeter produces an important improvement of CPU time. We discuss the algorithms and their performance in this paper.

  12. Energy calibration of very inclined air showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembinski, Hans [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Roth, Markus [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Hebbeker, Thomas [III. Physikalisches Institut A, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory detects extensive air showers which are initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays. The properties of the cosmic rays are derived indirectly from the air shower observation. The surface detector of the observatory is well suited to detect showers with zenith angles from 0 to 90 . Standard analyses focus on so called vertical showers with inclinations smaller than 60 . Showers with larger zenith angles are called very inclined showers. Both have distinct experimental signatures which require separate event reconstructions. The ground signal of very inclined air showers is muon dominated and the energy reconstruction uses the variable R{sub {mu}} as an estimator for the cosmic ray energy which is proportional to the total number of muons N{sub {mu}} on the ground. The talk will focus on the energy calibration of R{sub {mu}} with events observed simultaneously in the surface and fluorescence detector of the observatory. This calibration procedure also offers the unique opportunity to derive the shower-to-shower fluctuations of R{sub {mu}} which are sensitive to the cosmic ray mass composition.

  13. Spiral-shaped disinfection reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2015-08-20

    This disclosure includes disinfection reactors and processes for the disinfection of water. Some disinfection reactors include a body that defines an inlet, an outlet, and a spiral flow path between the inlet and the outlet, in which the body is configured to receive water and a disinfectant at the inlet such that the water is exposed to the disinfectant as the water flows through the spiral flow path. Also disclosed are processes for disinfecting water in such disinfection reactors.

  14. Scaling analysis of meteorite shower mass distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Lene; Meibom, A.; Bohr, Jakob

    1998-01-01

    Meteorite showers are the remains of extraterrestrial objects which are captivated by the gravitational field of the Earth. We have analyzed the mass distribution of fragments from 16 meteorite showers for scaling. The distributions exhibit distinct scaling behavior over several orders of magnetude...

  15. Extensive Air Showers in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badala, A.; Blanco, F.; La Rocca, P.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pulvirenti, A.; Riggi, F.

    2007-01-01

    The basic properties of extensive air showers of particles produced in the interaction of a high-energy primary cosmic ray in the Earth's atmosphere are discussed in the context of educational cosmic ray projects involving undergraduate students and high-school teams. Simulation results produced by an air shower development code were made…

  16. New Showers with transverse-momentum-ordering

    CERN Document Server

    Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    2004-01-01

    Two new showering routines are introduced, one for timelike final-state showers and one for spacelike initial-state ones. They are both based on emissions ordered in approximate transverse momenta that can easily be translated to virtualities. Matrix-element corrections can then be imposed as in the existing Pythia routines.

  17. Frozen-shower simulation of electromagnetic showers in the ATLAS forward calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Gasnikova, Ksenia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Accurate simulation of calorimeter response for high energy electromagnetic particles is essential for the LHC experiments. Detailed simulation of the electromagnetic showers using Geant4 is however very CPU intensive and various fast simulation methods were proposed instead. The frozen shower simulation substitutes the full propagation of the showers for energies below 1~GeV by showers taken from a pre-simulated library. The method is used for production of the main ATLAS Monte Carlo samples, greatly improving the production time. The frozen showers describe shower shapes, sampling fraction, sampling and noise-related fluctuations very well, while description of the constant term, related to calorimeter non-uniformity, requires a careful choice of the shower library binning. A new method is proposed to tune the binning variables, using multivariate techniques. The method is tested and optimized for the description of the ATLAS forward calorimeter.

  18. Air shower simulation and hadronic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this report of the Working Group on Hadronic Interactions and Air Shower Simulation is to give an overview of the status of the field, emphasizing open questions and a comparison of relevant results of the different experiments. It is shown that an approximate overall understanding of extensive air showers and the corresponding hadronic interactions has been reached. The simulations provide a qualitative description of the bulk of the air shower observables. Discrepancies are however found when the correlation between measurements of the longitudinal shower profile are compared to that of the lateral particle distributions at ground. The report concludes with a list of important problems that should be addressed to make progress in understanding hadronic interactions and, hence, improve the reliability of air shower simulations.

  19. Occurrence of Legionella in UK household showers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Samuel; Stevenson, David; Bennett, Allan; Walker, Jimmy

    2017-04-01

    Household water systems have been proposed as a source of sporadic, community acquired Legionnaires' disease. Showers represent a frequently used aerosol generating device in the domestic setting yet little is known about the occurrence of Legionella spp. in these systems. This study has investigated the prevalence of Legionella spp. by culture and qPCR in UK household showers. Ninety nine showers from 82 separate properties in the South of England were sampled. Clinically relevant Legionella spp. were isolated by culture in 8% of shower water samples representing 6% of households. Legionella pneumophila sg1 ST59 was isolated from two showers in one property and air sampling demonstrated its presence in the aerosol state. A further 31% of showers were positive by Legionella spp. qPCR. By multi-variable binomial regression modelling Legionella spp. qPCR positivity was associated with the age of the property (p=0.02), the age of the shower (p=0.01) and the frequency of use (p=0.09). The concentration of Legionella spp. detected by qPCR was shown to decrease with increased frequency of use (p=0.04) and more frequent showerhead cleaning (p=0.05). There was no association between Legionella spp. qPCR positivity and the cold water supply or the showerhead material (p=0.65 and p=0.71, respectively). Household showers may be important reservoirs of clinically significant Legionella and should be considered in source investigations. Simple public health advice may help to mitigate the risk of Legionella exposure in the domestic shower environment. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Pion showers in highly granular calorimeters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jaroslav Cvach; on behalf of the CALICE Collaboration

    2012-10-01

    New results on properties of hadron showers created by pion beam at 8–80 GeV in high granular electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters are presented. Data were used for the first time to investigate the separation of the neutral and charged hadron showers. The result is important to verify the prediction of the PFA algorithm based up to now on the simulated data only. Next, the properties of hadron showers were compared to different physics lists of GEANT4 version 9.3.

  1. Antenna Showers with Hadronic Initial States

    CERN Document Server

    Ritzmann, M; Skands, P

    2013-01-01

    We present an antenna shower formalism including contributions from initial-state partons and corresponding backwards evolution. We give a set of phase-space maps and antenna functions for massless partons which define a complete shower formalism suitable for computing observables with hadronic initial states. We focus on the initial-state components: initial-initial and initial-final antenna configurations. The formalism includes comprehensive possibilities for uncertainty estimates. We report on some preliminary results obtained with an implementation in the Vincia antenna-shower framework.

  2. High energy hadrons in extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonwar, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data on the high energy hadronic component in extensive air showers of energies approx. 10 to the 14 to 10 to the 16 eV when compared with expectations from Monte Carlo simulations have shown the observed showers to be deficient in high energy hadrons relative to simulated showers. An attempt is made to understand these anomalous features with more accurate comparison of observations with expectations, taking into account the details of the experimental system. Results obtained from this analysis and their implications for the high energy physics of particle interactions at energy approx. 10 to the 15 eV are presented.

  3. Radar reflection off extensive air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner F.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the possibility of detecting extensive air showers by the radar technique. Considering a bistatic radar system and different shower geometries, we simulate reflection of radio waves off the static plasma produced by the shower in the air. Using the Thomson cross-section for radio wave reflection, we obtain the time evolution of the signal received by the antennas. The frequency upshift of the radar echo and the power received are studied to verify the feasibility of the radar detection technique.

  4. Improved Parton Showers at Large Transverse Momenta

    CERN Document Server

    Corke, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Several methods to improve the parton-shower description of hard processes by an injection of matrix-element-based information have been presented over the years. In this article we study (re)weighting schemes for the first/hardest emission. One objective is to provide a consistent matching of the POWHEG next-to-leading order generator to the Pythia shower algorithms. Another is to correct the default behaviour of these showers at large transverse momenta, based on a comparison with real-emission matrix elements.

  5. Weak Gauge Boson Radiation in Parton Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Christiansen, Jesper Roy

    2014-01-01

    The emission of W and Z gauge boson is included in a traditional QCD + QED shower. The unitarity of the shower algorithm links the real radiation of the weak gauge bosons to the negative weak virtual corrections. The shower evolution process leads to a competition between QCD, QED and weak radiation, and allows for W and Z boson production inside jets. Various effects on LHC physics are studied, both at low and high transverse momenta, and effects at higher-energy hadron colliders are outlined.

  6. A branching model for hadronic air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Novotny, Vladimir; Ebr, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a simple branching model for the development of hadronic showers in the Earth's atmosphere. Based on this model, we show how the size of the pionic component followed by muons can be estimated. Several aspects of the subsequent muonic component are also discussed. We focus on the energy evolution of the muon production depth. We also estimate the impact of the primary particle mass on the size of the hadronic component. Even though a precise calculation of the development of air showers must be left to complex Monte Carlo simulations, the proposed model can reveal qualitative insight into the air shower physics.

  7. Showering in Flint, MI: Is there a DBP problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Joshua M; Cuthbertson, Amy A; Liberatore, Hannah K; Kimura, Susana Y; Mantha, Anurag; Edwards, Marc A; Richardson, Susan D

    2017-08-01

    Lead contamination in the City of Flint, MI has been well documented over the past two years, with lead levels above the EPA Action Level until summer 2016. This resulted from an ill-fated decision to switch from Detroit water (Lake Huron) with corrosion control, to Flint River water without corrosion control. Although lead levels are now closer to normal, reports of skin rashes have sparked questions surrounding tap water in some Flint homes. This study investigated the presence of contaminants, including disinfection by-products (DBPs), in the hot tap water used for showering in the homes of residents in Flint. Extensive quantitative analysis of 61 regulated and priority unregulated DBPs was conducted in Flint hot and cold tap water, along with the analysis of 50 volatile organic compounds and a nontarget comprehensive, broadscreen analysis, to identify a possible source for the reported skin rashes. For comparison, chlorinated hot and cold waters from three other cities were also sampled, including Detroit, which also uses Lake Huron as its source water. Results showed that hot water samples generally contained elevated levels of regulated and priority unregulated DBPs compared to cold water samples, but trihalomethanes were still within regulatory limits. Overall, hot shower water from Flint was similar to waters sampled from the three other cities and did not have unusually high levels of DBPs or other organic chemicals that could be responsible for the skin rashes observed by residents. It is possible that an inorganic chemical or microbial contaminant may be responsible. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Applications of Photocatalytic Disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Gamage

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the superior ability of photocatalysis to inactivate a wide range of harmful microorganisms, it is being examined as a viable alternative to traditional disinfection methods such as chlorination, which can produce harmful byproducts. Photocatalysis is a versatile and effective process that can be adapted for use in many applications for disinfection in both air and water matrices. Additionally, photocatalytic surfaces are being developed and tested for use in the context of “self-disinfecting” materials. Studies on the photocatalytic technique for disinfection demonstrate this process to have potential for widespread applications in indoor air and environmental health, biological, and medical applications, laboratory and hospital applications, pharmaceutical and food industry, plant protection applications, wastewater and effluents treatment, and drinking water disinfection. Studies on photocatalytic disinfection using a variety of techniques and test organisms are reviewed, with an emphasis on the end-use application of developed technologies and methods.

  9. Radio signals from very large showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Nishi, K.

    1985-01-01

    Radio signals from air showers with electron sizes in the range 1 x 10 to the 7th power to 2 x 10 to the 9th power were detected at 50kHz, 170kHz, and 1,647kHz at large core distances in the Akeno square kilometers air-shower array. The field strength is higher than that expected from any mechanisms hitherto proposed.

  10. Shower It,In Your Bathroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    By Tom Xue

    2008-01-01

    @@ Australian Wool Innovation (AWI),launched MerinoFreshTM and MerinoCoolTM at one of the world's largest apparel trade show,Intertextile Shanghai Apparel Fabrics 2008. Adding to the line of innovative merino products is AWI's revolutionary MerinoFreshTM- the world-first rinse and clean SHOWER SUIT technology that allows woven products made from Merino wool to be refreshed or cleaned after wear simply using a domestic shower.

  11. Photoproduction total cross section and shower development

    CERN Document Server

    Cornet, F; Grau, A; Pancheri, G; Sciutto, S J

    2015-01-01

    The total photoproduction cross section at ultra-high energies is obtained using a model based on QCD minijets and soft-gluon resummation and the ansatz that infrared gluons limit the rise of total cross sections. This cross section is introduced into the Monte Carlo system AIRES to simulate extended air-showers initiated by cosmic ray photons. The impact of the new photoproduction cross section on common shower observables, especially those related to muon production, is compared with previous results.

  12. Cosmic ray air showers from sphalerons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Schichtel, Peter; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson marks a key ingredient to establish the electroweak structure of the Standard Model. Its non-abelian gauge structure gives rise to, yet unobserved, non-perturbative baryon and lepton number violating processes. We propose to use cosmic ray air showers, as measured, for example, at the Pierre Auger Observatory, to set a limit on the hadronic production cross section of sphalerons. We identify several observables to discriminate between sphaleron and QCD induced air showers.

  13. Molecular Analysis of Shower Curtain Biofilm Microbes

    OpenAIRE

    Kelley, Scott T.; Theisen, Ulrike; Angenent, Largus T.; Amand, Allison St.; Pace, Norman R.

    2004-01-01

    Households provide environments that encourage the formation of microbial communities, often as biofilms. Such biofilms constitute potential reservoirs for pathogens, particularly for immune-compromised individuals. One household environment that potentially accumulates microbial biofilms is that provided by vinyl shower curtains. Over time, vinyl shower curtains accumulate films, commonly referred to as “soap scum,” which microscopy reveals are constituted of lush microbial biofilms. To dete...

  14. The VINCIA Antenna Shower for Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Skands, Peter; Prestel, Stefan; Ritzmann, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    We summarise the main features of VINCIA's antenna-based treatment of QCD initial- and final-state showers, which includes iterated tree-level matrix-element corrections and automated evaluations of perturbative shower uncertainties. The latter are computed on the fly and are cast as a set of alternative weights for each generated event. The resulting algorithm has been made publicly available as a plug-in to the PYTHIA 8 event generator.

  15. Microwave detection of air showers with MIDAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facal San Luis, P., E-mail: facal@kicp.uchicago.edu [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institue and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Alekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Alvarez, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Berlin, A. [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institue and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bertou, X. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Bogdan, M.; Bohacova, M. [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institue and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bonifazi, C. [Univ. Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Instituto de Fisica, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 68528, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho, W.R. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Campus Sur, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Mello Neto, J.R.T. de [Univ. Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Instituto de Fisica, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 68528, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Genat, J.F.; Mills, E.; Monasor, M.; Privitera, P.; Reyes, I.C.; Rouille d& #x27; Orfeuil, B. [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institue and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); and others

    2012-01-11

    MIDAS (MIcrowave Detector of Air Showers) is a prototype of a microwave telescope to detect extensive air showers: it images a 20{sup Degree-Sign } Multiplication-Sign 10{sup Degree-Sign} region of the sky with a 4.5 m parabolic reflector and 53 feeds in the focal plane. It has been commissioned in March 2010 and is currently taking data. We present the design, performance and first results of MIDAS.

  16. Splitting neutrino masses and showering into Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Fargion, D; Iacovelli, M; Lanciano, O; Oliva, P; De Lucentini, P G S; Grossi, M; De Santis, M

    2006-01-01

    Neutrino masses might be as light as a few time the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. High Energy ZeV cosmic neutrinos (in Z-Showering model) might hit relic ones at each mass in different resonance energies in our nearby Universe. This non-degenerated density and energy must split UHE Z-boson secondaries (in Z-Burst model) leading to multi injection of UHECR nucleons within future extreme AUGER energy. Secondaries of Z-Burst as neutral gamma, below a few tens EeV are better surviving local GZK cut-off and they might explain recent Hires BL-Lac UHECR correlations at small angles. A different high energy resonance must lead to Glashow's anti-neutrino showers while hitting electrons in matter. In air, Glashow's anti-neutrino showers lead to collimated and directional air-showers offering a new Neutrino Astronomy. At greater energy around PeV, Tau escaping mountains and Earth and decaying in flight are effectively showering in air sky. These Horizontal showering is splitting by geomagnetic field in forked sha...

  17. The return of the Andromedids meteor shower

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegert, Paul A; Weryk, Robert J; Wong, Daniel K

    2012-01-01

    The Andromedid meteor shower underwent spectacular outbursts in 1872 and 1885, producing thousands of visual meteors per hour and described as `stars fell like rain' in Chinese records of the time. The shower originates from comet 3D/Biela whose disintegration in the mid-1800's is linked to the outbursts, but the shower has been weak or absent since the late 19th Century. This shower returned in December 2011 with a zenithal hourly rate of approximately 50, the strongest return in over a hundred years. Some 122 probable Andromedid orbits were detected by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar. The shower outburst occurred during 2011 Dec 3-5. The radiant at RA +$18\\degree$ and Dec +$56\\degree$ is typical of the `classical' Andromedids of the early 1800's, whose radiant was actually in Cassiopeia. The orbital elements indicate that the material involved was released before 3D/Biela's breakup prior to 1846. The observed shower in 2011 had a slow geocentric speed (16 km s$^{-1}$) and was comprised of small particles: t...

  18. Chloramine-induced anaphylaxis while showering: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Alò Simona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Sodium-N-chlorine-p-toluene sulfonamide, commonly known as chloramine-T, is a derivative of chlorine which is widely used as a disinfectant. For many years, chloramine-T has been described as a cause of immediate-type hypersensitivity, especially with regard to asthma and rhinitis, and as a cause of occupational dermatoses in cleaning personnel in hospitals, although no anaphylactic reaction has yet been reported. Hence, to the best of our knowledge we present the first case of anaphylaxis to chloramine-T with evidence of specific immunoglobulin E antibodies. Case presentation We describe the case of a 25-year-old Caucasian woman who was in good health and with a negative history for atopy, including no respiratory symptoms of rhinitis or asthma, and with no professional exposure to chloramine-T. She, while showering, applied a chloramine-T solution to a skin area with folliculitis on her leg, and within a few minutes developed generalized urticaria and angioedema, followed by vomiting and collapse with loss of consciousness. A skin prick test with a chloramine-T solution at 10mg/mL concentration was positive, and specific immunoglobulin E to chloramine-T was quantified at a value of 2.9 optical density as measured by the enzyme allergosorbent test technique. Conclusion The strict cause-effect relationship and the results of the skin test and the in vitro test make certain the causative role of chloramine-T in this case of anaphylaxis. This suggests that chloramine-T, based on its wide use as a disinfectant, should be considered a possible cause in anaphylaxis of unknown origin.

  19. Chloramine-induced anaphylaxis while showering: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alò, Simona; De Pasquale, Tiziana; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Illuminati, Ilenia; Mistrello, Gianni; Roncarolo, Daniela; Pucci, Stefano

    2012-09-25

    Sodium-N-chlorine-p-toluene sulfonamide, commonly known as chloramine-T, is a derivative of chlorine which is widely used as a disinfectant. For many years, chloramine-T has been described as a cause of immediate-type hypersensitivity, especially with regard to asthma and rhinitis, and as a cause of occupational dermatoses in cleaning personnel in hospitals, although no anaphylactic reaction has yet been reported. Hence, to the best of our knowledge we present the first case of anaphylaxis to chloramine-T with evidence of specific immunoglobulin E antibodies. We describe the case of a 25-year-old Caucasian woman who was in good health and with a negative history for atopy, including no respiratory symptoms of rhinitis or asthma, and with no professional exposure to chloramine-T. She, while showering, applied a chloramine-T solution to a skin area with folliculitis on her leg, and within a few minutes developed generalized urticaria and angioedema, followed by vomiting and collapse with loss of consciousness. A skin prick test with a chloramine-T solution at 10mg/mL concentration was positive, and specific immunoglobulin E to chloramine-T was quantified at a value of 2.9 optical density as measured by the enzyme allergosorbent test technique. The strict cause-effect relationship and the results of the skin test and the in vitro test make certain the causative role of chloramine-T in this case of anaphylaxis. This suggests that chloramine-T, based on its wide use as a disinfectant, should be considered a possible cause in anaphylaxis of unknown origin.

  20. Fast simulation of electromagnetic showers in the ATLAS calorimeter Frozen showers

    CERN Document Server

    Barberio, E; Butler, B; Cheung, S L; Dell'Acqua, A; Di Simone, A; Ehrenfeld, E; Gallas, M V; Glazov, A; Marshall, Z; Mueller, J; Plačakyte, R; Rimoldi, A; Savard, P; Tsulaia, V; Waugh, A; Young, C C

    2009-01-01

    One of the most time consuming process simulating pp interactions in the ATLAS detector at LHC is the simulation of electromagnetic showers in the calorimeter. In order to speed up the event simulation several parametrisation methods are available in ATLAS. In this paper we present a short description of a frozen shower technique, together with some recent benchmarks and comparison with full simulation.

  1. Arrival time distribution of muons in extensive air showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villiers, E.J. de; Walt, D.J. van der; Urk, G. van; Grieder, P.K.F.

    1986-06-01

    The longitudinal structure of the muon disc has been studied up to distances of 60 m from the shower axis by measuring the relative arrival times between single muons in extensive air showers with particle numbers of 1 x 10/sup 5/ to 2 x 10/sup 7/. A rather constant thickness of the shower disc was found up to 60 m from the shower axis. The longitudinal distribution up to 30 m from the shower axis is not in agreement with the results from a shower model with a fairly high multiplicity rule for secondary particle formation in hadron interactions.

  2. Splitting Neutrino masses and Showering into Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargion, D.; D'Armiento, D.; Lanciano, O.; Oliva, P.; Iacobelli, M.; de Sanctis Lucentini, P. G.; Grossi, M.; de Santis, M.

    2007-06-01

    Neutrino masses might be as light as a few time the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. The relic cosmic neutrinos may cluster in wide Dark Hot Local Group Halo. High Energy ZeV cosmic neutrinos (in Z-Showering model) might hit relic ones at each mass in different resonance energies in our nearby Universe. This non-degenerated density and energy must split UHE Z-boson secondaries (in Z-Burst model) leading to multi injection of UHECR nucleons within future extreme AUGER energy. Secondaries of Z-Burst as neutral gamma, below a few tens EeV are better surviving local GZK cut-off and they might explain recent Hires BL-Lac UHECR correlations at small angles. A different high energy resonance must lead to Glashow's anti-neutrino showers while hitting electrons in matter. In water and ice it leads to isotropic light explosions. In air, Glashow's anti-neutrino showers lead to collimated and directional air-showers offering a new Neutrino Astronomy. Because of neutrino flavor mixing, astrophysical energetic tau neutrino above tens GeV must arise over atmospheric background. At TeV range is difficult to disentangle tau neutrinos from other atmospheric flavors. At greater energy around PeV, Tau escaping mountains and Earth and decaying in flight are effectively showering in air sky. These Horizontal showering is splitting by geomagnetic field in forked shapes. Such air-showers secondaries release amplified and beamed gamma bursts (like observed TGF), made also by muon and electron pair bundles, with their accompanying rich Cherenkov flashes. Also planet's largest (Saturn, Jupiter) atmosphere limbs offer an ideal screen for UHE GZK and Z-burst tau neutrino, because their largest sizes. Titan thick atmosphere and small radius are optimal for discovering up-going resonant Glashow resonant anti-neutrino electron showers. Detection from Earth of Tau, anti-Tau, anti-electron neutrino induced Air-showers by twin Magic Telescopes on top mountains, or space based detection on

  3. Neutrino induced showering from the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Fargion, D

    2003-01-01

    Ultra High Energy, UHE, Neutrino Astronomy should be soon tested looking toward the Earth. At present High Energy Neutrino Astronomy is searched by AMANDA, ANTARES underground detectors looking for its consequent unique muons secondary track. We suggest a higher energy Tau Neutrino Astronomy based on Horizontal and Upward Tau Air-Showers escaping from the Earth. These Tau air-showers greatly amplifies the single tau track by an abundant secondary tail (billions of electron pairs, gamma and tens of millions muon bundles) spread in huge areas (kilometer size) easily observable (even partially) from high mountains, balloon or satellite array detectors. Possible early evidence of such a New Neutrino UPTAUs or HORTAUs (Upward or Horizontal Tau Air-Showers) Astronomy may be already found in rare BATSE gamma records of brief up-going gamma showers named Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGF). The TGF features, energy and arrival clustering are well tuned to upward tau air-showers. Future confirmation of the Neutrino Tau As...

  4. Analysis of inclined showers measured with LOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saftoiu, A. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: allixme@gmail.com; Apel, W.D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [Inst. Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Auffenberg, J. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Wuppertal (Germany); Badea, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Baehren, L. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Buitink, S. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF Torino (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Daumiller, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)] (and others)

    2009-06-01

    In the present study, we analyze the radio signal from inclined air showers recorded by LOPES-30 in coincidence with KASCADE-Grande. LOPES-30 consists of 30 East-West oriented digital antennas, which are amplitude calibrated by an external source. Radio emission from air showers is considered a geomagnetic effect. Inclined events provide a larger range of values for geomagnetic angle (angle between shower axis and geomagnetic field direction) than vertical showers and thus more information on the emission processes can be gathered. In order to have the geometry of the air shower we use the reconstruction provided by the KASCADE-Grande particle detectors array. Analyzing events observed by both LOPES and the extended part of the KASCADE array, Grande, gives the possibility to test in particular the capability and efficiency of radio detection of more distant events. The results are compared with a previous analysis of inclined events recorded by the initial 10 antenna set-up, LOPES-10, in coincidence with the Grande array.

  5. Cosmic Ray Air Shower Detection with LOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haungs, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: haungs@ik.fzk.de; Apel, W.D.; Arteaga, J.C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [Inst. Prozessdatenverarb. und Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Badea, A.F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Baehren, L. [ASTRON, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, 53010 Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box Mg-6, RO-7690 Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Buitink, S. [Dept. of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Butcher, H. [ASTRON, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Daumiller, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Di Pierro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy)] (and others)

    2008-01-15

    LOPES is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and aims to investigate radio pulses from extensive air showers experimentally and theoretically. Data taken during half a year of operation of 10 LOPES antennas (LOPES-10), triggered by EAS observed with KASCADE-Grande have been analysed. We report about the results of correlations with shower parameters present in the radio signals measured by LOPES-10. The extended setup LOPES-30 consists of 30 antennas which have an absolute calibration and the data of which will be compared with expectations from detailed Monte-Carlo simulations. In addition, LOPES operates antennas of a different type (LOPES{sup STAR}) which are optimized for an application at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  6. Measurement of parton shower observables with OPAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, N.; Gieseke, S.; Kluth, S.; Plätzer, S.; Skands, P.

    2016-07-01

    A study of QCD coherence is presented based on a sample of about 397,000 e+e- hadronic annihilation events collected at √s = 91 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The study is based on four recently proposed observables that are sensitive to coherence effects in the perturbative regime. The measurement of these observables is presented, along with a comparison with the predictions of different parton shower models. The models include both conventional parton shower models and dipole antenna models. Different ordering variables are used to investigate their influence on the predictions.

  7. Measurement of parton shower observables with OPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of QCD coherence is presented based on a sample of about 397,000 e+e- hadronic annihilation events collected at √s = 91 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The study is based on four recently proposed observables that are sensitive to coherence effects in the perturbative regime. The measurement of these observables is presented, along with a comparison with the predictions of different parton shower models. The models include both conventional parton shower models and dipole antenna models. Different ordering variables are used to investigate their influence on the predictions.

  8. Air shower radio detection with LOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemer, J; Apel, W D; Arteaga, J C; Badea, F; Bekk, K; Bozdog, H; Daumiller, K [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T [Inst. Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Auffenberg, J [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Wuppertal (Germany); Baehren, L; Butcher, H [ASTRON, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Bertaina, M; Chiavassa, A [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita Torino (Italy); Biermann, P L [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie Bonn (Germany); Brancus, I M [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M; Buchholz, P [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Buitink, S [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Cossavella, F; Souza, V de [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: Johannes.Bluemer@ik.fzk.de (and others)

    2008-07-15

    LOPES is an array of 30 radio antenna co-located with the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower detector in Karlsruhe, Germany. It is designed as a digital radio interferometer for the detection of radio emission from extensive air showers. LOPES features high bandwidth and fast data processing. A unique asset is the concurrent operation with KASCADE-Grande. We report about the progress in understanding the radio signals measured by LOPES. In addition, the status and further perspectives of LOPES and the large scale application of this novel detection technique are sketched.

  9. Implementing NLO DGLAP evolution in Parton Showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Höche, Stefan [SLAC; Krauss, Frank [Durham U., IPPP; Prestel, Stefan [Fermilab

    2017-05-02

    We present a parton shower which implements the DGLAP evolution of parton densities and fragmentation functions at next-to-leading order precision up to effects stemming from local four-momentum conservation. The Monte-Carlo simulation is based on including next-to-leading order collinear splitting functions in an existing parton shower and combining their soft enhanced contributions with the corresponding terms at leading order. Soft double counting is avoided by matching to the soft eikonal. Example results from two independent realizations of the algorithm, implemented in the two event generation frameworks Pythia and Sherpa, illustrate the improved precision of the new formalism.

  10. Precise determination of muon and EM shower contents from shower universality property

    CERN Document Server

    Yushkov, A; Aramo, C; D'Urso, D; Guarino, F; Valore, L

    2011-01-01

    We present two new aspects of Extensive Air Shower (EAS) development universality allowing to make accurate estimation of muon and electromagnetic (EM) shower contents in two independent ways. In the first case, to get muon (or EM) signal in water Cherenkov detectors it is enough to know the vertical depth of shower maximum and the total signal. In the second case, the EM signal can be calculated from the primary particle energy and the zenith angle. In both cases the parameterizations of muon and EM signals are almost independent on primary particle nature, energy and zenith angle.

  11. Radio Emission in Atmospheric Air Showers: Results of LOPES-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haungs, A [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Apel, W D [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T [IPE, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)] (and others)

    2007-09-15

    LOPES is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and aims to measure and investigate radio pulses from Extensive Air Showers. Data taken during half a year of operation of 10 LOPES antennas (LOPES-10), triggered by showers observed with KASCADE-Grande have been analyzed. We report about results of correlations found of the measured radio signals by LOPES-10 with shower parameters.

  12. Radio Emission in Atmospheric Air Showers: Results of LOPES-10

    CERN Document Server

    Haungs, A; Asch, T; Badea, F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blumer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Bruggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Buitink, S; Butcher, H; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Hakenjos, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K H; Kolotaev, Yu; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Meurer, C; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Petcu, M; Petrovic, J; Pierog, T; Plewnia, S; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Sima, O; Singh, K; Stumpert, M; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Van Buren, J; Walkowiak, W; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; Zimmermann, D; Haungs, Andreas; al, et

    2006-01-01

    LOPES is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and aims to measure and investigate radio pulses from Extensive Air Showers. Data taken during half a year of operation of 10 LOPES antennas (LOPES-10), triggered by showers observed with KASCADE-Grande have been analyzed. We report about results of correlations found of the measured radio signals by LOPES-10 with shower parameters.

  13. Muons in Air Showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, M.

    We present measurements of muons in air showers at ultra-high energies with the Pierre Auger Observatory. The number of muons at the ground in air showers detected at large zenith angles is determined as a function of energy and the results are compared to air shower simulations. Furthermore, using data collected at zenith angles smaller than 60°, rescaling factors are derived that quantify the deficit of muon production in air shower simulations.

  14. Emergency Disinfection of Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    How to boil and disinfect water to kill most disease-causing microorganisms during emergency situations where regular water service has been interrupted and local authorities recommend using only bottled water, boiled water, or disinfected water.

  15. Summing threshold logs in a parton shower

    CERN Document Server

    Nagy, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    When parton distributions are falling steeply as the momentum fractions of the partons increases, there are effects that occur at each order in $\\alpha_s$ that combine to affect hard scattering cross sections and need to be summed. We show how to accomplish this in a leading approximation in the context of a parton shower Monte Carlo event generator.

  16. Highest Energy Neutrino Showers in EUSO

    CERN Document Server

    Fargion, D

    2002-01-01

    EUSO experiment, while monitoring the downward Earth atmosphere layers, may observe among common Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays, UHECR, also High Energy Neutrino-Induced Showers either blazing upward to the detectors at high (PeVs) energies or at much higher GZK E >= 10^19 eV energies, showering horizontally in air or vertically downward. A small fraction of these upward, horizontal and vertical Shower maybe originated by direct astrophysical UHE neutrino interacting on terrestrial air layers itself; however the dominant UHE neutrino signal are Upward and Horizontal Tau Air-Showers, UPTAUS and HORTAUs (or Earth skimming neutrinos), born within widest Earth Crust Crown (Sea or Rock) Areas, by UHE nu_tau + Nuclei--> tau interactions, respectively at PeVs and GZK energies: their rate and signatures are shown in a neutrino fluence map for EUSO thresholds versus other UHE air interacting neutrino signals and backgrounds. The effective target Masses originating HORTAUs seen by EUSO may exceed (on sea) a wide and hug...

  17. Systematic Improvement of QCD Parton Showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Jan; /CERN; Hoeche, Stefan; /SLAC; Hoeth, Hendrik; Krauss, Frank; Schonherr, Marek; Zapp, Korinna; /Durham U., IPPP; Schumann, Steffen; /Gottingen U., II. Phys. Inst.; Siegert, Frank; /Freiburg U.

    2012-05-17

    In this contribution, we will give a brief overview of the progress that has been achieved in the field of combining matrix elements and parton showers. We exemplify this by focusing on the case of electron-positron collisions and by reporting on recent developments as accomplished within the SHERPA event generation framework.

  18. A Parton Shower for High Energy Jets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Rosenkrantz; Lonnblad, Leif; M. Smillie, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to match the multi-parton states generated by the High Energy Jets Monte Carlo with parton showers generated by the Ariadne program using the colour dipole model. The High Energy Jets program already includes a full resummation of soft divergences. Hence, in the matching...

  19. Summing threshold logs in a parton shower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Zoltan [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Soper, Davison E. [Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (United States). Inst. of Theoretical Science

    2016-05-15

    When parton distributions are falling steeply as the momentum fractions of the partons increases, there are effects that occur at each order in α{sub s} that combine to affect hard scattering cross sections and need to be summed. We show how to accomplish this in a leading approximation in the context of a parton shower Monte Carlo event generator.

  20. A Parton Shower for High Energy Jets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Rosenkrantz; Lonnblad, Leif; M. Smillie, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to match the multi-parton states generated by the High Energy Jets Monte Carlo with parton showers generated by the Ariadne program using the colour dipole model. The High Energy Jets program already includes a full resummation of soft divergences. Hence, in the matching...

  1. Coherent radiation from extensive air showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Olaf; de Vries, Krijn D.; Werner, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The generic properties of the emission of coherent radiation from a moving charge distribution are discussed. The general structure of the charge and current distributions in an extensive air shower are derived. These are subsequently used to develop a very intuitive picture for the properties of th

  2. L3+C air shower array

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    Photo 01: a view of the L3+C air shower array; 50 scintillators on the roof of the SX-hall above L3. Photo 02: view of one of the detectors of the array.Photo 04: detectors seen against the background of the LEP Point 2 facilities.

  3. Disinfection Tests of MF-2 Disinfectant on Nature Water Resource

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jinlan; LIU Qingzeng; CUI Ying

    2002-01-01

    Objective To furnish evidence for practical application by examining the disinfection effect of MF - 2 disinfectant on different degree of contaminated water. Methods According to the determining methods of total bacterial count and coli - index of drinking water stimulated by the state conduct the forthwith disinfection experiments and accumulate disinfection experiments. Results Adding the MF - 2 into water resource to specific concentration according with the water resource sanitation criterion stipulated by the sater, after pointed time, it can chang water quality of severe contaminated water and questionable contaminated water into that of clean water, the quality of less contaminated water into that of drinking water. Conclusions MF - 2 disinfectant is applicable for disinfection of nature contaminated water resource in an outlying district and field - operation especially for urgent drinking water disinfection the area where there is neither clean water nor heating condition.

  4. Measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers with LOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoerandel, J.R., E-mail: j.horandel@astro.ru.n [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Apel, W.D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [IPE, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Badea, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Baehren, L. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita di Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Buitink, S. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita di Torino (Italy); Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplan etario, INAF Torino (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita di Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Daumiller, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Souza, V. de [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-02-21

    A new method is explored to detect extensive air showers: the measurement of radio waves emitted during the propagation of the electromagnetic shower component in the magnetic field of the Earth. Recent results of the pioneering experiment LOPES are discussed. It registers radio signals in the frequency range between 40 and 80 MHz. The intensity of the measured radio emission is investigated as a function of different shower parameters, such as shower energy, angle of incidence, and distance to shower axis. In addition, new antenna types are developed in the framework of LOPES{sup star} and new methods are explored to realize a radio self-trigger algorithm in real time.

  5. Measurement of Radio Emission from Extensive Air Showers with LOPES

    CERN Document Server

    Hoerandel, J R

    2009-01-01

    A new method is explored to detect extensive air showers: the measurement of radio waves emitted during the propagation of the electromagnetic shower component in the magnetic field of the Earth. Recent results of the pioneering experiment LOPES are discussed. It registers radio signals in the frequency range between 40 and 80 MHz. The intensity of the measured radio emission is investigated as a function of different shower parameters, such as shower energy, angle of incidence, and distance to shower axis. In addition, new antenna types are developed in the framework of LOPES-Star and new methods are explored to realize a radio self-trigger algorithm in real time.

  6. The Concepts of "Age" and "Universality" in Cosmic Ray Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Lipari, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    The concept of "age" as a parameter for the description of the state of development of high energy showers in the atmosphere has been in use in cosmic ray studies for several decades. In this work we briefly discuss how this concept, originally introduced to describe the average behavior of electromagnetic cascades, can be fruitfully applied to describe individual showers generated by primary particles of different nature, including protons, nuclei and neutrinos. Showers with the same age share three different important properties: (i) their electron size has the same fractional rate of change with increasing depth, (ii) the bulk of the electrons and photons in the shower (excluding high energy particles) have energy spectra with shapes and relative normalization uniquely determined by the age parameter, (iii) the electrons and photons in the shower have also the same angular and lateral distributions sufficiently far from the shower axis. In this work we discuss how the properties associated with the shower ...

  7. Biofilms on Hospital Shower Hoses: Characterization and Implications for Nosocomial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Giron, Maria J; Rodriguez-R, Luis M; Luo, Chengwei; Elk, Michael; Ryu, Hodon; Hoelle, Jill; Santo Domingo, Jorge W; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T

    2016-05-01

    Although the source of drinking water (DW) used in hospitals is commonly disinfected, biofilms forming on water pipelines are a refuge for bacteria, including possible pathogens that survive different disinfection strategies. These biofilm communities are only beginning to be explored by culture-independent techniques that circumvent the limitations of conventional monitoring efforts. Hence, theories regarding the frequency of opportunistic pathogens in DW biofilms and how biofilm members withstand high doses of disinfectants and/or chlorine residuals in the water supply remain speculative. The aim of this study was to characterize the composition of microbial communities growing on five hospital shower hoses using both 16S rRNA gene sequencing of bacterial isolates and whole-genome shotgun metagenome sequencing. The resulting data revealed a Mycobacterium-like population, closely related to Mycobacterium rhodesiae and Mycobacterium tusciae, to be the predominant taxon in all five samples, and its nearly complete draft genome sequence was recovered. In contrast, the fraction recovered by culture was mostly affiliated with Proteobacteria, including members of the genera Sphingomonas, Blastomonas, and Porphyrobacter.The biofilm community harbored genes related to disinfectant tolerance (2.34% of the total annotated proteins) and a lower abundance of virulence determinants related to colonization and evasion of the host immune system. Additionally, genes potentially conferring resistance to β-lactam, aminoglycoside, amphenicol, and quinolone antibiotics were detected. Collectively, our results underscore the need to understand the microbiome of DW biofilms using metagenomic approaches. This information might lead to more robust management practices that minimize the risks associated with exposure to opportunistic pathogens in hospitals.

  8. [Optimizing surgical hand disinfection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, G; Kramer, A; Rotter, M; Widmer, A

    2006-08-01

    For more than 110 years hands of surgeons have been treated before a surgical procedure in order to reduce the bacterial density. The kind and duration of treatment, however, has changed significantly over time. Recent scientific evidence suggests a few changes with the aim to optimize both the efficacy and the dermal tolerance. Aim of this article is the presentation and discussion of new insights in surgical hand disinfection. A hand wash should be performed before the first disinfection of a day, ideally at least 10 min before the beginning of the disinfection as it has been shown that a 1 min hand wash significantly increases skin hydration for up to 10 min. The application time may be as short as 1.5 min depending on the type of hand rub. Hands and forearms should be kept wet with the hand rub for the recommended application time in any case. A specific rub-in procedure according to EN 12791 has been found to be suitable in order to avoid untreated skin areas. The alcohol-based hand rub should have a proven excellent dermal tolerance in order to ensure appropriate compliance. Considering these elements in clinical practice can have a significant impact to optimize the high quality of surgical hand disinfection for prevention of surgical site infections.

  9. CHLORINE DISINFECTION OF AEROMONAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bacterial genus Aeromonas is currently listed on the USEPA's Candidate Contaminant List (CCL). Resistance to chemical disinfection is an essential aspect regarding all microbial groups listed on the CCL. This study was designed to determine the inactivation kinetics of Aeromo...

  10. Interleaved Parton Showers and Tuning Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Corke, Richard

    2010-01-01

    General-purpose Monte Carlo event generators have become important tools in particle physics, allowing the simulation of exclusive hadronic final states. In this article we examine the Pythia 8 generator, in particular focusing on its parton-shower algorithms. Some relevant new additions to the code are introduced, that should allow for a better description of data. We also implement and compare with 2 to 3 real-emission QCD matrix elements, to check how well the shower algorithm fills the phase space away from the soft and collinear regions. A tuning of the generator to Tevatron data is performed for two PDF sets and the impact of first new LHC data is examined.

  11. A new study of muons in air showers by NBU air shower array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, N.; Mukherjee, N.; Sarkar, S.; Basak, D. K.; Ghosh, B.

    1985-01-01

    The North Bengal University (NBU) air shower array has been in operation in conjunction with two muon magnetic spectrographs. The array incorporates 21 particle density sampling detectors around the magnetic spectrographs covering an area of 900 sq m. The layout of the array is based on the arrangement of detectors in a square symmetry. The array set up on the ground level is around a 10 m high magnetic spectrograph housing. This magnetic spectrograph housing limits the zenith angular acceptance of the incident showers to a few degrees. Three hundred muons in the fitted showers of size range 10 to the 4th power to 10 to the 5th power particles have so far been scanned and the momenta determined in the momentum range 2 - 440 GeV/c. More than 1500 recorded showers are now in the process of scanning and fitting. A lateral distribution of muons of energy greater than 300 MeV in the shower size range 10 to the 5th power to 7 x 10 to the 5th power has been obtained.

  12. An Analytical Approach to Fluctuations in Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Vázquez, R A

    1996-01-01

    We review the problem of fluctuations in particle shower theory. By using a generalization of Furry equation, we find relations between the $n$--particle correlation function and the number of particles average or 1--particle correlation function. Such relations show that the average is the only independent dynamical variable. We also develop a numerical code to solve the equation for the correlation functions and compare the results with those from a Montecarlo simulation which show a perfect agreement between both methods.

  13. Triple collinear emissions in parton showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Höche, Stefan [SLAC; Prestel, Stefan [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    A framework to include triple collinear splitting functions into parton showers is presented, and the implementation of flavor-changing NLO splitting kernels is discussed as a first application. The correspondence between the Monte-Carlo integration and the analytic computation of NLO DGLAP evolution kernels is made explicit for both timelike and spacelike parton evolution. Numerical simulation results are obtained with two independent implementations of the new algorithm, using the two independent event generation frameworks Pythia and Sherpa.

  14. Quark Matter Induced Extensive Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    If the dark matter of our galaxy is composed of nuggets of quarks or antiquarks in a colour superconducting phase there will be a small but non-zero flux of these objects through the Earth's atmosphere. A nugget of quark matter will deposit only a small fraction of it's kinetic energy in the atmosphere and is likely to be undetectable. If however the impacting object is composed of antiquarks the energy deposited can be quite large. In this case nuclear annihilations within the nugget will trigger an extensive air shower similar to that produced by a high energy cosmic ray. This paper gives a qualitative description of the basic properties of such a shower. Several distinctions from the air shower induced by a single ultra high energy nucleus will be described allowing these events to be distinguished from the cosmic ray background. The subtlety of these features may mean that some fraction of the high energy cosmic ray spectrum may in fact be due to this type of dark matter interaction. The estimated flux of...

  15. Socioeconomic status and exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking water in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serra Consol

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disinfection by-products in drinking water are chemical contaminants that have been associated with cancer and other adverse effects. Exposure occurs from consumption of tap water, inhalation and dermal absorption. Methods We determined the relationship between socioeconomic status and exposure to disinfection by-products in 1271 controls from a multicentric bladder cancer case-control study in Spain. Information on lifetime drinking water sources, swimming pool attendance, showering-bathing practices, and socioeconomic status (education, income was collected through personal interviews. Results The most highly educated subjects consumed less tap water (57% and more bottled water (33% than illiterate subjects (69% and 17% respectively, p-value = 0.003. These differences became wider in recent time periods. The time spent bathing or showering was positively correlated with attained educational level (p Conclusions The most highly educated subjects were less exposed to chlorination by-products through ingestion but more exposed through dermal contact and inhalation in pools and showers/baths. Health risk perceptions and economic capacity may affect patterns of water consumption that can result in differences in exposure to water contaminants.

  16. Dental unit waterlines disinfection using hypochlorous acid-based disinfectant

    OpenAIRE

    Irfana Fathima Shajahan; Kandaswamy, D; Padma Srikanth; L Lakshmi Narayana; R Selvarajan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy of a new disinfectant to disinfect the dental unit waterlines. Materials and Methods: New dental unit waterlines were installed in 13 dental chairs, and biofilm was allowed to grow for 10 days. Disinfection treatment procedure was carried out in the 12 units, and one unit was left untreated. The dental unit waterlines were removed and analyzed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) (TESCAN VEGA3 SBU). Result: On examina...

  17. Commercial Disinfectants During Disinfection Process Validation: More Failures than Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumber, Sushil Kumar; Khanduri, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Disinfection process validation is mandatory before introduction of a new disinfectant in hospital services. Commercial disinfection brands often question existing hospital policy claiming greater efficacy and lack of toxicity of their products. Inadvertent inadequate disinfection leads to morbidity, patient’s economic burden, and the risk of mortality. Aim To evaluate commercial disinfectants for high, intermediate and low-level disinfection so as to identify utility for our routine situations. Materials and Methods This laboratory based experiment was conducted at St Stephen Hospital, Delhi during July-September 2013. Twelve commercial disinfectants: Sanidex®, Sanocid®, Cidex®, SekuSept Aktiv®, BIB Forte®, Alprojet W®, Desnet®, Sanihygiene®, Incidin®, D125®, Lonzagard®, and Glutishield® were tested. Time-kill assay (suspension test) was performed against six indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella Typhi, Bacillus cereus, and Mycobacterium fortuitum). Low and high inoculum (final concentrations 1.5X106 and 9X106 cfu/ml) of the first five bacteria while only low level of M. fortuitum was tested. Results Cidex® (2.4% Glutaraldehyde) performed best as high level disinfectant while newer quarternary ammonium compounds (QACs) (Incidin®, D125®, and Lonzagard®) were good at low level disinfection. Sanidex® (0.55% Ortho-pthalaldehyde) though mycobactericidal took 10 minutes for sporicidal activity. Older QAC containing BIB Forte® and Desnet® took 20 minutes to fully inhibit P. aeruginosa. All disinfectants effectively reduced S. Typhi to zero counts within 5 minutes. Conclusion Cidex® is a good high-level disinfectant while newer QACs (Incidin®, D125®, and Lonzagard®) were capable low-level disinfectants. PMID:27656441

  18. Radio signal correlation at 32 MHz with extensive air showers parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Knurenko, Stanislav; Petrov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    The paper present correlation of radio signal with air shower parameters: shower energy E0 and depth of maximum Xmax. It is shown that from radio emission measurements of air showers one can obtain individual showers parameters and mass composition of cosmic rays. We also derived generalized formula for calculating energy of the air showers.

  19. Travelers' Health: Water Disinfection for Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chapter 2 - Food Poisoning from Marine Toxins Water Disinfection for Travelers Howard D. Backer RISK FOR TRAVELERS ... of iodine and chlorine (see Halogens below). Chemical Disinfection HALOGENS The most common chemical water disinfectants are ...

  20. Progress in Air Shower Radio Measurements: Detection of Distant Events

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Badea, A F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blumer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buitink, S; Bruggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Butcher, H; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huege, T; Kampert, K H; Kolotaev, Yu; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Meurer, C; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Petcu, M; Petrovic, J; Pierog, T; Plewnia, S; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Sima, O; Singh, K; Stumpert, M; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Van Buren, J; Walkowiak, W; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; Zimmermann, D

    2006-01-01

    Data taken during half a year of operation of 10 LOPES antennas (LOPES-10), triggered by EAS observed with KASCADE-Grande have been analysed. We report about the analysis of correlations of radio signals measured by LOPES-10 with extensive air shower events reconstructed by KASCADE-Grande, including shower cores at large distances. The efficiency of detecting radio signals induced by air showers up to distances of 700 m from the shower axis has been investigated. The results are discussed with special emphasis on the effects of the reconstruction accuracy for shower core and arrival direction on the coherence of the measured radio signal. In addition, the correlations of the radio pulse amplitude with the primary cosmic ray energy and with the lateral distance from the shower core are studied.

  1. Depth Distribution Of The Maxima Of Extensive Air Shower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. H.; Howell, L. W.

    2003-01-01

    Observations of the extensive air showers from space can be free from interference by low altitude clouds and aerosols if the showers develop at a sufficiently high altitude. In this paper we explore the altitude distribution of shower maxima to determine the fraction of all showers that will reach their maxima at sufficient altitudes to avoid interference from these lower atmosphere phenomena. Typically the aerosols are confined within a planetary boundary layer that extends from only 2-3 km above the Earth's surface. Cloud top altitudes extend above 15 km but most are below 4 km. The results reported here show that more than 75% of the showers that will be observed by EUSO have maxima above the planetary boundary layer. The results also show that more than 50% of the showers that occur on cloudy days have their maxima above the cloud tops.

  2. Preoperative preparation of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Reshma Aranha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is a stressful and anxiety provoking experience for children. Millions of children undergo surgery every year. The majority of children experience significant preoperative anxiety which intern can affect their recovery. Preoperative anxiety may bring about physical and physiological changes in children, which can be particularly evident in terms of increased heart rate and blood pressure. To identify various strategies used to minimize the preoperative anxiety of children and update their clinical effectiveness among children undergoing surgery, the authors searched PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Cochrane Library for identifying the relevant studies and retrieved available literature. It is concluded that utilization of the strategies available to reduce the preoperative anxiety of children will be a promising intervention to reduce anxiety, to promote relaxation, satisfaction, and speedy recovery. Many of these techniques are simple, cost-effective and can be easily carried out by nurses. It is essential to use the age appropriate and individualized methods in preparing children for surgery. Further research is required to strengthen the evidence.

  3. Radio Detection of Horizontal Extensive Air Showers with AERA

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    AERA, the Auger Engineering Radio Array, located at the Pierre Auger Observatory in Malarg\\"ue, Argentina measures the radio emission of extensive air showers in the 30-80 MHz frequency range and is optimized for the detection of air showers up to 60$^{\\circ}$ zenith angle. In this contribution the motivation, the status, and first results of the analysis of horizontal air showers with AERA will be presented.

  4. Hadron shower energy and direction measurements using drift chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinnel, T.S.; Sandler, P.H.; Smith, W.H.; Arroyo, C.; Bachmann, K.T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Bolton, T.; Foudas, C.; King, B.J.; Lefmann, W.C.; Leung, W.C.; Mishra, S.R.; Oltman, E.; Quintas, P.Z.; Rabinowitz, S.A.; Sciulli, F.J.; Seligman, W.G.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Merritt, F.S.; Oreglia, M.J.; Schumm, B.A.; Bernstein, R.H.; Borcherding, F.O.; Fisk, H.E.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; Merritt, K.W.B.; Schellman, H.; Yovanovitch, D.D.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.S.; Barbaro, P. de; Sakumoto, W.K. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States) Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States) Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States) Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States) Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States))

    1994-03-08

    We report energy and angle resolutions for hadron showers produced in the CCFR iron target-calorimeter. The measurements were made using drift chambers instrumented with FADC readout; showers were produced using a momentum-analyzed hadron test beam from the Fermilab Tevatron at energies of 40, 70, 100, 150, and 200 GeV. Shower energy measurements are compared to measurements using scintillation counters in the same target. (orig.)

  5. Disinfection and sterilization: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutala, William A; Weber, David J

    2013-05-01

    All invasive procedures involve contact by a medical device or surgical instrument with a patient's sterile tissue or mucous membranes. The level of disinfection or sterilization is dependent on the intended use of the object: critical (items that contact sterile tissue such as surgical instruments), semicritical (items that contact mucous membrane such as endoscopes), and noncritical (devices that contact only intact skin such as stethoscopes) items require sterilization, high-level disinfection, and low-level disinfection, respectively. Cleaning must always precede high-level disinfection and sterilization.

  6. A review on wastewater disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Amin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in regulations and development of new technologies have affected the selection of alternative for treated wastewater disinfection. Disinfection is the last barrier of wastewater reclamation process to protect ecosystem safety and human health. Driving forces include water scarcity and drinking water supply, irrigation, rapid industrialization, using reclaimed water, source protection, overpopulation, and environmental protection. The safe operation of water reuse depends on effluent disinfection. Understanding the differences in inactivation mechanisms is critical to identify rate-limiting steps involved in the inactivation process as well as to develop more effective disinfection strategies. Disinfection byproducts discharged from wastewater treatment plants may impair aquatic ecosystems and downstream drinking-water quality. Numerous inorganic and organic micropollutants can undergo reactions with disinfectants. Therefore, to mitigate the adverse effects and also to enhance that efficiency, the use of alternative oxidation/disinfection systems should be evaluated as possible alternative to chlorine. This review gives a summary of the traditional, innovative, and combined disinfection alternatives and also disinfection byproducts for effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plants.

  7. Time-domain radio pulses from particle showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Muniz, Jaime [Depto. de Fisica de Particulas and Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Romero-Wolf, Andres, E-mail: rw.andres@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Zas, Enrique [Depto. de Fisica de Particulas and Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2012-01-11

    The time-domain properties of the far-field coherent radio emission from electromagnetic showers are studied in depth. A purely time-domain technique for mapping the electromagnetic fields of charged tracks is developed. The method is applied to the ZHS shower code to produce electric fields. It is demonstrated that the technique is equivalent to the frequency domain methods used in the ZHS code and produces consistent results. In addition, a model for mapping the longitudinal charge profile of a shower to a time-domain electromagnetic field is developed. It is shown that the model is in good agreement to the results of shower simulation.

  8. Disinfectants used for environmental disinfection and new room decontamination technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutala, William A; Weber, David J

    2013-05-01

    Environmental contamination plays an important role in the transmission of several key health care-associated pathogens. Effective and thorough cleaning/disinfecting of the patient environment is essential. Room decontamination units (such as ultraviolet-C and hydrogen peroxide systems) aid in reducing environmental contamination after terminal room cleaning and disinfection.

  9. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, A; Villebro, N

    2005-01-01

    Smokers have a substantially increased risk of intra- and postoperative complications. Preoperative smoking intervention may be effective in decreasing this incidence. The preoperative period may be a well chosen time to offer smoking cessation interventions due to increased patient motivation....

  10. Precise determination of muon and electromagnetic shower contents from shower universality property

    CERN Document Server

    Yushkov, A; Aramo, C; Guarino, F; D'Urso, D; Valore, L

    2010-01-01

    We consider two new aspects of Extensive Air Shower development universality allowing to make accurate estimation of muon and electromagnetic (EM) shower contents in two independent ways. In the first case, to get muon (or EM) signal in water Cherenkov tanks or in scintillator detectors it is enough to know the vertical depth of shower maximum and the total signal in the ground detector. In the second case, the EM signal can be calculated from the primary particle energy and the zenith angle. In both cases the parametrizations of muon and EM signals are almost independent on primary particle nature, energy and zenith angle. Implications of the considered properties for mass composition and hadronic interaction studies are briefly discussed. The present study is performed on 28000 of proton, oxygen and iron showers, generated with CORSIKA~6.735 for $E^{-1}$ spectrum in the energy range log(E/eV)=18.5-20.0 and uniformly distributed in cos^2(theta) in zenith angle interval theta=0-65 degrees for QGSJET~II/Fluka ...

  11. Air shower registration algorithm and mathematical processing of showers with radio signal at the Yakutsk array

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, I; Petrov, Z

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes the techniques and method of registration of air shower radio emission at the Yakutsk array of extensive air showers at a frequency of 32 MHz. At this stage, emission registration involves two set of antennas, the distance between them is 500m. One set involves 8 antennas, second - 4 antennas. The antennas are perpendicularly crossed dipoles with radiation pattern North South,West East and raised 1.5 m above the ground. Each set of antennas connected to an industrial PC. The registration requires one of two triggers. First trigger are generated by scintillation detectors of Yakutsk array. Scintillation detectors cover area of 12 km^2 and registers air showers with energy more than 10^17 eV. The second trigger is generated by Small Cherenkov Array that covers area of 1 km^2 and registers air showers with energy 10^15 - 5*10^17 eV. Small Cherenkov Array is part of Yakutsk array and involve Cherenkov detectors located at a distance of 50, 100, 250 m. For further selection we are using an addi...

  12. Fractal dimension of particle showers measured in a highly granular calorimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Manqi; Jeans, Daniel; Boudry, Vincent; Brient, Jean-Claude; Videau, Henri

    2014-01-10

    We explore the fractal nature of particle showers using Monte Carlo simulation. We define the fractal dimension of showers measured in a high granularity calorimeter designed for a future lepton collider. The shower fractal dimension reveals detailed information of the spatial configuration of the shower. It is found to be characteristic of the type of interaction and highly sensitive to the nature of the incident particle. Using the shower fractal dimension, we demonstrate a particle identification algorithm that can efficiently separate electromagnetic showers, hadronic showers, and nonshowering tracks. We also find a logarithmic dependence of the shower fractal dimension on the particle energy.

  13. Showers with large zenith angles observed in emulsion chambers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任敬儒; 陆穗苓; 解卫; 王承瑞; 何瑁; 张乃健

    1997-01-01

    Showers with large zenith angles are observed in emulsion chambers exposed at Mt.Kanbala.The intensity of high energy muons is given and the multicore showers with large zenith angles are found.It is indicated that a new phenomenon may exist in the high energy nuclear interactions of cosmic rays.

  14. Construction and operation of an electromagnetic shower detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbincius, P.H.; Polychronakos, V.A.; Barton, D.S.; Dobrowolski, T.; Halliwell, C.; Kendall, H.W.; Lyons, T.; Young, C.C.; Nassalski, J.; Siemiarczuk, T.

    1979-10-01

    An electromagnetic shower detector consisting of lead glass blocks and scintillator hodoscopes was constructed. During calibration runs detector resolutions were measured for single incident electrons. Performance of the detector for ..pi../sup 0/ and multi-photon showers, including sizable backgrounds, was studied during actual data runs. This detector was used in Fermilab Experiment 451.

  15. Universality in the longitudinal development of Cosmic Ray showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipari, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    In this work we derive the result that the shape of the longitudinal development of individual very high energy showers, not too far from maximum, has in most cases a simple, smooth shape that resembles a gaussian with a small distortion, so that the post-maximum width of the shower profile is broader than the pre-maximum width. The distortion becomes smaller for larger shower energies. These results are independent from the nature of the primary particle (photon, electron, proton or nucleus) and are related to the fact that the spectra of the particles (e± and γ) that form the dominant component of a shower, have spectra that in good approximation depends only on the shower age. The longitudinal profiles of the showers are therefore reasonably well characterized by only few parameters: the position and size at maximum: tmax and Nmax, the width σ and the asymmetry a. Information about the nature of the primary particles (and the properties of hadronic interactions) can be extracted from statistical studies of the distributions of the shape parameters. Studies of tmax (the position of the shower maximum) are the most sensitive, but also the distributions of the shower width and asymmetry can give valuable information.

  16. Measure Guideline. Water Management at Tub and Shower Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Bruce [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Due to the high concentrations of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home’s structure a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. This guide shows how to install fundamental waterproofing strategies to prevent water related issues at shower and tub areas.

  17. The Karlsruhe extensive air shower simulation code CORSIKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdevielle, J. N.; Grieder, P.; Knapp, J.; Gabriel, P.; Gils, H. J.; Heck, D.; Mayer, H. J.; Oehlschläger, J.; Rebel, H.; Schatz, G.; Thouw, T.

    1992-11-01

    CORSIKA is a detailed simulation program for extensive air showers initiated by high energy cosmic particles. Primary protons and nuclei up to iron can be treated as well as photons. The reaction model for the hadronic interactions is based on the Dual Parton Model and relies on experimental data wherever possible. For electromagnetic interactions the shower program EGS4 may be used.

  18. Measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers with LOPES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horandel, J.R.; Apel, W.D.; Arteaga, J.C.; Asch, T.; Badea, F.; Bahren, L.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P.L.; Blumer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I.M.; Bruggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buitink, S.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; Souza, V. de; Pierro, F. di; Doll, P.; Ender, M.; Engel, R.; Falcke, H.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P.L.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Horneffer, A.; Huege, T.; Isar, P.G.; Kampert, K.H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Kromer, O.; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S.J.; Link, K.; Luczak, P.; Ludwig, M.; Mathes, H.J.; Mayer, H.J.; Melissas, M.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Nigl, A.; Oehlschlager, J.; Over, S.; Palmieri, N.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rautenberg, J.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Saftoiu, A.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schroder, F.; Sima, O.; Singh, K.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G.C.; Ulrich, H.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.; Zensus, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    A new method is explored to detect extensive air showers: the measurement of radio waves emitted during the propagation of the electromagnetic shower component in the magnetic field of the Earth. Recent results of the pioneering experiment LOPES are discussed. It registers radio signals in the frequ

  19. The Geant4-Based ATLAS Fast Electromagnetic Shower Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Barberio, E; Butler, B; Cheung, S L; Dell'Acqua, A; Di Simone, A; Ehrenfeld, W; Gallas, M V; Glasow, A; Hughes, E; Marshall, Z; Müller, J; Placakyte, R; Rimoldi, A; Savard, P; Tsulaia, V; Waugh, A; Young, C C; 10th ICATPP Conference on Astroparticle, Particle, Space Physics, Detectors and Medical Physics Applications

    2008-01-01

    We present a three-pronged approach to fast electromagnetic shower simulation in ATLAS. Parameterisation is used for high-energy, shower libraries for medium-energy, and an averaged energy deposition for very low-energy particles. We present a comparison between the fast simulation and full simulation in an ATLAS Monte Carlo production.

  20. 3D Reconstruction of Extensive Air Showers from Fluorescence Data

    CERN Document Server

    Andringa, S; Pimenta, M

    2007-01-01

    A new method to reconstruct the 3-dimensional structure of extensive air showers, seen by fluorescence detectors, is proposed. The observation of the shower is done in 2-dimensional pixels, for consecutive time bins. Time corresponds to a third dimension. Assuming that the cosmic ray shower propagates as a plane wave front moving at the speed of light, a complex 3D volume in space can be associated to each measured charge (per pixel and time bin). The 3D description in space allows a simultaneous access to the longitudinal and lateral profiles of each shower. In the case that several eyes observe the same shower, the method gives a straight-forward combination of all the information. This method is in an early phase of development and is not used for the general reconstruction of the Auger data.

  1. Observation of Polarised Microwave Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Smida, R; Engel, R; Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kroemer, O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Mathys, S; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Neunteufel, P; Oehlschlaeger, J; Palmieri, N; Pekala, J; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Riegel, M; Roth, M; Salamida, F; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Stasielak, J; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Unger, M; Weber, M; Weindl, A; Wilczynski, H; Will, M; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first direct measurement of the basic features of microwave radio emission from extensive air showers. Using a trigger provided by the KASCADE-Grande air shower array, the signals of the microwave antennas of the CROME (Cosmic-Ray Observation via Microwave Emission) experiment have been read out and searched for signatures of radio emission by high-energy air showers. Microwave signals have been detected for more than 30 showers with energies above $3\\times10^{16}$\\,eV. The observations presented in this Letter are consistent with a mainly forward-beamed, coherent and polarised emission process in the GHz frequency range. An isotropic, unpolarised radiation is disfavoured as the dominant emission model. The measurements show that microwave radiation offers a new means of studying air showers at very high energy.

  2. Hadron shower decomposition in a highly granular calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadeeva, Marina; CALICE Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The spatial development of showers induced by positive hadrons with momenta 10-80 GeV in the highly granular CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadronic calorimeter is analysed. The parametrisation of both longitudinal and radial shower profiles with the two- component functions are fit to the test beam data and simulations using the physics lists QGSP_BERT and FTFP_BERT from GEANT4 version 9.6 patch 01. The shower parameters, describing the longitudinal tail and radial halo, are in good agreement between data and simulations and are similar for pions and protons. For the longitudinal development, the most significant difference between data and simulations is in the relative containment of the separated components. For the radial development, the core slope parameter is underestimated by simulations. The physics list FTFP_BERT gives a very good description of proton showers in the studied energy range and gives better predictions of the pion shower development than QGSP_BERT.

  3. Extensive Air Shower Simulations at the Highest Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Knapp, J; Sciutto, S J; Dova, M T; Risse, M

    2003-01-01

    Air shower simulation programs are essential tools for the analysis of data from cosmic ray experiments and for planning the layout of new detectors. They are used to estimate the energy and mass of the primary particle. Unfortunately the model uncertainties translate directly into systematic errors in the energy and mass determination. Aiming at energies $> 10^{19}$ eV, the models have to be extrapolated far beyond the energies available at accelerators. On the other hand, hybrid measurement of ground particle densities and calorimetric shower energy, as will be provided by the Pierre Auger Observatory, will strongly constrain shower models. While the main uncertainty of contemporary models comes from our poor knowledge of the (soft) hadronic interactions at high energies, also electromagnetic interactions, low-energy hadronic interactions and the particle transport influence details of the shower development. We review here the physics processes and some of the computational techniques of air shower models ...

  4. Hadronic Shower Development in Iron-Scintillator Tile Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Amaral, P; Anderson, K; Barreira, G; Benetta, R; Berglund, S; Biscarat, C; Blanchot, G; Blucher, E; Bogush, A A; Bohm, C; Boldea, V; Borisov, O; Bosman, M; Bromberg, C; Budagov, Yu A; Burdin, S; Caloba, L; Carvalho, J; Casado, M P; Castillo, M V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Chadelas, R; Chirikov-Zorin, I E; Chlachidze, G; Cobal, M; Cogswell, F; Colaço, F; Cologna, S; Constantinescu, S; Costanzo, D; Crouau, M; Daudon, F; David, J; David, M; Davidek, T; Dawson, J; De, K; Del Prete, T; De Santo, A; Di Girolamo, B; Dita, S; Dolejsi, J; Dolezal, Z; Downing, R; Efthymiopoulos, I; Engström, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Evans, H; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Flaminio, V; Gallas, E; Gaspar, M; Gil, I; Gildemeister, O; Glagolev, V; Gomes, A; González, V; González de la Hoz, S; Grabskii, V; Graugès-Pous, E; Grenier, P; Hakopian, H H; Haney, M; Hansen, M; Hellman, S; Henriques, A; Hébrard, C; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Huston, J; Ivanyushenkov, Yu M; Jon-And, K; Juste, A; Kakurin, S; Karapetian, G V; Karyukhin, A N; Kopikov, S; Kukhtin, V; Kulchitskii, Yu A; Kurzbauer, W; Kuzmin, M; Lami, S; Lapin, V; Lazzeroni, C; Lebedev, A; Leitner, R; Li, J; Lomakin, Yu F; Lomakina, O V; Lokajícek, M; López-Amengual, J M; Maio, A; Malyukov, S; Marroquin, F; Martins, J P; Mazzoni, E; Merritt, F S; Miller, R; Minashvili, I A; Miralles, L; Montarou, G; Munar, A; Némécek, S; Nessi, Marzio; Onofre, A; Orteu, S; Park, I C; Pallin, D; Pantea, D; Paoletti, R; Patriarca, J; Pereira, A; Perlas, J A; Petit, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinhão, J; Poggioli, L; Price, L; Proudfoot, J; Pukhov, O; Reinmuth, G; Renzoni, G; Richards, R; Roda, C; Romance, J B; Romanov, V; Ronceux, B; Rosnet, P; Rumyantsev, V; Rusakovich, N; Sanchis, E; Sanders, H; Santoni, C; Santos, J; Sawyer, L; Says, L P; Seixas, J M; Selldén, B; Semenov, A; Shchelchkov, A S; Shochet, M; Simaitis, V; Sissakian, A N; Solodkov, A; Solovyanov, O; Sonderegger, P; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spanó, F; Stanek, R; Starchenko, E A; Stephens, R; Suk, M; Tang, F; Tas, P; Thaler, J; Tokar, S; Topilin, N; Trka, Z; Turcot, A S; Turcotte, M; Valkár, S; Varandas, M J; Vartapetian, A H; Vazeille, F; Vichou, I; Vinogradov, V; Vorozhtsov, S B; Wagner, D; White, A; Wolters, H; Yamdagni, N; Yarygin, G; Yosef, C; Zaitsev, A; Zdrazil, M; Zúñiga, J

    2000-01-01

    The lateral and longitudinal profiles of hadronic showers detected by a prototype of the ATLAS Iron-Scintillator Tile Hadron Calorimeter have been investigated. This calorimeter uses a unique longitudinal configuration of scintillator tiles. Using a fine-grained pion beam scan at 100 GeV, a detailed picture of transverse shower behavior is obtained. The underlying radial energy densities for four depth segments and for the entire calorimeter have been reconstructed. A three-dimensional hadronic shower parametrization has been developed. The results presented here are useful for understanding the performance of iron-scintillator calorimeters, for developing fast simulations of hadronic showers, for many calorimetry problems requiring the integration of a shower energy deposition in a volume and for future calorimeter design.

  5. Particle Showers in a Highly Granular Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The CALICE collaboration has constructed highly granular electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeter prototypes to evaluate technologies for the use in detector systems at a future Linear Collider. The hadron calorimeter uses small scintillator cells individually read out with silicon photomultipliers. The system with 7608 channels has been successfully operated in beam tests at DESY, CERN and Fermilab since 2006, and represents the first large scale tests of these devices in high energy physics experiments. The unprecedented granularity of the detector provides detailed information of the properties of hadronic showers, which helps to constrain hadronic shower models through comparisons with model calculations. We will discuss results on longitudinal and lateral shower profiles compared to a variety of different shower models, and present studies of the energy reconstruction of hadronic showers using software compensation techniques.

  6. A Simple Parallelization Scheme for Extensive Air Shower Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Stokes, B T; Ivanov, D; Matthews, J N; Thomson, G B

    2011-01-01

    A simple method for the parallelization of extensive air shower simulations is described. A shower is simulated at fixed steps in altitude. At each step, daughter particles below a specified energy threshold are siphoned off and tabulated for further simulation. Once the entire shower has been tabulated, the resulting list of particles is concatenated and divided into separate list files where each possesses a similar projected computation time. These lists are then placed on a computation cluster where the simulation can be completed in a piecemeal fashion as computing resources become available. Once the simulation is complete, the outputs are reassembled as a complete air shower simulation. The original simulation program (in this case CORSIKA) is in no way altered for this procedure. Verification is obtained by comparisons of 10^(16.5) eV showers produced with and without parallelization.

  7. Probing the radio emission from air showers with polarization measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bardenet, R.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Foerster, N.; Fox, B. D.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PeÂķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Preda, T.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Straub, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcǎu, O.; Thao, N. T.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    The emission of radio waves from air showers has been attributed to the so-called geomagnetic emission process. At frequencies around 50 MHz this process leads to coherent radiation which can be observed with rather simple setups. The direction of the electric field induced by this emission process depends only on the local magnetic field vector and on the incoming direction of the air shower. We report on measurements of the electric field vector where, in addition to this geomagnetic component, another component has been observed that cannot be described by the geomagnetic emission process. The data provide strong evidence that the other electric field component is polarized radially with respect to the shower axis, in agreement with predictions made by Askaryan who described radio emission from particle showers due to a negative charge excess in the front of the shower. Our results are compared to calculations which include the radiation mechanism induced by this charge-excess process.

  8. Hadronic shower development in Iron-Scintillator Tile Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, P.; Amorim, A.; Anderson, K.; Barreira, G.; Benetta, R.; Berglund, S.; Biscarat, C.; Blanchot, G.; Blucher, E.; Bogush, A.; Bohm, C.; Boldea, V.; Borisov, O.; Bosman, M.; Bromberg, C.; Budagov, J.; Burdin, S.; Caloba, L.; Carvalho, J.; Casado, P.; Castillo, M.V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Chadelas, R.; Chirikov-Zorin, I.; Chlachidze, G.; Cobal, M.; Cogswell, F.; Colaco, F.; Cologna, S.; Constantinescu, S.; Costanzo, D.; Crouau, M.; Daudon, F.; David, J.; David, M.; Davidek, T.; Dawson, J.; De, K.; Del Prete, T.; De Santo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dita, S.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Downing, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Engstroem, M.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Evans, H.; Fenyuk, A.; Ferrer, A.; Flaminio, V.; Gallas, E.; Gaspar, M.; Gil, I.; Gildemeister, O.; Glagolev, V.; Gomes, A.; Gonzalez, V.; Gonzalez De La Hoz, S.; Grabski, V.; Grauges, E.; Grenier, P.; Hakopian, H.; Haney, M.; Hansen, M.; Hellman, S.; Henriques, A.; Hebrard, C.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.; Huston, J.; Ivanyushenkov, Yu.; Jon-And, K.; Juste, A.; Kakurin, S.; Karapetian, G.; Karyukhin, A.; Kopikov, S.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kurzbauer, W.; Kuzmin, M.; Lami, S.; Lapin, V.; Lazzeroni, C.; Lebedev, A.; Leitner, R.; Li, J.; Lomakin, Yu.; Lomakina, O.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopez Amengual, J.M.; Maio, A.; Malyukov, S.; Marroquin, F.; Martins, J.P.; Mazzoni, E.; Merritt, F.; Miller, R.; Minashvili, I.; Miralles, Ll.; Montarou, G.; Munar, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nessi, M. E-mail: marzio.nessi@cern.ch; Onofre, A.; Orteu, S.; Park, I.C.; Pallin, D.; Pantea, D.; Paoletti, R.; Patriarca, J.; Pereira, A.; Perlas, J.A.; Petit, P.; Pilcher, J.; Pinhao, J.; Poggioli, L.; Price, L.; Proudfoot, J.; Pukhov, O.; Reinmuth, G.; Renzoni, G.; Richards, R.; Roda, C.; Romance, J.B.; Romanov, V.; Ronceux, B.; Rosnet, P.; Rumyantsev, V.; Russakovich, N.; Sanchis, E.; Sanders, H.; Santoni, C.; Santos, J.; Sawyer, L.; Says, L.-P.; Seixas, J.M.; Sellden, B.; Semenov, A.; Shchelchkov, A.; Shochet, M.; Simaitis, V. [and others

    2000-03-21

    The lateral and longitudinal profiles of hadronic showers detected by a prototype of the ATLAS Iron-Scintillator Tile Hadron Calorimeter have been investigated. This calorimeter presents a unique longitudinal configuration of scintillator tiles. Using a fine-grained pion beam scan at 100 GeV, a detailed picture of transverse shower behaviour is obtained. The underlying radial energy densities for the four depth segments and for the entire calorimeter have been reconstructed. A three-dimensional hadronic shower parametrisation has been developed. The results presented here are useful for understanding the performance of iron-scintillator calorimeters, for developing fast simulations of hadronic showers, for many calorimetry problems requiring the integration of a shower energy deposition in a volume and for future calorimeters design.

  9. Meteoroid Environment Modeling: The Meteoroid Engineering Model and Shower Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, Althea V.

    2017-01-01

    The meteoroid environment is often divided conceptually into meteor showers and the sporadic meteor background. It is commonly but incorrectly assumed that meteoroid impacts primarily occur during meteor showers; instead, the vast majority of hazardous meteoroids belong to the sporadic complex. Unlike meteor showers, which persist for a few hours to a few weeks, sporadic meteoroids impact the Earth's atmosphere and spacecraft throughout the year. The Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) has produced two environment models to handle these cases: the Meteoroid Engineering Model (MEM) and an annual meteor shower forecast. The sporadic complex, despite its year-round activity, is not isotropic in its directionality. Instead, their apparent points of origin, or radiants, are organized into groups called "sources". The speed, directionality, and size distribution of these sporadic sources are modeled by the Meteoroid Engineering Model (MEM), which is currently in its second major release version (MEMR2) [Moorhead et al., 2015]. MEM provides the meteoroid flux relative to a user-provided spacecraft trajectory; it provides the total flux as well as the flux per angular bin, speed interval, and on specific surfaces (ram, wake, etc.). Because the sporadic complex dominates the meteoroid flux, MEM is the most appropriate model to use in spacecraft design. Although showers make up a small fraction of the meteoroid environment, they can produce significant short-term enhancements of the meteoroid flux. Thus, it can be valuable to consider showers when assessing risks associated with vehicle operations that are brief in duration. To assist with such assessments, the MEO issues an annual forecast that reports meteor shower fluxes as a function of time and compares showers with the time-averaged total meteoroid flux. This permits missions to do quick assessments of the increase in risk posed by meteor showers. Section II describes MEM in more detail and describes our current efforts

  10. Pre-operative anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, B; Richards, T

    2015-01-01

    Pre-operative anaemia is a relatively common finding, affecting a third of patients undergoing elective surgery. Traditionally associated with chronic disease, management has historically focused on the use of blood transfusion as a solution for anaemia in the peri-operative period. Data from large series now suggest that anaemia is an independent risk associated with poor outcome in both cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. Furthermore, blood transfusion does not appear to ameliorate this risk, and in fact may increase the risk of postoperative complications and hospital length of stay. Consequently, there is a need to identify, diagnose and manage pre-operative anaemia to reduce surgical risk. Discoveries in the pathways of iron metabolism have found that chronic disease can cause a state of functional iron deficiency leading to anaemia. The key iron regulatory protein hepcidin, activated in response to inflammation, inhibits absorption of iron from the gastrointestinal tract and further reduces bioavailability of iron stores for red cell production. Consequently, although iron stores (predominantly ferritin) may be normal, the transport of iron either from the gastrointestinal tract or iron stores to the bone marrow is inhibited, leading to a state of 'functional' iron deficiency and subsequent anaemia. Since absorption from the gastrointestinal tract is blocked, increasing oral iron intake is ineffective, and studies are now looking at the role of intravenous iron to treat anaemia in the surgical setting. In this article, we review the incidence and impact of anaemia on the pre-operative patient. We explain how anaemia may be caused by functional iron deficiency, and how iron deficiency anaemia may be diagnosed and treated.

  11. Slope of the lateral density function of extensive air showers around the knee region as an indicator of shower age

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Rajat K

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing simulated extensive air shower (EAS) events generated with the Monte Carlo code CORSIKA, this paper critically studies the characteristics of lateral distribution of electrons in EAS around the knee energy region of the energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays. The study takes into account the issue of lateral shower age parameter as indicator of the stage of development of showers in the atmosphere. The correlation of lateral shower age parameter with other EAS observables is examined, using simulated data in the context of its possible use in a multi-parameter study of EAS, with a view to obtaining information about the nature of the shower initiating primaries at sea level EAS experiments. It is shown that the observed slope of the lateral density function in the 3-dimensional plot at least for the KASCADE data supports the idea of a transition from light to heavy mass composition around the knee.

  12. Slope of the lateral density function of extensive air showers around the knee region as an indicator of shower age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Rajat K.; Dam, Sandip

    2016-11-01

    Analyzing simulated extensive air shower (EAS) events generated with the Monte Carlo code CORSIKA, this paper critically studies the characteristics of lateral distribution of electrons in EAS around the knee energy region of the energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays. The study takes into account the issue of the lateral shower age parameter as an indicator of the stage of development of showers in the atmosphere. The correlation of the lateral shower age parameter with other EAS observables is examined, using simulated data in the context of its possible use in a multi-parameter study of EAS, with a view to obtaining information about the nature of the shower initiating primaries at sea level EAS experiments. It is shown that the observed slope of the lateral density function in the 3-dimensional plot, at least for the KASCADE data, supports the idea of a transition from light to heavy mass composition around the knee.

  13. Arrival directions of large air showers, low-mu showers and old-age low-mu air showers observed at St. Chacaltaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, T.; Hagiwara, K.; Yoshii, H.; Martinic, N.; Siles, L.; Miranda, P.; Kakimoto, F.; Obara, T.; Inoue, N.; Suga, K.

    1985-01-01

    Arrival directions of air showers with primary energies in the range 10 to the 16.5 power eV to 10 to the 18th power eV show the first harmonic in right ascension (RA) with amplitude of 2.7 + or - 1.0% and phase of 13-16h. However, the second harmonic in RA slightly seen for showers in the range 10 to the 18th power eV to 10 to the 19th power eV disappeared by accumulation of observed showers. The distribution of arrival directions of low-mu air showers with primary energies around 10 to the 15th power eV observed at Chacaltaya from 1962 to 1967 is referred to, relating to the above-mentioned first harmonic. Also presented in this paper are arrival directions of old-age low-mu air showers observed at Chacaltaya from 1962 to 1967, for recent interest in gamma-ray air showers.

  14. Fast Simulation of Electromagnetic Showers in the ATLAS Calorimeter: Frozen Showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barberio, E.; /Melbourne U.; Boudreau, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Butler, B.; /SLAC; Cheung, S.L.; /Toronto U.; Dell' Acqua, A.; /CERN; Di Simone, A.; /CERN; Ehrenfeld, E.; /Hamburg U. /DESY; Gallas, M.V.; /CERN; Glazov, A.; /DESY; Marshall, Z.; /Caltech /Nevis Labs, Columbia U.; Mueller, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Placakyte, R.; /DESY; Rimoldi, A.; /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia; Savard, P.; /Toronto U.; Tsulaia, V.; /Pittsburgh U.; Waugh, A.; /Sydney U.; Young, C.C.; /SLAC

    2011-11-29

    One of the most time consuming process simulating pp interactions in the ATLAS detector at LHC is the simulation of electromagnetic showers in the calorimeter. In order to speed up the event simulation several parametrisation methods are available in ATLAS. In this paper we present a short description of a frozen shower technique, together with some recent benchmarks and comparison with full simulation. An expected high rate of proton-proton collisions in ATLAS detector at LHC requires large samples of simulated events (Monte Carlo) to study various physics processes. A detailed simulation of particle reactions ('full simulation') in the ATLAS detector is based on GEANT4 and is very accurate. However, due to complexity of the detector, high particle multiplicity and GEANT4 itself, the average CPU time spend to simulate typical QCD event in pp collision is 20 or more minutes for modern computers. During detector simulation the largest time is spend in the calorimeters (up to 70%) most of which is required for electromagnetic particles in the electromagnetic (EM) part of the calorimeters. This is the motivation for fast simulation approaches which reduce the simulation time without affecting the accuracy. Several of fast simulation methods available within the ATLAS simulation framework (standard Athena based simulation program) are discussed here with the focus on the novel frozen shower library (FS) technique. The results obtained with FS are presented here as well.

  15. pp Interaction in Extended Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Kohara, A Kendi; Kodama, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Applying the recently constructed analytic representation for the pp scattering amplitudes, we present a study of p-air cross sections, with comparison to the data from Extensive Air Shower (EAS) measurements. The amplitudes describe with precision all available accelerator data at ISR, SPS and LHC energies, and its theoretical basis, together with the very smooth energy dependence of parameters controlled by unitarity and dispersion relations, permit reliable extrapolation to higher energies and to asymptotic ranges. The comparison with cosmic ray data is very satisfactory in the whole pp energy interval from 1 to 100 TeV. High energy asymptotic behaviour of cross sections is investigated in view of the geometric scaling property of the amplitudes. The amplitudes predict that the proton does not behave as a black disk even at asymptotically high enegies, and we discuss possible non-trivial consequences of this fact for pA collision cross sections at higher energies.

  16. pp interactions in extended air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendi Kohara A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Applying the recently constructed analytic representation for the pp scattering amplitudes, we present a study of p-air cross sections, with comparison to the data from Extensive Air Shower (EAS measurements. The amplitudes describe with precision all available accelerator data at ISR, SPS and LHC energies, and its theoretical basis, together with the very smooth energy dependence of parameters controlled by unitarity and dispersion relations, permit reliable extrapolation to higher energies and to asymptotic ranges. The comparison with cosmic ray data is very satisfactory in the whole pp energy interval from 1 to 100 TeV. High energy asymptotic behaviour of cross sections is investigated in view of the geometric scaling property of the amplitudes. The amplitudes predict that the proton does not behave as a black disk even at asymptotically high enegies, and we discuss possible non-trivial consequences of this fact for pA collision cross sections at higher energies.

  17. Shower reconstruction in TUNKA-HiSCORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porelli, Andrea; Wischnewski, Ralf [DESY-Zeuthen, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The Tunka-HiSCORE detector is a non-imaging wide-angle EAS cherenkov array designed as an alternative technology for gamma-ray physics above 10 TeV and to study spectrum and composition of cosmic rays above 100 TeV. An engineering array with nine stations (HiS-9) has been deployed in October 2013 on the site of the Tunka experiment in Russia. In November 2014, 20 more HiSCORE stations have been installed, covering a total array area of 0.24 square-km. We describe the detector setup, the role of precision time measurement, and give results from the innovative WhiteRabbit time synchronization technology. Results of air shower reconstruction are presented and compared with MC simulations, for both the HiS-9 and the HiS-29 detector arrays.

  18. Electroweak Splitting Functions and High Energy Showering

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Junmou; Tweedie, Brock

    2016-01-01

    We derive the electroweak (EW) collinear splitting functions for the Standard Model, including the massive fermions, gauge bosons and the Higgs boson. We first present the splitting functions in the limit of unbroken SU(2)xU(1) and discuss their general features in the collinear and soft-collinear regimes. We then systematically incorporate EW symmetry breaking (EWSB), which leads to the emergence of additional "ultra-collinear" splitting phenomena and naive violations of the Goldstone-boson Equivalence Theorem. We suggest a particularly convenient choice of non-covariant gauge (dubbed "Goldstone Equivalence Gauge") that disentangles the effects of Goldstone bosons and gauge fields in the presence of EWSB, and allows trivial book-keeping of leading power corrections in the VEV. We implement a comprehensive, practical EW showering scheme based on these splitting functions using a Sudakov evolution formalism. Novel features in the implementation include a complete accounting of ultra-collinear effects, matching...

  19. Simulation of radiation energy release in air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Christian; Erdmann, Martin; Hörandel, Jörg R.; Huege, Tim; Schulz, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    A simulation study of the energy released by extensive air showers in the form of MHz radiation is performed using the CoREAS simulation code. We develop an efficient method to extract this radiation energy from air-shower simulations. We determine the longitudinal profile of the radiation energy release and compare it to the longitudinal profile of the energy deposit by the electromagnetic component of the air shower. We find that the radiation energy corrected for the geometric dependence of the geomagnetic emission scales quadratically with the energy in the electromagnetic component of the air shower with a second-order dependence on the atmospheric density at the position of the maximum shower development Xmax. In a measurement where Xmax is not accessible, this second order dependence can be approximated using the zenith angle of the incoming direction of the air shower with only a minor loss in accuracy. Our method results in an intrinsic uncertainty of 4% in the determination of the energy in the electromagnetic air-shower component, which is well below current experimental uncertainties.

  20. IAU Meteor Data Center | the shower database: a status report

    CERN Document Server

    Jopek, Tadeusz Jan

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the meteor shower part of Meteor Data Center database includes: 112 established showers, 563 in the working list, among them 36 have pro tempore status and 23 will be removed from the list. The list of shower complexes contains 25 groups, 3 have established status and 1 has pro tempore status. In the past three years, new meteor showers submitted to the MDC database were detected amongst meteors observed by CAMS stations (Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance), meteors included in the EDMOND (European viDeo MeteOr Network Database), meteors collected by Japanese SonotaCo Network, meteors recorded in IMO (International Meteor Organization) database, amongst meteors observed by Croatian Meteor Network and meteors observed on the Southern Hemisphere by the SAAMER radar. During the XXIXth General Assembly of the IAU in Honolulu, Hawaii in 2015, the names of 18 showers were o?cially accepted and moved to the list of established showers. Also, one shower already o?cially named (3/SIA the Southern iota A...

  1. Controlling inclusive cross sections in parton shower + matrix element merging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaetzer, Simon

    2012-11-15

    We propose an extension of matrix element plus parton shower merging at tree level to preserve inclusive cross sections obtained from the merged and showered sample. Implementing this constraint generates approximate next-to-leading order (NLO) contributions similar to the LoopSim approach. We then show how full NLO, or in principle even higher order, corrections can be added consistently, including constraints on inclusive cross sections to account for yet missing parton shower accuracy at higher logarithmic order. We also show how NLO accuracy below the merging scale can be obtained.

  2. The 2017 Meteor Shower Activity Forecast for Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorehead, Althea; Cooke, Bill; Moser, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Most meteor showers will display typical activity levels in 2017. Perseid activity is expected to be higher than normal but less than in 2016; rates may reach 80% of the peak ZHR in 2016. Despite this enhancement, the Perseids rank 4th in flux for 0.04-cm-equivalent meteoroids: the Geminids (GEM), Daytime Arietids (ARI), and Southern delta Aquariids (SDA) all produce higher fluxes. Aside from heightened Perseid activity, the 2017 forecast includes a number of changes. In 2016, the Meteoroid Environment Office used 14 years of shower flux data to revisit the activity profiles of meteor showers included in the annual forecast. Both the list of showers and the shape of certain major showers have been revised. The names and three-letter shower codes were updated to match those in the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Meteor Data Center, and a number of defunct or insignificant showers were removed. The most significant of these changes are the increased durations of the Daytime Arietid (ARI) and Geminid (GEM) meteor showers. This document is designed to supplement spacecraft risk assessments that incorporate an annual averaged meteor shower flux (as is the case with all NASA meteor models). Results are presented relative to this baseline and are weighted to a constant kinetic energy. Two showers - the Daytime Arietids (ARI) and the Geminids (GEM) - attain flux levels approaching that of the baseline meteoroid environment for 0.1-cm-equivalent meteoroids. This size is the threshold for structural damage. These two showers, along with the Quadrantids (QUA) and Perseids (PER), exceed the baseline flux for 0.3-cm-equivalent particles, which is near the limit for pressure vessel penetration. Please note, however, that meteor shower fluxes drop dramatically with increasing particle size. As an example, the Arietids contribute a flux of about 5x10(exp -6) meteoroids m(exp -2) hr-1 in the 0.04-cm-equivalent range, but only 1x10(exp -8) meteoroids m(sub -2) hr-1 for the 0

  3. Observation of microwave emission from extensive air showers with CROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilczyński H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on the measurement of microwave radio signals from air showers with the CROME (Cosmic Ray Observation via Microwave Emission experiment. CROME is located in the center of the KASCADE-Grande air shower array. The radio signals of the CROME antennas are stored for each high-energy trigger from the KASCADE-Grande array and matched offine with the KASCADE-Grande data. After almost one year of data taking microwave signals have been observed for more than ten air showers.

  4. Modelling of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Marianne

    2011-06-01

    Cosmic rays entering the Earth's atmosphere induce extensive air showers consisting of up to billions of secondary particles. Among them, a multitude of electrons and positrons are generated. These get deflected in the Earth's magnetic field, creating time-varying transverse currents. Thereby, the air shower emits coherent radiation in the MHz frequency range measured by radio antenna arrays on the ground such as LOPES at the KIT. This detection method provides a possibility to study cosmic rays with energies above 1017 eV. At this time, the radio technique undergoes the change from prototype experiments to large scale application. Thus, a detailed understanding of the radio emission process is needed more than ever. Before starting this work, different models made conflicting predictions on the pulse shape and the amplitude of the radio signal. It turned out that a radiation component caused by the variation of the number of charged particles within the air shower was missed in several models. The Monte Carlo code REAS2 superposing the radiation of the individual air shower electrons and positrons was one of those. At this time, it was not known how to take the missing component into account. For REAS3, we developed and implemented the endpoint formalism, a universal approach, to calculate the radiation from each single particle. For the first time, we achieve a good agreement between REAS3 and MGMR, an independent and completely different simulation approach. In contrast to REAS3, MGMR is based on a macroscopic approach and on parametrisations of the air shower. We studied the differences in the underlying air shower models to explain the remaining deviations. For comparisons with LOPES data, we developed a new method which allows "top-down" simulations of air showers. From this, we developed an air shower selection criterion based on the number of muons measured with KASCADE to take shower-to-shower fluctuations for a single event analysis into account. With

  5. New disinfection and sterilization methods.

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    New disinfection methods include a persistent antimicrobial coating that can be applied to inanimate and animate objects (Surfacine), a high-level disinfectant with reduced exposure time (ortho-phthalaldehyde), and an antimicrobial agent that can be applied to animate and inanimate objects (superoxidized water). New sterilization methods include a chemical sterilization process for endoscopes that integrates cleaning (Endoclens), a rapid (4-hour) readout biological indicator for ethylene oxid...

  6. Disinfecting capabilities of oxychlorine compounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Noss, C I; Olivieri, V P

    1985-01-01

    The bacterial virus f2 was inactivated by chlorine dioxide at acidic, neutral, and alkaline pH values. The rate of inactivation increased with increasing pH. Chlorine dioxide disproportionation products, chlorite and chlorate, were not active disinfectants. As chlorine dioxide solutions were degraded under alkaline conditions, they displayed reduced viricidal effectiveness, thereby confirming the chlorine dioxide free radical as the active disinfecting species.

  7. A review on wastewater disinfection

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Mehdi Amin; Hassan Hashemi; Amir Mohammadi Bovini; Yung Tse Hung

    2013-01-01

    Changes in regulations and development of new technologies have affected the selection of alternative for treated wastewater disinfection. Disinfection is the last barrier of wastewater reclamation process to protect ecosystem safety and human health. Driving forces include water scarcity and drinking water supply, irrigation, rapid industrialization, using reclaimed water, source protection, overpopulation, and environmental protection. The safe operation of water reuse depends on effluent d...

  8. Experimental evidence for the sensitivity of the air-shower radio signal to the longitudinal shower development

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buchholz, P; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Finger, M; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

    2012-01-01

    We observe a correlation between the slope of radio lateral distributions, and the mean muon pseudorapidity of 59 individual cosmic-ray-air-shower events. The radio lateral distributions are measured with LOPES, a digital radio interferometer co-located with the multi-detector-air-shower array KASCADE-Grande, which includes a muon-tracking detector. The result proves experimentally that radio measurements are sensitive to the longitudinal development of cosmic-ray air-showers. This is one of the main prerequisites for using radio arrays for ultra-high-energy particle physics and astrophysics.

  9. Nitrogen fluorescence in air for observing extensive air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Keilhauer, B; Fraga, M; Matthews, J; Sakaki, N; Tameda, Y; Tsunesada, Y; Ulrich, A

    2012-01-01

    Extensive air showers initiate the fluorescence emissions from nitrogen molecules in air. The UV-light is emitted isotropically and can be used for observing the longitudinal development of extensive air showers in the atmosphere over tenth of kilometers. This measurement technique is well-established since it is exploited for many decades by several cosmic ray experiments. However, a fundamental aspect of the air shower analyses is the description of the fluorescence emission in dependence on varying atmospheric conditions. Different fluorescence yields affect directly the energy scaling of air shower reconstruction. In order to explore the various details of the nitrogen fluorescence emission in air, a few experimental groups have been performing dedicated measurements over the last decade. Most of the measurements are now finished. These experimental groups have been discussing their techniques and results in a series of \\emph{Air Fluorescence Workshops} commenced in 2002. At the 8$^{\\rm{th}}$ Air Fluoresc...

  10. Vertical Array in Space for Horizontal Air-Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Fargion, D

    2009-01-01

    We consider the guaranteed physics of horizontal (hadron) air-showers, HAS, developing at high (tens km) altitudes. Their morphology and information traces are different from vertical ones. Hundreds of km long HAS are often split by geomagnetic fields in a long (fan-like) showering with a twin spiral tail. The horizontal fan-like airshowers are really tangent and horizontal only at North and South poles. At different latitude these showering plane are turned and inclined by geomagnetic fields. In particular at magnetic equator such tangent horizontal East-West airshowers are bent and developed into a vertical fan air-shower, easily detectable by a vertical array detector (hanging elements by gravity). Such "medusa" arrays maybe composed by inflated floating balloons chains. The light gas float and it acts as an calorimeter for the particles, while it partially sustains the detector weight. Vertically hanging chains as well as rubber doughnut balloons (whose interior may record Cherenkov lights) reveal bundles...

  11. A Fast Hybrid Approach to Air Shower Simulations and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Drescher, H J; Bleicher, M; Reiter, M; Soff, S; Stöcker, H; Stoecker, Horst

    2003-01-01

    The SENECA model, a new hybrid approach to air shower simulations, is presented. It combines the use of efficient cascade equations in the energy range where a shower can be treated as one-dimensional, with a traditional Monte Carlo method which traces individual particles. This allows one to reproduce natural fluctuations of individual showers as well as the lateral spread of low energy particles. The model is quite efficient in computation time. As an application of the new approach, the influence of the low energy hadronic models on shower properties for AUGER energies is studied. We conclude that these models have a significant impact on the tails of lateral distribution functions, and deserve therefore more attention.

  12. Multiple shell shower fronts in EAS with ARGO-YBJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsella G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ARGO-YBJ experiment is an Extensive Air Shower array that has been operated at the high altitude Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (Tibet, P.R. China 4300 m a.s.l. in its final configuration since December 2007 until February 2013. The detector consists of a dense layer of Resistive Plate Counters (RPCs covering an area of about 11000 m2. It has been designed to measure the temporal and spatial structure of Extensive Air Showers (EAS with high space-time resolution. The detector gives a quite highly detailed picture of shower footprints at ground. It is perfectly suitable to understand the EAS morphology. These detector characteristics have been used for seeking particles of large rest mass produced in cosmic rays by measuring the Multiple Shell Shower Fronts relative delays. The technique and preliminary results will be illustrated in the present work.

  13. A confidence index for forecasting of meteor showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaubaillon, Jeremie

    2017-09-01

    The forecasting of meteor showers is currently very good at predicting the timing of meteor outbursts, but still needs further work regarding the level of a given shower. Moreover, uncertainties are rarely provided, leaving the end user (scientist, space agency or the public) with no way to evaluate how much the prediction is trustworthy. A confidence index for the forecasting of meteor showers is presented. It allows one to better understand how a specific forecasting has been performed. In particular, it underlines the role of our current knowledge of the parent body, its past orbit and past activity. The role of close encounters with planets for the time period considered is quantified as well. This confidence index is a first step towards better constrained forecasting of future meteor showers.

  14. Reweighting QCD matrix-element and parton-shower calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothmann, Enrico; Schönherr, Marek; Schumann, Steffen

    2016-11-01

    We present the implementation and validation of the techniques used to efficiently evaluate parametric and perturbative theoretical uncertainties in matrix-element plus parton-shower simulations within the Sherpa event-generator framework. By tracing the full α _s and PDF dependences, including the parton-shower component, as well as the fixed-order scale uncertainties, we compute variational event weights on-the-fly, thereby greatly reducing the computational costs to obtain theoretical-uncertainty estimates.

  15. Reweighting QCD matrix-element and parton-shower calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Bothmann, Enrico; Schumann, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    We present the implementation and validation of the techniques used to efficiently evaluate parametric and perturbative theoretical uncertainties in matrix-element plus parton-shower simulations within the Sherpa event-generator framework. By tracing the full $\\alpha_s$ and PDF dependences, including the parton-shower component, as well as the fixed-order scale uncertainties, we compute variational event weights on-the-fly, thereby greatly reducing the computational costs to obtain theoretical-uncertainty estimates.

  16. Measurement of hadronic shower punchthrough in magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Albajar, C; Arefev, A; Bacci, Cesare; Bencze, G L; Bergman, R; Bizzeti, A; Brouwer, C; Cardarelli, R; Casoli, P; Centro, Sandro; Ceradini, F; Choumilov, E; Chrisman, D; Ciapetti, G; Civinini, C; Cline, D; D'Alessandro, R; Della Negra, Michel; Dénes, E; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Dominik, Wojciech; Faissner, Helmut; Ferrando, A; Fouz-Iglesias, M C; Gorn, W; Górski, M; Hervé, A; Iglesias, A; Juntunen, M; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kluge, A; Kolotaev, Yu; Konecki, M; König, A C; Kólikowski, J; Lacava, F; Layter, J G; Le Coultre, P; Lyndon, C; Malinin, A; Margutti, G; Martinelli, R; Martínez-Laso, L; McNeil, R R; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Meschini, M; Moers, T; Mohammadi-Baarmand, M; Nisati, A; Orestano, D; Österberg, K; Otwinowski, S; Petrolo, E; Pimiä, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pols, C L A; Pontecorvo, L; Porth, Paul; Radermacher, E; Razen, B; Reithler, H; Ribeiro, R; Rojkov, A; Sanjari, A H; Santonico, R; Sartori, P; Shank, J T; Schwarthoff, H; Seez, Christopher J; Shen, B C; Szeptycka, M; Szoncsó, F; Teykal, H F; Tolsma, H; Tuchscherer, H; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuuva, T; van der Graaf, H; Veneziano, Stefano; Verzocchi, M; Vesztergombi, G; Wagner, H; Walzel, G; Wijnen, T A M; Wilson, G W; Wrochna, G; Wulz, Claudia Elisabeth; Zanello, L; Zotto, P L

    1996-01-01

    The total punchthrough probability of showers produced by negative pions, positive pions, positive kaons and protons, has been measured as a function of depth in an absorber in a magnetic field ranging from 0 to 3 Tesla. The incident particle momentum varied from 10 to 300 GeV/c. The lateral shower development and particle multiplicity at several absorber depths have been determined. The measurements are compared with the predictions of Monte Carlo simulation programs.

  17. Radio detection of air showers with LOFAR and AERA

    CERN Document Server

    Hörandel, Jörg R

    2015-01-01

    High-energy cosmic rays impinging onto the atmosphere of the Earth initiate extensive air showers. With the LOFAR radio telescope and the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) at the Pierre Auger Observatory radio emission from air showers is detected. Recent results are presented from both experiments. The measured properties of the radio emission are described. The measurements are used to derive the properties of high-energy cosmic rays: their arrival direction, energy, and particle type (mass).

  18. Photoproduction models for total cross section and shower development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Fernando; Garcia Canal, Carlos; Grau, Agnes; Pancheri, Giulia; Sciutto, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    A model for the total photoproduction cross section, based on the ansatz that resummation of infrared gluons limits the rise induced by QCD minijets in all the total cross-sections, is used to simulate extended air showers initiated by cosmic rays with the AIRES simulation program. The impact on common shower observables, especially those related with muon production, is analysed and compared with the corresponding results obtained with previous photoproduction models.

  19. Photoproduction models for total cross section and shower development

    CERN Document Server

    Cornet, Fernando; Grau, Agnes; Pancheri, Giulia; Sciutto, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    A model for the total photoproduction cross section based on the ansatz that resummation of infrared gluons limits the rise induced by QCD minijets in all the total cross-sections, is used to simulate extended air showers initiated by cosmic rays with the AIRES simulation program. The impact on common shower observables, especially those related with muon production, is analysed and compared with the corresponding results obtained with previous photoproduction models.

  20. Photoproduction models for total cross section and shower development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornet Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A model for the total photoproduction cross section, based on the ansatz that resummation of infrared gluons limits the rise induced by QCD minijets in all the total cross-sections, is used to simulate extended air showers initiated by cosmic rays with the AIRES simulation program. The impact on common shower observables, especially those related with muon production, is analysed and compared with the corresponding results obtained with previous photoproduction models.

  1. Reweighting QCD matrix-element and parton-shower calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bothmann, Enrico; Schumann, Steffen [Universitaet Goettingen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen (Germany); Schoenherr, Marek [Universitaet Zuerich, Physik-Institut, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2016-11-15

    We present the implementation and validation of the techniques used to efficiently evaluate parametric and perturbative theoretical uncertainties in matrix-element plus parton-shower simulations within the Sherpa event-generator framework. By tracing the full α{sub s} and PDF dependences, including the parton-shower component, as well as the fixed-order scale uncertainties, we compute variational event weights on-the-fly, thereby greatly reducing the computational costs to obtain theoretical-uncertainty estimates. (orig.)

  2. Environmentally friendly disinfectant: Production, disinfectant action and efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čekerevac Milan I.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver is a known disinfectant from ancient times, and it has been widely used for various purposes: for food and water disinfection, curing of wounds and as a universal antibiotic for a wide spectrum of diseases - until the Second World War and the discovery of penicillin. Until recently, it was assumed that silver, being a heavy metal, was toxic for humans and living beings. However, the newest research provides facts that the usage of silver, even for drinking water disinfection, is benign if it is added in small concentrations (in parts per billion. It has been shown in the newer scientific and technical literature that silver in colloidal form is a powerful (secondary disinfectant for drinking water, that it can be effectively used for the disinfection of water containers including swimming pools, installations in food industry, medicine, etc. Particularly, it has been shown that colloidal silver combined with hydrogen peroxide shows synergism having strong bactericidal and antiviral effects. The combination can be successfully used as a disinfectant in agriculture, food production and medicine. The original electrochemical process of production, the mechanism of physical-chemical reactions in that process and the mechanism of the antiseptic affect of the environmentally friendly disinfectant, based on the synergism of colloidal silver and hydrogen peroxide and the activity of electrochemically activated water, is shown. The starting solution was anolyte, obtained in electrochemical activation by water electrolysis of a highly diluted solution of K-tartarate in demineralized water (5.5-1CT4 M. The problem of electrolysis of very dilute aqueous solutions in membrane cells was particularly treated. It was shown that the efficiency of the electrolysis depends on the competition between the two processes: the rates of the processes of hydrogen and oxygen generation at the electrodes and the process of diffusion of hydrogen and hydroxyl ions

  3. Preoperative anxiety in neurosurgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perks, Anna; Chakravarti, Sucharita; Manninen, Pirjo

    2009-04-01

    Anxiety is common in surgical patients, with an incidence of 60% to 92%. There is little information on the incidence and severity of preoperative anxiety in patients scheduled for neurosurgery. The aim of this study was to measure the level of preoperative anxiety in neurosurgical patients and to assess any influencing factors. After the Institutional Review Board approval and informed written consent, 100 patients booked for neurosurgery were interviewed preoperatively. Each patient was asked to grade their preoperative anxiety level on a verbal analog scale, Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale, and a set of specific anxiety-related questions. The anxiety scores and the responses to the questions were compared between the sex, age, weight, diagnosis, and history of previous surgery. The mean age (+/-SD) was 50+/-13 years. The preoperative diagnosis was tumor (n=64), aneurysm (n=14), and other (n=22). Overall verbal analog scale was 5.2+/-2.7; the score was higher for female (5.8+/-2.8) than male patients (4.6+/-2.5) (PAmsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale anxiety and knowledge scores were greater for surgery than for anesthesia. Questionnaire results showed that the most common anxieties were waiting for surgery, physical/mental harm, and results of the operation. In conclusion, our study showed that neurosurgical patients have high levels of anxiety, with a higher incidence in females. There was a moderately high need for information, particularly in patients with a high level of preoperative anxiety.

  4. Investigation of meteor shower parent bodies using various metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, B. A.; Birlan, M.; Nedelcu, A.; Popescu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The present knowledge of meteor showers identifies the small bodies of our Solar System as supply sources for meteor streams. Both comets and asteroids are considered as the origin of meteor showers. The new paradigm of "active asteroids" opens up a large field of investigation regarding the relationships between asteroids and meteors. Processes like ejection and disaggregation at impacts, rotational instabilities, electrostatic repulsion, radiation pressure, dehydration stress followed by thermal fractures, sublimation of ices are sources of matter loss from asteroids. Our objective is to find genetic relationships between asteroids and meteor showers using metrics based on orbital elements. For this objective we selected three metrics (Southworth and Hawkins, 1963; Asher et al. 1993, and Jopek, 1993, respectively), the recent MPC database and the more recent IAU meteor shower database. From our analysis, 41 of the meteor showers have probabilities of being produced (or to be fueled) by asteroids. Our sample of asteroids contains more than 1000 objects, all of them belonging to the Near-Earth Asteroid population. The systematic approach performed, based on the physical properties of our sample, reinforced the link between asteroids and their associated meteor shower.

  5. An analytic parton shower. Algorithms, implementation and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Sebastian

    2012-06-15

    The realistic simulation of particle collisions is an indispensable tool to interpret the data measured at high-energy colliders, for example the now running Large Hadron Collider at CERN. These collisions at these colliders are usually simulated in the form of exclusive events. This thesis focuses on the perturbative QCD part involved in the simulation of these events, particularly parton showers and the consistent combination of parton showers and matrix elements. We present an existing parton shower algorithm for emissions off final state partons along with some major improvements. Moreover, we present a new parton shower algorithm for emissions off incoming partons. The aim of these particular algorithms, called analytic parton shower algorithms, is to be able to calculate the probabilities for branchings and for whole events after the event has been generated. This allows a reweighting procedure to be applied after the events have been simulated. We show a detailed description of the algorithms, their implementation and the interfaces to the event generator WHIZARD. Moreover we discuss the implementation of a MLM-type matching procedure and an interface to the shower and hadronization routines from PYTHIA. Finally, we compare several predictions by our implementation to experimental measurements at LEP, Tevatron and LHC, as well as to predictions obtained using PYTHIA. (orig.)

  6. Simulation of the Radiation Energy Release in Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Glaser, Christian; Hörandel, Jörg R; Huege, Tim; Schulz, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    A simulation study of the energy released by extensive air showers in the form of MHz radiation is performed using the CoREAS simulation code. We develop an efficient method to extract this radiation energy from air-shower simulations. We determine the longitudinal profile of the radiation energy release and compare it to the longitudinal profile of the energy deposit by the electromagnetic component of the air shower. We find that the radiation energy corrected for the geometric dependence of the geomagnetic emission scales quadratically with the energy in the electromagnetic component of the air shower with a second order dependency on the atmospheric density at the position of the maximum of the shower development $X_\\mathrm{max}$. In a measurement where $X_\\mathrm{max}$ is not accessible, this second order dependence can be approximated using the zenith angle of the incoming direction of the air shower with only a minor deterioration in accuracy. This method results in an intrinsic uncertainty of 4% with ...

  7. Simulation of Radiation Energy Release in Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Glaser, Christian; Hörandel, Jörg R; Huege, Tim; Schulz, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    A simulation study of the energy released by extensive air showers in the form of MHz radiation is performed using the CoREAS simulation code. We develop an efficient method to extract this radiation energy from air-shower simulations. We determine the longitudinal profile of the radiation energy release and compare it to the longitudinal profile of the energy deposit by the electromagnetic component of the air shower. We find that the radiation energy corrected for the geometric dependence of the geomagnetic emission scales quadratically with the energy in the electromagnetic component of the air shower with a second-order dependence on the atmospheric density at the position of the maximum shower development $X_\\mathrm{max}$. In a measurement where $X_\\mathrm{max}$ is not accessible, this second order dependence can be approximated using the zenith angle of the incoming direction of the air shower with only a minor loss in accuracy. Our method results in an intrinsic uncertainty of 4% in the determination o...

  8. Polarized radio emission from extensive air showers measured with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Schellart, P; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Krause, M; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Scholten, O; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Trinh, T N G

    2014-01-01

    We present LOFAR measurements of radio emission from extensive air showers. We find that this emission is strongly polarized, with a median degree of polarization exceeding $99\\%$, and that the angle between the polarization direction of the electric field and the Lorentz force acting on the particles, depends on the observer location in the shower plane. This can be understood as a superposition of the radially polarized charge-excess emission mechanism, first proposed by Askaryan and the geomagnetic emission mechanism proposed by Kahn and Lerche. We calculate the relative strengths of both contributions, as quantified by the charge-excess fraction, for $179$ individual air showers. We find that the measured charge-excess fraction is higher for air showers arriving from closer to zenith. Furthermore, the measured charge-excess fraction also increases with increasing observer distance from the air shower symmetry axis. The measured values range from $(3.47\\pm 0.79)\\%$ for very inclined air showers at $25\\, \\m...

  9. 9 CFR 96.9 - Casings admitted on disinfection; sealing; transfer and disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Casings admitted on disinfection; sealing; transfer and disinfection. 96.9 Section 96.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... STATES § 96.9 Casings admitted on disinfection; sealing; transfer and disinfection. Foreign animal...

  10. Studies on egg disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, H E; DaMassa, A J; Scott, W F

    1979-07-01

    Various concentrations of alkyldimethylbenzyl ammonium chloride (QAC), Na2CO3, and ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA) were tested for antimicrobial activity singly and in combination against Escherichia coli, Arizona hinshawii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bactericidal activity of the reagents were evaluated in embryonating eggs, trypticase soy broth, and a medium containing lecithin. Toxicity of the chemicals was assayed in embryonating eggs. An appraisal was made of an egg-washing solution composed of 250 ppm QAC, 100 ppm Na2CO3, and 10 and 100 ppm EDTA. The mixture was effective and nontoxic for this purpose. All egg treatments had an adverse effect on fertility and hatchability. Using the temperature differential procedure in egg dipping, the disinfectant mixture was relatively nontoxic if 10 ppm EDTA was used with 3000 ppm tylosin tartrate. One hundred parts per million of the chelator in the dip solution caused excessive embryo mortality due to synergistic toxicity with the antibiotic. The germicidal action of the QAC solution was markedly increased with Na2CO3. Ten parts per million EDTA did not improve the biocidal effect of QAC solutions in distilled water but increased bactericidal activity in tap water that contained 16 ppm Ca and 22 ppm Mg.

  11. Extensive Air Showers with unusual structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beznosko Dmitriy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 23500 Extensive Air Showers (EAS with energies above ∼ 1016 eV have been detected during the ∼3500 hours of the Horizon-T (HT detectors system operations before Aug. 2016. Among these EAS, more than a thousand had an unusual spatial and temporary structure that showed pulses with several maxima (modals or modes from several detection points of the HT at the same time. These modes are separated in time from each other starting from tens to thousands of ns. These EAS have been called multi-modal. Analysis shows that the multi-modal EAS that have been detected by Horizon-T have the following properties: 1. Multi-modal EAS have energy above ∼1017 eV. 2. Pulses with several modes are located at large distances from the EAS axis. An overview of the collected data will be provided. General comments about the unusual structure of the multi-modal EAS will be presented.

  12. The radio signal from extensive air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Revenu, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    The field of ultra-high energy cosmic rays made a lot of progresses last years with large area experiments such as the Pierre Auger Observatory, HiRes and the Telescope Array. A suppression of the cosmic ray flux at energies above $5.5x10^{19}$ eV is observed at a very high level of significance but the origin of this cut-off is not established: it can be due to the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin suppression but it can also reflect the upper limit of particle acceleration in astrophysical objects. The key characteristics to be measured on cosmic rays is their composition. Upper limits are set above $10^{18}$ eV on primary photons and neutrinos and primary cosmic rays are expected to be hadrons. Identifying the precise composition (light or heavy nuclei) will permit to solve the puzzle. It has been proven that the radio signal emitted by the extensive air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays reflects their longitudinal profile and can help in constraining the primary particle. We review in this paper th...

  13. Do cosmic ray air showers initiate lightning?: A statistical analysis of cosmic ray air showers and lightning mapping array data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, B. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Winner, L. H.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Kotovsky, D. A.; Caicedo, J. A.; Wilkes, R. A.; Carvalho, F. L.; Pilkey, J. T.; Ngin, T. K.; Gamerota, W. R.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2017-08-01

    It has been argued in the technical literature, and widely reported in the popular press, that cosmic ray air showers (CRASs) can initiate lightning via a mechanism known as relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA), where large numbers of high-energy and low-energy electrons can, somehow, cause the local atmosphere in a thundercloud to transition to a conducting state. In response to this claim, other researchers have published simulations showing that the electron density produced by RREA is far too small to be able to affect the conductivity in the cloud sufficiently to initiate lightning. In this paper, we compare 74 days of cosmic ray air shower data collected in north central Florida during 2013-2015, the recorded CRASs having primary energies on the order of 1016 eV to 1018 eV and zenith angles less than 38°, with Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data, and we show that there is no evidence that the detected cosmic ray air showers initiated lightning. Furthermore, we show that the average probability of any of our detected cosmic ray air showers to initiate a lightning flash can be no more than 5%. If all lightning flashes were initiated by cosmic ray air showers, then about 1.6% of detected CRASs would initiate lightning; therefore, we do not have enough data to exclude the possibility that lightning flashes could be initiated by cosmic ray air showers.

  14. Can pulsed xenon ultraviolet light systems disinfect aerobic bacteria in the absence of manual disinfection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinadatha, Chetan; Villamaria, Frank C; Ganachari-Mallappa, Nagaraja; Brown, Donna S; Liao, I-Chia; Stock, Eileen M; Copeland, Laurel A; Zeber, John E

    2015-04-01

    Whereas pulsed xenon-based ultraviolet light no-touch disinfection systems are being increasingly used for room disinfection after patient discharge with manual cleaning, their effectiveness in the absence of manual disinfection has not been previously evaluated. Our study indicates that pulsed xenon-based ultraviolet light systems effectively reduce aerobic bacteria in the absence of manual disinfection. These data are important for hospitals planning to adopt this technology as adjunct to routine manual disinfection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. The Working Group on Meteor Showers Nomenclature: a History, Current Status and a Call for Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jopek, T. J.; Jenniskens, P. M.

    2011-01-01

    During the IAU General Assembly in Rio de Janeiro in 2009, the members of Commission 22 established the Working Group on Meteor Shower Nomenclature, from what was formerly the Task Group on Meteor Shower Nomenclature. The Task Group had completed its mission to propose a first list of established meteor showers that could receive officially names. At the business meeting of Commission 22 the list of 64 established showers was approved and consequently officially accepted by the IAU. A two-step process is adopted for showers to receive an official name from the IAU: i) before publication, all new showers discussed in the literature are first added to the Working List of Meteor Showers, thereby receiving a unique name, IAU number and three-letter code; ii) all showers which come up to the verification criterion are selected for inclusion in the List of Established Meteor Showers, before being officially named at the next IAU General Assembly.

  16. New disinfection and sterilization methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutala, W. A.; Weber, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    New disinfection methods include a persistent antimicrobial coating that can be applied to inanimate and animate objects (Surfacine), a high-level disinfectant with reduced exposure time (ortho-phthalaldehyde), and an antimicrobial agent that can be applied to animate and inanimate objects (superoxidized water). New sterilization methods include a chemical sterilization process for endoscopes that integrates cleaning (Endoclens), a rapid (4-hour) readout biological indicator for ethylene oxide sterilization (Attest), and a hydrogen peroxide plasma sterilizer that has a shorter cycle time and improved efficacy (Sterrad 50). PMID:11294738

  17. Preoperative alcoholism and postoperative morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, H; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative risk assessment has become part of daily clinical practice, but preoperative alcohol abuse has not received much attention. METHODS: A Medline search was carried out to identify original papers published from 1967 to 1998. Relevant articles on postoperative morbidity...... in alcohol abusers were used to evaluate the evidence. RESULTS: Prospective and retrospective studies demonstrate a twofold to threefold increase in postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers, the most frequent complications being infections, bleeding and cardiopulmonary insufficiency. Wound complications...... to postoperative morbidity. CONCLUSION: Alcohol consumption should be included in the preoperative assessment of likely postoperative outcome. Reduction of postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers may include preoperative alcohol abstinence to improve organ function, or perioperative alcohol administration...

  18. Nitrogen fluorescence in air for observing extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilhauer, B.; Bohacova, M.; Fraga, M.; Matthews, J.; Sakaki, N.; Tameda, Y.; Tsunesada, Y.; Ulrich, A.

    2013-06-01

    Extensive air showers initiate the fluorescence emissions from nitrogen molecules in air. The UV-light is emitted isotropically and can be used for observing the longitudinal development of extensive air showers in the atmosphere over tenth of kilometers. This measurement technique is well-established since it is exploited for many decades by several cosmic ray experiments. However, a fundamental aspect of the air shower analyses is the description of the fluorescence emission in dependence on varying atmospheric conditions. Different fluorescence yields affect directly the energy scaling of air shower reconstruction. In order to explore the various details of the nitrogen fluorescence emission in air, a few experimental groups have been performing dedicated measurements over the last decade. Most of the measurements are now finished. These experimental groups have been discussing their techniques and results in a series of Air Fluorescence Workshops commenced in 2002. At the 8th Air Fluorescence Workshop 2011, it was suggested to develop a common way of describing the nitrogen fluorescence for application to air shower observations. Here, first analyses for a common treatment of the major dependences of the emission procedure are presented. Aspects like the contributions at different wavelengths, the dependence on pressure as it is decreasing with increasing altitude in the atmosphere, the temperature dependence, in particular that of the collisional cross sections between molecules involved, and the collisional de-excitation by water vapor are discussed.

  19. Measurements of the Fluorescence Light Yield in Electromagnetic Showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reil, K.; Chen, P.; Field, C.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Ng, J. S. T.; Odian, A.; Vincke, H.; Walz, D.; Belz, J.; Goldammer, A.; Guest, D.; Bergman, D. R.; Cavanaugh, S.; Perera, L.; Schnetzer, S.; Thomson, G. B.; Zech, A.; Cao, Z.; Huentemeyer, P.; Jui, C. C. H.; Loh, E. C.; Martens, K.; Matthews, J. N.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Thomas, S. B.; Chang, F. Y.; Chen, C. C.; Chen, C. W.; Huang, M. A.; Hwang, W.-Y. P.; Lin, G.-L.

    The two most common methods of determining the energy of an ultra high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) are ground arrays and fluorescence telescopes. Ground array detectors determine energy by sampling the number of shower particles arriving at the surface of the earth. In general, the more particles, the higher the energy. Fluorescence telescopes, on the other hand, determine the energy by measuring the number of ultraviolet photons produced by the electromagnetic shower produced in the atmosphere. The number of photons is related to the number of particles in the shower by the fluorescence yield (measured in photons per meter per charged particle). The Akeno Giant Air Shower Array (AGASA) and the High Resolution Flys Eye (HiRes) are the current world leading ground array and fluorescence detectors, respectively. Recent results from the two experiments indicate a significant discrepancy in the flux of cosmic rays as a function of energy[1―3 ]. This indicates that there may be a systematic offset in energy determination in the two techniques. The FLuorescence in Air from SHowers (FLASH) experiment is an effort to reduce the systematic uncertainty in energy determination for fluorescence detectors by making an improved measurement of the fluorescence yield. This work is intended to add to the prior work of Bunner, Kakimoto et al. and Nagano et al.[4―7]. We report on the current status of the experiment.

  20. Air shower measurements with the LOPES radio antenna array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haungs, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: andreas.haungs@ik.fzk.de; Apel, W.D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [Inst. Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Auffenberg, J. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Wuppertal (Germany); Badea, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Baehren, L. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Buitink, S. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF, Torino (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Daumiller, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)] (and others)

    2009-06-01

    LOPES is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and aims to measure and investigate radio pulses from extensive air showers. Since radio waves suffer very little attenuation, radio measurements allow the detection of very distant or highly inclined showers. These waves can be recorded day and night, and provide a bolometric measure of the leptonic shower component. LOPES is designed as a digital radio interferometer using high bandwidths and fast data processing and profits from the reconstructed air shower observables of KASCADE-Grande. The LOPES antennas are absolutely amplitude calibrated allowing to reconstruct the electric field strength which can be compared with predictions from detailed Monte-Carlo simulations. We report about the analysis of correlations present in the radio signals measured by the LOPES 30 antenna array. Additionally, LOPES operates antennas of a different type (LOPES{sup STAR}) which are optimized for an application at the Pierre Auger Observatory. Status, recent results of the data analysis and further perspectives of LOPES and the possible large scale application of this new detection technique are discussed.

  1. Investigations of the radio signal of inclined showers with LOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saftoiu, A., E-mail: allixme@gmail.com [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Apel, W.D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Baehren, L. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell& #x27; Universita Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Buchholz, P. [Universitaet Siegen, Fachbereich Physik (Germany); Buitink, S. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics (Netherlands); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell& #x27; Universita Torino (Italy); INAF Torino, Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell& #x27; Universita Torino (Italy); and others

    2012-01-11

    We report in this paper on an analysis of 20 months of data taken with LOPES. LOPES is radio antenna array set-up in coincidence with the Grande array, both located at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany. The data used in this analysis were taken with an antenna configuration composed of 30 inverted V-shape dipole antennas. We have restricted the analysis to a special selection of inclined showers - with zenith angle {theta}>40{sup Ring-Operator }. These inclined showers are of particular interest because they are the events with the largest geomagnetic angles and are therefore suitable to test emission models based on geomagnetic effects.The reconstruction procedure of the emitted radio signal in EAS uses as one ingredient the frequency-dependent antenna gain pattern which is obtained from simulations. Effects of the applied antenna model in the calibration procedure of LOPES are studied. In particular, we have focused on one component of the antenna, a metal pedestal, which generates a resonance effect, a peak in the amplification pattern where it is the most affecting high zenith angles, i.e. inclined showers. In addition, polarization characteristics of inclined showers were studied in detail and compared with the features of more vertical showers for the two cases of antenna models, with and without the pedestal.

  2. Extreme atmospheric electron densities created by extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutjes, Casper; Camporeale, Enrico; Ebert, Ute; Buitink, Stijn; Scholten, Olaf; Trinh, Gia

    2016-04-01

    A sufficient density of free electrons and strong electric fields are the basic requirements to start any electrical discharge. In the context of thunderstorm discharges it has become clear that in addition droplets and or ice particles are required to enhance the electric field to values above breakdown. In our recent study [1] we have shown that these three ingredients have to interplay to allow for lightning inception, triggered by an extensive air shower event. The extensive air showers are a very stochastic natural phenomenon, creating highly coherent bursts of extreme electron density in our atmosphere. Predicting these electron density bursts accurately one has to take the uncertainty of the input variables into account. To this end we use uncertainty quantification methods, like in [2], to post-process our detailed Monte Carlo extensive air shower simulations, done with the CORSIKA [3] software package, which provides an efficient and elegant way to determine the distribution of the atmospheric electron density enhancements. We will present the latest results. [1] Dubinova, A., Rutjes, C., Ebert, E., Buitink, S., Scholten, O., and Trinh, G. T. N. "Prediction of Lightning Inception by Large Ice Particles and Extensive Air Showers." PRL 115 015002 (2015) [2] G.J.A. Loeven, J.A.S. Witteveen, H. Bijl, Probabilistic collocation: an efficient nonintrusive approach for arbitrarily distributed parametric uncertainties, 45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, Nevada, 2007, AIAA-2007-317 [3] Heck, Dieter, et al. CORSIKA: A Monte Carlo code to simulate extensive air showers. No. FZKA-6019. 1998.

  3. Nitrogen fluorescence in air for observing extensive air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsunesada Y.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive air showers initiate the fluorescence emissions from nitrogen molecules in air. The UV-light is emitted isotropically and can be used for observing the longitudinal development of extensive air showers in the atmosphere over tenth of kilometers. This measurement technique is well-established since it is exploited for many decades by several cosmic ray experiments. However, a fundamental aspect of the air shower analyses is the description of the fluorescence emission in dependence on varying atmospheric conditions. Different fluorescence yields affect directly the energy scaling of air shower reconstruction. In order to explore the various details of the nitrogen fluorescence emission in air, a few experimental groups have been performing dedicated measurements over the last decade. Most of the measurements are now finished. These experimental groups have been discussing their techniques and results in a series of Air Fluorescence Workshops commenced in 2002. At the 8th Air Fluorescence Workshop 2011, it was suggested to develop a common way of describing the nitrogen fluorescence for application to air shower observations. Here, first analyses for a common treatment of the major dependences of the emission procedure are presented. Aspects like the contributions at different wavelengths, the dependence on pressure as it is decreasing with increasing altitude in the atmosphere, the temperature dependence, in particular that of the collisional cross sections between molecules involved, and the collisional de-excitation by water vapor are discussed.

  4. Alternative energy estimation from the shower lateral distribution function

    CERN Document Server

    De Souza, V; Brito, J; Dobrigkeit, C; Medina-Tanco, G; Souza, Vitor de; Escobar, Carlos O.; Brito, Joel; Dobrigkeit, Carola; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo

    2005-01-01

    The surface detector technique has been successfully used to detect cosmic ray showers for several decades. Scintillators or Cerenkov water tanks can be used to measure the number of particles and/or the energy density at a given depth in the atmosphere and reconstruct the primary particle properties. It has been shown that the experiment configuration and the resolution in reconstructing the core position determine a distance to the shower axis in which the lateral distribution function (LDF) of particles shows the least variation with respect to different primary particles type, simulation models and specific shapes of the LDF. Therefore, the signal at this distance (600 m for Haverah Park and 1000 m for Auger Observatory) has shown to be a good estimator of the shower energy. Revisiting the above technique, we show that a range of distances to the shower axis, instead of one single point, can be used as estimator of the shower energy. A comparison is done for the Auger Observatory configuration and the new...

  5. Comparative analysis of showering protocols for mass-casualty decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amlot, Richard; Larner, Joanne; Matar, Hazem; Jones, David R; Carter, Holly; Turner, Elizabeth A; Price, Shirley C; Chilcott, Robert P

    2010-01-01

    A well-established provision for mass-casualty decontamination that incorporates the use of mobile showering units has been developed in the UK. The effectiveness of such decontamination procedures will be critical in minimizing or preventing the contamination of emergency responders and hospital infrastructure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three empirical strategies designed to optimize existing decontamination procedures: (1) instructions in the form of a pictorial aid prior to decontamination; (2) provision of a washcloth within the showering facility; and (3) an extended showering period. The study was a three-factor, between-participants (or "independent") design with 90 volunteers. The three factors each had two levels: use of washcloths (washcloth/no washcloth), washing instructions (instructions/no instructions), and shower cycle duration (three minutes/six minutes). The effectiveness of these strategies was quantified by whole-body fluorescence imaging following application of a red fluorophore to multiple, discrete areas of the skin. All five showering procedures were relatively effective in removing the fluorophore "contaminant", but the use of a cloth (in the absence of instructions) led to a significant ( appox. 20%) improvement in the effectiveness of decontamination over the standard protocol (p mass-casualty decontamination effectiveness, especially in children, can be optimized by the provision of a washcloth. This simple but effective approach indicates the value of performing controlled volunteer trials for optimizing existing decontamination procedures.

  6. Less skin irritation from alcohol-based disinfectant than from detergent used for hand disinfection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L K; Held, E; Johansen, J D

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The benefit of alcohol-based disinfectant used on normal skin has been debated. OBJECTIVES: The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of repeated exposure to an alcohol-based disinfectant, a detergent and an alcohol-based disinfectant/detergent alternately for 10...... days, including noninvasive measurements in the evaluation. Skin reactivity in irritated skin after a 4-week interval was also evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Detergent, disinfectant and alternate disinfectant and detergent were applied twice daily every 10 min for 1 h to the ventral upper arms......: On day 5 the detergent caused a higher visual score than either disinfectant applied alone or alternate disinfectant and detergent, P disinfectant and detergent caused a higher score than disinfectant, P

  7. Independent identification of meteor showers in EDMOND database

    CERN Document Server

    Rudawska, R; Tóth, J; Kornoš, L

    2014-01-01

    Cooperation and data sharing among national networks and International Meteor Organization Video Meteor Database (IMO VMDB) resulted in European viDeo MeteOr Network Database (EDMOND). The current version of the database (EDMOND 5.0) contains 144 751 orbits collected from 2001 to 2014. In our survey we used EDMOND database in order to identify existing and new meteor showers in the database. In the first step of the survey, using Dsh criterion we found groups around each meteor within similarity threshold. Mean parameters of the groups were calculated and compared using a new function based on geocentric parameters (solar longitude, right ascension, declination, and geocentric velocity). Similar groups were merged into final clusters (representing meteor showers), and compared with IAU Meteor Data Center list of meteor showers. This paper presents the results obtained by the proposed methodology.

  8. Amplified radio emission from cosmic ray air showers in thunderstorms

    CERN Document Server

    Buitink, S; Asch, T; Badea, F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blumer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Bruggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Butcher, H; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huege, T; Kampert, K H; Kolotaev, Y; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Meurer, C; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Petcu, M; Petrovic, J; Pierog, T; Plewnia, S; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Sima, O; Singh, K; Stumpert, M; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Van Buren, J; Walkowiak, W; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; Zimmermann, D; Buitink, Stijn

    2007-01-01

    Cosmic ray air showers produce radio emission, consisting in large part of geosynchrotron emission. Since the radiation mechanism is based on particle acceleration, the atmospheric electric field can play an important role. Especially inside thunderclouds large electric fields can be present. We examine the contribution of an electric field to the emission mechanism theoretically and experimentally. Two mechanisms of amplification of radio emission are considered: the acceleration radiation of the shower particles and the radiation from the current that is produced by ionization electrons moving in the electric field. We selected and evaluated LOPES data recorded during thunderstorms, periods of heavy cloudiness and periods of cloudless weather. We find that during thunderstorms the radio emission can be strongly enhanced. No amplified pulses were found during periods of cloudless sky or heavy cloudiness, suggesting that the electric field effect for radio air shower measurements can be safely ignored during ...

  9. Analysis of extensive air showers with the hybrid code SENECA

    CERN Document Server

    Ortiz, J A; Medina-Tanco, G; Ortiz, Jeferson A.; Souza, Vitor de; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo

    2005-01-01

    The ultrahigh energy tail of the cosmic ray spectrum has been explored with unprecedented detail. For this reason, new experiments are exerting a severe pressure on extensive air shower modeling. Detailed fast codes are in need in order to extract and understand the richness of information now available. In this sense we explore the potential of SENECA, an efficient hybrid tridimensional simulation code, as a valid practical alternative to full Monte Carlo simulations of extensive air showers generated by ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. We discuss the influence of this approach on the main longitudinal characteristics of proton, iron nucleus and gamma induced air showers for different hadronic interaction models. We also show the comparisons of our predictions with those of CORSIKA code.

  10. Analysis of extensive air showers with the hybrid code SENECA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Jeferson A.; de Souza, Vitor; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo

    The ultrahigh energy tail of the cosmic ray spectrum has been explored with unprecedented detail. For this reason, new experiments are exerting a severe pressure on extensive air shower modeling. Detailed fast codes are in need in order to extract and understand the richness of information now available. In this sense we explore the potential of SENECA, an efficient hybrid tridimensional simulation code, as a valid practical alternative to full Monte Carlo simulations of extensive air showers generated by ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. We discuss the influence of this approach on the main longitudinal characteristics of proton, iron nucleus and gamma induced air showers for different hadronic interaction models. We also show the comparisons of our predictions with those of CORSIKA code.

  11. Observations of Microwave Continuum Emission from Air Shower Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Gorham, P W; Varner, G S; Beatty, J J; Connolly, A; Chen, P; Conde, M E; Gai, W; Hast, C; Hebert, C L; Miki, C; Konecny, R; Kowalski, J; Ng, J; Power, J G; Reil, K; Saltzberg, D; Stokes, B T; Walz, D

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a possible new technique for microwave measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) extensive air showers which relies on detection of expected continuum radiation in the microwave range, caused by free-electron collisions with neutrals in the tenuous plasma left after the passage of the shower. We performed an initial experiment at the AWA (Argonne Wakefield Accelerator) laboratory in 2003 and measured broadband microwave emission from air ionized via high energy electrons and photons. A follow-up experiment at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) in summer of 2004 confirmed the major features of the previous AWA observations with better precision and made additional measurements relevant to the calorimetric capabilities of the method. Prompted by these results we built a prototype detector using satellite television technology, and have made measurements indicating possible detection of cosmic ray extensive air showers. The method, if confirmed by experiments now in progress, cou...

  12. SUMMARY OF THE 2006 HADRONIC SHOWER SIMULATION WORKSHOP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WATERS, LAURIE S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-19

    The 2006 Hadronic Shower Simulation Workshop, held September 6-8, 2006 at Fermi National Laboratory brought together an international assembly of experts in the field of hadronic shower development. The overall goal was to present the current understanding of the physics of hadronic showers, and to study examples of how this is measured in particle-physics calorimetry. The modeling of such events is critical, and the major Monte Carlo codes, FLUKA, GEANT, MARS, MCNPX, and PHTS were represented at the workshop. A wide range of physics, much of which is used by the simulation codes was also discussed, ranging from the hadronic CEM, LAQGSM, and DTUJET models, down to low energy neutronics capabilities. Special purpose codes and methodologies used for specific applications such as muon and neutrino physics were also shown. The results of a code benchmarking exercises were presented and extensively discussed. This paper summarizes the key topics presented in the workshop.

  13. Radio emission of extensive air showers at microwave frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filonenko, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    It is found that the power of the incoherent radiation of ionization electrons of an extensive air shower in the frequency range of 150 GHz is more than 10-24 W/m2Hz, with the shower energy ~1018 eV at a distance of 5 km from its axis. This means that, unlike fluorescent detectors, a radio telescope with an effective area of more than 300 m2 can monitor the trajectory of showers with an energy higher than 1018 eV at any time of the day regardless of the weather. The spectrum maximum near the frequency of 150 GHz is roughly three orders of magnitude higher than the value experimentally measured in the characteristic band (~5-10 GHz).

  14. Transverse-Momentum-Ordered Showers and Interleaved Multiple Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    2004-01-01

    We propose a sophisticated framework for high-energy hadronic collisions, wherein different QCD physics processes are interleaved in a common sequence of falling transverse-momentum values. Thereby phase-space competition is introduced between multiple parton-parton interactions and initial-state radiation. As a first step we develop new transverse-momentum-ordered showers for initial- and final-state radiation, which should be of use also beyond the scope of the current article. These showers are then applied in the context of multiple interactions, and a few tests of the new model are presented. The article concludes with an outlook on further aspects, such as the possibility of a shower branching giving partons participating in two different interactions.

  15. TANGO ARRAY An Air Shower Experiment in Buenos Aires

    CERN Document Server

    Bauleo, P; Filevich, A; Reguera, A

    2004-01-01

    A new Air Shower Observatory has been constructed in Buenos Aires during 1999, and commissioned and set in operation in 2000. The observatory consists of an array of four water \\v{C}erenkov detectors, enclosing a geometrical area of $\\sim$ 30.000 m$^{2}$, and is optimized for the observation of cosmic rays in the ``knee'' energy region. The array detects $\\sim$ 250 to $\\sim$ 1500 showers/day, depending on the selected triggering condition. In this paper, the design and construction of the array, and the automatic system for data adquisition, daily calibration, and monitoring, are described. Also, the Monte Carlo simulations performed to develop a shower database, as well as the studies performed using the database to estimate the response and the angular and energy resolutions of the array, are presented in detail.

  16. Waterborne outbreak control: which disinfectant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, E W; Hoff, J C; Lippy, E C

    1982-12-01

    Drinking water disinfection was shown to be an important public health measure around the turn of the century. In the United States, it was perhaps the single most important factor in controlling typhoid fever, a waterborne disease that was rampant throughout the world during the last century. It may also be assumed that disinfection was important in limiting the number of cases of other diseases known to be capable of waterborne transmission, i.e., cholera, amebiasis, shigellosis, salmonellosis, and hepatitis A. Even though modern treatment has eliminated water as a major vehicle of infectious disease transmission, outbreaks still occur. In fact, the annual number has been increasing since 1966. Interruption in chlorination or failure to achieve adequate levels of chlorine residual is the most often identified deficiency of the involved water supplies. This finding indicates that waterborne microbial pathogens remain as a potential health threat and underscores the importance of disinfection. From the outset, chlorination has been the drinking water disinfectant of choice in the country. Numerous studies have demonstrated its ability to inactivate bacterial, viral, and protozoal pathogens when applied under proper conditions. However, the finding that chlorinated organics that are potentially carcinogenic are formed has prompted an evaluation of alternative disinfectants. The viable alternatives to chlorine currently under consideration for widespread use are ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramines. In terms of biocidal efficiency, ozone is the most potent of the three. Chlorine dioxide is about the equivalent of free chlorine in the hypochlorous acid form but much more efficient than the hypochlorite form of free chlorine. The chloramines are weaker biocides than hypochlorite. Although this general order of ranking of efficiency holds for diverse types of microorganisms, quantitative comparisons vary with different microorganisms and experimental conditions.

  17. Aging comets and their meteor showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Quan-Zhi

    2016-10-01

    Comets are thought to be responsible for the terrestrial accretion of water and organic materials. The aging of comets is one of the most critical yet poorly understood problems in planetary astronomy. Here we attack this problem by examining different parts of the cometary aging spectrum of Jupiter-family comets (JFCs), a group of comets that dominates the cometary influx in the near-Earth space, using both telescopic and meteor observations.We examine two representative JFCs and the population of dormant comets. At the younger end of the aging spectrum, we examine a moderately active JFC, 15P/Finlay, and review the puzzle of the non-detection of the associated Finlayid meteor shower. We find that, although having been behaved like a dying comet in the past several 102 years, 15P/Finlay does possess ability for energetic outbursts without a clear reason. Towards the more aged end of the spectrum, we examine a weakly active JFC, 209P/LINEAR. By bridging telescopic observations at visible and infrared wavelength, meteor observations and dynamical investigations, we find that 209P/LINEAR is indeed likely an aged yet long-lived comet. At the other end of the spectrum, we examine the population of dormant near-Earth comets, by conducting a comprehensive meteor-based survey looking for dormant comets that have recently been active. We find the lower limit of the dormant comet fraction in the near-Earth object (NEO) population to be 2.0 ± 1.7%. This number is at the lower end of the numbers found using dynamical and telescopic techniques, which may imply that a significant fraction of comets in the true JFC population are weakly active and are not yet detected.These results have revealed interesting diversities in dying or dead comets, both in their behaviors as well as their natures. An immediate quest in the understanding of cometary aging would be to examine a large number of dying or dead comets and understand their general characteristics.

  18. Cosmic ray air showers in the knee energy region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sanyal

    2003-03-01

    The cosmic ray extensive air showers in the knee energy region have been studied by the North Bengal University array. The differential size spectra at different atmospheric depths show a systematic shift of the knee towards smaller shower size with the increase in atmospheric depth. The measured values of spectral indices at below and above the knee are -2.45± 0.03 and -2.91± 0.05 respectively. Measurements at different atmospheric depths correspond to the same values within the error limits both for below and above the knee. The present experimental results have been compared with similar such experiments.

  19. A framework for second-order parton showers

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hai Tao

    2016-01-01

    A framework is presented for including second-order perturbative corrections to the radiation patterns of parton showers. The formalism allows to combine O(alphaS^2)-corrected iterated 2->3 kernels for "ordered" gluon emissions with tree-level 2->4 kernels for "unordered" ones. The combined Sudakov evolution kernel is thus accurate to O(alphaS^2). As a first step towards a full-fledged implementation of these ideas, we develop an explicit implementation of 2->4 shower branchings in this letter.

  20. Extensive air showers with the small muon content in the region of ultrahigh energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailov, A.A.; Efremov, N.N.; Nikiforova, E.S. [Yu.G. Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, 31 Lenin Ave., 677980 Yakutsk (Russian Federation)

    2008-01-15

    Ultrahigh-energy extensive air showers registered at the Yakutsk EAS array have been considered. The showers without the muon component are detected. Almost one half of them forms the clusters, the arrival directions of which correlate with the nearest pulsars. The classification of showers by muon composition has been carried out and the existence of four classes of showers has been shown. The problem of mass composition and origin of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays are discussed.

  1. 46 CFR 108.205 - Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., shower, and bathtub must have hot and cold running water. (j) Adjacent toilets must be separated by a... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. 108.205...; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. (a) For the purposes of this section— (1) “Private facility” means a...

  2. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Villebro, Nete; Møller, Ann Merete

    2014-01-01

    : Randomized controlled trials that recruited people who smoked prior to surgery, offered a smoking cessation intervention, and measured preoperative and long-term abstinence from smoking or the incidence of postoperative complications or both outcomes. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The review authors......BACKGROUND: Smokers have a substantially increased risk of postoperative complications. Preoperative smoking intervention may be effective in decreasing this incidence, and surgery may constitute a unique opportunity for smoking cessation interventions. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this review...... are to assess the effect of preoperative smoking intervention on smoking cessation at the time of surgery and 12 months postoperatively, and on the incidence of postoperative complications. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register in January 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA...

  3. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials.

  4. Tau Air-Showers Signature of Ultra High Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Fargion, D

    2001-01-01

    The discover of Ultra High Energy Neutrino of astrophysical nature may be already reached. Indeed upward and horizontal tau Air-showers emerging from the Earth crust or mountain chains offer the best and most powerful signal of Ultra High Energy UHE neutrinos nu_tau}, bar\

  5. The prediction of meteor showers from all potential parent comets

    CERN Document Server

    Neslusan, Lubos; Tomko, Dusan; Kanuchova, Zuzana; Jakubik, Marian

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to predict new meteor showers associated with as many as possible known periodic comets and to find a generic relationship of some already known showers with these comets. For a potential parent comet, we model a theoretical stream at the moment of its perihelion passage in a far past, and follow its dynamical evolution until the present. Subsequently, we analyze the orbital characteristics of the parts of the stream that approach the Earth's orbit. Modelled orbits of the stream particles are compared with the orbits of actual photographic, video, and radar meteors from several catalogues. The whole procedure is repeated for several past perihelion passages of the parent comet. To keep our description compact but detailed, we usually present only either a single or a few parent comets with their associated showers in one paper. Here, an overview of the results from the modelling of the meteor-shower complexes of more than ten parent bodies will be presented. This enables the...

  6. Simulating Meteor Shower Observations In The Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, J. P.; Christou, A. A.

    2005-08-01

    It is known that fast meteoroids entering the martian atmosphere give rise to bright, detectable meteors (Adolfsson et al, Icarus 119, 144, 1996). Although single meteors have already been detected at Mars (Selsis et al., Nature 435, 581, 2005), the characterisation of the martian meteor year will require a large number of detections. Experience at the Earth suggests that data storage and bandwidth resources to conduct such surveys will be substantial, and may be prohibitive. In an attempt to quantify the problem in detail, we have simulated meteor shower detection in the martian and terrestrial atmospheres. For a given shower, we assume a meteoroid stream flux, size distribution and velocity based on current knowledge of Earth streams as well as the proximity of certain comets' orbits to that of Mars. A numerical code is used to simulate meteoroid ablation in a model martian and terrestrial atmosphere. Finally, using the same baseline detector characteristics (limiting magnitude, sky coverage) we generate detection statistics for the two planets. We will present results for different types of showers, including strong annual activity and episodic outbursts from Halley-type and Jupiter family comets. We will show how detection efficiency at Mars compares to the Earth for these showers and discuss optimum strategies for monitoring the martian atmosphere for meteor activity. Astronomy research at Armagh Observatory is funded by the Northern Ireland Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL).

  7. Measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers

    OpenAIRE

    Hoerandel, Joerg R.

    2009-01-01

    A new promising development in astroparticle physics is to measure the radio emission from extensive air showers. The particles in the cascade emit synchrotron radiation (30 - 90 MHz) which is detected with arrays of dipole antennas. Recent experimental efforts are discussed.

  8. Polarized radio emission from extensive air showers measured with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, P.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Krause, M.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Scholten, O.; ter Veen, S.; Thoudam, S.; Trinh, T.N.G.

    2014-01-01

    We present LOFAR measurements of radio emission from extensive air showers. We find that this emission is strongly polarized, with a median degree of polarization of nearly 99%, and that the angle between the polarization direction of the electric field and the Lorentz force acting on the particles,

  9. Air shower detectors in gamma-ray astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinnis, Gus [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Extensive air shower (EAS) arrays directly detect the particles in an EAS that reach the observation altitude. This detection technique effectively makes air shower arrays synoptic telescopes -- they are capable of simultaneously and continuously viewing the entire overhead sky. Typical air shower detectors have an effective field-of-view of 2 sr and operate nearly 100% of the time. These two characteristics make them ideal instruments for studying the highest energy gamma rays, extended sources and transient phenomena. Until recently air shower arrays have had insufficient sensitivity to detect gamma-ray sources. Over the past decade, the situation has changed markedly. Milagro, in the US, and the Tibet AS{gamma} array in Tibet, have detected very-high-energy gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula and the active galaxy Markarian 421 (both previously known sources). Milagro has discovered TeV diffuse emission from the Milky Way, three unidentified sources of TeV gamma rays, and several candidate sources of TeV gamma rays. Given these successes and the suite of existing and planned instruments in the GeV and TeV regime (AGILE, GLAST, HESS, VERITAS, CTA, AGIS and IceCube) there are strong reasons for pursuing a next generation of EAS detectors. In conjunction with these other instruments the next generation of EAS instruments could answer long-standing problems in astrophysics.

  10. Measure Guideline: Water Management at Tub and Shower Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, B.

    2011-12-01

    Due to the high concentrations of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. This guide shows how to install fundamental waterproofing strategies to prevent water related issues at shower and tub areas. When conducting a total gut rehab of a structure or constructing a new home, best practice installation and detailing for effective waterproofing are critically important at bathtub and shower assemblies. Water management issues in a structure may go unrecognized for long periods, so that when they are finally observed, the damage from long-term water exposure is extensive. A gut rehab is often undertaken when a home has experienced a natural disaster or when the homeowners are interested in converting an old, high-energy-use building into a high-quality, efficient structure that meets or exceeds one of the national energy standards, such as ENERGY STAR or LEED for homes. During a gut rehab, bath areas need to be replaced with diligent attention to detail. Employing effective water management practices in the installation and detailing of tub and shower assemblies will minimize or eliminate water issues within the building cavities and on the finished surfaces. A residential tub-and-shower surround or shower-stall assembly is designed to handle a high volume of water - 2.5 gallons per minute, with multiple baths occurring during a typical day. Transitions between dissimilar materials and connections between multiple planes must be installed with care to avoid creating a pathway for water to enter the building assemblies. Due to the high volume of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure, a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. At each stage of

  11. Meteoroid Environment Modeling: the Meteoroid Engineering Model and Shower Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, Althea V.

    2017-01-01

    The meteoroid environment is often divided conceptually into meteor showers plus a sporadic background component. The sporadic complex poses the bulk of the risk to spacecraft, but showers can produce significant short-term enhancements of the meteoroid flux. The Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) has produced two environment models to handle these cases: the Meteoroid Engineering Model (MEM) and an annual meteor shower forecast. Both MEM and the forecast are used by multiple manned spaceflight projects in their meteoroid risk evaluation, and both tools are being revised to incorporate recent meteor velocity, density, and timing measurements. MEM describes the sporadic meteoroid complex and calculates the flux, speed, and directionality of the meteoroid environment relative to a user-supplied spacecraft trajectory, taking the spacecraft's motion into account. MEM is valid in the inner solar system and offers near-Earth and cis-lunar environments. While the current version of MEM offers a nominal meteoroid environment corresponding to a single meteoroid bulk density, the next version of MEMR3 will offer both flux uncertainties and a density distribution in addition to a revised near-Earth environment. We have updated the near-Earth meteor speed distribution and have made the first determination of uncertainty in this distribution. We have also derived a meteor density distribution from the work of Kikwaya et al. (2011). The annual meteor shower forecast takes the form of a report and data tables that can be used in conjunction with an existing MEM assessment. Fluxes are typically quoted to a constant limiting kinetic energy in order to comport with commonly used ballistic limit equations. For the 2017 annual forecast, the MEO substantially revised the list of showers and their characteristics using 14 years of meteor flux measurements from the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR). Defunct or insignificant showers were removed and the temporal profiles of many showers

  12. Predicting of bactericidal activity of chemical disinfectants using disinfection activity coefficient of solution

    OpenAIRE

    Gjorgjeska, Biljana

    2011-01-01

    There is the need for defining standard technique for quantitative determination of bactericidal activity of chemical disinfectant substances, as well as the need for defining parameter for comparing various chemical disinfectants. The methods which are usually used for evaluation of antiseptic activity of disinfectant aqueous solutions are microbiological.

  13. Anxiety in preoperative anesthetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela Millán, Jaquelyn; Barrera Serrano, José René; Ornelas Aguirre, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Preoperative anxiety is a common and poorly evaluated condition in patients who will undergo an anesthetic and surgical intervention. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of anxiety in a group of patients undergoing elective surgery, as assessed by the Amsterdam Anxiety Preoperative and Information (AAPI) scale. We studied 135 patients scheduled for elective surgery applying the AAPI scale 24 h before the surgical procedure to evaluate the presence of anxiety and patient characteristics. A descriptive analysis with mean +/- standard deviation for categorical variables was done. For intragroup differences, chi(2) test was used. Pearson correlation for the association between anxiety and postoperative complications was carried out. A value of p =0.05 was considered significant. One hundred six patients were surgically treated, 88% were female (average age 44 +/- 12 years). Some degree of preoperative anxiety was present in 72 patients (76%; p = 0.001) with a grade point average on the AAPI scale equal to 17 +/- 7 points, of which 95 (70%, OR = 5.08; p = 0.002) were females. Results of this study suggest the presence of high levels of preoperative anxiety in patients scheduled for elective surgery. The origin of the anxiety appears to be related to many factors that can be evaluated in pre-anesthetic consultation. Further study is needed to prevent the presence of this disorder.

  14. Sensitivity of the correlation between the depth of shower maximum and the muon shower size to the cosmic ray composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younk, Patrick; Risse, Markus

    2012-07-01

    The composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays is an important issue in astroparticle physics research, and additional experimental results are required for further progress. Here we investigate what can be learned from the statistical correlation factor r between the depth of shower maximum and the muon shower size, when these observables are measured simultaneously for a set of air showers. The correlation factor r contains the lowest-order moment of a two-dimensional distribution taking both observables into account, and it is independent of systematic uncertainties of the absolute scales of the two observables. We find that, assuming realistic measurement uncertainties, the value of r can provide a measure of the spread of masses in the primary beam. Particularly, one can differentiate between a well-mixed composition (i.e., a beam that contains large fractions of both light and heavy primaries) and a relatively pure composition (i.e., a beam that contains species all of a similar mass). The number of events required for a statistically significant differentiation is ˜200. This differentiation, though diluted, is maintained to a significant extent in the presence of uncertainties in the phenomenology of high energy hadronic interactions. Testing whether the beam is pure or well-mixed is well motivated by recent measurements of the depth of shower maximum.

  15. Surgical hand disinfection using alcohol: the effects of alcohol type, mode and duration of application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchomel, M; Gnant, G; Weinlich, M; Rotter, M

    2009-03-01

    Due to their strong antimicrobial activity, rapid action, good dermal tolerance and ease of application, alcohol-based hand rubs are recommended for pre-operative preparation of the surgical team's hands. Using the EN 12791 protocol, three commercial products containing either mixtures of propan-1-ol and propan-2-ol or ethanol at total alcohol concentrations (w/w) between 73% (propanols) and 78.2% (ethanol), as the main active agents, were tested with a shortened application of 1.5 min rather than the usual 3 min. Preparation A containing 30% propan-1-ol and 45% propan-2-ol not only passed the test at this short application but even exceeded, though not significantly, the efficacy of the reference disinfection procedure in EN 12791 when applied for 3 min. Preparation B containing 45% propan-1-ol and 28% propan-2-ol fulfilled the required standard whereas the ethanol (78.2%)-based product C did not (Phand rubs pass the test even within 1.5 min, emphasising the importance of validation before a product is introduced into clinical practice. In another series with both preparation A and 60% v/v propan-1-ol, it was demonstrated that the additional inclusion of the forearms into the disinfection procedure, not required by EN 12791 but normal practice in surgical hand disinfection, does not significantly interfere with the antimicrobial efficacy of either hand rub. Therefore, the mode of test procedure in EN 12791 does not need specific adaptation for hand disinfection by surgical teams.

  16. Disinfection of gloves: feasible, but pay attention to the disinfectant/glove combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheithauer, S; Häfner, H; Seef, R; Seef, S; Hilgers, R D; Lemmen, S

    2016-11-01

    Compliance with hand hygiene is complicated by indications for hand disinfection in rapid succession during the care of one patient. In such situations, disinfection of gloves could facilitate better workflow and optimize compliance rates. We analysed the efficacy of disinfecting gloves by comparing an individual effect of five different hand disinfectant solutions in combination with three different glove types. The investigation was performed in accordance with DIN EN 1500:2013. For all combinations, ten analyses were performed, including (1) right/left-hand examination disinfection efficacy after the first and fifth contamination with E. coli K12 NCTC 10538, (2) recovery rates after contamination, (3) reduction efficacy, (4) fingertip immersion culture, and (5) check for tightness. Disinfection of the ungloved hands was taken as an additional benchmark. The disinfection efficacy for all disinfectant/glove combinations was better with rather than without gloves. For eight combinations, the disinfection efficacy was always >5.0 log10. There were significant differences within the gloves (P=0.0021) and within the disinfectant product (P=0.0023), respectively. In detail, Nitril Blue Eco-Plus performed significantly better than Vasco Braun (P=0.0017) and Latex Med Comfort (P=0.0493). Descoderm showed a significantly worse performance than Promanum pure (P=0.043). In the check for tightness, only the Vasco Braun gloves showed no leaks in all samples. There were relevant qualitative differences pertaining to the comfort of disinfecting gloves. The disinfection efficacy for the different disinfectant/glove combinations was greater than for the ungloved hands. However, various disinfectant/glove combinations produce relevant differences as regards disinfection efficacy. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Interaction of disinfectant residues on cleanroom substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, H; Klein, D; Kopis, E; Leblanc, D; McDonnell, G; Tirey, J F

    1999-01-01

    This study will determine the levels of disinfectant residues on stainless steel surfaces after simulated manual cleaning activities. Additionally, this study will determine if chemical interactions between different chemical agents, representative of commonly used cleanroom disinfectant technologies, subsequently applied to the same surfaces exist, and to what degree these interactions impact sporicidal performance of an oxidizing biocide against Bacillus subtilis.

  18. Anaerobic effluent disinfection using ozone: Byproducts formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, G.H.R.; Daniel, L.A.; Bruning, H.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    This research was aimed at studying oxidation processes, coliform inactivation effectiveness and disinfection byproducts (DBPs) associated with the disinfection of anaerobic sanitary wastewater effluent with ozone applied at doses of 5.0, 8.0 and 10.0mg O(3)L(-1) for contact times of 5, 10 and 15 mi

  19. Ultraviolet (UV) Disinfection for Drinking Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    UV disinfection is an effective process for inactivating many microbial pathogens in water with potential to serve as stand-alone treatment or in combination with other disinfectants. USEPA provided guidance on the validation of UV reactors nearly a decade ago. Since then, lesson...

  20. Anaerobic effluent disinfection using ozone: Byproducts formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, G.H.R.; Daniel, L.A.; Bruning, H.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    This research was aimed at studying oxidation processes, coliform inactivation effectiveness and disinfection byproducts (DBPs) associated with the disinfection of anaerobic sanitary wastewater effluent with ozone applied at doses of 5.0, 8.0 and 10.0mg O(3)L(-1) for contact times of 5, 10 and 15 mi

  1. How to improve instrument disinfection by ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatzwauk, L; Schöne, H; Pietsch, H

    2001-08-01

    Ultrasound technologies have a wide range of hospital and dental applications which include cleaning and disinfection of surgical and dental instruments. We measured the germicidal efficacy of sonication, with or without chemical disinfectants, in an ultrasonic bath delivering a frequency of 35 kHz and an intensity of 0.66 W/cm2. Cultures of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans were exposed to ultrasound and to an amine-based disinfectant in non-bactericidal concentrations. Ultrasonication for 60 min alone did not cause a significant killing of the bacteria and yeast. However, we were able to show that sonication can act as a powerful synergistic agent to increase the cidal efficacy of the disinfectant against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. C. albicans was more resistant to the combination of ultrasound and chemical disinfection. The key role in the action of ultrasound in cleaning of instruments and perhaps in enhanced disinfection is played by cavitation phenomena. The distribution of cavitations in an ultrasonic bath is not homogenous. We found a similar synergistic effect of ultrasound and disinfectant in positions with low cavitation. The synergistic effect was not reduced inside rubber tubes. Before ultrasound can be accepted as an integral part of the cleaning and disinfection process of medical instruments, the influence of intensity and frequency of sonication and the effects of cavitation must be clarified.

  2. [Preoperative fasting guidelines: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Muñoz, A C; Busto Aguirreurreta, N; Tomás Braulio, J

    2015-03-01

    Anesthesiology societies have issued various guidelines on preoperative fasting since 1990, not only to decrease the incidence of lung aspiration and anesthetic morbidity, but also to increase patient comfort prior to anesthesia. Some of these societies have been updating their guidelines, as such that, since 2010, we now have 2 evidence-based preoperative fasting guidelines available. In this article, an attempt is made to review these updated guidelines, as well as the current instructions for more controversial patients such as infants, the obese, and a particular type of ophthalmic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Villebro, Nete; Møller, Ann Merete

    2010-01-01

    and keywords (surgery) or (operation) or (anaesthesia) or (anesthesia). MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL were also searched, combining tobacco- and surgery-related terms. Most recent search April 2010. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that recruited people who smoked prior to surgery, offered......Background Smokers have a substantially increased risk of postoperative complications. Preoperative smoking intervention may be effective in decreasing this incidence, and surgery may constitute a unique opportunity for smoking cessation interventions. Objectives The objective of this review...... was to assess the effect of preoperative smoking intervention on smoking cessation at the time of surgery and 12 months postoperatively and on the incidence of postoperative complications. Search strategy The specialized register of the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group was searched using the free text...

  4. Interventions for preoperative smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Villebro, N.; Møller, Ann Merete;

    2010-01-01

    Background Smokers have a substantially increased risk of postoperative complications. Preoperative smoking intervention may be effective in decreasing this incidence, and surgery may constitute a unique opportunity for smoking cessation interventions. Objectives The objective of this review...... was to assess the effect of preoperative smoking intervention on smoking cessation at the time of surgery and 12 months postoperatively and on the incidence of postoperative complications. Search strategy The specialized register of the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group was searched using the free text......; pooled RR 10.76 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.55 to 25.46, two trials) and RR 1.41 (95% CI 1.22 to 1.63, five trials) respectively. Four trials evaluating the effect on long-term smoking cessation found a significant effect; pooled RR 1.61 (95% CI 1.12 to 2.33). However, when pooling intensive...

  5. Susceptibility of Vaccinia Virus to Chemical Disinfectants

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Tércia Moreira Ludolfo; Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Coelho Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado; Ferreira, Jaqueline Maria Siqueira; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2011-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is the cause of bovine vaccinia (BV), an emerging zoonotic disease that affects dairy cows and milkers. Some chemical disinfectants have been used on farms affected by BV to disinfect cow teats and milkers' hands. To date, there is no information about the efficacy of disinfectants against VACV. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the virucidal activity of some active disinfectants commonly used in the field. Sodium hypochlorite, quaternary ammonium combined with chlorhexidine, and quaternary ammonium combined with glutaraldehyde were effective in inactivating the virus at all concentrations tested. Iodine and quaternary ammonium as the only active component were partially effective. The presence of bovine feces as organic matter and light decreased the effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite. These results show that an appropriated disinfection and asepsis of teats and hands may be helpful in the control and prevention of BV and other infections with VACV. PMID:21734141

  6. Resistive Plate Chamber Digitization in a Hadronic Shower Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Z; Wang, Y; Yue, Q; Yang, Z; Apostolakis, J; Folger, G; Grefe, C; Ivantchenko, V; Ribon, A; Uzhinskiy, V; Boumediene, D; Carloganu, C; Français, V; Cho, G; Kim, D-W; Lee, S C; Park, W; Vallecorsa, S; Cauwenbergh, S; Tytgat, M; Pingault, A; Zaganidis, N; Brianne, E; Ebrahimi, A; Gadow, K; Göttlicher, P; Günter, C; Hartbrich, O; Hermberg, B; Irles, A; Krivan, F; Krüger, K; Kvasnicka, J; Lu, S; Lutz, B; Morgunov, V; Neubüser, C; Provenza, A; Reinecke, M; Sefkow, F; Schuwalow, S; Tran, H L; Garutti, E; Laurien, S; Matysek, M; Ramilli, M; Schroeder, S; Bilki, B; Norbeck, E; Northacker, D; Onel, Y; Chang, S; Khan, A; Kim, D H; Kong, D.J; Oh, Y D; Kawagoe, K; Hirai, H; Sudo, Y; Suehara, T; Sumida, H; Yoshioka, T; Gil, E Cortina; Mannai, S; Buridon, V; Combaret, C; Caponetto, L; Eté, R; Garillot, G; Grenier, G; Han, R; Ianigro, J C; Kieffer, R; Laktineh, I; Lumb, N; Mathez, H; Mirabito, L; Petrukhin, A; Steen, A; Antequera, J Berenguer; Alamillo, E Calvo; Fouz, M-C; Marin, J; Puerta-Pelayo, J; Verdugo, A; Chadeeva, M; Danilov, M; Gabriel, M; Goecke, P; Kiesling, C; vanderKolk, N; Simon, F; Szalay, M; Bilokin, S; Bonis, J; Cornebise, P; Richard, F; Pöschl, R; Rouëné, J; Thiebault, A; Zerwas, D; Anduze, M; Balagura, V; Belkadhi, K; Boudry, V; Brient, J-C; Cornat, R; Frotin, M; Gastaldi, F; Haddad, Y; Magniette, F; Ruan, M; Rubio-Roy, M; Shpak, K; Videau, H; Yu, D; Callier, S; di Lorenzo, S Conforti; Dulucq, F; Martin-Chassard, G; de la Taille, Ch; Raux, L; Seguin-Moreau, N; Kotera, K; Ono, H; Takeshita, T; Corriveau, F

    2016-01-01

    The CALICE Semi-Digital Hadron Calorimeter (SDHCAL) technological prototype is a sampling calorimeter using Glass Resistive Plate Chamber detectors with a three-threshold readout as the active medium. This technology is one of the two options proposed for the hadron calorimeter of the International Large Detector for the International Linear Collider. The prototype was exposed to beams of muons, electrons and pions of different energies at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. To be able to study the performance of such a calorimeter in future experiments it is important to ensure reliable simulation of its response. In this paper we present our prototype simulation performed with GEANT4 and the digitization procedure achieved with an algorithm called SimDigital. A detailed description of this algorithm is given and the methods to determinate its parameters using muon tracks and electromagnetic showers are explained. The comparison with hadronic shower data shows a good agreement up to 50 GeV. Discrepancies are ...

  7. Matching fully differential NNLO calculations and parton showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alioli, Simone; Bauer, Christian W.; Berggren, Calvin; Walsh, Jonathan R.; Zuberi, Saba [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Tackmann, Frank J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    We present a general method to match fully differential next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) calculations to parton shower programs. We discuss in detail the perturbative accuracy criteria a complete NNLO+PS matching has to satisfy. Our method is based on consistently improving a given NNLO calculation with the leading-logarithmic (LL) resummation in a chosen jet resolution variable. The resulting NNLO+LL calculation is cast in the form of an event generator for physical events that can be directly interfaced with a parton shower routine, and we give an explicit construction of the input ''Monte Carlo cross sections'' satisfying all required criteria. We also show how other proposed approaches naturally arise as special cases in our method.

  8. Matching Fully Differential NNLO Calculations and Parton Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Alioli, Simone; Berggren, Calvin; Tackmann, Frank J; Walsh, Jonathan R; Zuberi, Saba

    2013-01-01

    We present a general method to match fully differential next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) calculations to parton shower programs. We discuss in detail the perturbative accuracy criteria a complete NNLO+PS matching has to satisfy. Our method is based on consistently improving a given NNLO calculation with the leading-logarithmic (LL) resummation in a chosen jet resolution variable. The resulting NNLO$+$LL calculation is cast in the form of an event generator for physical events that can be directly interfaced with a parton shower routine, and we give an explicit construction of the input "Monte Carlo cross sections" satisfying all required criteria. We also show how other proposed approaches naturally arise as special cases in our method.

  9. Radio detection of cosmic ray air showers with LOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huege, T.; Apel, W.D. [IK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [IPE, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Badea, A.F. [IK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Baehren, L. [ASTRON, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [IK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bercuci, A. [Nat. Inst. of Physics and Nuclear Eng., 7690 Bucharest (Romania); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [IK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); IEKP, Universitaet Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [IK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [Nat. Inst. of Physics and Nuclear Eng., 7690 Bucharest (Romania); Buitink, S. [Dpt. Astrophysics, Radboud Univ., 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen, 57072 Siegen (Germany); Butcher, H. [ASTRON, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [IEKP, Universitaet Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Daumiller, K. [IK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Di Pierro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy)] (and others)

    2007-03-15

    In the last few years, radio detection of cosmic ray air showers has experienced a true renaissance, becoming manifest in a number of new experiments and simulation efforts. In particular, the LOPES project has successfully implemented modern interferometric methods to measure the radio emission from extensive air showers. LOPES has confirmed that the emission is coherent and of geomagnetic origin, as expected by the geosynchrotron mechanism, and has demonstrated that a large scale application of the radio technique has great potential to complement current measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We describe the current status, most recent results and open questions regarding radio detection of cosmic rays and give an overview of ongoing research and development for an application of the radio technique in the framework of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  10. Radio detection of cosmic ray air showers with LOPES

    CERN Document Server

    Huege, T; Asch, T; Badea, A F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blumer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buitink, S; Bruggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Butcher, H; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Hakenjos, A; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Isar, P G; Kampert, K H; Kolotaev, Yu; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Meurer, C; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Petcu, M; Petrovic, J; Pierog, T; Plewnia, S; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Sima, O; Singh, K; Stumpert, M; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Van Buren, J; Walkowiak, W; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; Zimmermann, D; Huege, Tim; al, et

    2006-01-01

    In the last few years, radio detection of cosmic ray air showers has experienced a true renaissance, becoming manifest in a number of new experiments and simulation efforts. In particular, the LOPES project has successfully implemented modern interferometric methods to measure the radio emission from extensive air showers. LOPES has confirmed that the emission is coherent and of geomagnetic origin, as expected by the geosynchrotron mechanism, and has demonstrated that a large scale application of the radio technique has great potential to complement current measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We describe the current status, most recent results and open questions regarding radio detection of cosmic rays and give an overview of ongoing research and development for an application of the radio technique in the framework of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  11. Exploiting the geomagnetic distortion of the inclined atmospheric showers

    CERN Document Server

    Billoir, Pierre; Blanco, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for the determination of the nature of ultra-high energy cosmic rays by exploiting the geomagnetic deviation of muons in nearly horizontal showers. The distribution of the muons at ground level is well described by a simple parametrization providing a few shape parameters tightly correlated to $X^\\mu_\\mathrm{max}$, the depth of maximal muon production, which is a mass indicator tightly correlated to the usual parameter $X_\\mathrm{max}$, the depth of maximal development of the shower. We show that some constraints can be set on the predictions of hadronic models, especially by combining the geomagnetic distortion with standard measurement of the longitudinal profile. We discuss the precision needed to obtain significant results and we propose a schematic layout of a detector.

  12. Simulation of Proton and Iron Induced Extensive Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Thakuria, C

    2011-01-01

    The reliable simulation of extensive air showers induced by different primary particles (e. g. proton, iron, gamma etc.) is of great importance in high energy cosmic ray research. The CORSIKA is a standard Monte-Carlo simulation package to simulate the four dimensional evolution of Extensive Air Shower (EAS) in the atmosphere initiated by gamma, hadrons and nuclei. CORSIKA has different high energy interaction models like DPMJET, QGSJET, NEXUS, SIBYLL, VENUS and EPOS which are based on different theoretical frameworks. The influence of different hadronic interaction models, viz., QGSJET and DPMJET on the lateral distribution functions (LDF) and muon to electron ratio of cosmic ray EAS induced by 10^17 eV to 10^20 eV proton and iron primaries are explored in this work.

  13. W Production in an Improved Parton-Shower Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Miu, G; Miu, Gabriela; Sjostrand, Torbjorn

    1999-01-01

    In the description of the production properties of gauge bosons (W+/W-, Z0, gamma) at colliders, the lowest-order graph normally is not sufficient. The contributions of higher orders can be introduced either by an explicit order-by-order matrix-element calculation, by a resummation procedure or by a parton-shower algorithm. Each approach has its advantages and disadvantages. We here introduce a method that allows the parton-shower algorithm to be augmented by higher-order information, thereby offering an economical route to a description of all event properties. It is tested by comparing with the pT spectrum of W bosons at the Tevatron.

  14. Determining the Mass Composition of Cosmic Rays Using Shower Universality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscoveanu, Andrea; Mostafa, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    The mass composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays is an important parameter for understanding their origin. Using both fluorescence and surface detectors, The Pierre Auger Observatory measures the depth of shower maximum, Xmax, from which the mass of the primary particle can be inferred. The surface detector measurement of Xmax is based on the principle of shower universality, and increases the number of cosmic rays by at least a factor of 10 with respect to the fluorescence detector measurement since it is not limited by the duty cycle of the fluorescence telescopes. We present an event-by-event comparison of the Xmax measurements from both types of detectors for energies above 10 18 . 8 eV, and a preliminary anisotropy study discriminating by the mass of the primary particle calculated using universality.

  15. Containment and resolution of hadronic showers at the FCC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068766

    2016-01-01

    The particles produced at a potential Future Circular Collider with $\\sqrt{s}$ = 100 TeV are of unprecented energies. In this document we present the hadronic shower containment and resolution parametrizations based on Geant4 simulations for the Hadronic calorimetry needed for conceptual detector design at this energy. The Geant4 toolkit along with FTFP\\_BERT physics list are used in this study. Comparisons are made with test-beam data from the ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter. These simulations motivate a 12 $\\lambda$ calorimeter in order to contain at 98% level TeV single hadron showers and multi-TeV jets and keep a pion energy resolution constant term of 3%.

  16. Containment and resolution of hadronic showers at the FCC

    CERN Document Server

    Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Carli, Tancredi; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    The particles produced at a potential Future Circular Collider with $\\sqrt{s}$ = 100 TeV are of unprecented energies. In this document we present the hadronic shower containment and resolution parametrizations based on Geant4 simulations for the Hadronic calorimetry needed for conceptual detector design at this energy. The Geant4 toolkit along with FTFP_BERT physics list are used in this study. Comparisons are made with test-beam data from the ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter. These simulations motivate a 12 $\\lambda$ calorimeter in order to contain at 98% level TeV single hadron showers and multi-TeV jets and keep a pion energy resolution constant term of 3%.

  17. Results from the Puebla extensive air shower detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, H.; Martinez, O.; Moreno, E.; Cotzomi, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Saavedrac, O.

    2003-07-01

    We describe the design and operation of the first stage of the EAS-UAP extensive air shower array, as a detector of very high energy cosmic rays ( Eo > 10 14eV). The array is located at the Campus of Puebla University and consists of 18 liquid scintillator detectors, with an active surface of 1 m2 each and a detector spacing of 20 m in a square grid. In this report we discuss the stability and the calibration of the detector array, as derived from the 10 detectors in operation in the first stage. The main characteristics of the array allow us also to use it as an educational and training facility. First distributions of the arrival direction and the lateral shower srpead are also given.

  18. Determination of antiseptic efficacy of rubs on the forearm and consequences for surgical hand disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, N-O; Kellner, N B; Partecke, L I; Koburger, T; Heidecke, C-D; Kohlmann, T; Kramer, A

    2011-05-01

    While hands are acknowledged to be the most important source of pathogens from the skin of the surgical team, the transmission of pathogens from the forearms may also be relevant. Preoperative hand disinfection is recommended, but evidence-based standards for the forearms are lacking. As neither the European standard EN 12791 nor the American guidelines ASTM 1115 are applicable to the forearms, a new test method based on the European standard EN 12791 and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) method for testing for the efficacy of skin antiseptics was developed to address the forearms. The antiseptic efficacy of a commercially available alcohol-based hand rub [76.7% (w/w) ethanol] was assessed on the upper arm after 15s, 2.5 min, and 30 min, and on the lower arm after 2.5 min, 30 min, and 3 h. On the upper arm, application of the product followed the DGHM standard procedure. On the forearm, the product was applied by the participants themselves with the right hand over the left forearm and vice versa as performed during preoperative hand disinfection. Sampling and culture were performed according to the DGHM method for skin antisepsis on the upper arm. Twenty-two volunteers were investigated. The efficacy of the antiseptic treatment on the forearm was not significantly lower than on the upper arm for any of the areas tested (P > 0.05). Reduction factors for all tested areas and times were quite similar, with confidence intervals ranging between 1.43 and 2.31 log₁₀. We suggest that an application time of 10s may be sufficient for the treatment of the forearm as part of preoperative hand disinfection, provided that an appropriate product is used.

  19. A generalized description of the signal size in extensive air shower detectors and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ave, M.; Engel, R.; Roth, M.; Schulz, A.

    2017-01-01

    The number as well as the energy and angular distributions of particles in extensive air showers (EAS) depend on the stage of the shower development and the distance to the shower axis. In this work we derive an analytic parameterization of the particle distributions at ground from air shower simulations convolved with the response of a surface detector array. Shower particles are classified into four components according to the shower component they belong to: the muonic component, the electromagnetic component stemming from muon interactions and muon decay, the purely electromagnetic component, and the newly introduced electromagnetic component from low-energy hadrons. Using this scheme, we will show that the total signal at ground level for different surface detectors can be described with minimal fluctuations with parameterizations depending on the primary energy, position of the shower maximum, and the overall number of muons in the shower. The simulation results for different combinations of primaries and hadronic interaction models are reproduced with an accuracy better than 5-10% in the range from 100 m to 2000 m from the shower core. This parameterization is then used as a Lateral Distribution ansatz to reconstruct showers in current EAS experiments. Since this ansatz depends on physical parameters, it opens the possibility to infer them from data.

  20. On the Impact of Tsallis Statistics on Cosmic Ray Showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abrahão

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the impact of the Tsallis nonextensive statistics introduced by intrinsic temperature fluctuations in p-Air ultrahigh energy interactions on observables of cosmic ray showers, such as the slant depth of the maximum Xmax and the muon number on the ground Nμ. The results show that these observables are significantly affected by temperature fluctuations and agree qualitatively with the predictions of Heitler model.

  1. Mycobacterium avium in a shower linked to pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkinham, Joseph O; Iseman, Michael D; de Haas, Petra; van Soolingen, Dick

    2008-06-01

    Mycobacterium avium was isolated from hot and cold water samples and from sediment (biofilm) collected from the showerhead in the home of a woman with M. avium pulmonary disease lacking known M. avium risk factors. IS1245/IS1311 DNA fingerprinting demonstrated that M. avium isolates from the hot and cold water and showerhead sediment demonstrated a clonal relationship with the patient's M. avium isolate. The data provide evidence that showers may serve as sources of infection by waterborne M. avium.

  2. On the angular distribution of extensive air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Zotov, M Yu; Kulikov, G V; Sulakov, V P

    2009-01-01

    Angular distributions of extensive air showers with different number of charged particles in the range 2.5x10^5--4x10^7 are derived using the experimental data obtained with the EAS MSU array. Possible approximations of the obtained distributions with different empiric functions available in literature, are analysed. It is shown that the exponential function provides the best approximation of the angular distributions in the sense of the chi-squared criterion.

  3. VLF observation during Leonid Meteor Shower-2002 from Kolkata

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, S K; Acharyya, K; Mandal, S; Chakrabarti, S; Khan, R; Bose, B; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2002-01-01

    Using a Gyrator-II Loop antenna tuned at 19.0Khz, we monitored the meteor shower during 17-24th November, 2002. We observe the primary peak at 3h58m (UT) on the 19th of November, 2002. We distinctly observed several `beadlike' and `exponentially dropping' signals. The `beadlike' signals were more in abundance on the 18th of November, 2002, one day prior to the actual encounter.

  4. Fingerprint of Tsallis statistics in cosmic ray showers

    CERN Document Server

    Abrahão, M; de Almeida, R M; Gratieri, D R; Penna, T J P

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the impact of the Tsallis non extensive statistics introduced by intrinsic temperature fluctuations in p-Air ultra high energy interactions on observables of cosmic ray showers, such as the slant depth of the maximum Xmax and the muon number on the ground $n_{\\mu}$. The results show that these observables are significantly affected by temperature fluctuations and agree qualitatively with the Heitler model predictions.

  5. The AMY experiment: Microwave emission from air shower plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez-Muñiz J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available You The Air Microwave Yield (AMY experiment investigate the molecular bremsstrahlung radiation emitted in the GHz frequency range from an electron beam induced air-shower. The measurements have been performed at the Beam Test Facility (BTF of Frascati INFN National Laboratories with a 510 MeV electron beam in a wide frequency range between 1 and 20 GHz. We present the apparatus and the results of the tests performed.

  6. Meteor Showers in the Ancient Maya Hieroglyphic Codices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsman, J. H.

    2014-07-01

    Researchers of the ancient Maya culture have long been fascinated with the Maya obsession concerning cyclical calendars and precise visual observations of astronomical bodies and phenomena, in particular the Sun, Moon, visible planets, and solar and lunar eclipses. Although considered possible, heretofore no record of specific sightings of comets or meteor showers in the Maya inscriptions has been firmly established by scholars. Besides difficulties with decipherment of the hieroglyphic script, investigators have had to grapple with an ancient Maya calendar that has not been accurately correlated to the European calendar. Recent examination by this researcher has found that it may be possible to recognize written accounts of meteor showers embedded in the hieroglyphic corpus, especially the codices, the screen-fold books that were the tools of the astronomer-priests of that day. By proposing an alternative decipherment of an astronomical sign and using the accompanying hieroglyphic texts and illustrations with appropriate dates, this researcher believes it is possible to demonstrate that the Maya may have recorded meteor showers occurring in the seventh through the tenth centuries AD.

  7. Tagging Spallation Backgrounds with Showers in Water-Cherenkov Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shirley Weishi

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic-ray muons and especially their secondaries break apart nuclei ("spallation") and produce fast neutrons and beta-decay isotopes, which are backgrounds for low-energy experiments. In Super-Kamiokande, these beta decays are the dominant background in 6--18 MeV, relevant for solar neutrinos and the diffuse supernova neutrino background. In a previous paper, we showed that these spallation isotopes are produced primarily in showers, instead of in isolation. This explains an empirical spatial correlation between a peak in the muon Cherenkov light profile and the spallation decay, which Super-Kamiokande used to develop a new spallation cut. However, the muon light profiles that Super-Kamiokande measured are grossly inconsistent with shower physics. We show how to resolve this discrepancy and how to reconstruct accurate profiles of muons and their showers from their Cherenkov light. We propose a new spallation cut based on these improved profiles and quantify its effects. Our results can significantly benefit ...

  8. Producing EGS4 shower displays with the Unified Graphics System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, R.F. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Lab. for Nuclear Science); Nelson, W.R. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1990-08-16

    The EGS4 Code System has been coupled with the SLAC Unified Graphics System in such a manner as to provide a means for displaying showers on UGS77-supported devices. This is most easily accomplished by attaching an auxiliary subprogram package (SHOWGRAF) to existing EGS4 User Codes and making use of a graphics display or a post-processor code called EGS4PL. SHOWGRAF may be used to create shower displays directly on interactive IBM 5080 color display devices, supporting three-dimensional rotations, translations, and zoom features, and providing illustration of particle types and energies by color and/or intensity. Alternatively, SHOWGRAF may be used to record a two-dimensional projection of the shower in a device-independent graphics file. The EGS4PL post-processor may then be used to convert this file into device-dependent graphics code for any UGS77-supported device. Options exist within EGS4PL that allow for two-dimensional translations and zoom, for creating line structure to indicate particle types and energies, and for optional display of particles by type. All of this is facilitated by means of the command processor EGS4PL EXEC together with new options (5080 and PDEV) with the standard EGS4IN EXEC routine for running EGS4 interactively under VM/SP. 6 refs.

  9. Thunderstorm Observations by Air-Shower Radio Antenna Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buchholz, P; Buitink, S; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Doll, P; Ender, M; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Finger, M; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Nehls, S; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; 10.1016/j.asr.2011.06.003

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic, charged particles present in extensive air showers lead to a coherent emission of radio pulses which are measured to identify the shower initiating high-energy cosmic rays. Especially during thunderstorms, there are additional strong electric fields in the atmosphere, which can lead to further multiplication and acceleration of the charged particles and thus have influence on the form and strength of the radio emission. For a reliable energy reconstruction of the primary cosmic ray by means of the measured radio signal it is very important to understand how electric fields affect the radio emission. In addition, lightning strikes are a prominent source of broadband radio emissions that are visible over very long distances. This, on the one hand, causes difficulties in the detection of the much lower signal of the air shower. On the other hand the recorded signals can be used to study features of the lightning development. The detection of cosmic rays via the radio emission and the influence of s...

  10. Status of air-shower measurements with sparse radio arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Frank G.

    2017-03-01

    This proceeding gives a summary of the current status and open questions of the radio technique for cosmic-ray air showers, assuming that the reader is already familiar with the principles. It includes recent results of selected experiments not present at this conference, e.g., LOPES and TREND. Current radio arrays like AERA or Tunka-Rex have demonstrated that areas of several km2 can be instrumented for reasonable costs with antenna spacings of the order of 200m. For the energy of the primary particle such sparse antenna arrays can already compete in absolute accuracy with other precise techniques, like the detection of air-fluorescence or air-Cherenkov light. With further improvements in the antenna calibration, the radio detection might become even more accurate. For the atmospheric depth of the shower maximum, Xmax, currently only the dense array LOFAR features a precision similar to the fluorescence technique, but analysis methods for the radio measurement of Xmax are still under development. Moreover, the combination of radio and muon measurements is expected to increase the accuracy of the mass composition, and this around-the-clock recording is not limited to clear nights as are the light-detection methods. Consequently, radio antennas will be a valuable add-on for any air shower array targeting the energy range above 100 PeV.

  11. 7 CFR 301.89-12 - Cleaning, disinfection, and disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cleaning, disinfection, and disposal. 301.89-12... Cleaning, disinfection, and disposal. (a) Mechanized harvesting equipment that has been used to harvest... and, if disinfection is determined to be necessary by an inspector, disinfected in accordance with...

  12. 9 CFR 53.5 - Disinfection or destruction of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disinfection or destruction of....5 Disinfection or destruction of materials. (a) In order to prevent the spread of disease, materials... cost of disinfection would exceed the value of the materials or disinfection would be impracticable for...

  13. 9 CFR 83.7 - Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... disinfection. 83.7 Section 83.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... HEMORRHAGIC SEPTICEMIA § 83.7 Shipping containers; cleaning and disinfection. (a) All live fish that are to be... been cleaned and disinfected. (1) Cleaning and disinfection of shipping containers must be monitored by...

  14. Do psychological interventions reduce preoperative anxiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Tessa; Leary, Alison; Wiseman, Theresa

    The systematic review investigates whether, during preoperative assessments, nurse-delivered psychological interventions reduce anxiety levels preoperatively for patients undergoing elective surgery. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria for data extraction and in-depth critiquing. Of these, two were discarded due to lack of validity, while the remaining studies were organised thematically in a narrative synthesis, generating two principal results: patients' preoperative anxieties were lowered by nurse-delivered general preoperative psychological interventions; and patients valued individualised preoperative interventions delivered by nurses. However, the single oncology study in the review showed an elevation in preoperative anxiety, regardless of intervention, and highlights the need for more research in this under-reviewed area. In the meantime, the authors believe that service improvements should be implemented to ensure that, where possible, psychological preoperative interventions are individualised.

  15. Radio emission in air showers measured by LOPES-10 in concidence with KASCADE-Grande observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, A.F.; Apel, W.D.; Asch, T. (and others)

    2006-05-15

    Data taken during half a year of operation of 10 LOPES antennas (LOPES-10), triggered by EAS observed with KASCADE-Grande have been analysed. We report about the analysis of correlations of radio signals measured by LOPES-10 with extensive air shower events reconstructed by KASCADE-Grande, including shower cores at large distances. The efficiency of detecting radio signals induced by air showers up to distances of 700m from the shower axis has been investigated. The results are discussed with special emphasis on the effects of the reconstruction accuracy for shower core and arrival direction on the coherence of the measured radio signal. In addition, the correlations of the radio pulse amplitude with the primary cosmic ray energy and with the lateral distance from the shower core are studied. (Orig.)

  16. A generalized description of the time dependent signals in extensive air shower detectors and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ave, M.; Roth, M.; Schulz, A.

    2017-02-01

    The expected signal in extensive air shower (EAS) detectors can be predicted with a 10% accuracy by a parameterization that depends on a set of global shower parameters: the energy, the depth of the electromagnetic shower maximum (Xmax) and the overall muon content. By classifying shower particles in four components (muonic, purely electromagnetic, electromagnetic stemming from muon interactions and decay and electromagnetic-from-low-energy hadrons), shower-to-shower fluctuations are minimized. We follow this scheme to propose a model to describe the arrival time distributions of secondary particles as measured with surface detectors in an EAS experiment. This model is then used to reconstruct Xmax in Monte Carlo data sets. As an example, we show that for the case of the Pierre Auger Observatory Xmax can be reconstructed with an accuracy of about 45 g/cm2 at 1019 eV.

  17. Lateral distribution and the energy determination of showers along the ankle

    CERN Document Server

    Ros, G; De Donato, C; Del Peral, L; Rodríguez-Frías, D; D'Olivo, J C; Valdés-Galicia, J F; Arqueros, F

    2007-01-01

    The normalization constant of the lateral distribution function (LDF) of an extensive air shower is a monotonous (almost linear) increasing function of the energy of the primary. Therefore, the interpolated signal at some fixed distance from the core can be calibrated to estimate the energy of the shower. There is, somehow surprisingly, a reconstructed optimal distance, r_{opt}, at which the effects on the inferred signal, S(r_{opt}), of the uncertainties on true core location, LDF functional form and shower-to-shower fluctuations are minimized. We calculate the value of r_{opt} as a function of surface detector separation, energy and zenith angle and we demonstrate the advantage of using the r_{opt} value of each individual shower instead of a same fixed distance for every shower, specially in dealing with events with saturated stations. The effects on the determined spectrum are also shown.

  18. Enhancement of the radar signal of air showers due to time compression

    CERN Document Server

    Stasielak, J; Engel, R; Neunteufel, P; Pekala, J; Šm\\'\\ida, R; Werner, F; Wilczyński, H

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of detecting extensive air showers by the radar technique at viewing angles smaller than $\\sim 25^\\circ$ to the shower axis. Considering a bistatic radar setup and shower geometries in which the receiver points into the arriving shower, we simulate reflection of radio waves off the short-lived plasma produced by the high-energy shower particles in the air. Using the Thomson cross-section for scattering of radio waves and summing coherently contributions of the reflected radio wave over the volume of the plasma disk, we obtain the time evolution of the signal. We analyze the spectral power density of the radar echo and the received power. Based on the obtained results, we discuss possible modes of the radar detection of extensive air showers.

  19. Pion and proton showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadron calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Bilki, B.; Xia, L.; Eigen, G.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, D.R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D.H.; Kong, D.J.; Oh, Y.D.; Blazey, G.C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Lima, J.G.R.; Salcido, R.; Zutshi, V.; Salvatore, F.; Kawagoe, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Tomita, T.; Ueno, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Apostolakis, J.; Dannheim, D.; Folger, G.; Ivantchenko, V.; Klempt, W.; Lucaci-Timoce, A. -I.; Ribon, A.; Schlatter, D.; Sicking, E.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Giraud, J.; Grondin, D.; Hostachy, J. -Y.; Morin, L.; Brianne, E.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Ebrahimi, A.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Tran, H.L.; Buhmann, P.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Munwes, Y.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wing, M.; Combaret, C.; Caponetto, L.; Eté, R.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J.C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Antequera, J. Berenguer; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M. -C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Corriveau, F.; Bobchenko, B.; Chistov, R.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mironov, D.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Ilyin, A.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M.S.; Bonis, J.; Conforti Di Lorenzo, S.; Cornebise, P.; Dulucq, F.; Fleury, J.; Frisson, T.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Poschl, R.; Raux, L.; Richard, F.; Pöschl, R.; Rouëné, J.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; de la Taille, Ch.; Anduze, M.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J-C.; Clerc, C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Matthieu, A.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Musat, G.; Ruan, M.; Videau, H.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Jeans, D.; Weber, S.

    2015-01-01

    Showers produced by positive hadrons in the highly granular CALICE scintillatorsteel analogue hadronic calorimeter were studied. The experimental data were collected at CERN and FNAL for single particles with initial momenta from 10 to 80 GeV/c. The calorimeter response and resolution and spatial characteristics of shower development for proton- and pion-induced showers for test beam data and simulations using GEANT4 version 9.6 are compared.

  20. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronzhin, A., E-mail: ronzhin@fnal.gov [Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Los, S.; Ramberg, E. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Kim, H. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. The time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  1. On the penetrating showers observed in Chacaltaya two-storey emulsion chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, M. [Kinski University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Osaka (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    The penetrating nature of the cascade showers observed in the Chacaltaya two-storey chamber is compared with that of simulated (e, {gamma})-induced and hadron-induced cascade showers. It is shown that around 1/3 of the observed penetrating showers are neither (e, {gamma})-induced nor hadron-induced ones. A possible explanation is given in connection with mini-clusters.

  2. Regular and transitory showers of comet C/1979 Y1 (Bradfield)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajduková, M.; Neslušan, L.

    2017-09-01

    Aims: We intend to map the whole meteor complex of the long-period comet C/1979 Y1 (Bradfield), which is a proposed parent body of the July Pegasids, No. 175 in the list of meteor showers established by the Meteor Data Center (MDC) of the International Astronomical Union (IAU). Methods: For five perihelion passages of the parent comet in the past, we model associated theoretical stream, its parts, each consisting of 10 000 test particles, and follow the dynamical evolution of these parts up to the present. Subsequently, we analyze the mean orbital characteristics of those particles of the parts that approach the Earth's orbit and, thus, create a shower or showers. The showers are compared with their observed counterparts separated from photographic, radio, and several video databases. Results: The modeled stream of C/1979 Y1 approaches the Earth's orbit in two filaments that correspond to two regular (annual) showers. We confirm the generic relationship between the studied parent comet and 175 July Pegasids. The other predicted shower is a daytime shower with the mean radiant situated symmetrically to the July Pegasids with respect to the apex of the Earth's motion. This shower is not in the IAU MDC list, but we separated it from the Cameras-for-Allsky-Meteor-Surveillance (CAMS) and SonotaCo video data as a new shower. We suggest naming it α-Microscopiids. The stronger influence of the Poynting-Robertson drag deflects the stream away from the Earth's orbit in those sections that correspond to the July Pegasids and the predicted daytime shower, but it makes the stream cross the Earth's orbit in other sections. Corresponding showers are, however, only expected to survive during a limited period and to consist of particles of sizes in a narrow interval. We identified one of these "transitory" filaments to the 104 γ-Bootids in the IAU MDC list of meteor showers.

  3. Preoperative localization in primary hyperparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sanson; Kitamura, Hiroyuki; Takagita, Shin-ichi; Maetani, Toshiki; Iwahashi, Yuka; Miyazaki, Masakazu; Yamamoto, Norio [Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    Between 1992 and 1996, 31 cases (8 men and 23 women) with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) were treated in our department. In this study, we compared which of the preoperative localization methods was most useful in the detection of PHPT. The sensitivity for detection of abnormal parathyroid glands was 88.6% on ultrasonography (US), 76.9% on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 74.3% on Tl-Tc subtraction scintigraphy and 68.8% on computed tomography. We concluded that US should be performed first, with MRI as a supplementary method, for the detection of abnormal parathyroid glands and the evaluation of invasion within the body. (author)

  4. Preoperative Evaluation for Noncardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Steven L

    2016-12-06

    This issue provides a clinical overview of preoperative evaluation for noncardiac surgery, focusing on risk factors, elements of evaluation, medication management, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  5. Inactivation of an enterovirus by airborne disinfectants

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background The activity of airborne disinfectants on bacteria, fungi and spores has been reported. However, the issue of the virucidal effect of disinfectants spread by fogging has not been studied thoroughly. Methods A procedure has been developed to determine the virucidal activity of peracetic acid-based airborne disinfectants on a resistant non-enveloped virus poliovirus type 1. This virus was laid on a stainless carrier. The products were spread into the room by hot fogging at 55°C for 3...

  6. Studying High $p_T$ Muons in Cosmic-Ray Air Showers

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Spencer R.

    2006-01-01

    Most cosmic-ray air shower arrays have focused on detecting electromagnetic shower particles and low energy muons. A few groups (most notably MACRO + EASTOP and SPASE + AMANDA) have studied the high energy muon component of showers. However, these experiments had small solid angles, and did not study muons far from the core. The IceTop + IceCube combination, with its 1 km$^2$ muon detection area can study muons far from the shower core. IceCube can measure their energy loss ($dE/dx$), and hen...

  7. Estimation of Lateral Distribution Function in Extensive Air Showers by Using AIRES Simulation System

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Al-Rubaiee A

    2013-01-01

    In this work the estimation of the lateral distribution function in Extensive Air showers was performed by using a system for air shower simulations which is called AIRES version 2.6 for different hadronic models like (QGSJET99, SIBYLL and SIBYLL1.6). The simulation was fulfilled in the high energy range (10^15-10^19 eV) for different primary particles like (gamma, protons and iron nuclei) for vertical showers. This simulation can be used to reconstruct the type and energy of the particle that generated Extensive Air showers for charged particles that registered with different arrays.

  8. The Effect of Cold Showering on Health and Work: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Buijze, Geert A; Sierevelt, Inger N.; van der Heijden, Bas C. J. M.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H.W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the cumulative effect of a routine (hot-to-) cold shower on sickness, quality of life and work productivity. Methods Between January and March 2015, 3018 participants between 18 and 65 years without severe comorbidity and no routine experience of cold showering were randomized (1:1:1:1) to a (hot-to-) cold shower for 30, 60, 90 seconds or a control group during 30 consecutive days followed by 60 days of showering cold at their own discretion for ...

  9. Test results on re-use of reclaimed shower water: Summary. [space stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verostko, C. E.; Garcia, R.; Sauer, R.; Linton, A. T.; Elms, T.; Reysa, R. P.

    1988-01-01

    A microgravity whole body shower (WBS) and waste water recovery systems (WWRS) were evaluated in three separate closed loop tests. Following a protocol similar to that anticipated for the U.S. Space Station, test subjects showered in a prototype whole body shower. The WWRS processes evaluated during the test series were phase change and reverse osmosis (RO). A preprototype Thermoelectric Integrated Hollow Fiber Membrane Evaporation Subsystem phase change process was used for the initial test with chemical pretreatment of the shower water waste input. The second and third tests concentrated on RO technologies. The second test evaluated a dynamic RO membrane consisting of zirconium oxide polyacrylic acid (ZOPA) membranes deposited on the interior diameter of 316L porous stainless steel tubes while the final test employed a thin semipermeable RO membrane deposited on the interior surface of polysulfone hollow fibers. All reclaimed water was post-treated for purity using ion exchange and granular activated carbon beds immediately followed by microbial control treatment using both heat and iodine. The test hardware, controls exercised for whole body showering, types of soaps evaluated, shower subject response to reclaimed water showering, and shower water collection and chemical pretreatment (if required) for microbial control are described. The WWRS recovered water performance and the effectiveness of the reclaimed water post-treatment techniques used for maintaining water purity and microorganism control are compared. Results on chemical and microbial impurity content of the water samples obtained from various locations in the shower water reuse system are summarized.

  10. Latest Results from the Air Shower Simulation Programs CORSIKA and CONEX

    CERN Document Server

    Pierog, T; Heck, D; Ostapchenko, S; Werner, K

    2008-01-01

    Interpretation of EAS measurements strongly depends on detailed air shower simulations. The uncertainty in the prediction of shower observables for different primary particles and energies is currently dominated by differences between hadronic interaction models. The new models QGSJETII-3 and EPOS 1.6, which reproduce all major results of existing accelerator data (including detailed data of RHIC experiments for EPOS), have been implemented in the air shower simulation programs CORSIKA and CONEX. We show predictions of these new models and compare them with those from older models such as QGSJET01 or SIBYLL. Results for important air shower observables are discussed in detail.

  11. Dynamical modeling validation of parent bodies associated with newly discovered CMN meteor showers

    CERN Document Server

    Šegon, Damir; Gural, Peter S; Vida, Denis; Andreić, Željko; Korlević, Korado; Skokić, Ivica

    2016-01-01

    Context: Results from previous searches for new meteor showers in the combined Croatian Meteor Network and SonotaCo meteor databases suggested possible parent bodies for several newly identified showers. Aims: We aim to perform an analysis to validate the connection between the identified showers and candidate parent bodies. Methods: Simulated particles were ejected from candidate parent bodies, a dynamical modeling was performed and the results were compared to the real meteor shower observations. Results: From the 13 analysed cases, three were found to be connected with comets, four with asteroids which are possibly dormant comets, four were inconclusive or negative, and two need more observational data before any conclusions can be drawn.

  12. Bioanalytical and chemical evaluation of disinfection by-products in swimming pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ruby Y L; Farré, Maria José; Stalter, Daniel; Tang, Janet Y M; Molendijk, Jeffrey; Escher, Beate I

    2014-08-01

    Pool water disinfection is vital to prevent microbial pathogens. However, potentially hazardous disinfection by-products (DBP) are formed from the reaction between disinfectants and organic/inorganic precursors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of DBPs in various swimming pool types in Brisbane, Australia, including outdoor, indoor and baby pools, and the dynamics after a complete water renewal. Chemical analysis of 36 regulated and commonly found DBPs and total adsorbable organic halogens as well as in vitro bioassays targeting cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and genotoxicity were used to evaluate swimming pool water quality. Dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid dominated in the pool water samples with higher levels (up to 2600 μg/L) than the health guideline values set by the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines (100 μg/L). Chlorinated DBPs occurred at higher concentrations compared to tap water, while brominated DBPs decreased gradually with increasing pool water age. Biological effects were expressed as chloroacetic acid equivalent concentrations and compared to predicted effects from chemical analysis and biological characterisation of haloacetic acids. The quantified haloacetic acids explained 35-118% of the absorbable organic halogens but less than 4% of the observed non-specific toxicity (cytotoxicity), and less than 1% of the observed oxidative stress response and genotoxicity. While the DBP concentrations in Australian pools found in this study are not likely to cause any adverse health effect, they are higher than in other countries and could be reduced by better hygiene of pool users, such as thorough showering prior to entering the pool and avoiding urination during swimming.

  13. Preoperative fasting time in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adeel, S

    2012-02-01

    The aim of preoperative fasting is to prevent regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration while limiting potential problems of thirst, dehydration and hypoglycaemia. The American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) has suggested guidelines for preoperative fasting for children undergoing elective surgery. We did a postal survey to determine the current practice regarding these guidelines amongst all specialist registrars in anaesthesia in Ireland. A questionnaire was sent to all specialist registrars in anaesthesia (90 in total), 60 (67%) were returned and analysed. The question asked was how long children should be kept fasting before elective surgery. The results of our survey suggest that most of the respondents are following the ASA guidelines for clear fluids and solids however there were differing opinion regarding the duration of fasting for formula milk and breast milk. In conclusion, we would recommend greater awareness and collaboration between anaesthetists, nurses and surgeons to ensure that fasting instructions are consistent with the ASA guidelines and that patient and their parents understand these directives as well.

  14. 9 CFR 71.10 - Permitted disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS GENERAL PROVISIONS..., Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (7 U.S.C. 135 et seq.), with tuberculocidal claims, as disinfectants...

  15. Travelers' Health: Water Disinfection for Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Water Disinfection Infographics for Travelers MERS Health Advisory poster Food and Water: What's Safer Health Advisory: MERS ... prevent recontamination during storage Table 2-10. Microorganism size and susceptibility to filtration ORGANISM AVERAGE SIZE (µm) ...

  16. [Formaldehyde sediment in incubators following disinfection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartner, R; Kegel, M; Meyer, H D; Schlüter, G; Wegner, J; Werner, E

    1983-12-01

    Measurements in incubators revealed the presence of formaldehyde concentrations involving a health risk for premature and normal newborns kept and cared for in incubators. Prior to measurements, the incubators had been disinfected by means of formaldehyde vapours in an "Aseptor" disinfecting cabinet (Drägerwerk AG, Lübeck) and then ventilated in strict adherence to operating instructions. The elevated formaldehyde concentrations found had been due to residues of paraformaldehyde and urotropin on the surfaces of the disinfected apparatus, liberating formaldehyde by hydrolysis depending on temperature and relative humidity. There should be a basic reconsideration of the present practice of incubator disinfection. From experiments with activated-carbon filters in incubators it would seem that there is a chance of reducing such formaldehyde concentrations.

  17. ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFICIENCY OF DISINFECTION METHOD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    ABSTRACT. The efficiencies of three disinfection methods namely boiling, water guard and pur purifier were assessed. ... Water is an indispensable resource for supporting life systems [2- ...... developing country context: improving decisions.

  18. ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS FOR DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    During a one-year study at Jefferson Parish, Louisiana the chemical, microbiological, and mutagenic effects of using the major drinking water disinfectants (chlorine, chlorine dioxide, chloramine, ozone) were evaluated. ests were performed on samples collected from various treatm...

  19. ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTION FOR DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    During a one-yr study at Jefferson Parish, La., the chemical, microbiological, and mutagenic effects os using the major drinkgin water disinfectants (chlorine, chlorine dioxide, chloramine, ozone) were evaluated. Tests were performed on samples collected from various treatment s...

  20. [Elimination of microscopic filamentous fungi with disinfectants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laciaková, A; Laciak, V

    1994-01-01

    The antifungal effectivity of three single-component (Persteril, Septonex, Glutaraldehyd) and of three combined (Persteril+Septonex, Pesteril+Glutaraldehyd, Glutaraldehyd+Septonex) commercially available disinfectants was monitored by the diffuse method on five fen of the microscopic filamentous fungi Aspergillus alternata, Aspergillus niger, Mucor fragillis, Fusarium moniliforme, Penicillium glabrum. The highest antifungal activity was observed in 2% Persteril while 2% Persteril + 1% Septonex were the most effective among the combined disinfectants. M. fragilis was the most resistant strain.

  1. [Udder disinfection and mastitis in cattle: a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, T J; van Vliet, J H; Schukken, Y H

    1995-07-01

    Postmilking teat disinfection is accepted as an important part of standard preventive measures against mastitis in dairy cattle. The efficacy of postmilking teat disinfection against infections with contagious pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae is beyond doubt. However, the efficacy of teat disinfection against infections with environmental pathogens such as Escherichia coli is disputed, and a negative effect has even been described in some situations. This article reviews the practice of teat disinfection in dairy cattle. Premilking and postmilking teat disinfection are discussed, as is the efficacy, different ways of teat disinfection, and different disinfectants. It is concluded that post-milking teat disinfection is an effective management measure in most herds. Selection of teat disinfectants should be based on proven efficacy, which is required for registration of the preparation as a veterinary medical product in the Netherlands.

  2. Preoperative information management system using wireless PDAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Tomohiro; Okahara, Masaharu; Santo, Masayuki; Schmidt, Ulrich; Nakata, Yoshinori; Morita, Shigeho; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2003-01-01

    Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) and wireless communication are currently available in clinical settings. We developed wireless PDA software that assists anesthesiologists in pre-operative patient assessment. The device communicates with the hospital information system through a wireless LAN and is equipped with pre-programmed data entry templates for pre-operative assessment. As a preliminary test of the device, we randomly assigned residents in preoperative assessment to an intervention and a control arm and compared the results.

  3. The Air-Shower Experiment KASCADE-Grande

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haungs, A., E-mail: haungs@ik.fzk.d [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Apel, W.D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Badea, F.; Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box Mg-6, RO-7690 Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF, 10133 Torino (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Daumiller, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Souza, V. de [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Di Pierro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    KASCADE-Grande is an extensive air shower experiment at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany. Main parts of the experiment are the Grande array spread over an area of 700x700m{sup 2}, the original KASCADE array covering 200x200m{sup 2} with unshielded and shielded detectors, and additional muon tracking devices. This multi-detector system allows to investigate the energy spectrum, composition, and anisotropies of cosmic rays in the energy range up to 1 EeV. An overview on the performance of the apparatus and first results will be given.

  4. First detection of extensive air showers with the EEE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, M; Fabbri, F L; Bressan, E; Librizzi, F; Sartorelli, G; Piragino, G; Ferroli, R Baldini; Maggiora, A; Siddi, E; Zuyeuski, R; Frolov, V; Serci, S; Selvi, M; Zichichi, A; Romano, F; La Rocca, P; Williams, M C S; Cicalo, C; D'Incecco, M; Panareo, M; Menghetti, H; Garbini, M; Moro, R; Cifarelli, L; Riggi, F; Hatzifotiadou, D; Scapparone, E; Chiavassa, A; Gustavino, C; De Gruttola, D; Coccetti, F; Bencivenni, C; Miozzi, S; De Pasquale, S

    2010-01-01

    The Extreme Energy Events (EEE) Project is devoted to the study of extremely high energy cosmic rays by means of an array of particle detectors distributed all over the Italian territory. Each element of the array (called telescope in the following) is installed in a High School, with the further goal to introduce students to particle and astroparticle physics, and consists of three Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC), that have excellent time resolution and good tracking capability. In this paper the first results on the detection of extensive air showers by means of time coincidences between two telescopes are presented.

  5. Comet or asteroid shower in the late Eocene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Roald; Claeys, Philippe

    2004-07-23

    The passage of a comet shower approximately 35 million years ago is generally advocated to explain the coincidence during Earth's late Eocene of an unusually high flux of interplanetary dust particles and the formation of the two largest craters in the Cenozoic, Popigai and the Chesapeake Bay. However, new platinum-group element analyses indicate that Popigai was formed by the impact of an L-chondrite meteorite. Such an asteroidal projectile is difficult to reconcile with a cometary origin. Perhaps instead the higher delivery rate of extraterrestrial matter, dust, and large objects was caused by a major collision in the asteroid belt.

  6. Open b production at LHC and parton shower effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, H. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Antwerp Univ. (Belgium); Kraemer, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Lipatov, A.V.; Zotov, N.P. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). D.V. Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics

    2011-05-15

    We present hadron-level predictions from the Monte Carlo generator Cascade and numerical level calculations of beauty quark and inclusive b-jet production in the framework of the k{sub T}-factorization QCD approach for CERN LHC energies. The unintegrated gluon densities in a proton are determined using the CCFM evolution equation and the Kimber- Martin-Ryskin (KMR) prescription. We study the theoretical uncertainties of our calculations and investigate the effects coming from parton showers in initial and final states. Our predictions are compared with the recent data taken by the CMS collaboration. (orig.)

  7. Open b production at LHC and Parton Shower Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, H; Lipatov, A V; Zotov, N P

    2011-01-01

    We present hadron-level predictions from the Monte Carlo generator Cascade and numerical level calculations of beauty quark and inclusive b-jet production in the framework of the kT -factorization QCD approach for CERN LHC energies. The unintegrated gluon densities in a proton are determined using the CCFM evolution equation and the Kimber- Martin-Ryskin (KMR) prescription. We study the theoretical uncertainties of our calcula- tions and investigate the effects coming from parton showers in initial and final states. Our predictions are compared with the recent data taken by the CMS collaboration.

  8. Primary mass sensitivity of air shower observables and correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieder, P. K. F.

    An IDBF two-component model for 37 proton-initiated and 26 iron-initiated events, covering a 1,000,000-100,000,000 GeV energy range, is used to study the primary mass sensitivity of observables and correlations. Assumptions include appropriate energy-dependent cross-sections and the partial interaction of the constituents of the totally fragmenting heavy primaries. It is found that a number of the observables exhibit on average, and even in individual events, particular mass-sensitive features that in principle allow a distinction to be drawn between proton and iron group primary initiated showers.

  9. First detection of extensive air showers with the EEE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, R.

    2011-03-01

    The Extreme Energy Events (EEE) Project is devoted to the study of extremely high energy cosmic rays by means of an array of particle detectors distributed all over the Italian territory. Each element of the array (called telescope in the following) is installed in a High School, with the further goal to introduce students to particle and astroparticle physics, and consists of three Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC), that have excellent time resolution and good tracking capability. In this paper the first results on the detection of extensive air showers by means of time coincidences between two telescopes are presented.

  10. Photocatalytic Water Disinfection with Solar Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sichel, C.; Fernandez-Ibanez, P.; Blanco, J.; Malato, S.

    2006-07-01

    Drinking water disinfection is the final treatment phase before supplying drinking water to customers. Actually, the most widely employed disinfecting method is the chlorination. Even though it has high efficiency and long residual effects, chlorine presents the drawback of the high potential to produce chloro-organic compounds, which are hazardous. In order to find a safe method to disinfect drinking water, a number of so-called {sup n}ew technologies{sup a}re being developed by researchers from the entire world. Among these emerging technologies, the heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation is becoming more and more important, mainly for applications in isolated and arid areas of developing countries. In the case of heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation via TiO2, when the semiconductor is suspended or immersed in water and irradiated with near UV (?<385 nm), OH radicals are generated by the reaction of holes and electrons respectively with electron donor and acceptor molecules. The OH radical is highly toxic towards microorganisms and very reactive in the oxidation of organic substances. Therefore, a solar photocatalytic treatment can be a disinfecting method but at the same time a process to degrade organic matter. This contribution demonstrates the feasibility of using the photocatalytical processes to inactivate microorganisms present in water for potential applications in drinking water disinfection for solar systems. This work shows the main results on solar photocatalytic disinfection with solar photo-reactors, using the solar radiation and TiO2 as a photocatalyst. (Author)

  11. Amoebicidal effects of contact lens disinfecting solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boost, Maureen V; Shi, Guang-Sen; Lai, Sindy; Cho, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    To compare the traditional manual hemacytometer method and an automated counter (Vi-cell) to enumerate and distinguish between viable and non-viable amoeba, and to determine the efficacies of contact lens (CL) disinfecting solutions against three species of Acanthamoeba. The efficacies in the presence of a bacterial food source and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated. Four brands of multipurpose solutions and a hydrogen peroxide disinfecting system (Oxysept) for soft CLs, and four disinfecting solutions for Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) lenses were tested against three species of Acanthamoeba. Page's amoebic saline was included as a negative control and standard solutions of disinfecting agents, 6% hydrogen peroxide and 0.5% chlorhexidine, as positive controls. The effects of the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and BSA on effectiveness were assessed. None of the CL solutions tested achieved a 1-log reduction in viability of all three Acanthamoeba species within the manufacturer's recommended disinfection times. The presence of P. aeruginosa did not significantly affect disinfecting capacity of multipurpose solution solutions but reduced activity of RGP solutions and the hydrogen peroxide system. BSA reduced trophozoicidal activity of all solutions. Bland and Altman analysis showed good agreement between Vi-cell and hemacytometer. The Vi-Cell analyzer offers a simple and effective method of determining amoebicidal activity. Our results show that the CL solutions tested could not satisfactorily kill Acanthamoeba.

  12. A study of hadronic shower development in the ECAL of the alpha magnetic spectrometer Ⅱ%A study of hadronic shower development in the ECAL of the alpha magnetic spectrometer Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    藏京京; 王健; 王健2; 汪先友; 王征; 徐明; 许伟伟; 肖虹; 严琪; 杨民; 陈国明; 卞建国; 范嘉伟; 李祖豪; 梁松; 孟祥伟; 陶军全; 唐志成

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the development of hadronic shower in an electromagnetic calorimeter of Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Ⅱ. Two parametrized empirical formulae were proposed to describe the hadronic shower shape in calorimeter. Using 100 GeV proton b

  13. [Hygienic and dermatologic aspects of hand disinfection and prophylactic skin antisepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, A; Jünger, M; Kampf, G

    2005-08-01

    Hygienic hand disinfection must be carried out after all patient-care activities associated with contamination risks, as well as when moving from contaminated to clean body sites, after contact with environmental surfaces in the immediate vicinity of patients, after glove removal and before aseptic procedures. Preparatory handwashing (for about 10 seconds) to mechanically remove soil and bacterial spores should be performed at least 10 minutes before surgical hand disinfection. This allows time for the normalization of increased skin hydration, a prerequisite for effective hand disinfection. Depending on the manufacturer's instructions, application times of 1.5, 3 or 5 minutes can be observed. The regular use of skin care and skin protection products can help to prevent toxic skin irritation. For skin antisepsis the recommended exposure times are > or =15 seconds before subcutaneous injections, > or =1 minute before puncture of joints and body cavities as well as preoperatively, and > or =10 minutes on skin areas rich in sebaceous glands. For all 3 indications, alcohol-based formulations are the agents of choice.

  14. Preoperative evaluation of oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Lauren G; Gress, Frank G

    2015-02-01

    The preoperative evaluation of oesophageal adenocarcinoma involves endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET). With routine Barrett's oesophagus surveillance, superficial cancers are often identified. EUS, CT and PET have a limited role in the staging of superficial tumours. Standard EUS has limited accuracy, but high frequency ultrasound miniprobes are valuable for assessing tumour stage in superficial tumours. However, the best method for determining depth of invasion, and thereby stage of disease, is endoscopic mucosal resection. In contrast, in advanced oesophageal cancers, a multi-modality approach is crucial. Accurate tumour staging is very important since the treatment of advanced cancers involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. EUS is very useful for staging of the tumour and nodes. High frequency ultrasound miniprobes provide the ability to perform staging when the lesion is obstructing the oesophageal lumen. CT and PET provide valuable information regarding node and metastasis staging.

  15. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory : Measurement of atmospheric production depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Bravo, A. Gascon; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Albarracin, F. Gomez; Berisso, M. Gomez; Vitale, P. F. Gomez; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui De Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Meza, J. J. Masias; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rojo, J. Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Thao, N. T.; Theodoro, V. M.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Machado, D. Torres; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Silva, M. Zimbres; Ziolkowski, M.

    2014-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory provides information about the longitudinal development of the muonic component of extensive air showers. Using the timing information from the flash analog-to-digital converter traces of surface detectors far from the shower core, it is pos

  16. On the Parameterization of the Longitudinal Hadronic Shower Profiles in Combined Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kulchitskii, Yu A

    2000-01-01

    The extension of the longitudinal hadronic shower profile parameterization which takes into account non-compensations of calorimeters and the algorithm of the longitudinal hadronic shower profile curve making for a combined calorimeter are suggested. The proposed algorithms can be used for data analysis from modern combined calorimeters like in the ATLAS detector at the LHC.

  17. 16 CFR 1201.40 - Interpretation concerning bathtub and shower doors and enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interpretation concerning bathtub and shower... Policy and Interpretation § 1201.40 Interpretation concerning bathtub and shower doors and enclosures. (a) Purpose and background. The purpose of this section is to clarify the scope of the terms “bathtub...

  18. Atmospheric effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Argiro, S.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceicao, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Goncalves, P.; Goncalves do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutierrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Lopez, R.; Agueera, A. Lopez; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Luna Garcia, R.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Martello, D.; Martinez, J.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, A.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmid, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuessler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tuci, V.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters, such as pressure (P), temperature (T) and density (ρ∝P/T), affect the development of extensive air showers initiated by energetic cosmic rays. We have studied the impact of atmospheric variations on extensive air showers by means of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Ob

  19. Radio emission of highly inclined cosmic ray air showers measured with LOPES - possibility for neutrino detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrovic, J.; Bähren, L.; Buitink, S.J.; Falcke, H.D.E.; Horneffer, K.H.A.; Kuijpers, J.M.E.; Lafebre, S.J.; Nigl, A.

    2006-01-01

    LOPES - LOFAR PrototypE Station (LOFAR - LOw Frequency ARray) is an array of dipole antennas used for the detection of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers. It is co-located and triggered by the KASCADE (KArlsruhe Shower Core and Array Detector) experiment, which also provides information abou

  20. Comparison of hybrid and pure Monte Carlo shower generators on an event by event basis

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Jeff; Farrar, Glennys

    2007-01-01

    SENECA is a hybrid air shower simulation written by H. Drescher that utilizes both Monte Carlo simulation and cascade equations. By using the cascade equations only in the high energy portion of the shower, where the shower is inherently one-dimensional, SENECA is able to utilize the advantages in speed from the cascade equations yet still produce complete, three dimensional particle distributions at ground level which capture the shower to shower variations coming from the early interactions. We present a comparison, on an event by event basis, of SENECA and CORSIKA, a well trusted MC simulation code. By using the same first interaction in both SENECA and CORSIKA, the effect of the cascade equations can be studied within a single shower, rather than averaged over many showers. Our study shows that for showers produced in this manner, SENECA agrees with CORSIKA to a very high accuracy with respect to densities, energies, and timing information for individual species of ground-level particles from both iron an...

  1. Atmospheric effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Argiro, S.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceicao, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Goncalves, P.; Goncalves do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutierrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Lopez, R.; Agueera, A. Lopez; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Luna Garcia, R.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Martello, D.; Martinez, J.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, A.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmid, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuessler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tuci, V.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters, such as pressure (P), temperature (T) and density (ρ∝P/T), affect the development of extensive air showers initiated by energetic cosmic rays. We have studied the impact of atmospheric variations on extensive air showers by means of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Ob

  2. A realistic treatment of geomagnetic Cherenkov radiation from cosmic ray air showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, Klaus; de Vries, Krijn D.; Scholten, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    We present a macroscopic calculation of coherent electro-magnetic radiation from air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays, based on currents obtained from three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of air showers in a realistic geo-magnetic field. We discuss the importance of a correct

  3. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory : Measurement of atmospheric production depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Bravo, A. Gascon; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Albarracin, F. Gomez; Berisso, M. Gomez; Vitale, P. F. Gomez; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui De Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Meza, J. J. Masias; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rojo, J. Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Thao, N. T.; Theodoro, V. M.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Machado, D. Torres; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Silva, M. Zimbres; Ziolkowski, M.

    2014-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory provides information about the longitudinal development of the muonic component of extensive air showers. Using the timing information from the flash analog-to-digital converter traces of surface detectors far from the shower core, it is pos

  4. Relation between hadronic interactions and ultra-high energy extensive air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of hadronic interactions is of fundamental importance for the analysis of extensive air showers. The details of the relation between the measurement of hadronic interactions at accelerators and the impact on the air shower development is very difficult to evaluate. Several possibilities to study this relation are presented here.

  5. LORA : A scintillator array for LOFAR to measure extensive air showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoudam, S.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Frieswijk, W.; Horandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Krause, M.; Nelles, A.; Schellart, P.; Scholten, O.; ter Veen, S.; van den Akker, M.

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the radio emission from extensive air showers, induced by high-energy cosmic rays, is one of the key science projects of the LOFAR radio telescope. The LOfar Radboud air shower Array (LORA) has been installed in the core of LOFAR in the Netherlands. The main purpose of LORA is to

  6. Search for long-lived massive particles in extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, M.; Inoue, N.; Misaki, Y.; Manabe, O.; Takeuchi, T.; Toyoda, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Air showers containing delayed sub-showers which may be produced by a long-lived massive particle have been investigated by using twelve detectors. Ten events have been selected out as the candidates. However, a definite conclusion cannot be reached at the present time.

  7. An in-premise model for Legionella exposure during showering events

    Science.gov (United States)

    An exposure model was constructed to predict the critical Legionella densities in an engineered water system that might result in infection from inhalation of aerosols containing the pathogen while showering. The model predicted the Legionella densities in the shower air, water ...

  8. A macroscopic description of coherent geo-magnetic radiation from cosmic-ray air showers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.; Werner, K.; Rusydi, F.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a macroscopic description of coherent electromagnetic radiation from air showers initiated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays due to the presence of the geo-magnetic field. This description offers it simple and direct insight in the relation between the properties of the air shower a

  9. Gamma-rays from dark showers with twin Higgs models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytsis, Marat; Knapen, Simon; Robinson, Dean J.; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-05-01

    We consider a twin WIMP scenario whose twin sector contains a full dark copy of the SM hadrons, where the lightest twin particles are twin pions. By analogy to the standard WIMP paradigm, the dark matter (DM) freezes out through twin electroweak interactions, and annihilates into a dark shower of light twin hadrons. These are either stable or decay predominantly to standard model (SM) photons. We show that this `hadrosymmetric' scenario can be consistent with all applicable astrophysical, cosmological and collider constraints. In order to decay the twin hadrons before the big-bang nucleosynthesis epoch, an additional portal between the SM and twin sector is required. In most cases we find this additional mediator is within reach of either the LHC or future intensity frontier experiments. Furthermore, we conduct simulations of the dark shower and consequent photon spectra. We find that fits of these spectra to the claimed galactic center gamma-ray excess seen by Fermi -LAT non-trivially coincide with regions of parameter space that both successfully generate the observed DM abundance and exhibit minimal fine-tuning.

  10. Martian Atmospheric Methane Plumes from Meteor Shower Infall: A Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M.; Christou, A.; Archer, D.; Conrad, P.; Cooke, W.; Eigenbrode, J.; ten Kate, I. L.; Matney, M.; Niles, P.; Sykes, M.

    2016-01-01

    Methane plumes in the martian atmosphere have been detected using Earth-based spectroscopy, the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer on the ESA Mars Express mission, and the NASA Mars Science Laboratory. The methane's origin remains a mystery, with proposed sources including volcanism, exogenous sources like impacts and interplanetary dust, aqueous alteration of olivine in the presence of carbonaceous material, release from ancient deposits of methane clathrates, and/or biological activity. To date, none of these phenomena have been found to reliably correlate with the detection of methane plumes. An additional source exists, however: meteor showers could generate martian methane via UV pyrolysis of carbon-rich infall material. We find a correlation between the dates of Mars/cometary orbit encounters and detections of methane on Mars. We hypothesize that cometary debris falls onto Mars during these interactions, depositing freshly disaggregated meteor shower material in a regional concentration. The material generates methane via UV photolysis, resulting in a localized "plume" of short-lived methane.

  11. Hadron response and shower development in the ATLAS calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Simonyan, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Abstract 1 In the year 2004 a full slice of the Atlas barrel detector has been exposed to a pion test-beam covering the momentum range between 2 and 350 GeV. We report on results from a scan of beam impact points from eta=0.2 to eta=0.65 for beam momenta from 20 to 350 GeV in a set-up with the electro-magnetic (Lar/Pb and the hadronic calorimeter (Tile/scintillator) operational, and, on the results of a data taking period were, in addition, the inner detector system was operational and pion momenta from 2 to 180 GeV. The mean energy, the energy resolution and the longitudinal and radial shower profiles, and, various observables characterizing the shower topology in the calorimeter are measured using the same reconstruction method as used for the analysis of proton-proton collisions. The Monte Carlo simulation based on the Geant4 program is able to reproduce the pion response within a few percent. The largest deviations (up to 5%) are observed in the low pion momentum range. The simulation predicts a resolutio...

  12. Heavy Flavour Production at Tevatron and Parton Shower Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, H; Lipatov, A V; Zotov, N P

    2010-01-01

    We present hadron-level predictions from the Monte Carlo generator Cascade and numerical calculations of charm and beauty production at the Fermilab Tevatron within the framework of the $k_T$-factorization QCD approach. Our consideration is based on the CCFM-evolved unintegrated gluon densities in a proton. The performed analysis covers the total and differential cross sections of open charm and beauty quarks, $B$ and $D$ mesons (or rather muons from their semileptonic decays) and the total and differential cross sections of $b \\bar b$ di-jet hadroproduction. We study the theoretical uncertainties of our calculations and investigate the effects coming from parton showers in initial and final states. Our predictions are compared with the recent experimental data taken by the D0 and CDF collaborations. Special attention is put on the specific angular correlations between the final-state particles. We demonstrate that the final state parton shower plays a crucial role in the description of such observables. The ...

  13. Heavy flavour production at Tevatron and parton shower effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, H. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Antwerp Univ. (Belgium); Kraemer, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Lipatov, A.V.; Zotov, N.P. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). D.V. Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics

    2010-09-15

    We present hadron-level predictions from the Monte Carlo generator Cascade and numerical calculations of charm and beauty production at the Fermilab Tevatron within the framework of the k{sub T}-factorization QCD approach. Our consideration is based on the CCFMevolved unintegrated gluon densities in a proton. The performed analysis covers the total and differential cross sections of open charm and beauty quarks, B and D mesons (or rather muons from their semileptonic decays) and the total and differential cross sections of b anti b di-jet hadroproduction. We study the theoretical uncertainties of our calculations and investigate the effects coming from parton showers in initial and final states. Our predictions are compared with the recent experimental data taken by the D0 and CDF collaborations. Special attention is put on the specific angular correlations between the final-state particles. We demonstrate that the final state parton shower plays a crucial role in the description of such observables. The decorrelated part of angular separations can be fully described, if the process gg{sup *} {yields} gg is included. (orig.)

  14. First Results from the IceTop Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Klepser, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    IceTop is a 1 km^2 air shower detector presently under construction as a part of the IceCube Observatory at South Pole. It will consist of 80 detector stations, each equipped with two ice Cherenkov tanks, which cover 1 km^2. In 2008, the detector is half completed. One of the design goals of the detector is to investigate cosmic rays in the energy range from the knee up to approaching 1 EeV and study the mass composition of primary cosmic rays. In this report the performance of IceTop, the shower reconstruction algorithms and first results, obtained with one month of data with an array of 26 stations operated in 2007, will be presented. Preliminary results are shown for the cosmic ray energy spectrum in the range of 1 to 80 PeV. Being located at an atmospheric depth of only 700 g/cm^2 at the South Pole, a high sensitivity of the zenith angle distribution to the mass composition is observed. The main advantage of IceTop, compared to other detectors in this energy range, is the possibility to measure highly ene...

  15. TANGO ARRAY I: An Air Shower Experiment in Buenos Aires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.; Reguera, A.

    The TANGO Array is an air shower experiment which has been recently constructed in Buenos Aires, Argentina. It became fully operational in September, 2000. The array consists of 4 water ˇCerenkov detector stations enclosing a geometrical area of ˜ 30.000 m2 and its design has been optimized for the observation of EAS produced by cosmic rays near the "knee" energy region. Three of the detectors have been constructed using 12000-liter stainless steel tanks, and the fourth has been mounted in a smaller, 400liter plastic container. The detectors are connected by cables to the data acquisition room, where a fully automatic system, which takes advantage of the features of a 4-channel digital oscilloscope, was set for data collection without the need of operator intervention. This automatic experiment control includes monitoring, data logging, and daily calibration of all stations. This paper describes the detectors and their associated electronics, and details are given on the data acquisition system, the triggering and calibration procedures, and the operation of the array. Examples of air shower traces, recorded by the array, are presented.

  16. Gamma-rays from dark showers with twin Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freytsis, Marat [Institute of Theoretical Science, University of Oregon,Eugene, OR 97403 (United States); Knapen, Simon; Robinson, Dean J. [Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Tsai, Yuhsin [Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, Department of Physics,University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2016-05-03

    We consider a twin WIMP scenario whose twin sector contains a full dark copy of the SM hadrons, where the lightest twin particles are twin pions. By analogy to the standard WIMP paradigm, the dark matter (DM) freezes out through twin electroweak interactions, and annihilates into a dark shower of light twin hadrons. These are either stable or decay predominantly to standard model (SM) photons. We show that this ‘hadrosymmetric’ scenario can be consistent with all applicable astrophysical, cosmological and collider constraints. In order to decay the twin hadrons before the big-bang nucleosynthesis epoch, an additional portal between the SM and twin sector is required. In most cases we find this additional mediator is within reach of either the LHC or future intensity frontier experiments. Furthermore, we conduct simulations of the dark shower and consequent photon spectra. We find that fits of these spectra to the claimed galactic center gamma-ray excess seen by Fermi-LAT non-trivially coincide with regions of parameter space that both successfully generate the observed DM abundance and exhibit minimal fine-tuning.

  17. Assessment of emergency safety showers against proposed EU and ANSI standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Burby

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was carried out with the cooperation of a majorinternational safety shower manufacturer, Hughes Safety Showers Ltd. Thefirst part of this study was to characterise various commercial safetyshower heads with regard to their spray patternation, droplet sizes, dropletvelocities and impact forces. The spray patternation of a number of showerhead designs were compared against the proposed EU and AmericanNational Standard institute (ANSI standard for plumbed in body showers.The results of this work showed that a large proportion of the shower headdeigns failed to meet the proposed EU standard. The second part to thisstudy was to determine the efficiency and effectiveness of the emergencysafety shower head designs via a series of decontamination ‘wash-off’tests on a mannequin, with a number of simulated hazardous substancesapplied to its surface.

  18. Extensive Air Showers: from the muonic smoking guns to the hadronic backbone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cazon L.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive Air Showers are complex macroscopic objects initiated by single ultra-high energy particles. They are the result of millions of high energy reactions in the atmosphere and can be described as the superposition of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades. The hadronic cascade is the air shower backbone, and it is mainly made of pions. Decays of neutral pions initiate electromagnetic cascades, while the decays of charged pions produce muons which leave the hadronic core and travel many kilometers almost unaffected. Muons are smoking guns of the hadronic cascade: the energy, transverse momentum, spatial distribution and depth of production are key to reconstruct the history of the air shower. In this work, we overview the phenomenology of muons on the air shower and its relation to the hadronic cascade. We briefly review the experimental efforts to analyze muons within air showers and discuss possible paths to use this information.

  19. First Experimental Characterization of Microwave Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Smida, R; Engel, R; Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kroemer, O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Neunteufel, P; Oehlschlaeger, J; Palmieri, N; Pekala, J; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Riegel, M; Roth, M; Salamida, F; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Stasielak, J; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Unger, M; Weber, M; Weindl, A; Wilczynski, H; Will, M; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J

    2014-01-01

    We report the first direct measurement of the overall characteristics of microwave radio emission from extensive air showers. Using a trigger provided by the KASCADE-Grande air shower array, the signals of the microwave antennas of the CROME (Cosmic-Ray Observation via Microwave Emission) experiment have been read out and searched for signatures of radio emission by high-energy air showers in the GHz frequency range. Microwave signals have been detected for more than 30 showers with energies above 3*10^16 eV. The observations presented in this Letter are consistent with a mainly forward-directed and polarised emission process in the GHz frequency range. The measurements show that microwave radiation offers a new means of studying air showers at energies above 10^17 eV.

  20. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-08-01

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. A method for measuring the arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.

  1. Atmospheric effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Argirò, S.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonçalves Do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Luna García, R.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Martello, D.; Martínez, J.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, A.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tuci, V.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2009-09-01

    Atmospheric parameters, such as pressure (P), temperature (T) and density (ρ∝P/T), affect the development of extensive air showers initiated by energetic cosmic rays. We have studied the impact of atmospheric variations on extensive air showers by means of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The rate of events shows a ˜10% seasonal modulation and ˜2% diurnal one. We find that the observed behaviour is explained by a model including the effects associated with the variations of P and ρ. The former affects the longitudinal development of air showers while the latter influences the Molière radius and hence the lateral distribution of the shower particles. The model is validated with full simulations of extensive air showers using atmospheric profiles measured at the site of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  2. Atmospheric effects on extensive air showers observed with the Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters, such as pressure (P), temperature (T) and density, affect the development of extensive air showers initiated by energetic cosmic rays. We have studied the impact of atmospheric variations on extensive air showers by means of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The rate of events shows a ~10% seasonal modulation and ~2% diurnal one. We find that the observed behaviour is explained by a model including the effects associated with the variations of pressure and density. The former affects the longitudinal development of air showers while the latter influences the Moliere radius and hence the lateral distribution of the shower particles. The model is validated with full simulations of extensive air showers using atmospheric profiles measured at the site of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  3. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apresyan, A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Los, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Pena, C.; Presutti, F. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Ronzhin, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2016-08-21

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. A method for measuring the arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.

  4. Energy dependent fractal dimension in lateral electron distribution of extensive air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Purmohammad

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available   Secondary electrons at ground level of simulated extensive air showers have been analyzed using a wavelet transform based technique, in order to investigate the variation of fractal dimensions of the lateral distribution of the electrons with shower energy and primary particle mass number. The fractal dimension is shown to increase with shower energy and seems to saturate to constant values near the core of the shower at higher energies. Using the fractal dimension properties at different core distances, a multi-parameter separation technique is then applied to the data. It has been shown that the technique has good accuracy at high energy, provided the energy of the shower is obtained independently.

  5. Radio wave emitted by an extensive air showers in 10KHz to 1MHz region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichimura, J.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of radio waves in a frequency range of less than 1MHz in an EAS shower is discussed. Estimates of radio intensities at 10KHz, 100KHz and 1MHz in EAS showers made on the basis of the Kahn-Lerche theory. Negative charge excess in a shower is the main source of low frequency radio emission, in spite of the importance of the contribution of transverse current in the geomagnetic field in a higher frequency range. An estimate is also made for radio intensity produced when the shower hits the ground. The contribution of this process seems to be important at a large distance, i.e., beyond 1km from the shower axis.

  6. First Experimental Characterization of Microwave Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smída, R; Werner, F; Engel, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K-H; Kang, D; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Krömer, O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Neunteufel, P; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pekala, J; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Riegel, M; Roth, M; Salamida, F; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Stasielak, J; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Unger, M; Weber, M; Weindl, A; Wilczyński, H; Will, M; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J

    2014-11-28

    We report the first direct measurement of the overall characteristics of microwave radio emission from extensive air showers. Using a trigger provided by the KASCADE-Grande air shower array, the signals of the microwave antennas of the Cosmic-Ray Observation via Microwave Emission experiment have been read out and searched for signatures of radio emission by high-energy air showers in the GHz frequency range. Microwave signals have been detected for more than 30 showers with energies above 3×10^{16}  eV. The observations presented in this Letter are consistent with a mainly forward-directed and polarized emission process in the GHz frequency range. The measurements show that microwave radiation offers a new means of studying air showers at E≥10^{17}  eV.

  7. Showering effectiveness for human hair decontamination of the nerve agent VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josse, Denis; Wartelle, Julien; Cruz, Catherine

    2015-05-05

    In this work, our goals were to establish whether hair decontamination by showering one hour post-exposure to the highly toxic organophosphate nerve agent VX was effective, whether it required the addition of a detergent to water and, if it could be improved by using the adsorbent Fuller's Earth (FE) or the Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) 30 min prior to showering. Hair exposure to VX and decontamination was performed by using an in vitro model. Hair showering led to 72% reduction of contamination. Addition of detergent to water slightly increased the decontamination effectiveness. Hair treatment with FE or RSDL improved the decontamination rate. Combination of FE use and showering, which yielded a decontamination factor of 41, was demonstrated to be the most effective hair decontamination procedure. Hair wiping after showering was shown to contribute to hair decontamination. Altogether, our results highlighted the importance of considering hair decontamination as an important part of body surface decontamination protocols.

  8. [Spanish disinfectants for the 21st century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herruzo Cabrera, R

    2000-01-01

    There are two chemical disinfectants patents from Spain that permit to obtain advantageous products on other disinfectants: Nduopropenide (two iodures of quaternary ammonium) and "Peroxidine" (hydrogen peroxide that active to lactic acid and a surfactant mixture). The first product is used as an antiseptic or disinfectant, but the second, only act as disinfectant. DISINFECTION: It is studied (by germ-carrier methods), the microbicide effect on different microorganisms (Gram positive cocci, Gram negative bacilli, fungus, Mycobacteria and B subtilis spores), comparing these two products with different disinfectants as 2% glutaraldehyde, 1/8 phenate-glutaraldehyde, peracetic acid compounds, 11% oxygen peroxide and 2% sodium hypoclorite. It is obtained that 1/4 Peroxidine in 5 minutes or 1/6 Peroxidine in 10 minutes, are the most effective disinfectant on all microorganisms used (includes the most resistant) since it produces destruction of 4 log-10 of spores and 5 log-10 of Mycobacteria. Moreover, it can destroy, completely, the inoculum of commercial spores, routinely used for sterilization process evaluation, in 20 minutes, when 2% glutaraldehyd needs 3-10 hours. ANTISEPSIE: It is studied the "hygienization" and surgical handwashing with Nduopropenide solution, in comparison with classical washing methods (neutral soap in routinely handwashing and 5% chlorhexidine or 10% iodine-povidone in surgical washing): 1) Nduopropenide and alcohol solution is more effective that routinely handwashing. 2) This product is more effective and persistent, after surgical washing that chlorhexidine or iodine-povidone. Moreover, it does not must be applied with brush. 3) The mixture Nduopropenide and chlorhexidine makes a synergy, then it can be used in hand or skin washing, on heath personnel or patient people, being advantageous on the other products.

  9. Preoperative Smoking Status and Postoperative Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønkjær, Marie; Eliasen, Marie; Skov-Ettrup, Lise Skrubbeltrang;

    2014-01-01

    To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type.......To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type....

  10. IAU Meteor Data Center-the shower database: A status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jopek, Tadeusz Jan; Kaňuchová, Zuzana

    2017-09-01

    Currently, the meteor shower part of Meteor Data Center database includes: 112 established showers, 563 in the working list, among them 36 have the pro tempore status. The list of shower complexes contains 25 groups, 3 have established status and 1 has the pro tempore status. In the past three years, new meteor showers submitted to the MDC database were detected amongst the meteors observed by CAMS stations (Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance), those included in the EDMOND (European viDeo MeteOr Network Database), those collected by the Japanese SonotaCo Network, recorded in the IMO (International Meteor Organization) database, observed by the Croatian Meteor Network and on the Southern Hemisphere by the SAAMER radar. At the XXIX General Assembly of the IAU in Honolulu, Hawaii in 2015, the names of 18 showers were officially accepted and moved to the list of established ones. Also, one shower already officially named (3/SIA the Southern iota Aquariids) was moved back to the working list of meteor showers. At the XXIX GA IAU the basic shower nomenclature rule was modified, the new formulation predicates ;The general rule is that a meteor shower (and a meteoroid stream) should be named after the constellation that contains the nearest star to the radiant point, using the possessive Latin form;. Over the last three years the MDC database was supplemented with the earlier published original data on meteor showers, which permitted verification of the correctness of the MDC data and extension of bibliographic information. Slowly but surely new database software options are implemented, and software bugs are corrected.

  11. [Comparison of the quality and toxicity of wastewater after chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-sha; Zhang, Tong; Hu, Hong-ying

    2005-11-01

    The effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections on quality and toxicity of wastewater were compared. The experiment results showed that chlorine disinfection had no obvious effect on wastewater color, while chlorine dioxide disinfection decreased wastewater color observably. The DOC of wastewater did not change much after chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections. Chlorine disinfection significantly increased UV230 of wastewater and chlorine dioxide disinfection slightly decreased UV230 of wastewater. When the disinfectants dosage was 30 mg/L, UV230 increased about 0.7 cm(-1) after chlorine disinfection and decreased about 0.05 cm(-1) after chlorine dioxide disinfection. The acute toxicity of wastewater increased with increasing disinfectants dosage for both chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections and the acute toxicity after chlorine disinfection is much stronger than that after chlorine dioxide disinfection. The genotoxicity of wastewater increased slightly after chlorine disinfection and decreased slightly after chlorine dioxide disinfection.

  12. Comparison of the Physical Properties of Showers that the Satisfaction of Shower Feeling among Users in Three Asian Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minami Okamoto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to construct a scheme that makes it possible to compare the relationship between water usage, satisfaction, and physical properties in three countries. The physical properties of the shower were measured using physical properties testing apparatus of water-saving standard or scheme for showerheads issued in several water-saving countries and data for users satisfaction evaluation was acquired through bathing experiments. In this paper, we analyzed the result from Taiwanese and Vietnamese individuals to compare them to of Japanese subjects analyzed in the previous study. We compared the physical properties of showers assessed low in satisfaction by Taiwanese, Vietnamese and Japanese subjects. It was assumed that spray pattern tends to decrease satisfaction when the water volume ratio within 100 mm and 150 mm of a measuring device is located a 450 mm distance from the showerhead is low, and that, because all three countries showed the same value, it was imagined that there were no differences in the water volume ratio of high-satisfaction showerheads among three countries. On the other hand, the values of Spray Force-per-Hole, Temperature Drop, and Spray Angle were different among three countries. We speculated that these differences are affected respectively by ethnic differences in pain tolerance, thermoregulatory response and bathing habit.

  13. Disinfection for small water supplies: a technical guide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Solsona, F

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available This guide will present some disinfection systems, which will be useful in supporting disinfection programmes. The description of the different systems will provide a guideline for the selection of equipment base on balancing the simplicity...

  14. Basic Information about Chloramines and Drinking Water Disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloramines are disinfectants used to treat drinking water. Chloramines are most commonly formed when ammonia is added to chlorine to treat drinking water. Chloramines provide longer-lasting disinfection as the water moves through pipes to consumers.

  15. Wettability changes in polyether impression materials subjected to immersion disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Shetty

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, 2% glutaraldehyde proved safe for 10 min of immersion disinfection while 0.05% iodophor holds promise as an effective disinfectant without affecting the wettability of the material.

  16. Overview STUDY AND APPLICATION OF HERBAL DISINFECTANTS IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO-BIN CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Disinfection means killing or removing pathogenic microorganisms in media to realize a harmless process. A disinfectant, which is also referred to as a disinfection medicine in relevant regulations, is the medicine used to kill microorganisms for the purpose of disinfection. The disinfectants prepared from plants (including traditional Chinese herbal medicines) and the extracts thereof are called herbal disinfectants[1]. China has a long history of using herbal disinfectants. As early as in 533 A.D., the use of Cornel to sterilize well water was recorded in Necessary Techniques for Qi People by Jia Enxie of the Beiwei Dynasty[2]. During the Dragon Boat Festival, people often use fumigants made of traditional Chinese herbal medicines like Chinese Atractylodes, Argy Wormwood Leaf and Red Arsenic Sulfide to smoke their houses, so as to ward off plagues and drive away evils[3]. In fact this is now a kind of disinfection practice.

  17. Study and application of herbal disinfectants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao-Bin

    2004-12-01

    Disinfection means killing or removing pathogenic microorganisms in media to realize a harmless process. A disinfectant, which is also referred to as a disinfection medicine in relevant regulations, is the medicine used to kill microorganisms for the purpose of disinfection. The disinfectants prepared from plants (including traditional Chinese herbal medicines) and the extracts thereof are called herbal disinfectants. China has a long history of using herbal disinfectants. As early as in 533 A.D., the use of Cornel to sterilize well water was recorded in Necessary Techniques for Qi People by Jia Enxie of the Beiwei Dynasty. During the Dragon Boat Festival, people often use fumigants made of traditional Chinese herbal medicines like Chinese Atractylodes, Argy Wormwood Leaf and Red Arsenic Sulfide to smoke their houses, so as to ward off plagues and drive away evils. In fact this is now a kind of disinfection practice.

  18. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, which uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. Unconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low reso...

  19. Formation and Occurrence of Disinfection By-Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when disinfectants such as chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, or chloramines react with naturally occurring organic matter, anthropogenic contaminants, bromide, and iodide during the production of drinking water. There is concern about D...

  20. Disinfection for infection prevention over the course of time

    OpenAIRE

    Hell, M.; Pauser, G

    2007-01-01

    In recent years and decades increasingly more emphasis has been placed on alcohol-based solutions for hygienic and surgical hand disinfection. Traditional handwashing with soap and water has been largely replaced in the everyday clinical setting, as has the use of disinfectant soap-based solutions for surgical hand disinfection. It has been possible in recent years to reduce the exposure time for alcohol-based hand disinfection in surgery from 5 to 3 minutes, and there are plans to reduce thi...

  1. Trends in sterilization and disinfection procedures in orthodontic offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, R G

    1990-10-01

    The present survey is a repetition of a 1987 survey examining the sterilization/disinfection procedures of Georgia's orthodontists. The purpose of this study is to examine the trends in orthodontic sterilization/disinfection procedures. Orthodontists in Georgia have dramatically changed their sterilization and disinfection procedures. The major changes represented are greater use of protective barrier wear by doctor and staff members; increased heat sterilization methods for instruments, pliers, and handpieces; and increased disinfection of alginate impressions.

  2. An insight of disinfection by-product (DBP) formation by alternative disinfectants for swimming pool disinfection under tropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linyan; Schmalz, Christina; Zhou, Jin; Zwiener, Christian; Chang, Victor W-C; Ge, Liya; Wan, Man Pun

    2016-09-15

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) is the most commonly used disinfectant in pool treatment system. Outdoor pools usually suffer from the strong sunlight irradiation which degrades the free chlorine rapidly. In addition, more pools start to adopt the recirculation of swimming pool water, which intensifies the disinfection by-product (DBP) accumulation issue. Given these potential drawbacks of using NaClO in the tropical environment, two alternative organic-based disinfectants, trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA, C3Cl3N3O3) and bromochlorodimethylhydantoin (BCDMH, C5H6BrClN2O2), were investigated and compared to NaClO in terms of their self-degradation and the formation of DBPs, including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), under simulated tropical climate conditions. The result reveals that halogen stabilizer, TCCA, had the advantages of slower free chlorine degradation and lower DBP concentration compared to NaClO, which makes it a good alternative disinfectant. BCDMH was not recommended mainly due to the highly reactive disinfecting ingredient, hypobromous acid (HBrO), which fails to sustain the continuous disinfection requirement. Total disinfectant dosage was the main factor that affects residual chlorine/bromine and THM/HAA formation regardless of different disinfectant dosing methods, e.g. shock dosing (one-time spiking) in the beginning, and continuous dosing during the whole experimental period. Two-stage second-order-kinetic-based models demonstrate a good correlation between the measured and predicted data for chlorine decay (R(2) ≥ 0.95), THM (R(2) ≥ 0.99) and HAA (R(2) ≥ 0.83) formation. Higher temperature was found to enhance the DBP formation due to the temperature dependence of reaction rates. Thus, temperature control of pools, especially for those preferring higher temperatures (e.g. hydrotherapy and spa), should take both bather comfort and DBP formation potential into consideration. It is also observed that chlorine competition

  3. DETECTION OF INFECTIOUS ADENOVIRUS IN TERTIARY TREATED AND UV DISINFECTED WASTEWATER DURING A UV DISINFECTION PILOT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    An infectious enteric adenovirus was isolated from urban wastewater receiving tertiary treatment and ultraviolet (UV) disinfection. A pilot study was undertaken to investigate the efficacy of UV disinfection (low pressure, high intensity radiation) of total and fecal coliform bac...

  4. 42 CFR 71.42 - Disinfection of imports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disinfection of imports. 71.42 Section 71.42 Public... FOREIGN QUARANTINE Requirements Upon Arrival at U.S. Ports: Sanitary Inspection § 71.42 Disinfection of imports. When the cargo manifest of a carrier lists articles which may require disinfection under the...

  5. Disinfection of an infrared coagulation device used to treat hemorrhoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutala, William A; Gergen, Maria F; Weber, David J

    2012-02-01

    Infrared coagulation devices are used to treat internal hemorrhoids, and as semicritical items should undergo high-level disinfection between patients. We developed and validated a method for disinfecting an infrared coagulation device that cannot be immersed in disinfectant solution.

  6. 9 CFR 91.41 - Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft... INSPECTION AND HANDLING OF LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Cleaning and Disinfecting of Aircraft § 91.41 Cleaning and disinfecting of aircraft. Prior to loading of animals, the stowage area of aircraft to be used to...

  7. Studies on Disinfection By-Products and Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, Colleen E.

    2007-01-01

    Drinking water is disinfected with chemicals to remove pathogens, such as Giardia and Cryptosproridium, and prevent waterborne diseases such as cholera and typhoid. During disinfection, by-products are formed at trace concentrations. Because some of these by-products are suspected carcinogens, drinking water utilities must maintain the effectiveness of the disinfection process while minimizing the formation of by-products.

  8. Survival of Viral Biowarfare Agents in Disinfected Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    disinfection at small systems AWWA water quality division disinfection systems committee,” Journal of the American Water Works Association, vol. 92...no. 5, pp. 24–31, 2000. [2] G. F. Connell, J. C. Routt, B. Macler et al., “Committee report: disinfection at large and medium-size systems AWWA water

  9. Activity and action screening of selected disinfectants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Balharová

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This research work is aimed to monitoring of selected disinfectants´activity in operational conditions. Hereby there have been monitored two acidic disinfectants Despon K and Mikasan D, which have had-by their producer-stated different recommended concentration. These solutions were monitored in viewpoint of their activity at different temperature, time of circulation, pH and water hardness. In this work there were measured pH of solutions in unloaded medium to be compared with pH of solutions in loaded medium and this measuring was carried out regularly each week within a one month period. During this period there was also monitored total plate count (TPC, which was stated in the dairy, where samples were taken two-times monthly. It has been found, that the disinfectants Mikasan D and Mikal 94D are effective even by high water hardness.

  10. Intracellular mechanisms of solar water disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Alférez, María; Polo-López, María Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar

    2016-12-01

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a zero-cost intervention measure to disinfect drinking water in areas of poor access to improved water sources, used by more than 6 million people in the world. The bactericidal action of solar radiation in water has been widely proven, nevertheless the causes for this remain still unclear. Scientific literature points out that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside microorganisms promoted by solar light absorption is the main reason. For the first time, this work reports on the experimental measurement of accumulated intracellular ROS in E. coli during solar irradiation. For this experimental achievement, a modified protocol based on the fluorescent probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), widely used for oxidative stress in eukaryotic cells, has been tested and validated for E. coli. Our results demonstrate that ROS and their accumulated oxidative damages at intracellular level are key in solar water disinfection.

  11. Fingerprints of disoriented chiral condensates in cosmic ray showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, R. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Fraga, E. S.; Santos, E. M.

    2012-09-01

    Although the generation of disoriented chiral condensates (DCCs), where the order parameter for chiral symmetry breaking is misaligned with respect to the vacuum direction in isospin state, is quite natural in the theory of strong interactions, they have so far eluded experiments in accelerators and cosmic rays. If DCCs are formed in high-energy nuclear collisions, the relevant outcome are very large event-by-event fluctuations in the neutral-to-charged pion fraction. In this note we search for fingerprints of DCC formation in observables of ultra-high energy cosmic ray showers. We present simulation results for the depth of the maximum (Xmax) and number of muons on the ground, evaluating their sensitivity to the neutral-to-charged pion fraction asymmetry produced in the primary interaction.

  12. Bursts of extensive air showers chaos vs. stochasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, Y A; Zotov, M Yu; Fomin, Yu. A.

    2004-01-01

    Bursts of the count rate of extensive air showers (EAS) lead to the appearance of clusters in time series that represent EAS arrival times. We apply methods of nonlinear time series analysis to twenty EAS cluster events found in the data set obtained with the EAS-1000 prototype array. In particular, we use the Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm to compute the correlation dimension of the time series in the vicinity of the clusters. We find that four cluster events produce signs of chaos in the corresponding time series. By applying a number of supplementary methods we assess that the nature of the observed behaviour of the correlation dimension is likely to be deterministic. We compare our conclusions with the results of similar investigations performed by the EAS-TOP and LAAS groups.

  13. Occurrence of Legionella in showers at recreational facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Patrizia; Mozzetti, Cinzia; Amicosante, Massimo; D'Alò, Gian Loreto; Messina, Alessandra; Varrenti, Donatella; Giammattei, Roberto; Di Giorgio, Floriana; Corradi, Stefania; D'Auria, Alberto; Fraietta, Roberta; Gabrieli, Rosanna

    2017-06-01

    Critical environments, including water systems in recreational settings, represent an important source of Legionella pneumophila infection in humans. In order to assess the potential risk for legionellosis, we analyzed Legionella contamination of water distribution systems in 36 recreational facilities equipped with swimming pools. One hundred and sixty water samples were analyzed from shower heads or taps located in locker rooms or in bathrooms. By culture method and polymerase chain reaction, 41/160 samples were positive for Legionella from 12/36 recreational centers. Hotels (57.1%) and sports centers (41.2%) were the most contaminated. L. pneumophila serotypes 2-14 (25/41) were more frequently found than serotype 1 (10/41). Samples at temperature ≥30 °C were more frequently positive than samples at temperature 10 CFU/mL. Maintenance, good hygiene practices, interventions on the hydraulic system and regular controls must be implemented to minimize exposure to L. pneumophila infection risk.

  14. The "Horizon-T" Experiment: Extensive Air Showers Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Beisembaev, R U; Dalkarov, O D; Ryabov, V A; Stepanov, A V; Vildanov, N G; Vildanova, M I; Zhukov, V V; Baigarin, K A; Beznosko, D; Sadykov, T X; Suleymenov, N S

    2016-01-01

    Horizon-T is an innovative detector system constructed to study Extensive Air Showers (EAS) in the energy range above 10^16 eV coming from a wide range of zenith angles (0 - 85 degrees). The system is located at Tien Shan high-altitude Science Station of Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences at approximately 3340 meters above the sea level. It consists of eight charged particle detection points separated by the distance up to one kilometer as well as optical detector subsystem to view the Vavilov-Cerenkov light from the EAS. The time resolution of charged particles and Vavilov-Cerenkov light photons passage of the detector system is a few ns. This level of resolution allows conducting research of atmospheric development of individual EAS.

  15. Instrumented Water Tanks can Improve Air Shower Detector Sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    1999-01-01

    Previous works have shown that water Cherenkov detectors have superior sensitivity to those of scintillation counters as applied to detecting extensive air showers (EAS). This is in large part due to their much higher sensitivity to EAS photons which are more than five times more numerous than EAS electrons. Large area water Cherenkov detectors can be constructed relatively cheaply and operated reliably. A sparse detector array has been designed which uses these types of detectors to substantially increase the area over which the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory collects EAS information. Improvements to the Milagro detector's performance characteristics and sensitivity derived from this array and preliminary results from a prototype array currently installed near the Milagro detector will be presented.

  16. Status of the large high altitude air shower observatory project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Min, E-mail: zham@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Astroparticle and Cosmic Ray, Institute of High Energy Physics, YuQuan Road 19 B, 100049 Beijing (China)

    2012-11-11

    The Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) project is a multipurpose project. The main scientific tasks can be summarized as follows: (1) searching for galactic cosmic ray origins through gamma ray source detection above 30 TeV; (2) wide field of view survey for gamma ray sources at energies higher than 100 GeV; (3) energy spectrum measurements for individual cosmic ray species from 30 TeV to 10 PeV. To target above tasks, a complex detector array is designed. This paper describes the progress on the research and development of all kind of detectors. Construction and operation of a prototype detector array at Tibet site with 4300 m a.s.l. are also presented.

  17. A processing method and results of meteor shower radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkovich, O. I.; Suleimanov, N. I.; Tokhtasjev, V. S.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of meteor showers permit the solving of some principal problems of meteor astronomy: to obtain the structure of a stream in cross section and along its orbits; to retrace the evolution of particle orbits of the stream taking into account gravitational and nongravitational forces and to discover the orbital elements of its parent body; to find out the total mass of solid particles ejected from the parent body taking into account physical and chemical evolution of meteor bodies; and to use meteor streams as natural probes for investigation of the average characteristics of the meteor complex in the solar system. A simple and effective method of determining the flux density and mass exponent parameter was worked out. This method and its results are discussed.

  18. Investigation of beauty production and parton shower effects at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, H. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); European Lab. for Particle Physics (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Kraemer, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Lipatov, A.V.; Zotov, N.P. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). D.V. Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics

    2011-11-15

    We present hadron-level predictions from the Monte Carlo generator Cascade and parton level calculations of open b quark, b-flavored hadron and inclusive b-jet production in the framework of the k{sub T} -factorization QCD approach for the LHC energies. The unintegrated gluon densities in a proton are determined using the CCFM evolution equation and the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin (KMR) prescription. Our predictions are compared with the first data taken by the CMS and LHCb collaborations at {radical}(s)=7 TeV. We study the theoretical uncertainties of our calculations and investigate the effects coming from parton showers in initial and final states. The special role of initial gluon transverse momenta in description of the data is pointed out. (orig.)

  19. Implications of Ultrahigh Energy Air Showers for Physics and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    2002-01-01

    The primary ultrahigh energy particles which produce giant extensive air showers in the Earth's atmosphere present an intriguing mystery from two points of view: (1) How are these particles produced with such astounding energies, eight orders of magnitude higher than those produced by the best man-made terrestrial accelerators? (2) Since they are most likely extragalactic in origin, how do they reach us from extragalactic distances without suffering the severe losses expected from interactions with the 2.7 K thermal cosmic background photons -- the so-called GZK effect? The answers to these questions may involve new physics: violations of special relativity, grand unification theories, and quantum gravity theories involving large extra dimensions. They may involve new astrophysical sources, "zevatrons". Or some heretofore totally unknown physics or astrophysics may hold the answer. I will discuss here the mysteries involving the production and extragalactic propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and some...

  20. Energy Reconstruction of Hadron Showers in the CALICE Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The CALICE collaboration has constructed highly granular electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeter prototypes to evaluate technologies for the use in detector systems at the future International Linear Collider. These calorimeters have been tested extensively in particle beams at CERN and at Fermilab. We present analysis results for hadronic events recorded at CERN with a SiW ECAL, a scintillator tile HCAL and a scintillator strip tail catcher, the latter two with SiPM readout, focusing both on the HCAL alone and on the complete calorimeter setup. Particular emphasis is placed on the study of the linearity of the detector response and on the single particle energy resolution. The high granularity of the detectors was used to perform first studies of software compensation based on the local shower energy density, yielding significant improvements in the energy resolution. The required calibration precision to achieve this resolution, and the effect of calibration uncertainties, for the CALICE HCAL as well as fo...

  1. Naphthalene decomposition in a DC corona radical shower discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-jiang NI; Xu SHEN; Xiang GAO; Zu-liang WU; Hao LU; Zhong-shan LI; Zhong-yang LUO; Ke-fa CEN

    2011-01-01

    The naphthalene decomposition in a corona radical shower discharge (CRS) was investigated, with attention paid to the influences of voltage and initial naphthalene density. The OH emission spectra were investigated so as to know the naphthalene decomposing process. The by-products were analyzed and a decomposing theory in discharge was proposed. The results showed that higher voltage and relative humidity were effective on decomposition. The initial concentration affected the decomposing efficiency of naphthalene. When the mitial naphthalene density was 17 mg/m3, the decomposition rate was found to be 70% under 14 kV. The main by-products were carbon dioxide and water. However, a small amount of carbonic oxide, 1, 2-ethanediol and acetaldehyde were found due to the incomplete oxidization.

  2. Simulating radio emission from air showers with CoREAS

    CERN Document Server

    Huege, T; James, C W

    2013-01-01

    CoREAS is a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of radio emission from extensive air showers. It implements the endpoint formalism for the calculation of electromagnetic radiation directly in CORSIKA. As such, it is parameter-free, makes no assumptions on the emission mechanism for the radio signals, and takes into account the complete complexity of the electron and positron distributions as simulated by CORSIKA. In this article, we illustrate the capabilities of CoREAS with simulations carried out in different frequency ranges from tens of MHz up to GHz frequencies, and describe in particular the emission characteristics at high frequencies due to Cherenkov effects arising from the varying refractive index of the atmosphere.

  3. The new South Pole air shower experiment - SPASE-2

    CERN Document Server

    Dickinson, J E; Gaisser, T K; Gill, J R; Hart, S P; Hinton, J A; Lloyd-Evans, J; Martello, D; Miller, T C; Ogden, P A; Patel, M; Rochester, K; Spiczak, G M; Stanev, T; Watson, A A

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a new coincidence experiment designed to improve understanding of the composition of the primary cosmic-ray beam around the knee of the spectrum. The experiment consists of an air shower array on the surface (SPASE-2), which works in coincidence with an array of air-Cherenkov detectors (VULCAN), and the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) deep in the ice. The experiment must cover the energy range from approx 10 sup 1 sup 4 to approx 3x10 sup 1 sup 6 eV to overlap with direct measurements at lower energy and encompass the regions of the knee and beyond in the cosmic ray spectrum.

  4. Investigation of beauty production and parton shower effects at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, H; Lipatov, A V; Zotov, N P

    2011-01-01

    We present hadron-level predictions from the Monte Carlo generator Cascade and parton level calculations of open b quark, b-flavored hadron and inclusive b-jet production in the framework of the kt-factorization QCD approach for the LHC energies. The unintegrated gluon densities in a proton are determined using the CCFM evolution equation and the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin (KMR) prescription. Our predictions are compared with the first data taken by the CMS and LHCb collaborations at 7 TeV. We study the theoretical uncertainties of our calculations and investigate the effects coming from parton showers in initial and final states. The special role of initial gluon transverse momenta in description of the data is pointed out.

  5. Ground detectors for the study of cosmic ray showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, H [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, BUAP, Puebla, Pue., 72000 (Mexico); Villasenor, L [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, UMSNH, Morelia, Michoacan, 58040 (Mexico)], E-mail: villasen@ifm.umich.mx

    2008-06-01

    We describe the work that we have done over the last decade to design and construct instruments to measure properties of cosmic rays in Mexico. We describe the detection of decaying and crossing muons in a water Cherenkov detector and discuss an application of these results to calibrate water Cherenkov detectors. We also describe a technique to separate isolated isolated muons and electrons in water Cherenkov detector. Next we describe the design and performance of a hybrid extensive air shower detector array built on the Campus of the University of Puebla (19 deg. N, 90 deg. W, 800 g/cm{sup 2}) to measure the energy, arrival direction and composition of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1 PeV.

  6. Electromagnetic Shower Properties in a Lead-Scintillator Sampling Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V

    2013-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a general-purpose experimental apparatus with an inner tracking detector for measuring charged particles, surrounded by a calorimeter for measurements of electromagnetic and hadronic showers. We describe a {\\sc geant4} simulation and parameterization of the response of the CDF central electromagnetic calorimeter (CEM) to incident electrons and photons. The detector model consists of a detailed description of the CEM geometry and material in the direction of the incident particle's trajectory, and of the passive material between the tracker and the CEM. We use {\\sc geant4} to calculate the distributions of: the energy that leaks from the back of the CEM, the energy fraction sampled by the scintillators, and the energy dependence of the response. We parameterize these distributions to accurately model electron and photon response and resolution in a custom simulation for the measurement of the $W$ boson mass.

  7. Extensive air shower simulations with the CORSIKA program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdevielee, J. N.; Gabriel, P.; Gils, H. J.; Grieder, P.; Heck, D.; Knapp, J.; Mayer, H. J.; Oehlschläger, J.; Rebel, H.; Schatz, G.; Thouw, T.

    1993-06-01

    CORSIKA is a detailed Monte Carlo program to study the development of extensive air showers in the atmosphere initiated by photons, protons, or nuclei of energies up to 1017 eV. Wherever possible experimentally accessible data have been used to model the high energy interactions of primary and secondary particles with the nuclei of the atmosphere. The CORSIKA code is based essentially on the Dual Parton Model to describe the hadronic interactions at high energies, the isobar model for hadronic reactions at low energies, and EGS4 for a detailed simulation of the electromagnetic part. The nucleus-nucleus interaction model follows the considerations of Klar and Hüfner. Heuristic nucleus fragment models are implemented. Diffractive and charge exchange reactions are possible. Photoproduction of muon pairs and hadrons has been introduced into the electromagnetic part. The gross features of the program are presented and some results are given.

  8. Decomposition characteristics of toluene by a corona radical shower system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zu-liang; GAO Xiang; LUO Zhong-yang; NI Ming-jiang; CEN Ke-fa

    2004-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma technologies offer an innovative approach to decomposing various volatile organic compounds(VOCs). The decomposition of toluene from simulated flue gas was investigated using a pipe electrode with nozzles for the generation of free radicals. Corona characteristics and decomposition of toluene were investigated experimentally. In addition, the decomposition mechanism of toluene was explored in view of reaction rate. The experimental results showed that the humidity of additional gas has an important effect on corona characteristics and modes and stable streamer corona can be generated through optimizing flow rate and humidity of additional gas. Applied voltage, concentration of toluene, humidity of toluene and resident time are some important factors affecting decomposition efficiency. Under optimizing conditions, the decomposition efficiency of toluene can reach 80%. These results can give a conclusion that the corona radical shower technology is feasible and effective on the removal of toluene in the flue gas.

  9. Ground detectors for the study of cosmic ray showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, H.; Villasenor, L.

    2008-06-01

    We describe the work that we have done over the last decade to design and construct instruments to measure properties of cosmic rays in Mexico. We describe the detection of decaying and crossing muons in a water Cherenkov detector and discuss an application of these results to calibrate water Cherenkov detectors. We also describe a technique to separate isolated isolated muons and electrons in water Cherenkov detector. Next we describe the design and performance of a hybrid extensive air shower detector array built on the Campus of the University of Puebla (19°N, 90°W, 800 g/cm2) to measure the energy, arrival direction and composition of primary cosmic rays with energies around 1 PeV.

  10. Simulation Study on Identifiability of UHE Gamma-ray Air Showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Y.; Inoue, N.; Miyazawa, K. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Vankov, H.P. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgaria Academy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2008-01-15

    The chemical composition of Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) comic rays is one of unsolved mysteries, and its study will give us fruitful information on the origin and acceleration mechanism of UHE cosmic rays. Especially, a detection of UHE gamma-rays by hybrid experiments, such as AUGER and TA, will be a key to solve these questions. The characteristics of UHE gamma-ray showers have been studied by comparing the lateral and longitudinal structures of shower particles calculated with AIRES and our own simulation code, so far. There are apparent differences in a slope of lateral distribution ({eta}) and a depth of shower maximum (Xmax) between gamma-ray and proton induced showers because UHE gamma-ray showers are affected by the LPM effect and the geomagnetic cascading process in an energy region of >10{sup 19.5}eV. Different features between gamma-ray and proton showers are pointed out from the simulation study and an identifiability of gamma-ray showers from proton ones is also discussed by the method of Neural-Network-Analysis.

  11. Adapted cold shower as a potential treatment for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, Nikolai A

    2008-01-01

    Depression is a debilitating mood disorder that is among the top causes of disability worldwide. It can be characterized by a set of somatic, emotional, and behavioral symptoms, one of which is a high risk of suicide. This work presents a hypothesis that depression may be caused by the convergence of two factors: (A) A lifestyle that lacks certain physiological stressors that have been experienced by primates through millions of years of evolution, such as brief changes in body temperature (e.g. cold swim), and this lack of "thermal exercise" may cause inadequate functioning of the brain. (B) Genetic makeup that predisposes an individual to be affected by the above condition more seriously than other people. To test the hypothesis, an approach to treating depression is proposed that consists of adapted cold showers (20 degrees C, 2-3 min, preceded by a 5-min gradual adaptation to make the procedure less shocking) performed once or twice daily. The proposed duration of treatment is several weeks to several months. The following evidence appears to support the hypothesis: Exposure to cold is known to activate the sympathetic nervous system and increase the blood level of beta-endorphin and noradrenaline and to increase synaptic release of noradrenaline in the brain as well. Additionally, due to the high density of cold receptors in the skin, a cold shower is expected to send an overwhelming amount of electrical impulses from peripheral nerve endings to the brain, which could result in an anti-depressive effect. Practical testing by a statistically insignificant number of people, who did not have sufficient symptoms to be diagnosed with depression, showed that the cold hydrotherapy can relieve depressive symptoms rather effectively. The therapy was also found to have a significant analgesic effect and it does not appear to have noticeable side effects or cause dependence. In conclusion, wider and more rigorous studies would be needed to test the validity of the

  12. Disinfection of sewage sludge with gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melmed, L.N.; Comninos, D.K.

    1979-10-01

    Disinfection of sewage sludge by ionizing radiation, thermoradiation, and radiation combined with oxygenation was investigated in experimentation in Johannesburg, South Africa. Inactivation of Ascaris lumbricoides ova was used as the criterion of disinfection. Experimentation and methodology are explained. Complete inactivation could be obtained when 0.5 kGy radiation was applied at 50..cap alpha..C to a sludge containing 3% solids and when 0.4 kGy radiation was applied at 55..cap alpha..C to a sludge with 20% solids. (1 drawing, 5 graphs, 4 photos, 4 tables)

  13. [Sterilization and disinfection in clinical orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzel, I; Haydar, B

    1989-11-01

    Recently a great deal of attention has been devoted to the spread of hepatitis b and aids viruses and the high risk of contamination of these viruses during the dental operations has made orthodontists more aware of the necessity of sterilization and disinfection. This article discusses the methods of sterilization and disinfection. Avoidance of corrosion of instruments and the use of a ultrasonic cleaner to avoid contamination has been explained. In the conclusion the measures that the orthodontist has to take in order to protect himself is discussed.

  14. Reconstruction of Longitudinal Profiles of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Showers from Fluorescence and Cherenkov Light Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Unger, M; Engel, R; Schüssler, F; Ulrich, R

    2008-01-01

    We present a new method for the reconstruction of the longitudinal profile of extensive air showers induced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays. In contrast to the typically considered shower size profile, this method employs directly the ionization energy deposit of the shower particles in the atmosphere. Due to universality of the energy spectra of electrons and positrons, both fluorescence and Cherenkov light can be used simultaneously as signal to infer the shower profile from the detected light. The method is based on an analytic least-square solution for the estimation of the shower profile from the observed light signal. Furthermore, the extrapolation of the observed part of the profile with a Gaisser-Hillas function is discussed and the total statistical uncertainty of shower parameters like total energy and shower maximum is calculated.

  15. On the transverse momentum in Z-boson production in a virtually ordered parton shower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Zoltan [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Soper, Davison E. [Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (United States). Inst. of Theoretical Science

    2009-12-15

    Cross sections for physical processes that involve very different momentum scales in the same process will involve large logarithms of the ratio of the momentum scales when calculated in perturbation theory. One goal of calculations using parton showers is to sum these large logarithms. We ask whether this goal is achieved for the transverse momentum distribution of a Z-boson produced in hadron-hadron collisions when the shower is organized with higher virtuality parton splittings coming first, followed successively by lower virtuality parton splittings. We find that the virtuality ordered shower works well in reproducing the known QCD result. (orig.)

  16. Top-quark pair-production with one jet and parton showering at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alioli, Simone [LBNL and UC Berkeley, CA (United States); Fuster, Juan; Irles, Adrian; Vos, Marcel [IFIC, Univ. de Valencia - CSIC, Paterna (Spain); Moch, Sven-Olaf [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Uwer, Peter [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    We present heavy-flavor production in association with one jet in hadronic collisions matched to parton shower Monte Carlo predictions at next-to-leading order QCD with account of top-quark decays and spin correlations. We use the POWHEG BOX for the interface to the parton shower programs PYTHIA or HERWIG. Phenomenological studies for the LHC and the Tevatron are presented with particular emphasis on the inclusion of spin-correlation effects in top decay and the impact of the parton shower on the top-quark charge asymmetries. As a novel application of the present calculation the measurement of the top-quark mass is discussed.

  17. A (revised) confidence index for the forecasting of the meteor showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaubaillon, Jeremie

    2016-10-01

    The prediction of meteor shower is known to provide several quality results depending on how it is performed. As a consequence it is hard to have an idea of how much one can trust a given prediction. In this paper I will present a revised confidence index, aiming to provide users with information regarding the way the prediction was performed. An effort to quantify the influence of close encounters with the parent body of a meteor shower is part of this confidence index. In fine, a single code will be provided for each prediction of meteor showers at any planet with a focus on Earth, Mars and Venus.

  18. LPM Showers in the Atmosphere Taking into Account the Geomagnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankov, H.; Stanev, T.; Inoue, N.; Misaki, A.; Kawaguchi, S.; Konishi, E.

    2003-07-01

    It has become a common knowledge that a correct calculation of the development of air showers initiated by UHE (> 5 × 1019 eV) primary photons should take into account the interactions in the geomagnetic field before entering the atmosphere and the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect (LPM) in the atmosphere. We show that the geomagnetic field has also a noticeable effect on the UHE electromagnetic shower development in the atmosphere and has to be accounted for in precise calculations of the shower characteristic.

  19. Searching for mini black holes signatures in cosmic rays air shower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamri, S.; Kalli, S.; Mimouni, J. [Physics Department, El-Hadj Lakhdar University (Algeria); Physics Department, Mohamed Boudiaf University (Algeria); Laboratoire de Physique Mathematique et Subatomique, Mentouri University (Algeria)

    2012-06-27

    Theories with extra dimensions at low Planck scale, offer the exciting possibility of mini black holes production in ultra high-energy particles interactions. In particular, cosmic neutrinos interaction can produce black holes deep in the Earth's atmosphere. These mini black holes then decay and produce 'characteristic' air showers. In this paper, we examine the properties of the mini black holes (mBH) air showers and compare them to the standard model (mSM) ones. We point out to some possible criteria that help distinguishing mBH air showers.

  20. Electromagnetic and muonic structure of showers initiated by gamma-rays and by hadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillas, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    If photon cascades develop by the usual mechanisms, there should indeed be notable differences between the structure of showers due to photon and hadron primaries, as regards muon densities and lateral distributions of some detector signals. The muon content of showers from Cygnus X-3, observed at Kiel, cannot be understood in this way. One remedy is to postulate arbitrarily a strong hadronic interaction of photons in the TeV region. This would utterly change the nature of electromagnetic cascades, but surprisingly does not at first sight seem to be in conflict with air shower observations.

  1. Analysis of the extensive air showers of ultra-high energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailov, Aleksei A. [Yu.G. Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, 31 Lenin Ave., 677980 Yakutsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-15

    When we study extensive air showers (EAS), which correlate with pulsars, we had been found showers without a muon component. Here we analyzed the arrival directions of EAS with poor and without a muon component. We find that the arrival directions of these showers correlate with some pulsars which are distributed more isotropy. Among these pulsars with the short period of rotation around their axis are prevailed than it is expected by the catalogue of pulsars. In this connection the data of world arrays are considered.

  2. Showering from high-energy cosmic rays. Can be measured in the high school science lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisman, Henk; Wilke de Souza, Daniel; Steijger, Jos

    2014-09-01

    In particle physics a `shower' is the avalanche of secondary particles produced by an incoming particle with high energy. This production requires the interaction with mass. A shower produced by high-energy cosmic rays usually covers a wide area, on the order of a square kilometer. The secondary particles can be observed by using scintillators. In view of the large area affected and the relatively simple equipment needed, this is an ideal project to involve high-school students and their teachers. Showering can also be observed indoors, on a muchsmaller scale.

  3. A computer system to analyze showers in nuclear emulsions: Center Director's discretionary fund report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, C. A.; Fountain, W. F.; Berry, F. A., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A system to rapidly digitize data from showers in nuclear emulsions is described. A TV camera views the emulsions though a microscope. The TV output is superimposed on the monitor of a minicomputer. The operator uses the computer's graphics capability to mark the positions of particle tracks. The coordinates of each track are stored on a disk. The computer then predicts the coordinates of each track through successive layers of emulsion. The operator, guided by the predictions, thus tracks and stores the development of the shower. The system provides a significant improvement over purely manual methods of recording shower development in nuclear emulsion stacks.

  4. Three dimensional parametrization of electromagnetic shower in Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Ⅱ ECAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Jun-Quan; CHEN He-Sheng; CHEN Gang; YANG Min; CHEN Guo-Ming; LI Zu-Hao; LI Xin-Qiao; TANG Zhi-Cheng; ZHANG Zhen; WANG Jian; L(U) Yu-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    We develop an empirical formula to parameterize the 3-dimension (3D) distribution of electromagnetic showers in the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Ⅱ electromagnetic calorimeter(ECAL). The formula was verified by ECAL test beam data in 2002 and found to perform well. The distribution of electron showers in the ECAL are well described by the formula, which has parameters that allow one to determine the 3D shape of electromagnetic showers in the ECAL. We use this formula to correct for lateral energy leakage and dead channels in the ECAL; good results are obtained.

  5. Track segments in hadronic showers in a highly granular scintillator-steel hadron calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Chefdeville, M.; Drancourt, C.; Gaglione, R.; Geffroy, N.; Karyotakis, Y.; Koletsou, I.; Prast, J.; Vouters, G.; Francis, K.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Smith, J.; Xia, L.; Baldolemar, E.; Li, J.; Park, S.T.; Sosebee, M.; White, A.P.; Yu, J.; Eigen, G.; Mikami, Y.; Watson, N.K.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, D.R.; Yan, W.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Dannheim, D.; Dotti, A.; Folger, G.; Ivantchenko, V.; Klempt, W.; Kraaij, E.van der; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I; Ribon, A.; Schlatter, D.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Cârloganu, C.; Gay, P.; Manen, S.; Royer, L.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Blazey, G.C.; Dyshkant, A.; Lima, J.G.R.; Zutshi, V.; Hostachy, J.-Y; Morin, L.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Lu, S.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Feege, N.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Marchesini, I.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Wilson, G.W.; Kawagoe, K.; Sudo, Y.; Yoshioka, T.; Dauncey, P.D.; Magnan, A.-M; Bartsch, V.; Wing, M.; Salvatore, F.; Gil, E.Cortina; Mannai, S.; Baulieu, G.; Calabria, P.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Negra, R.Della; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J-C; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Donckt, M.Vander; Zoccarato, Y.; Alamillo, E.Calvo; Fouz, M.-C; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Corriveau, F.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Popov, V.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kirikova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Buzhan, P.; Ilyin, A.; Kantserov, V.; Kaplin, V.; Karakash, A.; Popova, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Kiesling, C.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M.S.; Bonis, J.; Callier, S.; Lorenzo, S.Conforti di; Cornebise, P.; Doublet, Ph; Dulucq, F.; Fleury, J.; Frisson, T.; der Kolk, N.van; Li, H.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Richard, F.; Taille, Ch de la; Pöschl, R.; Raux, L.; Rouëné, J.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J-C; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Guliyev, E.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Musat, G.; Ruan, M.; Tran, T.H.; Videau, H.; Bulanek, B.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Belhorma, B.; Ghazlane, H.; Kotera, K.; Takeshita, T.; Uozumi, S.; Jeans, D.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the three dimensional substructure of hadronic showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel hadronic calorimeter. The high granularity of the detector is used to find track segments of minimum ionising particles within hadronic showers, providing sensitivity to the spatial structure and the details of secondary particle production in hadronic cascades. The multiplicity, length and angular distribution of identified track segments are compared to GEANT4 simulations with several different shower models. Track segments also provide the possibility for in-situ calibration of highly granular calorimeters.

  6. Experimental study on disinfection effect of different dose of rapid hand disinfectant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuhua Li

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: In an effort to reduce the incidence of nosocomial infection, the medical personnel should sufficiently dry hands following handrubbing with disinfectant in a strict accordance with the six part washing technique for antiseptic handrubbing.

  7. Preoperative steroid in abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Brøndum, Tina Lee; Belhage, Bo

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative administration of high-dose glucocorticoid leads to improved recovery and decreased length of stay after abdominal surgery. Even so, studies on administration of glucocorticoids for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) for giant ventral hernia repair ...

  8. Preoperative alcohol cessation prior to elective surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oppedal, Kristian; Møller, Ann Merete; Pedersen, Bolette

    2012-01-01

    Hazardous drinking has been associated with an increased postoperative complication rate after surgery. Common complications include postoperative infections, cardiopulmonary complications, and bleeding episodes. Preoperative abstinence may to some degree reverse alcohol-induced pathophysiological...

  9. Preoperative steroid in abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Brøndum, Tina Lee; Belhage, Bo;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative administration of high-dose glucocorticoid leads to improved recovery and decreased length of stay after abdominal surgery. Even so, studies on administration of glucocorticoids for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) for giant ventral hernia repair ...

  10. Preoperative education for lumbar surgery for radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Louw, A; Louw, Q; L. Crous

    2009-01-01

    To date no studies have been published on preoperative education forpatients who had lumbar surgery. The aim of this study was to determine if there is a demand for preoperative education for patients who had lumbar surgery for radiculopathy. A convenience sample of 47 patients who had lumbar surgery and a random sample of 141 physiotherapists involved in treating patients who had lumbar surgery completed a newly developed spinal surgery questionnaire. The data were analyzed using descriptive...

  11. Preoperative prediction of severe postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkman, C J; Visser, K; Moen, J; Bonsel, G J; Grobbee, D E; Moons, K G M

    2003-10-01

    We developed and validated a prediction rule for the occurrence of early postoperative severe pain in surgical inpatients, using predictors that can be easily documented in a preoperative setting. A cohort of surgical inpatients (n=1416) undergoing various procedures except cardiac surgery and intracranial neurosurgery in a University Hospital were studied. Preoperatively the following predictors were collected: age, gender, type of scheduled surgery, expected incision size, blood pressure, heart rate, Quetelet index, the presence and severity of preoperative pain, health-related quality of life the (SF-36), Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS). The outcome was the presence of severe postoperative pain (defined as Numeric Rating Scale > or =8) within the first hour postoperatively. Multivariate logistic regression in combination with bootstrapping techniques (as a method for internal validation) was used to derive a stable prediction model. Independent predictors of severe postoperative pain were younger age, female gender, level of preoperative pain, incision size and type of surgery. The area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.71 (95% CI: 0.68-0.74). Adding APAIS scores (measures of preoperative anxiety and need for information), but not STAI, provided a slightly better model (ROC area 0.73). The reliability of this extended model was good (Hosmer and Lemeshow test p-value 0.78). We have demonstrated that severe postoperative pain early after awakening from general anesthesia can be predicted with a scoring rule, using a small set of variables that can be easily obtained from all patients at the preoperative visit. Before this internally validated preoperative prediction rule can be applied in clinical practice to support anticipatory pain management, external validation in other clinical settings is necessary.

  12. SDBD plasma jet for skin disinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Meijer, S.R.; Verweij, P.E.; Zanden, F. van der; Leenders, P.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    A consortium consisting of the research institute TNO, the medical university and hospital St Radboud and two industrial enterprises is working on a non-thermal plasma treatment method for skin and wound disinfection. The group is seeking for cooperation, in particular in the field of validation

  13. Action of commonly used disinfectants against enteroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, H K; Codd, A A

    1983-06-01

    The virucidal effect of some of the most commonly used hospital disinfectants against Coxsackie B4, Echovirus 11, Poliovirus type 1 and Rotavirus have been evaluated. It was found that 'Chloros', 'Totacide 28' and methylated spirits were completely virucidal to all the viruses under study. 'Stericol' and 'Lysol' had a limited effect while 'Hibiscrub' and 'Savlon' had no effect at all.

  14. 40 CFR 141.72 - Disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment must be sufficient to ensure at least 99.9 percent (3-log) inactivation of Giardia lamblia cysts... for Giardia lamblia cysts and viruses. If a system uses a disinfectant other than chlorine, the system....9 percent (3-log) inactivation and/or removal of Giardia lamblia cysts and at least 99.99 percent...

  15. Virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour disinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, E.; Terpstra, P.; Koopmans, M.; Duizer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Viral contamination of surfaces is thought to be important in transmission. Chemical disinfection can be an effective means of intervention, but little is known about the virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV) against enteric and respiratory viruses. Aim: To measure the

  16. Virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour disinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, E.; Terpstra, P.; Koopmans, M.; Duizer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Viral contamination of surfaces is thought to be important in transmission. Chemical disinfection can be an effective means of intervention, but little is known about the virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV) against enteric and respiratory viruses. Aim: To measure the vir

  17. symptoms in health personnel exposed to disinfectants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-03-01

    Mar 1, 2001 ... (31.7%), watering of eyes (25%), skin rash (10%) and chronic cough (8.3%). Among users ... Further studies involving larger sample sizes, are necessary to ... exposure to disinfectants among health personnel in some. Kenyan health ..... Sun H.W., Feigal R.J. and Messer H.H. Cytotoxicity of gutaraldehyde ...

  18. SDBD plasma jet for skin disinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Meijer, S.R.; Verweij, P.E.; Zanden, F. van der; Leenders, P.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    A consortium consisting of the research institute TNO, the medical university and hospital St Radboud and two industrial enterprises is working on a non-thermal plasma treatment method for skin and wound disinfection. The group is seeking for cooperation, in particular in the field of validation met

  19. Role of Disinfection in Food Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G Sansebastiano; R Zoni; R Zanelli; L Bigliardi

    2006-01-01

    At present microbiological risk are still the most frequent in the food industry and the disinfection is one of the procedures that can be carried out in the general prevention of foodborne infectious diseases. In the industrial process of food transformation the cleaning and disinfection procedures of surfaces and machinery have to be considered an integrate system with food production, a technological aspect that surely affects the finished product quality and safety. First of all to carry out properly these operations it is necessary that the factory and the equipment have been designed and constructed with high standard of hygiene to reduce the risk of contamination and to facilitate the sanitation. The procedures involve several stages which generally include pre-washing with water, cleaning, real disinfection, and a final rinsing with water. In order to assure a right disinfections of surfaces areas and of processing equipment the choice of disinfectant takes on particular importance. Some of the most widely used disinfectants include the hypochlorous acid, the chlorine dioxide and the peroxides like peracetic acid; the latter is widely used in soft drink and mineral water industries. The efficiency of these chemical agents depends on various factors as pH, temperature and the presence of organic substances with which the disinfectants can react to give by-products which can reduce the activity and can present toxicity. The use of hypochlorite may led to the formation of carcinogenic substance such as trialomethanes (THM) while the use of chlorine dioxide may lead to the formation of chlorites and chiorates. The peracetic acid is a good alternative compounds and it doesn't lead to the formation of carcinogenic by-products. In our researches we evaluated the effectiveness of peracetic acid to inactivate some resistant micro-organism like hepatitis A virus; our results show that in practical application in CIP (cleaning in place) it's necessary to use

  20. Air shower simulation for background estimation in muon tomography of volcanoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Béné

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the main sources of background for the radiography of volcanoes with atmospheric muons comes from the accidental coincidences produced in the muon telescopes by the air showers. In order to quantify this background, Monte-Carlo simulations of the showers and of the detector are developed by the Tomuvol collaboration. As a first step, the atmospheric showers were simulated and investigated using two Monte-Carlo packages, CORSIKA and GEANT4. We compared the results provided by the two programs for the muonic component of vertical proton-induced showers at three energies: 1, 10 and 100 TeV. We found that the spatial distribution and energy spectrum of the muons were in good agreement for the two codes, while significant differences were observed for the arrival time of the muons.

  1. Measurement of the circular polarization in radio emission from extensive air showers confirms emission mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Scholten, O; Bonardi, A; Buitink, S; Correa, P; Corstanje, A; Hasankiadeh, Q Dorosti; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Mitra, P; Mulrey, K; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Schellart, P; Thoudam, S; ter Veen, S; de Vries, K D; Winchen, T

    2016-01-01

    We report here on a novel analysis of the complete set of four Stokes parameters that uniquely determine the linear and/or circular polarization of the radio signal for an extensive air shower. The observed dependency of the circular polarization on azimuth angle and distance to the shower axis is a clear signature of the interfering contributions from two different radiation mechanisms, a main contribution due to a geomagnetically-induced transverse current and a secondary component due to the build-up of excess charge at the shower front. The data, as measured at LOFAR, agree very well with a calculation from first principles. This opens the possibility to use circular polarization as an investigative tool in the analysis of air shower structure, such as for the determination of atmospheric electric fields.

  2. Deep Mapping of Small Solar System Bodies with Galactic Cosmic Ray Secondary Particle Showers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our Phase I study demonstrated that muons, the long-range charged component of GCR showers, can penetrate SSBs on the order of a km in diameter or less,...

  3. Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Air Shower Structure with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, J; Aglietta, M; Aguirre, C; Ahn, E J; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Argirò, S; Arisaka, K; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Barber, K B; Barbosa-Ademarlaudo, F; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Bérat, C; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Carvalho, W; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Chye, J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Conceição, R; Connolly, B; Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; De Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; De Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; Del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Fratte, C Delle; Dembinski, H; DiGiulio, C; Diaz, J C; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Duvernois, M A; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferrer, F; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fleck, I; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fulgione, W; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; GarcíaGámez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giller, M; Glass, H; Goggin, L M; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Amaral, M Gonçalves do; González, D; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Gozzini, S R; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutiérrez, J; Hague, J D; Halenka, V; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Hebrero, G; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jiraskova, S; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kühn, F; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, K; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; LaRosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lucero, A; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Martello, D; Bravo, O Martínez; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Müller, S; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nhung, P T; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Redondo, A; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Rídky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Robledo, C; Rodríguez, G; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schroeder, F; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Sigl, G; Śmia\\lkowski, A; Šmída, R; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suárez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Tarutina, T; Taşcuau, O; Tcaciuc, R; Tcherniakhovski, D; Tegolo, D; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Ticona, R; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torres, I; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; vandenBerg, A M; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Wu, H; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Ziolkowski, M

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the composition of the highest energy cosmic rays with the Pierre Auger Observatory, including examination of hadronic physics effects on the structure of extensive air showers. Submissions to the 31st ICRC, Lodz, Poland (July 2009).

  4. Radio emission of highly inclined cosmic ray air showers measured with LOPES

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovic, Jelena; Asch, T; Badea, F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blumer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Bruggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Buitink, S; Butcher, H; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huege, T; Kampert, K H; Kolotaev, Yu; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Meurer, C; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Plewnia, S; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Sima, O; Singh, K; Stumpert, M; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Van Buren, J; Walkowiak, W; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; Zimmermann, D

    2006-01-01

    LOPES-10 (the first phase of LOPES, consisting of 10 antennas) detected a significant number of cosmic ray air showers with a zenith angle larger than 50$^{\\circ}$, and many of these have very high radio field strengths. The most inclined event that has been detected with LOPES-10 has a zenith angle of almost 80$^{\\circ}$. This is proof that the new technique is also applicable for cosmic ray air showers with high inclinations, which in the case that they are initiated close to the ground, can be a signature of neutrino events.Our results indicate that arrays of simple radio antennas can be used for the detection of highly inclined air showers, which might be triggered by neutrinos. In addition, we found that the radio pulse height (normalized with the muon number) for highly inclined events increases with the geomagnetic angle, which confirms the geomagnetic origin of radio emission in cosmic ray air showers.

  5. Water Use Patterns in Vietnamese Hotels: Modeling Toilet and Shower Usage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kanako Toyosada; Takayuki Otani; Yasutoshi Shimizu

    2016-01-01

    .... This study investigated water-use patterns in a hotel in Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam. It aimed to quantify the efficiency of water-saving devices through modeling toilet and shower usage patterns, including water consumption...

  6. Water Use Patterns in Vietnamese Hotels: Modeling Toilet and Shower Usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Toyosada

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Water saving is a key issue in rapidly developing countries, such as Vietnam, that face various water resource management challenges. This study investigated water-use patterns in a hotel in Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam. It aimed to quantify the efficiency of water-saving devices through modeling toilet and shower usage patterns, including water consumption. The shift in hourly consumption of cold and hot water was also identified. Analysis revealed that, on average, a full toilet flush occurs 3.3 times/day, a half flush 3.0 times/day, water consumption due to shower usage is 48.1 L/day, showering time is 7.3 min/day and the shower water temperature is 37.7 °C. Shifting levels of hot and cold water use revealed high activity in the morning time and that there are two peaks, occurring in the morning and at night.

  7. Forward physics : from SPS to LHC, what can we learn from air showers ?

    CERN Document Server

    Pierog, T

    2009-01-01

    Since recent RHIC data and the development of new theories for small x physics, a new interest appeared for forward physics. At LHC, a correct description of multiple parton interactions will be crucial to understand all the results. On the other hand, forward particle production and multiple interactions are the key points of air shower development. That's why air shower measurements done by precise experiments like KASCADE can help to understand high energy interactions, using hadronic models which are able to reproduce both accelerator and air shower data. In the framework of the EPOS model, we will show what constraints can be fixed by air shower experiment on particle production from SPS to LHC energies.

  8. Extensive Air Showers High Energy Phenomena and Astrophysical Aspects - A Tutorial, Reference Manual and Data Book

    CERN Document Server

    Grieder, Peter K.F

    2010-01-01

    Extensive air showers are a very unique phenomenon. In the more than six decades since their discovery by Auger et al. we have learned a great deal about these extremely energetic events and gained deep insights into high-energy phenomena, particle physics and astrophysics. In this Tutorial, Reference Manual and Data Book Peter K. F. Grieder provides the reader with a comprehensive view of the phenomenology and facts of the various types of interactions and cascades, theoretical background, experimental methods, data evaluation and interpretation, and air shower simulation. He discusses astrophysical aspects of the primary radiation and addresses the questions that continue to puzzle researchers. The book is divided into two parts, each in its own separate volume: Part I in Volume I deals mainly with the basic theoretical framework of the processes that determine an air shower and ends with a summary of ways to extract information on the primary radiation from air shower observations. It also presents a compi...

  9. Changes in extensive air showers from isotropic Lorentz violation in the photon sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, J. S.; Klinkhamer, F. R.; Risse, M.

    2016-10-01

    We consider a theory with isotropic nonbirefringent Lorentz violation in the photon sector and explore the effects on the development of the electromagnetic component of extensive air showers in the Earth atmosphere. Specifically, we consider the case of a "fast" photon with a phase velocity larger than the maximum attainable velocity of a massive Dirac fermion (this case corresponds to a negative Lorentz-violating parameter κ in the action). Shower photons with above-threshold energies decay promptly into electron-positron pairs, instead of decaying by the conventional production of electron-positron pairs in the background fields of atomic nuclei. This rapid production of charged leptons accelerates the shower development, decreasing the atmospheric depth of the shower maximum (Xmax) by an amount which could be measured by cosmic-ray observatories. Precise measurements of Xmax could then improve existing limits on the negative Lorentz-violating parameter κ by several orders of magnitude.

  10. Measurement of the circular polarization in radio emission from extensive air showers confirms emission mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, O.; Trinh, T. N. G.; Bonardi, A.; Buitink, S.; Correa, P.; Corstanje, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Mitra, P.; Mulrey, K.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Schellart, P.; Thoudam, S.; ter Veen, S.; de Vries, K. D.; Winchen, T.

    2016-11-01

    We report here on a novel analysis of the complete set of four Stokes parameters that uniquely determine the linear and/or circular polarization of the radio signal for an extensive air shower. The observed dependency of the circular polarization on azimuth angle and distance to the shower axis is a clear signature of the interfering contributions from two different radiation mechanisms, a main contribution due to a geomagnetically-induced transverse current and a secondary component due to the build-up of excess charge at the shower front. The data, as measured at LOFAR, agree very well with a calculation from first principles. This opens the possibility to use circular polarization as an investigative tool in the analysis of air shower structure, such as for the determination of atmospheric electric fields.

  11. Measurement of the Depth of Maximum of Extensive Air Showers above 1018eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Mičanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pękala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, Xmax⁡, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 1018eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are selected for the analysis. The average shower maximum was found to evolve with energy at a rate of (106-21+35)g/cm2/decade below 1018.24±0.05eV, and (24±3)g/cm2/decade above this energy. The measured shower-to-shower fluctuations decrease from about 55 to 26g/cm2. The interpretation of these results in terms of the cosmic ray mass composition is briefly discussed.

  12. Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Air Shower Structure with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the average depth of shower maximum and its fluctuations with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) Study of the nuclear mass composition of UHECR with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Comparison of data from the Pierre Auger Observatory with predictions from air shower simulations: testing models of hadronic interactions; (4) A Monte Carlo exploration of methods to determine the UHECR composition with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) The delay of the start-time measured with the Pierre Auger Observatory for inclined showers and a comparison of its variance with models; (6) UHE neutrino signatures in the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory; and (7) The electromagnetic component of inclined air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  13. Determining the EDTA Content in a Consumer Shower Cleaner. An Introductory Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, Willis A.

    2000-10-01

    At Altoona College, Chemistry 11 is offered to students as a preparatory course for the University's Chemical Principles course, Chem 12. A relevant laboratory is a source of motivation for the students to learn the chemistry. One way of making the laboratory relevant is to analyze the chemical components of consumer products. Several new shower-cleaning products have been introduced, which advertise that cleaning the shower is no longer necessary. The cleaners work using a combination of surfactants, alcohols, and a chelating agent. The Web site of a popular shower cleaner lists EDTA (ethylenediamine tetraacetate ion) as the chelating agent. The classic EDTA/calcium complexometric titration can be used to determine the EDTA content of the cleaner. This article describes the experiment to determine the EDTA content in a shower-cleaning product.

  14. Radio pulses from electromagnetic, hadronic and neutrino-induced showers up to EeV energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Muniz, Jaime, E-mail: jaime.alvarezmuniz@gmail.com [Depto. de Fisica de Particulas and Inst. Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias, Univ. de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago (Spain); Carvalho, Washington R.; Zas, Enrique [Depto. de Fisica de Particulas and Inst. Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias, Univ. de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago (Spain); Romero-Wolf, Andres [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Tueros, Matias [Depto. de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Univ. Nacional de La Plata (Argentina)

    2012-01-11

    The radio pulses emitted by electromagnetic, hadronic, and neutrino-induced showers are calculated for showers of energies in the EeV range and above in ice and in air. These are obtained in three-dimensional simulations of both the shower and the radio emission. An AIRES-based Monte Carlo code, ZHAIRES, has been developed for this purpose that allows us to predict the radio emission in both the time and frequency domains. The algorithms used, obtained from first principles, predict the radio emission due to all emission mechanisms, including the deflection of charged particles in the Earth's magnetic field. The code which has been extended to calculate in the Fresnel regime can reproduce the full complexity of the relevant shower phenomena.

  15. Jet Hadronization via Recombination of Parton Showers in Vacuum and in Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Fries, Rainer J; Ko, Che Ming

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the hadronization of jet parton showers based on the quark recombination model. This is achieved by letting gluons at the end of the perturbative shower evolution undergo a non-perturbative splitting into quark and antiquark pairs, then applying a Monte-Carlo version of instantaneous quark recombination, and finally subjecting remnant quarks (those which have not found a recombination partner) to Lund string fragmentation. When applied to parton showers from the PYTHIA Monte Carlo generator, the final hadron spectra from our calculation compare quite well to PYTHIA jets that have been hadronized with the default Lund string fragmentation. Modeling the quark gluon plasma produced in heavy ion collisions by a blast wave model, we have further studied medium effects on the hadronization of jet shower partons by also including their recombination with the thermal partons from the quark gluon plasma. We find that the latter leads to a significant enhancement of intermediate transverse momentum pion...

  16. Efficacy of various disinfectants against SARS coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabenau, H F; Kampf, G; Cinatl, J; Doerr, H W

    2005-10-01

    The recent severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in Asia and Northern America led to broad use of various types of disinfectant in order to control the public spread of the highly contagious virus. However, only limited data were available to demonstrate their efficacy against SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We therefore investigated eight disinfectants for their activity against SARS-CoV according to prEN 14476. Four hand rubs were tested at 30s (Sterillium, based on 45% iso-propanol, 30% n-propanol and 0.2% mecetronium etilsulphate; Sterillium Rub, based on 80% ethanol; Sterillium Gel, based on 85% ethanol; Sterillium Virugard, based on 95% ethanol). Three surface disinfectants were investigated at 0.5% for 30 min and 60 min (Mikrobac forte, based on benzalkonium chloride and laurylamine; Kohrsolin FF, based on benzalkonium chloride, glutaraldehyde and didecyldimonium chloride; Dismozon pur, based on magnesium monoperphthalate), and one instrument disinfectant was investigated at 4% for 15 min, 3% for 30 min and 2% for 60 min [Korsolex basic, based on glutaraldehyde and (ethylenedioxy)dimethanol]. Three types of organic load were used: 0.3% albumin, 10% fetal calf serum, and 0.3% albumin with 0.3% sheep erythrocytes. Virus titres were determined by a quantitative test (endpoint titration) in 96-well microtitre plates. With all tested preparations, SARS-CoV was inactivated to below the limit of detection (reduction factor mostly > or =4), regardless of the type of organic load. In summary, SARS-CoV can be inactivated quite easily with many commonly used disinfectants.

  17. LOPES 3D - vectorial measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray induced air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

    2013-01-01

    LOPES 3D is able to measure all three components of the electric field vector of the radio emission from air showers. This allows a better comparison with emission models. The measurement of the vertical component increases the sensitivity to inclined showers. By measuring all three components of the electric field vector LOPES 3D demonstrates by how much the reconstruction accuracy of primary cosmic ray parameters increases. Thus LOPES 3D evaluates the usefulness of vectorial measurements for large scale applications.

  18. The wavefront of the radio signal emitted by cosmic ray air showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, W.D.; Bekk, K.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R. [Institut für Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Arteaga-Velázquez, J.C. [Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana, Edificio C-3, Cd. Universitaria, C.P. 58040 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Bähren, L.; Falcke, H. [ASTRON, Oude Hoogeveensedijk 4, 7991 PD Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Bertaina, M.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Pierro, F. Di [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, Via Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Str. Reactorului no. 30, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); De Souza, V. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador São-Carlense 400, Pq. Arnold Schmidt, São Carlos (Brazil); Fuchs, B. [Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Gemmeke, H. [Institut für Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Grupen, C., E-mail: frank.schroeder@kit.edu [Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering, Universität Siegen, Walter-Flex-Straße 3, 57072 Siegen (Germany); and others

    2014-09-01

    Analyzing measurements of the LOPES antenna array together with corresponding CoREAS simulations for more than 300 measured events with energy above 10{sup 17} eV and zenith angles smaller than 45{sup o}, we find that the radio wavefront of cosmic-ray air showers is of approximately hyperbolic shape. The simulations predict a slightly steeper wavefront towards East than towards West, but this asymmetry is negligible against the measurement uncertainties of LOPES. At axis distances ∼> 50 m, the wavefront can be approximated by a simple cone. According to the simulations, the cone angle is clearly correlated with the shower maximum. Thus, we confirm earlier predictions that arrival time measurements can be used to study the longitudinal shower development, but now using a realistic wavefront. Moreover, we show that the hyperbolic wavefront is compatible with our measurement, and we present several experimental indications that the cone angle is indeed sensitive to the shower development. Consequently, the wavefront can be used to statistically study the primary composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. At LOPES, the experimentally achieved precision for the shower maximum is limited by measurement uncertainties to approximately 140 g/c {sup 2}. But the simulations indicate that under better conditions this method might yield an accuracy for the atmospheric depth of the shower maximum, X{sub max}, better than 30 g/c {sup 2}. This would be competitive with the established air-fluorescence and air-Cherenkov techniques, where the radio technique offers the advantage of a significantly higher duty-cycle. Finally, the hyperbolic wavefront can be used to reconstruct the shower geometry more accurately, which potentially allows a better reconstruction of all other shower parameters, too.

  19. Energetic delayed hadrons in large air showers observed at 5200m above sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, T.; Hagiwara, K.; Yoshii, H.; Martinic, N.; Siles, L.; Miranda, P.; Kakimoto, F.; Tsuchimoto, I.; Inoue, N.; Suga, K.

    1985-01-01

    Energetic delayed hadrons in air showers with electron sizes in the range 10 to the 6th power to 10 to the 9th power were studied by observing the delayed bursts produced in the shield of nine square meter scintillation detectors in the Chacaltaya air-shower array. The frequency of such delayed burst is presented as a function of electron size, core distance and sec theta.

  20. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields in Thunderstorms through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Schellart, P; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Scholten, O; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Ebert, U; Koehn, C; Rutjes, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J M; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Holties, H A; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Moldon, J; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D J; Serylak, M; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; van Weeren, R J; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers that took place during thunderstorms. The intensity and polarization patterns of these air showers are radically different from those measured during fair-weather conditions. With the use of a simple two-layer model for the atmospheric electric field, these patterns can be well reproduced by state-of-the-art simulation codes. This in turn provides a novel way to study atmospheric electric fields.

  1. Hadronic Shower Validation Experience for the ATLAS End-Cap Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiryunin, A. E.; Salihagić, D.

    2007-03-01

    Validation of GEANT4 hadronic physics models is carried out by comparing experimental data from beam tests of modules of the ATLAS end-cap calorimeters with GEANT4 based simulations. Two physics lists (LHEP and QGSP) for the simulation of hadronic showers are evaluated. Calorimeter performance parameters like the energy resolution and response for charged pions and shapes of showers are studied. Comparison with GEANT3 predictions is done as well.

  2. Analytic Calculation of Radio Emission from Extensive Air Showers subjected to Atmospheric Electric Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Scholten, Olaf; de Vries, Krijn D; van Sloten, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a code that semi-analytically calculates the radio footprint (intensity and polarization) of an extensive air shower subject to atmospheric electric fields. This can be used to reconstruct the height dependence of atmospheric electric field from the measured radio footprint. The various parameterizations of the spatial extent of the induced currents are based on the results of Monte-Carlo shower simulations. The calculated radio footprints agree well with microscopic CoREAS simulations.

  3. Particle Size Distribution and Inhalation Dose of Shower Water Under Selected Operating Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yue; Benson, Janet M.; Irvin, Clinton; Irshad, Hammad; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    2007-01-01

    Showering produces respirable droplets that may serve to deposit pollutants such as trihalomethane decontamination products, heavy metals, inorganic salts, microbes, or cyanoacterial toxins within the respiratory tract. The extent and importance of this route of indoor exposure depend on the physical characteristics of the aerosol as well as the pollutant profile of the source water. The purpose of this study was to characterize shower-generated aerosols as a function of water flow rate, temp...

  4. Search for tachyons associated with extensive air showers in the ground level cosmic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masjed, H. F.; Ashton, F.

    1985-01-01

    Events detected in a shielded plastic scintillation counter occurring in the 26 microsec preceding the arrival of an extensive air shower at ground level with local electron density or = 20 m to the -2 power and the 240 microsec after its arrival have been studied. No significant excess of events (tachyons) arriving in the early time domain have been observed in a sample of 11,585 air shower triggers.

  5. Application of CORSIKA Simulation Code to Study Lateral and Longitudinal Distribution of Fluorescence Light in Cosmic Ray Extensive Air Showers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zahra Bagheri; Pantea Davoudifar; Gohar Rastegarzadeh; Milad Shayan

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we used CORSIKA code to understand the characteristics of cosmic ray induced showers at extremely high energy as a function of energy, detector distance to shower axis, number, and density of secondary charged particles and the nature particle producing the shower. Based on the standard properties of the atmosphere, lateral and longitudinal development of the shower for photons and electrons has been investigated. Fluorescent light has been collected by the detector for protons, helium, oxygen, silicon, calcium and iron primary cosmic rays in different energies. So we have obtained a number of electrons per unit area, distance to the shower axis, shape function of particles density, percentage of fluorescent light, lateral distribution of energy dissipated in the atmosphere and visual field angle of detector as well as size of the shower image. We have also shown that location of highest percentage of fluorescence light is directly proportional to atomic number of elements. Also we have shown when the distance from shower axis increases and the shape function of particles density decreases severely. At the first stages of development, shower axis distance from detector is high and visual field angle is small; then with shower moving toward the Earth, angle increases. Overall, in higher energies, the fluorescent light method has more efficiency. The paper provides standard calibration lines for high energy showers which can be used to determine the nature of the particles.

  6. Radio signals from extensive air showers with the energies E 0 ≥ 1019 eV according to data from the Yakutsk extensive air shower array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knurenko, S. P.; Petrov, I. S.

    2016-09-01

    A radio instrument and results obtained from the measurements of the 32-MHz radio signal from particles of extensive air showers (EASs) with energies E 0 ≥ 1×1019 eV are reported in brief. The data were obtained at the Yakutsk EAS array in 1987-1989 (the first series of measurements) and in 2009-2014 (new series of measurements). The radio signal from EASs with energies above 1020eV was detected at the Yakutsk EAS array for the first time, including the shower with the record energy of 2×1020 eV for the Yakutsk EAS array.

  7. The shape of the radio wavefront of extensive air showers as measured with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Corstanje, A; Nelles, A; Buitink, S; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Frieswijk, W; Hörandel, J R; Krause, M; Rachen, J P; Scholten, O; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Trinh, G; Akker, M van den; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Avruch, I M; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Engels, D; Fallows, R A; Ferrari, C; Garrett, M A; Griessmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Hoeft, M; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Kohler, J; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Maat, P; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Mevius, M; Munk, H; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pandey, V N; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D; Smirnov, O; Stewart, A; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Toribio, C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wijnholds, S J; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P

    2014-01-01

    Extensive air showers, induced by high energy cosmic rays impinging on the Earth's atmosphere, produce radio emission that is measured with the LOFAR radio telescope. As the emission comes from a finite distance of a few kilometers, the incident wavefront is non-planar. A spherical or conical shape of the wavefront has been proposed, but measurements of individual air showers have been inconclusive so far. For a selected high-quality sample of 161 measured extensive air showers, we have reconstructed the wavefront by measuring pulse arrival times to sub-nanosecond accuracy in 200 to 350 individual antennas. For each measured air shower, we have fitted a conical, spherical, and hyperboloid shape to the arrival times. The fit quality and a likelihood analysis show that a hyperboloid is the best parametrization. Using a non-planar wavefront shape gives an improved angular resolution, when reconstructing the shower arrival direction. Furthermore, a dependence of the wavefront shape on the shower geometry can be s...

  8. Lateral Distribution of the Radio Signal in Extensive Air Showers Measured with LOPES

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Asch, T; Badea, A F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Brueggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Buitink, S; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; De Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Finger, M; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K H; Kang, D; Kickelbick, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Oehlschläger, J; Over, S; Palmieri, N; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schroeder, F; Sima, O; Singh, K; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

    2009-01-01

    The antenna array LOPES is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and aims to measure and investigate radio pulses from Extensive Air Showers. The coincident measurements allow us to reconstruct the electric field strength at observation level in dependence of general EAS parameters. In the present work, the lateral distribution of the radio signal in air showers is studied in detail. It is found that the lateral distributions of the electric field strengths in individual EAS can be described by an exponential function. For about 20% of the events a flattening towards the shower axis is observed, preferentially for showers with large inclination angle. The estimated scale parameters R0 describing the slope of the lateral profiles range between 100 and 200 m. No evidence for a direct correlation of R0 with shower parameters like azimuth angle, geomagnetic angle, or primary energy can be found. This indicates that the lateral profile is an intrinsic pr...

  9. The Effect of Cold Showering on Health and Work: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijze, Geert A; Sierevelt, Inger N; van der Heijden, Bas C J M; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the cumulative effect of a routine (hot-to-) cold shower on sickness, quality of life and work productivity. Between January and March 2015, 3018 participants between 18 and 65 years without severe comorbidity and no routine experience of cold showering were randomized (1:1:1:1) to a (hot-to-) cold shower for 30, 60, 90 seconds or a control group during 30 consecutive days followed by 60 days of showering cold at their own discretion for the intervention groups. The primary outcome was illness days and related sickness absence from work. Secondary outcomes were quality of life, work productivity, anxiety, thermal sensation and adverse reactions. 79% of participants in the interventions groups completed the 30 consecutive days protocol. A negative binomial regression model showed a 29% reduction in sickness absence for (hot-to-) cold shower regimen compared to the control group (incident rate ratio: 0.71, P = 0.003). For illness days there was no significant group effect. No related serious advents events were reported. A routine (hot-to-) cold shower resulted in a statistical reduction of self-reported sickness absence but not illness days in adults without severe comorbidity. Netherlands National Trial Register NTR5183.

  10. Radio emission of air showers with extremely high energy measured by the Yakutsk Radio Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knurenko, S. P.; Petrov, Z. E.; Petrov, I. S.

    2017-09-01

    The Yakutsk Array is designed to study cosmic rays at energy 1015 -1020 eV . It consists several independent arrays that register charged particles, muons with energy E ≥ 1 GeV , Cherenkov light and radio emission. The paper presents a technical description of the Yakutsk Radio Array and some preliminary results obtained from measurements of radio emission at 30-35 MHz frequency induced by air shower particles with energy ε ≥ 1 ·1017 eV . The data obtained at the Yakutsk array in 1986-1989 (first set of measurements) and 2009-2014 (new set of measurements). Based on the obtained results we determined: Lateral distribution function (LDF) of air showers radio emission with energy ≥1017 eV . Radio emission amplitude empirical connection with air shower energy. Determination of depth of maximum by ratio of amplitude at different distances from the shower axis. For the first time, at the Yakutsk array radio emission from the air shower with energy >1019 eV was registered including the shower with the highest energy ever registered at the Yakutsk array with energy ∼ 2 ·1020 eV .

  11. 40 CFR 141.541 - What are significant changes to disinfection practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... disinfection practice? 141.541 Section 141.541 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Disinfection Benchmark § 141.541 What are significant changes to disinfection practice? Significant changes to disinfection practice include: (a) Changes to the...

  12. 40 CFR 141.540 - Who has to develop a disinfection benchmark?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who has to develop a disinfection... Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Disinfection Benchmark § 141.540 Who has to develop a disinfection benchmark? If you are a subpart H system required to develop a disinfection profile under §§ 141...

  13. Advance pre-operative chlorhexidine reduces the incidence of surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywiel, Michael G; Daley, Jacqueline A; Delanois, Ronald E; Naziri, Qais; Johnson, Aaron J; Mont, Michael A

    2011-07-01

    Surgical site infections following elective knee arthroplasties occur most commonly as a result of colonisation by the patient's native skin flora. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of deep surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty patients who used an advance cutaneous disinfection protocol and who were compared to patients who had peri-operative preparation only. All adult reconstruction surgeons at a single institution were approached to voluntarily provide patients with chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths and a printed sheet instructing their use the night before and morning of surgery. Records for all knee arthroplasties performed between January 2007 and December 2008 were reviewed to determine the incidence of deep incisional and periprosthetic surgical site infections. Overall, the advance pre-operative protocol was used in 136 of 912 total knee arthroplasties (15%). A lower incidence of surgical site infection was found in patients who used the advance cutaneous preparation protocol as compared to patients who used the in-hospital protocol alone. These findings were maintained when patients were stratified by surgical infection risk category. No surgical site infections occurred in the 136 patients who completed the protocol as compared to 21 infections in 711 procedures (3.0%) performed in patients who did not. Patient-directed skin disinfection using chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths the evening before, and the morning of, elective knee arthroplasty appeared to effectively reduce the incidence of surgical site infection when compared to patients who underwent in-hospital skin preparation only.

  14. Peracetic acid for secondary effluent disinfection: a comprehensive performance assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, M; Turolla, A; Mezzanotte, V; Nurizzo, C

    2013-01-01

    The paper is a review of previous research on secondary effluent disinfection by peracetic acid (PAA) integrated with new data about the effect of a preliminary flash-mixing step. The process was studied at bench and pilot scale to assess its performance for discharge in surface water and agricultural reuse (target microorganisms: Escherichia coli and faecal coliform bacteria). The purposes of the research were: (1) determining PAA decay and disinfection kinetics as a function of operating parameters, (2) evaluating PAA suitability as a disinfectant, (3) assessing long-term disinfection efficiency, (4) investigating disinfected effluent biological toxicity on some aquatic indicator organisms (Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna and Selenastrum capricornutum), (5) comparing PAA with conventional disinfectants (sodium hypochlorite, UV irradiation). PAA disinfection was capable of complying with Italian regulations on reuse (10 CFU/100 mL for E. coli) and was competitive with benchmarks. No regrowth phenomena were observed, as long as needed for agricultural reuse (29 h after disinfection), even at negligible concentrations of residual disinfectant. The toxic effect of PAA on the aquatic environment was due to the residual disinfectant in the water, rather than to chemical modification of the effluent.

  15. Proteobacteria become predominant during regrowth after water disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Castro, Cristina; Macedo, Gonçalo; Silva, Adrian M T; Manaia, Célia M; Nunes, Olga C

    2016-12-15

    Disinfection processes aim at reducing the number of viable cells through the generation of damages in different cellular structures and molecules. Since disinfection involves unspecific mechanisms, some microbial populations may be selected due to resilience to treatment and/or to high post-treatment fitness. In this study, the bacterial community composition of secondarily treated urban wastewater and of surface water collected in the intake area of a drinking water treatment plant was compared before and 3-days after disinfection with ultraviolet radiation, ozonation or photocatalytic ozonation. The aim was to assess the dynamics of the bacterial communities during regrowth after disinfection. In all the freshly collected samples, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the predominant phyla (40-50% and 20-30% of the reads, respectively). Surface water differed from wastewater mainly in the relative abundance of Actinobacteria (17% and disinfected samples presented a shift of Gammaproteobacteria (from 8 to 10% to 33-65% of the reads) and Betaproteobacteria (from 14 to 20% to 31-37% of the reads), irrespective of the type of water and disinfection process used. Genera such as Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter or Rheinheimera presented a selective advantage after water disinfection. These variations were not observed in the non-disinfected controls. Given the ubiquity and genome plasticity of these bacteria, the results obtained suggest that disinfection processes may have implications on the microbiological quality of the disinfected water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An ionization chamber shower detector for the LHC luminosity monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Beche, J F; Datte, P S; Haguenauer, Maurice; Manfredi, P F; Millaud, J E; Placidi, Massimo; Ratti, L; Re, V; Riot, V J; Schmickler, Hermann; Speziali, V; Turner, W C

    2000-01-01

    The front IR quadrupole absorbers (TAS) and the IR neutral particle absorbers (TAN) in the high luminosity insertions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) each absorb approximately 1.8 TeV of forward collision products on average per pp interaction (~235 W at design luminosity 10/sup 34/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/). This secondary particle flux can be exploited to provide a useful storage ring operations tool for optimization of luminosity. A novel segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for sampling the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The system design choices have been strongly influenced by optimization of signal to noise ratio and by the very high radiation environment. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast, pulse shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. Data on each bunch are to be separately accumulated over multiple bunch crossings until the desire...

  17. Extensive air showers, lightning, and thunderstorm ground enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilingarian, A.; Hovsepyan, G.; Kozliner, L.

    2016-09-01

    For lightning research, we monitor particle fluxes from thunderclouds, the so-called thunderstorm ground enhancements (TGEs) initiated by runaway electrons, and extensive air showers (EASs) originating from high-energy protons or fully stripped nuclei that enter the Earth's atmosphere. We also monitor the near-surface electric field and atmospheric discharges using a network of electric field mills. The Aragats "electron accelerator" produced several TGEs and lightning events in the spring of 2015. Using 1-s time series, we investigated the relationship between lightning and particle fluxes. Lightning flashes often terminated the particle flux; in particular, during some TGEs, lightning events would terminate the particle flux thrice after successive recovery. It was postulated that a lightning terminates a particle flux mostly in the beginning of a TGE or in its decay phase; however, we observed two events (19 October 2013 and 20 April 2015) when the huge particle flux was terminated just at the peak of its development. We discuss the possibility of a huge EAS facilitating lightning leader to find its path to the ground.

  18. A Neutron Burst Associated with an Extensive Air Shower?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Mauro; Martin, Inacio; Shkevov, Rumen; Gusev, Anatoly; De Abreu, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    A portable and compact system based on a He-3 tube (LND, USA; model 25311) with an area of approximately 250 cm² and is used to record neutron count rates at ground level in the energy range of 0.025 eV to 10 MeV, in São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil (23° 12' 45" S, 45° 52' 00" W; altitude, 660m). The detector, power supply, digitizer and other hardware are housed in an air-conditioned room. The detector power supply and digitizer are not connected to the main electricity network; a high-capacity 12-V battery is used to power the detector and digitizer. Neutron counts are accumulated at 1-minute intervals continuously. The data are stored in a PC for further analysis. In February 8, 2015, at 12 h 22 min (local time) during a period of fair weather with minimal cloud cover (extensive air shower that occurred over the detector.

  19. Atmospheric Effects on Cosmic Ray Air Showers Observed with HAWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma Ray detector (HAWC), currently under construction on the Sierra Negra volcano near Puebla, Mexico, can be used to study solar physics with its scaler data acquisition system. Increases in the scaler rates are used to observe GeV cosmic rays from solar flares while decreases in the rates show the heliospheric disturbances associated with coronal mass ejections. However, weather conditions and height-dependent state variables such as pressure and temperature affect the production of extensive particle air showers that can be detected by the scaler system. To see if these atmospheric effects can be removed, we obtained local weather data from the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) and the local weather station at HAWC. The scaler pulse rates were then correlated to the pressure and temperature. We present data from a Forbush decrease observed by HAWC following a significant coronal mass ejection in April 2013, and describe our efforts to remove atmospheric variations from the scaler counts. This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation’s REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881 to the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  20. Preoperative education for lumbar surgery for radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Louw

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available To date no studies have been published on preoperative education forpatients who had lumbar surgery. The aim of this study was to determine if there is a demand for preoperative education for patients who had lumbar surgery for radiculopathy. A convenience sample of 47 patients who had lumbar surgery and a random sample of 141 physiotherapists involved in treating patients who had lumbar surgery completed a newly developed spinal surgery questionnaire. The data were analyzed using descriptiveand inferential statistical tests. Results showed that 100% of the patients and 99% of therapists view preoperative education to be an important component for lumbar surgery for radiculopathy. The most important factors identifiedfor inclusion in preoperative educational programs were reason for surgery, risks associated with surgery, limitations following surgery and more education regarding pain. The preferred method of education delivery was verbal one-on-one education. This study demonstrates that there is a demand for preoperative education for patients who had lumbar surgery.

  1. [Preoperative assessment of lung disease patients.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gilson; Ramos Filho, José; Pereira, Edísio; Junqueira, Marcos; Assis, Carlos Henrique C

    2003-02-01

    Lung complications are the most frequent causes of postoperative morbidity-mortality, especially in lung disease patients. So, those patients should be preoperatively carefully evaluated and prepared, both clinically and laboratorially. This review aimed at determining surgical risk and at establishing preoperative procedures to minimize peri and postoperative morbidity-mortality in lung disease patients. Major anesthetic-surgical repercussions in lung function have already been described. Similarly, we tried to select higher-risk patients, submitted or not to lung resection. To that end, clinical and laboratorial propedeutics were used. Finally, a proposal of a preoperative algorithm was presented for procedures with lung resection. Lung disease patients, especially those with chronic evolution, need to be preoperatively thoroughly evaluated. ASA physical status and Goldmans cardiac index are important risk forecasting factors for lung disease patients not candidates for lung resection. Adding to these criteria, estimated postoperative max VO2, FEV1 and diffusion capacity are mandatory for some patients submitted to lung resection. beta2-agonists and steroids should be considered in the preoperative period of these patients.

  2. Composition of primary cosmic rays near the bend from a study of hadrons in air showers at sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mincer, A. I.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Goodman, J. A.; Tonwar, S. C.; Yodh, G. B.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Berley, D.

    1985-01-01

    Data on hadrons in air showers arriving at sea level were studied to find sensitivity to primary cosmic ray composition. The rate of showers which satisfy minimum shower density and hadron energy requirements as well as the rate of showers containing hadrons delayed with respect to the electron shower front are compared to Monte Carlo simulations. The data on the rate of total triggers and delayed hadrons are compared to predicted rates for two models of primary composition. The data are consistent with models which require an increasing heavy nuclei fraction near 10 to the 15th power eV. The spectra which are consistent with the observed rate are also compared to the observed shower size spectrum at sea level and mountain level.

  3. Evaluation and comparison of high-level microwave oven disinfection with chemical disinfection of dental gypsum casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghashri, K; Kumar, Prasanna; Prasad, D Krishna; Hegde, Rakshit

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare microwave disinfection with chemical disinfection of dental gypsum casts. A total of 120 casts were prepared from a silicone mold using Type III dental stone. Of the 120 casts, 60 casts were contaminated with 1 ml suspension of Staphylococcus aureus and 60 casts were contaminated with 1 ml suspension of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Then, the casts were disinfected with microwave irradiation and chemical disinfection using the microwave oven and 0.5% sodium hypochlorite. Bacteriologic procedures were performed; the cfu/ml for each cast was calculated as a weighted mean. The results were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. The untreated casts showed Brain heart infusion broth counts of 106 log cfu/ml compared to irradiated and chemically disinfected casts, in which 105 log reduction of cfu/ml was seen. These results satisfied the requirements of current infection control guidelines for the dental laboratory. The results obtained for chemical disinfection were in equivalence with microwave disinfection. Within the limitation of this in vitro study, it was found that microwave disinfection of casts for 5 min at 900 W gives high-level disinfection that complies with the current infection control guidelines for the dental laboratory and microwave disinfection method is an effective and validated method as chemical disinfection. How to cite the article: Meghashri K, Kumar P, Prasad DK, Hegde R. Evaluation and comparison of high-level microwave oven disinfection with chemical disinfection of dental gypsum casts. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):56-60 .

  4. A parameterization for the radio emission of air showers as predicted by CoREAS simulations and applied to LOFAR measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Nelles, Anna; Falcke, Heino; Hörandel, Jörg; Huege, Tim; Schellart, Pim

    2014-01-01

    Measuring radio emission from air showers provides excellent opportunities to directly measure all air shower properties, including the shower development. To exploit this in large-scale experiments, a simple and analytic parameterization of the distribution of the pulse power at ground level is needed. Data taken with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) show a complex two-dimensional pattern of pulse powers, which is sensitive to the shower geometry. Earlier parameterizations of the lateral signal distribution have proven insufficient to describe these data. In this article, we present a parameterization derived from air-shower simulations. We are able to fit the two-dimensional distribution with a double Gaussian, requiring five independent parameters. All parameters show strong correlations with air shower properties, such as the energy of the shower, the arrival direction, and the shower maximum. We successfully apply the parameterization to data taken with LOFAR and discuss implications for air shower experi...

  5. INFLUENCE OF PHYSICAL QUALITY CHANGES ON UV DISINFECTION OF WASTEWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Vaezi

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR has been accepted as an attractive alternative to chlorination for the disinfection of wastewater. In this study the effluent from Sahebgaranieh treatment plant was subjected to changes in UV transmission and turbidity in order to correlate these commonly measured parameters with the performance of a submerged -UV- reactor employed in disinfecting the effluent. Studies have shown successful performance of the reactor in disinfecting typical secondary effluents. Highly significant correlations are observed between TJV- transmission, turbidity, and the degree of coliforms inactivation which depend upon disinfection limit. Besides, the method was regarded suitable in disinfecting effluent samples, having suspended solids twice as much the discharge quality at disinfection detention time of 102 seconds. Average UV dosages ranged from 230 to 580 milliwatt - second per square centimeter.

  6. Reaction of silver nanoparticles in the disinfection process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhihua; Chen, Yunbin; Li, Tingting; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the dissolution, aggregation, and reaction kinetics of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with the three types of water disinfectants (ultraviolet, sodium hypochlorite, and ozone) under the different conditions of pH, ionic strength, or humic acid (HA). The physicochemical changes of AgNPs were measured by using UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer. The results showed that when AgNPs contacted the disinfectants, oxidative dissolution was the primary reaction. In addition, the reaction kinetics studies revealed that the reaction rate of AgNPs with disinfectants was significantly influenced by different disinfectants along with different pH and the presence of sodium nitrate and HA. Our research demonstrated the potential effect of disinfectants on AgNPs, which will improve our understanding of the fate of AgNPs in the disinfection processes in the water and wastewater treatment plant.

  7. Enhanced shower formation for 205 GeV positrons incident near crystalline axes in Ge and Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsener, K.; Moeller, S.P.; Petersen, J.B.B.; Uggerhoej, E.

    1988-10-06

    The formation of electromagnetic showers in single crystals has been investigated experimentally. The multiplicity of charged particles in the shower is deduced from the energy deposited in a semiconductor detector. The showers are found to develop much faster along axial directions than far from axes. Based on this effect, the construction of compact electromagnetic calorimeters for very high energy gamma rays, using aligned single crystals as converters, is suggested.

  8. 75 FR 49487 - Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... AGENCY Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray AGENCY: Environmental Protection... period for the draft document ``Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray'' (EPA.... ] ADDRESSES: The draft ``Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray'' is available...

  9. THE UPTAKE OF WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS INTO FOODS DURING HOME PROCESSING

    Science.gov (United States)

    A variety of organic compounds in tap water are produced as a result of disinfection process. Use of chlorine-containing chemicals for disinfection produces many disinfection by-products (DBPs) including trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles and haloacetic acid. Ozonation with secon...

  10. Silver-based Antibacterial Surfaces for Drinking Water Disinfection - An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risks associated with current disinfection techniques, including the formation of disinfection by-products and multi-drug resistant bacterial species, have prompted the exploration of advanced disinfection methods. One such technique employs silver nanoparticles incorporation on ...

  11. 40 CFR 141.64 - Maximum contaminant levels for disinfection byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in this paragraph (a): Disinfection byproduct Best available technology Bromate Control of ozone... source water: Disinfection byproduct Best available technology Total trihalomethanes (TTHM) and... disinfection byproducts. 141.64 Section 141.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  12. Pre-operative fasting guidelines: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søreide, E; Eriksson, L I; Hirlekar, G

    2005-01-01

    Liberal pre-operative fasting routines have been implemented in most countries. In general, clear fluids are allowed up to 2 h before anaesthesia, and light meals up to 6 h. The same recommendations apply for children and pregnant women not in labour. In children......Liberal pre-operative fasting routines have been implemented in most countries. In general, clear fluids are allowed up to 2 h before anaesthesia, and light meals up to 6 h. The same recommendations apply for children and pregnant women not in labour. In children...

  13. Water disinfecting; Desinfection d'eau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parisot, F

    2009-04-15

    The Soxitis equipment is an innovating alternative to the use of chemical products for disinfecting cooling tower circuits. This equipment is based on a higher temperature electrolysis of the salt molecules contained in water. Present electrodes (titanium, tungsten, silver, copper or gold) used in similar systems are limited in voltage to 1.5 V. The Soxitis electrode can sustain 3 V which enlarges the spectrum of chemical reactions: chloride, ozone, hydrogen peroxide, persulfates, per-carbonates and hydroxide radicals are produced. The combining effect of all these products generates a disinfecting effect 4 times as high as chloride alone. As a consequence Soxitis uses 4 times less salt than present equipment and releases less corrosive water in the system. (A.C.)

  14. Disinfection properties of some bovine teat dips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J S; Neave, F K; Westgarth, D R

    1977-02-01

    The efficacy of 18 disinfectant teat dips was tested on teats artificially contaminated with a milk suspension of Staphylococcus aureus. A solution of Na hypochlorite with 40 g/l available chlorine was significantly more bactericidal than one containing 1 g/1 available chlorine and than most other disinfectants tested. The method was not able to distinguish differences in efficacy between solution containing 40g/1 and 10g/1 available chlorine nor between these and some of the iodophors containing 5 g/1 available iodine. The additon of 190-416 g/1 (15-33% v/v) glycerol significantly reduced the bactericidal properties of 3 iodophors (5 g/1 available iodine), but soluble lanolin at approximately 20 g/1 did not appear to lower the efficiency of NaOC1 (45 g/1 available chlorine) or of an iodophor (5 g/1 available iodine).

  15. Proteomic adaptations to starvation prepare Escherichia coli for disinfection tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhe; Nandakumar, Renu; Nickerson, Kenneth W; Li, Xu

    2015-02-01

    Despite the low nutrient level and constant presence of secondary disinfectants, bacterial re-growth still occurs in drinking water distribution systems. The molecular mechanisms that starved bacteria use to survive low-level chlorine-based disinfectants are not well understood. The objective of this study is to investigate these molecular mechanisms at the protein level that prepare starved cells for disinfection tolerance. Two commonly used secondary disinfectants chlorine and monochloramine, both at 1 mg/L, were used in this study. The proteomes of normal and starved Escherichia coli (K12 MG1655) cells were studied using quantitative proteomics. Over 60-min disinfection, starved cells showed significantly higher disinfection tolerance than normal cells based on the inactivation curves for both chlorine and monochloramine. Proteomic analyses suggest that starvation may prepare cells for the oxidative stress that chlorine-based disinfection will cause by affecting glutathione metabolism. In addition, proteins involved in stress regulation and stress responses were among the ones up-regulated under both starvation and chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. By comparing the fold changes under different conditions, it is suggested that starvation prepares E. coli for disinfection tolerance by increasing the expression of enzymes that can help cells survive chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. Protein co-expression analyses show that proteins in glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway that were up-regulated under starvation are also involved in disinfection tolerance. Finally, the production and detoxification of methylglyoxal may be involved in the chlorine-based disinfection and cell defense mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Disinfectant effect of Methylated Ethanol against Listeria species

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to determine the disinfectant effect of Methylated spirit® (95% methanol and 5% ethanol) as a teat dip against Listeria species. Hand milking was employed to collect 576 (288 x 2) raw milk samples from different lactating cows within Sokoto metropolis (Nigeria). 288 samples were collected before disinfecting the udder teats with Methylated spirit®, while the other 288 were collected after disinfection with Methylated spirit®. The ...

  17. Influence of ultrasound enhancement on chlorine dioxide consumption and disinfection by-products formation for secondary effluents disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Zhao, Junyuan; Li, Zifu; Lan, Juanru; Li, Yajie; Yang, Xin; Wang, Dongling

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) has been promoted as an alternative disinfectant because of its high disinfection efficiency and less formation of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs). However, particle-associated microorganisms could be protected during the disinfection process, which decreases the disinfection efficiency or increases the required dosage. Besides, the formation of inorganic disinfection by-products is a significant concern in environment health. Ultrasound (US)-combined disinfection methods are becoming increasingly attractive because they are efficient and environmentally friendly. In this study, US was introduced as an enhancement method to identify its influence on ClO2 demand reduction and to minimize the production of potential DBPs for secondary effluents disinfection. Fecal coliform was used as an indicator, and DBPs, including trichloromethane (TCM), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), chlorite (ClO2(-)), and chlorate (ClO3(-)), were analyzed to observe the potential DBPs formation. Results show that US pretreatment could reduce half of ClO2 dosage compared with ClO2 disinfection alone for the same disinfection efficiency, and that an input power density of 2.64 kJ/L pretreatment with the 1.5mg/L ClO2 was enough to meet the discharge requirement in China (i.e., fecal coliform below 1000 CFU/L for Class 1A) for secondary effluent disinfection, and the ClO2(-) concentration in the disinfection effluent was only 1.37 mg/L at the same time. Furthermore, the different effects of US on the two processes (US as pretreatment and simultaneous US/ClO2 disinfection) were also analyzed, including deagglomerating, cell damage, and synergistic disinfection as well as degasing/sonolysis. It was proved that the production of TCM, DCAA, and TCAA was insignificantly influenced with the introduction of US, but US pretreatment did reduce the production of ClO2(-) and ClO3(-) effectually. In general, US pretreatment could be a better option for

  18. Field trial evaluation of premilking teat disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankey, J W; Wildman, E E; Drechsler, P A; Hogan, J S

    1987-04-01

    Efficacy of premiliking teat disinfection (predipping) with good udder preparation was compared with good udder preparation alone on four well-managed, commercial dairy farms. Three teat dip formulations containing iodophor were used for predipping. Predipping reduced the rate of intramammary infection with major mastitis pathogens approximately 54%. Infection rate with esculin-positive streptococci and coliforms was reduced more than 51%. Udder infections with coagulase-negative staphylococci were not controlled by predipping.

  19. Detailed studies of the electron lateral distribution in extensive air showers with energies around 10(16) eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzikowski, T.; Gawin, J.; Wdowczyk, J.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed studies have been performed of the electron lateral distribution in extensive air showers using the Lodz extensive air shower array. The showers were grouped according to their particle densities around 20 m from the core. The grouping was made in very narrow intervals of the densities. For every group of showers and for every distance interval /changing by 5 m/ histograms of the numbers of electron counters discharged have been obtained. The trays of G.M counters were located at following distances from the center of the triggering detectors array: 16 m, 76 m, 117 m, 137 m, 141 m and 147 m.

  20. Hand disinfection in hospitals - benefits and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Günter; Löffler, Harald

    2010-12-01

    The WHO regards hand hygiene as an essential tool for the prevention of noso-comial infections. The hygienic hand disinfection has a superior antimicrobial efficacy compared to hand washing and should be performed as the treatment of choice before and after a variety of activities at the point of patient care. Washing hands should be preferred when the hands are visibly soiled. Skin irritation is quite common among healthcare workers and is mainly caused by water, soap and long lasting occlusion. Compliance with hand disinfection in clinical practice is often low. Measures to improve compliance include training, provision of hand rubs where they are needed, and the responsibility of doctors to set a good example. Improved compliance in hand hygiene and targeted use of alcohol-based hand rubs can reduce the nosocomial infection rate by up to 40 %. The benefit of hand disinfection is therefore much larger than possible risks. © The Authors • Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  1. Evaluation of toothbrush disinfection via different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basman, Adil; Peker, Ilkay; Akca, Gulcin; Alkurt, Meryem Toraman; Sarikir, Cigdem; Celik, Irem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of using a dishwasher or different chemical agents, including 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate, 2% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), a mouthrinse containing essential oils and alcohol, and 50% white vinegar, for toothbrush disinfection. Sixty volunteers were divided into five experimental groups and one control group (n = 10). Participants brushed their teeth using toothbrushes with standard bristles, and they disinfected the toothbrushes according to instructed methods. Bacterial contamination of the toothbrushes was compared between the experimental groups and the control group. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Duncan's multiple range tests, with 95% confidence intervals for multiple comparisons. Bacterial contamination of toothbrushes from individuals in the experimental groups differed from those in the control group (p method for elimination of all tested bacterial species was 50% white vinegar, followed in order by 2% NaOCl, mouthrinse containing essential oils and alcohol, 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate, dishwasher use, and tap water (control). The results of this study show that the most effective method for disinfecting toothbrushes was submersion in 50% white vinegar, which is cost-effective, easy to access, and appropriate for household use.

  2. Evaluation of toothbrush disinfection via different methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil BASMAN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of using a dishwasher or different chemical agents, including 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate, 2% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, a mouthrinse containing essential oils and alcohol, and 50% white vinegar, for toothbrush disinfection. Sixty volunteers were divided into five experimental groups and one control group (n = 10. Participants brushed their teeth using toothbrushes with standard bristles, and they disinfected the toothbrushes according to instructed methods. Bacterial contamination of the toothbrushes was compared between the experimental groups and the control group. Data were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Duncan's multiple range tests, with 95% confidence intervals for multiple comparisons. Bacterial contamination of toothbrushes from individuals in the experimental groups differed from those in the control group (p < 0.05. The most effective method for elimination of all tested bacterial species was 50% white vinegar, followed in order by 2% NaOCl, mouthrinse containing essential oils and alcohol, 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate, dishwasher use, and tap water (control. The results of this study show that the most effective method for disinfecting toothbrushes was submersion in 50% white vinegar, which is cost-effective, easy to access, and appropriate for household use.

  3. Effects of disinfectants in renal dialysis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, E.

    1986-11-01

    Patients receiving hemodialysis therapy risk exposure to both disinfectants and sterilants. Dialysis equipment is disinfected periodically with strong solutions of hypochlorite or formaldehyde. Gross hemolysis resulting from accidental hypochlorite infusion has led to cardiac arrest, probably as a result of hyperkalemia. Formaldehyde is commonly used in 4% solutions to sterilize the fluid paths of dialysis controllers and to sterilize dialyzers before reuse. It can react with red cell antigenic surfaces leading to the formation of anti-N antibodies. The major exposure risk is the low concentration of disinfectant found in municipal water used to prepare 450 L dialysate weekly. With thrice-weekly treatment schedules, the quality requirements for water used to make this solution must be met rigorously. Standards for water used in the preparation of dialysate have recently been proposed but not all patients are treated with dialysate meeting such standards. The introduction of sterilants via tap water is insidious and has let to more pervasive consequences. Both chlorine and chloramines, at concentrations found in potable water, are strong oxidants that cause extensive protein denaturation and hemolysis. Oxidation of the Fe/sup 2 +/ in hemoglobin to Fe/sup 3 +/ forms methemoglobin, which is incapable of carrying either O/sub 2/ or CO/sub 2/. Chloramine can form not only methemoglobin, but can also denature proteins within the red cell, thus forming aggregates (Heinz bodies). Chloramines also inhibit hexose monophosphate shunt activity, a mechanism that makes the red cell even more susceptible to oxidant damage.

  4. Spiral-shaped reactor for water disinfection

    KAUST Repository

    Soukane, Sofiane

    2016-04-20

    Chlorine-based processes are still widely used for water disinfection. The disinfection process for municipal water consumption is usually carried out in large tanks, specifically designed to verify several hydraulic and disinfection criteria. The hydrodynamic behavior of contact tanks of different shapes, each with an approximate total volume of 50,000 m3, was analyzed by solving turbulent momentum transport equations with a computational fluid dynamics code, namely ANSYS fluent. Numerical experiments of a tracer pulse were performed for each design to generate flow through curves and investigate species residence time distribution for different inlet flow rates, ranging from 3 to 12 m3 s−1. A new nature-inspired Conch tank design whose shape follows an Archimedean spiral was then developed. The spiral design is shown to strongly outperform the other tanks’ designs for all the selected plug flow criteria with an enhancement in efficiency, less short circuiting, and an order of magnitude improvement in mixing and dispersion. Moreover, following the intensification philosophy, after 50% reduction in its size, the new design retains its properties and still gives far better results than the classical shapes.

  5. The catheter hub disinfection cap as esophageal foreign body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Kareem O; Myer, Charles M; Shikary, Tasneem; Goldschneider, Kenneth R

    2015-12-01

    Disinfection caps are increasingly being used to prevent catheter-associated bloodstream infections. These devices, designed for continuous passive disinfection of catheter hubs, are typically small and often brightly colored. As such, they have the potential to become pediatric airway and esophageal foreign bodies. We report two patients who developed esophageal foreign body following ingestion of disinfection caps. Given the increasing use of these devices, it is imperative that health care providers be aware of this potential iatrogenic problem. We propose that the use of disinfection caps may not be appropriate in pediatric patients with risk factors for foreign body ingestion.

  6. Current and emergent strategies for disinfection of hospital environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Ana C; Tavares, Rafaela R; Borges, Anabela; Mergulhão, Filipe; Simões, Manuel

    2013-12-01

    A significant number of hospital-acquired infections occur due to inefficient disinfection of hospital surfaces, instruments and rooms. The emergence and wide spread of multiresistant forms of several microorganisms has led to a situation where few compounds are able to inhibit or kill the infectious agents. Several strategies to disinfect both clinical equipment and the environment are available, often involving the use of antimicrobial chemicals. More recently, investigations into gas plasma, antimicrobial surfaces and vapour systems have gained interest as promising alternatives to conventional disinfectants. This review provides updated information on the current and emergent disinfection strategies for clinical environments.

  7. Bacterial spores survive treatment with commercial sterilants and disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagripanti, J L; Bonifacino, A

    1999-09-01

    This study compared the activity of commercial liquid sterilants and disinfectants on Bacillus subtilis spores deposited on three types of devices made of noncorrodible, corrodible, or polymeric material. Products like Renalin, Exspor, Wavicide-01, Cidexplus, and cupric ascorbate were tested under conditions specified for liquid sterilization. These products, at the shorter times indicated for disinfection, and popular disinfectants, like Clorox, Cavicide, and Lysol were also studied. Data obtained with a sensitive and quantitative test suggest that commercial liquid sterilants and disinfectants are less effective on contaminated surfaces than generally acknowledged.

  8. Resistance to chemical disinfection under conditions of microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchin, George L.

    1998-01-01

    In unit gravity, bacteria and disinfecting resin beads co-sediment to the septum in a fluid processing apparatus (FPA) resulting in effective chemical disinfection. In microgravity bacteria in suspension have access to a larger volume of the FPA because of a lack of sedimentation. Further, when disinfecting resin beads are added to the FPA they also remain in suspension reducing their effective concentration. Typically, therefore, disinfection experiments in microgravity return larger numbers of viable bacteria than ground-based controls. Preliminary experiments aboard the MIR Space Station with Pseudomonas aeruginosa additionally suggest that the longer bacteria are retained in microgravity the more resistant they become to chemical disinfection. This phenomenon is probably due to additional time to develop resistant biofilms on the interior of the FPA. To partially solve these problems we have developed additional disinfecting materials to use in conjunction with polyiodide containing resin beads. One of these materials carbon beads coated with 3-trimethoxy silylpropyl dimethyloctadecyl ammonium chloride (Dow-Corning 5700®), acts synergistically with polyiodide resin disinfectants. Carbon beads so treated are still able to remove aqueous iodine from the water stream while providing an additional level of chemical disinfection. This additional capability prevents contamination of the carbon beads with heterotrophic bacteria and insures that bacteria surviving iodine disinfection are efficiently devitalized.

  9. Impact of food disinfection on beneficial biothiol contents in vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Zhimin; Demirkol, Omca; Ercal, Nuran; Adams, Craig

    2005-12-14

    In this work we investigated the impact of food disinfection on the beneficial biothiol contents in a suite of vegetables consumed daily, including spinach, green bean, asparagus, cucumber, and red pepper. Four disinfection technologies commonly studied and/or used in food processing and preservation, including hydrogen peroxide, free chlorine, and gaseous- and aqueous-phase ozone, were examined with common dosages and contact times. Results indicate that the common disinfection technologies may result in significant loss of beneficial biothiols in vegetables which are essentially important to human health. For example, as much as 70% of biothiols were lost when spinach was treated with hydrogen peroxide (5.0 wt %) for 30 min. Approximately 48-54% of biothiols were destroyed by free chlorine and gaseous- and aqueous-phase ozone under typical contacting conditions. In red pepper, about 60-71% of reduced glutathione was oxidized by the disinfectants. The potential decrease in biothiols during disinfection was dependent upon the biothiol type, the disinfectant, and the vegetable. The effectiveness of total bacterial inactivation by the four disinfection technologies was concurrently evaluated. Results show that free chlorine is most effective, achieving disinfection efficiencies of greater than 4 log for all study vegetables. This study may provide important information for the food industry to design optimum contacting methods for vegetables to simultaneously achieve sufficient bacterial disinfection while minimizing loss of beneficial biothiols.

  10. Production of various disinfection byproducts in indoor swimming pool waters treated with different disinfection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin; Jun, Myung-Jin; Lee, Man-Ho; Lee, Min-Hwan; Eom, Seog-Won; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the concentrations of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including trihalomethanes (THMs; chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform), haloacetic acids (HAAs; dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid), haloacetonitriles (HANs; dichloroacetonitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, bromochloroacetonitrile, and dibromoacetonitrile), and chloral hydrate (CH) were measured in 86 indoor swimming pools in Seoul, Korea, treated using different disinfection methods, such as chlorine, ozone and chlorine, and a technique that uses electrochemically generated mixed oxidants (EGMOs). The correlations between DBPs and other environmental factors such as with total organic carbon (TOC), KMnO(4) consumption, free residual chlorine, pH, and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) in the pools were examined. The geometric mean concentrations of total DBPs in swimming pool waters were 183.1±2.5μg/L, 32.6±2.1μg/L, and 139.9±2.4μg/L in pools disinfected with chlorine, ozone/chlorine, and EGMO, respectively. The mean concentrations of total THMs (TTHMs), total HAAs (THAAs), total HANs (THANs), and CH differed significantly depending on the disinfection method used (P<0.01). Interestingly, THAAs concentrations were the highest, followed by TTHMs, CH, and THANs in all swimming pools regardless of disinfection method. TOC showed a good correlation with the concentrations of DBPs in all swimming pools (chlorine; r=0.82, P<0.01; ozone/chlorine; r=0.52, P<0.01, EGMO; r=0.39, P<0.05). In addition, nitrate was positively correlated with the concentrations of total DBPs in swimming pools disinfected with chlorine and ozone/chlorine (chlorine; r=0.58; ozone/chlorine; r=0.60, P<0.01), whereas was negative correlated with the concentrations of total DBPs (r=-0.53, P<0.01) in the EGMO-treated pools.

  11. PREOPERATIVE ENDOSCOPIC MARKING OF UNPALPABLE COLONIC TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Goncharov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of small colon lesions is one of the major problems in laparoscopic colonic resection.Research objective: to develop a technique of visualization of small tumors of a colon by preoperative endoscopic marking of a tumor.Materials and methods. In one day prior to operation to the patient after bowel preparation the colonoscopy is carried out. In the planned point near tumor on antimesentery edge the submucous infiltration of marking solution (Micky Sharpz blue tattoo pigment, UK is made. The volume of entered solution of 1–3 ml. In only 5 months of use of a technique preoperative marking to 14 patients with small (the size of 1–3 cm malignant tumors of the left colon is performed.Results. The tattoo mark was well visualized by during operation at 13 of 14 patients. In all cases we recorded no complications. Time of operation with preoperative marking averaged 108 min, that is significantly less in comparison with average time of operation with an intra-operative colonoscopy – 155 min (р < 0.001.Conclusions. The first experience of preoperative endoscopic marking of non palpable small tumors of a colon is encouraging. Performance of a technique wasn't accompanied by complications and allowed to reduce significantly time of operation and to simplify conditions of performance of operation.

  12. Preoperative exercise training to improve postoperative outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenet, K.

    2017-01-01

    It is common knowledge that better preoperative physical fitness is associated with better postoperative outcomes. However, as a result of aging of the population and improved surgical and anaesthesia techniques, the proportion of frail patients with decreased physical fitness levels undergoing majo

  13. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  14. Preoperative evaluation : risk management and implementation aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, W.A. van

    2002-01-01

    In preoperative risk management the anesthesiologist uses diagnostic information to estimate the probability of outcomes and to decide on the anesthetic strategy in a particular patient. The aim of this thesis was explore to what extent simple patient characteristics, particularly obtained from

  15. Pre-operative fasting guidelines: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søreide, E; Eriksson, L I; Hirlekar, G

    2005-01-01

    Liberal pre-operative fasting routines have been implemented in most countries. In general, clear fluids are allowed up to 2 h before anaesthesia, and light meals up to 6 h. The same recommendations apply for children and pregnant women not in labour. In children...

  16. Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  17. Preoperative and intraoperative continuous use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-13

    Sep 13, 2016 ... in clinics to improve patient safety and effectiveness with. Introduction ... and control group according to different use of drugs. The two ... Key words: Anesthesia, dexmedetomidine, effect, intervention, preoperative, recovery, remifentanil .... will lead to postoperative pain in patients and severe agitation after ...

  18. Preoperational test, vent building ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-20

    Preoperational Test Procedure for Vent Building Ventilation System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The Vent Building ventilation system provides ventilation, heating, cooling, and zone confinement control for the W-030 Project Vent Building. The tests verify correct System operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control system.

  19. Preoperative evaluation : risk management and implementation aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, W.A. van

    2002-01-01

    In preoperative risk management the anesthesiologist uses diagnostic information to estimate the probability of outcomes and to decide on the anesthetic strategy in a particular patient. The aim of this thesis was explore to what extent simple patient characteristics, particularly obtained from preo

  20. A Radio Air-Shower Test Array (RASTA) for IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Böser, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we explore the possibility to complement the cosmic ray physics program of the IceCube observatory with an extended surface array of radio antennas. The combination of air-shower sampling on the surface and muon calorimetry underground offers significant scientifc potential: the neutrino sensitivity above the horizon can be enhanced by vetoing air-showers on the ground, photon-induced air-showers can be identifed by their small muon component and the coincident measurement of the particle density on the surface and the muon component gives useful information on the composition of the primary flux. All of these analyses are pursued with the existing IceTop array. However, the IceTop footprint is small compared to the acceptance of the InIce sensor array, which severely limits the solid angle for coincident measurements, calling for an extended surface air-shower detector. As demonstrated by the LOPES experiment, measuring air-showers through their geosynchrotron emission has become a viable and c...

  1. Investigating cosmic rays and air shower physics with IceCube/IceTop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dembinski Hans

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available IceCube is a cubic-kilometer detector in the deep ice at South Pole. Its square-kilometer surface array, IceTop, is located at 2800 m altitude. IceTop is large and dense enough to cover the cosmic-ray energy spectrum from PeV to EeV energies with a remarkably small systematic uncertainty, thanks to being close to the shower maximum. The experiment offers new insights into hadronic physics of air showers by observing three components: the electromagnetic signal at the surface, GeV muons in the periphery of the showers, and TeV muons in the deep ice. The cosmic-ray flux is measured with the surface signal. The mass composition is extracted from the energy loss of TeV muons observed in the deep ice in coincidence with signals at the surface. The muon lateral distribution is obtained from GeV muons identified in surface signals in the periphery of the shower. The energy spectrum of the most energetic TeV muons is also under study, as well as special events with laterally separated TeV muon tracks which originate from high-pT TeV muons. A combination of all these measurements opens the possibility to perform powerful new tests of hadronic interaction models used to simulate air showers. The latest results will be reviewed from this perspective.

  2. Measurement of horizontal air showers with the Auger Engineering Radio Array

    CERN Document Server

    Kambeitz, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA), at the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina, measures the radio emission of extensive air showers in the 30-80 MHz frequency range. AERA consists of more than 150 antenna stations distributed over 17 km$^2$. Together with the Auger surface detector, the fluorescence detector and the under-ground muon detector (AMIGA), AERA is able to measure cosmic rays with energies above 10$^{17}$ eV in a hybrid detection mode. AERA is optimized for the detection of air showers up to 60$^{\\circ}$ zenith angle, however, using the reconstruction of horizontal air showers with the Auger surface array, very inclined showers can also be measured. In this contribution an analysis of the AERA data in the zenith angle range from 62$^{\\circ}$ to 80$^{\\circ}$ will be presented. CoREAS simulations predict radio emission footprints of several km$^2$ for horizontal air showers, which are now confirmed by AERA measurements. This can lead to radio-based composition measurements and energy determi...

  3. Jet Hadronization via Recombination of Parton Showers in Vacuum and in Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Rainer J.; Han, Kyongchol; Ko, Che Ming

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a hadronization algorithm for jet parton showers based on a hybrid approach involving recombination of quarks and fragmentation of strings. The algorithm can be applied to parton showers from a shower Monte Carlo generator at the end of their perturbative evolution. The algorithm forces gluon decays and then evaluates the recombination probabilities for quark-antiquark pairs into mesons and (anti)quark triplets into (anti)baryons. We employ a Wigner phase space formulation based on the assumption of harmonic oscillator wave functions for stable hadrons and resonances. Partons too isolated in phase space to find recombination partners are connected by QCD strings to other quarks. Fragmentation of those remnant strings and the decay of all hadron resonances complete the hadronization process. We find that our model applied to parton showers from the PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generator leads to results very similar to pure Lund string fragmentation. We suggest that our algorithm can be readily generalized to jets embedded in quark-gluon plasma by adding sampled thermal partons from the phase transition hypersurface. The recombination of thermal partons and shower partons leads to an enhancement of pions and protons at intermediate momentum at both RHIC and LHC.

  4. An attempt to identify the muonic and electromagnetic components of extensive showers in water Cherenkov detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Marcio Aparecido; Chinellato, Jose Augusto [Universidade de Campinas (IFGW/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Gleb Wataghin

    2011-07-01

    Full text: One of the purposes of the Pierre Auger Collaboration is to study the mass composition of primary cosmic rays. When a cosmic ray collides in the upper atmosphere, depending on the mass composition, we have different numbers of mesons being produced and therefore different amounts of muons at detector level. For example, showers initiated by proton have less muons than showers initiated by iron nucleus. If we can select the muon signal in Cherenkov tanks, we might be able to infer primary composition. To achieve this goal, we will use the so-called 'Muon Jump Method', which aims to discriminate muons from the electromagnetic component, based on the time structure of their FADC signal. Muons produces on average more signal than electrons or gammas and they induce spiky signals whereas the electromagnetic component produce a continuum of small peaks in the FADC traces. Using this information, we estimate the number of particles for each component, by setting filters the time distribution of the shower front. Therefore, we can infer the primary mass composition. Another important point of this study is to compare the predictions of the hadronic interaction models for each component of the shower front. We present an introduction to the main aspects of the 'Muon Jump Method' as well as some preliminary results we achieved by simulating air showers, reconstructing their main features and filtering the signals of each component. (author)

  5. A phenomenological model of the muon density profile on the ground of very inclined air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, H. P.; Billoir, P.; Deligny, O.; Hebbeker, T.

    2010-09-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays generate extensive air showers in Earth's atmosphere. A standard approach to reconstruct the energy of an ultra-high energy cosmic rays is to sample the lateral profile of the particle density on the ground of the air shower with an array of surface detectors. For cosmic rays with large inclinations, this reconstruction is based on a model of the lateral profile of the muon density observed on the ground, which is fitted to the observed muon densities in individual surface detectors. The best models for this task are derived from detailed Monte-Carlo simulations of the air shower development. We present a phenomenological parametrization scheme which allows to derive a model of the average lateral profile of the muon density directly from a fit to a set of individual Monte-Carlo simulated air showers. The model reproduces the detailed simulations with a high precision. As an example, we generate a muon density model which is valid in the energy range 10 18 eV < E < 10 20 eV and the zenith angle range 60°<θ<90°. We will further demonstrate a way to speed up the simulation of such muon profiles by three orders of magnitude, if only the muons in the shower are of interest.

  6. The wavefront of the radio signal emitted by cosmic ray air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Fuchs, B; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing measurements of the LOPES antenna array together with corresponding CoREAS simulations for more than 300 measured events with energy above $10^{17}$eV and zenith angles smaller than $45^\\circ$, we find that the radio wavefront of cosmic-ray air showers is of hyperbolic shape. At axis distances $\\gtrsim 50$m, the wavefront can be approximated by a simple cone. According to the simulations, the cone angle is clearly correlated with the shower maximum. Thus, we confirm earlier predictions that arrival time measurements can be used to study the longitudinal shower development, but now using a realistic wavefront. Moreover, we show that the hyperbolic wavefront is compatible with our measurement, and we present several experimental indications that the cone angle is indeed sensitive to the shower development. Consequently, the wavefront can be used to statistically study the primary composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. At LOPES, the experimentally achieved precision for the shower maximum is lim...

  7. ACTION OF NEWER DISINFECTANTS ON MULTIDRUG RESISTANT BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipasa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current procedures for infection control in hospital environments have not been successful in curbing the rise in infections by multi-drug-resistant (MDR pathogens. Emergence of resistance to chemical disinfectants is increasing steadily and has been reported worldwide. So prevention of multidrug-resistant health care associated infections (HAI has become a priority issue and great challenge to clinicians. This requires appropriate sterilization and disinfection procedures and strict adherence to protocol in infection control policy. There is a need to evaluate the efficacy of newer disinfectants which have come into the market for better control of HAI. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare disinfection efficacy of three newer disinfectants– Novacide (didecyldimethylammonium chloride and polyhexamethylene biguanide, Silvicide a strong oxidizing agent (hydrogen peroxide and silver nitrate and Virkon, a powerful oxidizing agent (a stabilized blend of peroxygen compounds and potassium salts, pitting them against two time-honored conventional disinfectants phenol and lysol and testing them against common MDR clinical isolates, reference strains and spores. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All the disinfectants at different dilutions were tested for bactericidal efficacy by liquid suspension time-kill tests. A heavy initial microbial load was simulated by preparing bacterial inoculum. Numbers of viable cells were counted and reduction in microbial colony counts before and after disinfectant exposure was expressed as log reduction. RESULTS: Among the disinfectants, Novacide was most effective. All clinical MDR bacterial isolates and reference strains were killed within 30 seconds of exposure at 0.156% solution, whereas spores got killed after 30 minutes of exposure at 2.5% solution which is the recommended concentration. For Silvicide all vegetative bacteria were killed at 5% solution after 20 minutes contact time

  8. A discrimination technique for extensive air showers based on multiscale, lacunarity and neural network analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaro, Antonio; D'Alí Staiti, G.; D'Anna, F.

    2011-03-01

    We present a new method for the identification of extensive air showers initiated by different primaries. The method uses the multiscale concept and is based on the analysis of multifractal behaviour and lacunarity of secondary particle distributions together with a properly designed and trained artificial neural network. In the present work the method is discussed and applied to a set of fully simulated vertical showers, in the experimental framework of ARGO-YBJ, to obtain hadron to gamma primary separation. We show that the presented approach gives very good results, leading, in the 1-10 TeV energy range, to a clear improvement of the discrimination power with respect to the existing figures for extended shower detectors.

  9. A discrimination technique for extensive air showers based on multiscale, lacunarity and neural network analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliaro, Antonio, E-mail: pagliaro@ifc.inaf.it [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo - Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); D' Ali Staiti, G. [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); D' Anna, F. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo - Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    We present a new method for the identification of extensive air showers initiated by different primaries. The method uses the multiscale concept and is based on the analysis of multifractal behaviour and lacunarity of secondary particle distributions together with a properly designed and trained artificial neural network. In the present work the method is discussed and applied to a set of fully simulated vertical showers, in the experimental framework of ARGO-YBJ, to obtain hadron to gamma primary separation. We show that the presented approach gives very good results, leading, in the 1-10 TeV energy range, to a clear improvement of the discrimination power with respect to the existing figures for extended shower detectors.

  10. a Multiscale, Lacunarity and Neural Network Method for γ/h Discrimination in Extensive Air Showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaro, A.; D'Anna, F.; D'Alí Staiti, G.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a new method for the identification of extensive air showers initiated by different primaries. The method uses the multiscale concept and is based on the analysis of multifractal behaviour and lacunarity of secondary particle distributions together with a properly designed and trained artificial neural network. The separation technique is particularly suited for being applied when the topology of the particle distribution in the shower front is as largely detailed as possible. In the present work the method is discussed and applied in the experimental framework of ARGO-YBJ, to obtain hadron to gamma primary separation. We show that the presented approach gives very good results, leading, in the 1 - 10 Tev energy range, to a clear improvement of the discrimination power with respect to the existing figures for extended shower detectors.

  11. The time development of hadronic showers and the T3B experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldner, Christian

    2013-06-06

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) is a future linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operated at a center of mass energy of up to 3 TeV and with a collision rate of particle bunches of up to 2 GHz. This poses challenging requirements on the detector system. The accumulation of background events, such as {gamma}{gamma}{yields}hadrons resulting from Beamstrahlung, must be minimized through a precise time stamping capability in all subdetector systems. In the event reconstruction, the energy depositions within the calorimeters will be used to assign events precisely to a small set of consecutive bunch crossings. The finite time evolution of hadronic showers, on the other hand, requires an extended integration time to achieve a satisfactory energy resolution in the calorimeter. The energy resolution is also deteriorated by the leakage of shower particles. Tungsten is foreseen as dense absorber material, but the time evolution of hadron showers within such a calorimeter is not sufficiently explored yet. In the context of this thesis, the T3B experiment (short for Tungsten Timing Test Beam) was designed and constructed. It is optimized to measure the time development and the contribution of delayed energy depositions within hadronic cascades. The T3B experiment consists of 15 scintillator cells assembled in a strip. The scintillation light generated within the cells is detected by novel silicon photomultiplier whose signal is read out with fast oscilloscopes providing a sampling rate of 1.25 GHz. This strip was positioned behind two different calorimeter prototypes of the CALICE collaboration which use a tungsten and steel (for comparison) absorber structure. T3B was part of the CALICE test beam campaign 2010/2011 carried out at the PS and SPS at CERN and acquired data on hadronic showers in an energy range of 2-300 GeV. A test beam optimized data acquisition software was developed from scratch. With the development and application of a novel waveform decomposition algorithm

  12. Atmospheric profiles at the southern Pierre Auger Observatory and their relevance to air shower measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keilhauer, B.; Bluemer, J.; Engel, R.; Gora, D.; Homola, P.; Klages, H.; Pekala, J.; Risse, M.; Unger, M.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.

    2005-07-01

    The dependence of atmospheric conditions on altitude and time have to be known at the site of an air shower experiment for accurate reconstruction of extensive air showers and their simulations. The height-profile of atmospheric depth is of particular interest as it enters directly into the reconstruction of longitudinal shower development and of the primary energy and mass of cosmic rays. For the southern part of the Auger Observatory, the atmosphere has been investigated in a number of campaigns with meteorological radio soundings and with continuous measurements of ground-based weather stations. Focusing on atmospheric depth and temperature profiles, temporal variations are described and monthly profiles are developed. Uncertainties of the monthly atmospheres that are currently applied in the Auger reconstruction are discussed.

  13. Reconstruction of inclined air showers detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Aab, A; Aglietta, M; Ahlers, M; Ahn, E J; Samarai, I Al; Albuquerque, I F M; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Almela, A; Castillo, J Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Batista, R Alves; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Aramo, C; Arqueros, F; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avenier, M; Avila, G; Badescu, A M; Barber, K B; Bäuml, J; Baus, C; Beatty, J J; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Berat, C; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanco, F; Blanco, M; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brancus, I; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Buscemi, M; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caccianiga, B; Caccianiga, L; Candusso, M; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chavez, A G; Cheng, S H; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chudoba, J; Cilmo, M; Clay, R W; Cocciolo, G; Colalillo, R; Collica, L; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cooper, M J; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dallier, R; Daniel, B; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; de Jong, S J; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Oliveira, J; de Souza, V; del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Dembinski, H; Dhital, N; Di Giulio, C; Di Matteo, A; Diaz, J C; Castro, M L D\\'\\iaz; Diep, P N; Diogo, F; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Hasankiadeh, Q Dorosti; Dova, M T; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Erfani, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Falcke, H; Fang, K; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Fernandes, M; Fick, B; Figueira, J M; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fox, B D; Fratu, O; Fröhlich, U; Fuchs, B; Fuji, T; Gaior, R; Garc\\'\\ia, B; Roca, S T Garcia; Garcia-Gamez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garilli, G; Bravo, A Gascon; Gate, F; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giammarchi, M; Giller, M; Glaser, C; Glass, H; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Vitale, P F Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Gonzalez, J G; Gookin, B; Gorgi, A; Gorham, P; Gouffon, P; Grebe, S; Griffith, N; Grillo, A F; Grubb, T D; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harrison, T A; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Heimann, P; Herve, A E; Hill, G C; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holt, E; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horvath, P; Hrabovský, M; Huber, D; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Isar, P G; Islo, K; Jandt, I; Jansen, S; Jarne, C; Josebachuili, M; Kääpä, A; Kambeitz, O; Kampert, K H; Kasper, P; Katkov, I; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Keivani, A; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Krause, R; Krohm, N; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuempel, D; Kunka, N; La Rosa, G; LaHurd, D; Latronico, L; Lauer, R; Lauscher, M; Lautridou, P; Coz, S Le; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; López, R; Agëra, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lu, L; Lucero, A; Ludwig, M; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Malacari, M; Maldera, S; Maller, J; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, V; Mariş, I C; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martin, L; Martinez, H; Bravo, O Mart\\'\\inez; Martraire, D; Meza, J J Mas\\'\\ias; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Matthews, A J; Matthews, J; Matthiae, G; Maurel, D; Maurizio, D; Mayotte, E; Mazur, P O; Medina, C; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Messina, S; Meyhandan, R; Mićanović, S; Micheletti, M I; Middendorf, L; Minaya, I A; Miramonti, L; Mitrica, B; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morello, C; Moreno, J C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Muller, M A; Müller, G; Münchmeyer, M; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Newton, D; Niechciol, M; Niemietz, L; Niggemann, T; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Novotny, V; Nožka, L; Ochilo, L; Olinto, A; Oliveira, M; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Palmieri, N; Papenbreer, P; Parente, G; Parra, A; Pastor, S; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Peters, C; Petrera, S; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Plum, M; Porcelli, A; Porowski, C; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Purrello, V; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Quinn, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rizi, V; Roberts, J; de Carvalho, W Rodrigues; Cabo, I Rodriguez; Fernandez, G Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodr\\'\\iguez-Fr\\'\\ias, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Rühle, C; Saffi, S J; Saftoiu, A; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Greus, F Salesa; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Sanchez-Lucas, P; Santo, C E; Santos, E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarmento, R; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovánek, P; Schulz, A; Schulz, J; Sciutto, S J; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Sigl, G; Sima, O; kowski, A Śmiał; Šm\\'\\ida, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Squartini, R; Srivastava, Y N; Stanič, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J; Stephan, M; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Szuba, M; Taborda, O A; Tapia, A; Tartare, M; Thao, N T; Theodoro, V M; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Peixoto, C J Todero; Toma, G; Tomankova, L; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Elipe, G Torralba; Machado, D Torres; Travnicek, P; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van Aar, G; Berg, A M van den; van Velzen, S; van Vliet, A; Varela, E; Cárdenas, B Vargas; Varner, G; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vlcek, B; Vorobiov, S; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weidenhaupt, K; Weindl, A; Werner, F; Whelan, B J; Widom, A; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Will, M; Williams, C; Winchen, T; Wittkowski, D; Wundheiler, B; Wykes, S; Yamamoto, T; Yapici, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zamorano, B; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Zhou, J; Zhu, Y; Silva, M Zimbres; Ziolkowski, M

    2014-01-01

    We describe the method devised to reconstruct inclined cosmic-ray air showers with zenith angles greater than $60^\\circ$ detected with the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The measured signals at the ground level are fitted to muon density distributions predicted with atmospheric cascade models to obtain the relative shower size as an overall normalization parameter. The method is evaluated using simulated showers to test its performance. The energy of the cosmic rays is calibrated using a sub-sample of events reconstructed with both the fluorescence and surface array techniques. The reconstruction method described here provides the basis of complementary analyses including an independent measurement of the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using very inclined events collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  14. LOPES-3D, an antenna array for full signal detection of air-shower radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buchholz, P; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Finger, M; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; 10.1016/j.nima.2012.08.082

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the radio signal emitted by extensive air-showers and to further develop the radio detection technique of high-energy cosmic rays, the LOPES experiment was reconfigured to LOPES-3D. LOPES-3D is able to measure all three vectorial components of the electric field of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers. The additional measurement of the vertical component ought to increase the reconstruction accuracy of primary cosmic ray parameters like direction and energy, provides an improved sensitivity to inclined showers, and will help to validate simulation of the emission mechanisms in the atmosphere. LOPES-3D will evaluate the feasibility of vectorial measurements for large scale applications. In order to measure all three electric field components directly, a tailor-made antenna type (tripoles) was deployed. The change of the antenna type necessitated new pre-amplifiers and an overall recalibration. The reconfiguration and the recalibration procedure are presented and the operationality of...

  15. Muon Production Height investigated by the Air-Shower Experiment KASCADE-Grande

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, P., E-mail: doll@ik.fzk.d [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Apel, W.D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Badea, F.; Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Bluemer, H. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 7690 Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Instituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF, 10133 Torino (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Daumiller, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Souza, V. de [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Di Pierro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, 10125 Torino (Italy); Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    A large area (128m{sup 2}) Muon Tracking Detector (MTD), located within the KASCADE experiment, has been built with the aim to identify muons (E{sub m}u>0.8GeV) and their directions in extensive air showers by track measurements under more than 18 r.l. shielding. The orientation of the muon track with respect to the shower axis is expressed in terms of the radial- and tangential angles. By means of triangulation the muon production height H{sub m}u is determined. By means of H{sub m}u, a transition from light to heavy cosmic ray primary particles with increasing shower energy E{sub o} from 1-10 PeV is observed.

  16. Longitudinal EAS-Development Studies in the Air-Shower Experiment KASCADE-Grande

    CERN Document Server

    Doll, P; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buchholz, P; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; di Pierro, F; Engel, R; Engler, J; Finger, M; Fuhrmann, D; Ghia, P L; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Kickelbick, D; Klages, H O; Link, K; Łuczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Palmieria, N; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J

    2010-01-01

    A large area (128 m^2) Muon Tracking Detector (MTD), located within the KASCADE experiment, has been built with the aim to identify muons (E_mu > 0.8 GeV) and their directions in extensive air showers by track measurements under more than 18 r.l. shielding. The orientation of the muon track with respect to the shower axis is expressed in terms of the radial- and tangential angles. By means of triangulation the muon production height H_mu is determined. By means of H_mu, a transition from light to heavy cosmic ray primary particle with increasing shower energy Eo from 1-10 PeV is observed. Muon pseudorapidity distributions for the first interactions above 15 km are studied and compared to Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Radio emission of energetic cosmic ray air showers: Polarization measurements with LOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isar, P.G. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: gina.isar@ik.fzk.de; Apel, W.D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [Inst. Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Auffenberg, J. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Wuppertal (Germany); Badea, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Baehren, L. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Buitink, S. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita Torino (Italy); Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF Torino (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Daumiller, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)] (and others)

    2009-06-01

    LOPES is a radio antenna array co-located with the Karlsruhe Shower Core and Array DEtector, KASCADE-Grande in Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, which provides well-calibrated trigger information and air shower parameters for primary energies up to 10{sup 18}eV. By the end of 2006, the radio antennas were re-configured to perform polarization measurements of the radio signal of cosmic ray air showers, recording in the same time both, the East-West and North-South polarization directions of the radio emission. The main goal of these measurements is to reconstruct the polarization characteristics of the emitted signal. This will allow a detailed comparison with theoretical predictions. The current status of these measurements is reported here.

  18. Multiple lacerations in a pregnant woman caused by spontaneously exploding shower screen glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søreide, Kjetil; Søreide, Annbjørg Hegelstad

    2008-11-01

    Injuries caused by glass occur frequently, in particular in children, and make up an estimated 3% to 5% of all emergency visits, most frequently involving lacerations of hands, feet, and face. About 30% to 40% of glass injuries occur at home and often involve so-called architectural glass or bottles and glass containers. Accidents reported in association with showering mostly refer to falls or scalding by hot water. However, an increasing number of shower screens are made of tempered glass, which may potentially brake. Such injuries may be potentially severe, causing laceration of extremity arteries; requiring hospitalization or outpatient treatment for injuries; causing absence from work. These injuries are likely underreported in the medical literature but could have potential medicolegal consequences for the patient. We report a case of multiple lacerations developed in a third-trimester pregnant woman caused by the spontaneous shattering of a shower screen glass and discuss the apparent unawareness to this potential hazard in the scientific literature.

  19. A likelihood method to cross-calibrate air-shower detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Dembinski, H P; Mariş, I C; Roth, M; Veberič, D

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed statistical treatment of the energy calibration of hybrid air-shower detectors, which combine a surface detector array and a fluorescence detector, to obtain an unbiased estimate of the calibration curve. The special features of calibration data from air showers prevent unbiased results, if a standard least-squares fit is applied to the problem. We develop a general maximum-likelihood approach, based on the detailed statistical model, to solve the problem. Our approach was developed for the Pierre Auger Observatory, but the applied principles are general and can be transferred to other air-shower experiments, even to the cross-calibration of other observables. Since our general likelihood function is expensive to compute, we derive two approximations with significantly smaller computational cost. In the recent years both have been used to calibrate data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We demonstrate that these approximations introduce negligible bias when they are applied to simulated t...

  20. Drell-Yan Production at NNLL'+NNLO Matched to Parton Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Alioli, Simone; Berggren, Calvin; Tackmann, Frank J; Walsh, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    We present results for Drell-Yan production from the GENEVA Monte-Carlo framework. We combine the fully-differential NNLO calculation with higher-order resummation in the 0-jettiness resolution variable. The resulting parton-level events are further combined with parton showering and hadronization provided by PYTHIA8. The 0-jettiness resummation is carried out to NNLL', which consistently incorporates all singular virtual and real NNLO corrections. It thus provides a natural perturbative connection between the NNLO calculation and the parton shower regime, including a systematic assessment of perturbative uncertainties. In this way, inclusive observables are correct to NNLO, up to small power corrections in the resolution cutoff. Furthermore, the perturbative accuracy of 0-jet-like resummation variables is significantly improved beyond the parton shower approximation. We provide comparisons with LHC measurements of Drell-Yan production at 7 TeV from ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb. As already observed in $e^+e^-$ collis...