WorldWideScience

Sample records for premixed gaseous reactants

  1. The role of reactant unmixedness, strain rate, and length scale on premixed combustor performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsen, S.; LaRue, J.; Vilayanur, S. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Lean premixed combustion provides a means to reduce pollutant formation and increase combustion efficiency. However, fuel-air mixing is rarely uniform in space and time. This nonuniformity in concentration will lead to relative increases in pollutant formation and decreases in combustion efficiency. The nonuniformity of the concentration at the exit of the premixer has been defined by Lyons (1981) as the {open_quotes}unmixedness.{close_quotes} Although turbulence properties such as length scales and strain rate are known to effect unmixedness, the exact relationship is unknown. Evaluating this relationship and the effect of unmixedness in premixed combustion on pollutant formation and combustion efficiency are an important part of the overall goal of US Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program and are among the goals of the program described herein. The information obtained from ATS is intended to help to develop and commercialize gas turbines which have (1) a wide range of operation/stability, (2) a minimal amount of pollutant formation, and (3) high combustion efficiency. Specifically, with regard to pollutants, the goals are to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions by at least 10%, obtain less than 20 PPM of both CO and UHC, and increase the combustion efficiency by 5%.

  2. Polymeric Electrolyte Membrane Photoelectrochemical (PEM-PEC Cell with a Web of Titania Nanotube Arrays as Photoanode and Gaseous Reactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsampas M.N.

    2017-01-01

    Photoanodes of titania nanotube arrays, TNTAs, were developed, for the first time, on a Ti-web of microfiber substrates, by electrochemical anodization. The performance of TNTAs/Ti-web photoanodes were evaluated in both gaseous and liquid reactants. Due to the presence of reliable reference electrode in gas phase direct comparison of the results was possible. Gas phase operation with He or Air as carrier gases and only 2.5% of water content exhibits very promising photoefficiency in comparison with conventional PEC cells.

  3. The impact of reactants composition and temperature on the flow structure in a wake stabilized laminar lean premixed CH4/H2/air flames; mechanism and scaling

    KAUST Repository

    Michaels, D.

    2016-11-11

    In this paper we investigate the role of reactants composition and temperature in defining the steady flow structure in bluff body stabilized premixed flames. The study was motivated by experiments which showed that the flow structure and stability map for different fuels and inlet conditions collapse using the extinction strain rate as the chemical time scale. The investigation is conducted using a laminar lean premixed flame stabilized on a heat conducting bluff-body. Calculations are performed for a wide range of mixtures of CH4/H2/air (0.35 ≤ ϕ ≤ 0.75, 0 ≤ %H2 ≤ 40, 300 ≤ Tin [K] ≤ 500) in order to systematically vary the burning velocity (2.0–35.6 cm/s), dilatation ratio (2.7–6.4), and extinction strain rate (106–2924 1/s). The model is based on a fully resolved unsteady two-dimensional flow with detailed chemistry and species transport, and with no artificial flame anchoring boundary conditions. Calculations reveal that the recirculation zone length correlates with a chemical time scale based on the flame extinction strain rate corresponding to the inlet fuel composition, stoichiometry, pressure and temperature; and are consistent with experimental data in literature. It was found that in the wake region the flame is highly stretched and its location and interaction with the flow is governed by the reactants combustion characteristics under high strain.

  4. Solar fuel production in a novel polymeric electrolyte membrane photoelectrochemical (PEM-PEC) cell with a web of titania nanotube arrays as photoanode and gaseous reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoll, T.; Zafeiropoulos, G.; Tsampas, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    A novel photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell design is proposed and investigated for H-2 production with gaseous reactants. The core of the cell is a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) that consists of a TiO2 nanotube arrays photoanode, a Pt/C cathode, a Pt/C reference electrode and a proton conducting po

  5. Gaseous Non-Premixed Flame Research Planned for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Dennis P.; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Hickman, J. Mark; Suttles, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Thus far, studies of gaseous diffusion flames on the International Space Station (ISS) have been limited to research conducted in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) in mid-2009 and early 2012. The research was performed with limited instrumentation, but novel techniques allowed for the determination of the soot temperature and volume fraction. Development is now underway for the next experiments of this type. The Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) project consists of five independent experiments that will be conducted with expanded instrumentation within the stations Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR). ACMEs goals are to improve our understanding of flame stability and extinction limits, soot control and reduction, oxygen-enriched combustion which could enable practical carbon sequestration, combustion at fuel lean conditions where both optimum performance and low emissions can be achieved, the use of electric fields for combustion control, and materials flammability. The microgravity environment provides longer residence times and larger length scales, yielding a broad range of flame conditions which are beneficial for simplified analysis, e.g., of limit behaviour where chemical kinetics are important. The detailed design of the modular ACME hardware, e.g., with exchangeable burners, is nearing completion, and it is expected that on-orbit testing will begin in 2016.

  6. Non-dispersive atomic-fluorescence spectrometry of trace amounts of bismuth by introduction of its gaseous hydride into a premixed argon (entrained air)-hydrogen flame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S; Nakahara, T; Musha, S

    1979-10-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of bismuth by generation of its gaseous hydride and introduction of the hydride into a premixed argon (entrained air)-hydrogen flame, the atomic-fluorescence lines from which are all detected by use of a non-dispersive system. The detection limit is 5 pg/ml, or 0.1 ng of bismuth, but the reagent blank found in a 20-ml sample volume was approximately 2 ng of bismuth. Analytical working curves obtained by measuring peak-heights and integrated peak-areas of the signals are linear over a range of about four orders of magnitude from the detection limit. Perchloric, phosphoric and sulphuric acids up to 2.0M concentration give no interference, but nitric acid gives slight depression of the signal. The presence of silver, gold, nickel, palladium, platinum, selenium and tellurium in 1000-fold ratio to bismuth causes pronounced depression of the signal, whereas mercury and tin slightly enhance the atomic-fluorescence signal. The method has been applied to the determination of bismuth in aluminium-base alloys and sulphide ores with use of the standard additions method. The results are in good agreement with those obtained by flame atomic-absorption spectrometry and optical emission spectrometry with an inductively coupled plasma.

  7. A non-permselective membrane reactor for chemical processes normally requiring strict stoichiometric feed rates of reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloot, H.J.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1990-01-01

    A novel type of membrane reactor with separated feeding of the reactants is presented for chemical processes normally requiring strict stoichiometric feed rates of premixed reactants. The reactants are fed in the reactor to the different sides of a porous membrane which is impregnated with a catalys

  8. A non-permselective membrane reactor for chemical processes normally requiring strict stoichiometric feed rates of reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloot, H.J.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1990-01-01

    A novel type of membrane reactor with separated feeding of the reactants is presented for chemical processes normally requiring strict stoichiometric feed rates of premixed reactants. The reactants are fed in the reactor to the different sides of a porous membrane which is impregnated with a

  9. Stirring effects and bistability in the iodate-arsenous acid reaction: Premixed vs segregated flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, L.; Horsthemke, W.

    1987-01-01

    Using a coalescence-dispersion model of the continuous flow-stirred tank reactor (CSTR), we study the effect of premixed vs nonpremixed reactant flows on chemical bistability. The region of bistability is smaller for segregated feed streams than for a fully premixed feed stream. The transition from flow branch to thermodynamic branch is particularly sensitive to the feed stream configuration.

  10. Equalization equations in reactant resolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jacek Korchowiec

    2005-09-01

    The chemical system can be analyzed in different resolutions. The assumed resolution imposes a given partitioning of the system in physical or functional space. The most frequently explored are global, reactant, atoms-in-molecule, orbital, and local resolutions. In this paper we have considered reactant resolution, i.e., the mutually polarized reactants before the charge-transfer among them. We have demonstrated that a certain type of generalized sensitivity, the system responses to the population variables, is equalized throughout the space up to the infinite order in the perturbation expansion.

  11. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  12. Fundamentals of premixed turbulent combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Lipatnikov, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Lean burning of premixed gases is considered to be a promising combustion technology for future clean and highly efficient gas turbine engines. This book highlights the phenomenology of premixed turbulent flames. The text provides experimental data on the general appearance of premixed turbulent flames, physical mechanisms that could affect flame behavior, and physical and numerical models aimed at predicting the key features of premixed turbulent combustion. The author aims to provide a simple introduction to the field for advanced graduate and postgraduate students. Topics covered include La

  13. Premixed Flame Dynamics in Narrow 2D Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Ayoobi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Premixed flames propagating within small channels show complex combustion phenomena that differ from flame propagation at conventional scales. Available experimental and numerical studies have documented stationary/non-stationary and/or asymmetric modes that depend on properties of the incoming reactant flow as well as channel geometry and wall temperatures. The present work seeks to illuminate mechanisms leading to symmetry-breaking and limit cycle behavior that are fundamental to these combustion modes. Specifically, four cases of lean premixed methane/air combustion -- two equivalence ratios (0.53 and 0.7) and two channel widths (2 and 5mm) -- are investigated in a 2D configuration with constant channel length and bulk inlet velocity, where numerical simulations are performed using detailed chemistry. External wall heating is simulated by imposing a linear temperature gradient as a boundary condition on both walls. In the 2mm-channel, both equivalence ratios produce flames that stabilize with symmetric fla...

  14. Autoignition and flame stabilisation processes in turbulent non-premixed hot coflow flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenhof , E.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines stabilisation processes in turbulent non-premixed jet flames, created by injecting gaseous fuel into a co-flowing stream of hot, low-oxygen combustion products. Being able to predict whether and how a flame achieves stable and reliable combustion is a matter of great pract

  15. Response mechanisms of attached premixed flames subjected to harmonic forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreekrishna

    The persistent thrust for a cleaner, greener environment has prompted air pollution regulations to be enforced with increased stringency by environmental protection bodies all over the world. This has prompted gas turbine manufacturers to move from nonpremixed combustion to lean, premixed combustion. These lean premixed combustors operate quite fuel-lean compared to the stochiometric, in order to minimize CO and NOx productions, and are very susceptible to oscillations in any of the upstream flow variables. These oscillations cause the heat release rate of the flame to oscillate, which can engage one or more acoustic modes of the combustor or gas turbine components, and under certain conditions, lead to limit cycle oscillations. This phenomenon, called thermoacoustic instabilities, is characterized by very high pressure oscillations and increased heat fluxes at system walls, and can cause significant problems in the routine operability of these combustors, not to mention the occasional hardware damages that could occur, all of which cumulatively cost several millions of dollars. In a bid towards understanding this flow-flame interaction, this research works studies the heat release response of premixed flames to oscillations in reactant equivalence ratio, reactant velocity and pressure, under conditions where the flame preheat zone is convectively compact to these disturbances, using the G-equation. The heat release response is quantified by means of the flame transfer function and together with combustor acoustics, forms a critical component of the analytical models that can predict combustor dynamics. To this end, low excitation amplitude (linear) and high excitation amplitude (nonlinear) responses of the flame are studied in this work. The linear heat release response of lean, premixed flames are seen to be dominated by responses to velocity and equivalence ratio fluctuations at low frequencies, and to pressure fluctuations at high frequencies which are in the

  16. Gaseous Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    aseous Matter focuses on the many important discoveries that led to the scientific interpretation of matter in the gaseous state. This new, full-color resource describes the basic characteristics and properties of several important gases, including air, hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and nitrogen. The nature and scope of the science of fluids is discussed in great detail, highlighting the most important scientific principles upon which the field is based. Chapters include:. Gaseous Matter An Initial Perspective. Physical Characteristics of Gases. The Rise of the Science of Gases. Kinetic Theory of

  17. Enhanced bactericidal action of acidified sodium chlorite caused by the saturation of reactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, N H; Park, T H; Rhee, M S

    2014-06-01

    Factors affecting the antibacterial action of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC), a widely used disinfectant, have not been determined. This study investigated the significant factors suggesting efficient production method to maximize bactericidal action of ASC. The effects of (i) preparation procedures (total three methods); (ii) initial concentrations of reactants: sodium chlorite (SC) and citric acid (CTA) (up to maximum solubility of each reactant) and (iii) final pH values (3·0 and 2·5) to the bactericidal action of ASC were investigated with a fixed final concentration of SC (10 ppm) using various foodborne pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus). The antimicrobial compounds produced and the bactericidal effects depended on the preparation procedure and the initial concentrations of the reactants. The ASC prepared by premixing highly concentrated reactants (in particular > 40%) followed by dilution (dilution after reaction, DAR) was more effective in inactivating foodborne pathogens, and it produced higher antimicrobial compound (Cl(2) and ClO(2)) yields than the other procedures. A 5-min treatment with ASC, produced using the other procedures, resulted in a reduction of < 3·5 log CFU ml(-1) (Gram positive = 0·18-0·78; Gram negative = 0·03-3·49 log CFU ml(-1)), whereas ASC produced with the DAR procedure using the saturated reactants completely inactivated all of the test pathogens within 5 min without recovery (initial concentration = 6·94-7·08 log CFU ml(-1)). The ASC production with the DAR procedure using the saturated reactants maximizes both the antimicrobial compound yields and bactericidal effects of the ASC solutions. This study will contribute to increase the efficiency of ASC treatments for disinfections reducing the effective SC concentrations for industrial use. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Simulations of premixed combustion in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantis, D. J.; Mastorakos, E.; Goussis, D. A.

    2002-09-01

    A numerical model for planar premixed flames of methane in ceramic porous media has been developed to improve the understanding of the structure of such flames. The model successfully reproduces experimental data for both single- and two-layer surface flames. The success is attributed to the detail given to the boundary conditions and the radiation modelling, which was done by solving the radiation transfer equation inside the porous medium without any simplifying models. Surface-stabilized flames yielded SL/SL01 and their energy balance was similar to that of a free flame, which implies that the burning velocity acceleration is due to the reactant preheat. The flame solutions were further analysed with concepts from the computational singular perturbation method to construct reduced mechanisms. For all types of combustion (surface or submerged), an almost identical ordering of chemistry timescales to free flames was found and previously developed reduced mechanisms for free flames were accurate also for the flames inside the porous medium. The results suggest that the thermal exchange between the two phases that is responsible for the flame behaviour remains decoupled from the fast part of the chemistry.

  19. Compact mixed-reactant fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestnall, Michael A.; Kotzeva, Vega P.; Fish, Deborah J.; Nilsson, Eva M.

    The compact mixed-reactant (CMR) fuel cell is an important new "platform" approach to the design and operation of all types of fuel cell stacks. Amongst several other advantages, CMR has the potential to reduce polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) stack component costs by around a third and to raise volumetric power densities by an order of magnitude. Mixed-reactant fuel cells, in which the fuel and oxidant within a cell are allowed to mix, rely upon the selectivity of anode and cathode electrocatalysts to separate the electrochemical oxidation of fuel and reduction of oxidant. A comprehensive review of the 50-year history of mixed-reactant literature has demonstrated that such systems can perform as well as and, in some circumstances, much better than conventional fuel cells. The significant innovation that Generics has introduced to this field is to combine the concept of mixed-reactant fuel cells with that of a fully porous membrane electrode assembly (MEA) structure. Passing a fuel-oxidant mixture through a stack of porous cells allows the conventional bipolar flow-field plates required in many fuel cell designs to be eliminated. In a conventional PEM stack, for example, the bipolar carbon flow-field plates may block up to half of the active cell area and account for up to 90% of the volume of the stack and of the order of one-third of the materials costs. In addition to all the advantages of mixed-reactant systems, the "flow-through" mode, embodied in Generics' CMR approach, significantly enhances mass-transport of reactants to the electrodes and can reduce reactant pressure drops across the stack. Redesigning fuel cells to operate in a CMR mode with selective electrodes offers the attractive prospect of much reduced stack costs and significantly higher stack power densities for all types of fuel cell. Initial modeling and proof of principle experiments using an alkaline system have confirmed the validity of the CMR approach and the potential for substantial

  20. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A PREMIXED TURBULENT V-SHAPED FLAME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M I El Khazen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we simulate a turbulent premixed V-shape flame stabilized on a hot wire. The device used is composed of a vertical combustion chamber where the methane-air mixture is convected upwards with a mean velocity of 4ms-1. The flow was simulated running Fluent 6.3, which numerically solved the stationary Favre-averaged mass balance; Navier-Stokes equations; combustion progress variable, and k-ε equations on a two-dimensional numerical mesh. We model gaseous mixture, ignoring Soret and Dufour effects and radiation heat transfer. The progress variable balance equation was closed using Eddy Break Up model. The results of our simulations allow us to analyze the influence of equivalence ratio and the turbulent intensity on the properties of the flame (velocity, fluctuation, progress variable and Thickness of flame.This work gives us an idea on the part which turbulence can play to decrease the risks of extinction and instabilities caused by the lean premixed combustion.

  1. On the regimes of premixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelini, S.; Theofanous, T.G.; Yuen, W.W. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Risk Studies and Safety

    1998-01-01

    The conditions of the MAGICO-2000 experiment are extended to more broadly investigate the regimes of premixing, and the corresponding internal structures of mixing zones. With the help of the data and numerical simulations using the computer code PM-ALPHA, we can distinguish extremes of behavior dominated by inertia and thermal effects - we name these the inertia and thermal regimes, respectively. This is an important distinction that should guide future experiments aimed at code verification in this area. Interesting intermediate behaviors are also delineated and discussed. (author)

  2. Development of Criteria for Flameholding Tendencies within Premixer Passages for High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Elliot Sullivan- [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); McDonell, Vincent G. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Due to increasingly stringent air quality requirements stationary power gas turbines have moved to lean-premixed operation, which reduces pollutant emissions but can result in flashback. Flashback can cause serious damage to the premixer hardware. Curtailing flashback can be difficult with hydrocarbon fuels and becomes even more challenging when hydrogen is used as the fuel. The two main approaches for coping with flashback are either to design a combustor that is resistant to flashback, or to design a premixer that will not anchor a flame if flashback occurs. Even with a well-designed combustor flashback can occur under certain circumstances, thus it is necessary to determine how to avoid flameholding within the premixer passageways of a gas turbine. To this end, an experiment was designed that would determine the flameholding propensities at elevated pressures and temperatures of three different classes of geometric features commonly found in gas turbine premixers, with both natural gas and hydrogen fuel. Experiments to find the equivalence ratio at blow off were conducted within an optically accessible test apparatus with four flameholders: 0.25 and 0.50 inch diameter cylinders, a reverse facing step with a height of 0.25 inches, and a symmetric airfoil with a thickness of 0.25 inches and a chord length of one inch. Tests were carried out at temperatures between 300 K and 750 K, at pressures up to 9 atmospheres. Typical bulk velocities were between 40 and 100 m/s. The effect of airfoil’s angle of rotation was also investigated. Blow off for hydrogen flames was found to occur at much lower adiabatic flame temperatures than natural gas flames. Additionally it was observed that at high pressures and high turbulence intensities, reactant velocity does not have a noticeable effect on the point of blow off due in large part to corresponding increases in turbulent flame speed. Finally a semi empirical correlation was developed that predicts flame extinction for both

  3. Development of Criteria for Flameholding Tendencies within Premixer Passages for High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Elliot; McDonell, Vincent

    2015-03-31

    Due to increasingly stringent air quality requirements stationary power gas turbines have moved to lean-premixed operation, which reduces pollutant emissions but can result in flashback. Flashback can cause serious damage to the premixer hardware. Curtailing flashback can be difficult with hydrocarbon fuels and becomes even more challenging when hydrogen is used as the fuel. The two main approaches for coping with flashback are either to design a combustor that is resistant to flashback, or to design a premixer that will not anchor a flame if flashback occurs. Even with a well-designed combustor flashback can occur under certain circumstances, thus it is necessary to determine how to avoid flameholding within the premixer passageways of a gas turbine. To this end, an experiment was designed that would determine the flameholding propensities at elevated pressures and temperatures of three different classes of geometric features commonly found in gas turbine premixers, with both natural gas and hydrogen fuel. Experiments to find the equivalence ratio at blow off were conducted within an optically accessible test apparatus with four flameholders: 0.25 and 0.50 inch diameter cylinders, a reverse facing step with a height of 0.25 inches, and a symmetric airfoil with a thickness of 0.25 inches and a chord length of one inch. Tests were carried out at temperatures between 300 K and 750 K, at pressures up to 9 atmospheres. Typical bulk velocities were between 40 and 100 m/s. The effect of airfoil’s angle of rotation was also investigated. Blow off for hydrogen flames was found to occur at much lower adiabatic flame temperatures than natural gas flames. Additionally it was observed that at high pressures and high turbulence intensities, reactant velocity does not have a noticeable effect on the point of blow off due in large part to corresponding increases in turbulent flame speed. Finally a semi empirical correlation was developed that predicts flame extinction for both

  4. Computational aspects of premixing modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, D.F. [Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Witt, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    In the steam explosion research field there is currently considerable effort being devoted to the modelling of premixing. Practically all models are based on the multiphase flow equations which treat the mixture as an interpenetrating continuum. Solution of these equations is non-trivial and a wide range of solution procedures are in use. This paper addresses some numerical aspects of this problem. In particular, we examine the effect of the differencing scheme for the convective terms and show that use of hybrid differencing can cause qualitatively wrong solutions in some situations. Calculations are performed for the Oxford tests, the BNL tests, a MAGICO test and to investigate various sensitivities of the solution. In addition, we show that use of a staggered grid can result in a significant error which leads to poor predictions of `melt` front motion. A correction is given which leads to excellent convergence to the analytic solution. Finally, we discuss the issues facing premixing model developers and highlight the fact that model validation is hampered more by the complexity of the process than by numerical issues. (author)

  5. Excited state charge transfer reaction in (mixed solvent + electrolyte) systems: Role of reactant-solvent and reactant-ion interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harun Al Rasid Gazi; Ranjit Biswas

    2011-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques have been used to study the excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile (P4C) in two sets of mixed solvents, (1-propanol + ethyl acetate) and (propylene carbonate + acetonitrile), in the absence and presence of a strong electrolyte, lithium perchlorate. These two sets of mixed solvent systems represent binary solvent mixtures of low and high polarities, respectively. Density, sound velocity and viscosity measurements indicate that these two mixed solvent systems are structurally different. Stronger ion-reactant interaction is evidenced in the mole fraction independence of emission frequencies in electrolyte solutions of low polar binary solvent mixtures. For both these mixtures, the reaction driving force (- ) decreases with increase in mole fraction of the relatively less polar solvent component of the mixture. Interestingly, - increases significantly on addition of electrolyte in low polar mixtures and exhibits mixture composition dependence but, in contrast, - in high polar mixtures does not sense variation in mixture composition in presence of electrolyte. This insensitivity to mixture composition for high polar mixtures is also observed for the measured reaction time constant. In addition, the reaction time constant does not sense the presence of electrolyte in the high polar solvent mixtures. The reaction time constant in low polar mixtures, which becomes faster on addition of electrolyte, lengthens on increasing the mole fraction of the relatively less polar solvent component of the mixture. These observations have been qualitatively explained in terms of the measured solvent reorganization energy and reaction driving force by using expressions from the classical theory of electron transfer reaction.

  6. Nonlinear hydrodynamic and thermoacoustic oscillations of a bluff-body stabilised turbulent premixed flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin Yik; Li, Larry Kin Bong; Juniper, Matthew P.; Cant, Robert Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent premixed flames often experience thermoacoustic instabilities when the combustion heat release rate is in phase with acoustic pressure fluctuations. Linear methods often assume a priori that oscillations are periodic and occur at a dominant frequency with a fixed amplitude. Such assumptions are not made when using nonlinear analysis. When an oscillation is fully saturated, nonlinear analysis can serve as a useful avenue to reveal flame behaviour far more elaborate than period-one limit cycles, including quasi-periodicity and chaos in hydrodynamically or thermoacoustically self-excited system. In this paper, the behaviour of a bluff-body stabilised turbulent premixed propane/air flame in a model jet-engine afterburner configuration is investigated using computational fluid dynamics. For the frequencies of interest in this investigation, an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach is found to be appropriate. Combustion is represented using a modified laminar flamelet approach with an algebraic closure for the flame surface density. The results are validated by comparison with existing experimental data and with large eddy simulation, and the observed self-excited oscillations in pressure and heat release are studied using methods derived from dynamical systems theory. A systematic analysis is carried out by increasing the equivalence ratio of the reactant stream supplied to the premixed flame. A strong variation in the global flame structure is observed. The flame exhibits a self-excited hydrodynamic oscillation at low equivalence ratios, becomes steady as the equivalence ratio is increased to intermediate values, and again exhibits a self-excited thermoacoustic oscillation at higher equivalence ratios. Rich nonlinear behaviour is observed and the investigation demonstrates that turbulent premixed flames can exhibit complex dynamical behaviour including quasiperiodicity, limit cycles and period-two limit cycles due to the interactions of various

  7. Selectivity and mixed reactant fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riess, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    Mixed reactant fuel cells (MR-FCs), are aimed at using a uniform mixture of fuel and oxygen applied to both the anode and the cathode. This allows redesign of fuel cells with a significantly simpler construction, having potentially a higher power density, better fuel utilization and be less expensive. The challenge in realizing MR-FCs is finding selective electrodes that can enhance oxygen reduction at the cathode, fuel oxidation at the anode while inhibiting the chemical reaction between the fuel and oxygen in the gas mixture. This task is in particular challenging in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), as they operate at elevated temperatures, where many reactions are easily activated and selectivity is difficult to achieve. As a result no true MR-FC of the SOFC type were reported while some were found for low temperature fuel cells (FCs). The so-called single-chamber-SOFC are not true MR-FCs as they do not contain two selective electrodes, as required. We shall discuss potential ways to search for and develop selective anodes and cathodes for SOFC type MR-FCs. We first consider material properties which should contribute to that goal. This refers to electronic properties of the bulk, band banding under adsorbed specie, point defects in the bulk and on the surface. We then proceed to show how cell design, in particular electrode structure, can contribute to selectivity. Finally operation conditions are considered and it is shown that they also can contribute to selectivity. The operation condition considered are gas mixture composition, gas mixture residence time in the hot zone, hence gas flow rate, current density and temperature. The topics discussed hold for all FC types but are crucial for the SOFC type because of the difficulty to achieve selectivity at elevated temperatures. It is suggested that a concerted effort taking advantage of all those options should allow development of a true SOFC type MR-FC.

  8. A flame particle tracking analysis of turbulence–chemistry interaction in hydrogen–air premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Uranakara, Harshavardhana A.

    2015-11-21

    Interactions of turbulence, molecular transport, and energy transport, coupled with chemistry play a crucial role in the evolution of flame surface geometry, propagation, annihilation, and local extinction/re-ignition characteristics of intensely turbulent premixed flames. This study seeks to understand how these interactions affect flame surface annihilation of lean hydrogen–air premixed turbulent flames. Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are conducted at different parametric conditions with a detailed reaction mechanism and transport properties for hydrogen–air flames. Flame particle tracking (FPT) technique is used to follow specific flame surface segments. An analytical expression for the local displacement flame speed (Sd) of a temperature isosurface is considered, and the contributions of transport, chemistry, and kinematics on the displacement flame speed at different turbulence-flame interaction conditions are identified. In general, the displacement flame speed for the flame particles is found to increase with time for all conditions considered. This is because, eventually all flame surfaces and their resident flame particles approach annihilation by reactant island formation at the end of stretching and folding processes induced by turbulence. Statistics of principal curvature evolving in time, obtained using FPT, suggest that these islands are ellipsoidal on average enclosing fresh reactants. Further examinations show that the increase in Sd is caused by the increased negative curvature of the flame surface and eventual homogenization of temperature gradients as these reactant islands shrink due to flame propagation and turbulent mixing. Finally, the evolution of the normalized, averaged, displacement flame speed vs. stretch Karlovitz number are found to collapse on a narrow band, suggesting that a unified description of flame speed dependence on stretch rate may be possible in the Lagrangian description.

  9. Premixed flame chemistry of a gasoline primary reference fuel surrogate

    KAUST Repository

    Selim, Hatem

    2017-03-10

    Investigating the combustion chemistry of gasoline surrogate fuels promises to improve detailed reaction mechanisms used for simulating their combustion. In this work, the combustion chemistry of one of the simplest, but most frequently used gasoline surrogates – primary reference fuel 84 (PRF 84, 84 vol% iso-octane and 16 vol% n-heptane), has been examined in a stoichiometric premixed laminar flame. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron light source for species photoionization was used. Reactants, major end-products, stable intermediates, free radicals, and isomeric species were detected and quantified. Numerical simulations were conducted using a detailed chemical kinetic model with the most recently available high temperature sub-mechanisms for iso-octane and heptane, built on the top of an updated pentane isomers model and AramcoMech 2.0 (C0C4) base chemistry. A detailed interpretation of the major differences between the mechanistic pathways of both fuel components is given. A comparison between the experimental and numerical results is depicted and rate of production and sensitivity analyses are shown for the species with considerable disagreement between the experimental and numerical findings.

  10. Design factors for stable lean premix combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J.; Gemmen, R.S.

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program includes the development of low-emission combustors. Low emissions have already been achieved by premixing fuel and air to avoid the hot gas pockets produced by nozzles without premixing. While the advantages of premixed combustion have been widely recognized, turbine developers using premixed nozzles have experienced repeated problems with combustion oscillations. Left uncontrolled, these oscillations can lead to pressure fluctuations capable of damaging engine hardware. Elimination of such oscillations is often difficult and time consuming - particularly when oscillations are discovered in the last stages of engine development. To address this issue, METC is studying oscillating combustion from lean premixing fuel nozzles. These tests are providing generic information on the mechanisms that contribute to oscillating behavior in gas turbines. METC is also investigating the use of so-called {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} control of combustion oscillations. This technique periodically injects fuel pulses into the combustor to disrupt the oscillating behavior. Recent results on active combustion control are presented in Gemmen et al. (1995) and Richards et al. (1995). This paper describes the status of METC efforts to avoid oscillations through simple design changes.

  11. Chaos in an imperfectly premixed model combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabiraj, Lipika, E-mail: lipika.kabiraj@tu-berlin.de; Saurabh, Aditya; Paschereit, Christian O. [Hermann Föttinger Institut, Technische Universität Berlin (Germany); Karimi, Nader [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Sailor, Anna [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706 (United States); Mastorakos, Epaminondas; Dowling, Ann P. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    This article reports nonlinear bifurcations observed in a laboratory scale, turbulent combustor operating under imperfectly premixed mode with global equivalence ratio as the control parameter. The results indicate that the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability correspond to quasi-periodic bifurcation to low-dimensional, deterministic chaos, a route that is common to a variety of dissipative nonlinear systems. The results support the recent identification of bifurcation scenarios in a laminar premixed flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Chaos: Interdiscip. J. Nonlinear Sci. 22, 023129 (2012)) and extend the observation to a practically relevant combustor configuration.

  12. Extension of jaguar procedures for new gaseous species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, Leonard; Baker, Ernest L.; Murphy, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Jaguar is a highly efficient and accurate thermochemical equilibrium program for the detonation properties of explosives. In previous studies, equation of state Exp-6 parameters for H-C-N-O gaseous explosives product species have been optimized with available individual species Hugoniot data. The Jaguar library also includes solid and liquid properties for carbon and aluminum, silicon, and boron compounds. In this study the Jaguar property library has been expanded to include additional gaseous detonation products. New Exp-6 parameters for gaseous fluorine and chlorine compounds have been established by analyses of Hugoniot data for the actual species or for reactants which decompose into these compounds. Tests with data for explosives and additional compounds containing fluorine and chlorine have been performed to determine the accuracy of calculated detonation properties in comparison to experimental data.

  13. Extension of JAGUAR Procedures for New Gaseous and Condensed Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, Leonard; Baker, Ernest; Murphy, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    JAGUAR is a highly efficient and accurate thermochemical equilibrium program for the detonation properties of explosives. In previous studies equation of state EXP-6 parameters for H-CN-O gaseous explosives product species have been optimized with available individual species Hugoniot data. The Jaguar library also includes solid and liquid properties for carbon and aluminum, silicon, and boron compounds. In this study the Jaguar property library has been expanded to include additional gaseous, liquid, and solid detonation products. New EXP-6 parameters for gaseous fluorine and chlorine compounds have been established through theoretical procedures, and by analyses of Hugoniot data for the actual species or for reactants which decompose into these compounds. Properties for additional condensed species have also been analyzed and added to the library. Extensive tests have beeb performed to determine the accuracy of calculated detonation properties in comparison to experimental data. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Institute for Multi Scale Reactive Modeling.

  14. Near Critical Catalyst Reactant Branching Processes with Controlled Immigration

    CERN Document Server

    Budhiraja, Amarjit

    2012-01-01

    Near critical catalyst-reactant branching processes with controlled immigration are studied. The reactant population evolves according to a branching process whose branching rate is proportional to the total mass of the catalyst. The bulk catalyst evolution is that of a classical continuous time branching process; in addition there is a specific form of immigration. Immigration takes place exactly when the catalyst population falls below a certain threshold, in which case the population is instantaneously replenished to the threshold. Such models are motivated by problems in chemical kinetics where one wants to keep the level of a catalyst above a certain threshold in order to maintain a desired level of reaction activity. A diffusion limit theorem for the scaled processes is presented, in which the catalyst limit is described through a reflected diffusion, while the reactant limit is a diffusion with coefficients that are functions of both the reactant and the catalyst. Stochastic averaging principles under ...

  15. The anchoring mechanism of a bluff-body stabilized laminar premixed flame

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, Kushal S.

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the mechanism of the laminar premixed flame anchoring near a heat-conducting bluff-body. We use unsteady, fully resolved, two-dimensional simulations with detailed chemical kinetics and species transport for methane-air combustion. No artificial flame anchoring boundary conditions were imposed. Simulations show a shear-layer stabilized flame just downstream of the bluff-body, with a recirculation zone formed by the products of combustion. A steel bluff-body resulted in a slightly larger recirculation zone than a ceramic bluff-body; the size of which grew as the equivalence ratio was decreased. A significant departure from the conventional two-zone flame-structure is shown in the anchoring region. In this region, the reaction zone is associated with a large negative energy convection (directed from products to reactants) resulting in a negative flame-displacement speed. It is shown that the premixed flame anchors at an immediate downstream location near the bluff-body where favorable ignition conditions are established; a region associated with (1) a sufficiently high temperature impacted by the conjugate heat exchange between the heat-conducting bluff-body and the hot reacting flow and (2) a locally maximum stoichiometry characterized by the preferential diffusion effects. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  16. PMR polyimide composites for aerospace applications. [Polymerization of Monomer Reactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, T. T.

    1984-01-01

    A novel class of addition-type polyimides has been developed in response to the need for high temperature polymers with improved processability. The new plastic materials are known as PMR (for in situ polymerization of monomer reactants) polyimides. The highly processable PMR polyimides have made it possible to realize much of the potential of high temperature resistant polymers. Monomer reactant combinations for several PMR polyimides have been identified. The present investigation is concerned with a review of the current status of PMR polyimides. Attention is given to details of PMR polyimide chemistry, the processing of composites and their properties, and aerospace applications of PMR-15 polyimide composites.

  17. Reactant-Product Quantum Coherence in Electron Transfer Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kominis, I K

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the physical meaning of quantum superposition states between reactants and products in electron transfer reactions. We show that such superpositions are strongly suppressed and to leading orders of perturbation theory do not pertain in electron transfer reactions. This is because of the intermediate manifold of states separating the reactants from the products. We provide an intuitive description of these considerations with Feynman diagrams. We also discuss the relation of such quantum coherences to understanding the fundamental quantum dynamics of spin-selective radical-ion-pair reactions.

  18. Conductive polymer layers to limit transfer of fuel reactants to catalysts of fuel cells to reduce reactant crossover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanis, Ronald J.; Lambert, Timothy N.

    2016-12-06

    An apparatus of an aspect includes a fuel cell catalyst layer. The fuel cell catalyst layer is operable to catalyze a reaction involving a fuel reactant. A fuel cell gas diffusion layer is coupled with the fuel cell catalyst layer. The fuel cell gas diffusion layer includes a porous electrically conductive material. The porous electrically conductive material is operable to allow the fuel reactant to transfer through the fuel cell gas diffusion layer to reach the fuel cell catalyst layer. The porous electrically conductive material is also operable to conduct electrons associated with the reaction through the fuel cell gas diffusion layer. An electrically conductive polymer material is coupled with the fuel cell gas diffusion layer. The electrically conductive polymer material is operable to limit transfer of the fuel reactant to the fuel cell catalyst layer.

  19. Conductive polymer layers to limit transfer of fuel reactants to catalysts of fuel cells to reduce reactant crossover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanis, Ronald J.; Lambert, Timothy N.

    2016-12-06

    An apparatus of an aspect includes a fuel cell catalyst layer. The fuel cell catalyst layer is operable to catalyze a reaction involving a fuel reactant. A fuel cell gas diffusion layer is coupled with the fuel cell catalyst layer. The fuel cell gas diffusion layer includes a porous electrically conductive material. The porous electrically conductive material is operable to allow the fuel reactant to transfer through the fuel cell gas diffusion layer to reach the fuel cell catalyst layer. The porous electrically conductive material is also operable to conduct electrons associated with the reaction through the fuel cell gas diffusion layer. An electrically conductive polymer material is coupled with the fuel cell gas diffusion layer. The electrically conductive polymer material is operable to limit transfer of the fuel reactant to the fuel cell catalyst layer.

  20. The flame anchoring mechanism and associated flow structure in bluff-body stabilized lean premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Dan; Shanbhogue, Santosh; Ghoniem, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    We present numerical analysis of a lean premixed flame anchoring on a heat conducting bluff-body. Different mixtures of CH4/H2/air are analyzed in order to systematically vary the burning velocity, adiabatic flame temperature and extinction strain rate. The study was motivated by our experimental measurements in a step combustor which showed that both the recirculation zone length and stability map under acoustically coupled conditions for different fuels and thermodynamic conditions collapse using the extinction strain rate. The model fully resolves unsteady two-dimensional flow with detailed chemistry and species transport, and without artificial flame anchoring boundary conditions. The model includes a low Mach number operator-split projection algorithm, coupled with a block-structured adaptive mesh refinement and an immersed boundary method for the solid body. Calculations reveal that the recirculation zone length correlates with the flame extinction strain rate, consistent with the experimental evidence. It is found that in the vicinity of the bluff body the flame is highly stretched and its leading edge location is controlled by the reactants combustion characteristics under high strain. Moreover, the flame surface location relative to the shear layer influences the vorticity thus impacting the velocity field and the recirculation zone. The study sheds light on the experimentally observed collapse of the combustor dynamics using the reactants extinction strain rate.

  1. Blow-off characteristics of turbulent premixed flames in curved-wall Jet Burner

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Morkous S.

    2015-08-02

    This study concerns the flame dynamics of a curved-wall jet (CWJ) stabilized turbulent premixed flame as it approaches blow-off conditions. Time resolved OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) delineated reaction zone contours and simultaneously stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) quantified the turbulent flow field features. Ethylene/air flames were stabilized in CWJ burner to determine the sequence of events leading to blowoff. For stably burning flames far from blowoff, flames are characterized with a recirculation zone (RZ) upstream for flame stabilization followed by an intense turbulent interaction jet (IJ) and merged-jet regions downstream; the flame front counterparts the shear layer vortices. Near blowoff, as the velocity of reactants increases, high local stretch rates exceed the extinction stretch rates instantaneously resulting in localized flame extinction along the IJ region. As Reynolds number (Re) increases, flames become shorter and are entrained by larger amounts of cold reactants. The increased strain rates together with heat loss effects result in further fragmentation of the flame, eventually leading to the complete quenching of the flame. This is explained in terms of local turbulent Karlovitz stretch factor (K) and principal flow strain rates associated with C contours. Hydrogen addition and increasing the RZ size lessen the tendency of flames to be locally extinguished.

  2. A Fixed Bed Barrier Reactor with Separate Feed of Reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neomagus, H.W.J.P.; Saracco, G.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2001-01-01

    A new type of gas-solid reactor was developed and characterised in the series of reactor configurations with separate feed of reactants studied by our group. The novelty in the proposed design lies in the use of a fixed bed of small catalytic particles instead of a porous catalytic membrane. The maj

  3. A Fixed Bed Barrier Reactor with Separate Feed of Reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neomagus, H.W.J.P.; Saracco, G.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2001-01-01

    A new type of gas-solid reactor was developed and characterised in the series of reactor configurations with separate feed of reactants studied by our group. The novelty in the proposed design lies in the use of a fixed bed of small catalytic particles instead of a porous catalytic membrane. The maj

  4. Resolvent methods for steady premixed flame shapes governed by the Zhdanov-Trubnikov equation

    CERN Document Server

    Borot, Gaëtan; Joulin, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Using pole decompositions as starting points, the one parameter (-1 =< c < 1) nonlocal and nonlinear Zhdanov-Trubnikov (ZT) equation for the steady shapes of premixed gaseous flames is studied in the large-wrinkle limit. The singular integral equations for pole densities are closely related to those satisfied by the spectral density in the so-called O(n) matrix model, with n = -2(1 + c)/(1 - c). They can be solved via the introduction of complex resolvents and the use of complex analysis. We retrieve results obtained recently for -1 =< c =< 0, and we explain and cure their pathologies when they are continued naively to 0 < c < 1. Moreover, for any -1 =< c < 1, we derive closed-form expressions for the shapes of steady isolated flame crests, and then bicoalesced periodic fronts. These theoretical results fully agree with numerical resolutions. Open problems are evoked.

  5. Novel analytical model for predicting the combustion characteristics of premixed flame propagation in lycopodium dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidabadi, Mehdi; Rahbari, Alireza [Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    This paper presents the effects of the temperature difference between gas and particle, different Lewis numbers, and heat loss from the walls in the structure of premixed flames propagation in a combustible system containing uniformly distributed volatile fuel particles in an oxidizing gas mixture. It is assumed that the fuel particles vaporize first to yield a gaseous fuel, which is oxidized in a gas phase. The analysis is performed in the asymptotic limit, where the value of the characteristic Zeldovich number is large. The structure of the flame is composed of a preheat zone, reaction zone, and convection zone. The governing equations and required boundary conditions are applied in each zone, and an analytical method is used for solving these equations. The obtained results illustrate the effects of the above parameters on the variations of the dimensionless temperature, particle mass friction, flame temperature, and burning velocity for gas and particle

  6. Turbulence in laminar premixed V-flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Xiaoqian(张孝谦); LEI; Yu(雷宇); WANG; Baorui(王宝瑞); WANG; Yue(王岳); WEI; Minggang(韦明罡)

    2003-01-01

    Strong velocity fluctuations had been found in the laminar premixed V-flames. These velocity fluctuations are closely related to the chemical reaction. But the effects of the upstream combustible mixture velocity on the velocity fluctuations inside the flame are quite weak. The probability distribution function (PDF) of the velocity in the centre region of the flame appears "flat top" shaped. By analyzing the experiment results the flame-flow interactions are found to affect the flame not only at large scale in the flow field but also at small scale inside the flame. These effects will give rise to flame generated small scale turbulences.

  7. CSP-based chemical kinetics mechanisms simplification strategy for non-premixed combustion: An application to hybrid rocket propulsion

    KAUST Repository

    Ciottoli, Pietro P.

    2017-08-14

    A set of simplified chemical kinetics mechanisms for hybrid rocket applications using gaseous oxygen (GOX) and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) is proposed. The starting point is a 561-species, 2538-reactions, detailed chemical kinetics mechanism for hydrocarbon combustion. This mechanism is used for predictions of the oxidation of butadiene, the primary HTPB pyrolysis product. A Computational Singular Perturbation (CSP) based simplification strategy for non-premixed combustion is proposed. The simplification algorithm is fed with the steady-solutions of classical flamelet equations, these being representative of the non-premixed nature of the combustion processes characterizing a hybrid rocket combustion chamber. The adopted flamelet steady-state solutions are obtained employing pure butadiene and gaseous oxygen as fuel and oxidizer boundary conditions, respectively, for a range of imposed values of strain rate and background pressure. Three simplified chemical mechanisms, each comprising less than 20 species, are obtained for three different pressure values, 3, 17, and 36 bar, selected in accordance with an experimental test campaign of lab-scale hybrid rocket static firings. Finally, a comprehensive strategy is shown to provide simplified mechanisms capable of reproducing the main flame features in the whole pressure range considered.

  8. Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, and chemical reactant sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C

    2013-11-26

    Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, chemical reactant sources, and related methods are disclosed. In one embodiment, a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor system comprising a reaction chamber, a combustion torch positioned to direct a flame into the reaction chamber, and one or more reactant feed assemblies configured to electrically energize at least one electrically conductive solid reactant structure to form a plasma and feed each electrically conductive solid reactant structure into the plasma to form at least one product is disclosed. In an additional embodiment, a chemical reactant source for a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor comprising an elongated electrically conductive reactant structure consisting essentially of at least one chemical reactant is disclosed. In further embodiments, methods of forming a chemical reactant source and methods of chemically converting at least one reactant into at least one product are disclosed.

  9. Numerical simulation of laminar premixed combustion in a porous burner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Pinghui; CHEN Yiliang; LIU Minghou; DING Min; ZHANG Genxuan

    2007-01-01

    Premixed combustion in porous media differs substantially from combustion in free space. The interphase heat transfer between a gas mixture and a porous medium becomes dominant in the premixed combustion process. In this paper, the premixed combustion of CH4/air mixture in a porous medium is numerically simulated with a laminar combustion model. Radiative heat transfer in solids and convective heat transfer between the gas and the solid is especially studied. A smaller detailed reaction mechanism is also used and the results can show good prediction for many combustion phenomena.

  10. Determination of the Burning Velocity Domain of a Statistically Stationary Turbulent Premixed Flame in Presence of Counter-Gradient Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sabel'nikov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at providing a complete picture of the various propagation scenarios that a statistically stationary turbulent premixed flame may possibly undergo. By explicitly splitting the scalar turbulent flux between its gradient and counter-gradient contributions, the scalar governing equation is rewritten as an ordinary differential equation in the phase space. Then, an analysis of the characteristic equations in the vicinity of the reactants and products side is carried out. The domain of existence of the propagation velocity is then determined and positioned over the relevant Bray number range. It is shown in particular that when a counter-gradient transport at the cold leading edge of the flame is dominant, there still exists a possibility of observing a steady regime of propagation. This conclusion is compatible with recent experimental data and observations based on the analysis of direct numerical simulations.

  11. Premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Kirill A

    2015-01-01

    Analytical treatment of premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes with smooth walls is given. Using the on-shell flame description, equations describing quasi-steady flame with a small but finite front thickness are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that near the limits of inflammability, solutions describing upward flame propagation come in pairs having close propagation speeds, and that the effect of gravity is to reverse the burnt gas velocity profile generated by the flame. On the basis of these results, a theory of partial flame propagation driven by the gravitational field is developed. A complete explanation is given of the intricate observed behavior of limit flames, including dependence of the inflammability range on the size of the combustion domain, the large distances of partial flame propagation, and the progression of flame extinction. The role of the finite front-thickness effects is discussed in detail. Also, various mechanisms governing flame acceleration in smooth tubes are ide...

  12. Addition-type polyimides from solutions of monomeric reactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvigs, P.; Serafini, T. T.; Lightsey, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The monomeric reactants approach was used to fabricate addition-type polyimide/graphite fiber composites with improved mechanical properties and thermal stability characteristics over those of composites derived from addition-type amide acid prepolymers. A screening study of 24 different monomer combinations was performed. The results of a more extensive investigation of a selected number of monomer combinations showed that the combination providing the best thermomechanical properties was 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid monomethyl ester/4,4'-methylenedianiline/3,3'4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid dimethyl ester at a molar ratio of 2/3.09/2.09.

  13. Premixes production for synthesis of wear-resistant composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontsevoi, Yu V.; Meilakh, A. G.; Shubin, A. B.; Pastukhov, E. A.; Dolmatov, A. V.; Sipatov, I. S.

    2017-01-01

    State of the art line of powder metallurgy is application of initial powders as micro-composites with additional components - premixes. Usage of premixes inhibits segregation of added components and implies the homogeneity of powder charge composition, and finally it has a significant impact on structure formation and properties of end products. The aim of the present work was to design the new production technology of premixes based on iron powder which is layer-by-layer plated by aluminium and copper. We propose to carry out production of Cu-Al-Fe premixes in two stages: cladding of iron powder by aluminium and coating of the obtained composite by copper. The self-developed technique of vibration treatment of iron and aluminium powder mixture was chosen for this purpose. The uniform in thickness and unbroken copper-plating of Fe-Al powders were carried out by chemical technique. Physico-chemical properties and production conditions of premixes-powders were studied, besides optimal parameters of production and further heat-treatment were selected. In the result of the present study the Fe-Al-Cu premixes with laminated structure comprising of iron core, Fe-Al and Cu-Al intermetallide shells were synthesised.

  14. Tribology in Gaseous Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawae, Yoshinori; Sugimura, Joich

    Hydrogen is expected as a clean and renewable energy carrier for future environment-friendly society. Many machine elements in hydrogen energy systems should be operating within hydrogen gas and tribological behavior, such as friction and wear, of bearings and seals are affected by the hydrogen environment through some interactions between material surfaces and gaseous hydrogen, i.e., physisorption of hydrogen molecules and following chemisorptions of dissociated atoms on metal surfaces, formation of metal hydride and reduction of metal oxide layer by hydrogen atoms diffused into bulk. Therefore, friction and wear characteristics of tribomaterials in the hydrogen environment should be appropriately understood to establish a design guideline for reliable hydrogen utilizing systems. This paper reviews the current knowledge about the effect of hydrogen on friction and wear of materials, and then describes our recent progress of hydrogen research in the tribology field.

  15. Two-dimensional simulations of steady perforated-plate stabilized premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Altay, H. Murat

    2010-03-17

    The objective of this work is to examine the impact of the operating conditions and the perforated-plate design on the steady, lean premixed flame characteristics. We perform two-dimensional simulations of laminar flames using a reduced chemical kinetics mechanism for methane-air combustion, consisting of 20 species and 79 reactions. We solve the heat conduction problem within the plate, allowing heat exchange between the gas mixture and the solid plate. The physical model is based on a zero-Mach-number formulation of the axisymmetric compressible conservation equations. The results suggest that the flame consumption speed, the flame structure, and the flame surface area depend significantly on the equivalence ratio, mean inlet velocity, the distance between the perforated-plate holes and the plate thermal conductivity. In the case of an adiabatic plate, a conical flame is formed, anchored near the corner of the hole. When the heat exchange between themixture and the plate is finite, the flame acquires a Gaussian shape stabilizing at a stand-off distance, that grows with the plate conductivity. The flame tip is negatively curved; i.e. concave with respect to the reactants. Downstream of the plate, the flame base is positively curved; i.e. convex with respect to the reactants, stabilizing above a stagnation region established between neighboring holes. As the plate\\'s thermal conductivity increases, the heat flux to the plate decreases, lowering its top surface temperature. As the equivalence ratio increases, the flame moves closer to the plate, raising its temperature, and lowering the flame stand-off distance. As the mean inlet velocity increases, the flame stabilizes further downstream, the flame tip becomes sharper, hence raising the burning rate at that location. The curvature of the flame base depends on the distance between the neighboring holes; and the flame there is characterized by high concentration of intermediates, like carbon monoxide. © 2010 Taylor

  16. Premixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin P. Lacy; Keith R. McManus; Balachandar Varatharajan; Biswadip Shome

    2005-12-16

    This 21-month project translated DLN technology to the unique properties of high hydrogen content IGCC fuels, and yielded designs in preparation for a future testing and validation phase. Fundamental flame characterization, mixing, and flame property measurement experiments were conducted to tailor computational design tools and criteria to create a framework for predicting nozzle operability (e.g., flame stabilization, emissions, resistance to flashback/flame-holding and auto-ignition). This framework was then used to establish, rank, and evaluate potential solutions to the operability challenges of IGCC combustion. The leading contenders were studied and developed with the most promising concepts evaluated via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and using the design rules generated by the fundamental experiments, as well as using GE's combustion design tools and practices. Finally, the project scoped the necessary steps required to carry the design through mechanical and durability review, testing, and validation, towards full demonstration of this revolutionary technology. This project was carried out in three linked tasks with the following results. (1) Develop conceptual designs of premixer and down-select the promising options. This task defined the ''gap'' between existing design capabilities and the targeted range of IGCC fuel compositions and evaluated the current capability of DLN pre-mixer designs when operated at similar conditions. Two concepts (1) swirl based and (2) multiple point lean direct injection based premixers were selected via a QFD from 13 potential design concepts. (2) Carry out CFD on chosen options (1 or 2) to evaluate operability risks. This task developed the leading options down-selected in Task 1. Both a GE15 swozzle based premixer and a lean direct injection concept were examined by performing a detailed CFD study wherein the aerodynamics of the design, together with the chemical kinetics of the

  17. Large eddy simulation of bluff body stabilized premixed and partially premixed combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porumbel, Ionut

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of bluff body stabilized premixed and partially premixed combustion close to the flammability limit is carried out in this thesis. The main goal of the thesis is the study of the equivalence ratio effect on flame stability and dynamics in premixed and partially premixed flames. An LES numerical algorithm able to handle the entire range of combustion regimes and equivalence ratios is developed for this purpose. The algorithm has no ad-hoc adjustable model parameters and is able to respond automatically to variations in the inflow conditions, without user intervention. Algorithm validation is achieved by conducting LES of reactive and non-reactive flow. Comparison with experimental data shows good agreement for both mean and unsteady flow properties. In the reactive flow, two scalar closure models, Eddy Break-Up (EBULES) and Linear Eddy Mixing (LEMLES), are used and compared. Over important regions, the flame lies in the Broken Reaction Zone regime. Here, the EBU model assumptions fail. In LEMLES, the reaction-diffusion equation is not filtered, but resolved on a linear domain and the model maintains validity. The flame thickness predicted by LEMLES is smaller and the flame is faster to respond to turbulent fluctuations, resulting in a more significant wrinkling of the flame surface when compared to EBULES. As a result, LEMLES captures better the subtle effects of the flame-turbulence interaction, the flame structure shows higher complexity, and the far field spreading of the wake is closer to the experimental observations. Three premixed (φ = 0.6, 0.65, and 0.75) cases are simulated. As expected, for the leaner case (φ = 0.6) the flame temperature is lower, the heat release is reduced and vorticity is stronger. As a result, the flame in this case is found to be unstable. In the rich case (φ = 0.75), the flame temperature is higher, and the spreading rate of the wake is increased due to the higher amount of heat release. The ignition

  18. Calculating fusion neutron energy spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, J.; Conroy, S.; Andersson Sundén, E.; Hellesen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Directional Relativistic Spectrum Simulator (DRESS) code can perform Monte-Carlo calculations of reaction product spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions, using fully relativistic kinematics. The code is set up to calculate energy spectra from neutrons and alpha particles produced in the D(d, n)3He and T(d, n)4He fusion reactions, but any two-body reaction can be simulated by including the corresponding cross section. The code has been thoroughly tested. The kinematics calculations have been benchmarked against the kinematics module of the ROOT Data Analysis Framework. Calculated neutron energy spectra have been validated against tabulated fusion reactivities and against an exact analytical expression for the thermonuclear fusion neutron spectrum, with good agreement. The DRESS code will be used as the core of a detailed synthetic diagnostic framework for neutron measurements at the JET and MAST tokamaks.

  19. Soot reduction under DC electric fields in counterflow non-premixed laminar ethylene flames

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Daegeun

    2014-04-23

    The effects of DC electric fields on non-premixed ethylene flames in a counterflow burner were studied experimentally with a focus on the reduction of soot particles. The experiment was conducted by connecting a high voltage terminal and a ground terminal to a lower (fuel) and upper (oxidizer) nozzle, respectively. We applied direct current (DC) potentials in a range of -5 kV < Vdc < 5 kV. Uniform electric fields were then generated in the gap between the two nozzles. The experimental conditions were selected to cover both soot formation (SF) and soot formation oxidation (SFO) flames. The flames subjected to the negative electric fields moved toward the fuel nozzle because of an ionic wind due to the Lorentz force acting on the positive ions in the flames. In addition, the yellow luminosity significantly decreased, indicating changes in the sooting characteristics. To analyze the sooting characteristics under the electric fields, planar laser induced incandescence (PLII) and fluorescence (PLIF) techniques were used to visualize the soot, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and OH radicals. The sooting limits in terms of the fuel and oxygen mole fractions were measured. No substantial soot formation due to the effects of the DC electric fields for the tested range of voltages and reactant mole fractions could be identified. The detailed flame behaviors and sooting characteristics under the DC electric fields are discussed. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  20. Interplay of Darrieus-Landau instability and weak turbulence in premixed flame propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creta, Francesco; Lamioni, Rachele; Lapenna, Pasquale Eduardo; Troiani, Guido

    2016-11-01

    In this study we investigate, both numerically and experimentally, the interplay between the intrinsic Darrieus-Landau (DL) or hydrodynamic instability of a premixed flame and the moderately turbulent flow field in which the flame propagates. The objective is threefold: to establish, unambiguously, through a suitably defined marker, the presence or absence of DL-induced effects on the turbulent flame, to quantify the DL effects on the flame propagation and morphology and, finally, to asses whether such effects are mitigated or suppressed as the turbulence intensity is increased. The numerical simulations are based on a deficient reactant model which lends itself to a wealth of results from asymptotic theory, such as the determination of stability limits. The skewness of the flame curvature probability density function is identified as an unambiguous morphological marker for the presence or absence of DL effects in a turbulent environment. In addition, the turbulent propagation speed is shown to exhibit a distinct dual behavior whereby it is noticeably enhanced in the presence of DL instability while it is unchanged otherwise. Furthermore, increasing the turbulence intensity is found to be mitigating with respect to DL-induced effects such as the mentioned dual behavior which disappears at higher intensities. Experimental propane and/or air Bunsen flames are also investigated, utilizing two distinct diameters, respectively, above and below the estimated DL cutoff wavelength. Curvature skewness is still clearly observed to act as a marker for DL instability while the turbulent propagation speed is concurrently enhanced in the presence of the instability.

  1. Markstein Numbers of Negatively-Stretched Premixed Flames: Microgravity Measurements and Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarreta, Alfonso F.; Driscoll, James F.; Feikema, Douglas A.; Salzman, Jack (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of flame stretch, composed of strain and curvature, plays a major role in the propagation of turbulent premixed flames. Although all forms of stretch (positive and negative) are present in turbulent conditions, little research has been focused on the stretch due to curvature. The present study quantifies the Markstein number (which characterizes the sensitivity of the flame propagation speed to the imposed stretch rate) for an inwardly-propagating flame (IPF). This flame is of interest because it is negatively stretched, and is subjected to curvature effects alone, without the competing effects of strain. In an extension of our previous work, microgravity experiments were run using a vortex-flame interaction to create a pocket of reactants surrounded by an IPF. Computations using the RUN-1DL code of Rogg were also performed in order to explain the measurements. It was found that the Markstein number of an inwardly-propagating flame, for both the microgravity experiment and the computations, is significantly larger than that of an outwardly-propagating flame. Further insight was gained by running the computations for the simplified (hypothetical) cases of one step chemistry, unity Lewis number, and negligible heat release. Results provide additional evidence that the Markstein numbers associated with strain and curvature have different values.

  2. Effect of an external electric field on the propagation velocity of premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Sánchez-Sanz, Mario

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. There have been many experimental investigations into the ability of electric fields to enhance combustion by acting upon ion species present in flames [1]. In this work, we examine this phenomenon using a one-dimensional model of a lean premixed flame under the influence of a longitudinal electric field. We expand upon prior two-step chain-branching reaction laminar models with reactions to model the creation and consumption of both a positively-charged radical species and free electrons. Also included are the electromotive force in the conservation equation for ion species and the electrostatic form of the Maxwell equations in order to resolve ion transport by externally applied and internally induced electric fields. The numerical solution of these equations allows us to compute changes in flame speed due to electric fields. Further, the variation of key kinetic and transport parameters modifies the electrical sensitivity of the flame. From changes in flame speed and reactant profiles we are able to gain novel, valuable insight into how and why combustion can be controlled by electric fields.

  3. Premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Kirill A.

    2016-04-01

    Analytical treatment of the premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes with smooth walls is given. Using the on-shell flame description, equations for a quasi-steady flame with a small but finite front thickness are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that near the limits of inflammability, solutions describing upward flame propagation come in pairs having close propagation speeds and that the effect of gravity is to reverse the burnt gas velocity profile generated by the flame. On the basis of these results, a theory of partial flame propagation driven by a strong gravitational field is developed. A complete explanation is given of the intricate observed behavior of limit flames, including dependence of the inflammability range on the size of the combustion domain, the large distances of partial flame propagation, and the progression of flame extinction. The role of the finite front-thickness effects is discussed in detail. Also, various mechanisms governing flame acceleration in smooth tubes are identified. Acceleration of methane-air flames in open tubes is shown to be a combined effect of the hydrostatic pressure difference produced by the ambient cold air and the difference of dynamic gas pressure at the tube ends. On the other hand, a strong spontaneous acceleration of the fast methane-oxygen flames at the initial stage of their evolution in open-closed tubes is conditioned by metastability of the quasi-steady propagation regimes. An extensive comparison of the obtained results with the experimental data is made.

  4. Cool gaseous nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Shaver, P A; Pottasch, S R

    1979-01-01

    The electron temperatures of diffuse gaseous nebulae have long been thought to be close to 10/sup 4/K. Much lower temperatures were derived from some of the early radio continuum and recombination line work, but these were generally considered to be wrong for a variety of reasons. While there is little doubt that the bright nebulae do indeed have temperatures of approximately 8000-9000K, there are strong indications that some nebulae of lower densities have much lower temperatures,

  5. A NEW DOUBLE-SLIT CURVED WALL-JET (CWJ) BURNER FOR STABILIZING TURBULENT PREMIXED AND NON-PREMIXED FLAMES

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Morkous S.

    2015-06-30

    A novel double-slit curved wall-jet (CWJ) burner was proposed and employed, which utilizes the Coanda effect by supplying fuel and air as annular-inward jets over a curved surface. We investigated the stabilization characteristics and structure of methane/air, and propane/air turbulent premixed and non-premixed flames with varying global equivalence ratio, , and Reynolds number, Re. Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence of OH radicals were conducted. The burner showed potential for stable operation for methane flames with relatively large fuel loading and overall rich conditions. These have a non-sooting nature. However, propane flames exhibit stable mode for a wider range of equivalence ratio and Re. Mixing characteristics in the cold flow of non-premixed cases were first examined using acetone fluorescence technique, indicating substantial transport between the fuel and air by exhibiting appreciable premixing conditions.PIV measurements revealed that velocity gradients in the shear layers at the boundaries of the annularjets generate the turbulence, enhanced with the collisions in the interaction jet, IJ,region. Turbulent mean and rms velocities were influenced significantly by Re and high rms turbulent velocities are generated within the recirculation zone improving the flame stabilization in this burner.Premixed and non-premixed flames with high equivalence ratio were found to be more resistant to local extinction and exhibited a more corrugated and folded nature, particularly at high Re. For flames with low equivalence ratio, the processes of local quenching at IJ region and of re-ignition within merged jet region maintained these flames further downstream particularly for non-premixed methane flame, revealing a strong intermittency.

  6. Soot Formation in Freely-Propagating Laminar Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, K.-C.; Hassan, M. I.; Faeth, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    Soot formation within hydrocarbon-fueled flames is an important unresolved problem of combustion science. Thus, the present study is considering soot formation in freely-propagating laminar premixed flames, exploiting the microgravity environment to simplify measurements at the high-pressure conditions of interest for many practical applications. The findings of the investigation are relevant to reducing emissions of soot and continuum radiation from combustion processes, to improving terrestrial and spacecraft fire safety, and to developing methods of computational combustion, among others. Laminar premixed flames are attractive for studying soot formation because they are simple one-dimensional flows that are computationally tractable for detailed numerical simulations. Nevertheless, studying soot-containing burner-stabilized laminar premixed flames is problematical: spatial resolution and residence times are limited at the pressures of interest for practical applications, flame structure is sensitive to minor burner construction details so that experimental reproducibility is not very good, consistent burner behavior over the lengthy test programs needed to measure soot formation properties is hard to achieve, and burners have poor durability. Fortunately, many of these problems are mitigated for soot-containing, freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. The present investigation seeks to extend work in this laboratory for various soot processes in flames by observing soot formation in freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. Measurements are being made at both Normal Gravity (NG) and MicroGravity (MG), using a short-drop free-fall facility to provide MG conditions.

  7. Visualization of flashback in a premixed burner with swirling flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satoshi; TANIMURA; Masaharu; KOMIYAMA; Kenichiro; TAKEISHI; Yuji; IWASAKI; Kiyonobu; NAKAYAMA

    2010-01-01

    In this study,the measurement object is a flame propagating in a premixed burner with swirling flow in order to investigate unsteady flame behavior in a gas turbine premixer.During flashback,the flame propagating upstream was visualized with a high-speed camera.Moreover,we established the technique to measure the instantaneous flow fields of unburned fuel-air mixture in a swirling premixed burner using particle image velocimetry(PIV).As a result,the characteristics of flame behavior propagating upstream were examined.And it was found that a low velocity region existed in the vicinity of the flame tip.The relationship between low velocity region and flame behavior was discussed in detail.

  8. Injectable Premixed Cement of Nanoapatite and Polyamide Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new type of injectable premixed bone cement consisting of nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) and polyamide 66(PA66) composite is investigated. This cement can be handled as paste and easily shaped, which can set in air, in physiological saline solution and in blood. The setting time, injectability and compressive strength of the cement largely depend on the ratio of liquid to powder (L/P). Moreover, the content of n-HA in composite also affects the compressive strength and injectability of the cement. The premixed composite cement can remain stable in the package for a long period and harden only after delivery to the defects site. The results suggest that injectable premixed cement has a reasonable setting time, reasonable viscosity for injecting, excellent washout resistance and high mechanical strength, which can be developed for root canal filling, sealing and various bone defects augmentation.

  9. New controllable premixed combustion for dimethyl ether engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A new concept of the controllable premixed combustion (CPC) system was proposed for dimethyl ether (DME) to explore a new approach to achieving ultra-low NOX emissions with the zero level of particulate matter exhaust emissions. The DME fuel was injected into the premix chamber by means of the electronically controlled low pressure injection system, then the mixture formation and combustion process were controlled with a control-valve set between the main chamber and the premix chamber. The test bench was constructed based on a single diesel engine. Preliminary studies demonstrated that ultra-low NOX emissions had been realized with zero particulate matter emissions under the optimum specifications of the DME engine, NOX emissions were less than 65 × 10-6. According to the engine combustion analysis, it was found that the control-valve played an important role in the pre-mixture formation and ignition timing.

  10. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon; Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2016-11-01

    Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al2O3 were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al2O3 shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al2O3, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al2O3 on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  11. Investigation of non-premixed flame combustion characters in GO2/GH2 shear coaxial injectors using non-intrusive optical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jian; Yu, NanJia; Cai, GuoBiao

    2015-12-01

    Single-element combustor experiments are conducted for three shear coaxial geometry configuration injectors by using gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen (GO2/GH2) as propellants. During the combustion process, several spatially and timeresolved non-intrusive optical techniques, such as OH planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF), high speed imaging, and infrared imaging, are simultaneously employed to observe the OH radical concentration distribution, flame fluctuations, and temperature fields. The results demonstrate that the turbulent flow phenomenon of non-premixed flame exhibits a remarkable periodicity, and the mixing ratio becomes a crucial factor to influence the combustion flame length. The high speed and infrared images have a consistent temperature field trend. As for the OH-PLIF images, an intuitionistic local flame structure is revealed by single-shot instantaneous images. Furthermore, the means and standard deviations of OH radical intensity are acquired to provide statistical information regarding the flame, which may be helpful for validation of numerical simulations in future. Parameters of structure configurations, such as impinging angle and oxygen post thickness, play an important role in the reaction zone distribution. Based on a successful flame contour extraction method assembled with non-linear anisotropic diffusive filtering and variational level-set, it is possible to implement a fractal analysis to describe the fractal characteristics of the non-premixed flame contour. As a result, the flame front cannot be regarded as a fractal object. However, this turbulent process presents a self-similarity characteristic.

  12. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon [School Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungjun, E-mail: hyungjun@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Han-Bo-Ram, E-mail: hbrlee@inu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Incheon National University, 406-840 Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Fundamental research plasma process for thin film deposition is presented. • VHF plasma source for PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was employed to reduce plasma damage. • The use of VHF plasma improved all of the film qualities and growth characteristics. - Abstract: Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  13. Quantification of extinction mechanism in counterflow premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Sangkyu

    2014-09-01

    The extinction mechanisms of stretched premixed flames have been investigated numerically for the fuels of CH4, C3H8, H2, CO and for the mixture fuels of CH4+H2 and CO+H2 by adopting symmetric double premixed flames in a counterflow configuration. The local equilibrium temperature concept was used as a measure of energy loss or gain in order to quantify the extinction mechanism by preferential diffusion and/or incomplete reaction. The energy loss ratio from preferential diffusion arising from non-unity Lewis number and the loss ratio from incomplete reaction were calculated at various equivalence ratios near flame extinction. The results showed that the extinction of lean H2, CH4, CH4+H2, CO+H2, and rich C3H8 premixed flames was caused by incomplete reaction due to insufficient reaction time, indicating that the effective Lewis number was smaller than unity, while the effect of preferential diffusion resulted in energy gain. However, the extinction of rich H2, CH4, CH4+H2, CO+H2, and lean C3H8 premixed flames was affected by the combined effects of preferential diffusion and incomplete reaction indicating that the effective Lewis number was larger than unity. In CO premixed flames, incomplete reaction was dominant in both lean and rich cases due to the effective Lewis number close to unity. The effect of H2 mixing to CO is found to be quite significant as compared to CH4+H2 cases, which can alter the flame behavior of CO flames to that of H2.

  14. The blow-off mechanism of a bluff-body stabilized laminar premixed flame

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, Kushal S.

    2015-04-01

    © 2014 The Combustion Institute. The objective of this work is to investigate the dynamics leading to blow-off of a laminar premixed flame stabilized on a confined bluff-body using high fidelity numerical simulations. We used unsteady, fully resolved, two-dimensional simulations with detailed chemical kinetics and species transport for methane-air combustion. The flame-wall interaction between the hot reactants and the heat conducting bluff-body was accurately captured by incorporating the conjugate heat exchange between them. Simulations showed a shear-layer stabilized flame just downstream of the bluff-body, with a recirculation zone formed by the products of combustion. The flame was negatively stretched along its entire length, primarily dominated by the normal component of the strain. Blow-off was approached by decreasing the mixture equivalence ratio, at a fixed Reynolds number, of the incoming flow. A flame is stable (does not undergo blow-off) when (1) flame displacement speed is equal to the flow speed and (2) the gradient of the flame displacement speed normal to its surface is higher than the gradient of the flow speed along the same direction. As the equivalence ratio is reduced, the difference between the former and the latter shrinks until the dynamic stability condition (2) is violated, leading to blow-off. Blow-off initiates at a location where this is first violated along the flame. Our results showed that this location was far downstream from the flame anchoring zone, near the end of the recirculation zone. Blow-off started by flame pinching separating the flame into an upstream moving (carried within the recirculation zone) and a downstream convecting (detached from the recirculation zone) flame piece. Within the range of operating conditions investigated, the conjugate heat exchange with the bluff-body had no impact on the flame blow-off.

  15. A new gaseous detector- micro mesh gaseous structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Hao-Hui; GUO Jun-Jun; WANG Xiao-Lian; XU Zi-Zong

    2009-01-01

    The structure and working principle of Micromegas (MICRO Mesh Gaseous Structure) is discussed. Some radiation sources of a and X rays are used to test this detector. The optimized electric-field intensity of the conversion gap is obtained. The transmission of electrons and the uniformity of the amplification gap are also presented. The energy resolution of the 5.9 keV peak is better than 27%.

  16. Modeling dry-scrubbing of gaseous HCl with hydrated lime in cyclones with and without recirculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibante, Vania G., E-mail: vaniachi@fe.up.pt [DEQ/LEPAE, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Fonseca, Ana M., E-mail: afonseca@ufp.pt [CIAGEB, Universidade Fernando Pessoa, Praca 9 Abril 349, 4249-004 Porto (Portugal); Salcedo, Romualdo R., E-mail: rsalcedo@fe.up.pt [DEQ/LEPAE, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Advanced Cyclone Systems S.A., Rua de Salazares, 842, Ed. Promonet, Porto (Portugal)

    2010-06-15

    A mathematical model describing the dry-scrubbing of gaseous hydrogen chloride (HCl) with solid hydrated lime particles (Ca(OH){sub 2}) was developed and experimentally verified. The model applies to cyclone systems with and without recirculation, where reaction and particle collection occurs in the same processing unit. The Modified Grain Model was selected to describe the behavior of the reaction process and it was assumed that the gas and the solid particles flow in the reactor with a plug flow. In this work, this behavior is approximated by a cascade of N CSTRs in series. Some of the model parameters were estimated by optimization taking into account the experimental results obtained. A good agreement was observed between the experimental results and those predicted by the model, where the main control resistance is the diffusion of the gaseous reactant in the layer of solid product formed.

  17. Modification of premixed combustion in shear layers by grid turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MU Kejin; WANG Yue; ZHANG Zhedian; NIE Chaoqun

    2007-01-01

    The influence of grid turbulence on the shear layer of a jet and the premixed flames embedded in it was investigated in the present study. The velocity field of the jet was measured by using hot-wire anemometry. It was found that grid turbulence reduced turbulence intensities in the shear layer and suppressed low frcquency fluctuation. Moreover, the energy contained in small-scale fluctuation was increased and turbulence became homogeneous. The results indicate that grid turbulence inhibits the formation of a large-scale coherent structure in the shear layer. Flame temperature was measured by using a compensated free-wire thermocouple. It was found that grid turbulence reduced low frequency fluctuation of thc flame fronts, increased the small-scale wrinkles and elevated the mean temperature of the flame zone. The results show that grid turbulence can enhance and stabilize premixed flames in shear flow.

  18. Response analysis of a laminar premixed M-flame to flow perturbations using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, M., E-mail: mathieu.blanchard@ladhyx.polytechnique.fr [LadHyX, CNRS and Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Schuller, T. [CNRS, UPR 288, Laboratoire d’Energétique Moléculaire et Macroscopique Combustion (EM2C), Grande Voie des Vignes, 92290 Châtenay-Malabry (France); Centrale-Supélec, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92290 Châtenay-Malabry (France); Sipp, D. [ONERA-DAFE, 8 rue des Vertugadins, 92190 Meudon (France); Schmid, P. J. [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    The response of a laminar premixed methane-air flame subjected to flow perturbations around a steady state is examined experimentally and using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver with a one-step chemistry mechanism to describe combustion. The unperturbed flame takes an M-shape stabilized both by a central bluff body and by the external rim of a cylindrical nozzle. This base flow is computed by a nonlinear direct simulation of the steady reacting flow, and the flame topology is shown to qualitatively correspond to experiments conducted under comparable conditions. The flame is then subjected to acoustic disturbances produced at different locations in the numerical domain, and its response is examined using the linearized solver. This linear numerical model then allows the componentwise investigation of the effects of flow disturbances on unsteady combustion and the feedback from the flame on the unsteady flow field. It is shown that a wrinkled reaction layer produces hydrodynamic disturbances in the fresh reactant flow field that superimpose on the acoustic field. This phenomenon, observed in several experiments, is fully interpreted here. The additional perturbations convected by the mean flow stem from the feedback of the perturbed flame sheet dynamics onto the flow field by a mechanism similar to that of a perturbed vortex sheet. The different regimes where this mechanism prevails are investigated by examining the phase and group velocities of flow disturbances along an axis oriented along the main direction of the flow in the fresh reactant flow field. It is shown that this mechanism dominates the low-frequency response of the wrinkled shape taken by the flame and, in particular, that it fully determines the dynamics of the flame tip from where the bulk of noise is radiated.

  19. Mechanisms of stabilization and blowoff of a premixed flame downstream of a heat-conducting perforated plate

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, Kushal S.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the flame stabilization mechanism and the conditions leading to the blowoff of a laminar premixed flame anchored downstream of a heat-conducting perforated-plate/multi-hole burner, with overall nearly adiabatic conditions. We use unsteady, fully resolved, two-dimensional simulations with detailed chemical kinetics and species transport for methane-air combustion. Results show a bell-shaped flame stabilizing above the burner plate hole, with a U-shaped section anchored between neighboring holes. The base of the positively curved U-shaped section of the flame is positioned near the stagnation point, at a location where the flame displacement speed is equal to the flow speed. This location is determined by the combined effect of heat loss and flame stretch on the flame displacement speed. As the mass flow rate of the reactants is increased, the flame displacement speed at this location varies non-monotonically. As the inlet velocity is increased, the recirculation zone grows slowly, the flame moves downstream, and the heat loss to the burner decreases, strengthening the flame and increasing its displacement speed. As the inlet velocity is raised, the stagnation point moves downstream, and the flame length grows to accommodate the reactants mass flow. Concomitantly, the radius of curvature of the flame base decreases until it reaches an almost constant value, comparable to the flame thickness. While the heat loss decreases, the higher flame curvature dominates thereby reducing the displacement speed of the flame base. For a stable flame, the gradient of the flame base displacement speed normal to the flame is higher than the gradient of the flow speed along the same direction, leading to dynamic stability. As inlet velocity is raised further, the former decreases while the latter increases until the stability condition is violated, leading to blowoff. The flame speed during blow off is determined by the feedback between the

  20. Premixed burner experiments: Geometry, mixing, and flame structure issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A.K.; Lewis, M.J.; Gupta, M. [Univ of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    This research program is exploring techniques for improved fuel-air mixing, with the aim of achieving combustor operations up to stoichiometric conditions with minimal NO x and maximum efficiency. The experimental studies involve the use of a double-concentric natural gas burner that is operable in either premixed or non-premixed modes, and the system allows systematic variation of equivalence ratio, swirl strength shear length region and flow momentum in each annulus. Flame structures formed with various combinations of swirl strengths, flow throughput and equivalence ratios in premixed mode show the significant impact of swirl flow distribution on flame structure emanating from the mixedness. This impact on flame structure is expected to have a pronounced effect on the heat release rate and the emission of NO{sub x}. Thus, swirler design and configuration remains a key factor in the quest for completely optimized combustion. Parallel numerical studies of the flow and combustion phenomena were carried out, using the RSM and thek-{epsilon} turbulence models. These results have not only indicated the strengths and limitations of CFD in performance and pollutants emission predictions, but have provided guidelines on the size and strength of the recirculation produced and the spatio-temporal structure of the combustion flowfield. The first stage of parametric studies on geometry and operational parameters at Morgan State University have culminated in the completion of a one-dimensional flow code that is integrated with a solid, virtual model of the existing premixed burner. This coupling will provide the unique opportunity to study the impact of geometry on the flowfield and vice-versa, with particular emphasis on concurrent design optimization.

  1. Microbial production of gaseous hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hideo

    1987-10-20

    Microbial production of ethylene, isobutane and a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture was described. Microbial ethylene production was studied with Penicillium digitatum IFO 9372 and a novel pathway of the ethylene biosynthesis through alpha-ketoglutarate was proposed. Rhodotorula minuta IFO 1102 was selected for the microbial production of isobutane and the interesting actions of L-leucine and L-phenylalanine for the isobutane production were found. It was finally presented about the microbial production of a saturated gaseous hydrocarbon mixture with Rhizopus japonicus IFO 4758 was described. A gas mixture was produced through a chemical reaction of SH compounds and some cellular component such as squalene under aerobic conditions. (4 figs, 7 tabs, 41 refs)

  2. Gaseous fuel nuclear reactor research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, F. C.; Thom, K.

    1975-01-01

    Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors are described; their distinguishing feature is the use of fissile fuels in a gaseous or plasma state, thereby breaking the barrier of temperature imposed by solid-fuel elements. This property creates a reactor heat source that may be able to heat the propellant of a rocket engine to 10,000 or 20,000 K. At this temperature level, gas-core reactors would provide the breakthrough in propulsion needed to open the entire solar system to manned and unmanned spacecraft. The possibility of fuel recycling makes possible efficiencies of up to 65% and nuclear safety at reduced cost, as well as high-thrust propulsion capabilities with specific impulse up to 5000 sec.

  3. Premixed intravenous admixtures: a positive development for hospital pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H E

    1983-06-01

    The development of premixed intravenous admixtures is reviewed in a historical context, and its effects on hospital pharmacy practice are discussed. As pharmaceutical manufacturers introduce more i.v. medications in ready-to-use containers, the same complaints that were voiced by pharmacists about unit dose packaging and ready-to-dispense tablets and capsules are being aired. But premixed i.v. admixtures are a logical extension of the basic unit dose principle of providing a readily identifiable and ready-to-administer dose. The time and cost savings these products offer are needed in hospital pharmacies. Some of the disadvantages of these products--including storage and freezer space and multiplicity of administration systems--are overcome by proper planning and education of personnel. If fewer personnel are now needed to prepare i.v. admixtures, then those personnel should be used to improve patient care in other ways. The use of premixed i.v. admixtures is a positive technological advance in drug packaging. Its advantages outweight its disadvantages, and it will soon be become the universally accepted form of i.v. drug packaging.

  4. Large eddy simulation of unsteady lean stratified premixed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duwig, C. [Division of Fluid Mechanics, Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Fureby, C. [Division of Weapons and Protection, Warheads and Propulsion, The Swedish Defense Research Agency, FOI, SE 147 25 Tumba (Sweden)

    2007-10-15

    Premixed turbulent flame-based technologies are rapidly growing in importance, with applications to modern clean combustion devices for both power generation and aeropropulsion. However, the gain in decreasing harmful emissions might be canceled by rising combustion instabilities. Unwanted unsteady flame phenomena that might even destroy the whole device have been widely reported and are subject to intensive studies. In the present paper, we use unsteady numerical tools for simulating an unsteady and well-documented flame. Computations were performed for nonreacting, perfectly premixed and stratified premixed cases using two different numerical codes and different large-eddy-simulation-based flamelet models. Nonreacting simulations are shown to agree well with experimental data, with the LES results capturing the mean features (symmetry breaking) as well as the fluctuation level of the turbulent flow. For reacting cases, the uncertainty induced by the time-averaging technique limited the comparisons. Given an estimate of the uncertainty, the numerical results were found to reproduce well the experimental data in terms both of mean flow field and of fluctuation levels. In addition, it was found that despite relying on different assumptions/simplifications, both numerical tools lead to similar predictions, giving confidence in the results. Moreover, we studied the flame dynamics and particularly the response to a periodic pulsation. We found that above a certain excitation level, the flame dynamic changes and becomes rather insensitive to the excitation/instability amplitude. Conclusions regarding the self-growth of thermoacoustic waves were drawn. (author)

  5. Large Eddy Simulation of High-Speed, Premixed Ethylene Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Kiran; Edwards, Jack R.; Chelliah, Harsha; Goyne, Christopher; McDaniel, James; Rockwell, Robert; Kirik, Justin; Cutler, Andrew; Danehy, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A large-eddy simulation / Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (LES/RANS) methodology is used to simulate premixed ethylene-air combustion in a model scramjet designed for dual mode operation and equipped with a cavity for flameholding. A 22-species reduced mechanism for ethylene-air combustion is employed, and the calculations are performed on a mesh containing 93 million cells. Fuel plumes injected at the isolator entrance are processed by the isolator shock train, yielding a premixed fuel-air mixture at an equivalence ratio of 0.42 at the cavity entrance plane. A premixed flame is anchored within the cavity and propagates toward the opposite wall. Near complete combustion of ethylene is obtained. The combustor is highly dynamic, exhibiting a large-scale oscillation in global heat release and mass flow rate with a period of about 2.8 ms. Maximum heat release occurs when the flame front reaches its most downstream extent, as the flame surface area is larger. Minimum heat release is associated with flame propagation toward the cavity and occurs through a reduction in core flow velocity that is correlated with an upstream movement of the shock train. Reasonable agreement between simulation results and available wall pressure, particle image velocimetry, and OH-PLIF data is obtained, but it is not yet clear whether the system-level oscillations seen in the calculations are actually present in the experiment.

  6. Complex nonlinear behaviour of a fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1999-01-01

    The fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle investigated in this paper can exhibit periodic solutions. These solutions bifurcate from the steady state in a Hopf bifurcation. The Hopf bifurcation encountered at the lowest value of the inlet concentration turns the steady state unstable and marks......,that the dynamic behaviour of a fixed bed reactor with reactant recycle is much more complex than previously reported....

  7. Reactant ion chemistry for detection of TNT, RDX, and PETN using an ion mobility spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klassen, S.E.; Rodacy, P.; Silva, R.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the responses of three energetic materials (TNT, RDX, and PETN) to varying reactant ion chemistries and IMS cell temperatures. The following reactant ion chemistries were evaluated; air-dry; air-wet; methylene chloride-dry; methylene chloride-wet; methylene bromide-dry; nitrogen dioxide-wet; sulfur dioxide-wet. The temperature was varied between 160 - 220{degrees}C.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations for a Lotka-type model with reactant surface diffusion and interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvejnieks, G; Kuzovkov, V N

    2001-05-01

    The standard Lotka-type model, which was introduced for the first time by Mai et al. [J. Phys. A 30, 4171 (1997)] for a simplified description of autocatalytic surface reactions, is generalized here for a case of mobile and energetically interacting reactants. The mathematical formalism is proposed for determining the dependence of transition rates on the interaction energy (and temperature) for the general mathematical model, and the Lotka-type model, in particular. By means of Monte Carlo computer simulations, we have studied the impact of diffusion (with and without energetic interactions between reactants) on oscillatory properties of the A+B-->2B reaction. The diffusion leads to a desynchronization of oscillations and a subsequent decrease of oscillation amplitude. The energetic interaction between reactants has a dual effect depending on the type of mobile reactants. In the limiting case of mobile reactants B the repulsion results in a decrease of amplitudes. However, these amplitudes increase if reactants A are mobile and repulse each other. A simplified interpretation of the obtained results is given.

  9. Gaseous abundances in M82

    CERN Document Server

    Ranalli, P; Origlia, L; Maiolino, R; Makishima, K; Ranalli, Piero; Comastri, Andrea; Origlia, Livia; Maiolino, Roberto; Makishima, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    We present the preliminary analysis of a deep (100ks) XMM-Newton observation of M82. The spatial distribution of the abundances of chemical elements (Fe, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S) is investigated through narrow-band imaging analisys and spatially-resolved spectroscopy. We find that the abundances of alpha-elements follow a bipolar distribution, these elements being more abundant in the gaseous outflow than in the galaxy centre. This behaviour is found to be more marked for lighter elements (O, Ne) than for heavier elements.

  10. Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

    2013-12-17

    A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

  11. Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

  12. Intensifying existing premix therapy (BIAsp 30) with BIAsp 50 and BIAsp 70

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brito, Miguel; Ligthelm, Robert Jan; Boemi, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, consensus guidelines were published on intensification of insulin therapy using the premix analog biphasic insulin aspart (BIAsp) 30 in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, based on the recommendations of an international, independent expert panel. The guidelines included recommendations...... switch from a BIAsp 30 to a mid-/high-ratio premix regimen for the vast majority of patients with type 2 diabetes. A panel of independent experts with extensive clinical experience in premix analog therapy met in October 2009 to review the therapeutic role of mid- and high-ratio premixes (BIAsp 50 and 70...... assist physicians in introducing mid-/high-ratio premixes to optimize the insulin therapy of patients with type 2 diabetes who are failing to achieve glycemic targets on a BIAsp 30 BID or TID regimen....

  13. Acceleration of disproportionation of aromatic alcohols through self-emulsification of reactants in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binbin; Song, Jinliang; Liu, Huizhen; Han, Buxing; Jiang, Tao; Fan, Honglei; Zhang, Zhaofu; Wu, Tianbin

    2012-12-01

    Exploration of new and effective routes to conduct organic reactions in water using the special properties of water/organics is of great importance. In this work, we performed the disproportionation of various aromatic alcohols in water and in different organic solvents. It was demonstrated that the disproportionation reactions of the alcohols were accelerated more effectively in water than organic-solvent-based or solvent-free reactions. A series of control experiments were conducted to study the mechanism of the accelerated reaction rate in water. It was shown that the reactants could emulsify the reactant/water systems at the reaction conditions owing to their amphiphilic nature. The regularly orientated reactant molecules at the water/reactant droplet interface improved the contact probability of the reactive groups and the Pd nanocatalysts, which is one of the main reasons for the enhanced reaction rate in water. Controlling the self-emulsification of amphiphilic reactant/water systems has great application potential for optimizing the rate and/or selectivity of many organic reactions.

  14. Flashback mechanisms in lean premixed gas turbine combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Benim, Ali Cemal

    2014-01-01

    Blending fuels with hydrogen offers the potential to reduce NOx and CO2 emissions in gas turbines, but doing so introduces potential new problems such as flashback.  Flashback can lead to thermal overload and destruction of hardware in the turbine engine, with potentially expensive consequences. The little research on flashback that is available is fragmented. Flashback Mechanisms in Lean Premixed Gas Turbine Combustion by Ali Cemal Benim will address not only the overall issue of the flashback phenomenon, but also the issue of fragmented and incomplete research.Presents a coherent review of f

  15. Premixed Combustion of Coconut Oil on Perforated Burner

    OpenAIRE

    I.K.G. Wirawan; I. N. G. Wardana; Rudy Soenoko; Slamet Wahyudi

    2013-01-01

    Coconut oil premixed combustion behavior has been studied experimentally on perforated burner with equivalence ratio (φ) varied from very lean until very rich. The results showed that burning of glycerol needs large number of air so that the laminar burning velocity (SL) is the highest at very lean mixture and the flame is in the form of individual Bunsen flame on each of the perforated plate hole. As φ is increased the  SL decreases and the secondary Bunsen flame with open tip occurs from φ ...

  16. Setting mechanisms of an acidic premixed calcium phosphate cement

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Premixed calcium phosphate cements (pCPC), where glycerol is used instead of water as mixing liquid, present better handling characteristics than water-based cements. However, the setting mechanisms of pCPC have not been described thoroughly. The aim of this paper is to increase the understanding of the setting mechanism of pCPC. The investigated cement starts to set when glycerol is exchanged with water via diffusion of glycerol out to the surrounding body fluid and water into the material. ...

  17. Jet flow and premixed jet flame control by plasma swirler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Jiang, Xi; Zhao, Yujun; Liu, Cunxi; Chen, Qi; Xu, Gang; Liu, Fuqiang

    2017-04-01

    A swirler based on dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators is designed and its effectiveness in both jet flow and premixed jet flame control is demonstrated. In contrast to traditional spanwise-oriented actuators, plasma actuators are placed along the axial direction of the injector to induce a circumferential velocity to the main flow and create a swirl flow without any insertion or moving part. In the DBD plasma swirl injector, the discharge does not ignite the mixture nor does it induce flashback. Flame visualization is obtained by cameras while velocity profiles are obtained by Laser Doppler Anemometry measurements. The results obtained indicate the effectiveness of the new design.

  18. Premixer assembly for mixing air and fuel for combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    York, William David; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2016-12-13

    A premixer assembly for mixing air and fuel for combustion includes a plurality of tubes disposed at a head end of a combustor assembly. Also included is a tube of the plurality of tubes, the tube including an inlet end and an outlet end. Further included is at least one non-circular portion of the tube extending along a length of the tube, the at least one non-circular portion having a non-circular cross-section, and the tube having a substantially constant cross-sectional area along its length

  19. Role of inlet reactant mixedness on the thermodynamic performance of a rotating detonation engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordeen, C. A.; Schwer, D.; Schauer, F.; Hoke, J.; Barber, T.; Cetegen, B. M.

    2016-07-01

    Rotating detonation engines have the potential to achieve the high propulsive efficiencies of detonation cycles in a simple and effective annular geometry. A two-dimensional Euler simulation is modified to include mixing factors to simulate the imperfect mixing of injected reactant streams. Contrary to expectations, mixing is shown to have a minimal impact on performance. Oblique detonation waves are shown to increase local stream thermal efficiency, which compensates for other losses in the flow stream. The degree of reactant mixing is, however, a factor in controlling the stability and existence of rotating detonations.

  20. Finite amplitude wave interaction with premixed laminar flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Mohamad; Regele, Jonathan D.

    2014-11-01

    The physics underlying combustion instability is an active area of research because of its detrimental impact in many combustion devices, such as turbines, jet engines, and liquid rocket engines. Pressure waves, ranging from acoustic waves to strong shocks, are potential sources of these disturbances. Literature on flame-disturbance interactions are primarily focused on either acoustics or strong shock wave interactions, with little information about the wide spectrum of behaviors that may exist between these two extremes. For example, the interaction between a flame and a finite amplitude compression wave is not well characterized. This phenomenon is difficult to study numerically due to the wide range of scales that need to be captured, requiring powerful and efficient numerical techniques. In this work, the interaction of a perturbed laminar premixed flame with a finite amplitude compression wave is investigated using the Parallel Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Method (PAWCM). This method optimally solves the fully compressible Navier-Stokes equations while capturing the essential scales. The results show that depending on the amplitude and duration of a finite amplitude disturbance, the interaction between these waves and premixed flames can produce a broad range of responses.

  1. Mixing Model Performance in Non-Premixed Turbulent Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Stephen B.; Ren, Zhuyin

    2002-11-01

    In order to shed light on their qualitative and quantitative performance, three different turbulent mixing models are studied in application to non-premixed turbulent combustion. In previous works, PDF model calculations with detailed kinetics have been shown to agree well with experimental data for non-premixed piloted jet flames. The calculations from two different groups using different descriptions of the chemistry and turbulent mixing are capable of producing the correct levels of local extinction and reignition. The success of these calculations raises several questions, since it is not clear that the mixing models used contain an adequate description of the processes involved. To address these questions, three mixing models (IEM, modified Curl and EMST) are applied to a partially-stirred reactor burning hydrogen in air. The parameters varied are the residence time and the mixing time scale. For small relative values of the mixing time scale (approaching the perfectly-stirred limit) the models yield the same extinction behavior. But for larger values, the behavior is distictly different, with EMST being must resistant to extinction.

  2. Direct Numerical Simulations of Statistically Stationary Turbulent Premixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2016-07-15

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties of hydrocarbon fuels, with physical parameter ranges approaching laboratory scale flames, thereby allowing direct comparison and cross-validation against laser diagnostic measurements. While these developments have led to significantly improved understanding of fundamental turbulent flame characteristics, there are increasing demands to explore combustion regimes at higher levels of turbulent Reynolds (Re) and Karlovitz (Ka) numbers, with a practical interest in new combustion engines driving towards higher efficiencies and lower emissions. The article attempts to provide a brief overview of the state-of-the-art DNS of turbulent premixed flames at high Re/Ka conditions, with an emphasis on homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow configurations. Some important qualitative findings from numerical studies are summarized, new analytical approaches to investigate intensely turbulent premixed flame dynamics are discussed, and topics for future research are suggested. © 2016 Taylor & Francis.

  3. Ion measurements in premixed methane-oxygen flames

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad

    2014-07-25

    Ions are formed as a result of chemi-ionization processes in combustion systems. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in understanding flame ion chemistry due to the possible application of external electric fields to reduce emissions and improve combustion efficiency by active control of combustion process. In order to predict the effect of external electric fields on combustion plasma, it is critical to gain a good understanding of the flame ion chemistry. In this work, a Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometer (MBMS) is utilized to measure ion concentration profiles in premixed methane-oxygen-argon burner-stabilized flames. Lean, stoichiometric and rich flames at atmospheric pressure are used to study the dependence of ion chemistry on equivalence ratio of premixed flames. The relative ion concentration profiles are compared qualitatively with previous methane-oxygen studies and show good agreement. The relative ion concentration data obtained in the present study can be used to validate and improve ion chemistry models for methane-oxygen flames.

  4. Cathlean: catalytic, hybrid, lean-premixed burner for gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroni, Richard; Griffin, Timothy [Alstom Power Technology Ltd., Baden-Daettwil (Switzerland); Kelsall, Greg [Alstom Power Technology Centre, Whetstone (United Kingdom)

    2004-08-01

    Cathlean (an EU FP5 project) addresses the research and development of an advanced, ultra-low NO{sub x}, hybrid burner for gas turbines (present and future), that combines catalytic and lean-premix combustion components. Such a hybrid design enables this new technology to be introduced in a lower-risk manner. The catalytic elements serve to pretreat the fuel in order to enhance performance in terms of emissions <3 ppmv NO{sub x} and <10 ppmv CO at 15% O{sub 2} and 50-100% load, for natural gas fuel), part-load stability (reducing the lean blow-out temperature by over 100 deg C) and thermoacoustic phenomena (pulsations << 0.3% of pressure). The principle scientific objective is to quantify the advantages of the hybrid burner in terms of the above-mentioned criteria, relative to traditional, lean-premixed combustors. The present paper describes the technical and organisational aspects of the project, including an outline of state-of-the-art catalytic combustion technology, technical specification of the advanced burner and a description of the methods used to attain project goals. (Author)

  5. Establishing bioequivalence of veterinary premixes (Type A medicated articles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, R P; Lees, P; Concordet, D; Toutain, P-L

    2012-04-01

    a) Key issues concerning Premix (Type A medicated articles) Bioequivalence evaluations: 1) This is a complex issue concerning both route of administration and formulation. 2) If the animal is not at the bunk/trough, the animal is not self-administering (eating medicated feed), thus there can be no drug absorption. b) Differing opinions among scientists and regulatory authorities/expert bodies regarding: 1) No harmonization on how to design, conduct, and interpret in vivo studies. 2) Applicability of biowaivers to Type A (premix) products. 3) Why are topdress and complete feed considered differently? Are they different formulations or different routes of administration? 4) Single dose vs. multi-dose studies. 5) What is the final formulation? c) What are the next steps: 1) Harmonize current bioequivalence guidelines through the VICH process. 2) Determine the applicability/non-applicability of the Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS). 3) Establish the Total Mixed Ration (i.e. formulation) effects. 4) Define the test subject (individual, pen, etc.).

  6. Simuliranje izotermnega QUEOS preskusa mešalne faze eksplozije pare Q08: Simulation of the isothermal QUEOS steam-explosion premixing experiment Q08:

    OpenAIRE

    Leskovar, Matjaž; Mavko, Borut

    2002-01-01

    The premixing phase of a steam explosion covers the interaction of the melt jet with the water prior to any steam explosion occuring. To ger a better insight into the hydrodynamic processes during the premixing phase in addition to "hot" premixing experiments, where the water evaporation is significant. "cold" isothermal premixing experiments were also performed. The special feature of isothermal premixing experiments is that three phases are involved - the water, the air and the spheres phas...

  7. Influence of water content on hardening and handling of a premixed calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrand, Johanna; Aberg, Jonas; Engqvist, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Handling of calcium phosphate cements is difficult, where problems often arise during mixing, transferring to syringes, and subsequent injection. Via the use of premixed cements the risk of handling complications is reduced. However, for premixed cements to work in a clinical situation the setting time needs to be improved. The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the addition of water on the properties of premixed cement. Monetite-forming premixed cements with small amounts of added water (less than 6.8 wt.%) were prepared and the influence on injectability, working time, setting time and mechanical strength was evaluated. The results showed that the addition of small amounts of water had significant influence on the properties of the premixed cement. With the addition of just 1.7 wt.% water, the force needed to extrude the cement from a syringe was reduced from 107 (±15) N to 39 (±9) N, the compression strength was almost doubled, and the setting time decreased from 29 (±4) min to 19 (±2) min, while the working time remained 5 to 6h. This study demonstrates the importance of controlling the water content in premixed cement pastes and how water can be used to improve the properties of premixed cements.

  8. High-bandwidth Modulation of H2/Syngas Fuel to Control Combustion Dynamics in Micro-Mixing Lean Premix Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeff Melzak; Tim Lieuwen; Adel Mansour

    2012-01-31

    The goal of this program was to develop and demonstrate fuel injection technologies that will facilitate the development of cost-effective turbine engines for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, while improving efficiency and reducing emissions. The program involved developing a next-generation multi-point injector with enhanced stability performance for lean premix turbine systems that burn hydrogen (H2) or synthesis gas (syngas) fuels. A previously developed injector that demonstrated superior emissions performance was improved to enhance static flame stability through zone staging and pilot sheltering. In addition, piezo valve technology was implemented to investigate the potential for enhanced dynamic stability through high-bandwidth modulation of the fuel supply. Prototype injector and valve hardware were tested in an atmospheric combustion facility. The program was successful in meeting its objectives. Specifically, the following was accomplished: Demonstrated improvement of lean operability of the Parker multi-point injector through staging of fuel flow and primary zone sheltering; Developed a piezo valve capable of proportional and high-bandwidth modulation of gaseous fuel flow at frequencies as high as 500 Hz; The valve was shown to be capable of effecting changes to flame dynamics, heat release, and acoustic signature of an atmospheric combustor. The latter achievement indicates the viability of the Parker piezo valve technology for use in future adaptively controlled systems for the mitigation of combustion instabilities, particularly for attenuating combustion dynamics under ultra-lean conditions.

  9. Solid oxide fuel cell systems with hot zones having improved reactant distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poshusta, Joseph C.; Booten, Charles W.; Martin, Jerry L.

    2016-05-17

    A Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system having a hot zone with a center cathode air feed tube for improved reactant distribution, a CPOX reactor attached at the anode feed end of the hot zone with a tail gas combustor at the opposing end for more uniform heat distribution, and a counter-flow heat exchanger for efficient heat retention.

  10. The catalytic combustion of natural gas in a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neomagus, H.W.J.P.; Saracco, G.; Wessel, H.F.W.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an experimental and modelling analysis of the performance of a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants for the combustion of methane. In this reactor concept methane and air streams are fed at opposite sides of a Pt/γ-Al2O3-activated porous membrane which hosts their

  11. The catalytic combustion of natural gas in a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neomagus, H.W.J.P.; Saracco, G.; Wessel, H.F.W.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an experimental and modelling analysis of the performance of a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants for the combustion of methane. In this reactor concept methane and air streams are fed at opposite sides of a Pt/γ-Al2O3-activated porous membrane which hosts their rea

  12. Catalytic membrane in denitrification of water: a means to facilitate intraporous diffusion of reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilinich, O.M.; Cuperus, F.P.; Gemert, van R.W.; Gribov, E.N.; Nosova, L.V.

    2000-01-01

    The series of mono- and bi-metallic catalysts with Pd and/or Cu supported over γ-Al 2O 3 was investigated with respect to reduction of nitrate and nitrite ions in water by hydrogen. Pronounced limitations of catalytic performance due to intraporous diffusion of the reactants were observed in the rea

  13. Isolation of a lipopolysaccharide-binding acute phase reactant from rabbit serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, P S; Soldau, K; Ulevitch, R J

    1986-09-01

    This report describes the purification of an acute phase reactant from acute phase rabbit serum, which endows normal serum with the properties of acute phase serum, insofar as LPS is concerned. The acute phase reactant is referred to as LPS-binding protein, or LBP. LBP was purified approximately 2,000-fold by chromatography of acute phase serum on Bio-Rex 70 and Mono-Q resins. The resulting preparation consisted of two glycoproteins having molecular weights of 60,500 and 58,000; the two were obtained in a variable ratio, usually near 10:1, respectively. After separation by SDS-PAGE, the N-terminal 36 amino acid sequences of the two proteins were identical. From the N-terminal sequence, as well as other properties of LBP, LBP appears to be unrelated to any known acute phase reactants. The direct interaction of LPS and LBP was inferred from two types of evidence: first, immunoprecipitation of [3H]LPS from APRS by anti-LBP sera; and second, by the 125I-labeling of LBP when APRS-containing 125I-labeled 2-(p-azidosalicylamido)ethyl 1,3'-dithiopropionyl-LPS was photolysed. The data presented here support the concept that the 60-kD glycoprotein we have termed LBP is a newly recognized acute phase reactant that may modulate the biochemical and biologic properties of LPS in vivo.

  14. 共反应剂TPPD的制备%Synthesis of a nevol co-reactant TPPD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉红; 梁艳霞; 刘娟娟; 肖丹

    2012-01-01

    本实验合成了一种共反应剂N,N,N’,N’-4-丙基-戊二胺(TPPD),它的分子中含有两个叔氨基,与传统的共反应剂三丙胺(TPA)相比增加了一个氮的活性位点.并且分子中的碳碳长链使得TPPD的疏水性增加,因此能与钌配合物[Ru(bpy)3] [4-(Clph)4B]2同时固定到ITO电极上,减少了ECL过程中的共反应剂的消耗.%In this work,a new organic-soluble co-reactant N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(propyl)-pentanediamine(TPPD) was synthesized. It contains two tertiary amines. Compared with the traditional co-reactant, such as tripropylamine (TPA) it has two nitrogen active sites. The new co-reactant is very hydrophobic and thus could be co-immobilized with tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II)ditetrakis (4-chlorophenyl)borate[Ru(bpy)3] [4-(Clph)4B]2 on an indium tin oxide(ITO) electrode. So the consumption of co-reactant is greatly reduced in the electrochemiluminescent(ECL) process.

  15. Catalytic membrane in denitrification of water: a means to facilitate intraporous diffusion of reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilinich, O.M.; Cuperus, F.P.; Gemert, van R.W.; Gribov, E.N.; Nosova, L.V.

    2000-01-01

    The series of mono- and bi-metallic catalysts with Pd and/or Cu supported over γ-Al 2O 3 was investigated with respect to reduction of nitrate and nitrite ions in water by hydrogen. Pronounced limitations of catalytic performance due to intraporous diffusion of the reactants were observed in the

  16. The catalytic combustion of natural gas in a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neomagus, H.W.J.P.; Saracco, G.; Wessel, H.F.W.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an experimental and modelling analysis of the performance of a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants for the combustion of methane. In this reactor concept methane and air streams are fed at opposite sides of a Pt/γ-Al2O3-activated porous membrane which hosts their rea

  17. Novel Adsorbent-Reactants for Treatment of Ash and Scrubber Pond Effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill Batchelor; Dong Suk Han; Eun Jung Kim

    2010-01-31

    The overall goal of this project was to evaluate the ability of novel adsorbent/reactants to remove specific toxic target chemicals from ash and scrubber pond effluents while producing stable residuals for ultimate disposal. The target chemicals studied were arsenic (As(III) and As(V)), mercury (Hg(II)) and selenium (Se(IV) and Se(VI)). The adsorbent/reactants that were evaluated are iron sulfide (FeS) and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}). Procedures for measuring concentrations of target compounds and characterizing the surfaces of adsorbent-reactants were developed. Effects of contact time, pH (7, 8, 9, 10) and sulfate concentration (0, 1, 10 mM) on removal of all target compounds on both adsorbent-reactants were determined. Stability tests were conducted to evaluate the extent to which target compounds were released from the adsorbent-reactants when pH changed. Surface characterization was conducted with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to identify reactions occurring on the surface between the target compounds and surface iron and sulfur. Results indicated that target compounds could be removed by FeS{sub 2} and FeS and that removal was affected by time, pH and surface reactions. Stability of residuals was generally good and appeared to be affected by the extent of surface reactions. Synthesized pyrite and mackinawite appear to have the required characteristics for removing the target compounds from wastewaters from ash ponds and scrubber ponds and producing stable residuals.

  18. Photocatalytic Conversion of Carbon Dioxide Using Zn–Cu–Ga Layered Double Hydroxides Assembled with Cu Phthalocyanine: Cu in Contact with Gaseous Reactant is Needed for Methanol Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamura Shogo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalytic conversion of CO2 into fuels is an attractive option in terms of both reducing the increased concentration of atmospheric CO2 as well as generating renewable hydrocarbon fuels. It is necessary to investigate good catalysts for CO2 conversion and to clarify the mechanism irradiated by natural light. Layered Double Hydroxides (LDH have been attracting attention for CO2 photoreduction with the expectation of sorption capacity for CO2 in the layered space and tunable semiconductor properties as a result of the choice of metal cations. This study first clarifies the effects of Cu doping to LDH comprising Zn and Al or Ga. Cu could be incorporated in the cationic layers of LDH as divalent metal cations and/or interlayer anions as Cu(OH42−. The formation rates of methanol and CO were optimized for [Zn1.5Cu1.5Ga(OH8]+2Cu(OH42−·mH2O at a total rate of 560 nmol h−1 gcat−1 irradiated by UV–visible light. Cu phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate hydrate (CuPcTs4− and silver were effective as promoters of LDH for CO2 photoreduction. Especially, the total formation rate using CuPcTs-[Zn3Ga(OH8]+2CO32−·mH2O irradiated by visible light was 73% of that irradiated by UV–visible light. The promotion was based on HOMO–LUMO excitation of CuPcTs4− by visible light. The LUMO was distributed on N atoms of pyrrole rings bound to central Cu2+ ions. The photogenerated electrons diffused to the Cu site would photoreduce CO2 progressively in a similar way to inlayer and interlayer Cu sites in the LDH in this study.

  19. Gaseous phase coal surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okoh, J.M.; Pinion, J.; Thiensatit, S.

    1992-05-07

    In this report, we present an improved, feasible and potentially cost effective method of cleaning and beneficiating ultrafine coal. Increased mechanization of mining methods and the need towards depyritization, and demineralization have led to an increase in the quantity of coal fines generated in recent times. For example, the amount of {minus}100 mesh coal occurring in coal preparation plant feeds now typically varies from 5 to 25% of the total feed. Environmental constraints coupled with the greatly increased cost of coal have made it increasingly important to recover more of these fines. Our method chemically modifies the surface of such coals by a series of gaseous phase treatments employing Friedel-Crafts reactions. By using olefins (ethene, propene and butene) and hydrogen chloride catalyst at elevated temperature, the surface hydrophobicity of coal is enhanced. This increased hydrophobicity is manifest in surface phenomena which reflect conditions at the solid/liquid interphase (zeta potential) and those which reflect conditions at the solid/liquid/gas interphases (contact angle, wettability and floatability).

  20. Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Craig D.; Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI

    2003-12-30

    During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

  1. Coaxial fuel and air premixer for a gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, William D; Ziminsky, Willy S; Lacy, Benjamin P

    2013-05-21

    An air/fuel premixer comprising a peripheral wall defining a mixing chamber, a nozzle disposed at least partially within the peripheral wall comprising an outer annular wall spaced from the peripheral wall so as to define an outer air passage between the peripheral wall and the outer annular wall, an inner annular wall disposed at least partially within and spaced from the outer annular wall, so as to define an inner air passage, and at least one fuel gas annulus between the outer annular wall and the inner annular wall, the at least one fuel gas annulus defining at least one fuel gas passage, at least one air inlet for introducing air through the inner air passage and the outer air passage to the mixing chamber, and at least one fuel inlet for injecting fuel through the fuel gas passage to the mixing chamber to form an air/fuel mixture.

  2. Three dimensional dynamic mode decomposition of premixed turbulent jet flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenga, Temistocle; Macart, Jonathan; Mueller, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of turbulent combustion DNS data largely focuses on statistical analyses. However, turbulent combustion is highly unsteady and dynamic. In this work, Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) will be explored as a tool for dynamic analysis of turbulent combustion DNS data, specifically a series of low Mach number spatially-evolving turbulent planar premixed hydrogen/air jet flames. DMD decomposes data into coherent modes with corresponding growth rates and oscillatory frequencies. The method identifies structures unbiased by energy so is particularly well suited to exploring dynamic processes at scales smaller than the largest, energy-containing scales of the flow and that may not be co-located in space and time. The focus of this work will be on both the physical insights that can potentially be derived from DMD modes and the computational issues associated with applying DMD to large three-dimensional DNS datasets.

  3. Flashback detection sensor for lean premix fuel nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Jimmy Dean; Richards, George Alan; Straub, Douglas L.; Liese, Eric Arnold; Trader, Jr., John Lee; Fasching, George Edward

    2002-08-06

    A sensor for detecting the flame occurring during a flashback condition in the fuel nozzle of a lean premix combustion system is presented. The sensor comprises an electrically isolated flashback detection electrode and a guard electrode, both of which generate electrical fields extending to the walls of the combustion chamber and to the walls of the fuel nozzle. The sensor is positioned on the fuel nozzle center body at a location proximate the entrance to the combustion chamber of the gas turbine combustion system. The sensor provides 360.degree. detection of a flashback inside the fuel nozzle, by detecting the current conducted by the flame within a time frame that will prevent damage to the gas turbine combustion system caused by the flashback condition.

  4. A turbulent premixed flame on fractal-grid generated turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Soulopoulos, Nikos; Beyrau, Frank; Hardalupas, Yannis; Taylor, A M K P; Vassilicos, J Christos

    2010-01-01

    A space-filling, low blockage fractal grid is used as a novel turbulence generator in a premixed turbulent combustion experiment. In contrast to the power law decay of a standard turbulence grid, the downstream turbulence intensity of the fractal grid increases until it reaches a peak at some distance from the grid before it finally decays. The effective mesh size and the solidity are the same as those of a standard square mesh grid with which it is compared. It is found that, for the same flow rate and stoichiometry, the fractal generated turbulence enhances the burning rate and causes the flame to further increase its area. Using a flame fractal model, an attempt is made to highlight differences between the flames established at the two different turbulent fields.

  5. Sintering Response of Aluminum 6061-TiB2 Composite: Effect of Prealloyed and Premixed Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paidpilli, Mahesh; Gupta, Gaurav Kumar; Upadhyaya, Anish

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, Al6061-based alloy and composites were produced using powder metallurgy route. Two different kinds of base powders (prealloyed and premixed 6061Al alloy) were mixed with TiB2 particles in compositions ranging from 0 to 15 vol.%, respectively. The processed powders were compacted at 300 MPa and sintered at 620 °C under N2 atmosphere. The microstructural evolution of prealloyed and premixed 6061Al alloy, at different stages of sintering cycle, was studied using scanning electron microscope and EDS analysis. A comparative study was done between prealloyed- and premixed-based composites on the basis of densification, microstructure, hardness, transverse rupture strength and electrical conductivity as a function of TiB2 content. Results indicated that premixed-based composites have better mechanical properties than prealloyed-based composites.

  6. An Investigation of a Hybrid Mixing Model for PDF Simulations of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Li, Shan; Wang, Hu; Ren, Zhuyin

    2015-11-01

    Predictive simulations of turbulent premixed flames over a wide range of Damköhler numbers in the framework of Probability Density Function (PDF) method still remain challenging due to the deficiency in current micro-mixing models. In this work, a hybrid micro-mixing model, valid in both the flamelet regime and broken reaction zone regime, is proposed. A priori testing of this model is first performed by examining the conditional scalar dissipation rate and conditional scalar diffusion in a 3-D direct numerical simulation dataset of a temporally evolving turbulent slot jet flame of lean premixed H2-air in the thin reaction zone regime. Then, this new model is applied to PDF simulations of the Piloted Premixed Jet Burner (PPJB) flames, which are a set of highly shear turbulent premixed flames and feature strong turbulence-chemistry interaction at high Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers. Supported by NSFC 51476087 and NSFC 91441202.

  7. Embedded computer controlled premixing inline injection system for air-assisted variable-rate sprayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improvements to reduce chemical waste and environmental pollution for variable-rate sprayers used in orchards and ornamental nurseries require inline injection techniques. A microprocessor controlled premixing inline injection system implementing a ceramic piston chemical metering pump and two small...

  8. Extinction conditions of a premixed flame in a channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliche, Mounir [LMP2M, Universite de Medea, Quartier Ain Dheb, 26000 Medea (Algeria); M2P2, UMR CNRS 6181, Universite de Provence, Marseille (France); Haldenwang, Pierre [M2P2, UMR CNRS 6181, Universite de Provence, Marseille (France); Chikh, Salah [LTPMP, Faculte de Genie Mecanique and de Genie des Procedes, USTHB, Bab Ezzouar (Algeria)

    2010-06-15

    A local refinement method is used to numerically predict the propagation and extinction conditions of a premixed flame in a channel considering a thermodiffusive model. A local refinement method is employed because of the numerous length scales that characterize this phenomenon. The time integration is self adaptive and the solution is based on a multigrid method using a zonal mesh refinement in the flame reaction zone. The objective is to determine the conditions of extinction which are characterized by the flame structure and its properties. We are interested in the following properties: the curvature of the flame, its maximum temperature, its speed of propagation and the distance separating the flame from the wall. We analyze the influence of heat losses at the wall through the thermal conductivity of the wall and the nature of the fuel characterized by the Lewis number of the mixture. This investigation allows us to identify three propagation regimes according to heat losses at the wall and to the channel radius. The results show that there is an intermediate value of the radius for which the flame can bend and propagate provided that its curvature does not exceed a certain limit value. Indeed, small values of the radius will choke the flame and extinguish it. The extinction occurs if the flame curvature becomes too small. Furthermore, this study allows us to predict the limiting values of the heat loss coefficient at extinction as well as the critical value of the channel radius above which the premixed flame may propagate without extinction. A dead zone of length 2-4 times the flame thickness appears between the flame and the wall for a Lewis number (Le) between 0.8 and 2. For small values of Le, local extinctions are observed. (author)

  9. Early structure of LPG partially premixed conically stabilized flames

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental investigation of LPG partially premixed turbulent flames stabilized within a conical nozzle burner under constant degree of partial premixing. The stability limits and mean flame structure are presented based on the mean gas temperature and the concentration of CO, O 2, NO, and HC at the flame early region of reaction. The investigation covered the influence of the nozzle cone angle, the jet exit velocity and the jet equivalence ratio. The stability results show that the flames with cone are more stable than those without cone. For conical stabilized flames, the stability results exhibit three different sensitivity regions between the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The inflame measurements prove that the flame stability could be attributed to the triple flame structure at the flame leading edge. The data show that the triple flame structure is influenced by cone angle, the jet velocity and the equivalence ratio. The flame is believed to be controlled by the recirculation flow inside the cone. Increasing the cone angle induced higher air entrainment to the reaction zone as depicted by a higher O 2 concentration within the flame leading edge. Increasing the jet velocity to a certain limit enhances the intensity of combustion at the flame leading edge, while excessive increase in jet velocity reduces this intensity. At a fixed jet velocity the higher the equivalence ratio, the higher the amount of fuel diffused and engulfed to the reaction zone, the more delay of the combustion completion and the higher the emission concentrations of the flame. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  10. On the mechanism of effective chemical reactions with turbulent mixing of reactants and finite rate of molecular reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorotilin, V. P.

    2017-01-01

    A generalization of the theory of chemical transformation processes under turbulent mixing of reactants and arbitrary values of the rate of molecular reactions is presented that was previously developed for the variant of an instantaneous reaction [13]. The use of the features of instantaneous reactions when considering the general case, namely, the introduction of the concept of effective reaction for the reactant volumes and writing a closing conservation equation for these volumes, became possible due to the partition of the whole amount of reactants into "active" and "passive" classes; the reactants of the first class are not mixed and react by the mechanism of instantaneous reactions, while the reactants of the second class approach each other only through molecular diffusion, and therefore their contribution to the reaction process can be neglected. The physical mechanism of reaction for the limit regime of an ideal mixing reactor (IMR) is revealed and described. Although formally the reaction rate in this regime depends on the concentration of passive fractions of the reactants, according to the theory presented, the true (hidden) mechanism of the reaction is associated only with the reaction of the active fractions of the reactants with vanishingly small concentration in the volume of the reactor. It is shown that the rate constant of fast chemical reactions can be evaluated when the mixing intensity of reactants is much less than that needed to reach the mixing conditions in an IMR.

  11. The catalytic oxidation of H2S in a stainless steel membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neomagus, H.W.J.P.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Versteeg, Geert

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation of H2S is studied in a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants. As a novelty in the concept of separate introduction of the reactants, a sintered stainless steel membrane is used, because this type of material is easy to integrate into the reactor, and the catalytic properties

  12. The catalytic oxidation of H2S in a stainless steel membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neomagus, H.W.J.P.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van; Versteeg, G.F.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation of H2S is studied in a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants. As a novelty in the concept of separate introduction of the reactants, a sintered stainless steel membrane is used, because this type of material is easy to integrate into the reactor, and the catalytic properties

  13. An original combined multiphase model of the steam-explosion premixing phase

    OpenAIRE

    Leskovar, Matjaž; Mavko, Borut

    2015-01-01

    In multiphase flow, different distributions can occur that cannot be adequately modeled with just free-surface models or with just multiphase models. Such a distribution of phases occurs for example, in isothermal steam-explosion premixing experiments, where dispersed spheres penetrate the water and the water-air surface remains sharp. A common practice when modeling isothermal premixing experiments is to treat all three phases involved - the water, the air and the spheres phase - equally, wi...

  14. Modeling of complex physics & combustion dynamics in a combustor with a partially premixed turbulent flame

    OpenAIRE

    Shahi, Mina

    2014-01-01

    To avoid the formation of the high temperature stoichiometric regions in flames in a gas turbine combustor, and hence the formation of nitric oxides, an alternative concept of combustion technology was introduced by means of lean premixed combustion. However, the low emission of nitric oxides and carbon monoxide of the lean premixed combustion of natural gas comes at the cost of increased sensitivity to thermoacoustic instabilities. These are driven by the feedback loop between heat release, ...

  15. Ignition by Hot Transient Jets in Confined Mixtures of Gaseous Fuels and Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Karimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ignition of a combustible mixture by a transient jet of hot reactive gas is important for safety of mines, prechamber ignition in IC engines, detonation initiation, and novel constant-volume combustors. The present work is a numerical study of the hot jet ignition process in a long constant-volume combustor (CVC that represents a wave rotor channel. The hot jet of combustion products from a prechamber is injected through a converging nozzle into the main CVC chamber containing a premixed fuel-air mixture. Combustion in a two-dimensional analogue of the CVC chamber is modeled using a global reaction mechanism, a skeletal mechanism, or a detailed reaction mechanism for three hydrocarbon fuels: methane, propane, and ethylene. Turbulence is modeled using the two-equation SST k-ω model, and each reaction rate is limited by the local turbulent mixing timescale. Hybrid turbulent-kinetic schemes using some skeletal reaction mechanisms and detailed mechanisms are good predictors of the experimental data. Shock wave traverse of the reaction zone is seen to significantly increase the overall reaction rate, likely due to compression heating, as well as baroclinic vorticity generation that stirs and mixes reactants and increases flame area. Less easily ignitable methane mixture is found to show slower initial reaction and greater dependence on shock interaction than propane and ethylene.

  16. Gaseous hydrogen production by water dissociation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipovetsky, V.

    2003-04-01

    Gaseous hydrogen production is based on employment of the water dissociation process, intensified by action of a high water temperature and increase of the minus electric field, as a factor for water dissociation instead of electric current used in electrolysis. The water dissociation method makes it possible to produce concurrently both gaseous hydrogen and electric power in the operating reactor. The main power type used is thermal. (Author)

  17. Decreasing vitamin premix on chicken carcass composition and blood chemistry in floor and battery cage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Shivazad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were conducted the to compare the effect of a decreasing amount of vitamin premix in diets inbroilers from 29 to 42 days of age on carcass composition and blood chemistry in floor (Experiment 1 and battery cage (Experiment 2 systems. At 35 and 42 days of ages, one bird of each replicate was slaughtered and carcass composition was measured. Blood concentrations of alkaline phosphatase (ALP and Ca were used to diagnose vitamin D3 deficiency and enzymes aspartate amino transferase (AST to identify vitamin E deficiency. Floor raised birds showed that vitamin premix reduction/withdrawal at 29 days of age did not impair body weight (BW, carcass composition, ALP and Ca during the final rearing period. However, diet without vitamin premix (T1 had a higher AST at 42 days of age than the other diets. Birds reared in cages were slightly more sensitive to vitamin premix reduction/withdrawal, probably due to the impracticality of performing coprophagy. Diet without vitamin premix (T1 had a lower BW, carcass breast and thigh yield at 42 days of age; also serum ALP, AST and Ca were impaired. In conclusion, the withdrawal of vitamins is not a reasonable option but it is possible to reduce vitamin premix in finisher broilers’ diets without negative effects on performance and on some metabolic traits during the finisher period with both methods of rearing.

  18. Inerting characteristics of entrained atomized water on premixed methane-air flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Feng; Wang Ping; Zhou Jiebo; Li Chao

    2015-01-01

    A combustion tube experiment platform was designed and used to study the inerting conditions and capacity of entrained atomized water on premixed methane–air flame. The structure of a laminar flame of premixed methane–air gas and the process of interaction between atomized water and flame was recorded, and the rules of combustion velocity, stability and strength rate of laminar flame were experi-mentally studied. The inerting process and mechanism was analyzed, and the characteristics of inerting premixed methane–air gas within explosion limits by atomized water were acquired. The research results show that:for the premixed methane–air gas with a concentration of 7%, the minimum inerting atomized water flux is 20.8 mL/(m2 min);for the premixed methane–air gas with a concentration of 9%, the mini-mum inerting atomized water flux is 32.9 mL/(m2 min);for the premixed methane–air gas with a concen-tration of 11%, the minimum inerting atomized water flux is 44.6 mL/(m2 min). The research results are significant for extinguishing methane flame and inhibiting of methane explosion using atomized water.

  19. 7th International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics

    CERN Document Server

    James, David

    1994-01-01

    The Seventh International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, U. S. A. , on April 24-28, 1994. The symposium continued the interdisciplinary character and comprehensive approach of the preceding six symposia. Gaseous DielecIries VII is a detailed record of the symposium proceedings. It covers recent advances and developments in a wide range of basic, applied and industrial areas of gaseous dielectrics. It is hoped that Gaseous DielecIries VII will aid future research and development in, and encourage wider industrial use of, gaseous dielectrics. The Organizing Committee of the Seventh International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics consisted of G. Addis (U. S. A. ), L. G. Christophorou (U. S. A. ), F. Y. Chu (Canada), A. H. Cookson (U. S. A. ), O. Farish (U. K. ), I. Gallimberti (Italy) , A. Garscadden (U. S. A. ), D. R. James (U. S. A. ), E. Marode (France), T. Nitta (Japan), W. Pfeiffer (Germany), Y. Qiu (China), I. Sauers (U. S. A. ), R. J. Van Brunt (U. S. A. ), and W. Zaengl...

  20. A study of reactant interfaces in Ni+Al particle systems during shock wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ryan A.; McDowell, David L.; Horie, Yasuyuki; Benson, David J.

    2007-06-01

    Macro-scale responses of energetic materials during shock compression are influenced strongly by thermo-mechano-chemical processes occurring at the level of the microstructure. For example, it is believed that the propagation of chemical reactions in reactive particle systems is intimately linked to conditions at reactant interfaces such as surface temperature, phase changes, defect density, and mass mixing due to inelastic deformation. To provide explicit resolution of such interfacial conditions, numerical models are constructed. The finite element method is used to numerically solve the differential equations that govern the coupled thermomechanical response of micron-size particle mixtures of Ni and Al during shock wave propagation (interface chemistry is not yet modeled). The size and temperature distributions of contiguous reactant contact surfaces are quantified for a range of shock strengths. A parametric study of mixture attributes is undertaken to assess the sensitivity of the aforementioned distributions to variations of the microstructure.

  1. Rotational asymmetry of reactant concentration and its evolution in a circulating fluidized bed riser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongbing Li; Ajay K. Ray; Madhumita B. Ray; Jesse Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Rotational asymmetric distribution of reactant (ozone) concentration and its evolution along with the gas-solid reactive flow were studied in a 76 mm i.d.,10.2 m high circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser reactor.The superficial gas velocity ranged from 3 to 5 m/s and the solids circulation rates were 50 and 100kg/(m2 s).Experimental results show that the asymmetry of reactant distribution can extend to a height close to the length of flow developing zone of the CFB riser reactor and then disappears.Based on the hydrodynamics of the gas and solid phases in the solids entrance region,this asymmetry can be attributed to the effect of the solids entrance structure.

  2. Structure of silica xerogels synthesized with organoalkoxysilane co-reactants hints at multiple phase separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gommes, Cédric J; Basiura, Monika; Goderis, Bart; Pirard, Jean-Paul; Blacher, Silvia

    2006-04-20

    The microstructure of hybrid silica xerogels synthesized by the base-catalyzed polymerization of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in ethanol in the presence of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (AES) and of 3-(2-aminoethylamino)propyltrimethoxysilane (EDAS) as co-reactants, and dried in subcritical conditions, is analyzed. A thorough structural characterization of the samples is performed combining nitrogen adsorption, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and transmission electron microscopy coupled with digital image analysis. The use of these methods shows that, for both co-reactants, the xerogels are made of macropores supported by filaments, with each filament being formed of smaller structures. The quantitative impact of the additive on each structural level is assessed. The data are compared with a previous time-resolved SAXS study conducted during the formation of the gels (J. Phys. Chem. B 2004, 108, 8983-8991). The results are analyzed in the framework of a double phase separation model.

  3. Acute-phase reactants in periodontal disease: current concepts and future implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archana, Vilasan; Ambili, Ranjith; Nisha, Krishnavilasam Jayakumary; Seba, Abraham; Preeja, Chandran

    2015-05-01

    Periodontal disease has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events by unknown mechanisms. C-reactive protein is a systemic marker released during the acute phase of an inflammatory response and is a prognostic marker for cardiovascular disease, with elevated serum levels being reported during periodontal disease. Studies also reported elevated levels of various other acute-phase reactants in periodontal disease. It has been reported extensively in the literature that treatment of periodontal infections can significantly lower serum levels of C-reactive protein. Therefore, an understanding of the relationship between acute-phase response and the progression of periodontal disease and other systemic health complications would have a profound effect on the periodontal treatment strategies. In view of this fact, the present review highlights an overview of acute-phase reactants and their role in periodontal disease. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. A mixed-reactants solid-polymer-electrolyte direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, K.; Shukla, A. K.; Jackson, C. L.; Meuleman, W. R. A.

    Mixed-reactants solid-polymer-electrolyte direct methanol fuel cells (SPE-DMFCs) with a PtRu/C anode and a methanol-tolerant oxygen-reduction cathode catalyst have been assembled and have been subjected to galvanostatic polarisation studies. The oxygen-reduction cathode was either of the FeTMPP/C, CoTMPP/C, FeCoTMPP/C and RuSe/C. It was found that the SPE-DMFC with the RuSe/C cathode yielded the best performance. It has been possible to achieve power densities of approximately 50 and 20 mW/cm 2 while operating a mixed-reactants SPE-DMFC at 90 °C with oxygen and air fed cathodes, respectively. Interestingly, these SPE-DMFCs exhibit no parasitic oxidation of methanol with oxygen.

  5. A continuous flow microfluidic calorimeter: 3-D numerical modeling with aqueous reactants

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Mehmet A.; Kowalski, Gregory J.; Fiering, Jason; Larson, Dale

    2015-01-01

    A computational analysis of the reacting flow field, species diffusion and heat transfer processes with thermal boundary layer effects in a microchannel reactor with a coflow configuration was performed. Two parallel adjacent streams of aqueous reactants flow along a wide, shallow, enclosed channel in contact with a substrate, which is affixed to a temperature controlled plate. The Fluent computational fluid dynamics package solved the Navier–Stokes, mass transport and energy equations. The e...

  6. Wet in situ transesterification of microalgae using ethyl acetate as a co-solvent and reactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongseok; Kim, Bora; Chang, Yong Keun; Lee, Jae W

    2017-04-01

    This study addresses wet in situ transesterification of microalgae for the production of biodiesel by introducing ethyl acetate as both reactant and co-solvent. Ethyl acetate and acid catalyst are mixed with wet microalgae in one pot and the mixture is heated for simultaneous lipid extraction and transesterification. As a single reactant and co-solvent, ethyl acetate can provide higher FAEE yield and more saccharification of carbohydrates than the case of binary ethanol and chloroform as a reactant and a co-solvent. The optimal yield was 97.8wt% at 114°C and 4.06M catalyst with 6.67mlEtOAC/g dried algae based on experimental results and response surface methodology (RSM). This wet in situ transesterification of microalgae using ethyl acetate doesn't require an additional co-solvent and it also promises more economic benefit as combining extraction and transesterification in a single process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. An efficient empirical model for microwave-induced average temperature of liquid cylindrical reactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuqiao; Yakovlev, Vadim V

    2013-01-01

    Microwave-assisted chemical reactions have become very popular in preparative chemistry due to many advantages such as accelerated reaction rate, higher chemical yield and lower energy use. In dedicated equipment, however, the microwave units operate as "black boxes" keeping the role of the thermal effects in microwave-assisted chemical processes somewhat obscure. To address this issue, in this paper, we propose a simple mathematical model for computing microwave-induced temperature in a three-media cylindrical structure representing a core element of a typical microwave reactor with the reactant assumed to be stirred by convection flows. The model determines the average temperature of the reactant for the known absorbed microwave power and heating time. To illustrate its functionality, the model is used to compute time-temperature characteristics of water, ethanol, and methanol heated in the batch reactor MiniFlow 200SS. The curve calculated for water appears to be in an excellent agreement with an experiment. This confirms the hypothesis on temperature homogenization in liquid reactants in batch reactors due to convection and suggests that modeling can be helpful in clarifying and quantifying the details of microwave-assisted chemical processes.

  8. Short communication: Preference for flavored concentrate premixes by dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, M T; Oh, J; Giallongo, F; Lopes, J C; Weeks, H L; Faugeron, J; Hristov, A N

    2016-08-01

    Flavor preferences may be used to stimulate feed intake in dairy cows, which may improve use of robotic milking systems and increase feed intake of sick cows. A cafeteria-design experiment was used to determine if dairy cows have flavor preferences. Sixteen lactating Holstein cows averaging 197±32d in milk, 1.9±0.8 lactations, 27.8±4.2kg/d of dry matter intake, and 41.5±7.4kg/d of milk yield were involved in the experiment. Cows were offered 7 flavored concentrate premixes (FCP) and 1 control premix. The FCP flavors were anise, fenugreek, honey, orange, thyme, molasses, and vanilla; the absence of flavor, neutral, acted as a control. The inclusion rate of the flavors in FCP was 250 to 300g/t on an as-is basis. Cows were not adapted to the flavors before the experiment. Cows were housed in a tiestall barn and offered, on each day, 4 different FCP (1kg each) in plastic bins placed in front of each cow. The experiment lasted 6 consecutive days. Each FCP was presented to each cow once every 2d, 2h after the morning feeding. Flavors and position of the bins in front of the cows were randomized. As a result, each flavor was presented to each cow 3 times during the experiment, at 3 different bin locations. Each cow had access to the FCP for 5min from the time they started eating. Eating time and amount eaten were recorded. The vanilla and fenugreek FCP were consumed the most, at 408 and 371g/5-min offering, respectively, whereas the orange and anise FCP were consumed the least, at 264 and 239g/5-min offering, respectively. Similarly, cows spent the most time eating the vanilla and fenugreek FCP at 99 and 75 s/offering, respectively, and the least amount of time eating the orange and anise FCP at 49 and 50 s/offering, respectively. We detected an effect of bin position: the 2 center FCP were consumed more than the outer 2 FCP. Flavor had no effect on consumption rate. In conclusion, relative to the control, concentrate intake was not affected by flavor, but dairy cows

  9. Numerical Investigation of Soot Formation in Non-premixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelgadir, Ahmed Gamaleldin

    2017-05-01

    Soot is a carbon particulate formed as a result of the combustion of fossil fuels. Due to the health hazard posed by the carbon particulate, government agencies have applied strict regulations to control soot emissions from road vehicles, airplanes, and industrial plants. Thus, understanding soot formation and evolution is critical. Practical combustion devices operate at high pressure and in the turbulent regime. Elevated pressures and turbulence on soot formation significantly and fundamental understanding of these complex interactions is still poor. In this study, the effects of pressure and turbulence on soot formation and growth are investigated numerically. As the first step, the evolution of the particle size distribution function (PSDF) and soot particles morphology are investigated in turbulent non-premixed flames. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code is developed and used. The stochastic reactor describes the evolution of soot in fluid parcels following Lagrangian trajectories in a turbulent flow field. The trajectories are sampled from a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of an n-heptane turbulent non-premixed flame. Although individual trajectories display strong bimodality as in laminar flames, the ensemble-average PSDF possesses only one mode and a broad tail, which implies significant polydispersity induced by turbulence. Secondly, the effect of the flow and mixing fields on soot formation at atmospheric and elevated pressures is investigated in coflow laminar diffusion flames. The experimental observation and the numerical prediction of the spatial distribution are in good agreement. Based on the common scaling methodology of the flames (keeping the Reynolds number constant), the scalar dissipation rate decreases as pressure increases, promoting the formation of PAH species and soot. The decrease of the scalar dissipation rate significantly contributes to soot formation occurring closer to the nozzle and outward on the flames wings as pressure

  10. An analytical model for the prediction of the dynamic response of premixed flames stabilized on a heat-conducting perforated plate

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, Kushal S.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic response of a premixed flame stabilized on a heat-conducting perforated plate depends critically on their coupled thermal interaction. The objective of this paper is to develop an analytical model to capture this coupling. The model predicts the mean flame base standoff distance; the flame base area, curvature and speed; and the burner plate temperature given the operating conditions; the mean velocity, temperature and equivalence ratio of the reactants; thermal conductivity and the perforation ratio of the burner. This coupled model is combined with our flame transfer function (FTF) model to predict the dynamic response of the flame to velocity perturbations. We show that modeling the thermal coupling between the flame and the burner, while accounting for the two-dimensionality of the former, is critical to predicting the dynamic response characteristics such as the overshoot in the gain curve (resonant condition) and the phase delay. Good agreement with the numerical and experimental results is demonstrated over a range of conditions. © 2012 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of bluff-body-stabilized premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Arias, Paul G.

    2014-01-10

    To enable high fidelity simulation of combustion phenomena in realistic devices, an embedded boundary method is implemented into direct numerical simulations (DNS) of reacting flows. One of the additional numerical issues associated with reacting flows is the stable treatment of the embedded boundaries in the presence of multicomponent species and reactions. The implemented method is validated in two test con gurations: a pre-mixed hydrogen/air flame stabilized in a backward-facing step configuration, and reactive flows around a square prism. The former is of interest in practical gas turbine combustor applications in which the thermo-acoustic instabilities are a strong concern, and the latter serves as a good model problem to capture the vortex shedding behind a bluff body. In addition, a reacting flow behind the square prism serves as a model for the study of flame stabilization in a micro-channel combustor. The present study utilizes fluid-cell reconstruction methods in order to capture important flame-to-solid wall interactions that are important in confined multicomponent reacting flows. Results show that the DNS with embedded boundaries can be extended to more complex geometries without loss of accuracy and the high fidelity simulation data can be used to develop and validate turbulence and combustion models for the design of practical combustion devices.

  12. Simulation studies of premixed ch4/air Microcombustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Bala Murali

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study of CH4-air premixed combustion in the micro combustors with a five step global mechanism is performed by solving the two dimensional governing equations of continuity, momentum and species, coupled with the energy equation. A reference case is defined as the combustion in a cylindrical tube with 1 mm inlet diameter and length 10 times its inlet diameter with a uniform velocity profile at the inlet plane. Different physical and boundary conditions have been applied in order to investigate their respective effects on the flame temperature. The conditions studied in the current paper include the combustor size, geometry and inlet velocities. Downscaling the combustion chamber and higher velocities leaded to reduction in residence time which results in lower combustion efficiency causing insufficient heat generation unable to maintain the self-sustained combustion. The effect of variation in inlet velocity has role in the determining the flame position in combination with given thermal conditions. The results of this paper indicate that these various boundary and physical conditions have effects on the flame temperature to different extent and should be carefully monitored when applied for different applications.

  13. Premixed Combustion of Coconut Oil on Perforated Burner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.K.G. Wirawan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Coconut oil premixed combustion behavior has been studied experimentally on perforated burner with equivalence ratio (φ varied from very lean until very rich. The results showed that burning of glycerol needs large number of air so that the laminar burning velocity (SL is the highest at very lean mixture and the flame is in the form of individual Bunsen flame on each of the perforated plate hole. As φ is increased the  SL decreases and the secondary Bunsen flame with open tip occurs from φ =0.54 at the downstream of perforated flame. The perforated flame disappears at φ = 0.66 while the secondary Bunsen flame still exist with SL increases following that of hexadecane flame trend and then extinct when the equivalence ratio reaches one or more. Surrounding ambient air intervention makes SL decreases, shifts lower flammability limit into richer mixture, and performs triple and cellular flames. The glycerol diffusion flame radiation burned fatty acids that perform cellular islands on perforated hole.  Without glycerol, laminar flame velocity becomes higher and more stable as perforated flame at higher φ. At rich mixture the Bunsen flame becomes unstable and performs petal cellular around the cone flame front. Keywords: cellular flame; glycerol; perforated flame;secondary Bunsen flame with open tip; triple flame

  14. Hydrogen-hydrocarbon turbulent non-premixed flame structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabet, F. [ANSYS-Benelux, 4 Avenue Pasteur, B-1300 Wavre (Belgium); Sarh, B.; Goekalp, I. [Institut de Combustion, Aerothermique, Reactivite et Environnement (ICARE), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 1 C avenue de la recherche scientifique, Orleans 45071 Cedex 2 (France)

    2009-06-15

    In this study, the structure of turbulent non-premixed CH{sub 4}-H{sub 2}/air flames is analyzed with a special emphasis on mixing and air entrainment. The amount of H{sub 2} in the fuel mixture varies under constant volumetric fuel flow. Mixing is described by mixture fraction and its variance while air entrainment is characterized by the ratio of gas mass flow to fuel mass flow at the inlet section. The flow field and the chemistry are coupled by the flamelet assumption. Mixture fraction and its variance are transported by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The slow chemistry aspect of NO{sub x} is handled by solving an additional transport equation with a source term derived from flamelet library. The results obtained show an improvement of mixing with hydrogen addition leading to a strong consumption of CH{sub 4} and a high air entrainment into the centerline region. As a global effect of this, the composite fuels burn faster and thereby reduce the residence time which ultimately shortens the flame length and thickness. On the other hand, hydrogen is found to increase NO{sub x} level. (author)

  15. Tangential stretching rate (TSR) analysis of non premixed reactive flows

    KAUST Repository

    Valorani, Mauro

    2016-10-16

    We discuss how the Tangential stretching rate (TSR) analysis, originally developed and tested for spatially homogeneous systems (batch reactors), is extended to spatially non homogeneous systems. To illustrate the effectiveness of the TSR diagnostics, we study the ignition transient in a non premixed, reaction–diffusion model in the mixture fraction space, whose dependent variables are temperature and mixture composition. The reactive mixture considered is syngas/air. A detailed H2/CO mechanism with 12 species and 33 chemical reactions is employed. We will discuss two cases, one involving only kinetics as a model of front propagation purely driven by spontaneous ignition, the other as a model of deflagration wave involving kinetics/diffusion coupling. We explore different aspects of the system dynamics such as the relative role of diffusion and kinetics, the evolution of kinetic eigenvalues, and of the tangential stretching rates computed by accounting for the combined action of diffusion and kinetics as well for kinetics only. We propose criteria based on the TSR concept which allow to identify the most ignitable conditions and to discriminate between spontaneous ignition and deflagration front.

  16. Premixed combustion under electric field in a constant volume chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2012-12-01

    The effects of electric fields on outwardly propagating premixed flames in a constant volume chamber were experimentally investigated. An electric plug, subjected to high electrical voltages, was used to generate electric fields inside the chamber. To minimize directional ionic wind effects, alternating current with frequency of 1 kHz was employed. Lean and rich fuel/air mixtures for both methane and propane were tested to investigate various preferential diffusion conditions. As a result, electrically induced instability showing cracked structure on the flame surface could be observed. This cracked structure enhanced flame propagation speed for the initial period of combustion and led to reduction in flame initiation and overall combustion duration times. However, by analyzing pressure data, it was found that overall burning rates are not much affected from the electric field for the pressurized combustion period. The reduction of overall combustion time is less sensitive to equivalence ratio for methane/air mixtures, whereas the results demonstrate pronounced effects on a lean mixture for propane. The improvement of combustion characteristics in lean mixtures will be beneficial to the design of lean burn engines. Two hypothetical mechanisms to explain the electrically induced instability were proposed: 1) ionic wind initiated hydrodynamic instability and 2) thermodiffusive instability through the modification of transport property such as mass diffusivity. © 2012 IEEE.

  17. Development of a lean premixed burner for hydrogen utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.O. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The long-term mandate of the hydrogen program is to develop the technologies needed to establish a hydrogen economy. Although a hydrogen fueled automobile has been established as a demonstration project, there are at least three other end use sectors that are recognized by the H{sub 2} program and that are addressed by this project. These end uses are: (1) power generation from stationary turbines, (2) generation of process heat or steam, and (3) commercial and residential direct use applications. Eliminating carbon from the fuel will remove carbon containing species from the emissions, however, NO{sub x} resulting from thermal NO production cannot be ignored. Thermal NO production is minimized by reducing the peak combustion temperature and the residence time at the peak temperature. NO can be reduced to extremely low levels (a few ppm) by operating sufficiently lean to reduce the peak combustion temperatures below 1700 to 1800 K. The objectives for this project are to: (1) develop an environmentally benign and safe burner operating on hydrogen in a lean premixed mode, (2) provide a facility in which fundamental investigations can be performed to support other programs.

  18. Unstrained and strained flamelets for LES of premixed combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langella, Ivan; Swaminathan, Nedunchezhian

    2016-05-01

    The unstrained and strained flamelet closures for filtered reaction rate in large eddy simulation (LES) of premixed flames are studied. The required sub-grid scale (SGS) PDF in these closures is presumed using the Beta function. The relative performances of these closures are assessed by comparing numerical results from large eddy simulations of piloted Bunsen flames of stoichiometric methane-air mixture with experimental measurements. The strained flamelets closure is observed to underestimate the burn rate and thus the reactive scalars mass fractions are under-predicted with an over-prediction of fuel mass fraction compared with the unstrained flamelet closure. The physical reasons for this relative behaviour are discussed. The results of unstrained flamelet closure compare well with experimental data. The SGS variance of the progress variable required for the presumed PDF is obtained by solving its transport equation. An order of magnitude analysis of this equation suggests that the commonly used algebraic model obtained by balancing source and sink in this transport equation does not hold. This algebraic model is shown to underestimate the SGS variance substantially and the implications of this variance model for the filtered reaction rate closures are highlighted.

  19. Measurements of turbulent premixed flame dynamics using cinema stereoscopic PIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, Adam M.; Driscoll, James F. [University of Michigan, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ceccio, Steven L. [University of Michigan, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2008-06-15

    A new experimental method is described that provides high-speed movies of turbulent premixed flame wrinkling dynamics and the associated vorticity fields. This method employs cinema stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and has been applied to a turbulent slot Bunsen flame. Three-component velocity fields were measured with high temporal and spatial resolutions of 0.9 ms and 140{mu}m, respectively. The flame-front location was determined using a new multi-step method based on particle image gradients, which is described. Comparisons are made between flame fronts found with this method and simultaneous CH-PLIF images. These show that the flame contour determined corresponds well to the true location of maximum gas density gradient. Time histories of typical eddy-flame interactions are reported and several important phenomena identified. Outwardly rotating eddy pairs wrinkle the flame and are attenuated at they pass through the flamelet. Significant flame-generated vorticity is produced downstream of the wrinkled tip. Similar wrinkles are caused by larger groups of outwardly rotating eddies. Inwardly rotating pairs cause significant convex wrinkles that grow as the flame propagates. These wrinkles encounter other eddies that alter their behavior. The effects of the hydrodynamic and diffusive instabilities are observed and found to be significant contributors to the formation and propagation of wrinkles. (orig.)

  20. Dynamic-Stability Characteristics of Premixed Methane Oxy-Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Shroll, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    This work explores the dynamic stability characteristics of premixed CH 4/O 2/CO 2 mixtures in a 50 kW swirl stabilized combustor. In all cases, the methane-oxygen mixture is stoichiometric, with different dilution levels of carbon dioxide used to control the flame temperature (T ad). For the highest T ad\\'s, the combustor is unstable at the first harmonic of the combustor\\'s natural frequency. As the temperature is reduced, the combustor jumps to fundamental mode and then to a low-frequency mode whose value is well below the combustor\\'s natural frequency, before eventually reaching blowoff. Similar to the case of CH 4/air mixtures, the transition from one mode to another is predominantly a function of the T ad of the reactive mixture, despite significant differences in laminar burning velocity and/or strained flame consumption speed between air and oxy-fuel mixtures for a given T ad. High speed images support this finding by revealing similar vortex breakdown modes and thus similar turbulent flame geometries that change as a function of flame temperature. Copyright © 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  1. Photon-counting chirped amplitude modulation lidar using a smart premixing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zijing; Zhang, Jianlong; Wu, Long; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Yuan; Su, Jianzhong

    2013-11-01

    We proposed a new premixing method for photon-counting chirped amplitude modulation lidar (PCCAML). Earlier studies used the counting results of the returned signal detected by a Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector (Gm-APD) to mix with the reference signal, called the postmixing method. We use an alternative method known as the premixing method, in which the reference signal is used to directly modulate the sampling gate width of the Gm-APD, and the mixing of the returned signal and the reference signal is completed before the Gm-APD. This premixing method is more flexible and may perform better than the postmixing method in terms of signal-to-noise ratio by cutting down a separated mixer commonly used in the postmixing lidar system. Furthermore, this premixing method lowers the demand for the sampling frequency of the Gm-APD. It allows the use of a much wider modulation bandwidth to improve the range accuracy and resolution. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to use the premixing method in the PCCAML system, which will benefit future lidar applications.

  2. Gaseous Electronics Tables, Atoms, and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    2011-01-01

    With the constant emergence of new research and application possibilities, gaseous electronics is more important than ever in disciplines including engineering (electrical, power, mechanical, electronics, and environmental), physics, and electronics. The first resource of its kind, Gaseous Electronics: Tables, Atoms, and Molecules fulfills the author's vision of a stand-alone reference to condense 100 years of research on electron-neutral collision data into one easily searchable volume. It presents most--if not all--of the properly classified experimental results that scientists, researchers,

  3. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of temperature, hydrogen pressure, stress intensity, and yield strength on the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted crack propagation in 18Ni maraging steels were investigated experimentally. It was found that crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity was characterized by an apparent threshold for crack growth, a stage where the growth rate increased sharply, and a stage where the growth rate was unchanged over a significant range of stress intensity. Cracking proceeded on load application with little or no detectable incubation period. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased with increasing yield strength.

  4. Single cell performance studies on the Fe/Cr Redox Energy Storage System using mixed reactant solutions at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahn, R. F.; Hagedorn, N. H.; Ling, J. S.

    Experimental studies in a 14.5 sq cm single cell system using mixed reactant solutions at 65 C are described. Systems were tested under isothermal conditions i.e., reactants and the cell were at the same temperature. Charging and discharging performance were evaluted by measuring watt-hour and coulombic efficiencies, voltage-current relationships, hydrogen evolution and membrane resistivity. Watt-hour efficiencies ranged from 86% at 43 ma/sq cm to 75% at 129 ma/sq cm with corresponding coulombic efficiencies of 92% and 97%, respectively. Hydrogen evolution was less than 1% of the charge coulombic capacity during charge-discharge cycling. Bismuth and bismuth-lead catalyzed chromium electrodes maintained reversible performance and low hydrogen evolution under normal and adverse cycling conditions. Reblending of the anode and cathode solutions was successfully demonstrated to compensate for osmotic volume changes. Improved performance was obtained with mixed reactant systems in comparison to the unmixed reactant systems.

  5. An experimental study on premixed charge compression ignition-direct ignition engine fueled with ethanol and gasohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saravanan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the combustion, performance and emission characteristics of a partial Premixed Charge Compression Ignition-Direct Injection (PCCI-DI Engine with premixed fuels ethanol and gasohol (90% gasoline and 10% ethanol by volume along with direct injection of diesel fuel into the combustion chamber. The experiments were conducted in a four stroke, naturally aspirated, air cooled, constant speed diesel engine with 20% premixed fuels from no load to full load condition. The addition of premixed fuel enhances the air fuel mixture strength and for that the combustion duration is decreased in dual fuel operation. From this experiment it was observed the 70% and 67% reduction in smoke emission from premixed gasohol and ethanol fuel when compared to neat diesel operation. In addition to that, the oxides of nitrogen emissions were reduced to 30% and 24% for premixed gasohol and ethanol fuel. In particular, premixed gasohol reduces the smoke and oxides of nitrogen emissions more than the ethanol and also, significant increase in brake thermal efficiency was noted in 20% premixed gasohol and ethanol in dual fuel mode, when compared to neat diesel operation.

  6. Effect of powder density variation on premixed Ti-6Al-4V and Cu composites during laser metal deposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erinosho, MF

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the effect of powder density variation on the premixed Ti-6Al-4V/Cu and Ti-6A-4V/2Cu Composites. Two sets of experiment were conducted in this study. Five deposits each were made for the two premixed composites. Laser powers were...

  7. Electrochemiluminescence from tris(2,2′-bipyridyl) ruthenium (Ⅱ) in the presence of aminocarboxylic acid co-reactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Due to the highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL), tris(2,2′-bipyridyl) ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy)32+) is often used in the field of bioarrays with the help of co-reactants. However, the generally used co-reactant, tripropylamine (TPA), is toxic, corrosive and volatile. Therefore, the search for safe, sensitive and economical co-reactants is critical. Herein, three aminocarboxylic acids, ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and 2-hydroxyethylethylene diaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA), have been investigated as potential co-reactants for promoting Ru(bpy)32+ ECL behaviour. A possible ECL mechanism is also presented. The experimental results suggested that the co-reactants have a different ECL behaviour compared to TPA, such as different pH- and surfactant-responses. The detection limits of Ru(bpy)32+ using NTA, EDTA and HEDTA as co-reactants are 1, 60 and 680 fmol·L-1, respectively. The results indicate that NTA has a much higher efficiency than TPA to excite Ru(bpy)3 2+ ECL under their own optimal conditions. NTA could be widely used in many fields because it is less toxic, corrosive and volatile than TPA. Moreover, using Ru(bpy)3 2+ ECL, a sensitive method for the detection of aminocarboxylic acids is also developed. An improvement of four orders of magnitude in detection limits is obtained for EDTA compared to the known Ru(bpy) 3 2+ chemiluminescent methods.

  8. An Investigation of a Hybrid Mixing Timescale Model for PDF Simulations of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Kuron, Mike; Ren, Zhuyin; Lu, Tianfeng; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2016-11-01

    Transported probability density function (TPDF) method features the generality for all combustion regimes, which is attractive for turbulent combustion simulations. However, the modeling of micromixing due to molecular diffusion is still considered to be a primary challenge for TPDF method, especially in turbulent premixed flames. Recently, a hybrid mixing rate model for TPDF simulations of turbulent premixed flames has been proposed, which recovers the correct mixing rates in the limits of flamelet regime and broken reaction zone regime while at the same time aims to properly account for the transition in between. In this work, this model is employed in TPDF simulations of turbulent premixed methane-air slot burner flames. The model performance is assessed by comparing the results from both direct numerical simulation (DNS) and conventional constant mechanical-to-scalar mixing rate model. This work is Granted by NSFC 51476087 and 91441202.

  9. Unsteady Diffusion Flames: Ignition, Travel, and Burnout (SUBCORE Project: Simplified Unsteady Burning of Contained Reactants)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendell, Francis; Rungaldier, Harald

    1999-01-01

    An experimental apparatus for the examination of a planar, virtually strain-rate-free diffusion flame in microgravity has been designed and fabricated. Such a diffusion flame is characterized by relatively large spatial scale and high symmetry (to facilitate probing), and by relatively long fluid-residence time (to facilitate investigation of rates associated with sooting phenomena). Within the squat rectangular apparatus, with impervious, noncatalytic isothermal walls of stainless steel, a thin metallic splitter plate subdivides the contents into half-volumes. One half-volume initially contains fuel vapor diluted with an inert gas, and the other, oxidizer diluted with another inert gas-so that the two domains have equal pressure, density, and temperature. As the separator is removed, by translation in its own plane, through a tightly fitting slit in one side wall, a line ignitor in the opposite side wall initiates a triple-flame propagation across the narrow layer of combustible mixture formed near midheight in the chamber. The planar diffusion flame so emplaced is quickly disrupted in earth gravity. In microgravity, the planar flame persists, and travels ultimately into the half-volume containing the stoichiometrically deficient reactant; the flame eventually becomes extinguished owing to reactant depletion and heat loss to the walls.

  10. Time resolved FTIR study of the catalytic CO oxidation under periodic variation of the reactant concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritzenberger, J.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Oxidation of CO over palladium/zirconia catalyst obtained from an amorphous Pd{sub 25}Zr{sub 75} precursor was investigated by time resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Sine wave shaped modulation of the reactant concentration, i.e. variation of CO or O{sub 2} partial pressure, was used to induce variations of the IR signals of product (CO{sub 2}) and unconverted reactant (CO), which were detected in a multi-pass absorption cell. The phase shift {phi} between external perturbation and variation of the CO{sub 2} signal was examined in dependence on temperature (100{sup o}C{<=}T{<=}350{sup o}C) and modulation frequency (1.39x10{sup -4}Hz{<=}{omega}{<=}6.67x10{sup -2}Hz). From the phase shift values, a simple Eley-Rideal mechanism is excluded, and the rate limiting step of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism for the CO oxidation may be identified. Adsorption and possible surface movement of CO to the actual reaction site determine the rate of the CO oxidation on the palladium/zirconia catalyst used in our study. The introduction of an external perturbation is a first step towards the application of two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to heterogeneous catalyzed reactions. (author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  11. Gaseous Surrogate Hydrocarbons for a Hifire Scramjet that Mimic Opposed Jet Extinction Limits for Cracked JP Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Vaden, Sarah N.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes, first, the top-down methodology used to define simple gaseous surrogate hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures for a hypersonic scramjet combustion subtask of the HiFIRE program. It then presents new and updated Opposed Jet Burner (OJB) extinction-limit Flame Strength (FS) data obtained from laminar non-premixed HC vs. air counterflow diffusion flames at 1-atm, which follow from earlier investigations. FS represents a strain-induced extinction limit based on cross-section-average air jet velocity, U(sub air), that sustains combustion of a counter jet of gaseous fuel just before extinction. FS uniquely characterizes a kinetically limited fuel combustion rate. More generally, Applied Stress Rates (ASRs) at extinction (U(sub air) normalized by nozzle or tube diameter, D(sub n or t) can directly be compared with extinction limits determined numerically using either a 1-D or (preferably) a 2-D Navier Stokes simulation with detailed transport and finite rate chemistry. The FS results help to characterize and define three candidate surrogate HC fuel mixtures that exhibit a common FS 70% greater than for vaporized JP-7 fuel. These include a binary fuel mixture of 64% ethylene + 36% methane, which is our primary recommendation. It is intended to mimic the critical flameholding limit of a thermally- or catalytically-cracked JP-7 like fuel in HiFIRE scramjet combustion tests. Our supporting experimental results include: (1) An idealized kinetically-limited ASR reactivity scale, which represents maximum strength non-premixed flames for several gaseous and vaporized liquid HCs; (2) FS characterizations of Colket and Spadaccini s suggested ternary surrogate, of 60% ethylene + 30% methane + 10% n-heptane, which matches the ignition delay of a typical cracked JP fuel; (3) Data showing how our recommended binary surrogate, of 64% ethylene + 36% methane, has an identical FS; (4) Data that characterize an alternate surrogate of 44% ethylene + 56% ethane with identical

  12. Gaseous haloes : Linking galaxies to the IGM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraternali, Filippo; Binney, James; Oosterloo, Tom; Sancisi, Renzo

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, evidence has accumulated that nearby spiral galaxies are surrounded by massive haloes of neutral and ionised gas. These gaseous haloes rotate more slowly than the disks and show inflow motions. They are clearly analogous to the High Velocity Clouds of the Milky Way. We show that the

  13. Tabulated Combustion Model Development For Non-Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prithwish

    Turbulent non-premixed flames play a very important role in the field of engineering ranging from power generation to propulsion. The coupling of fluid mechanics and complicated combustion chemistry of fuels pose a challenge for the numerical modeling of these type of problems. Combustion modeling in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is one of the most important tools used for predictive modeling of complex systems and to understand the basic fundamentals of combustion. Traditional combustion models solve a transport equation of each species with a source term. In order to resolve the complex chemistry accurately it is important to include a large number of species. However, the computational cost is generally proportional to the cube of number of species. The presence of a large number of species in a flame makes the use of CFD computationally expensive and beyond reach for some applications or inaccurate when solved with simplified chemistry. For highly turbulent flows, it also becomes important to incorporate the effects of turbulence chemistry interaction (TCI). The aim of this work is to develop high fidelity combustion models based on the flamelet concept and to significantly advance the existing capabilities. A thorough investigation of existing models (Finite-rate chemistry and Representative Interactive Flamelet (RIF)) and comparative study of combustion models was done initially on a constant volume combustion chamber with diesel fuel injection. The CFD modeling was validated with experimental results and was also successfully applied to a single cylinder diesel engine. The effect of number of flamelets on the RIF model and flamelet initialization strategies were studied. The RIF model with multiple flamelets is computationally expensive and a model was proposed on the frame work of RIF. The new model was based on tabulated chemistry and incorporated TCI effects. A multidimensional tabulated chemistry database generation code was developed based on the 1

  14. Lean premixed flames for low NO{sub x} combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sojka, P.; Tseng, L.; Bryjak, J. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Gas turbines are being used throughout the world to generate electricity. Due to increasing fuel costs and environmental concerns, gas turbines must meet stringent performance requirements, demonstrating high thermal efficiencies and low pollutant emissions. In order for U.S. manufactured gas turbines to stay competitive, their NO{sub x} levels must be below 10 ppm and their thermal efficiencies should approach 60%. Current technology is being stretched to achieve these goals. The twin goals of high efficiency and low NO{sub x} emissions require extending the operating range of current gas turbines. Higher efficiency requires operation at higher pressures and temperatures. Lower NO{sub x} emissions requires lower flame temperatures. Lower flame temperatures can be achieved through partially to fully pre-mixed combustion. However, increased performance and lower emissions result in a set of competing goals. In order to achieve a successful compromise between high efficiency and low NO{sub x} emissions, advanced design tools must be developed. One key design tool is a computationally efficient, high pressure, turbulent flow, combustion model capable of predicting pollutant formation in an actual gas turbine. Its development is the goal of this program. Achieving this goal requires completion of three tasks. The first task is to develop a reduced chemical kinetics model describing N{sub O}x formation in natural gas-air systems. The second task is to develop a computationally efficient model that describes turbulence-chemistry interactions. The third task is to incorporate the reduced chemical kinetics and turbulence-chemistry interaction models into a commercially available flow solver and compare its predictions with experimental data obtained under carefully controlled conditions so that the accuracy of model predictions can be evaluated.

  15. Experimental Evaluation of a Subscale Gaseous Hydrogen/gaseous Oxygen Coaxial Rocket Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy D.; Klem, Mark D.; Breisacher, Kevin J.; Farhangi, Shahram; Sutton, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The next generation reusable launch vehicle may utilize a Full-Flow Stage Combustion (FFSC) rocket engine cycle. One of the key technologies required is the development of an injector that uses gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen as propellants. Gas-gas propellant injection provides an engine with increased stability margin over a range of throttle set points. This paper summarizes an injector design and testing effort that evaluated a coaxial rocket injector for use with gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen propellants. A total of 19 hot-fire tests were conducted up to a chamber pressure of 1030 psia, over a range of 3.3 to 6.7 for injector element mixture ratio. Post-test condition of the hardware was also used to assess injector face cooling. Results show that high combustion performance levels could be achieved with gas-gas propellants and there were no problems with excessive face heating for the conditions tested.

  16. Pdf modeling for premixed turbulent combustion based on the properties of iso-concentration surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervisch, L.; Kollmann, W.; Bray, K. N. C.; Mantel, T.

    1994-01-01

    In premixed turbulent flames the presence of intense mixing zones located in front of and behind the flame surface leads to a requirement to study the behavior of iso-concentration surfaces defined for all values of the progress variable (equal to unity in burnt gases and to zero in fresh mixtures). To support this study, some theoretical and mathematical tools devoted to level surfaces are first developed. Then a database of direct numerical simulations of turbulent premixed flames is generated and used to investigate the internal structure of the flame brush, and a new pdf model based on the properties of iso-surfaces is proposed.

  17. Effects of a Premixed Layer on the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Bao-Lin; ZHANG Xin-Ting; QI Jin; WNG Shuang-Hu

    2011-01-01

    The effects of a premixed layer on the Richmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) are studied by setting a density gradient for the first shocked fluid in the RMI problems.The RMI with initial density gradients are simulated by using a high resolution arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method.The effects of density gradient and gradient width are analyzed on the basis of the simulation results for the shock from a light fluid to a heavy fluid and for the shock from a heavy fluid to a light fluid.Overall,the premixed layer can suppress the perturbation growth,and the detailed effects are different depending on the detailed premixed configuration.The width of the premixed layer has a very light influence on the perturbation,while the density gradient has quite a significant effect on two kinds of RMIs.The instability of a material interface under an acceleration by an incident shock was predicted theoretically by Richtmyer in 1960.Ten years later,Meshkov confirmed experimentally Richtmyer's prediction.Since then,this interfacial instability has been referred as the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI).[1-11] Such instabilities are observed in supernovae explosions and inertial confinement fusion (ICF),and are thus of great importance to science and technology.Extensive theoretical and experimental studies of the RM instability have been carried out in the last three decades.With the advent of computer technology and increasing computing power,numerical studies of the RM instability have become very common.%The effects of a premixed layer on the Richmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) are studied by setting a density gradient for the first shocked fluid in the RMI problems. The RMI with initial density gradients are simulated by using a high resolution arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method. The effects of density gradient and gradient width are analyzed on the basis of the simulation results for the shock from a light fluid to a heavy fluid and for the shock from a heavy fluid to a light

  18. Dynamic properties of combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Nikimoto, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Takaya; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2011-03-01

    We experimentally investigate the dynamic behavior of the combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine combustor from the viewpoint of nonlinear dynamics. A nonlinear time series analysis in combination with a surrogate data method clearly reveals that as the equivalence ratio increases, the dynamic behavior of the combustion instability undergoes a significant transition from stochastic fluctuation to periodic oscillation through low-dimensional chaotic oscillation. We also show that a nonlinear forecasting method is useful for predicting the short-term dynamic behavior of the combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine combustor, which has not been addressed in the fields of combustion science and physics.

  19. Low temperature gaseous nitriding and carburising of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The response of various austenitic and duplex stainless steel grades to low temperature gaseous nitriding and carburising was investigated. Gaseous nitriding was performed in ammonia/hydrogen mixtures at temperatures ,723 K; gaseous carburising was carried out in carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures...

  20. Hydroxyl radical reactions with adenine: reactant complexes, transition states, and product complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qianyi; Gu, Jiande; Compaan, Katherine R; Schaefer, Henry F

    2010-10-18

    In order to address problems such as aging, cell death, and cancer, it is important to understand the mechanisms behind reactions causing DNA damage. One specific reaction implicated in DNA oxidative damage is hydroxyl free-radical attack on adenine (A) and other nucleic acid bases. The adenine reaction has been studied experimentally, but there are few theoretical results. In the present study, adenine dehydrogenation at various sites, and the potential-energy surfaces for these reactions, are investigated theoretically. Four reactant complexes [A···OH]* have been found, with binding energies relative to A+OH* of 32.8, 11.4, 10.7, and 10.1 kcal mol(-1). These four reactant complexes lead to six transition states, which in turn lie +4.3, -5.4, (-3.7 and +0.8), and (-2.3 and +0.8) kcal mol(-1) below A+OH*, respectively. Thus the lowest lying [A···OH]* complex faces the highest local barrier to formation of the product (A-H)*+H(2)O. Between the transition states and the products lie six product complexes. Adopting the same order as the reactant complexes, the product complexes [(A-H)···H(2)O]* lie at -10.9, -22.4, (-24.2 and -18.7), and (-20.5 and -17.5) kcal mol(-1), respectively, again relative to separated A+OH*. All six A+OH* → (A-H)*+H(2)O pathways are exothermic, by -0.3, -14.7, (-17.4 and -7.8), and (-13.7 and -7.8) kcal mol(-1), respectively. The transition state for dehydrogenation at N(6) lies at the lowest energy (-5.4 kcal mol(-1) relative to A+OH*), and thus reaction is likely to occur at this site. This theoretical prediction dovetails with the observed high reactivity of OH radicals with the NH(2) group of aromatic amines. However, the high barrier (37.1 kcal mol(-1)) for reaction at the C(8) site makes C(8) dehydrogenation unlikely. This last result is consistent with experimental observation of the imidazole ring opening upon OH radical addition to C(8). In addition, TD-DFT computed electronic transitions of the N(6) product around 420 nm

  1. A Regime Diagram for Autoignition of Homogeneous Reactant Mixtures with Turbulent Velocity and Temperature Fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2015-04-02

    A theoretical scaling analysis is conducted to propose a diagram to predict weak and strong ignition regimes for a compositionally homogeneous reactant mixture with turbulent velocity and temperature fluctuations. The diagram provides guidance on expected ignition behavior based on the thermo-chemical properties of the mixture and the flow/scalar field conditions. The analysis is an extension of the original Zeldovich’s analysis by combining the turbulent flow and scalar characteristics in terms of the characteristic Damköhler and Reynolds numbers of the system, thereby providing unified and comprehensive understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms controlling ignition characteristics. Estimated parameters for existing experimental measurements in a rapid compression facility show that the regime diagram predicts the observed ignition characteristics with good fidelity.

  2. Controlling an electron-transfer reaction at a metal surface by manipulating reactant motion and orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Nils; Krüger, Bastian C; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Schäfer, Tim

    2014-12-08

    The loss or gain of vibrational energy in collisions of an NO molecule with the surface of a gold single crystal proceeds by electron transfer. With the advent of new optical pumping and orientation methods, we can now control all molecular degrees of freedom important to this electron-transfer-mediated process, providing the most detailed look yet into the inner workings of an electron-transfer reaction and showing how to control its outcome. We find the probability of electron transfer increases with increasing translational and vibrational energy as well as with proper orientation of the reactant. However, as the vibrational energy increases, translational excitation becomes unimportant and proper orientation becomes less critical. One can understand the interplay of all three control parameters from simple model potentials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Crosslinking-property relationships in PMR polyimide composites. I. [polymerization of monomer reactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pater, R. H.; Whitley, K.; Morgan, C.; Chang, A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the crosslink density of the matrix on physical and mechanical properties of a graphite-fiber-reinforced PMR (for polymerization of monomer reactants) polyimide composites during isothermal aging was investigated in experiments where unidirectional composite specimens of Celion 6000/PMR-P1 were isothermally exposed at 288 C in air for various time periods up to 5000 hrs. It was found that, as the crosslink density increased, the glass transition temperature, density, and elevated-temperature interlaminar shear strength of a composite increased, while the initial moisture absorption and the coefficient of thermal expansion decreased. However, after reaching the highest possible matrix crosslink density, several of the composite properties began to deteriorate rapidly.

  4. Power Reactant Storage Assembly (PRSA) (Space Shuttle). PRSA hydrogen and oxygen DVT tank refurbishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The Power Reactant Storage Assembly (PRSA) liquid hydrogen Development Verification Test (H2 DVT) tank assembly (Beech Aircraft Corporation P/N 15548-0116-1, S/N 07399000SHT0001) and liquid oxygen (O2) DVT tank assembly (Beech Aircraft Corporation P/N 15548-0115-1, S/N 07399000SXT0001) were refurbished by Ball Electro-Optics and Cryogenics Division to provide NASA JSC, Propulsion and Power Division, the capability of performing engineering tests. The refurbishments incorporated the latest flight configuration hardware and avionics changes necessary to make the tanks function like flight articles. This final report summarizes these refurbishment activities. Also included are up-to-date records of the pressure time and cycle histories.

  5. Validity of the Michaelis-Menten equation--steady-state or reactant stationary assumption: that is the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    The Michaelis-Menten equation is generally used to estimate the kinetic parameters, V and K(M), when the steady-state assumption is valid. Following a brief overview of the derivation of the Michaelis-Menten equation for the single-enzyme, single-substrate reaction, a critical review of the criteria for validity of the steady-state assumption is presented. The application of the steady-state assumption makes the implicit assumption that there is an initial transient during which the substrate concentration remains approximately constant, equal to the initial substrate concentration, while the enzyme-substrate complex concentration builds up. This implicit assumption is known as the reactant stationary assumption. This review presents evidence showing that the reactant stationary assumption is distinct from and independent of the steady-state assumption. Contrary to the widely believed notion that the Michaelis-Menten equation can always be applied under the steady-state assumption, the reactant stationary assumption is truly the necessary condition for validity of the Michaelis-Menten equation to estimate kinetic parameters. Therefore, the application of the Michaelis-Menten equation only leads to accurate estimation of kinetic parameters when it is used under experimental conditions meeting the reactant stationary assumption. The criterion for validity of the reactant stationary assumption does not require the restrictive condition of choosing a substrate concentration that is much higher than the enzyme concentration in initial rate experiments. © 2013 FEBS.

  6. Renewable synthesis-gas-production. Do hydrocarbons in the reactant flow of the reverse water-gas shift reaction cause coke formation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.; Kern, C.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    In a two-step synthetic fuel production process based on carbon dioxide and renewable hydrogen, the best possible selectivity towards liquid hydrocarbons (Hc) shall be implemented. The process consists of a combination of the Reverse Water-Gas Shift reaction and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. To achieve this goal, gaseous short-chained Hc from the FTS reactor are recycled in the RWGS unit. In this paper, challenges coming up with the implementation of a recycle loop are discussed. First of all, it has to be examined whether Hc are converted under conditions present in the RWGS reactor. The coking caused by the recycle of Hc is regarded, including thermal coking in the heating zone of the reactor and catalytic coking in the catalyst bed. Coking of course is unwanted, as it deactivates the catalyst. The scope of this work is to find out to which extent and under which conditions gaseous Hc can be recycled. Therefore, experiments were carried out in both, a quartz glass reactor using a commercial Ni-catalyst at ambient pressure and in a pressurized steel reactor (without catalyst) to examine coking during the thermal decomposition of Hc. The catalytic experiments at atmospheric pressure showed that a recycle of CH{sub 4} did not cause coking up to a ratio of CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} below one. For these conditions, long term stability was proved. The reaction rates of the CH{sub 4} conversion were below those of the RWGS reaction. However, replacing CH{sub 4} by C{sub 3}H{sub 8} leads to thermal and catalytic coking. Catalytic coking hits the maximum level at about 700 C and decreases for higher temperatures and, thus is not regarded as a problem for the RWGS reactor. In contrast to that, thermal coking raises with higher temperatures, but it can be supressed efficiently with additional injection of H{sub 2}O, which of course shifts the equilibrium towards the undesired reactant side. (orig.)

  7. Trends and new developments in gaseous detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hoch, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Almost one century ago the method of particle detection with gaseous detectors was invented. Since then they have been exploited successfully in many experiments using a wide variety of different applications. The development is still going on today. The underlying working principles are today well understood and with the help of modern simulation techniques, new configurations can be easily examined and optimized before a first experimental test. Traditional wire chamber ensembles demonstrate that they are still up to date and are well prepared to meet also the challenges of LHC. Applications will be discussed using TPCs in high multiplicity environments with standard Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) as readout as well as drift tubes in a muon spectrometer for a Large Hardron Collider (LHC) experiment. Triggered by the evolving printed circuit technology, a new generation of gaseous detectors with very high position resolution and rate capability has emerged. Two representatives (MICROMEGAS, GEM) have ...

  8. Towards spark-proof gaseous pixel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigaridas, S.; Beuzekom, M. v.; Chan, H. W.; Graaf, H. v. d.; Hartjes, F.; Heijhoff, K.; Hessey, N. P.; Prodanovic, V.

    2016-11-01

    The micro-pattern gaseous pixel detector, is a promising technology for imaging and particle tracking applications. It is a combination of a gas layer acting as detection medium and a CMOS pixelated readout-chip. As a prevention against discharges we deposit a protection layer on the chip and then integrate on top a micromegas-like amplification structure. With this technology we are able to reconstruct 3D track segments of particles passing through the gas thanks to the functionality of the chip. We have turned a Timepix3 chip into a gaseous pixel detector and tested it at the SPS at Cern. The preliminary results are promising and within the expectations. However, the spark protection layer needs further improvement to make reliable detectors. For this reason, we have created a setup for spark-testing. We present the first results obtained from the lab-measurements along with preliminary results from the testbeam.

  9. Gaseous fuel reactor systems for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, K.; Schwenk, F. C.

    1977-01-01

    Research on the gaseous fuel nuclear rocket concept continues under the programs of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Office for Aeronautics and Space Technology and now includes work related to power applications in space and on earth. In a cavity reactor test series, initial experiments confirmed the low critical mass determined from reactor physics calculations. Recent work with flowing UF6 fuel indicates stable operation at increased power levels. Preliminary design and experimental verification of test hardware for high-temperature experiments have been accomplished. Research on energy extraction from fissioning gases has resulted in lasers energized by fission fragments. Combined experimental results and studies indicate that gaseous-fuel reactor systems have significant potential for providing nuclear fission power in space and on earth.

  10. Photosensitive Gaseous Detectors for Cryogenic Temperature Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Iacobaeus, C; Lund-Jensen, B; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F

    2007-01-01

    There are several proposals and projects today for building LXe Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) for dark matter search. An important element of these TPCs are the photomultipliers operating either inside LXe or in vapors above the liquid. We have recently demonstrated that photosensitive gaseous detectors (wire type and hole-type) can operate perfectly well until temperatures of LN2. In this paper results of systematic studies of operation of the photosensitive version of these detectors (combined with reflective or semi-transparent CsI photocathodes) in the temperature interval of 300-150 K are presented. In particular, it was demonstrated that both sealed and flushed by a gas detectors could operate at a quite stable fashion in a year/time scale. Obtained results, in particular the long-term stability of photosensitive gaseous detectors, strongly indicate that they can be cheap and simple alternatives to photomultipliers or avalanche solid-state detectors in LXe TPC applications.

  11. Gaseous mediators in resolution of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, John L; Ianaro, Angela; Flannigan, Kyle L; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    There are numerous gaseous substances that can act as signaling molecules, but the best characterized of these are nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide. Each has been shown to play important roles in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. This article is focused on the effects of these gasotransmitters in the context of inflammation. There is considerable overlap in the actions of nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide with respect to inflammation, and these mediators appear to act primarily as anti-inflammatory substances, promoting resolution of inflammatory processes. They also have protective and pro-healing effects in some tissues, such as the gastrointestinal tract and lung. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in the development of novel anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective drugs that release of one or more of these gaseous mediators.

  12. A simulation of a bluff-body stabilized turbulent premixed flame using LES-PDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeonglae; Pope, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    A turbulent premixed flame stabilized by a triangular cylinder as a flame-holder is simulated. The computational condition matches the Volvo experiments (Sjunnesson et al. 1992). Propane is premixed at a fuel lean condition of ϕ = 0 . 65 . For this reactive simulation, LES-PDF formulation is used, similar to Yang et al. (2012). The evolution of Lagrangian particles is simulated by solving stochastic differential equations modeling transport of the composition PDF. Mixing is modeled by the modified IEM model (Viswanathan et al. 2011). Chemical reactions are calculated by ISAT and for the good load balancing, PURAN distribution of ISAT tables is applied (Hiremath et al. 2012). To calculate resolved density, the two-way coupling (Popov & Pope 2013) is applied, solving a transport equation of resolved specific volume to reduce statistical noise. A baseline calculation shows a good agreement with the experimental measurements in turbulence statistics, temperature, and minor species mass fractions. Chemical reaction does not significantly contribute to the overall computational cost, in contrast to non-premixed flame simulations (Hiremath et al. 2013), presumably due to the restricted manifold of the purely premixed flame in the composition space.

  13. Influence of particle size on hardening and handling of a premixed calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberg, Jonas; Engstrand, Johanna; Engqvist, Håkan

    2013-04-01

    Premixed calcium phosphate cements (pCPC) have been developed to circumvent problems related to mixing and transfer of cements in the operating room. In addition, by using pCPC the short working times generally associated with conventional water-mixed cements are avoided. In this work, the influence of particle size on handling and hardening characteristics of a premixed monetite cement has been assessed. The cements were evaluated with respect to their injectability, setting time and compressive strength. It was found that cements with smaller particle sizes were more difficult to inject and had higher compressive strength. Regarding setting time, no clear trend could be discerned. The addition of granules made the cements easier to inject, but setting time was prolonged and lower strengths were obtained. The main findings of this work demonstrate that particle size can be used to control handling and physical properties of premixed cements and that previous knowledge from water-based CPC, regarding effects of particle size, is not directly applicable to premixed CPC.

  14. Acute toxicity study of Vilocym Premix (herbal growth promoter for Livestockin Wistar Albino Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Ahmad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study with the objective of safety evaluation of Vilocym Premix, herbal growth promoter for Livestock (supplied by Ayurvet Ltd., Baddi, India, was done as per standard guidelines of OECD-423 for acute toxicity testing. Vilocym Premix is a scientifically developed combination of herbs that contains herbal ingredients namely Azadirachta indica, Curcuma longa & many more alongwith natural zeolites. The study was done in 3 males and 3 female Wistar Albino rats, which were administered an initial dose of 50 mg/kg body weight followed by dose rates of 300, 500 & 5000 mg/kg body weight of test compound. The animals were observed for signs of convulsions, tremors, circling, depression, excitement and mortality. Body weight was recorded at 0,7th and 14th day and plasma total protein, albumin; AST and ALT were measured after 3rd day of experiment. No abnormal sign of symptoms were observed in any of the animal fed with Vilocym Premix at the dose rate of 50, 300, 500 & 5000 mg/kg. No mortality was observed indicating safety of herbal premix. [Vet. World 2009; 2(3.000: 100-102

  15. Numerical and experimental investigation of NO{sub x} formation in lean premixed combustion of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtsson, K.; Benz, P.; Marti, T.; Schaeren, R.; Schlegel, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    A high pressure jet-stirred reactor has been built and employed to investigate NO{sub x} formation in lean premixed combustion of methane/air. Experimental results are compared with numerical predictions using the model of a perfectly stirred reactor and elementary reaction mechanisms. Four reaction mechanisms are considered with respect to NO{sub x} formation. (author) 3 figs., 6 refs.

  16. High throughput production of double emulsions using packed bed premix emulsification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahin, S.; Sawalha, H.I.M.; Schroen, C.G.P.H.

    2014-01-01

    We explored the potential of packed bed premix emulsification for homogenizing coarse food grade W/O/W emulsions, prepared with sunflower oil. Using packed beds with different glass bead sizes (30–90 µm) at different applied pressures (200–600 kPa), emulsions with reasonably uniform droplet size (sp

  17. Turbulent combustion modelling of a confined premixed jet flame including heat loss effects using tabulated chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gövert, S.; Mira, D.; Kok, J.B.W.; Vázquez, M.; Houzeaux, G.

    2015-01-01

    The present work addresses the coupling of a flamelet database, to a low-Mach approximation of the Navier–Stokes equations using scalar controlling variables. The model is characterized by the chemistry tabulation based on laminar premixed flamelets in combination with an optimal choice of the react

  18. Polylactide microspheres prepared by premix membrane emulsification - Effects of solvent removal rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawalha, H.I.M.; Purwanti, N.; Rinzema, A.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    Polylactide microspheres were prepared by pre-mix membrane emulsification and subsequent extraction of solvent in a coagulation bath, and ultimately to the gas phase. The polymer was dissolved in dichloromethane and emulsified with water or water¿methanol mixtures by repeated passage through a glass

  19. Preparation of stable food-grade double emulsions with a hybrid premix membrane emulsification system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisinaite, Viktorija; Juraite, Dovile; Schroën, Karin; Leskauskaite, Daiva

    2016-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that food-grade double emulsions can be successfully prepared using a hybrid premix emulsification system. A coarse emulsion containing beetroot juice as inner water phase, sunflower oil as oil phase and 0.5% or 1.0% whey protein isolate solution as outer water phase

  20. Transient combustion modeling of an oscillating lean premixed methane/air flam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withag, J.A.M.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.; Syed, Khawar

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the present study is to demonstrate accurate low frequency transient turbulent combustion modeling. For accurate flame dynamics some improvements were made to the standard TFC combustion model for lean premixed combustion. With use of a 1D laminar flamelet code, predictions

  1. A non-adiabatic flamelet progress–variable approach for LES of turbulent premixed flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cecere, Donato; Giacomazzi, Eugenio; Picchia, Franca R.; Arcidiacono, Nunzio; Donato, Filippo; Verzicco, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    A progress variable/flame surface density/probability density function method has been employed for a Large Eddy Simulation of a CH4/Air turbulent premixed bluff body flame. In particular, both mean and variance of the progress variable are transported and subgrid spatially filtered gradient contrib

  2. Experimental Investigation of Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction in High-Reynolds-Number Turbulent Partially Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-23

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0277 Experimental Investigation of Turbulence- Chemistry Interaction in High-Reynolds-Number Turbulent Partially Premixed...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE [U] Experimental investigation of turbulence- chemistry interaction in high-Reynolds-number 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER turbulent...flames. Mixture fraction is an important variable in understanding and modeling turbulent mixing and turbulence- chemistry interaction, two key

  3. Preparation of ZnO-Al2O3 Particles in a Premixed Flame

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Joakim Reimer; Johannessen, Tue; Wedel, Stig

    2000-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) and alumina (Al2O3) particles are synthesized by the combustion of their volatilized acetylacetonate precursors in a premixed air-methane flame reactor. The particles are characterized by XRD, transmission electron microscopy, scanning mobility particle sizing and by measurement ...

  4. Rare earth metals appliance for magnetic admixtures recovery from mineral premixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shevtsov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the material composition metallomagnetic admixtures of mineral premix. It is shown that the dressed metallomagnetic impurity includes low-magnetic particles with low magnetic susceptibility. Removing these particles from the product stream in process of magnetic separation using high-energy rare earth magnets is a challenging task.

  5. National Gas Survey. Synthesized gaseous hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    The supply-Technical Advisory Task Force-Synthesized Gaseous Hydrocarbon Fuels considered coal, hydrocarbon liquids, oil shales, tar sands, and bioconvertible materials as potential feedstocks for gaseous fuels. Current status of process technology for each feedstock was reviewed, economic evaluations including sensitivity analysis were made, and constraints for establishment of a synthesized gaseous hydrocarbon fuels industry considered. Process technology is presently available to manufacture gaseous hydrocarbon fuels from each of the feedstocks. In 1975 there were eleven liquid feedstock SNG plants in the United States having a capacity of 1.1 billion SCFD. There can be no contribution of SNG before 1982 from plants using feedstocks other than liquids because there are no plants in operation or under construction as of 1977. Costs for SNG are higher than current regulated prices for U.S. natural gas. Because of large reserves, coal is a prime feedstock candidate although there are major constraints in the area of coal leases, mining and water permits, and others. Commercial technology is available and several new gasification processes are under development. Oil shale is also a feedstock in large supply and commercial process technology is available. There are siting and permit constraints, and water availability may limit the ultimate size of an oil shale processing industry. Under projected conditions, bioconvertible materials are not expected to support the production of large quantities of pipeline quality gas during the next decade. Production of low or medium Btu gas from municipal solid wastes can be expected to be developed in urban areas in conjunction with savings in disposal costs. In the economic evaluations presented, the most significant factor for liquid feedstock plants is the anticipated cost of feedstock and fuel. The economic viability of plants using other feedstocks is primarily dependent upon capital requirements.

  6. Correlation and prediction of gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, T. R.; Mason, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new correlation method for binary gaseous diffusion coefficients from very low temperatures to 10,000 K is proposed based on an extended principle of corresponding states, and having greater range and accuracy than previous correlations. There are two correlation parameters that are related to other physical quantities and that are predictable in the absence of diffusion measurements. Quantum effects and composition dependence are included, but high-pressure effects are not. The results are directly applicable to multicomponent mixtures.

  7. The flow field structure of highly stabilized partially premixed flames in a concentric flow conical nozzle burner with coflow

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2015-08-29

    The stability limits, the stabilization mechanism, and the flow field structure of highly stabilized partially premixed methane flames in a concentric flow conical nozzle burner with air co-flow have been investigated and presented in this work. The stability map of partial premixed flames illustrates that the flames are stable between two extinction limits. A low extinction limit when partial premixed flames approach non-premixed flame conditions, and a high extinction limit, with the partial premixed flames approach fully premixed flame conditions. These two limits showed that the most stable flame conditions are achieved at a certain degree of partial premixed. The stability is improved by adding air co-flow. As the air co-flow velocity increases the most stable flames are those that approach fully premixed. The turbulent flow field of three flames at 0, 5, 10 m/s co-flow velocity are investigated using Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) in order to explore the improvement of the flame stability due to the use of air co-flow. The three flames are all at a jet equivalence ratio (Φj) of 2, fixed level of partial premixing and jet Reynolds number (Rej) of 10,000. The use of co-flow results in the formation of two vortices at the cone exit. These vortices act like stabilization anchors for the flames to the nozzle tip. With these vortices in the flow field, the reaction zone shifts toward the reduced turbulence intensity at the nozzle rim of the cone. Interesting information about the structure of the flow field with and without co-flow are identified and reported in this work.

  8. Effects of fractal grid on emissions in burner combustion by using fuel-water-air premix injector derived from biodiesel crude palm oil (CPO base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suardi Mirnah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The alternative fuel is attracted good attention from worldwide especially for renewable and prevention energy such as biodiesel. Biodiesel is one of the hydrocarbon fuels and it has potential for external combustion. As one of the different solutions to these problems, rapid mixing of biodiesel-water-air technique is one of the most significant approaches to improve the combustion and reduce the emissions. The gas emission can be reduced by two methods. First is by improving an injector with fractal and the other is by using a biodiesel-water mixture as an alternative fuel. Mixing of water with fuel in the combustion process is a low cost and effective way. This research used biodiesel Crude Palm Oil (CPO as fuels in which blended with diesel. This study investigated the effects of water content and equivalence ratio on emissions with the rapid mixing injector. Fuels used are diesel, CPO5, CPO10 and CPO15 and the exhausts gaseous tested are CO, CO2, HC and NOX. The gas emissions processes are tested by using the gas analyzer. In this research, water premix of percentage up to 15vol% and blending biodiesel ratio was varied from 5vom% - 15vol%. The result shows that increasing of water content will effected decrement of CO, CO2 and HC emissions but increasing the NOX emissions.

  9. Subfilter Scale Combustion Modelling for Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazian, Nasim

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is a powerful computational tool for modelling turbulent combustion processes. However, for reactive flows, LES is still under significant development. In particular, for turbulent premixed flames, a considerable complication of LES is that the flame thickness is generally much smaller than the LES filter width such that the flame front and chemical reactions cannot be resolved on the grid. Accurate and robust subfilter-scale (SFS) models of the unresolved turbulence-chemistry interactions are therefore required and studies are needed to evaluate and improve them. In this thesis, a detailed comparison and evaluation of five different SFS models for turbulence- chemistry interactions in LES of premixed flames is presented. These approaches include both flamelet- and non-flamelet-based models, coupled with simple or tabulated chemistry. The mod- elling approaches considered herein are: algebraic- and transport-equation variants of the flame surface density (FSD) model, the presumed conditional moment (PCM) with flame prolongation of intrinsic low-dimensional manifold (FPI) tabulated chemistry, or PCM-FPI approach, evaluated with two different presumed probability density function (PDF) models; and conditional source-term estimation (CSE) approach. The predicted LES solutions are compared to the existing laboratory-scale experimental observation of Bunsen-type turbulent premixed methane-air flames, corresponding to lean and stoichiometric conditions lying from the upper limit of the flamelet regime to well within the thin reaction zones regime of the standard regimes diagram. Direct comparison of different SFS approaches allows investigation of stability and performance of the models, while the weaknesses and strengths of each approach are identified. Evaluation of algebraic and transported FSD models highlights the importance of non-equilibrium transport in turbulent premixed flames. The effect of the PDF type for the reaction progress

  10. Reactant gas transport and cell performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells with tapered flow field design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.C.; Yan, W.M. [Department of Mechatronic Engineering, Huafan University, Shih-Ting, Taipei 223, Taiwan (ROC); Soong, C.Y. [Department of Aerospace and Systems Engineering, Feng Chia University, Seatwen, Taichung 407, Taiwan (ROC); Chen, Falin [Institute of Applied Mechanics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (ROC); Chu, H.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (ROC)

    2006-07-14

    The objective of this work is to examine the reactant gas transport and the cell performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a tapered flow channel design. It is expected that, with the reduction in the channel depth along the streamwise direction, the reactant fuel gas in the tapered channel can be accelerated as well as forced into the gas diffuser layer to enhance the electrochemical reaction and thus augment the cell performance. The effects of liquid water formation on the reactant gas transport are taken into account in the present study. Numerical predictions show that the cell performance can be enhanced with the fuel channel tapered, and the enhancement is more noticeable at a lower voltage. The results also reveal that the liquid water effect in general influences the cell performance and the effect becomes significant at lower voltages. (author)

  11. Reactant gas transport and cell performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells with tapered flow field design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. C.; Yan, W. M.; Soong, C. Y.; Chen, Falin; Chu, H. S.

    The objective of this work is to examine the reactant gas transport and the cell performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a tapered flow channel design. It is expected that, with the reduction in the channel depth along the streamwise direction, the reactant fuel gas in the tapered channel can be accelerated as well as forced into the gas diffuser layer to enhance the electrochemical reaction and thus augment the cell performance. The effects of liquid water formation on the reactant gas transport are taken into account in the present study. Numerical predictions show that the cell performance can be enhanced with the fuel channel tapered, and the enhancement is more noticeable at a lower voltage. The results also reveal that the liquid water effect in general influences the cell performance and the effect becomes significant at lower voltages.

  12. The application of near-infrared spectroscopy for the quality control analysis of rocket propellant fuel pre-mixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Michael D

    2004-03-10

    The viability of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy as a technique for the quality control analysis of ingredient concentrations in a rocket propellant fuel liquid pre-mix was investigated. The pre-mix analyzed consisted of a polybutadiene pre-polymer, a plasticizer and two antioxidants. It was determined that NIR spectroscopy offered a fast and convenient method of verifying the percentage level of all four ingredients while requiring no sample preparation. The NIR methodology exhibited a high level of accuracy and precision. There was also a clear indication that the technique allowed monitoring of antioxidant depletion in the pre-mix on ageing.

  13. Electrochemiluminescence from tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium (Ⅱ) in the presence of aminocarboxylic acid co-reactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN XueBo; SHA BeiBei; HE XiWen

    2009-01-01

    Due to the highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL),tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium(Ⅱ) (Ru(bpy)32+)is often used in the field of bioarrays with the help of co-reactants.However,the generally used co-reactant,tripropylamine (TPA),is toxic,corrosive and volatile.Therefore,the search for safe,sensitive and economical co-reactants is critical.Herein,three aminocarboxylic acids,ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA),nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA),and 2-hydroxyethylethylene diaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA),have been investigated as potential co-reactants for promoting Ru(bpy)32+ ECL behaviour.A possible ECL mechanism is also presented.The experimental results suggested that the co-reactants have a different ECL behaviour compared to TPA,such as different pH-and surfactant-responses.The detection limits of Ru(bpy)32+ using NTA,EDTA and HEDTA as co-reactants are 1,60 and 680 fmoI.L1,respectively.The results indicate that NTA has a much higher efficiency than TPA to excite Ru(bpy)32+ ECL under their own optimal conditions.NTA could be widely used in many fields because it is less toxic,corrosive and volatile than TPA.Moreover,using Ru(bpy)32+ ECL,a sensitive method for the detection of aminocarboxylic acids is also developed.An improvement of four orders of magnitude in detection limits is obtained for EDTA compared to the known Ru(bpy)32+ chemiluminescent methods.

  14. ISRU Reactant, Fuel Cell Based Power Plant for Robotic and Human Mobile Exploration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Russell S.; Sanders, Gerald; Simon, Thomas; McCurdy, Kerri

    2003-01-01

    Three basic power generation system concepts are generally considered for lander, rover, and Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) assistant applications for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration missions. The most common power system considered is the solar array and battery system. While relatively simple and successful, solar array/battery systems have some serious limitations for mobile applications. For typical rover applications, these limitations include relatively low total energy storage capabilities, daylight only operating times (6 to 8 hours on Mars), relatively short operating lives depending on the operating environment, and rover/lander size and surface use constraints. Radioisotope power systems are being reconsidered for long-range science missions. Unfortunately, the high cost, political controversy, and launch difficulties that are associated with nuclear-based power systems suggests that the use of radioisotope powered landers, rovers, and EVA assistants will be limited. The third power system concept now being considered are fuel cell based systems. Fuel cell power systems overcome many of the performance and surface exploration limitations of solar array/battery power systems and the prohibitive cost and other difficulties associated with nuclear power systems for mobile applications. In an effort to better understand the capabilities and limitations of fuel cell power systems for Moon and Mars exploration applications. NASA is investigating the use of In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) produced reactant, fuel cell based power plants to power robotic outpost rovers, science equipment, and future human spacecraft, surface-excursion rovers, and EVA assistant rovers. This paper will briefly compare the capabilities and limitations of fuel cell power systems relative to solar array/battery and nuclear systems, discuss the unique and enhanced missions that fuel cell power systems enable, and discuss the common technology and system attributes

  15. Surface Chemistry of Aromatic Reactants on Pt- and Mo-Modified Pt Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Allison M.; Mark, Lesli; Rasmussen, Mathew J.; Hensley, Jesse E.; Medlin, J. Will

    2016-11-01

    Supported catalysts containing an oxophilic metal such as Mo and a noble metal such as Pt have shown promising activity and selectivity for deoxygenation of biomass-derived compounds. Here, we report that PtMo catalysts also promote hydrogenolysis of the model compound benzyl alcohol, while decarbonylation is most prevalent over unmodified Pt. A combination of single crystal surface science studies, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and vapor phase upgrading experiments using supported catalysts was carried out to better understand the mechanism by which Mo promotes deoxygenation. Molybdenum was deposited in submonolayer quantities on a Pt(111) surface and reduced at high temperature. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments using benzyl alcohol as a reactant showed greatly enhanced yields of the deoxygenation product toluene at moderate Mo coverages. To understand how the interaction of the aromatic group with the surface influenced this reactivity, we investigated the adsorption of toluene as a probe molecule. We found that the addition of Mo to Pt(111) resulted in a significant decrease in toluene decomposition. DFT calculations indicated that this decrease was consistent with decreased aromatic adsorption strengths that accompany incorporation of Mo into the Pt subsurface. The weaker aromatic-surface interaction on Pt/Mo surfaces led to a tilted adsorption geometry for benzyl alcohol, which presumably promotes hydrogenolysis to produce toluene instead of decarbonylation to produce benzene and CO. Alumina-supported Pt and PtMo catalysts were also tested for benzyl alcohol deoxygenation. PtMo catalysts had a higher rate of toluene production and lower rates of benzene and benzaldehyde production. Additionally, when benzaldehyde was used as the reactant to measure decarbonylation activity the mass-normalized rate of benzene production was 2.5 times higher on Pt than PtMo. Overall, the results of TPD, DFT, and supported catalyst experiments

  16. Lean premixed combustion stabilized by radiation feedback and heterogeneous catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibble, R.W.; Jyh-Yuan Chen; Sawyer, R.F. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Gas-turbine based systems are becoming the preferred approach to electric power generation from gaseous and liquid fossil-fuels and from biomass. As coal gasification becomes, gas turbines will also become important in the generation of electricity from coal. In smaller, distributed installations, gas turbines will also become important in the generation of electricity from coal. In smaller, distributed installations, gas turbines offer the prospect of cogeneration of electricity and heat, with increased efficiency and reduced pollutant emissions. One of the most important problems facing combustion-based power generation is the control of air pollutants, primarily nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}, consisting of NO and NO{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO). Nitric oxide (NO) is formed during gas-phase combustion and is the precursor of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), the principal component of photochemical smog. Recent research into the mechanisms and control of NO{sub x} formation has been spurred by increasingly stringent emission standards. The principal objective of this research project is the development of effective models for the simulation of catalytic combustion applications.

  17. Experimental data regarding the characterization of the flame behavior near lean blowout in a non-premixed liquid fuel burner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia De Giorgi

    2016-03-01

    The data are related to the research article “Image processing for the characterization of flame stability in a non-premixed liquid fuel burner near lean blowout” in Aerospace Science and Technology [1].

  18. Kinetic analysis on photocatalytic degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide on nanosized porous TiO2 films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iis Sopyan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the UV illumination-assisted degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde, hydrogen sulfide, and ammonia on highly active nanostructured-anatase and rutile films were investigated. It was found that the anatase film showed a higher photocatalytic activity than the counterpart did, however, the magnitude of difference in the photocatalytic activity of both films decreased in the order ammonia>acetaldehyde>hydrogen sulfide. To elucidate the reasons for the observation, the adsorption characteristics and the kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of the three reactants on both films were analyzed. The adsorption analysis examined using a simple Langmuir isotherm, showed that adsorbability on both films decreased in the order ammonia>acetaldehyde>hydrogen sulfide, which can be explained in terms of the decreasing electron-donor capacity. Acetaldehyde and ammonia adsorbed more strongly and with higher coverage on anatase film (1.2 and 5.6 molecules/nm2, respectively than on rutile (0.6 and 4.7 molecules/nm2, respectively. Conversely, hydrogen sulfide molecules adsorbed more strongly on rutile film (0.7 molecules/nm2 than on anatase (0.4 molecules/nm2. Exposure to UV light illumination brought about the photocatalytic oxidation of the three gases in contact with both TiO2 films, and the decrease in concentration were measured, and their kinetics are analyzed in terms of the Langmuir–Hinshelwood kinetic model. From the kinetic analysis, it was found that the anatase film showed the photocatalytic activities that were factors of ~8 and ~5 higher than the rutile film for the degradation of gaseous ammonia and acetaldehyde, respectively. However, the activity was only a factor of ~1.5 higher for the photodegradation of hydrogen sulfide. These observations are systematically explained by the charge separation efficiency and the adsorption characteristics of each catalyst as well as by the physical and electrochemical properties of each

  19. Nitric Oxide and Oxygen Air-Contamination Effects on Extinction Limits of Non-Premixed Hydrocarbon-Air Flames for a HIFiRE Scramjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Dawson, Lucy C.; Vaden, Sarah N.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2009-01-01

    Unique nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen air-contamination effects on the extinction Flame Strength (FS) of non-premixed hydrocarbon (HC) vs. air flames are characterized for 7 gaseous HCs, using a new idealized 9.3 mm straight-tube Opposed Jet Burner (OJB) at 1 atm. FS represents a laminar strain-induced extinction limit based on cross-section-average air jet velocity, Uair, that sustains combustion of a counter jet of gaseous fuel just before extinction. Besides ethane, propane, butane, and propylene, the HCs include ethylene, methane, and a 64 mole-% ethylene / 36 % methane mixture, the writer s previously recommended gaseous surrogate fuel for HIFiRE scramjet tests. The HC vs. clean air part of the work is an extension of a May 2008 JANNAF paper that characterized surrogates for the HIFiRE project that should mimic the flameholding of reformed (thermally- or catalytically-cracked) endothermic JP-like fuels. The new FS data for 7 HCs vs. clean air are thus consolidated with the previously validated data, normalized to absolute (local) axial-input strain rates, and co-plotted on a dual kinetically dominated reactivity scale. Excellent agreement with the prior data is obtained for all 7 fuels. Detailed comparisons are also made with recently published (Univ. Va) numerical results for ethylene extinction. A 2009-revised ethylene kinetic model (Univ. Southern Cal) led to predicted limits within approx. 5 % (compared to 45 %, earlier) of this writer s 2008 (and present) ethylene FSs, and also with recent independent data (Univ. Va) obtained on a new OJB system. These +/- 5 % agreements, and a hoped-for "near-identically-performing" reduced kinetics model, would greatly enhance the capability for accurate numerical simulations of surrogate HC flameholding in scramjets. The measured air-contamination effects on normalized FS extinction limits are projected to assess ongoing Arc-Heater-induced "facility test effects" of NO production (e.g., 3 mole-%) and resultant oxygen

  20. Turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elperin, T.; Kleeorin, N.; Liberman, M.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2014-11-01

    We study turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures in a developed turbulence. In our previous study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 69 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.80.69] using a path-integral approach for a delta-correlated in a time random velocity field, we demonstrated a strong modification of turbulent transport in fluid flows with chemical reactions or phase transitions. In the present study we use the spectral τ approximation that is valid for large Reynolds and Peclet numbers and show that turbulent diffusion of the reacting species can be strongly depleted by a large factor that is the ratio of turbulent and chemical times (turbulent Damköhler number). We have demonstrated that the derived theoretical dependence of a turbulent diffusion coefficient versus the turbulent Damköhler number is in good agreement with that obtained previously in the numerical modeling of a reactive front propagating in a turbulent flow and described by the Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov-Fisher equation. We have found that turbulent cross-effects, e.g., turbulent mutual diffusion of gaseous admixtures and turbulent Dufour effect of the chemically reacting gaseous admixtures, are less sensitive to the values of stoichiometric coefficients. The mechanisms of the turbulent cross-effects differ from the molecular cross-effects known in irreversible thermodynamics. In a fully developed turbulence and at large Peclet numbers the turbulent cross-effects are much larger than the molecular ones. The obtained results are applicable also to heterogeneous phase transitions.

  1. Single cell performance studies on the FE/CR Redox Energy Storage System using mixed reactant solutions at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahn, R. F.; Hagedorn, N. H.; Ling, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental studies in a 14.5 sq cm single cell system using mixed reactant solutions at 65 C are described. Systems were tested under isothermal conditions, i.e., reactants and the cell were at the same temperature. Charging and discharging performance were evaluated by measuring watt-hour and coulombic efficiencies, voltage-current relationships, hydrogen evolution and membrane resistivity. Watt-hour efficiencies ranged from 86 percent at 43 ma/sq cm to 75 percent at 129 ma/sq cm with corresponding coulombic efficiencies of 92 percent and 97 percent, respectively. Hydrogen evolution was less than 1 percent of the charge coulumbic capacity during charge-discharge cycling. Bismuth amd bismuth-lead catalyzed chromium electrodes maintained reversible performance and low hydrogen evolution under normal and adverse cycling conditions. Reblending of the anode and cathode solutions was successfully demonstrated to compensate for osmotic volume changes. Improved performance was obtained with mixed reactant systems in comparison to the unmixed reactant systems. Previously announced in STAR as N83-25042

  2. The impact of the confinement of reactants on the metal distribution in bimetallic nanoparticles synthesized in reverse micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concha Tojo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic study on the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles in microemulsions was carried out by computer simulation. A comprehensive analysis of the resulting nanostructures was performed regarding the influence of intermicellar exchange on reactivity. The objects of this study were metals having a difference in standard reduction potential of about 0.2–0.3 V. Relatively flexible microemulsions were employed and the concentration of the reactants was kept constant, while the reaction rate of each metal was monitored as a function of time using different reactant proportions. It was demonstrated that the reaction rates depend not only on the chemical reduction rate, but also on the intermicellar exchange rate. Furthermore, intermicellar exchange causes the accumulation of slower precursors inside the micelles, which favors chemical reduction. As a consequence, slower reduction rates strongly correlate with the number of reactants in this confined media. On the contrary, faster reduction rates are limited by the intermicellar exchange rate and not the number of reactants inside the micelles. As a result, different precursor proportions lead to different sequences of metal reduction, and thus the arrangement of the two metals in the nanostructure can be manipulated.

  3. A continuous flow microfluidic calorimeter: 3-D numerical modeling with aqueous reactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Mehmet A., E-mail: mehmet.sen@mathworks.com [Northeastern University, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, 360 Hungtington Avenue, 334 Snell Engineering Center, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kowalski, Gregory J., E-mail: gkowal@coe.neu.edu [Northeastern University, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, 360 Hungtington Avenue, 334 Snell Engineering Center, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Fiering, Jason, E-mail: jfiering@draper.com [Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, 555 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Larson, Dale, E-mail: dlarson@draper.com [Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, 555 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2015-03-10

    Highlights: • A co-flow microreactor is modeled in flow, reaction/diffusion, and thermal domains. • Analysis shows how arrayed temperature sensors can provide enthalpy of reaction. • Optical plasmonic temperature sensors could be arrayed suitably for calorimetry. • The reactor studied has a volume of 25 nL. - Abstract: A computational analysis of the reacting flow field, species diffusion and heat transfer processes with thermal boundary layer effects in a microchannel reactor with a coflow configuration was performed. Two parallel adjacent streams of aqueous reactants flow along a wide, shallow, enclosed channel in contact with a substrate, which is affixed to a temperature controlled plate. The Fluent computational fluid dynamics package solved the Navier–Stokes, mass transport and energy equations. The energy model, including the enthalpy of reaction as a nonuniform heat source, was validated by calculating the energy balance at several control volumes in the microchannel. Analysis reveals that the temperature is nearly uniform across the channel thickness, in the direction normal to the substrate surface; hence, measurements made by sensors at or near the surface are representative of the average temperature. Additionally, modeling the channel with a glass substrate and a silicone cover shows that heat transfer is predominantly due to the glass substrate. Finally, using the numerical results, we suggest that a microcalorimeter could be based on this configuration, and that temperature sensors such as optical nanohole array sensors could have sufficient spatial resolution to determine enthalpy of reaction.

  4. Preprocedural serum levels of acute-phase reactants and prognosis after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahel, Braim M; Visseren, Frank L J; Suttorp, Maarten-Jan; Plokker, Thijs H W; Kelder, Johannes C; de Jongh, Bartelt M; Bouter, K Paul; Diepersloot, Rob J A

    2003-10-15

    In this study we evaluate the value of baseline concentrations of acute-phase reactants on prognosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Blood samples were drawn immediately before PCI to measure baseline concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)), and fibrinogen. Follow-up data were collected at 8 months. Repeat PCI, CABG, myocardial infarction, and death were recorded as major adverse clinical events (MACE). Furthermore the recurrence of angina pectoris was noted. The study included 600 consecutive patients after a successful PCI. Sixty-four percent of the patients were stented. The mean age was 61.6 years and 68.9% were male. CRP levels were significantly higher in patients who were to have repeat angina as compared with those who were not (P=0.0322). IL-6 levels were not correlated with angina or MACE. Lp(a) and fibrinogen concentrations were both significantly related to MACE (P=0.0337 and P=0.0253, respectively). Our study clearly supports the role of inflammation in restenosis after PCI as measured in statistically higher levels of Lp(a) and fibrinogen in patients with MACE and CRP in patients with repeat angina.

  5. Slow reactant-water exchange and high catalytic performance of water-tolerant Lewis acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koito, Yusuke; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Hasegawa, Ryota; Kitano, Masaaki; Hara, Michikazu

    2014-06-23

    (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic measurement with trimethylphosphine oxide (TMPO) was applied to evaluate the Lewis acid catalysis of various metal triflates in water. The original (31)P NMR chemical shift and line width of TMPO is changed by the direct interaction of TMPO molecules with the Lewis acid sites of metal triflates. [Sc(OTf)3] and [In(OTf)3] had larger changes in (31)P chemical shift and line width by formation of the Lewis acid-TMPO complex than other metal triflates. It originates from the strong interaction between the Lewis acid and TMPO, which results in higher stability of [Sc(OTf)3TMPO] and [In(OTf)3TMPO] complexes than other metal triflate-TMPO complexes. The catalytic activities of [Sc(OTf)3] and [In(OTf)3] for Lewis acid-catalyzed reactions with carbonyl compounds in water were far superior to the other metal triflates, which indicates that the high stability of metal triflate-carbonyl compound complexes cause high catalytic performance for these reactions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation suggests that low LUMO levels of [Sc(OTf)3] and [In(OTf)3] would be responsible for the formation of stable coordination intermediate with nucleophilic reactant in water. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Use of Gas Transported Reactants for Uranium Remediation in Vadose Zone Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Truex, Michael J.; Resch, Charles T.; Williams, Mark D.

    2010-03-10

    This laboratory-scale investigation is focused on decreasing mobility of uranium in subsurface contaminated sediments in the vadose zone by in situ geochemical manipulation at low water content. This geochemical manipulation of the sediment surface phases included reduction, pH change (acidic and alkaline), and additions of chemicals (phosphate, ferric iron) to form specific precipitates. Reactants were advected into 1-D columns packed with Hanford 200 area U-contaminated sediment as a reactive gas (for CO2, NH3, H2S, SO2), with a 0.1% water content mist (for NaOH, Fe(III), HCl, PO4) and with a 1% water content foam (for PO4). Because uranium is present in the sediment in multiple phases, changes in U surface phases were evaluated with a series of liquid extractions that dissolve progressively less soluble phases and electron microbe identification of mineral phases. In terms of the short-term decrease in U mobility (in decreasing order), NH3, NaOH mist, CO2, HCl mist, and Fe(III) mist showed 20% to 35% change in U surface phases. The two reductive gas treatments (H2S and SO2) showed little change. For long-term decrease in U transport, mineral phases created that had low solubility (phosphates, silicates) were desired, so NH3, phosphates (mist and foam delivered), and NaOH mist showed the greatest formation of these minerals.

  7. Polyaniline/Vanadium oxide composites: An effective control in morphology by varying reactant concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goswami, S. [Thin Film and Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Maiti, U.N.; Maiti, S. [Thin Film and Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Mitra, M.K. [School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Chattopadhyay, K.K., E-mail: kalyan_chattopadhyay@yahoo.com [Thin Film and Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2013-02-15

    A one pot synthesis protocol is presented for the realization of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures comprised of polyaniline and vanadium oxide. The polyaniline/vanadium oxide hybrid morphology is tailored by controlling the relative concentration of reactants which resulted in diverse morphologies ranging from nanorods, combined nano/microrods to porous nano/microspheres. Temporal evolution of morphology is investigated to elucidate the formation mechanism in detail. The prepared composites exhibit enhanced thermal stability in comparison to pure polyaniline which may be attributed to the strong chemical combination of vanadium oxide and polyaniline within the composites as prevailed by FTIR and TGA analysis of the products. This simple and controllable approach for synthesizing the organic/inorganic hybrid material should have future applications in energy storage devices, sensors and many more. Highlights: ► Polyaniline/Vanadium oxide composite was tailored by a simple route. ► Morphology control by varying reagent concentrations. ► Possible growth mechanism for rods and hollow spheres. ► Exhibited enhanced thermal stability in comparison to pure polyaniline.

  8. A continuous flow microfluidic calorimeter: 3-D numerical modeling with aqueous reactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Mehmet A; Kowalski, Gregory J; Fiering, Jason; Larson, Dale

    2015-03-10

    A computational analysis of the reacting flow field, species diffusion and heat transfer processes with thermal boundary layer effects in a microchannel reactor with a coflow configuration was performed. Two parallel adjacent streams of aqueous reactants flow along a wide, shallow, enclosed channel in contact with a substrate, which is affixed to a temperature controlled plate. The Fluent computational fluid dynamics package solved the Navier-Stokes, mass transport and energy equations. The energy model, including the enthalpy of reaction as a nonuniform heat source, was validated by calculating the energy balance at several control volumes in the microchannel. Analysis reveals that the temperature is nearly uniform across the channel thickness, in the direction normal to the substrate surface; hence, measurements made by sensors at or near the surface are representative of the average temperature. Additionally, modeling the channel with a glass substrate and a silicone cover shows that heat transfer is predominantly due to the glass substrate. Finally, using the numerical results, we suggest that a microcalorimeter could be based on this configuration, and that temperature sensors such as optical nanohole array sensors could have sufficient spatial resolution to determine enthalpy of reaction.

  9. Effects of reactant rotational excitations on H2 + NH2 → H + NH3 reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongwei; Guo, Hua

    2014-12-01

    Rotational mode specificity of the title reaction is examined using an initial state selected time-dependent wave packet method on an accurate ab initio based global potential energy surface. This penta-atomic reaction presents an ideal system to test several dynamical approximations, which might be useful for future quantum dynamics studies of polyatomic reactions, particularly with rotationally excited reactants. The first approximation involves a seven-dimensional (7D) model in which the two non-reactive N-H bonds are fixed at their equilibrium geometry. The second is the centrifugal sudden (CS) approximation within the 7D model. Finally, the J-shifting (JS) model is tested, again with the fixed N-H bonds. The spectator-bond approximation works very well in the energy range studied, while the centrifugal sudden and J-shifting integral cross sections (ICSs) agree satisfactorily with the coupled-channel counterparts in the low collision energy range, but deviate at the high energies. The calculated integral cross sections indicate that the rotational excitation of H2 somewhat inhibits the reaction while the rotational excitations of NH2 have little effect. These findings are compared with the predictions of the sudden vector projection model. Finally, a simple model is proposed to predict rotational mode specificity using K-averaged reaction probabilities.

  10. Electrostatic Precipitation in Nearly Pure Gaseous Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Charles; Calle, Carlos; Clements, Sid; Cox, Bobby; Ritz, Mindy

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic precipitation was performed in a nearly pure gaseous nitrogen system as a possible remedy for black dust contaminant from high pressure 6000 psi lines at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The results of a prototype electrostatic precipitator that was built and tested using nitrogen gas at standard atmospheric pressures is presented. High voltage pulsed waveforms are generated using a rotating spark gap system at 30 Hz. A unique dust delivery system utilizing the Venturi effect was devised that supplies a given amount of dust per unit time for testing purposes.

  11. The Effect of Premixed Schedule on the Crystal Formation of Calcium Phosphate Cement-chitosan Composite with Added Tetracycline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing MAO; Yan LIU; Bin ZHOU; Liyun YAO

    2008-01-01

    In this study, calcium phosphate cements (CPC) were prepared by mixing cement powders of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) with a cement liquid of phosphate acid saline solution. Tetracycline (TTC)-CPC, chitosan-CPC and chitosan-TTC-CPC were investigated with different premixed schedule. It was demonstrate that both TTC and chitosan worked on the phase transition and crystal characteristics. TTCP mixed with phosphate acid saline solution had similar features of Fourier transform-infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) no matter it was mixed with chitosan or TTC or both. TTC premixed with cement liquid or powder had significant different features of FT-IR and 876 cm-1seemed to be a special peak for TTC when TTC was premixed with cement liquid. This was also supported by XRD analysis, which showed that TTC premixed with cement liquid improved phase transition of TTCP to OCP. Chitosan, as organic additive, regulates the regular crystal formation and inhibits the phase transition of TTCP to OCP, except when it is mingled with cement liquid premixed with TTC in field scanning electron microscope. It was concluded that the premixed schedule influences the crystal formation and phase transition, which may be associated with its biocompatibility and bioactivities in vivo.

  12. Reactant Carrier Microfoam Technology for In-Situ Remediation of Radionuclide and Metallic Contaminants in Deep Vadose Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Zhong, Lirong; Jansik, Danielle P.; Foote, Martin; Hart, Andrea T.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing advanced remedial technologies for addressing metal and radionuclide (Cr, Tc, and U) contamination in deep vadose zone environments. One of the transformational technology alternatives being considered by the DOE Office of Environmental Management, is the use of Reactant Carrier Microfoams (RCM) as a minimally invasive method for delivery and emplacement of reagents for in-situ immobilization of contaminants. Penetration of low permeability zones deep within the subsurface for Enhance Oil Recovery (EOR) has been well-established. Use of surfactant foams have also been explored for mobilizing DNAPL from sediments. So far, the concept of using RCM for immobilizing labile metal and long-lived radionuclide contaminants in the deep vadose zone has not been explored. We, at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), conducted studies to develop stable foams as a means to deliver reductive and/or precipitating reactants to the deep subsurface. To test the feasibility of this approach, we developed a preliminary foam formulation consisting of a mixture of an anionic and a nonionic surfactant with a reactant consisting of a 9:1 blend of tripoly- and orthophosphate. The MSE Technology Applications, Inc (MSE) in collaboration with PNNL, conducted a scale-up test to evaluate the efficacy of this reactant carrier foam for in-situ immobilization of U containing sediment zones in a heterogenous sediment matrix. The data indicated that successful immobilization of U contamination is feasible using specifically tailored reactant carrier foam injection technology. Studies are continuing for developing more robust optimized RCM for highly mobile contaminants such as Cr (VI), Tc (VII) in the deep vadose zone.

  13. A gaseous stripper proposal based on hadrontherapy facility HIMM

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Xiucui; Zhang, Xiaohu

    2013-01-01

    Multi-turn Injection scheme with gaseous stripper is usually used in high intensity and super heavy ion injection process. With its advantage of long lifetime and uniformity, a gaseous stripper is proposed based on the under construction hadrontherapy facility HIMM (Heavy Ion Medical Machine). In this paper, the physical process between the injecting beam and the gaseous target is studied, and a simulation work is conducted based on the former developed code.

  14. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Dugheri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen fluoride (HF is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC/mass spectrometry (MS. After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90. In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n=10, 4.3%, sensitivity (0.2 μg/filter, and linearity (2.0–4000 μg/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913 were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation.

  15. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonari, Alessandro; Pompilio, Ilenia; Monti, Alessandro; Arcangeli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS). After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90). In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n = 10, 4.3%), sensitivity (0.2 μg/filter), and linearity (2.0–4000 μg/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913) were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day) and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation. PMID:27829835

  16. Position-sensitive gaseous photomultipliers research and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Francke, Tom; Peskov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Gaseous photomultipliers are defined as gas-filled devices capable of recording single ultraviolet (UV) and visible photons with high position resolution. Used in a variety of research areas, these detectors can be paired with computers to treat and store imaging information of UV-light. Position-Sensitive Gaseous Photomultipliers: Research and Applications explores the advancement of gaseous detectors as applied for single photon detection. Emphasizing emerging perspectives and new ways to apply gaseous detectors across research fields, this research-based publication is an essential reference source for engineers, physicists, graduate-level students, and researchers.

  17. Gaseous detonation synthesis and characterization of nano-oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Honghao; Wu, Linsong; Li, Xiaojie; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-07-01

    Gaseous detonation is a new method of heating the precursor of nanomaterials into gas, and integrating it with combustible gas as mixture to be detonated for the synthesis of nanomaterials. In this paper, the mixed gas of oxygen and hydrogen is used as the source for detonation, to synthesize nano TiO2, nano SiO2 and nano SnO2 through gaseous detonation method, characterization and analysis of the products, it was found that the products from gaseous detonation method were of high purity, good dispersion, smaller particle size and even distribution. It also shows that for the synthesis of nano-oxides, gaseous detonation is universal.

  18. An experimental and kinetic modeling study of premixed nitroethane flames at low pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Kuiwen; Zhang, Lidong; Xie, Mingfeng

    2013-01-01

    An experimental and kinetic modeling study is reported on three premixed nitroethane/oxygen/argon flames at low pressure (4.655kPa) with the equivalence ratios (Φ) of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0. Over 30 flame species were identified with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrome......An experimental and kinetic modeling study is reported on three premixed nitroethane/oxygen/argon flames at low pressure (4.655kPa) with the equivalence ratios (Φ) of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0. Over 30 flame species were identified with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass...... predictions have shown satisfactory agreement with the experimental results. Basing on the rate-of-production analysis, the reaction pathways that feature the combustion of nitroethane were revealed, including the primary decomposition of C–N bond fission, the oxidation of C2 and C1 hydrocarbons...

  19. Laminar premixed methane/air flame extinction characteristics influenced by co-flow water mists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU XuanYa; LU ShouXiang; ZHU YingChun; LIU Yi

    2008-01-01

    Based on the tubular burner, the burning velocities, flame stretch and inhibition rules influenced by co-flow water mists were studied using a high-speed schlieren system. Moreover, the variation rules of the flame critical extinction in our burner equipment were also obtained by analyzing the process and mechanism of flame extinction and inhibition. It is shown that the flame stretch is related to the fuel concentration, co-flow fluxes and water mist diameters. For droplets with a larger diameter, the smaller the co-flow fluxes, the more obvious the flame stretch. When the water mist loading rate is rather smaller, for fuel-rich premixed flame with Le>1, the flame with larger burning rate tends to backfire more easily. Under the same water mist conditions, for fuel-lean premixed flame with Le<1, the smaller the gas concentration, the easier the flame is extinct.

  20. Effects Of Ignition on Premixed Vortex Rings: A Simultaneous PLIF and PIV Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, T. R.; Gord, J. R.; Katta, V. R.; Gogineni, S. P.

    2001-11-01

    Preliminary studies of reacting, premixed vortex rings have shown that flame propagation is highly sensitive to ignition timing, equivalence ratio, and vortex strength. A variety of divergent phenomena have been observed, such as interior/exterior flame propagation, vortex-induced flame bridging across the jet column, and the formation of unburned pockets. In the current work, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of acetone and OH is performed to study the non-reacting and reacting regions, respectively, and particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to study the effects of reaction on the flow field. The flow field consists of well-characterized vortex rings of premixed methane and air generated at the exit of an axisymmetric nozzle using a solenoid-driven piston. Ignition is initiated at various phases of vortex development and propagation. Results are compared with corresponding numerical simulations from a time-dependent computational fluid dynamics code with chemistry.

  1. Analysis of the flamelet concept in the numerical simulation of laminar partially premixed flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consul, R.; Oliva, A.; Perez-Segarra, C.D.; Carbonell, D. [Centre Tecnologic de Transferencia de Calor (CTTC), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Colom 11, E-08222, Terrassa, Barcelona (Spain); de Goey, L.P.H. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2008-04-15

    The aim of this work is to analyze the application of flamelet models based on the mixture fraction variable and its dissipation rate to the numerical simulation of partially premixed flames. Although the main application of these models is the computation of turbulent flames, this work focuses on the performance of flamelet concept in laminar flame simulations removing, in this way, turbulence closure interactions. A well-known coflow methane/air laminar flame is selected. Five levels of premixing are taken into account from an equivalence ratio {phi}={infinity} (nonpremixed) to {phi}=2.464. Results obtained using the flamelet approaches are compared to data obtained from the detailed solution of the complete transport equations using primitive variables. Numerical simulations of a counterflow flame are also presented to support the discussion of the results. Special emphasis is given to the analysis of the scalar dissipation rate modeling. (author)

  2. Development of lean premixed low-swirl burner for low NO{sub x} practical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yegian, D.T.; Cheng, R.K.

    1999-07-07

    Laboratory experiments have been performed to evaluate the performance of a premixed low-swirl burner (LSB) in configurations that simulate commercial heating appliances. Laser diagnostics were used to investigate changes in flame stabilization mechanism, flowfield, and flame stability when the LSB flame was confined within quartz cylinders of various diameters and end constrictions. The LSB adapted well to enclosures without generating flame oscillations and the stabilization mechanism remained unchanged. The feasibility of using the LSB as a low NO{sub x} commercial burner has also been verified in a laboratory test station that simulates the operation of a water heater. It was determined that the LSB can generate NO{sub x} emissions < 10 ppm (at 3% O{sub 2}) without significant effect on the thermal efficiency of the conventional system. The study has demonstrated that the lean premixed LSB has commercial potential for use as a simple economical and versatile burner for many low emission gas appliances.

  3. Recent Advances in Understanding of Thermal Expansion Effects in Premixed Turbulent Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabelnikov, Vladimir A.; Lipatnikov, Andrei N.

    2017-01-01

    When a premixed flame propagates in a turbulent flow, not only does turbulence affect the burning rate (e.g., by wrinkling the flame and increasing its surface area), but also the heat release in the flame perturbs the pressure field, and these pressure perturbations affect the turbulent flow and scalar transport. For instance, the latter effects manifest themselves in the so-called countergradient turbulent scalar flux, which has been documented in various flames and has challenged the combustion community for approximately 35 years. Over the past decade, substantial progress has been made in investigating (a) the influence of thermal expansion in a premixed flame on the turbulent flow and turbulent scalar transport within the flame brush, as well as (b) the feedback influence of countergradient scalar transport on the turbulent burning rate. The present article reviews recent developments in this field and outlines issues to be solved in future research.

  4. Does the presence of bacteria effect basaltic glass dissolution rates? 1: Dead Pseudomonas reactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmann, Gabrielle J.; Shirokova, Liudmila S.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Oelkers, Eric H.; Benezeth, Pascale

    2010-05-01

    Basaltic glass and crystalline basalt formations in Iceland have been suggested for industrial CO2 storage due to their porous and permeable properties and high reactivity. Acid CO2-saturated waters in contact with basaltic glass will lead to rapid dissolution of the glass and release of divalent cations, (Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe2+) that can react to form stable carbonates and thereby trap the CO2. However, the basalt formations in Iceland not only contains glass and mineral assemblages, but also host microbiological communities that either by their presence or by active involvement in chemical reactions could affect the amount of basaltic glass being dissolved and CO2 being trapped. Samples of natural bacteria communities from the CO2 storage grounds in Iceland were collected, separated, and purified using agar plate technique and cultured under laboratory conditions in nutrient broth-rich media. Heterotrophic aerobic Gram-negative strain of Pseudomonas reactants was selected for a series of flow-through experiments aimed at evaluation of basaltic glass dissolution rate in the presense of increasing amounts of dead bacteria and their lysis products. The experiments were carried out using mixed-flow reactors at pH 4, 6, 8 and 10 at 25 °C. Each of the four reactors contained 1 gram of basaltic glass of the size fraction 45-125 μm. This glass was dissolved in ~ 0.01 M buffer solutions (acetate, MES, bicarbonate and carbonate+bicarbonate mixture) of the desired pH. All experiments ran 2 months, keeping the flowrate and temperature stable and only changing the concentration of dead bacteria in the inlet solutions (from 0 to 430 mg/L). Experiments were performed in sterile conditions, and bacterial growth was prevented by adding NaN3 to the inlet solutions. Routine culturing of bacteria on the agar plates confirmed the sterility of experiments. Samples of outlet solutions were analyzed for major cations and trace elements by ICP-MS. Results demonstrate a slight decrease in the

  5. NO{sub x} formation in lean premixed combustion of methane at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtsson, K.U.M.; Griebel, P.; Schaeren, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    High pressure experiments in a jet-stirred reactor have been performed to study the NO{sub x} formation in lean premixed combustion of methane/air mixtures. The experimental results are compared with numerical predictions using four well known reaction mechanisms and a model which consists of a series of two perfectly stirred reactors and a plug flow reactor. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs.

  6. Premixed Combustion of Kapok (ceiba pentandra) seed oil on Perforated Burner

    OpenAIRE

    I.K.G. Wirawan; I. N. G. Wardana; Rudy Soenoko; Slamet Wahyudi

    2014-01-01

    Availability of fossil fuels in the world decrease gradually due to excessive fuel exploitation. This situations push researcher to look for alternative fuels as a source of renewable energy, one of them is kapok (ceiba pentandra) seed oil. The aim this study was to know the behavior of laminar burning velocity, secondary Bunsen flame with open tip, cellular and triple flame. Premixed combustion of kapok seed oil was studied experimentally on perforated burner with equivalence ratio (φ) varie...

  7. Exploring Soot Particle Concentration and Emissivity by Transient Thermocouples Measurements in Laminar Partially Premixed Coflow Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi De Falco

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Soot formation in combustion represents a complex phenomenon that strongly depends on several factors such as pressure, temperature, fuel chemical composition, and the extent of premixing. The effect of partial premixing on soot formation is of relevance also for real combustion devices and still needs to be fully understood. An improved version of the thermophoretic particle densitometry (TPD method has been used in this work with the aim to obtain both quantitative and qualitative information of soot particles generated in a set of laminar partially-premixed coflow flames characterized by different equivalence ratios. To this aim, the transient thermocouple temperature response has been analyzed to infer particle concentration and emissivity. A variety of thermal emissivity values have been measured for flame-formed carbonaceous particles, ranging from 0.4 to 0.5 for the early nucleated soot particles up to the value of 0.95, representing the typical value commonly attributed to mature soot particles, indicating that the correct determination of the thermal emissivity is necessary to accurately evaluate the particle volume fraction. This is particularly true at the early stage of the soot formation, when particle concentration measurement is indeed particularly challenging as in the central region of the diffusion flames. With increasing premixing, an initial increase of particles is detected both in the maximum radial soot volume fraction region and in the central region of the flame, while the further addition of primary air determines the particle volume fraction drop. Finally, a modeling analysis based on a sectional approach has been performed to corroborate the experimental findings.

  8. Quantification of trace metals in infant formula premixes using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cama-Moncunill, Raquel; Casado-Gavalda, Maria P.; Cama-Moncunill, Xavier; Markiewicz-Keszycka, Maria; Dixit, Yash; Cullen, Patrick J.; Sullivan, Carl

    2017-09-01

    Infant formula is a human milk substitute generally based upon fortified cow milk components. In order to mimic the composition of breast milk, trace elements such as copper, iron and zinc are usually added in a single operation using a premix. The correct addition of premixes must be verified to ensure that the target levels in infant formulae are achieved. In this study, a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was assessed as a fast validation tool for trace element premixes. LIBS is a promising emission spectroscopic technique for elemental analysis, which offers real-time analyses, little to no sample preparation and ease of use. LIBS was employed for copper and iron determinations of premix samples ranging approximately from 0 to 120 mg/kg Cu/1640 mg/kg Fe. LIBS spectra are affected by several parameters, hindering subsequent quantitative analyses. This work aimed at testing three matrix-matched calibration approaches (simple-linear regression, multi-linear regression and partial least squares regression (PLS)) as means for precision and accuracy enhancement of LIBS quantitative analysis. All calibration models were first developed using a training set and then validated with an independent test set. PLS yielded the best results. For instance, the PLS model for copper provided a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.995 and a root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 14 mg/kg. Furthermore, LIBS was employed to penetrate through the samples by repetitively measuring the same spot. Consequently, LIBS spectra can be obtained as a function of sample layers. This information was used to explore whether measuring deeper into the sample could reduce possible surface-contaminant effects and provide better quantifications.

  9. Simulations and experiments on the ignition probability in turbulent premixed bluff-body flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitte, Michael Philip; Bach, Ellen; Kariuki, James; Bauer, Hans-Jörg; Mastorakos, Epaminondas

    2016-05-01

    The ignition characteristics of a premixed bluff-body burner under lean conditions were investigated experimentally and numerically with a physical model focusing on ignition probability. Visualisation of the flame with a 5 kHz OH* chemiluminescence camera confirmed that successful ignitions were those associated with the movement of the kernel upstream, consistent with previous work on non-premixed systems. Performing many separate ignition trials at the same spark position and flow conditions resulted in a quantification of the ignition probability Pign, which was found to decrease with increasing distance downstream of the bluff body and a decrease in equivalence ratio. Flows corresponding to flames close to the blow-off limit could not be ignited, although such flames were stable if reached from a richer already ignited condition. A detailed comparison with the local Karlovitz number and the mean velocity showed that regions of high Pign are associated with low Ka and negative bulk velocity (i.e. towards the bluff body), although a direct correlation was not possible. A modelling effort that takes convection and localised flame quenching into account by tracking stochastic virtual flame particles, previously validated for non-premixed and spray ignition, was used to estimate the ignition probability. The applicability of this approach to premixed flows was first evaluated by investigating the model's flame propagation mechanism in a uniform turbulence field, which showed that the model reproduces the bending behaviour of the ST-versus-u‧ curve. Then ignition simulations of the bluff-body burner were carried out. The ignition probability map was computed and it was found that the model reproduces all main trends found in the experimental study.

  10. Low and High Temperature Combustion Chemistry of Butanol Isomers in Premixed Flames and Autoignition Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Yasunaga, K; Curran, H J; Tsujimura, T; Osswald, P; Kohse-Hoinghaus, K

    2010-12-12

    Butanol is a fuel that has been proposed as a bio-derived alternative to conventional petroleum derived fuels. The structural isomer in traditional 'bio-butanol' fuel is n-butanol, but newer conversion technologies produce iso-butanol as a fuel. In order to better understand the combustion chemistry of bio-butanol, this study presents a comprehensive chemical kinetic model for all the four isomers of butanol (e.g., 1-, 2-, iso- and tert-butanol). The proposed model includes detailed high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. In this study, the primary experimental validation target for the model is premixed flat low-pressure flame species profiles obtained using molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). The model is also validated against previously published data for premixed flame velocity and n-butanol rapid compression machine and shock tube ignition delay. The agreement with these data sets is reasonably good. The dominant reaction pathways at the various pressures and temperatures studied are elucidated. At low temperature conditions, we found that the reaction of alphahydroxybutyl with O{sub 2} was important in controlling the reactivity of the system, and for correctly predicting C{sub 4} aldehyde profiles in low pressure premixed flames. Enol-keto isomerization reactions assisted by HO{sub 2} were also found to be important in converting enols to aldehydes and ketones in the low pressure premixed flames. In the paper, we describe how the structural features of the four different butanol isomers lead to differences in the combustion properties of each isomer.

  11. Microwave and conventional sintering of premixed and prealloyed Cu-12Sn bronze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethi G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation is to study the sintering behavior of the Cu-12Sn bronze system in both, a microwave furnace as well as a conventional furnace. The powders prepared by premixed and prealloyed routes were sintered in the range of solid state, transient and supersolidus liquid phase sintering conditions. The comparative analysis is based on the sintered density, densification parameter, hardness, macrostructures and microstructures of the samples.

  12. Numerical simulation of pollutant emission and flame extinction in lean premixed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggenspieler, Gilles

    Premixed and partially-premixed combustion and pollutant emissions in full-scale gas turbines has been numerically investigated using a massively-parallel Large-Eddy Simulation Combustion Dynamics Model. Through the use of a flamelet library approach, it was observed that CO (Carbon Oxide) and NO (Nitric Oxide) emission can be predicted and match experimental results. The prediction of the CO emission trend is shown to be possible if the influence of the formation of UHC (Unburnt HydroCarbons) via flame extinction is taken into account. Simulations were repeated with two different combustion approach: the G-equation model and the Linear-Eddy Mixing (LEM) Model. Results are similar for these two set of numerical simulations. The LEM model was used to simulate flame extinction and flame lift-off in a dump combustion chamber. The LEM model is compared to the G-equation model and it was found that the LEM model is more versatile than the G-equation model with regard to accurate simulation of flame propagation in all turbulent premixed combustion regimes. With the addition of heat losses, flame extinction was observed for low equivalence ratio. Numerical simulation of flame propagation with transient inflow conditions were also carried out and demonstrated the ability of the LEM model to accurately simulate flame propagation in the case of a partially-premixed system. In all simulations where flame extinction and flame lift-off was simulated, release of unburnt fuel in the post-flame region through flame extinction was not observed.

  13. Effects of balneotherapy on the reactants of acute inflammation phase in Ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamenković Bojana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects sacroiliac joints, spinal column and peripheral joints. Beside medication therapy, physical and balneotherapy play an important role in its complex treatment. Objective. The aim of the research was to establish serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP, α 1-acid glycoprotein (α 1-AGP, ceruloplasmine (CP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (SE before and after the balneotherapy in ankylosing spondylitis. Methods. The research included 50 AS patients according to the revised New York criteria, of mean age 43 years, who were treated for 14 days on the average at the Clinic for Rheumatology of the Institute 'Niška Banja'. All the patients received medications and balneotherapy (radioactive oligomineral baths, peloid, massage, kinesitherapy; the serum concentrations of CRP, α1-AGP, CP and SE were measured before and after balneotherapy. Serum proteins were determined using original Nor Partigen plates Boehringer. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was measured by Westergreen method. Balneotherapy was applied individually, intensively or mildly, depending on the AS stage and activity phase. Results. After dosed balneotherapy, a significant decrease in the concentrations of CP (p<0.05, α1-AGP (p<0.01 and CRP (p<0.05 was registered in the serums of AS patients. ESR was not significantly reduced. Conclusion. The research proved that α 1-acid glycoprotein, ceruloplasmine and C-reactive protein represent more sensitive inflammation markers as compared to erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The identification of acute phase reactants is important in the evaluation of dosed balneotherapy efficiency in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

  14. Relationship of Acute Phase Reactants and Fat Accumulation during Treatment for Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Sanchez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tuberculosis causes inflammation and muscle wasting. We investigated how attenuation of inflammation relates to repletion of body composition during treatment in an underserved population. Design. Twenty-four patients (23 to 79 years old with pulmonary tuberculosis and inflammation (pretreatment albumin =2.96±0.13 g/dL, C-reactive protein [CRP] =6.71±1.34 μg/dL, and beta-2-microglobulin =1.68±0.10 μg/L were evaluated and had BIA over 24 weeks. Results. Weight increased by 3.02±0.81 kg (5.5%; =0.007 at week 4 and by 8.59±0.97 kg (15.6%; <0.0001 at week 24. Repletion of body mass was primarily fat, which increased by 2.09±0.52 kg at week 4 and 5.05±0.56 kg at week 24 (=0.004 and <0.0001 versus baseline. Fat-free mass (FFM, body cell mass (BCM, and phase angle did not increase until study week 8. Albumin rose to 3.65±0.14 g/dL by week 4 (<0.001 and slowly increased thereafter. CRP levels declined by ~50% at each interval visit. Conclusions. During the initial treatment, acute phase reactants returned towards normal. The predominant accrual of fat mass probably reflects ongoing, low levels of inflammation.

  15. Cord Blood Acute Phase Reactants Predict Early Onset Neonatal Sepsis in Preterm Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palac, Hannah L.; Yogev, Ram; Ernst, Linda M.; Mestan, Karen K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Early onset sepsis (EOS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants, yet diagnosis remains inadequate resulting in missed cases or prolonged empiric antibiotics with adverse consequences. Evaluation of acute phase reactant (APR) biomarkers in umbilical cord blood at birth may improve EOS detection in preterm infants with intrauterine infection. Methods In this nested case-control study, infants (29.7 weeks gestation, IQR: 27.7–32.2) were identified from a longitudinal cohort with archived cord blood and placental histopathology. Patients were categorized using culture, laboratory, clinical, and antibiotic treatment data into sepsis groups: confirmed sepsis (cEOS, n = 12); presumed sepsis (PS, n = 30); and no sepsis (controls, n = 30). Nine APRs were measured in duplicate from cord blood using commercially available multiplex immunoassays (Bio-Plex Pro™). In addition, placental histopathologic data were linked to biomarker results. Results cEOS organisms were Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, Proteus mirabilis, Haemophilus influenzae and Listeria monocytogenes. C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid P and ferritin were significantly elevated in cEOS compared to controls (p<0.01). SAA, CRP, and Hp were elevated in cEOS but not in PS (p<0.01) and had AUCs of 99%, 96%, and 95% respectively in predicting cEOS. Regression analysis revealed robust associations of SAA, CRP, and Hp with EOS after adjustment for covariates. Procalcitonin, fibrinogen, α-2-macroglobulin and tissue plasminogen activator were not significantly different across groups. Placental acute inflammation was associated with APR elevation and was present in all cEOS, 9 PS, and 17 control infants. Conclusion This study shows that certain APRs are elevated in cord blood of premature infants with EOS of intrauterine origin. SAA, CRP, and Hp at birth have potential diagnostic utility for risk stratification and

  16. Cord Blood Acute Phase Reactants Predict Early Onset Neonatal Sepsis in Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithal, Leena B; Palac, Hannah L; Yogev, Ram; Ernst, Linda M; Mestan, Karen K

    2017-01-01

    Early onset sepsis (EOS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants, yet diagnosis remains inadequate resulting in missed cases or prolonged empiric antibiotics with adverse consequences. Evaluation of acute phase reactant (APR) biomarkers in umbilical cord blood at birth may improve EOS detection in preterm infants with intrauterine infection. In this nested case-control study, infants (29.7 weeks gestation, IQR: 27.7-32.2) were identified from a longitudinal cohort with archived cord blood and placental histopathology. Patients were categorized using culture, laboratory, clinical, and antibiotic treatment data into sepsis groups: confirmed sepsis (cEOS, n = 12); presumed sepsis (PS, n = 30); and no sepsis (controls, n = 30). Nine APRs were measured in duplicate from cord blood using commercially available multiplex immunoassays (Bio-Plex Pro™). In addition, placental histopathologic data were linked to biomarker results. cEOS organisms were Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, Proteus mirabilis, Haemophilus influenzae and Listeria monocytogenes. C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid P and ferritin were significantly elevated in cEOS compared to controls (p<0.01). SAA, CRP, and Hp were elevated in cEOS but not in PS (p<0.01) and had AUCs of 99%, 96%, and 95% respectively in predicting cEOS. Regression analysis revealed robust associations of SAA, CRP, and Hp with EOS after adjustment for covariates. Procalcitonin, fibrinogen, α-2-macroglobulin and tissue plasminogen activator were not significantly different across groups. Placental acute inflammation was associated with APR elevation and was present in all cEOS, 9 PS, and 17 control infants. This study shows that certain APRs are elevated in cord blood of premature infants with EOS of intrauterine origin. SAA, CRP, and Hp at birth have potential diagnostic utility for risk stratification and identification of infants with EOS.

  17. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Cavity-Stabilized Ethylene/Air Premixed Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jacqueline; Konduri, Aditya; Kolla, Hemanth; Rauch, Andreas; Chelliah, Harsha

    2016-11-01

    Cavity flame holders have been shown to be important for flame stabilization in scramjet combustors. In the present study the stabilization of a lean premixed ethylene/air flame in a rectangular cavity at thermo-chemical conditions relevant to scramjet combustors is simulated using a compressible reacting multi-block direct numerical simulation solver, S3D, incorporating a 22 species ethylene-air reduced chemical model. The fuel is premixed with air to an equivalence ratio of 0.4 and enters the computational domain at Mach numbers between 0.3 and 0.6. An auxiliary inert channel flow simulation is used to provide the turbulent velocity profile at the inlet for the reacting flow simulation. The detailed interaction between intense turbulence, nonequilibrium concentrations of radical species formed in the cavity and mixing with the premixed main stream under density variations due to heat release rate and compressibility effects is quantified. The mechanism for flame stabilization is quantified in terms of relevant non-dimensional parameters, and detailed analysis of the flame and turbulence structure will be presented. We acknowledge the sponsorship of the AFOSR-NSF Joint Effort on Turbulent Combustion Model Assumptions and the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences.

  18. DNS of turbulent premixed slot flames with mixture inhomogeneity: a study of NOx formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Stefano; Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2016-11-01

    A set of Direct Numerical Simulations of three-dimensional methane/air lean flames in a spatially developing turbulent slot burner are performed. The flames are in the thin-reaction zone regimes and the jet Reynolds number is 5600. This configuration is of interest since it displays turbulent production by mean shear as in real devices. The gas phase hydrodynamics are modeled with the reactive, unsteady Navier-Stokes equations in the low Mach number limit. Combustion is treated with finite-rate chemistry. The jet is characterized by a non-uniform equivalence ratio at the inlet and varying levels of incomplete premixing for the methane/air mixture are considered. The global equivalence ratio is 0.7 and temperature is 800 K. All simulations are performed at 4 atm. The instantaneous profiles of the mass fractions of methane and air at the inlet are sampled from a set of turbulent channel simulations that provide realistic, fully turbulent fields. The data are analyzed to study the influence of partial premixing on the flame structure. Particular focus is devoted to the assessment of heat release rate fluctuations and NOx formation. In particular, the effects of partial premixing on the production rates for the various pathways to NOx formation are investigated.

  19. Optimization of instant dalia dessert pre-mix production by using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Alok; Shalini, B N; Patel, Ashok Ambalal; Singh, Mithilesh; Rasane, Prasad

    2015-02-01

    Dalia, a wheat-based, particulate containing dairy dessert is popularly consumed as a breakfast food and is also considered as a health food. Though popular throughout Northern parts of the country, its limited shelf-life even under refrigeration imposes severe restrictions on its organized manufacture and marketing. In order to promote dalia dessert as a marketable product, in the present study, a process was developed for manufacture of instant dalia pre-mix, as a dry product with long shelf-life, which could be attractively packaged and easily reconstituted for consumption. During the investigation, the effect of different levels of milk solids and wheat solids was studied on dalia pre-mix quality by employing a central composite rotatable design (CCRD). The suggested formulation had 17.82 % milk solids and 2.87 % wheat solids. This formulation was found to be most appropriate for manufacture of instant dalia pre-mix with predicted sensory scores (Max. 100) of 85.35, 41.98 and 67.27 for mouthfeel, consistency and flavor, respectively; the viscosity of the product was 941.0 cp.

  20. Conditional budgets of second-order statistics in nonpremixed and premixed turbulent combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macart, Jonathan F.; Grenga, Temistocle; Mueller, Michael E.

    2016-11-01

    Combustion heat release modifies or introduces a number of new terms to the balance equations for second-order turbulence statistics (turbulent kinetic energy, scalar variance, etc.) compared to incompressible flow. A major modification is a significant increase in viscosity and dissipation in the high-temperature combustion products, but new terms also appear due to density variation and gas expansion (dilatation). Previous scaling analyses have hypothesized that dilatation effects are important in turbulent premixed combustion but are unimportant in turbulent nonpremixed combustion. To explore this hypothesis, a series of DNS calculations have been performed in the low Mach number limit for spatially evolving turbulent planar jet flames of hydrogen and air in both premixed and nonpremixed configurations. Unlike other studies exploring the effects of heat release on turbulence, the turbulence is not forced, and detailed chemical kinetics are used to describe hydrogen-air combustion. Budgets for second-order statistics are computed conditioned on progress variable in the premixed flame and on mixture fraction in the nonpremixed flame in order to locate regions with respect to the flame structure where dilatation effects are strongest.

  1. Combined Influence of Strain and Heat Loss on Turbulent Premixed Flame Stabilization

    KAUST Repository

    Tay-Wo-Chong, Luis

    2015-11-16

    The present paper argues that the prediction of turbulent premixed flames under non-adiabatic conditions can be improved by considering the combined effects of strain and heat loss on reaction rates. The effect of strain in the presence of heat loss on the consumption speed of laminar premixed flames was quantified by calculations of asymmetric counterflow configurations (“fresh-to-burnt”) with detailed chemistry. Heat losses were introduced by setting the temperature of the incoming stream of products on the “burnt” side to values below those corresponding to adiabatic conditions. The consumption speed decreased in a roughly exponential manner with increasing strain rate, and this tendency became more pronounced in the presence of heat losses. An empirical relation in terms of Markstein number, Karlovitz Number and a non-dimensional heat loss parameter was proposed for the combined influence of strain and heat losses on the consumption speed. Combining this empirical relation with a presumed probability density function for strain in turbulent flows, an attenuation factor that accounts for the effect of strain and heat loss on the reaction rate in turbulent flows was deduced and implemented into a turbulent combustion model. URANS simulations of a premixed swirl burner were carried out and validated against flow field and OH chemiluminescence measurements. Introducing the effects of strain and heat loss into the combustion model, the flame topology observed experimentally was correctly reproduced, with good agreement between experiment and simulation for flow field and flame length.

  2. Influence of polymer addition on the mechanical properties of a premixed calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrand, Johanna; Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Premixed calcium phosphate cements can reduce handling complications that are associated with the mixing of cements in the operating room. However, to extend the clinical indication of ceramic cements their mechanical properties need to be further improved. The incorporation of a polymeric material with intrinsically high tensile properties could possibly assist in increasing the mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cement. In this study polymer microparticles made from poly(lactid-co-glycolide) plasticised with poly(ethylene glycol) 400 (PLGA/PEG microparticles) were added in amounts of up to 5 wt% to a premixed acidic calcium phosphate cement. The PLGA/PEG microparticles added undergo a shape transformation at 37 °C, which could give a better integration between polymer microparticles and ceramic cement compared with polymer microparticles lacking this property. The results showed that the incorporation of 1.25 wt% PLGA/PEG microparticles increased the compressive strength by approximately 20% up to 15.1 MPa while the diametral tensile strength was kept constant. The incorporation of PLGA/PEG microparticles increased the brushite to monetite ratio after setting compared with pure ceramic cements. In conclusion, small amounts of PLGA/PEG microparticles can be incorporated into premixed acidic calcium phosphate cement and increase their mechanical properties, which could lead to increased future applications.

  3. Influence of polymer addition on the mechanical properties of a premixed calcium phosphate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrand, Johanna; Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Premixed calcium phosphate cements can reduce handling complications that are associated with the mixing of cements in the operating room. However, to extend the clinical indication of ceramic cements their mechanical properties need to be further improved. The incorporation of a polymeric material with intrinsically high tensile properties could possibly assist in increasing the mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cement. In this study polymer microparticles made from poly(lactid-co-glycolide) plasticised with poly(ethylene glycol) 400 (PLGA/PEG microparticles) were added in amounts of up to 5 wt% to a premixed acidic calcium phosphate cement. The PLGA/PEG microparticles added undergo a shape transformation at 37 °C, which could give a better integration between polymer microparticles and ceramic cement compared with polymer microparticles lacking this property. The results showed that the incorporation of 1.25 wt% PLGA/PEG microparticles increased the compressive strength by approximately 20% up to 15.1 MPa while the diametral tensile strength was kept constant. The incorporation of PLGA/PEG microparticles increased the brushite to monetite ratio after setting compared with pure ceramic cements. In conclusion, small amounts of PLGA/PEG microparticles can be incorporated into premixed acidic calcium phosphate cement and increase their mechanical properties, which could lead to increased future applications. PMID:24270588

  4. Understanding premixed flame chemistry of gasoline fuels by comparing quantities of interest

    KAUST Repository

    Selim, Hatem

    2016-07-23

    Gasoline fuels are complex mixtures that vary in composition depending on crude oil feedstocks and refining processes. Gasoline combustion in high-speed spark ignition engines is governed by flame propagation, so understanding fuel composition effects on premixed flame chemistry is important. In this study, the combustion chemistry of low-pressure, burner-stabilized, premixed flames of two gasoline fuels was investigated under stoichiometric conditions. Flame speciation was conducted using vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron photoionization time-of-flight molecular beam mass spectroscopy. Stable end-products, intermediate hydrocarbons, and free radicals were detected and quantified. In addition, several isomeric species in the reaction pool were distinguished and quantified with the help of the highly tunable synchrotron radiation. A comparison between the products of both flames is presented and the major differences are highlighted. Premixed flame numerical simulations were conducted using surrogate fuel kinetic models for each flame. Furthermore, a new approach was developed to elucidate the main discrepancies between experimental measurements and the numerical predictions by comparing quantities of interest. © 2016.

  5. Gravitational Influences on Flame Propagation through Non-Uniform, Premixed Gas Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Fletcher J.; Easton, John; Ross, Howard D.; Marchese, Anthony; Perry, David; Kulis, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Flame propagation through non-uniformly premixed (or layered) gases has importance both in useful combustion systems and in unintentional fires. As summarized previously, non-uniform premixed gas combustion receives scant attention compared to the more usual limiting cases of diffusion or uniformly premixed flames, especially regarding the role gravity plays. This paper summarizes our progress on furthering the knowledge of layered combustion, in which a fuel concentration gradient exists normal to the direction of flame spread. We present experimental and numerical results for flame spread through propanol-air layers formed near the flash point temperature (25 C) or near the stoichiometric temperature (33 C). Both the model and experimental results show that the removal of gravity results in a faster spreading flame, by as much as 80% depending on conditions. This is exactly the opposite effect as that predicted by an earlier model reported. We also found that having a gallery lid results in faster flame spread, an effect more pronounced at normal gravity, demonstrating the importance of enclosure geometry. Also reported here is the beginning of our spectroscopic measurements of fuel vapor.

  6. Linear Stability Analysis of Laminar Premixed Fuel-Rich Double-Spray Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Weinberg

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the stability of a double-spray premixed flame formed when both fuel and oxidizer are initially present in the form of sprays of evaporating liquid droplets. To simplify the inherent complexity that characterizes the analytic solution of multi-phase combustion processes, the analysis is restricted to fuel-rich laminar premixed double-spray flames, and assumes a single-step global chemical reaction mechanism. Steady-state solutions are obtained and the sensitivity of the flame temperature and the flame propagating velocity to the initial liquid fuel and/or oxidizer loads are established. The stability analysis revealed an increased proneness to cellular instability induced by the presence of the two sprays, and for the fuel-rich case considered here the influence of the liquid oxidizer was found to be more pronounced than that of the liquid fuel. Similar effects were noted for the neutral pulsating stability boundaries. The impact of unequal latent heats of vaporization is also investigated and found to be in keeping with the destabilizing influence of heat loss due to droplet evaporation. It should be noted that as far as the authors are aware no experimental evidence is available for (at least validation of the predictions. However, they do concur in a general and reasonable fashion with independent experimental evidence in the literature of the behavior of single fuel spray laminar premixed flames.

  7. Bluff-body stabilized flame dynamics of lean premixed syngas combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hong G.; Kim, Yu Jeong; Lee, Bok Jik; Kaust Team

    2015-11-01

    Recently, syngas combustion has been actively investigated for the potential application to integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While lean premixed combustion is attractive for both reduced emission and enhanced efficiency, flame instability becomes often an issue. Bluff-bodies have been adopted as effective flame holders for practical application of premixed flames. In the present study, high-fidelity direct numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the dynamics of lean premixed syngas flames stabilized on a bluff-body, in particular at the near blow-off regime of the flame. A two-dimensional domain of 4 mm height and 20 mm length with a flame holder of a 1 mm-by-1 mm square geometry is used. For a syngas mixture with the equivalence ratio of 0.5 and the CO:H2 ratio of 1, several distinct flame modes are identified as the inflow velocity approaches to the blowoff limit. The sequences of extinction pathway and combustion characteristics are discussed.

  8. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed mc1hane/oxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt: the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames. for reasons that still must be explained.

  9. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Methane/Oxygen Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Flame structure and soot formation were studied within soot-containing laminar premixed methanefoxygen flames at atmospheric pressure. The following measurements were made: soot volume fractions by laser extinction, soot temperatures by multiline emission, gas temperatures (where soot was absent) by corrected fine-wire thermocouples, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscope (TEM), major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, and gas velocities by laser velocimetry. Present measurements of gas species concentrations were in reasonably good agreement with earlier measurements due to Ramer et al. as well as predictions based on the detailed mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt; the predictions also suggest that H atom concentrations are in local thermodynamic equilibrium throughout the soot formation region. Using this information, it was found that measured soot surface growth rates could be correlated successfully by predictions based on the hydrogenabstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of both Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall, extending an earlier assessment of these mechanisms for premixed ethylene/air flames to conditions having larger H/C ratios and acetylene concentrations. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates were somewhat lower than the earlier observations for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames and were significantly lower than corresponding rates in laminar diffusion flames, for reasons that still must be explained.

  10. White organic light-emitting diodes with an ultra-thin premixed emitting layer

    CERN Document Server

    Jeon, T; Tondelier, Denis; Bonnassieux, Yvan; Forget, Sebastien; Chenais, Sebastien; Ishow, Elena

    2014-01-01

    We described an approach to achieve fine color control of fluorescent White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLED), based on an Ultra-thin Premixed emitting Layer (UPL). The UPL consists of a mixture of two dyes (red-emitting 4-di(4'-tert-butylbiphenyl-4-yl)amino-4'-dicyanovinylbenzene or fvin and green-emitting 4-di(4'-tert-butylbiphenyl-4-yl)aminobenzaldehyde or fcho) premixed in a single evaporation cell: since these two molecules have comparable structures and similar melting temperatures, a blend can be evaporated, giving rise to thin films of identical and reproducible composition compared to those of the pre-mixture. The principle of fine color tuning is demonstrated by evaporating a 1-nm-thick layer of this blend within the hole-transport layer (4,4'-bis[N-(1-naphtyl)-N-phenylamino]biphenyl (\\alpha-NPB)) of a standard fluorescent OLED structure. Upon playing on the position of the UPL inside the hole-transport layer, as well as on the premix composition, two independent parameters are available to finel...

  11. CATALYTIC COMBUSTION OF PROPANE IN A MEMBRANE REACTOR WITH SEPARATE FEED OF REACTANT .1. OPERATION IN ABSENCE OF TRANS-MEMBRANE PRESSURE-GRADIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SARACCO, G; VELDSINK, JW; VERSTEEG, GF; VANSWAAIJ, WPM

    1995-01-01

    A pilot plant study on propane catalytic combustion in a membrane reactor with separate reactant feeds is presented. The membrane consisted of a porous alumina tube activated by insertion into its pores of a Pt/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst. The role of reactants concentration and of the feed flow rates were

  12. CATALYTIC COMBUSTION OF PROPANE IN A MEMBRANE REACTOR WITH SEPARATE FEED OF REACTANT .1. OPERATION IN ABSENCE OF TRANS-MEMBRANE PRESSURE-GRADIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SARACCO, G; VELDSINK, JW; VERSTEEG, GF; VANSWAAIJ, WPM

    1995-01-01

    A pilot plant study on propane catalytic combustion in a membrane reactor with separate reactant feeds is presented. The membrane consisted of a porous alumina tube activated by insertion into its pores of a Pt/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst. The role of reactants concentration and of the feed flow rates were

  13. Fundamental studies on porous flame reactors for minimisation of gaseous pollutant emissions in premixed combustion; Grundlagenuntersuchungen an poroesen Flammenreaktoren zur Minimierung von Schadgasemissionen bei der vorgemischten Verbrennung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moessbauer, S.

    1999-06-23

    The still new technology of pore reactors is described to begin with, i.e. mechanisms, advantages and potential. Different types of porous materials were analyzed in order to obtain information on stability and heat transfer mechanisms. The results will provide a basis for further investigation. [German] Der vorliegende Bericht fasst Arbeiten zusammen, die sich mit dem grundlegenden Verstaendnis zum Stabilisierungsverhalten von poroesen Flammenreaktoren befassen. Die Technologie der poroesen Flammenreaktoren konnte am Lehrstuhl fuer Stroemungsmechanik der Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg entwickelt werden, und es wird durch die vorgestellten, von der Max-Buchner-Forschungsstiftung gefoerderten, Arbeiten versucht, ein vertieftes Verstaendnis der dabei ablaufenden Vorgaenge zu erlangen. Bevor auf die durchgefuehrten experimentellen Arbeiten im Detail eingegangen wird, erfolgt eine kurze Einfuehrung in die noch neue Technologie der Porenreaktoren. Im Rahmen dieser Einfuehrung werden grundlegende Mechanismen aufgezeigt, und es wird dargelegt, warum diese sogenannte Porenbrennertechnologie herausragende Vorteile besitzt und warum sie deshalb ein sehr grosses Potential aufweist, sich in vielfaeltigen industriellen Anwendungsgebieten erfolgreich zu bewaehren. Es wurden unterschiedliche poroese Materialien in verschiedenen Regionen des Porenreaktors untersucht und die sich ergebenden Temperaturverteilungen im Inneren der poroesen Struktur sowie die daraus resultierende Charakteristik der Schadstoffemission aufgenommen. Aus diesen Daten konnten neue Erkenntnisse ueber das Stabilitaetsverhalten von Porenbrennern und ueber das Zusammenspiel der beteiligten Waermetransportmechanismen gewonnen werden. Die erhaltenen Ergebnisse fliessen zum einen direkt in Neuentwicklungen von Porenbrennern ein und tragen aufgrund ihrer Uebertragbarkeit somit wesentlich zur Verkuerzung der Entwicklungsarbeiten bei. Zum anderen stellen die gemessenen Temperatur- und Konzentrationsfelder wichtige Ausgangsdatensaetze fuer weiterfuehrende, detaillierte numerische Simulationen dar. (orig.)

  14. Gaseous species as reaction tracers in the solvothermal synthesis of the zinc oxide terephthalate MOF-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorf, Steffen; Baitalow, Felix; Seidel, Jürgen; Mertens, Florian O R L

    2007-05-24

    Gaseous species emitted during the zinc oxide/zinc hydroxide 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate metal organic framework synthesis (MOF-5, MOF-69c) have been used to investigate the reaction scheme that leads to the framework creation. Changes of the gas-phase composition over time indicate that the decomposition of the solvent diethylformamide occurs at least via two competing reaction pathways that can be linked to the reaction's overall water and pH management. From isotope exchange experiments, we deduce that one of the decomposition pathways leads to the removal of water from the reaction mixture, which sets the conditions when the synthesis of an oxide-based (MOF-5) instead of an hydroxide-based MOF (MOF-69c) occurs. A quantitative account of most reactants and byproducts before and after the MOF-5/MOF-69c synthesis is presented. From the investigation of the reaction intermediates and byproducts, we derive a proposal of a basic reaction scheme for the standard synthesis zinc oxide carboxylate MOFs.

  15. Background reduction of a spherical gaseous detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fard, Ali Dastgheibi; Loaiza, Pia; Piquemal, Fabrice; Giomataris, Ioannis; Gray, David; Gros, Michel; Magnier, Patrick; Navick, Xavier-François; Savvidis, Ilias

    2015-08-01

    The Spherical gaseous detector (or Spherical Proportional Counter, SPC) is a novel type of detector. It consists of a large spherical volume filled with gas, using a single detection readout channel. The detector allows 100 % detection efficiency. SEDINE is a low background version of SPC installed at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (LSM) underground laboratory (4800 m.w.e) looking for rare events at very low energy threshold, below 100 eV. This work presents the details on the chemical cleaning to reduce internal 210Pb surface contamination on the copper vessel and the external radon reduction achieved via circulation of pure air inside anti-radon tent. It will be also show the radon measurement of pure gases (Ar, N, Ne, etc) which are used in the underground laboratory for the low background experiments.

  16. 2011 GASEOUS IONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Anderson

    2011-03-04

    The Gaseous Ions: Structures, Energetics and Reactions Gordon Research Conference will focus on ions and their interactions with molecules, surfaces, electrons, and light. The conference will cover theory and experiments, and systems ranging from molecular to biological to clusters to materials. The meeting goal continues to be bringing together scientists interested in fundamentals, with those applying fundamental phenomena to a wide range of practical problems. Each of the ten conference sessions will focus on a topic within this spectrum, and there will also be poster sessions for contributed papers, with sufficient space and time to allow all participants to present their latest results. To encourage active participation by young investigators, about ten of the poster abstracts will be selected for 15 minute 'hot topic' talks during the conference sessions. Hot topic selection will be done about a month before the meeting. Funds should be available to offset the participation cost for young investigators.

  17. Test Beam Measurements on Picosec Gaseous Detector.

    CERN Document Server

    Sohl, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    In the Picosec project micro pattern gaseous detectors with a time resolution of some ten picoseconds are developed. The detectors are based on Micromegas detectors. With a cherenkov window and a photocathode the time jitter from different position of the primary ionization clusters can be substituted. This reports describes the beam setup and measurements of different Picosec prototypes. A time resolution of under 30 ps has been measured during the test beam. This report gives an overview of my work as a Summer Student. I set up and operated a triple-GEM tracker and a trigger system for the beam. During the beam I measured different prototypes of Picosec detectors and analysed the data.

  18. Acoustoelectric effects in a gaseous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, R. E.; Paranjape, B. V.

    1992-06-01

    The well-known acoustoelectric coupling effect in semiconductors, whereby a sound wave is amplified if a charge carrier's drift velocity exceeds the speed of sound, also exists for ions and electrons in a gaseous medium, but theoretical analysis so far has been limited to simplified collisional-exchange models [G. M. Sessler, Phys. Fluids 7, 90 (1964); U. Ingard and M. Schultz, Phys. Rev. 158, 106 (1967); T. D. Mantei and M. Fitaire, in 2 Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1971), p. 309]. The present paper is based upon more accurate considerations of collisional phenomena, leading to more realistic predictions of the qualitative and quantitative nature of the effect.

  19. Gaseous Detectors: recent developments and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Titov, Maxim

    2010-01-01

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multiwire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volume with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photo-lithography and micro-processing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolut...

  20. Coevolution of Binaries and Gaseous Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Fleming, David P

    2016-01-01

    The recent discoveries of circumbinary planets by $\\it Kepler$ raise questions for contemporary planet formation models. Understanding how these planets form requires characterizing their formation environment, the circumbinary protoplanetary disc, and how the disc and binary interact and change as a result. The central binary excites resonances in the surrounding protoplanetary disc that drive evolution in both the binary orbital elements and in the disc. To probe how these interactions impact binary eccentricity and disc structure evolution, N-body smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of gaseous protoplanetary discs surrounding binaries based on Kepler 38 were run for $10^4$ binary periods for several initial binary eccentricities. We find that nearly circular binaries weakly couple to the disc via a parametric instability and excite disc eccentricity growth. Eccentric binaries strongly couple to the disc causing eccentricity growth for both the disc and binary. Discs around sufficiently eccentri...

  1. Background reduction of a spherical gaseous detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fard, Ali Dastgheibi [Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane, France ali.dastgheibi-fard@lsm.in2p3.fr (France); Loaiza, Pia; Piquemal, Fabrice [Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (France); Giomataris, Ioannis; Gray, David; Gros, Michel; Magnier, Patrick; Navick, Xavier-François [CEA Saclay - IRFU/SEDI - 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Savvidis, Ilias [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-08-17

    The Spherical gaseous detector (or Spherical Proportional Counter, SPC) is a novel type of detector. It consists of a large spherical volume filled with gas, using a single detection readout channel. The detector allows 100 % detection efficiency. SEDINE is a low background version of SPC installed at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (LSM) underground laboratory (4800 m.w.e) looking for rare events at very low energy threshold, below 100 eV. This work presents the details on the chemical cleaning to reduce internal {sup 210}Pb surface contamination on the copper vessel and the external radon reduction achieved via circulation of pure air inside anti-radon tent. It will be also show the radon measurement of pure gases (Ar, N, Ne, etc) which are used in the underground laboratory for the low background experiments.

  2. THE RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES AND OUTBURST MECHANISM OF GASEOUS COAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何学秋; 周世宁; 林柏泉

    1991-01-01

    Coal and methane outburst is one of the harmful disasters in coal mines. We have studied the rheological properties of gaseous coal in laboratory and obtained its rheological fracture principle. This principle can better explain and describe the outburst mechanism of gaseous coal. Thereby a rheological hypothesis of coal and methane outburst is put forward in this paper.

  3. Investigation on the gaseous and particulate emissions of a compression ignition engine fueled with diesel-dimethyl carbonate blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, C S; Zhu, Ruijun; Huang, Zuohua

    2011-01-01

    The effect of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) on the gaseous and particulate emissions of a diesel engine was investigated using Euro V diesel fuel blended with different proportions of DMC. Combustion analysis shows that, with the blended fuel, the ignition delay and the heat release rate in the premixed combustion phase increase, while the total combustion duration and the fuel consumed in the diffusion combustion phase decrease. Compared with diesel fuel, with an increase of DMC in the blended fuel, the brake thermal efficiency is slightly improved but the brake specific fuel consumption increases. On the emission side, CO increases significantly at low engine load but decreases at high engine load while HC decreases slightly. NO(x) reduces slightly but the reduction is not statistically significant, while NO(2) increases slightly. Particulate mass and number concentrations decrease upon using the blended fuel while the geometric mean diameter of the particles shifts towards smaller size. Overall speaking, diesel-DMC blends lead to significant improvement in particulate emissions while the impact on CO, HC and NO(x) emissions is small.

  4. Control of excitation and quenching in multi-colour electrogenerated chemiluminescence systems through choice of co-reactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbante, Gregory J; Kebede, Noah; Hindson, Christopher M; Doeven, Egan H; Zammit, Elizabeth M; Hanson, Graeme R; Hogan, Conor F; Francis, Paul S

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate a new approach to manipulate the selective emission in mixed electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) systems, where subtle changes in co-reactant properties are exploited to control the relative electron-transfer processes of excitation and quenching. Two closely related tertiary-amine co-reactants, tri-n-propylamine and N,N-diisopropylethylamine, generate remarkably different emission profiles: one provides distinct green and red ECL from [Ir(ppy)3] (ppy=2-phenylpyridinato-C2,N) and a [Ru(bpy)3](2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) derivative at different applied potentials, whereas the other generates both emissions simultaneously across a wide potential range. These phenomena can be rationalized through the relative exergonicities of electron-transfer quenching of the excited states, in conjunction with the change in concentration of the quenchers over the applied potential range.

  5. Methods for reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons using electrical discharge

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-02-16

    Methods for the reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons are provided. The methods can include forming a bubble containing the gaseous hydrocarbon in a liquid. The bubble can be generated to pass in a gap between a pair of electrodes, whereby an electrical discharge is generated in the bubble at the gap between the electrodes. The electrodes can be a metal or metal alloy with a high melting point so they can sustain high voltages of up to about 200 kilovolts. The gaseous hydrocarbon can be combined with an additive gas such as molecular oxygen or carbon dioxide. The reformation of the gaseous hydrocarbon can produce mixtures containing one or more of H2, CO, H2O, CO2, and a lower hydrocarbon such as ethane or ethylene. The reformation of the gaseous hydrocarbon can produce low amounts of CO2 and H2O, e.g. about 15 mol-% or less.

  6. Resonance Related Spiral Substructure in a Galactic Gaseous Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Yáñez, Miguel A; Martos, Marco A; Hayes, John C

    2007-01-01

    We use high resolution 2D hydrodynamic simulations to study the formation of spiral substructure in the gaseous disk of a galaxy. The obtained gaseous response is driven by a self-consistent non-axisymmetric potential obtained from an imposed spiral mass distribution. We highlight the importance of ultraharmonic resonances in generating these features. The temporal evolution of the system is followed with the parallel ZEUS-MP code, and we follow the steepening of perturbations induced by the spiral potential until large-scale shocks emerge. These shocks exhibit bifurcations that protrude from the gaseous arms and continue to steepen until new shocks are formed. When the contribution from the spiral potential relative to the axisymmetric background is increased from our default value, spurs protrude from the main arms after several revolutions of the gaseous disk. Such spurs overlap on top of the aforementioned shocks. These results support the hypothesis that a complicated gaseous response can coexist with an...

  7. QCT and QM calculations of the Cl(2P) + NH3 reaction: influence of the reactant well on the dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge-Palacios, M; Yang, M; Espinosa-García, J

    2012-04-14

    A detailed dynamics study, using both quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) and reduced-dimensional quantum mechanical (QM) calculations, was carried out to understand the reactivity and mechanism of the Cl((2)P) + NH(3)→ HCl + NH(2) gas-phase reaction, which evolves through deep wells in the entry and exit channels. The calculations were performed on an analytical potential energy surface recently developed by our group, PES-2010 [M. Monge-Palacios, C. Rangel, J. C. Corchado and J. Espinosa-Garcia, Int. J. Quantum. Chem., 2011], together with a simplified model surface, mod-PES, in which the reactant well is removed to analyze its influence. The main finding was that the QCT and QM methods show a change of the reaction probability with collision energy, suggesting a change of the atomic-level mechanism of reaction with energy. This change disappeared when the mod-PES was used, showing that the behaviour at low energies is a direct consequence of the existence of the reactant well. Analysis of the trajectories showed that different mechanisms operate depending on the collision energy. Thus, while at high energies (E(coll) > 5 kcal mol(-1)) practically all trajectories are direct, at low energies (E(coll) cross section results reinforce this change of mechanism, showing also the influence of the reactant well on this reaction. Thus, the PES-2010 surface yields a forward-backward symmetry in the scattering, while when the reactant well is removed with the mod-PES the shape is more isotropic.

  8. Kinetics of the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways: influences of pH and reactant initial concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A previously proposed kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways has been validated by changing the initial pH (4.8, 5.5, 6.0, 6.8 and 7.5) of the reaction and reactant initial concentrations (1:2 and 2:1 molar ratios were compared to the 1:1 ratio). The model consists of 10

  9. Detailed high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of OMEGA separated reactants inertial confinement fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, Brian M.; Grim, Gary P.; Fincke, James R.; Shah, Rahul C.; Forrest, Chad J.; Silverstein, Kevin; Marshall, Frederic J.; Boswell, Melissa; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Gore, Robert A.; Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna C.; Jungman, Gerard; Klein, Andreas; Rundberg, Robert S.; Steinkamp, Michael J.; Wilhelmy, Jerry B.

    2016-07-01

    We present results from the comparison of high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) simulations with data from the implosions of inertial confinement fusion capsules with separated reactants performed on the OMEGA laser facility. Each capsule, referred to as a “CD Mixcap,” is filled with tritium and has a polystyrene (CH) shell with a deuterated polystyrene (CD) layer whose burial depth is varied. In these implosions, fusion reactions between deuterium and tritium ions can occur only in the presence of atomic mix between the gas fill and shell material. The simulations feature accurate models for all known experimental asymmetries and do not employ any adjustable parameters to improve agreement with experimental data. Simulations are performed with the RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code using an Implicit Large Eddy Simulation (ILES) strategy for the hydrodynamics. We obtain good agreement with the experimental data, including the DT/TT neutron yield ratios used to diagnose mix, for all burial depths of the deuterated shell layer. Additionally, simulations demonstrate good agreement with converged simulations employing explicit models for plasma diffusion and viscosity, suggesting that the implicit sub-grid model used in ILES is sufficient to model these processes in these experiments. In our simulations, mixing is driven by short-wavelength asymmetries and longer-wavelength features are responsible for developing flows that transport mixed material towards the center of the hot spot. Mix material transported by this process is responsible for most of the mix (DT) yield even for the capsule with a CD layer adjacent to the tritium fuel. Consistent with our previous results, mix does not play a significant role in TT neutron yield degradation; instead, this is dominated by the displacement of fuel from the center of the implosion due to the development of turbulent instabilities seeded by long-wavelength asymmetries. Through these processes, the long

  10. Detailed high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of OMEGA separated reactants inertial confinement fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, Brian M., E-mail: bmhaines@lanl.gov; Fincke, James R.; Shah, Rahul C.; Boswell, Melissa; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Gore, Robert A.; Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna C.; Jungman, Gerard; Klein, Andreas; Rundberg, Robert S.; Steinkamp, Michael J.; Wilhelmy, Jerry B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS T087, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Grim, Gary P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Forrest, Chad J.; Silverstein, Kevin; Marshall, Frederic J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    We present results from the comparison of high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) simulations with data from the implosions of inertial confinement fusion capsules with separated reactants performed on the OMEGA laser facility. Each capsule, referred to as a “CD Mixcap,” is filled with tritium and has a polystyrene (CH) shell with a deuterated polystyrene (CD) layer whose burial depth is varied. In these implosions, fusion reactions between deuterium and tritium ions can occur only in the presence of atomic mix between the gas fill and shell material. The simulations feature accurate models for all known experimental asymmetries and do not employ any adjustable parameters to improve agreement with experimental data. Simulations are performed with the RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code using an Implicit Large Eddy Simulation (ILES) strategy for the hydrodynamics. We obtain good agreement with the experimental data, including the DT/TT neutron yield ratios used to diagnose mix, for all burial depths of the deuterated shell layer. Additionally, simulations demonstrate good agreement with converged simulations employing explicit models for plasma diffusion and viscosity, suggesting that the implicit sub-grid model used in ILES is sufficient to model these processes in these experiments. In our simulations, mixing is driven by short-wavelength asymmetries and longer-wavelength features are responsible for developing flows that transport mixed material towards the center of the hot spot. Mix material transported by this process is responsible for most of the mix (DT) yield even for the capsule with a CD layer adjacent to the tritium fuel. Consistent with our previous results, mix does not play a significant role in TT neutron yield degradation; instead, this is dominated by the displacement of fuel from the center of the implosion due to the development of turbulent instabilities seeded by long-wavelength asymmetries. Through these processes, the long

  11. Detailed high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of OMEGA separated reactants inertial confinement fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Brian M.; Grim, Gary P.; Fincke, James R.; Shah, Rahul C.; Forrest, Chad J.; Silverstein, Kevin; Marshall, Frederic J.; Boswell, Melissa; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Gore, Robert A.; Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna C.; Jungman, Gerard; Klein, Andreas; Rundberg, Robert S.; Steinkamp, Michael J.; Wilhelmy, Jerry B.

    2016-07-01

    We present results from the comparison of high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) simulations with data from the implosions of inertial confinement fusion capsules with separated reactants performed on the OMEGA laser facility. Each capsule, referred to as a "CD Mixcap," is filled with tritium and has a polystyrene (CH) shell with a deuterated polystyrene (CD) layer whose burial depth is varied. In these implosions, fusion reactions between deuterium and tritium ions can occur only in the presence of atomic mix between the gas fill and shell material. The simulations feature accurate models for all known experimental asymmetries and do not employ any adjustable parameters to improve agreement with experimental data. Simulations are performed with the RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code using an Implicit Large Eddy Simulation (ILES) strategy for the hydrodynamics. We obtain good agreement with the experimental data, including the DT/TT neutron yield ratios used to diagnose mix, for all burial depths of the deuterated shell layer. Additionally, simulations demonstrate good agreement with converged simulations employing explicit models for plasma diffusion and viscosity, suggesting that the implicit sub-grid model used in ILES is sufficient to model these processes in these experiments. In our simulations, mixing is driven by short-wavelength asymmetries and longer-wavelength features are responsible for developing flows that transport mixed material towards the center of the hot spot. Mix material transported by this process is responsible for most of the mix (DT) yield even for the capsule with a CD layer adjacent to the tritium fuel. Consistent with our previous results, mix does not play a significant role in TT neutron yield degradation; instead, this is dominated by the displacement of fuel from the center of the implosion due to the development of turbulent instabilities seeded by long-wavelength asymmetries. Through these processes, the long

  12. Soft X-Ray Photochemistry of Condensed Mixed Reactants: Thin Film Growth and Ion Desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jerry Franklin, Jr.

    reactants will be discussed.

  13. The influence of tertiary butyl hydrazine as a co-reactant on the atomic layer deposition of silver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golrokhi, Zahra; Marshall, Paul A.; Romani, Simon; Rushworth, Simon; Chalker, Paul R.; Potter, Richard J.

    2017-03-01

    Ultra-thin conformal silver films are the focus of development for applications such as anti-microbial surfaces, optical components and electronic devices. In this study, metallic silver films have been deposited using direct liquid injection thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) using (hfac)Ag(1,5-COD) ((hexafluoroacetylacetonato)silver(I)(1,5-cyclooctadiene)) as the metal source and tertiary butyl hydrazine (TBH) as a co-reactant. The process provides a 23 °C wide 'self-limiting' ALD temperature window between 105 and 128 °C, which is significantly wider than is achievable using alcohol as a co-reactant. A mass deposition rate of ∼20 ng/cm2/cycle (∼0.18 Å/cycle) is observed under self-limiting growth conditions. The resulting films are crystalline metallic silver with a near planar film-like morphology which are electrically conductive. By extending the temperature range of the ALD window by the use of TBH as a co-reactant, it is envisaged that the process will be exploitable in a range of new low temperature applications.

  14. Dielectric image effects in environmental reorganization free energies and inter-reactant work terms of metalloprotein electron transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharkats, Yurij I.; Ulstrup, Jens

    1990-02-01

    Kinetics of electron transfer between redox metalloproteins and small inorganic reaction partners has become a powerful tool for investigations of protein electron transport. We introduce here a model for metalloprotein electron transfer which incorporates essential features omitted in previous approaches to metalloprotein electron transfer data analysis. The protein is represented by a spherical region of low dielectric constant, with a conducting sphere excentrically located inside the protein simulating the metal centre. A conducting sphere outside the protein represents the small reaction partners, and the whole system is embedded in a dielectric solvent. The inter-reactant work terms and overall protein and solvent reorganization free energy for this model have been calculated. It appears that dielectric image interactions for multiply charged small reactants are important and comparable to interactions with both the protein surface charges and the solvent. The character of work terms and reorganization free energies for proteins is thus different from those of small ionic reactants. Cross relations and other frames where these features are disregarded should therefore be used with care for protein electron transfer.

  15. Synthesis of nanoparticles from malleable and ductile metals using powder-free, reactant-assisted mechanical attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Brandon W; Perez, Jesus Paulo L; Yu, Jiang; Boatz, Jerry A; Anderson, Scott L

    2014-11-26

    A reactant-assisted mechanochemical method was used to produce copious nanoparticles from malleable/ductile metals, demonstrated here for aluminum, iron, and copper. The milling media is intentionally degraded via a reactant-accelerated wear process, where the reactant aids particle production by binding to the metal surfaces, enhancing particle production, and reducing the tendency toward mechanochemical (cold) welding. The mechanism is explored by comparing the effects of different types of solvents and solvent mixtures on the amount and type of particles produced. Particles were functionalized with oleic acid to aid in particle size separation, enhance dispersion in hydrocarbon solvents, and protect the particles from oxidation. For aluminum and iron, the result is air-stable particles, but for copper, the suspended particles are found to dissolve when exposed to air. Characterization was performed using electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Density functional theory was used to examine the nature of carboxylic acid binding to the aluminum surface, confirming the dominance of bridging bidentate binding.

  16. 78 FR 66779 - United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... Employment and Training Administration United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant... Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, including on-site leased workers from Diversified Management...: All workers of United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant,......

  17. Mass spectrometric study of thermodynamic properties of gaseous lead tellurates. Estimation of formation enthalpies of gaseous lead polonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugurov, S. M.; Panin, A. I.; Lopatin, S. I.; Emelyanova, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    Gaseous reactions involving lead oxides, tellurium oxide and lead tellurates were studied by the Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry. Equilibrium constants and reaction enthalpies were evaluated. Structures, molecular parameters and thermodynamic functions of gaseous PbTeO3 and Pb2TeO4 were calculated by quantum chemistry methods. The formation enthalpies ΔfH0 (298.15) = -294 ± 13 for gaseous PbTeO3 and ΔfH0 (298.15) = -499 ± 12 for gaseous Pb2TeO4 were obtained. On the base of these results the formation enthalpies of gaseous PbPoO3 and Pb2PoO4 were estimated as -249 ± 34 and -478 ± 38, respectively.

  18. The effects of maternal dietary vitamin premixes, canthaxanthin, and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol on the performance of progeny ducklings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Z Z; Wang, J P; Zeng, Q F; Ding, X M; Bai, S P; Luo, Y H; Su, Z W; Xuan, Y; Zhang, K Y

    2016-03-01

    This trial studied the effects of maternal dietary vitamin premixes, and the mixture of canthaxanthin (CX) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-OH-D3) on the performance of progeny ducklings. Four maternal diets were used under a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement with 2 kinds of vitamin premixes (Regular and High; High premix had higher levels of all vitamins except K3 than the Regular premix), and with or without the addition of the mixture of CX (6 mg/kg) and 25-OH-D3 (0.069 mg/kg). Cherry Valley duck breeders (38-wk-old) were fed with corn-wheat flour-soybean meal-based diets for 8 wk, and then eggs were collected and hatched. Healthy ducklings (equal number of female and male) from each maternal group were randomly selected and received the same commercial starter (1 to 14 d) and grower (15 to 35 d) pellet diet for 35 d. Maternal High vitamin premix increased shank pigmentation (1 d, P = 0.001), BW (1 d, P growth performance and antioxidant status of ducklings.

  19. THE SEPARATION OF URANIUM ISOTOPES BY GASEOUS DIFFUSION: A LINEAR PROGRAMMING MODEL,

    Science.gov (United States)

    URANIUM, ISOTOPE SEPARATION), (*GASEOUS DIFFUSION SEPARATION, LINEAR PROGRAMMING ), (* LINEAR PROGRAMMING , GASEOUS DIFFUSION SEPARATION), MATHEMATICAL MODELS, GAS FLOW, NUCLEAR REACTORS, OPERATIONS RESEARCH

  20. Pollutant Emissions and Lean Blowoff Limits of Fuel Flexible Burners Operating on Gaseous Renewable and Fossil Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado, Andres

    This study provides an experimental and numerical examination of pollutant emissions and stability of gaseous fueled reactions stabilized with two premixed-fuel-flexible and ultra-low NOx burner technologies. Both burners feature lean combustion technology to control the formation of nitrogen oxides (NOx). The first fuel--flexible burner is the low-swirl burner (LSB), which features aerodynamic stabilization of the reactions with a divergent flow-field; the second burner is the surface stabilized combustion burner (SSCB), which features the stabilization of the reactions on surface patterns. For combustion applications the most commonly studied species are: NOx, carbon monoxide (CO), and unburned hydrocarbons (UHC). However these are not the only pollutants emitted when burning fossil fuels; other species such as nitrous oxide (N2O), ammonia (NH3) and formaldehyde (CH2O) can be directly emitted from the oxidation reactions. Yet the conditions that favor the emission of these pollutants are not completely understood and require further insight. The results of this dissertation close the gap existing regarding the relations between emission of pollutants species and stability when burning variable gaseous fuels. The results of this study are applicable to current issues such as: 1. Current combustion systems operating at low temperatures to control formation of NOx. 2. Increased use of alternative fuels such as hydrogen, synthetic gas and biogas. 3. Increasing recognition of the need/desire to operate combustion systems in a transient manner to follow load and to offset the intermittency of renewable power. 4. The recent advances in measurement methods allow us to quantify other pollutants, such as N 2O, NH3 and CH2O. Hence in this study, these pollutant species are assessed when burning natural gas (NG) and its binary mixtures with other gaseous fuels such as hydrogen (H2), carbon dioxide (CO2), ethane (C 2H6) and propane (C3H8) at variable operation modes including

  1. Growth of graphene films from non-gaseous carbon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James; Sun, Zhengzong; Yan, Zheng; Ruan, Gedeng; Peng, Zhiwei

    2015-08-04

    In various embodiments, the present disclosure provides methods of forming graphene films by: (1) depositing a non-gaseous carbon source onto a catalyst surface; (2) exposing the non-gaseous carbon source to at least one gas with a flow rate; and (3) initiating the conversion of the non-gaseous carbon source to the graphene film, where the thickness of the graphene film is controllable by the gas flow rate. Additional embodiments of the present disclosure pertain to graphene films made in accordance with the methods of the present disclosure.

  2. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON PREMIX COMBUSTION AT ISOSCELES TRIANGLE TYPE RATE OF HEAT RELEASE FOR SQUISH TYPE COMBUSTION CHAMBER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a theory on premix fuel combustion at nearisosceles triangle type rate of heat release,describes the measures taken for the combustion system,points out its many theoretical advantages,and that it can solve effectively the problems of rough running,fuel consumption and exhaust emission.Two squish lip type combustion chambers are designed to match separately with multiple holes injector and conical spray type injector in order to achieve premix combustion at near isosceles triangle type rate of heat release.Experimental studies on two single cylinder diesel engines showed that premix combustion at isosceles triangle type rate of heat release resulted in longer ignition delay period,larger amount of fuel injected into cylinder during the ignition delay period,lower maximum pressure,better fuel economy,and better exhaust emission.

  3. Coevolution of binaries and circumbinary gaseous discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, David P.; Quinn, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    The recent discoveries of circumbinary planets by Kepler raise questions for contemporary planet formation models. Understanding how these planets form requires characterizing their formation environment, the circumbinary protoplanetary disc and how the disc and binary interact and change as a result. The central binary excites resonances in the surrounding protoplanetary disc which drive evolution in both the binary orbital elements and in the disc. To probe how these interactions impact binary eccentricity and disc structure evolution, N-body smooth particle hydrodynamics simulations of gaseous protoplanetary discs surrounding binaries based on Kepler 38 were run for 104 binary periods for several initial binary eccentricities. We find that nearly circular binaries weakly couple to the disc via a parametric instability and excite disc eccentricity growth. Eccentric binaries strongly couple to the disc causing eccentricity growth for both the disc and binary. Discs around sufficiently eccentric binaries which strongly couple to the disc develop an m = 1 spiral wave launched from the 1:3 eccentric outer Lindblad resonance which corresponds to an alignment of gas particle longitude of periastrons. All systems display binary semimajor axis decay due to dissipation from the viscous disc.

  4. Automated sampling and control of gaseous simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Ruoguan

    2013-05-04

    In this work, we describe a method that automates the sampling and control of gaseous fluid simulations. Several recent approaches have provided techniques for artists to generate high-resolution simulations based on a low-resolution simulation. However, often in applications the overall flow in the low-resolution simulation that an animator observes and intends to preserve is composed of even lower frequencies than the low resolution itself. In such cases, attempting to match the low-resolution simulation precisely is unnecessarily restrictive. We propose a new sampling technique to efficiently capture the overall flow of a fluid simulation, at the scale of user\\'s choice, in such a way that the sampled information is sufficient to represent what is virtually perceived and no more. Thus, by applying control based on the sampled data, we ensure that in the resulting high-resolution simulation, the overall flow is matched to the low-resolution simulation and the fine details on the high resolution are preserved. The samples we obtain have both spatial and temporal continuity that allows smooth keyframe matching and direct manipulation of visible elements such as smoke density through temporal blending of samples. We demonstrate that a user can easily configure a simulation with our system to achieve desired results. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  5. First gaseous boronization during pulsed discharge cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, J., E-mail: jinseok@nfri.re.kr [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Den Hartog, D.J.; Goetz, J.A.; Weix, P.J.; Limbach, S.T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The first successful gaseous boronization during a pulsed discharge is reported. Sublimation of o-carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) combined with pulsed discharge plasmas with a repetition rate of 1 Hz is used to produce a hard boron-containing coating for reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas in the Madison Symmetric Torus. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with Ar ion beam etching for silicon coupons installed at the plasma boundary shows about 60% boron concentration in the deposited layer. Both profilometer and scanning electron microscope analyses of the silicon coupons imply a strong toroidally non-uniform deposition depending on the location of the o-carborane injection. The layer thickness ranges from 50 to 300 nm. Ellipsometry calibrated with the profilometer results yields a refractive index of 2.2-2.3 for the films. The high refractive index implies that the coating is hard and has a well-ordered morphology. A reduction in wall recycling has consistently been observed after all boronization sessions. Comparison of the X-ray spectra in standard RFP plasmas before and after boronization indicates a slight decrease in the effective ionic charge.

  6. First gaseous boronization during pulsed discharge cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, J.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J. A.; Weix, P. J.; Limbach, S. T.

    2013-01-01

    The first successful gaseous boronization during a pulsed discharge is reported. Sublimation of o-carborane (C2B10H12) combined with pulsed discharge plasmas with a repetition rate of 1 Hz is used to produce a hard boron-containing coating for reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas in the Madison Symmetric Torus. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with Ar ion beam etching for silicon coupons installed at the plasma boundary shows about 60% boron concentration in the deposited layer. Both profilometer and scanning electron microscope analyses of the silicon coupons imply a strong toroidally non-uniform deposition depending on the location of the o-carborane injection. The layer thickness ranges from 50 to 300 nm. Ellipsometry calibrated with the profilometer results yields a refractive index of 2.2-2.3 for the films. The high refractive index implies that the coating is hard and has a well-ordered morphology. A reduction in wall recycling has consistently been observed after all boronization sessions. Comparison of the X-ray spectra in standard RFP plasmas before and after boronization indicates a slight decrease in the effective ionic charge.

  7. The hydrodynamic stability of gaseous cosmic filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Birnboim, Yuval; Zinger, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Virial shocks at edges of cosmic-web structures are a clear prediction of standard structure formation theories. We derive a criterion for the stability of the post-shock gas and of the virial shock itself in spherical, filamentary and planar infall geometries. When gas cooling is important, we find that shocks become unstable, and gas flows uninterrupted towards the center of the respective halo, filament or sheet. For filaments, we impose this criterion on self-similar infall solutions. We find that instability is expected for filament masses between $10^{11}-10^{13}M_\\odot Mpc^{-1}.$ Using a simplified toy model, we then show that these filaments will likely feed halos with $10^{10}M_{\\odot}\\lesssim M_{halo}\\lesssim 10^{13}M_{\\odot}$ at redshift $z=3$, as well as $10^{12}M_{\\odot}\\lesssim M_{halo}\\lesssim 10^{15}M_{\\odot}$ at $z=0$. The instability will affect the survivability of the filaments as they penetrate gaseous halos in a non-trivial way. Additionally, smaller halos accreting onto non-stable filam...

  8. Measurements of reactive gaseous rocket injector admittances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Bell, W. A.; Zinn, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the results of an experimental study of the quantitative determination of the capabilities of the combustion processes associated with coaxial gaseous propellant rocket injectors to drive combustor pressure oscillations. The data, obtained by employing the modified impedance tube technique with compressed air as the oxidizer and acetylene gas as the fuel, describe the frequency dependence of the admittance of the combined injector-combustion process. The measured data are compared with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann analytical model utilizing different values for the characteristic combustion time tau sub b. The values of tau sub b which result in a best fit between the measured and predicted data are indicated for different equivalence ratios. It is shown that for the coaxial injector investigated in this study the tau sub b varies between 0.7 and 1.2 msec for equivalence ratios in the range of 0.57 to 1.31. In addition, the experimental data indicate that the tested injector system could drive combustion instabilities over a frequency range that is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann model.

  9. Action-FRET of a Gaseous Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Steven; Knight, Geoffrey; Halim, Mohamed Abdul; Kulesza, Alexander; Choi, Chang Min; Chirot, Fabien; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is an extremely powerful technique for analysis of biological molecules, in particular proteins. One aspect that has been contentious is how much native solution-phase structure is preserved upon transposition to the gas phase by soft ionization methods such as electrospray ionization. To address this question—and thus further develop mass spectrometry as a tool for structural biology—structure-sensitive techniques must be developed to probe the gas-phase conformations of proteins. Here, we report Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements on a ubiquitin mutant using specific photofragmentation as a reporter of the FRET efficiency. The FRET data is interpreted in the context of circular dichroism, molecular dynamics simulation, and ion mobility data. Both the dependence of the FRET efficiency on the charge state—where a systematic decrease is observed—and on methanol concentration are considered. In the latter case, a decrease in FRET efficiency with methanol concentration is taken as evidence that the conformational ensemble of gaseous protein cations retains a memory of the solution phase conformational ensemble upon electrospray ionization.

  10. A gasdynamic gun driven by gaseous detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinping; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Shizhong; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Yu, Hongru

    2016-01-01

    A gasdynamic gun driven by gaseous detonation was developed to address the disadvantages of the insufficient driving capability of high-pressure gas and the constraints of gunpowder. The performance of this gasdynamic gun was investigated through experiments and numerical simulations. Much more powerful launching capability was achieved by this gun relative to a conventional high-pressure gas gun, owing to the use of the chemical energy of the driver gas. To achieve the same launching condition, the initial pressure required for this gun was an order of magnitude lower than that for a gun driven by high-pressure H2. Because of the presence of the detonation, however, a more complex internal ballistic process of this gun was observed. Acceleration of projectiles for this gun was accompanied by a series of impulse loads, in contrast with the smooth acceleration for a conventional one, which indicates that this gun should be used conditionally. The practical feasibility of this gun was verified by experiments. The experiments demonstrated the convenience of taking advantage of the techniques developed for detonation-driven shock tubes and tunnels.

  11. Nonlinear Dynamical Friction in a Gaseous Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Hyosun

    2009-01-01

    Using high-resolution, two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate nonlinear gravitational responses of gas to, and the resulting drag force on, a very massive perturber M_p moving at velocity V_p through a uniform gaseous medium of adiabatic sound speed a_0. We model the perturber as a Plummer potential with softening radius r_s, and run various models with differing A=GM_p/(a_0^2 r_s) and M=V_p/a_0 by imposing cylindrical symmetry with respect to the line of perturber motion. For supersonic cases, a massive perturber quickly develops nonlinear flows that produce a detached bow shock and a vortex ring, which is unlike in the linear cases where Mach cones are bounded by low-amplitude Mach waves. The flows behind the shock are initially non-steady, displaying quasi-periodic, overstable oscillations of the vortex ring and the shock. The vortex ring is eventually shed downstream and the flows evolve toward a quasi-steady state where the density wake near the perturber is in near hydrostatic equilibr...

  12. Measuring scattering lengths of gaseous samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, M. G.; Black, T. C.; Haun, R.; Pushin, D. A.; Shahi, C. B.; Weitfeldt, F. E.

    2016-03-01

    Neutron interferometry represents one of the most precise techniques for measuring the coherent scattering lengths (bc) of particular nuclear isotopes. Currently bc for helium-4 is known only to 1% relative uncertainty; a factor of ten higher than precision measurements of other light isotopes. Scattering lengths are measured using a neutron interferometer and by comparing the phase shift a neutron acquires as it passes through a gaseous sample relative to that of a neutron passing through vacuum. The density of the gas is determined by continuous monitoring of the sample's temperature and pressure. Challenges for these types of experiments include achieving the necessary long-term phase stability and accurate determination of the phase shift caused by the aluminum cell used to hold the gas; a phase shift many times greater than that of the sample. The present status on the effort to measure the n-4He scattering length at the NIST center for Neutron Research will be given. Financial support provided by the NSERC `Create' and `Discovery' programs, CERC, NIST and NSF Grant PHY-1205342.

  13. Gaseous Nitrogen Orifice Mass Flow Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritrivi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Gaseous Nitrogen (GN2) Orifice Mass Flow Calculator was used to determine Space Shuttle Orbiter Water Spray Boiler (WSB) GN2 high-pressure tank source depletion rates for various leak scenarios, and the ability of the GN2 consumables to support cooling of Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) lubrication during entry. The data was used to support flight rationale concerning loss of an orbiter APU/hydraulic system and mission work-arounds. The GN2 mass flow-rate calculator standardizes a method for rapid assessment of GN2 mass flow through various orifice sizes for various discharge coefficients, delta pressures, and temperatures. The calculator utilizes a 0.9-lb (0.4 kg) GN2 source regulated to 40 psia (.276 kPa). These parameters correspond to the Space Shuttle WSB GN2 Source and Water Tank Bellows, but can be changed in the spreadsheet to accommodate any system parameters. The calculator can be used to analyze a leak source, leak rate, gas consumables depletion time, and puncture diameter that simulates the measured GN2 system pressure drop.

  14. Gaseous Hydrocarbon Separations Using Functionalized Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moura Leila

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The functionalization of the side chains on the cation or the anion of an ionic liquid is a common approach to tailor its properties for different processes including the separation of gases. In this paper, we present the current state of the art concerning the usage of ionic liquids for hydrocarbon separations. We also show how the functionalization of ionic liquids or the appropriate anion/cation combinations can contribute to the increase of the performance of the ionic liquids for the separation of gaseous hydrocarbons – either by improving the capacity of the ionic liquid to absorb a given gas or by increasing the selectivity towards a particular hydrocarbon. Original results concerning the usage of olefin-complexing metal salts of lithium (I, nickel (II and copper (II dissolved in ionic liquids for selectively absorbing light olefins are presented. It is observed that the absorption capacity of an imidazolium-based ionic liquid is doubled by the addition of a copper (II salt. This result is compared with the effect of the functionalization of the ionic liquid and the advantages and difficulties of the two approaches are analyzed.

  15. Unravelling tidal dissipation in gaseous giant planets

    CERN Document Server

    Guenel, Mathieu; Remus, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Tidal dissipation in planetary interiors is one of the key physical mechanisms that drive the evolution of star-planet and planet-moon systems. New constraints are now obtained both in the Solar and exoplanetary systems. Tidal dissipation in planets is intrinsically related to their internal structure. In particular, fluid and solid layers behave differently under tidal forcing. Therefore, their respective dissipation reservoirs have to be compared. In this letter, we compute separately the contributions of the potential dense rocky/icy core and the convective fluid envelope of gaseous giant planets, as a function of core size and mass. We then compare the associated dissipation reservoirs, by evaluating the frequency-average of the imaginary part of the Love numbers $k^2_2$ in each region. In the case of Jupiter and Saturn-like planets, we show that the viscoelastic dissipation in the core could dominate the turbulent friction acting on tidal inertial waves in the envelope. However, the fluid dissipation wou...

  16. GEM - A novel gaseous particle detector

    CERN Document Server

    Meinschad, T

    2005-01-01

    The work carried out within the framework of this Ph.D. deals with the construction of gaseous prototype detectors using Gas Electron Multiplier electrodes for the amplification of charges released by ionizing particles. The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) is a thin metal-clad polymer foil, etched with a high density of narrow holes, typically 50-100mm-2. On the application of a potential difference between the conductive top and bottom sides each hole acts as independent proportional counter. This new fast device permits to reach large amplification factors at high rates with a strong photon and ion-mediated feedback suppression due to the avalanche confinement in the GEM-holes. Here, in particular studies have been performed, which should prove, that the GEM-technology is applicable for an efficient measurement of single Cherenkov photons. These UV-photons can be detected in different ways. An elegant solution to develop large area RICH-detectors is to evaporate a pad-segmented readout-cathode of a multi-wire...

  17. Comparison of Performance and Leg Bone Characteristics of Broiler Fed Different Levels of Vitamin Premix in Floor and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Moravej

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were carried out in order to comparison of the effect of different levels of vitamin premix in two raising systems of floor and cage on performance and leg bone characteristics of broiler chickens which were fed with adjusted diet base on wheat and barley during 29 to 42 days. The treatments were composed of 0, 33.33, 66.66 and 100 percent of vitamin premix (according to the recommendation of vitamin premix Producer Company which used from 29 to 42 days. Experiment in floor was carried out by using 288 male broiler chickens (Ross 308 with 4 treatments and 4 replicates in a completely randomized design in floor system. Experiment in cage battery system was carried out by using 80 male broiler chickens with 4 treatments and 4 replicates in raising cage. Feed intake and body weight gain of each replicate were calculated during two weeks of the experiment. During these two weeks, in experiment in floor, two broiler chickens were measured and in experiment in cage battery system one broiler chickens slaughtered and breast, thigh, percentage of abdominal fat and liver were measured. After slaughtered, right leg of each bird was used for determine ash, calcium, phosphorus and strength. The results of the experiment in floor showed that vitamin premix withdrawal at 29 days of age did not impair carcass characteristics and leg bone characteristics during the final rearing period. The results of battery cage system showed that withdrawal of vitamin premix from the diet of experimental birds; were induced negative effect on productive performance, weights of thigh, and breast and leg bone characteristics during 36-42 day of ages. Therefore, it seems that there is the possibility of vitamin premix levels reduction up to the approximate 33% level in finisher period while in the floor system; it is possible to withdraw vitamin supplements in broilers’ finisher diets and in this way the costs of poultry industry will reduce.

  18. Study of low-pressure premixed laminar n-heptane+ propane/oxygen/nitrogen flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Wu; WEI LiXia; MA ZhiHao; HUANG ZuoHua; YUAN Tao; TIAN ZhenYu; LI YuYang

    2009-01-01

    Low-pressure premixed laminar n-heptane+propane/oxygen/nitrogen flames were investigated with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and molecular-beam sampling mass spectrometry. Three flames with different mass percentage of propane in the fuel blends of 0%, 10%, and 20% were studied. The combustion intermediates were identified by comparing the measured IEs with those values in literatures. Mole fraction profiles of the main species were compared among the three flames. The experimental results provide detailed data in understanding the combustion of n-heptane and n-heptane/propane blends in engine. They are also helpful in establishing and verifying the kinetic models.

  19. An experimental and kinetic modeling study of premixed nitromethane flames at low pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Kuiwen; Li, Yuyang; Yuan, Tao

    2011-01-01

    An experimental and modeling study is reported on three premixed nitromethane/oxygen/argon flames at low pressure (4.655kPa) with equivalence ratios (ϕ) of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0. Flame species were identified with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization. The mole fraction profiles of more...... against experimental results of all three flames. The computed predictions showed satisfactory agreement with the experimental results. Based on a rate-of-production analysis, reaction pathway diagrams were obtained to describe the hydrocarbon oxidation process and nitrogenous species chemistry...

  20. Flame holding tolerant fuel and air premixer for a gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, William David; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve

    2012-11-20

    A fuel nozzle with active cooling is provided. It includes an outer peripheral wall, a nozzle center body concentrically disposed within the outer wall in a fuel and air pre-mixture. The fuel and air pre-mixture includes an air inlet, a fuel inlet and a premixing passage defined between the outer wall in the center body. A gas fuel flow passage is provided. A first cooling passage is included within the center body in a second cooling passage is defined between the center body and the outer wall.

  1. Influence of rarefaction wave on premixed flame structure and propagation behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xianfeng; SUN Jinhua; LU Shouxiang; CHU Guanquan; YAO Liyin; LIU Yi

    2007-01-01

    To explore the influence of rarefaction wave on the structure and propagation behavior of the premixed propane/air flame in a rectangle combustion pipe, the techniques of high speed Schlieren photograph method, pressure measurement and so on are used to study the interaction processes between rarefaction wave and flame. Two cases of rarefaction wave-flame interaction were performed in the experiment. The experimental result shows that both the rarefaction waves can cause the flame transition from laminar to turbulent combustion quickly. The cowflow rarefaction wave decreases the flame speed, while the counterflow rarefaction wave leads the flame propagation speed to increasing on the whole, accompanied with sharp vibration.

  2. Premixing hydrogen burners for surface refinement of glass; Vormischende Wasserstoffbrenner zur Oberflaechenbearbeitung von Glas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerisch, Matthias [Linde AG, Linde Gas Deutschland, Nuernberg (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    As a result, inter alia, of unceasing globalisation, European glass producers in practically all sectors - flat glass, container glass, crystal glass and special glasses - are faced with ever tougher competition from Asia. In the 2012 to 2015 period and beyond, the principal focuses in the manufacture of glass products will again be on reducing overall production costs and increasing process efficiency wherever possible, on greater productivity and on enhanced product (surface) quality. To meet these challenges in the field of surface refinement and flame polishing of glass products as efficiently as possible, Linde AG/Linde Gases Division has developed premixing Hydropox {sup registered} burner technology for hydrogen/oxygen fuels. (orig.)

  3. Understanding and predicting soot generation in turbulent non-premixed jet flames.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hai (University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA); Kook, Sanghoon; Doom, Jeffrey; Oefelein, Joseph Charles; Zhang, Jiayao; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Schefer, Robert W.; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2010-10-01

    This report documents the results of a project funded by DoD's Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) on the science behind development of predictive models for soot emission from gas turbine engines. Measurements of soot formation were performed in laminar flat premixed flames and turbulent non-premixed jet flames at 1 atm pressure and in turbulent liquid spray flames under representative conditions for takeoff in a gas turbine engine. The laminar flames and open jet flames used both ethylene and a prevaporized JP-8 surrogate fuel composed of n-dodecane and m-xylene. The pressurized turbulent jet flame measurements used the JP-8 surrogate fuel and compared its combustion and sooting characteristics to a world-average JP-8 fuel sample. The pressurized jet flame measurements demonstrated that the surrogate was representative of JP-8, with a somewhat higher tendency to soot formation. The premixed flame measurements revealed that flame temperature has a strong impact on the rate of soot nucleation and particle coagulation, but little sensitivity in the overall trends was found with different fuels. An extensive array of non-intrusive optical and laser-based measurements was performed in turbulent non-premixed jet flames established on specially designed piloted burners. Soot concentration data was collected throughout the flames, together with instantaneous images showing the relationship between soot and the OH radical and soot and PAH. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for ethylene combustion, including fuel-rich chemistry and benzene formation steps, was compiled, validated, and reduced. The reduced ethylene mechanism was incorporated into a high-fidelity LES code, together with a moment-based soot model and models for thermal radiation, to evaluate the ability of the chemistry and soot models to predict soot formation in the jet diffusion flame. The LES results highlight the importance of including an optically-thick radiation

  4. Characterization of complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Amano, Masahito; Miyano, Takaya; Ikawa, Takuya; Maki, Koshiro; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2012-12-01

    We characterize complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor by nonlinear time series analysis to evaluate permutation entropy, fractal dimensions, and short-term predictability. The dynamic behavior in combustion instability near lean blowout exhibits a self-affine structure and is ascribed to fractional Brownian motion. It undergoes chaos by the onset of combustion oscillations with slow amplitude modulation. Our results indicate that nonlinear time series analysis is capable of characterizing complexities in combustion instability close to lean blowout.

  5. QUEOS, an experimental investigation of the premixing phase with hot spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, L. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-01-01

    A second series of experiments with hot spheres to investigate the premixing phase of a steam explosion has been performed in the QUEOS facility at FZK. The diameter of the sphere jet plunging into the water has been reduced from 180 mm to 100 mm and larger masses have been employed. Both changes led to longer pours, compared to the short pours in the first series. The data of seven experiments are presented using three types of spheres at 1800 K and total volumes of approximately two and four liters, respectively. High speed films were taken, pressures, water temperatures and the steaming rate were measured. (author)

  6. Determination of liquid-fuel prevaporization and premixing in gas-turbine combustion chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrugalla, J.

    A semiempirical mathematical model of the evaporation and distribution of liquid fuel in the prevaporization-premixing zone of a stationary gas turbine is developed, and the predictions obtained are compared with published experimental data and with the results of photographic, suction-probe, two-focus-laser-velocimeter, and light-scattering measurements on water sprays from 65-deg hollow-cone nozzles in a wind tunnel operating at 64 m/s. Good agreement is obtained, and the applicability of the model to the design of turbine combustion chambers giving lower NO(x) and CO emissions is indicated.

  7. MECHANISM ON DISTRIBUTION OF PILOT FUEL SPRAY AND COMPRESSING IGNITION IN PREMIXED NATURAL GAS ENGINE IGNITED BY PILOT DIESEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Chunde; Yao Guangtao; Song Jinou; Wang Yinshan

    2005-01-01

    Numerical simulations of pilot fuel spray and compressing ignition for pre-mixed natural gas ignited by pilot diesel are described. By means of these modeling, the dual fuel and diesel fuel ignition mechanism of some phenomena investigated on an optional engine by technology of high-speed CCD is analyzed. It is demonstrated that the longer delay of ignition in dual fuel engine is not mainly caused by change of the mixture thermodynamics parameters. The analysis results illustrate that the ignition of pre-mixed natural gas ignited by pilot diesel taking place in dual fuel engine is a process of homogenous charge compression ignition.

  8. Gaseous Helium Reclamation at Rocket Test Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ability to restore large amounts of vented gaseous helium (GHe) at rocket test sites preserves the GHe and reduces operating cost. The used GHe is vented into...

  9. Determining gaseous composition of fluid inclusions with quadrupole mass spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱和平; 王莉娟

    2002-01-01

    Quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) is an instrument for effectively determining gaseous composition of fluid inclusion. The gaseous component is extracted from inclusions with thermal decrepitation method and then determined with the sensitive QMS instrument. The method is characterized by high sensitivity and high accuracy with the relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 6) of less than 3%. It has been successfully used for analyzing fluid inclusions. The analytical re-sults meet the requirement of geological study.

  10. Euthanasia using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentim, A M; Guedes, S R; Pereira, A M; Antunes, L M

    2016-08-01

    Several questions have been raised in recent years about the euthanasia of laboratory rodents. Euthanasia using inhaled agents is considered to be a suitable aesthetic method for use with a large number of animals simultaneously. Nevertheless, its aversive potential has been criticized in terms of animal welfare. The data available regarding the use of carbon dioxide (CO2), inhaled anaesthetics (such as isoflurane, sevoflurane, halothane and enflurane), as well as carbon monoxide and inert gases are discussed throughout this review. Euthanasia of fetuses and neonates is also addressed. A table listing currently available information to ease access to data regarding euthanasia techniques using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents was compiled. Regarding better animal welfare, there is currently insufficient evidence to advocate banning or replacing CO2 in the euthanasia of rodents; however, there are hints that alternative gases are more humane. The exposure to a volatile anaesthetic gas before loss of consciousness has been proposed by some scientific studies to minimize distress; however, the impact of such a measure is not clear. Areas of inconsistency within the euthanasia literature have been highlighted recently and stem from insufficient knowledge, especially regarding the advantages of the administration of isoflurane or sevoflurane over CO2, or other methods, before loss of consciousness. Alternative methods to minimize distress may include the development of techniques aimed at inducing death in the home cage of animals. Scientific outcomes have to be considered before choosing the most suitable euthanasia method to obtain the best results and accomplish the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement).

  11. Gaseous emissions from plants in controlled environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubay, Denis T.

    1988-01-01

    Plant growth in a controlled ecological life support system may entail the build-up over extended time periods of phytotoxic concentrations of volatile organic compounds produced by the plants themselves. Ethylene is a prominent gaseous emission of plants, and is the focus of this report. The objective was to determine the rate of ethylene release by spring wheat, white potato, and lettuce during early, middle, and late growth stages, and during both the light and dark segments of the diurnal cycle. Plants grown hydroponically using the nutrient film technique were covered with plexiglass containers for 4 to 6 h. At intervals after enclosure, gas samples were withdrawn with a syringe and analyzed for ethylene with a gas chromatograph. Lettuce produced 10 to 100 times more ethylene than wheat or potato, with production rates ranging from 141 to 158 ng g-dry/wt/h. Wheat produced from 1.7 to 14.3 ng g-dry/wt/h, with senescent wheat producing the least amount and flowering wheat the most. Potatoes produced the least amount of ethylene, with values never exceeding 5 ng g-dry/wt/h. Lettuce and potatoes each produced ethylene at similar rates whether in dark period or light period. Ethylene sequestering of 33 to 43 percent by the plexiglass enclosures indicated that these production estimates may be low by one-third to one-half. These results suggest that concern for ethylene build-up in a contained atmosphere should be greatest when growing lettuce, and less when growing wheat or potato.

  12. Serum levels of chicken mannan-binding lectin (MBL) during virus infections; indication that chicken MBL is an acute phase reactant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.L.; Jensenius, J. C.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    1999-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a serum collectin which is believed to be an opsonin of the innate immune defence against various microorganisms. MBL is a minor acute phase reactant in man. We investigated the concentration of serum MBL in chickens infected with infectious bronchitis virus (IBV...... levels returned to normal values 6-10 days after infection. The results indicated that MBL is a minor acute phase reactant in chickens....

  13. Effect of Inhibitors on Biogas Laminar Burning Velocity and Flammability Limits in Spark Ignited Premix Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willyanto Anggono

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is the natural byproduct of the decomposition of vegetation or animal manure, of which there are almost in exhaustable supplies in the world, and which does not contribute CO2 or other greenhouse gases to global warming or climate change. Biogas contains 66.4% flammable gas (CH4 and 33.6% inhibitors (CO2 and N2. This study focuses on the effects of inhibitors on biogas laminar burning velocity and flammability limits in spark ignited premix combustion. Spherically expanding laminar premixed flames, freely propagating from spark ignition sources in initially quiescent biogas–air mixtures, are continuously recorded by a high-speed digital camera. Initially, all the experiments in this paper were performed using inhibitorless biogas (biogas without inhibitors at room temperature, at reduced pressure (0.5 atm and at various equivalence ratios (ϕ from the lower flammable limit to the upper flammable limit. The results are compared with those from biogas (containing inhibitors flames at reduced pressure, inhibitorless biogas flames at atmospheric pressure (1 atm, and biogas flames at atmospheric pressure to emphasize the effect of inhibitors on biogas laminar burning velocity and flammability limits. Compared to an inhibitorless biogas-air mixtures, in the biogas-air mixtures, the presence of inhibitors cause a reduction in the laminar burning velocity and the flammable limits become narrower.

  14. Microjet Injection Strategies for Mitigating Dynamics in a Lean Premixed Swirl-Stabilized Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    LaBry, Zachary

    2011-01-04

    Combustion dynamics remain a challenge in the development of low-emission, air-breathing combustors for power generation and aircraft propulsion. In this paper, we presenta parametric study on the use of microjet injectors for suppressing or mitigating the combustion dynamics that energize the thermoacoustic instability in a swirl-stabilized, premixed combustor. Microjet injectors consist of small inlet ports intended to inject flow with high momentum at relatively low mass flow rates into the flame-anchoring region. The microjets were configured to inject flow either axially, into the outer recirculation zone, or radially into the inner recirculation zone. Additionally, different injectors were tested with different relative senses of swirl (signs of angular momentum)with respect to the main flow: co-swirling, not swirling, or counter-swirling. We observed that injecting air or premixed fuel/air into the inner recirculation zone via counter-swirling radial microjets, we were able to reduce the overall sound pressure level in the combustor by over 20 dB in the lean end of the operating range. Other injector configurations were not observed to positively influence the combust or stability. Detailed PIV measurements are used to examine possible mechanisms of how the microjets impact the combustion dynamics, and the technology implications of our experiments are discussed.

  15. Soot Particle Size Distribution Functions in a Turbulent Non-Premixed Ethylene-Nitrogen Flame

    KAUST Repository

    Boyette, Wesley

    2017-02-21

    A scanning mobility particle sizer with a nano differential mobility analyzer was used to measure nanoparticle size distribution functions in a turbulent non-premixed flame. The burner utilizes a premixed pilot flame which anchors a C2H4/N2 (35/65) central jet with ReD = 20,000. Nanoparticles in the flame were sampled through a N2-filled tube with a 500- μm orifice. Previous studies have shown that insufficient dilution of the nanoparticles can lead to coagulation in the sampling line and skewed particle size distribution functions. A system of mass flow controllers and valves were used to vary the dilution ratio. Single-stage and two-stage dilution systems were investigated. A parametric study on the effect of the dilution ratio on the observed particle size distribution function indicates that particle coagulation in the sampling line can be eliminated using a two-stage dilution process. Carbonaceous nanoparticle (soot) concentration particle size distribution functions along the flame centerline at multiple heights in the flame are presented. The resulting distributions reveal a pattern of increasing mean particle diameters as the distance from the nozzle along the centerline increases.

  16. A simple one-step chemistry model for partially premixed hydrocarbon combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Tarrazo, Eduardo [Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial, Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, Antonio L. [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganes 28911 (Spain); Linan, Amable [ETSI Aeronauticos, Pl. Cardenal Cisneros 3, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Williams, Forman A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States)

    2006-10-15

    This work explores the applicability of one-step irreversible Arrhenius kinetics with unity reaction order to the numerical description of partially premixed hydrocarbon combustion. Computations of planar premixed flames are used in the selection of the three model parameters: the heat of reaction q, the activation temperature T{sub a}, and the preexponential factor B. It is seen that changes in q with equivalence ratio f need to be introduced in fuel-rich combustion to describe the effect of partial fuel oxidation on the amount of heat released, leading to a universal linear variation q(f) for f>1 for all hydrocarbons. The model also employs a variable activation temperature T{sub a}(f) to mimic changes in the underlying chemistry in rich and very lean flames. The resulting chemistry description is able to reproduce propagation velocities of diluted and undiluted flames accurately over the whole flammability limit. Furthermore, computations of methane-air counterflow diffusion flames are used to test the proposed chemistry under nonpremixed conditions. The model not only predicts the critical strain rate at extinction accurately but also gives near-extinction flames with oxygen leakage, thereby overcoming known predictive limitations of one-step Arrhenius kinetics. (author)

  17. Enstrophy transport conditional on local flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Papapostolou, Vassilios

    2017-09-11

    Enstrophy is an intrinsic feature of turbulent flows, and its transport properties are essential for the understanding of premixed flame-turbulence interaction. The interrelation between the enstrophy transport and flow topologies, which can be assigned to eight categories based on the three invariants of the velocity-gradient tensor, has been analysed here. The enstrophy transport conditional on flow topologies in turbulent premixed flames has been analysed using a Direct Numerical Simulation database representing the corrugated flamelets (CF), thin reaction zones (TRZ) and broken reaction zones (BRZ) combustion regimes. The flame in the CF regime exhibits considerable flame-generated enstrophy, and the dilatation rate and baroclinic torque contributions to the enstrophy transport act as leading order sink and source terms, respectively. Consequently, flow topologies associated with positive dilatation rate values, contribute significantly to the enstrophy transport in the CF regime. By contrast, enstrophy decreases from the unburned to the burned gas side for the cases representing the TRZ and BRZ regimes, with diminishing influences of dilatation rate and baroclinic torque. The enstrophy transport in the TRZ and BRZ regimes is governed by the vortex-stretching and viscous dissipation contributions, similar to non-reacting flows, and topologies existing for all values of dilatation rate remain significant contributors.

  18. Combustion characteristics of lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus oil in a partial premixed charge compression ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Alagumalai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Indeed, the development of alternate fuels for use in internal combustion engines has traditionally been an evolutionary process in which fuel-related problems are met and critical fuel properties are identified and their specific limits defined to resolve the problem. In this regard, this research outlines a vision of lemongrass oil combustion characteristics. In a nut-shell, the combustion phenomena of lemongrass oil were investigated at engine speed of 1500 rpm and compression ratio of 17.5 in a 4-stroke cycle compression ignition engine. Furthermore, the engine tests were conducted with partial premixed charge compression ignition-direct injection (PCCI-DI dual fuel system to profoundly address the combustion phenomena. Analysis of cylinder pressure data and heat-release analysis of neat and premixed lemongrass oil were demonstrated in-detail and compared with conventional diesel. The experimental outcomes disclosed that successful ignition and energy release trends can be obtained from a compression ignition engine fueled with lemongrass oil.

  19. Turbulent non-premixed combustion driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshochi, Hilda; Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Attal, Nitesh

    2016-11-01

    We report on 3D high resolution numerical simulations of a non-premixed, reacting Richmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability performed using the FLASH code. In the simulations, a Mach 1.6 shock traverses a diffuse, corrugated material interface separating Hydrogen at 1000 K and Oxygen at 300 K, so that local misalignments between pressure and density gradients induce baroclinic vorticity at the contact line. The vorticity deposition drives the RM instability, which in turn results in combustion and flame formation. We study the evolution of the interface and the flame as the resulting RM instability grows through linear, nonlinear and turbulent stages. We develop a detailed understanding of the effects of heat release and combustion on the underlying flow properties by comparing our results with a baseline non-reacting RM flow. We document the properties of the instability (growth rates, pdfs, spectra) and the flame (scalar dissipation rate, flame surface area, heat release rate) as well as the nature of the coupling between the two. Our findings are relevant to supernovae detonation, knocking in IC engines and scramjet performance, while the underlying flow problem defined here represents a novel canonical framework to understand the broader class of non-premixed turbulent flames.

  20. Forced and self-excited oscillations in a natural gas fired lean premixed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daesik; Park, Sung Wook

    2010-11-15

    An experimental study of the flame response in a premixed gas turbine combustor has been conducted at room temperature and under atmospheric pressure inlet conditions using natural gas. The fuel is premixed with the air upstream of a choked inlet to avoid equivalence ratio fluctuations. Therefore the observed flame response is only the result of the imposed velocity fluctuations, which are produced using a variable-speed siren. Also, a variable length combustor is designed for investigating characteristics of self-excited instabilities. Measurements are made of the velocity fluctuation in the mixing section using hot wire anemometry and of the heat release fluctuation in the combustor using chemiluminescence emission. The results are analyzed to determine the phase and gain of the flame transfer function. The results show that the gain of flame transfer function is closely associated both with inlet flow forcing conditions such as frequency and amplitude of modulation as well as the operating conditions such as equivalence ratio. In order to predict the operating conditions where the combustor goes stable or unstable at given combustor and nozzle designs, time-lag analysis was tried using convection time delay measured from the phase information of the transfer function. The model prediction was in very good agreement with the self-excited instability measurement. However, spatial heat release distribution became more significant in long flames than in short flames and also had an important influence on the system damping procedure. (author)

  1. Combustion Characteristics for Turbulent Prevaporized Premixed Flame Using Commercial Light Diesel and Kerosene Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S. Shehata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study has been carried out for investigating fuel type, fuel blends, equivalence ratio, Reynolds number, inlet mixture temperature, and holes diameter of perforated plate affecting combustion process for turbulent prevaporized premixed air flames for different operating conditions. CO2, CO, H2, N2, C3H8, C2H6, C2H4, flame temperature, and gas flow velocity are measured along flame axis for different operating conditions. Gas chromatographic (GC and CO/CO2 infrared gas analyzer are used for measuring different species. Temperature is measured using thermocouple technique. Gas flow velocity is measured using pitot tube technique. The effect of kerosene percentage on concentration, flame temperature, and gas flow velocity is not linearly dependent. Correlations for adiabatic flame temperature for diesel and kerosene-air flames are obtained as function of mixture strength, fuel type, and inlet mixture temperature. Effect of equivalence ratio on combustion process for light diesel-air flame is greater than for kerosene-air flame. Flame temperature increases with increased Reynolds number for different operating conditions. Effect of Reynolds number on combustion process for light diesel flame is greater than for kerosene flame and also for rich flame is greater than for lean flame. The present work contributes to design and development of lean prevaporized premixed (LPP gas turbine combustors.

  2. Influence of obstacle-produced turbulence on development of premixed flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Lixin(余立新); SUN; Wenchao(孙文超); WU; Chengkang(吴承康)

    2002-01-01

    An investigation into influence of obstructions on premixed flame propagation has been carried out in a semi-open tube.It is found that there exists flame acceleration and rising overpressure along the path of flame due to obstacles.According to the magnitude of flame speeds,the propagation of flame in the tube can be classified into three regimes:the quenching,the choking and the detonation regimes.In premixed flames near the flammability limits,the flame is observed first to accelerate and then to quench itself after propagating past a certain number of obstacles.In the choking regime,the maximum flame speeds are somewhat below the combustion product sound speeds,and insensitive to the blockage ratio.In the more sensitive mixtures,the transition to detonation (DDT) occurs when the equivalence ratio increases.The transition is not observed for the less sensitive mixtures.The dependence of overpressure on blockage ratio is not monotonous.Furthermore,a numerical study of flame acceleration and overpressure with the unsteady compressible flow model is performed,and the agreement between the simulation and measurements is good.``

  3. Direct simulation and modeling of flame-wall interaction for premixed turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poinsot, T.J.; Haworth, D.C.; Bruneaux, G. (CNRS, Toulouse (France). Inst. de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse General Motors Research, Warren, MI (United States) Inst. Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France))

    1993-10-01

    The interaction between turbulent premixed flames and walls is studied using a two-dimensional full Navier-Stokes solver with simple chemistry. The effects of wall distance on the local and global flame structure are investigated. Quenching distances and maximum wall heat fluxes during quenching are computed in laminar cases and are found to be comparable to experimental and analytical results. For turbulent cases, it is shown that quenching distances and maximum heat fluxes remain of the same order as for laminar flames. Based on simulation results, a law-of-the-wall'' model is derived to describe the interaction between a turbulent premixed flame and a wall. This model is constructed to provide reasonable behavior of flame surface density near a wall under the assumption that flame -- wall interaction takes place at scales smaller than the computational mesh. It can be implemented in conjunction with any of several recent flamelet models based on a modeled surface density equation, with no additional constraints on mesh size or time step. Preliminary tests of this model are presented for the case of a spark-ignited piston engine.

  4. Emission characteristics and axial flame temperature distribution of producer gas fired premixed burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhoi, P.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, L and T-Sargent and Lundy Limited, L and T Energy Centre, Near Chhani Jakat Naka, Baroda 390 002 (India); Channiwala, S.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology, Deemed University, Ichchhanath, Surat 395 007, Gujarat (India)

    2009-03-15

    This paper presents the emission characteristics and axial flame temperature distribution of producer gas fired premixed burner. The producer gas fired premixed burner of 150 kW capacity was tested on open core throat less down draft gasifier system in the present study. A stable and uniform flame was observed with this burner. An instrumented test set up was developed to evaluate the performance of the burner. The conventional bluff body having blockage ratio of 0.65 was used for flame stabilization. With respect to maximum flame temperature, minimum pressure drop and minimum emissions, a swirl angle of 60 seems to be optimal. The experimental results also showed that the NO{sub x} emissions are inversely proportional to swirl angle and CO emissions are independent of swirl angle. The minimum emission levels of CO and NO{sub x} are observed to be 0.167% and 384 ppm respectively at the swirl angle of 45-60 . The experimental results showed that the maximum axial flame temperature distribution was achieved at A/F ratio of 1.0. The adiabatic flame temperature of 1653 C was calculated theoretically at A/F ratio of 1.0. Experimental results are in tune with theoretical results. It was also concluded that the CO and UHC emissions decreases with increasing A/F ratio while NO{sub x} emissions decreases on either side of A/F ratio of 1.0. (author)

  5. Considerations and calculations on the breakup of jets and drops of melt related to premixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, M.; Berg, E. von; Buck, M. [Inst. fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme (IKE), Univ. of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    Various descriptions of jet and drop breakup are applied in premixing codes, presently. The main task is to check these descriptions over a wide range of conditions in order to assure extrapolation capabilities for the codes. Jet breakup under non-boiling conditions is relatively well described by IKEJET, based on Conte/Miles (CM) instability description and a relatively detailed stripping model, in contrast to using Kelvin/Helmholtz (KH) theory. Remaining open questions are elaborated. Especially, thick jet behavior with dominance of stripping even at small relative velocities must be distinguished from thin jets with coarse breakup. The application of IKEJET to cases with jet breakup under strong film boiling yielded significantly too little fragmentation. As a possible explanation line, multiphase effects on the wave growth and stripping are considered, due to entrainment of melt and water. Parametric checking calculations are performed with a strongly simplified approach for PREMIX and FARO experiments in order to reveal main effects and the possible physical explanation features as a basis for extended modelling. The results indicate that jet breakup may be essentially sufficient to explain the experimental behavior. Rather coalescence than further drop breakup may be expected. This is also indicated by calculations with IKE drop breakup models. (author)

  6. DNS and modeling of the interaction between turbulent premixed flames and walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinsot, T. J.; Haworth, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    The interaction between turbulent premixed flames and walls is studied using a two-dimensional full Navier-Stokes solver with simple chemistry. The effects of wall distance on the local and global flame structure are investigated. Quenching distances and maximum wall heat fluxes during quenching are computed in laminar cases and are found to be comparable to experimental and analytical results. For turbulent cases, it is shown that quenching distances and maximum heat fluxes remain of the same order as for laminar flames. Based on simulation results, a 'law-of-the-wall' model is derived to describe the interaction between a turbulent premixed flame and a wall. This model is constructed to provide reasonable behavior of flame surface density near a wall under the assumption that flame-wall interaction takes place at scales smaller than the computational mesh. It can be implemented in conjunction with any of several recent flamelet models based on a modeled surface density equation, with no additional constraints on mesh size or time step.

  7. Characteristics of liquid water removal from the gas diffusion layer by reactant flow in a PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, K.; Park, J.; Li, X. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Water in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells is accumulated in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and removed by the static pressure gradient caused by the fast reactant flow in the flow channel. Reactants can leak into the neighbouring channels via the porous GDL and inhibit the removal of liquid water. This study examined the characteristics of liquid water removal from the GDL by measuring unsteady pressure drop in a PEM fuel cell in which the GDL was initially wetted with liquid water. GDL thickness was controlled by inserting metal shims between the fuel cell plates. The experiment showed that the amount of pressure drop is inversely proportional to GDL thickness. Thicker GDLs with higher porosity levels increased cross flow. Liquid water removal was also influenced by the change of inlet Reynolds number, which demonstrated that air flow rates must be high enough for efficient water removal. Various GDL porosities and permeabilities were calculated, and their influence on the characteristics of liquid water removal were evaluated. A transparent flow channel design was used to visualize water movement in the GDL. It was concluded that the effects of cross flow and GDL compression levels should be considered in the analysis and design of PEM fuel cells. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Methods for Calculating Energy Requirements for Processes in Which a Reactant Is Also a Fuel: Need for Standardization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, H. Y.; Olivas-Martinez, Miguel

    2014-09-01

    When a process involves both endothermic chemical reactions and heat generation from the combustion of fuels, the choice of endothermic reactions to include in computing the "energy requirement" for the overall process is arbitrary and can be a source of confusion. It is shown that the essential question becomes whether the heat of combustion of a reactant, which can be used as a fuel, should be included in the energy requirement value. It is noted that the choice is a matter of convention, but it is important to clearly state what convention is followed in presenting the results of energy calculations. There is a need to select a standard approach because the presented value of "energy requirement" of a process depends on the choice. This problem is illustrated using the example of ironmaking by different processes including a novel flash ironmaking process under development at the University of Utah. The authors advocate using just the "process energy requirement" as the standard value of the energy requirement for a process in which a reactant is also a fuel.

  9. CFD Analysis of Fuel Atomization, Secondary Droplet Breakup and Spray Dispersion in the Premix Duct of a LPP Combustor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmehl, R.; Maier, G.; Wittig, S.

    2000-01-01

    The two phase flow in the premix duct of a LPP combustor is computed using a Lagrangian droplet tracking method. To reproduce the characteristic spray structure of an air-assisted pressure-swirl atomizer, a sheet spray model is de-rived from measured sheet parameters and combined with an advanced co

  10. The Impact of Variable Inlet Mixture Stratification on Flame Topology and Emissions Performance of a Premixer/Swirl Burner Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Koutmos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the assessment of a low emissions premixer/swirl burner configuration utilizing lean stratified fuel preparation. An axisymmetric, single- or double-cavity premixer, formed along one, two, or three concentric disks promotes propane-air premixing and supplies the combustion zone at the afterbody disk recirculation with a radial equivalence ratio gradient. The burner assemblies are operated with a swirl co-flow to study the interaction of the recirculating stratified flame with the surrounding swirl. A number of lean and ultra-lean flames operated either with a plane disk stabilizer or with one or two premixing cavity arrangements were evaluated over a range of inlet mixture conditions. The influence of the variation of the imposed swirl was studied for constant fuel injections. Measurements of turbulent velocities, temperatures, OH* chemiluminescence and gas analysis provided information on the performance of each burner set up. Comparisons with Large Eddy Simulations, performed with an 11-step global chemistry, illustrated the flame front interaction with the vortex formation region under the influence of the variable inlet mixture stratifications. The combined effort contributed to the identification of optimum configurations in terms of fuel consumption and pollutants emissions and to the delineation of important controlling parameters and limiting fuel-air mixing conditions.

  11. Error analysis of large-eddy simulation of the turbulent non-premixed sydney bluff-body flame

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempf, A.M.; Geurts, B.J.; Oefelein, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    A computational error analysis is applied to the large-eddy simulation of the turbulent non-premixed Sydney bluff-body flame, where the error is defined with respect to experimental data. The errorlandscape approach is extended to heterogeneous compressible turbulence, which is coupled to combustion

  12. The global, centralized approach of the GAIN Premix Facility has made oil fortification in Indonesia more affordable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallier, Vincent; Guyondet, Christophe; Provent, Adeline; Laillou, Arnaud; Soekirman; Moench-Pfanner, Regina

    2013-06-01

    Access to high-grade micronutrients is a recurring challenge that often threatens the long-term sustainability of food fortification programs. To assess the efficiency of the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) Premix Facility in procuring quality, affordable vitamin A for fortification of edible oil in Indonesia. A global approach to procurement of standard items was used by combining volumes across various demand streams in order to reduce the total cost of acquisition through economies of scale. The GAIN Premix Facility undertook a detailed analysis of vitamin A requirements across its existing customer base, which served as a basis for developing a reliable demand forecast. A consolidated, competitive tender was launched that resulted in the setting up of a long-term commercial agreement with the selected supplier to lock in the most competitive price for a given period of time. The direct benefit to oil manufacturers of fortifying with vitamin A is that the cost of fortification went down significantly compared with prices they would have been offered had they ordered vitamin A individually. In Indonesia, this consolidated procurement approach has allowed a 14.5% decrease in the unit price of vitamin A. The GAIN Premix Facility demonstrated its effectiveness in acting as a global procurement platform by aggregating demand across different customers and leveraging improved prices through increased volumes. Building on the success of this effort, the GAIN Premix Facility is replicating this global approach for procurement of other standard items being procured across fortification programs worldwide.

  13. Research on Cellular Instabilities of Lean Premixed Syngas Flames under Various Hydrogen Fractions Using a Constant Volume Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Meng Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of the intrinsic instabilities of H2/CO lean (φ = 0.4 to φ = 1.0 premixed flames at different hydrogen fractions ranging from 0% to 100% at elevated pressure and room temperature was performed in a constant volume vessel using a Schlieren system. The unstretched laminar burning velocities were compared with data from the previous literature and simulated results. The results indicate that excellent agreements are obtained. The cellular instabilities of syngas-air flames were discussed and critical flame radii were measured. When hydrogen fractions are above 50%, the flame tends to be more stable as the equivalence ratio increases; however, the instability increases for flames of lower hydrogen fractions. For the premixed syngas flame with hydrogen fractions greater than 50%, the decline in cellular instabilities induced by the increase in equivalence ratio can be attributed to a reduction of diffusive-thermal instabilities rather than increased hydrodynamic instabilities. For premixed syngas flames with hydrogen fractions lower than 50%, as the equivalence ratio increases, the cellular instabilities become more evident because the enhanced hydrodynamic instabilities become the dominant effect. For premixed syngas flames, the enhancement of cellular instabilities induced by the increase in hydrogen fraction is the result of both increasing diffusive-thermal and hydrodynamic instabilities.

  14. NO formation in the burnout region of a partially premixed methane-air flame with upstream heat loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokhov, A.V.; Levinsky, H.B.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of temperature and NO concentration in laminar, partially premixed methane-air flames stabilized on a ceramic burner in coflow are reported. The NO concentration and temperature were determined by laser- induced fluorescence (LIF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering: (CARS), respe

  15. Diode laser absorption measurement and analysis of HCN in atmospheric-pressure, fuel-rich premixed methane/air flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gersen, Sander; Mokhov, A. V.; Levinsky, H. B.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of HCN in flat, fuel-rich premixed methane/air flames at atmospheric pressure are reported. Quartz-microprobe sampling followed by wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy with second harmonic detection was used to obtain an overall measurement uncertainty of better than 20% for

  16. Inclusion of preferential diffusion in simulations of premixed combustion of hydrogen/methane mixtures with flamelet generated manifolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, J.A.M.de; Bastiaans, R.J.M.; Oijen, J.A. van; Goey, L.P.H. de; Cant, R.S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study the possibility to account for preferential diffusion effects in lean turbulent premixed flames in numerical predictions with reduced chemistry. We studied the situation when hydrogen is added to methane at levels of 20% and 40% by volume in the fuel, at lean combustion (φ=

  17. Depletion of gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a forest canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-D. Choi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid uptake of gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs by a forest canopy was observed at Borden in Southern Ontario, Canada during bud break in early spring 2003. High volume air samples were taken on 12 individual days at three different heights (44.4, 29.1, and 16.7 m on a scaffolding tower and on the forest floor below the canopy (1.5 m. Concentrations of PAHs were positively correlated to ambient temperature, resulting from relatively warm and polluted air masses passing over the Eastern United States and Toronto prior to arriving at the sampling site. An analysis of vertical profiles and gas/particle partitioning of the PAHs showed that gaseous PAHs established a concentration gradient with height, whereas levels of particulate PAHs were relatively uniform, implying that only the uptake of gaseous PAHs by the forest canopy was sufficiently rapid to be observed. Specifically, the gaseous concentrations of intermediate PAHs, such as phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene, during budburst and leaf emergence were reduced within and above the canopy. When a gradient was observed, the percentage of PAHs on particles increased at the elevations experiencing a decrease in gas phase concentrations. The uptake of intermediate PAHs by the canopy also led to significant differences in gaseous PAH composition with height. These results are the most direct evidence yet of the filter effect of forest canopies for gaseous PAHs in early spring. PAH deposition fluxes and dry gaseous deposition velocities to the forest canopy were estimated from the concentration gradients.

  18. Computational Enhancements for Direct Numerical Simulations of Statistically Stationary Turbulent Premixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Mukhadiyev, Nurzhan

    2017-05-01

    Combustion at extreme conditions, such as a turbulent flame at high Karlovitz and Reynolds numbers, is still a vast and an uncertain field for researchers. Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent flame is a superior tool to unravel detailed information that is not accessible to most sophisticated state-of-the-art experiments. However, the computational cost of such simulations remains a challenge even for modern supercomputers, as the physical size, the level of turbulence intensity, and chemical complexities of the problems continue to increase. As a result, there is a strong demand for computational cost reduction methods as well as in acceleration of existing methods. The main scope of this work was the development of computational and numerical tools for high-fidelity direct numerical simulations of premixed planar flames interacting with turbulence. The first part of this work was KAUST Adaptive Reacting Flow Solver (KARFS) development. KARFS is a high order compressible reacting flow solver using detailed chemical kinetics mechanism; it is capable to run on various types of heterogeneous computational architectures. In this work, it was shown that KARFS is capable of running efficiently on both CPU and GPU. The second part of this work was numerical tools for direct numerical simulations of planar premixed flames: such as linear turbulence forcing and dynamic inlet control. DNS of premixed turbulent flames conducted previously injected velocity fluctuations at an inlet. Turbulence injected at the inlet decayed significantly while reaching the flame, which created a necessity to inject higher than needed fluctuations. A solution for this issue was to maintain turbulence strength on the way to the flame using turbulence forcing. Therefore, a linear turbulence forcing was implemented into KARFS to enhance turbulence intensity. Linear turbulence forcing developed previously by other groups was corrected with net added momentum removal mechanism to prevent mean

  19. Increased level of acute phase reactants in patients infected with modern Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypes in Mwanza, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stavrum, Ruth; PrayGod, George; Range, Nyagosya;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence to suggest that different Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages cause variations in the clinical presentation of tuberculosis (TB). Certain M. tuberculosis genotypes/lineages have been shown to be more likely to cause active TB in human populations from...... a distinct genetic ancestry. This study describes the genetic biodiversity of M. tuberculosis genotypes in Mwanza city, Tanzania and the clinical presentation of the disease caused by isolates of different lineages. METHODS: Two-hundred-fifty-two isolates from pulmonary TB patients in Mwanza, Tanzania were...... characterized by spoligotyping, and 45 isolates were further characterized by mycobacterium interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR). The patients' level of the acute phase reactants AGP, CRP and neutrophil counts, in addition to BMI, were measured and compared to the M...

  20. Pd(II)-catalyzed cascade Wacker-Heck reaction: chemoselective coupling of two electron-deficient reactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Franck; Reiter, Maud; Mills-Webb, Rebecca; Sawicki, Marcin; Klär, Daniel; Bensel, Nicolas; Wagner, Alain; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2006-10-27

    A novel palladium(II)-catalyzed oxy-carbopalladation process was developed allowing for the orchestrated union of hydroxy ynones with ethyl acrylate, two electron-deficient reactants. With beta-hydroxy ynones, this cascade Wacker-Heck process gave access to highly functionalized tri- or tetrasubstituted dihydropyranones featuring an unusual dienic system. For diastereomerically pure and for enantioenriched beta-hydroxyynones, these reactions proceed without affecting the stereochemical integrity of the existing stereocenters. In addition, tetrasubstituted furanones can be prepared when alpha-hydroxyynones and ethyl acrylate are used as starting materials. The dihydropyranones and furanones obtained upon cyclization are novel compounds, but structurally related carbohydrate derivatives featuring a similar dienic system have been used as starting materials for the construction of polyannulated products, suggesting that these cascade Pd(II)-mediated oxidative heterocyclizations are of value for various synthetic applications.

  1. Electricity generation by two types of microbial fuel cells using nitrobenzene as the anodic or cathodic reactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Luo, Yong; Zhang, Cuiping; Li, Mingchen

    2010-06-01

    The effect of nitrobenzene (NB) on electricity generation and simultaneous biodegradation of NB were studied with two types of microbial fuel cells (MFCs): a ferricyanide-cathode MFC with NB as the anodic reactant and a NB-cathode MFC. Compared to controls without NB, the presence of NB in the anode of the first MFC decreased maximum voltage outputs, maximum power densities and Coulombic efficiencies. No electricity was generated from the first MFC using NB as the sole fuel; however, the second MFC using NB as the electron acceptor generated electricity successfully with a maximum voltage of 400mV. NB was degraded completely within 24h in both anode and cathode chambers. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles demonstrated that the presence of NB caused changes in relative abundance of the dominant bacterial species and emergence of new bacteria on the anodes.

  2. A reactant-coordinate-based approach to state-to-state differential cross sections for tetratomic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Hua

    2016-11-01

    A new algorithm is proposed to compute quantum mechanically state-to-state differential cross sections for reactions involving four atoms in full dimensionality. This algorithm, which is based on the propagation of an initial state specific wave packet exclusively in reactant coordinates, extracts the S-matrix elements in the product channel by first interpolating the time-dependent wave packet using a collocation method at selected time intervals on the product coordinate grid and then projecting out the contributions of all final product states. This approach is efficient and accurate, particularly for reactions that are dominated by a product well or long-range interactions. Validation of this approach is demonstrated for the H2 + OH → H + H2O reaction.

  3. Extruder system and method for treatment of a gaseous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvi, Norberto; Perry, Robert James; Singh, Surinder Prabhjot; Balch, Gary Stephen; Westendorf, Tiffany Elizabeth Pinard

    2016-04-05

    A system for treatment of a gaseous medium, comprises an extruder having a barrel. The extruder further comprises a first inlet port, a second inlet port, and a plurality of outlet ports coupled to the barrel. The first inlet port is configured for feeding a lean sorbent, the second inlet port is configured for feeding a gaseous medium, and the plurality of outlet ports are configured for releasing a plurality of components removed from the gaseous medium. Further, the extruder comprises a plurality of helical elements coupled to a plurality of kneading elements, mounted on a shaft, and disposed within the barrel. The barrel and the plurality of helical and kneading elements together form an absorption unit and a desorption unit. The first and second inlet ports are formed in the absorption unit and the plurality of outlet ports are formed in the absorption and desorption units.

  4. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene for Applications in Gaseous Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Franchino, S.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jackman, R.B.; Muller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; de Oliveira, R.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.; van Stenis, M.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-07-11

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical and electrical properties. Regarded as the thinnest and narrowest conductive mesh, it has drastically different transmission behaviours when bombarded with electrons and ions in vacuum. This property, if confirmed in gas, may be a definitive solution for the ion back-flow problem in gaseous detectors. In order to ascertain this aspect, graphene layers of dimensions of about 2x2cm$^2$, grown on a copper substrate, are transferred onto a flat metal surface with holes, so that the graphene layer is freely suspended. The graphene and the support are installed into a gaseous detector equipped with a triple Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM), and the transparency properties to electrons and ions are studied in gas as a function of the electric fields. The techniques to produce the graphene samples are described, and we report on preliminary tests of graphene-coated GEMs.

  5. Charge transfer properties through graphene for applications in gaseous detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franchino, S.; Gonzalez-Diaz, D. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Hall-Wilton, R. [ESS, European Spallation Source, Tunavägen 24, 223 63 Lund (Sweden); Jackman, R.B. [London Centre for Nanotechnology and the Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Muller, H. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Nguyen, T.T. [London Centre for Nanotechnology and the Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Oliveira, R. de; Oliveri, E. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Pfeiffer, D. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); ESS, European Spallation Source, Tunavägen 24, 223 63 Lund (Sweden); Resnati, F., E-mail: filippo.resnati@cern.ch [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); ESS, European Spallation Source, Tunavägen 24, 223 63 Lund (Sweden); Ropelewski, L. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Smith, J. [London Centre for Nanotechnology and the Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Stenis, M. van [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Streli, C. [Atominstitut, Technische Universität Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Thuiner, P. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Atominstitut, Technische Universität Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); and others

    2016-07-11

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical and electrical properties. Regarded as the thinnest and narrowest conductive mesh, it has drastically different transmission behaviours when bombarded with electrons and ions in vacuum. This property, if confirmed in gas, may be a definitive solution for the ion back-flow problem in gaseous detectors. In order to ascertain this aspect, graphene layers of dimensions of about 2×2 cm{sup 2}, grown on a copper substrate, are transferred onto a flat metal surface with holes, so that the graphene layer is freely suspended. The graphene and the support are installed into a gaseous detector equipped with a triple Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM), and the transparency properties to electrons and ions are studied in gas as a function of the electric fields. The techniques to produce the graphene samples are described, and we report on preliminary tests of graphene-coated GEMs.

  6. Flux and polarization signals of spatially inhomogeneous gaseous exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Karalidi, T; Guirado, D

    2013-01-01

    We present numerically calculated, disk--integrated, spectropolarimetric signals of starlight that is reflected by vertically and horizontally inhomogeneous gaseous exoplanets. We include various spatial features that are present on Solar System's gaseous planets: belts and zones, cyclonic spots, and polar hazes, to test whether such features leave traces in the disk--integrated flux and polarization signals. Broadband flux and polarization signals of starlight that is reflected by gaseous exoplanets are calculated using an efficient, adding--doubling radiative transfer code, that fully includes single and multiple scattering and polarization. The planetary model atmospheres are vertically inhomogeneous and can be horizontally inhomogeneous, and contain gas molecules and/or cloud and/or aerosol particles.

  7. A concise quantum efficiency measurement system for gaseous photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, Toru [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Tokanai, Fuyuki, E-mail: tokanai@sci.kj.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Okazaki, Keisuke; Sakurai, Hirohisa; Gunji, Shuichi [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Kawabata, Hironobu; Sohtome, Takayuki [BUNKOUKEIKI Co., Ltd., Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0033 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Takayuki [Graduate School of the Faculty of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Sugiyama, Hirioyuki; Okada, Teruyuki; Ohishi, Noboru [Electron Tube Division, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Shizuoka 438-0193 (Japan); Kishimoto, Syunji [Institute of Material Structure Science, KEK, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2013-12-21

    We have been developing gaseous photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with a bialkali photocathode combined with micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs). The sensitivity of a PMT is described in terms of its quantum efficiency (QE). The QE is very important in many experiments, particularly when dealing with low photon statistics. A concise QE measurement system has been developed to evaluate the characteristics of a sealed gaseous PMT with a bialkali photocathode. This QE measurement system consists of a Xe arc lamp source, reflective optics and filters, a monochromator, and a reference Si photodiode detector. Using the system, we evaluated the QE, gain, and long-term stability of the gaseous PMT. Here, we report the results of our evaluation.

  8. Extruder system and method for treatment of a gaseous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvi, Norberto; Perry, Robert James; Singh, Surinder Prabhjot; Balch, Gary Stephen; Westendorf, Tiffany Elizabeth Pinard

    2016-04-05

    A system for treatment of a gaseous medium, comprises an extruder having a barrel. The extruder further comprises a first inlet port, a second inlet port, and a plurality of outlet ports coupled to the barrel. The first inlet port is configured for feeding a lean sorbent, the second inlet port is configured for feeding a gaseous medium, and the plurality of outlet ports are configured for releasing a plurality of components removed from the gaseous medium. Further, the extruder comprises a plurality of helical elements coupled to a plurality of kneading elements, mounted on a shaft, and disposed within the barrel. The barrel and the plurality of helical and kneading elements together form an absorption unit and a desorption unit. The first and second inlet ports are formed in the absorption unit and the plurality of outlet ports are formed in the absorption and desorption units.

  9. Characteristics of response factors of coaxial gaseous rocket injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Zinn, B. T.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation undertaken to determine the frequency dependence of the response factors of various gaseous propellant rocket injectors subject to axial instabilities are presented. The injector response factors were determined, using the modified impedance-tube technique, under cold-flow conditions simulating those observed in unstable rocket motors. The tested injectors included a gaseous-fuel injector element, a gaseous-oxidizer injector element and a coaxial injector with both fuel and oxidizer elements. Emphasis was given to the determination of the dependence of the injector response factor upon the open-area ratio of the injector, the length of the injector orifice, and the pressure drop across the injector orifices. The measured data are shown to be in reasonable agreement with the corresponding injector response factor data predicted by the Feiler and Heidmann model.

  10. INFLUENCE OF GASEOUS MEDIA ON DAMPING OF PNEUMATIC COUPLINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef KRAJŇÁK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In our department has long been devoted specifically flexible pneumatic shaft couplings. These couplings are filled with a gaseous medium air. Examination, we found that the type of gas, its properties such as gas density, compressibility factor, molecular weight and viscosity alter dynamic properties pneumatic coupling. The main objective of this article is to determine how various gaseous media influences damping coefficient b. The article compares three different gases, air, helium and propane-butane. These gases have different properties and it can change damping coefficient b. The measurements are performed in the laboratories of our department in Košice. We used flexible one-bellow pneumatic coupling 4-1/70-T-C and two-bellows pneumatic coupling 4-2/70-T-C. Pressure gaseous medium was varied in the range of 100 to 600kPa.

  11. Influence of the reactant carbon-hydrogen-oxygen composition on the key products of the direct gasification of dewatered sewage sludge in supercritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Miao; Zhu, Wei; Fan, Yujie; Zhang, Huiwen; Su, Ying

    2016-05-01

    The supercritical water gasification of ten different types of dewatered sewage sludges was investigated to understand the relationship between sludge properties and gasification products. Experiments were performed in a high-pressure autoclave at 400°C for 60 min. Results showed that gasification of sewage sludge in supercritical water consists mainly of a gasification reaction, a carbonization reaction and a persistent organic pollutants synthesis reaction. Changes in the reactant C/H/O composition have significant effects on the key gasification products. Total gas production increased with increasing C/H2O of the reactant. The char/coke content increased with increasing C/H ratio of the reactant. A decrease in the C/O ratio of the reactant led to a reduction in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation. This means that we can adjust the reactant C/H/O composition by adding carbon-, hydrogen-, and oxygen-containing substances such as coal, algae and H2O2 to optimize hydrogen production and to inhibit an undesired by-product formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental Study of Pre-mixed Flames on a Multi-Hole Matrix Burner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasudevan Raghavan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with an experimental investigation of the flame characteristics of premixed Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG - air mixtures with different equivalence ratios on a multi-hole matrix burner. Lowest possible fuel-lean mixing conditions are envisaged. Results show that the flame pattern changes into four different types which are oscillatory flames in the middle region, flames with oscillations along the centerline, flames with very little oscillations and stable flames from all the holes. Species concentration measurements are performed with the help of  gas analyzer and the results show that the concentrations of carbon-monoxide and oxygen decreases, whereas that of carbon-dioxide and nitric oxide increases with increase in the volumetric flow rate of LPG and air mixture. In addition to this, temperature measurements are carried out using a K-type thermocouple over the burner surface at different heights. Temperature contours for each plane have been presented.

  13. Evaluation of Sintering Behavior of Premix Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haris Rudianto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sintering of light aluminium alloys powder has been investigated as a way to substitute steels in automotive and aerospace industries. Premix Al-5.5Zn-2.5Mg-0.5Cu composite powder called Alumix 431D was analyzed in this research. Sintering was carried out under ultra high purity nitrogen gas and before reaching sintering temperature, green samples were delubricated at 400°C for 30 min. The powder possesses high sinterability by reaching 96% relative density at 580°C sintering temperature. Formation of liquid phase seems to support achieving high sintering density. Optimum mechanical properties also were obtained under those conditions. T6 heat treatment was done to improve the mechanical properties by formation of precipitation strengthening, and MgZn2 appears to be dominant strengthening precipitate. X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and SEM-EDS were used to characterize powder, and sintered and heat treated samples.

  14. Numerical Study on Laminar Burning Velocity and Flame Stability of Premixed Methane/Ethylene/Air Flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈珊珊; 蒋勇; 邱榕; 安江涛

    2012-01-01

    A numerical study on premixed methane/ethylene/air flames with various ethylene fractions and equivalence ratios was conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The effects of ethylene addition on laminar burning velocity, flame structure and flame stability under the condition of lean burning were investigated. The results show that the laminar burning velocity increases with ethylene fraction, especially at a large equivalence ratio. More ethylene addition gives rise to higher concentrations of H, O and OH radicals in the flame, which significantly promotes chemical reactions, and a linear correlation exists between the laminar burning velocity and the maximum H + OH concentration in the reaction zone. With the increase of ethylene fraction, the adiabatic flame temperature is raised, while the inner layer temperature becomes lower, contributing to the enhancement of combustion. Markstein length and Markstein number, representative of the flame stability, increase as more ethylene is added, indicating the tendency of flame stability to improve with ethylene addition.

  15. Microstructure of premixed propane/air flame in the transition from laminar to turbulent combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN XianFeng; SUN JinHua; LIU Yi; LIU XuanYa; CHEN SiNing; LU ShouXiang

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore the flame structure and propagation behavior of premixed propane/air in the transition from laminar to turbulent combustion, the high speed camera and Schlieren images methods were used to record the photograph of flame propagation process in a semi-vented pipe. Meanwhile, the super-thin thermocouple and ionization current probe methods were applied to detect the temperature distribution and reaction intensity of combustion reaction. The characteristics of propane/air flame propagation and microstructure were analyzed in detail by the experimental results coupled with chemical reaction thermodynamics. In the test, the particular tulip flame behavior and the formation process in the laminar-turbulent transition were disclosed clearly. From the Schlieren images and iron current results, one conclusion can be drawn that the small-scale turbulent combustion also appeared in laminar flame, which made little influence on the flame shape, but increased the flame thickness obviously.

  16. Stabilization of premixed lean methane-air combustion using dielectric barrier discharge with low pollutant emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ryo; Ogura, Kazuaki; Mogi, Toshio

    2017-09-01

    Catalytic combustion is a promising technology to stabilize lean combustion with low pollutant emissions. Catalytic combustion has been applied to gas turbine combustors; however, some drawbacks of this technology remain to be addressed. In this work, a new concept is demonstrated to overcome the problems of catalytic combustion by using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) instead of a catalyst. A premixed lean methane-air mixture preheated to 400 °C with an equivalence ratio of 0.45 is flowed through the DBD reactor under atmospheric pressure. Almost complete combustion is achieved with a DBD power of 0.7% of the net calorific value of the mixture. The exhaust emissions are NO = 20 ppm, NO2 = 2 ppm, CO = 2 ppm, and HC \\cong 0 ppm. This work demonstrates that DBD-assisted combustion is a potential alternative to catalytic combustion.

  17. Identifying combustion intermediates in premixed MTBE/gasoline/oxygen flame probed via synchrotron radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Chunde; QI Fei; LI Jing; LI Qi; JI Qing; HUANG Chaoqun; WEI Lixia; WANG Jing; TIAN Zhenyu; LI Yuyang

    2007-01-01

    Molecular-beam sampling mass spectrometry (MBMS) combined with tunable synchrotron radiation photoionization technique offers obvious advantages for the study of flame chemistry over other techniques because of the precision measurement of the combustion intermediates and products in flame.In this paper,the results to identify combustion intermediates in low-pressure premixed gasoline/oxygen flame with the synchrotron radiation were reported.Based on the results obtained,the formation process of five products and the difference between gasoline/oxygen and MTBE/gasoline/oxygen flame were emphatically analyzed.The results achieved provide data basis for the analysis of intermediates and radicals in flame,and are helpful to establish the kinetic modeling of gasoline/oxygen and MTBE/gasoline/oxygen flames.

  18. Flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion: A direct numerical simulation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacks, Daniel H.; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Klein, Markus; Arias, Paul G.; Im, Hong G.

    2016-12-01

    The distributions of flow topologies within the flames representing the corrugated flamelets, thin reaction zones, and broken reaction zone regimes of premixed turbulent combustion are investigated using direct numerical simulation data of statistically planar turbulent H2-air flames with an equivalence ratio ϕ =0.7 . It was found that the diminishing influence of dilatation rate with increasing Karlovitz number has significant influences on the statistical behaviors of the first, second, and third invariants (i.e., P ,Q , and R ) of the velocity gradient tensor. These differences are reflected in the distributions of the flow topologies within the flames considered in this analysis. This has important consequences for those topologies that make dominant contributions to the scalar-turbulence interaction and vortex-stretching terms in the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport equations, respectively. Detailed physical explanations are provided for the observed regime dependences of the flow topologies and their implications on the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport.

  19. Explosive Combustion of a Neutron Star into a Quark Star: the non-premixed scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Ouyed, Rachid; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2013-01-01

    We review aspects of the hydrodynamical combustion of nuclear matter to strange quark matter in a neutron star. Numerical studies on non-premixed combustion that consistently include hydrodynamical flows in a reactive-diffusive setup show that in 1D, the conversion (burning) front moves at sub-sonic speeds and stops short of converting the entire star to SQM, essentially due to advective forces. However, in the process, we also find that neutrino cooling of the interface causes it to wrinkle, laying a platform for a deflagrative-to-detonative transition (DDT). We outline progress on improvements in the burning code (Burn-UD: http://quarknova.ucalgary.ca/software/Burn-UD/) that will ultimately reveal the mechanism that can explode the outermost layers of even a dense compact object like a neutron star.

  20. LES-Modeling of a Partially Premixed Flame using a Deconvolution Turbulence Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Wu, Hao; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    The modeling of the turbulence/chemistry interaction in partially premixed and multi-stream combustion remains an outstanding issue. By extending a recently developed constrained minimum mean-square error deconvolution (CMMSED) method, to objective of this work is to develop a source-term closure for turbulent multi-stream combustion. In this method, the chemical source term is obtained from a three-stream flamelet model, and CMMSED is used as closure model, thereby eliminating the need for presumed PDF-modeling. The model is applied to LES of a piloted turbulent jet flame with inhomogeneous inlets, and simulation results are compared with experiments. Comparisons with presumed PDF-methods are performed, and issues regarding resolution and conservation of the CMMSED method are examined. The author would like to acknowledge the support of funding from Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  1. Effect of fuel type on equivalence ratio measurements using chemiluminescence in premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orain, Mikaël; Hardalupas, Yannis

    2010-05-01

    Local temporally-resolved measurements of chemiluminescent intensity from OH ∗, CH ∗ and C ∗2 radicals were obtained in premixed counterflow flames operating with propane and prevaporised fuels (isooctane, ethanol and methanol), for different equivalence ratios and strain rates. The results quantified independently the effects of fuel type, strain rate and equivalence ratio on chemiluminescent emissions from flames. The ability of chemiluminescent intensity from OH ∗, CH ∗ and C ∗2 radicals to indicate heat release rate depends strongly on fuel type. The intensity ratio OH ∗/CH ∗ has a monotonic decrease with equivalence ratio for all fuels and can be used to measure equivalence ratio of the reacting mixture. For propane and isooctane, the OH ∗/CH ∗ ratio remains independent of flame strain rate, whereas some dependence is observed for ethanol and methanol.

  2. Flowfield characterization of a piloted lean premixed injector by particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdanier, Catherine G. P.

    Limiting atmospheric pollution, especially nitrous oxides, is an important endeavor for aviation technology companies. Technology-driving regulations from the International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Committee of Aviation Environmental Protection (CAEP) standards spur the combustion research and development community to find innovative engine technologies to decrease emissions in the coming years. As engine technologies are developed, testing is necessary to verify combustion models and expected flow patterns. Optical diagnostics provide a unique opportunity to visualize flowfields in complex practical combustor systems. For this thesis, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed to characterize the flowfield in a piloted lean premixed injector under non-combusting conditions. Planes of PIV data were acquired at five spanwise locations and two streamwise locations, at two different pressure conditions in order to characterize the flowfields and structures throughout the optically accessible flowpath. Average velocity maps and time-resolved vector fields at these planes were analyzed for this thesis.

  3. An experimental investigation of the interaction between a Karman vortex street and a premixed laminar flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namer, I.

    1980-12-01

    The interaction of a premixed C2H4-air flame with a Karman vortex street was studied. Laser Doppler anemometry was used for velocity measurements and Rayleigh scattering was used to measure total gas density. A reference hot wire was used to enable phase-locked ensemble averaging to be performed on the data. The velocity measurements for vortex shedding cylinder Reynolds numbers indicated that the vortex street and, hence, the flow field upstream of the flame is deflected by the flame. This is due to the pressure drop across the flame which is necessary to accelerate the flow behind the flame. The vortices were not observed behind the flame. The combination of dilation and increased dissipation consumed the vortices. Density statistics obtained from Rayleigh scattering measurements were compared with predictions by the Bray-Moss-Libby (B-M-L) model which neglects intermediate states. Density fluctuations were overpredicted by the B-M-L model by a small amount.

  4. Dynamics of premixed flames in a narrow channel with a step-wise wall temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurdyumov, Vadim N. [Department of Energy, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pizza, Gianmarco [Aerothermochemistry and Combustion Systems Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich CH-8092 (Switzerland); Combustion Research, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen CH-5232 (Switzerland); Frouzakis, Christos E. [Aerothermochemistry and Combustion Systems Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich CH-8092 (Switzerland); Mantzaras, John [Combustion Research, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen CH-5232 (Switzerland)

    2009-11-15

    The effect of channel height, inflow velocity and wall temperature on the dynamics and stability of unity Lewis number premixed flames in channels with specified wall temperature is investigated with steady and transient numerical simulations using a two-dimensional thermo-diffusive model. The simplified model is capable of capturing many of the transitions and the combustion modes observed experimentally and in direct numerical simulations in micro- and meso-scale channels, and indicates that the thermal flame/wall interaction is the mechanism leading to the observed flame instabilities. Finally, an ad-hoc one-dimensional model based on the flame-sheet approximation is tested in its capacity to reproduce some of the flame dynamics of the two-dimensional thermo-diffusive model. (author)

  5. Emissions measurements for a lean premixed propane/air system at pressures up to 30 atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffe, G.

    1979-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted in which the emissions of a lean premixed system of propane and air were measured at pressures of 5, 10, 20 and 30 atm in a flametube apparatus. Measurements were made for inlet temperatures between 600K and 1000K and combustor residence times from 1.0 to 3.0 msec. A schematic of the test rig is presented along with graphs showing emissions measurements for nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and UHC as functions of bustor residence time for various equivalence ratios, entrance temperatures and pressures; typical behavior of emissions as a function of equivalence ratio for a fixed residence time. Correlations of nitric oxide emission index with adiabatic flame temperature for a fixed residence time of 2 msec and pressures from 5 to 30 atm; and adiabatic flame temperature corresponding to CO breakpoint conditions for 2 msec residence time as a function of inlet temperature.

  6. Identification of oxygenated ions in premixed flames of dimethyl ether and oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig Østergaard, L.; Egsgaard, H.; Hammerum, S.

    2003-01-01

    dimethyl ether, (CH3)(2)OH+. The flame-ion m/z 61 is a mixture of the trimethyloxonium ion, (CH3)(3)O+ and lesser amounts of protonated methyl formate and/or protonated ethyl methyl ether. The viability of an ionic mechanism to soot formation for dimethyl ether-oxygen flames is discussed on the background......The structure of characteristic flame-ions in premixed flames of dimethyl ether and oxygen was studied by ion-molecule reactions with ammonia and collision activation with argon. The results obtained show that the flame-ions m/z 45 and m/z 47 are the methoxymethyl cation, CH3OCH2+, and protonated...... of ions present in the dimethyl ether flames and the reactivity of the ions....

  7. Flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion: A direct numerical simulation analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Wacks, Daniel H.

    2016-12-02

    The distributions of flow topologies within the flames representing the corrugated flamelets, thin reaction zones, and broken reaction zone regimes of premixed turbulent combustion are investigated using direct numerical simulation data of statistically planar turbulent H-2-air flames with an equivalence ratio phi = 0.7. It was found that the diminishing influence of dilatation rate with increasing Karlovitz number has significant influences on the statistical behaviors of the first, second, and third invariants (i.e., P, Q, and R) of the velocity gradient tensor. These differences are reflected in the distributions of the flow topologies within the flames considered in this analysis. This has important consequences for those topologies that make dominant contributions to the scalar-turbulence interaction and vortex-stretching terms in the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport equations, respectively. Detailed physical explanations are provided for the observed regime dependences of the flow topologies and their implications on the scalar dissipation rate and enstrophy transport.

  8. Electron impact phenomena and the properties of gaseous ions

    CERN Document Server

    Field, F H; Massey, H S W; Brueckner, Keith A

    1970-01-01

    Electron Impact Phenomena and the Properties of Gaseous Ions, Revised Edition deals with data pertaining to electron impact and to molecular gaseous ionic phenomena. This book discusses electron impact phenomena in gases at low pressure that involve low-energy electrons, which result in ion formation. The text also describes the use of mass spectrometers in electron impact studies and the degree of accuracy obtained when measuring electron impact energies. This book also reviews relatively low speed electrons and the transitions that result in the ionization of the atomic system. This text the

  9. Cyclic Combustion Variations in Dual Fuel Partially Premixed Pilot-Ignited Natural Gas Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, K. K. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Krishnan, S. R. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Qi, Y. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

    2012-05-09

    Dual fuel pilot ignited natural gas engines are identified as an efficient and viable alternative to conventional diesel engines. This paper examines cyclic combustion fluctuations in conventional dual fuel and in dual fuel partially premixed low temperature combustion (LTC). Conventional dual fueling with 95% (energy basis) natural gas (NG) substitution reduces NOx emissions by almost 90%t relative to straight diesel operation; however, this is accompanied by 98% increase in HC emissions, 10 percentage points reduction in fuel conversion efficiency (FCE) and 12 percentage points increase in COVimep. Dual fuel LTC is achieved by injection of a small amount of diesel fuel (2-3 percent on an energy basis) to ignite a premixed natural gas₋air mixture to attain very low NOx emissions (less than 0.2 g/kWh). Cyclic variations in both combustion modes were analyzed by observing the cyclic fluctuations in start of combustion (SOC), peak cylinder pressures (Pmax), combustion phasing (Ca50), and the separation between the diesel injection event and Ca50 (termed "relative combustion phasing" ). For conventional dual fueling, as % NG increases, Pmax decreases, SOC and Ca50 are delayed, and cyclic variations increase. For dual fuel LTC, as diesel injection timing is advanced from 20° to 60° BTDC, the relative combustion phasing is identified as an important combustion parameter along with SoC, Pmax, and CaPmax. For both combustion modes, cyclic variations were characterized by alternating slow and fast burn cycles, especially at high %NG and advanced injection timings. Finally, heat release return maps were analyzed to demonstrate thermal management strategies as an effective tool to mitigate cyclic combustion variations, especially in dual fuel LTC.

  10. Study and modeling of finite rate chemistry effects in turbulent non-premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervisch, Luc

    1993-01-01

    The development of numerical models that reflect some of the most important features of turbulent reacting flows requires information about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between turbulent and chemical processes is so strong that it is extremely difficult to isolate the role played by one individual physical phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (hereafter DNS) allows us to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interaction in some restricted but completely defined situations. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting regimes: the fast chemistry case, where the turbulent flame can be pictured as a random distribution of local chemical equilibrium problems; and the slow chemistry case, where the chemistry integrates in time the turbulent fluctuations. The Damkoehler number, ratio of a mechanical time scale to chemical time scale, is used to distinguish between these regimes. Today most of the industrial computer codes are able to perform predictions in the hypothesis of local equilibrium chemistry using a presumed shape for the probability density function (pdt) of the conserved scalar. However, the finite rate chemistry situation is of great interest because industrial burners usually generate regimes in which, at some points, the flame is undergoing local extinction or at least non-equilibrium situations. Moreover, this variety of situations strongly influences the production of pollutants. To quantify finite rate chemistry effect, the interaction between a non-premixed flame and a free decaying turbulence is studied using DNS. The attention is focused on the dynamic of extinction, and an attempt is made to quantify the effect of the reaction on the small scale mixing process. The unequal diffusivity effect is also addressed. Finally, a simple turbulent combustion model based on the DNS observations and tractable in real flow configurations is proposed.

  11. The i-V curve characteristics of burner-stabilized premixed flames: detailed and reduced models

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jie

    2016-07-17

    The i-V curve describes the current drawn from a flame as a function of the voltage difference applied across the reaction zone. Since combustion diagnostics and flame control strategies based on electric fields depend on the amount of current drawn from flames, there is significant interest in modeling and understanding i-V curves. We implement and apply a detailed model for the simulation of the production and transport of ions and electrons in one-dimensional premixed flames. An analytical reduced model is developed based on the detailed one, and analytical expressions are used to gain insight into the characteristics of the i-Vcurve for various flame configurations. In order for the reduced model to capture the spatial distribution of the electric field accurately, the concept of a dead zone region, where voltage is constant, is introduced, and a suitable closure for the spatial extent of the dead zone is proposed and validated. The results from the reduced modeling framework are found to be in good agreement with those from the detailed simulations. The saturation voltage is found to depend significantly on the flame location relative to the electrodes, and on the sign of the voltage difference applied. Furthermore, at sub-saturation conditions, the current is shown to increase linearly or quadratically with the applied voltage, depending on the flame location. These limiting behaviors exhibited by the reduced model elucidate the features of i-V curves observed experimentally. The reduced model relies on the existence of a thin layer where charges are produced, corresponding to the reaction zone of a flame. Consequently, the analytical model we propose is not limited to the study of premixed flames, and may be applied easily to others configurations, e.g.~nonpremixed counterflow flames.

  12. Chemiluminescence-based multivariate sensing of local equivalence ratios in premixed atmospheric methane-air flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, Markandey M.; Krishnan, Sundar R.; Srinivasan, Kalyan K.; Yueh, Fang-Yu; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2011-09-07

    Chemiluminescence emissions from OH*, CH*, C2, and CO2 formed within the reaction zone of premixed flames depend upon the fuel-air equivalence ratio in the burning mixture. In the present paper, a new partial least square regression (PLS-R) based multivariate sensing methodology is investigated and compared with an OH*/CH* intensity ratio-based calibration model for sensing equivalence ratio in atmospheric methane-air premixed flames. Five replications of spectral data at nine different equivalence ratios ranging from 0.73 to 1.48 were used in the calibration of both models. During model development, the PLS-R model was initially validated with the calibration data set using the leave-one-out cross validation technique. Since the PLS-R model used the entire raw spectral intensities, it did not need the nonlinear background subtraction of CO2 emission that is required for typical OH*/CH* intensity ratio calibrations. An unbiased spectral data set (not used in the PLS-R model development), for 28 different equivalence ratio conditions ranging from 0.71 to 1.67, was used to predict equivalence ratios using the PLS-R and the intensity ratio calibration models. It was found that the equivalence ratios predicted with the PLS-R based multivariate calibration model matched the experimentally measured equivalence ratios within 7%; whereas, the OH*/CH* intensity ratio calibration grossly underpredicted equivalence ratios in comparison to measured equivalence ratios, especially under rich conditions ( > 1.2). The practical implications of the chemiluminescence-based multivariate equivalence ratio sensing methodology are also discussed.

  13. Flame kernel generation and propagation in turbulent partially premixed hydrocarbon jet

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Mohy S.

    2014-04-23

    Flame development, propagation, stability, combustion efficiency, pollution formation, and overall system efficiency are affected by the early stage of flame generation defined as flame kernel. Studying the effects of turbulence and chemistry on the flame kernel propagation is the main aim of this work for natural gas (NG) and liquid petroleum gas (LPG). In addition the minimum ignition laser energy (MILE) has been investigated for both fuels. Moreover, the flame stability maps for both fuels are also investigated and analyzed. The flame kernels are generated using Nd:YAG pulsed laser and propagated in a partially premixed turbulent jet. The flow field is measured using 2-D PIV technique. Five cases have been selected for each fuel covering different values of Reynolds number within a range of 6100-14400, at a mean equivalence ratio of 2 and a certain level of partial premixing. The MILE increases by increasing the equivalence ratio. Near stoichiometric the energy density is independent on the jet velocity while in rich conditions it increases by increasing the jet velocity. The stability curves show four distinct regions as lifted, attached, blowout, and a fourth region either an attached flame if ignition occurs near the nozzle or lifted if ignition occurs downstream. LPG flames are more stable than NG flames. This is consistent with the higher values of the laminar flame speed of LPG. The flame kernel propagation speed is affected by both turbulence and chemistry. However, at low turbulence level chemistry effects are more pronounced while at high turbulence level the turbulence becomes dominant. LPG flame kernels propagate faster than those for NG flame. In addition, flame kernel extinguished faster in LPG fuel as compared to NG fuel. The propagation speed is likely to be consistent with the local mean equivalence ratio and its corresponding laminar flame speed. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  14. Combustion characteristics of pulverized coal and air/gas premixed flame in a double swirl combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, M.M. [Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt). Faculty of Education

    2009-07-01

    An experimental work was performed to investigate the co-firing of pulverized coal and premixed gas/air streams in a double swirl combustor. The results showed that the NOx emissions are affected by the relative rates of thermal NOx formation and destruction via the pyrolysis of the fuel-N species in high temperature fuel-rich zones. Various burner designs were tested in order to vary the temperature history and the residence time across both coal and gas flames inside the furnace. It was found that by injecting the coal with a gas/air mixture as a combined central jet surrounded by a swirled air stream, a double flame envelope develops with high temperature fuel-rich conditions in between the two reaction zones such that the pyrolysis reactions to N{sub 2} are accelerated. A further reduction in the minimum NOx emissions, as well as in the minimum CO concentrations, was reported for the case where the coal particles are fed with the gas/air mixture in the region between the two swirled air streams. On the other hand, allocating the gas/air mixture around the swirled air-coal combustion zone provides an earlier contact with air and retards the NOx reduction mechanism in such a way that the elevated temperatures around the coal particles allow higher overall NOx emissions. The downstream impingement of opposing air jets was found more efficient than the impinging of particle non-laden premixed flames for effective NOx reduction. In both cases, there is an upstream flow from the stagnation region to the coal primary combustion region, but with the case of air impingement, the hot fuel-rich zone develops earlier. The optimum configuration was found by impinging all jets of air and coal-gas/air mixtures that pronounced minimum NOx and CO concentrations of 310 and 480ppm, respectively.

  15. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Ethylene/Air Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot formation was studied within laminar premixed ethylene/air flames (C/O ratios of 0.78-0.98) stabilized on a flat-flame burner operating at atmospheric pressure. Measurements included soot volume fractions by both laser extinction and gravimetric methods, temperatures by multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscopy, major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of condensable hydrocarbons by gravimetric sampling. and velocities by laser velocimetry. These data were used to find soot surface growth rates and primary soot particle nucleation rates along the axes of the flames. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates were correlated successfully by predictions based on typical hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall. These results suavest that reduced soot surface growth rates with increasing residence time seen in the present and other similar flames were mainly caused by reduced rates of surface activation due to reduced H atom concentrations as temperatures decrease as a result of radiative heat losses. Primary soot particle nucleation rates exhibited variations with temperature and acetylene concentrations that were similar to recent observations for diffusion flames; however, nucleation rates in the premixed flames were significantly lower than in, the diffusion flames for reasons that still must be explained. Finally, predictions of yields of major gas species based on mechanisms from both Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt were in good agreement with present measurements and suggest that H atom concentrations (relevant to HACA mechanisms) approximate estimates based on local thermodynamic equilibrium in the present flames.

  16. Rayleigh/Raman/LIF measurements in a turbulent lean premixed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandula, S.P.; Pitz, R.W. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Barlow, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Much of the industrial electrical generation capability being added worldwide is gas-turbine engine based and is fueled by natural gas. These gas-turbine engines use lean premixed (LP) combustion to meet the strict NO{sub x} emission standards, while maintaining acceptable levels of CO. In conventional, diffusion flame gas turbine combustors, large amount of NO{sub x} forms in the hot stoichiometric zones via the Zeldovich (thermal) mechanism. Hence, lean premixed combustors are rapidly becoming the norm, since they are specifically designed to avoid these hot stoichiometric zones and the associated thermal NO, However, considerable research and development are still required to reduce the NO{sub x} levels (25-40 ppmvd adjusted to 15% O{sub 2} with the current technology), to the projected goal of under 10 ppmvd by the turn of the century. Achieving this objective would require extensive experiments in LP natural gas (or CH{sub 4}) flames for understanding the combustion phenomena underlying the formation of the exhaust pollutants. Although LP combustion is an effective way to control NO{sub x}, the downside is that it increases the CO emissions. The formation and destruction of the pollutants (NO{sub x} and CO) are strongly affected by the fluid mechanics, the finite-rate chemistry, and their (turbulence-chemistry) interactions. Hence, a thorough understanding of these interactions is vital for controlling and reducing the pollutant emissions. The present research is contributing to this goal by providing a detailed nonintrusive laser based data set with good spatial and temporal resolutions of the pollutants (NO and CO) along with the major species, temperature, and OH. The measurements reported in this work, along with the existing velocity data on a turbulent LP combustor burning CH{sub 4}, would provide insight into the turbulence-chemistry interactions and their effect on pollutant formation.

  17. Enhancement of gaseous iodine emission by aqueous ferrous ions during the heterogeneous reaction of gaseous ozone with aqueous iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Yosuke; Enami, Shinichi; Tonokura, Kenichi

    2013-04-11

    Gaseous I2 formation from the heterogeneous reaction of gaseous ozone with aqueous iodide in the presence of aqueous ferrous ion (Fe(2+)) was investigated by electron impact ionization mass spectrometry. Emission of gaseous I2 increased as a function of the aqueous FeCl2 concentration, and the maximum I2 formation with Fe(2+) was about 10 times more than without Fe(2+). This enhancement can be explained by the OH(-) scavenging by Fe(3+) formed from Fe(2+) ozonation to produce colloidal Fe(OH)3. This mechanism was confirmed by measurements of aqueous phase products using a UV-vis spectrometer and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer. We infer that such a pH-buffering effect may play the key role in general halogen activations.

  18. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence of tris(2,2' bipyridine)ruthenium(II) using common biological buffers as co-reactant, pH buffer and supporting electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Noah; Francis, Paul S; Barbante, Gregory J; Hogan, Conor F

    2015-11-07

    A series of aliphatic tertiary amines (HEPES, POPSO, EPPS and BIS-TRIS) commonly used to buffer the pH in biological experiments, were examined as alternative, non-toxic co-reactants for the electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(ii) ([Ru(bpy)3](2+)). These were found to be very attractive as "multi-tasking" reagents, serving not only as co-reactants, but also fulfiling the roles of pH buffer and supporting electrolyte within an aqueous environment; thus significantly simplifying the overall ECL analysis. Sub-nanomolar detection limits were obtained for [Ru(bpy)3](2+) in the presence of BIS-TRIS, making this species an valuable option for co-reactant ECL-based bioanalytical applications.

  19. Heterogeneous Photocatalytic Degradation Kinetic of Gaseous Ammonia Over Nano-TiO2 Supported on Latex Paint Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI-JIN GENG; XI-KUI WANG; SHAN-FANG TANG

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the photoeatalytic degradation of gaseous ammonia in static state by using nano-TiO2 as photocatalyst supported on latex paint film under UV-irradiation.Methods Experiments were conducted to study the relationship between the initial concentration of ammonia and the degradation products competing to be adsorbed on catalyst surface.Degradation of ammonia and its products were detected by spectrophotometry and catalytic kinetic spectrophotometry,respectively.Results On the one hand,TiO2 catalyst was excellent for degradation of ammonia,and the crystal phase of TiO2,anatase or rutile,had little effect on degradation of ammonia,but the conversion of ammonia grew with the increase of catalyst content.On the other hand,apparent rate constant and conversion of anmaoma decreased with the increase of initial concentration of ammonia,and the photocatalytic degradation reaction followed a pseudo-first-order expression due to the evidence of linear correlation between-lnC/Co vs.irradiation time t, but the relationship between initial concentration and the degradation products Was not linear in low initial concentration.Conclusion Whether the photocatalytic degradation of ammonia in static state follows a first-order reaction depends on the initial ammonia concentration due to competition in adsorption between reactant and the degradation products.

  20. A Gaseous Compton Camera using a 2D-sensitive gaseous photomultiplier for Nuclear Medical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, C.D.R., E-mail: cdazevedo@ua.pt; Pereira, F.A.; Lopes, T.; Correia, P.M.M.; Silva, A.L.M.; Carramate, L.F.N.D.; Covita, D.S.; Veloso, J.F.C.A.

    2013-12-21

    A new Compton Camera (CC) concept based on a High Pressure Scintillation Chamber coupled to a position-sensitive Gaseous PhotoMultiplier for Nuclear Medical Imaging applications is proposed. The main goal of this work is to describe the development of a ϕ25×12cm{sup 3} cylindrical prototype, which will be suitable for scintimammography and for small-animal imaging applications. The possibility to scale it to an useful human size device is also in study. The idea is to develop a device capable to compete with the standard Anger Camera. Despite the large success of the Anger Camera, it still presents some limitations, such as: low position resolution and fair energy resolutions for 140 keV. The CC arises a different solution as it provides information about the incoming photon direction, avoiding the use of a collimator, which is responsible for a huge reduction (10{sup −4}) of the sensitivity. The main problem of the CC's is related with the Doppler Broadening which is responsible for the loss of angular resolution. In this work, calculations for the Doppler Broadening in Xe, Ar, Ne and their mixtures are presented. Simulations of the detector performance together with discussion about the gas choice are also included.

  1. The Effect of Premixed Al-Cu Powder on the Stir Zone in Friction Stir Welding of AA3003-H18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abnar, B.; Kazeminezhad, M.; Kokabi, A. H.

    2015-02-01

    In this research, 3-mm-thick AA3003-H18 non-heat-treatable aluminum alloy plates were joined by friction stir welding (FSW). It was performed by adding pure Cu and premixed Cu-Al powders at various rotational speeds of 800, 1000, and 1200 rpm and constant traveling speeds of 100 mm/min. At first, the powder was filled into the gap (0.2 or 0.4 mm) between two aluminum alloy plates, and then the FSW process was performed in two passes. The microstructure, mechanical properties, and formation of intermetallic compounds were investigated in both cases of using pure Cu and premixed Al-Cu powders. The results of using pure Cu and premixed Al-Cu powders were compared in the stir zone at various rotational speeds. The copper particle distribution and formation of Al-Cu intermetallic compounds (Al2Cu and AlCu) in the stir zone were desirable using premixed Al-Cu powder into the gap. The hardness values were significantly increased by formation of Al-Cu intermetallic compounds in the stir zone and it was uniform throughout the stir zone when premixed Al-Cu powder was used. Also, longitudinal tensile strength from the stir zone was higher when premixed Al-Cu powder was used instead of pure Cu powder.

  2. Investigation of the effects of quarl and initial conditions on swirling non-premixed methane flames: Flow field, temperature, and species distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2015-12-19

    Detailed measurements are presented of the turbulent flow field, gas species concentrations and temperature field in a non-premixed methane swirl flame. Attention is given to the effect of the quarl geometry on the flame structure and emission characteristics due to its importance in gas turbine and industrial burner applications. Two different quarls were fitted to the burner exit, one a straight quarl and the other a diverging quarl of 15° half cone angle. Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) was applied to obtain the three components of the instantaneous velocity on a vertical plane immediately downstream of the quarl exit. Temperature and gaseous species measurements were made both inside and downstream of the quarls, using a fine wire thermocouple and sampling probe, respectively. This work provides experimental verification by complementary techniques. The results showed that although the main flame structures were governed by the swirl motion imparted to the air stream, the quarl geometry, fuel loading and air loading also had a significant effect on the flow pattern, turbulence intensity, mixture formation, temperature distribution, emissions and flame stabilization. Particularly, in the case of the straight quarl flame, the flow pattern leads to strong, rapid mixing and reduces the residence time for NO formation within the internal recirculation zone (IRZ). However, for the diverging quarl flames, the recirculation zone is shifted radially outward, and the turbulent interaction between the central fuel jet and the internal recirculation zone IRZ induces another small vortex between these two flow features. Less mixing near the diverging quarl exit is observed, with a higher concentration of NO and CO in the post-combustion zone. The instantaneous flow field for both flames showed the existence of small scale vortical structure near the shear layers which were not apparent in the time averaged flow field. These structures, along with high levels

  3. Use of periodic variations of reactant concentrations in time resolved ftir studies of CO oxidation on Pd/ZrO{sub 2} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortelli, E.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Sine wave modulation of feed concentrations was used to induce dynamic variations in the concentrations of products, intermediates and reactants, which were monitored in a diffuse reflectance FTIR (DRIFT) cell. The phase shift {Delta}{phi} between the external perturbation of the feed and the signals of products, intermediates and reactants was examined in dependence on the modulation frequency {omega}. Reaction constants of a simplified model mechanism were estimated for a Pd{sub 25}Zr{sub 75} based catalyst for CO oxidation. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  4. Nuclear waste disposal utilizing a gaseous core reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternoster, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a gaseous core nuclear reactor designed to produce power to also reduce the national inventories of long-lived reactor waste products through nuclear transmutation was examined. Neutron-induced transmutation of radioactive wastes is shown to be an effective means of shortening the apparent half life.

  5. Test of potential homogeneity in the KATRIN gaseous tritium source

    CERN Document Server

    Rysavy, M

    2005-01-01

    83mKr is supposed to be used to study the properties of the windowless gaseous tritium source of the experiment KATRIN. In this work we deduce the amount of 83mKr which is necessary to determine possible potential inhomogeneities via conversion-electron-line broadening.

  6. Relationship between epiphytic lichens, trace elements and gaseous atmospheric pollutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobben, van H.F.; Wamelink, G.W.W.; Braak, ter C.J.F.

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the joint effect of gaseous atmospheric pollutants and trace elements on epiphytic lichens. We used our data to test the hypothesis that lichens are generally insensitive to toxic effects of trace elements, and can therefore be used as accumulator organisms to esti

  7. Oxidation of gaseous hydrocarbons by alkene-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Gaseous alkenes are widespread in the environment due to the emission of these hydrocarbons by industry and due to their production from natural sources as for instance ethene by plants, fungi and bacteria. Micro-organisms have developed the potential to oxidize these hydrocarbons. Alkenes

  8. Oxidation of gaseous hydrocarbons by alkene-utilizing bacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Gaseous alkenes are widespread in the environment due to the emission of these hydrocarbons by industry and due to their production from natural sources as for instance ethene by plants, fungi and bacteria. Micro-organisms have developed the potential to oxidize these hydrocarbons. Alkenes can eithe

  9. Chapter 4 Gaseous Elemental Mercury in the Ambient Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariya, Parisa A.; Skov, Henrik; Grage, Mette M L

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the kinetics and mechanisms associated with the atmospheric chemistry of mercury is of great importance to protecting the environment. This review will focus on theoretical calculations to advance understanding of gas phase oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) by halogen spe...

  10. Relationship between epiphytic lichens, trace elements and gaseous atmospheric pollutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobben, van H.F.; Wamelink, G.W.W.; Braak, ter C.J.F.

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the joint effect of gaseous atmospheric pollutants and trace elements on epiphytic lichens. We used our data to test the hypothesis that lichens are generally insensitive to toxic effects of trace elements, and can therefore be used as accumulator organisms to esti

  11. Low temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present contribtion gives an overview of some of the technological aspects of low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel. Examples of low temperature gaseous nitriding, carburising and nitrocarburising of stainless steel are presented and discussed. In particular......, the morphology, microstructure and characteristics of so-called expanded austenite "layers" on stainless steel are addressed....

  12. Low temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The present contribution gives an overview of some of the technological aspects of low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel. Examples of low temperature gaseous nitriding, carburising and nitrocarburising of stainless steel are presented and discussed. In particular......, the morphology, microstructure and characteristics of so-called expanite “layers” on stainless steel are addressed....

  13. Inhalation gases or gaseous mediators as neuroprotectants for cerebral ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Brad A; Harrison, Joanne C; Nair, Shiva M; Sammut, Ivan A

    2013-01-01

    Ischaemic stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While recombinant tissue plasminogen activator can be administered to produce thrombolysis and restore blood flow to the ischaemic brain, therapeutic benefit is only achieved in a fraction of the subset of patients eligible for fibrinolytic intervention. Neuroprotective therapies attempting to restrict the extent of brain injury following cerebral ischaemia have not been successfully translated into the clinic despite overwhelming pre-clinical evidence of neuroprotection. Therefore, an adequate treatment for the majority of acute ischaemic stroke patients remains elusive. In the stroke literature, the use of therapeutic gases has received relatively little attention. Gases such as hyperbaric and normobaric oxygen, xenon, hydrogen, helium and argon all possess biological effects that have shown to be neuroprotective in pre-clinical models of ischaemic stroke. There are significant advantages to using gases including their relative abundance, low cost and feasibility for administration, all of which make them ideal candidates for a translational therapy for stroke. In addition, modulating cellular gaseous mediators including nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulphide may be an attractive option for ischaemic stroke therapy. Inhalation of these gaseous mediators can also produce neuroprotection, but this strategy remains to be confirmed as a viable therapy for ischaemic stroke. This review highlights the neuroprotective potential of therapeutic gas therapy and modulation of gaseous mediators for ischaemic stroke. The therapeutic advantages of gaseous therapy offer new promising directions in breaking the translational barrier for ischaemic stroke.

  14. Simulation study of silicon and gaseous tracking detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Beaumont, W; De Lentdecker, G; Devroede, O; Doninck, W V; Dyck, C V; Udo, Fred; Van Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Verbeure, F; Zhukov, V

    2002-01-01

    The performance of microstrip gaseous counters (MSGC, MSGC + GEM) and silicon microstrip sensors has been studied in view of their use in high luminosity tracking applications. Simulations of signal development in the detectors and subsequent signal treatment in the readout electronics were performed. The simulation results are compared with experimental data obtained in test beams.

  15. Impact of gaseous nitrogen deposition on plant functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulen, I.; Perez-Soba, M; De Kok, LJ; Van der Eerden, L

    1998-01-01

    Dry deposition of NH3 and NOx (NO and NO2) can affect plant metabolism at the cellular and whole-plant level. Gaseous pollutants enter the plant mainly through the stomata, and once in the apoplast NH3 dissolves to form NH4+, whereas NO2 dissolves to form NO3- and NO2-. The latter compound can also

  16. Methods for deacidizing gaseous mixtures by phase enhanced absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang

    2012-11-27

    An improved process for deacidizing a gaseous mixture using phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption is described. The process utilizes a multiphasic absorbent that absorbs an acid gas at increased rate and leads to reduced overall energy costs for the deacidizing operation.

  17. Charge amplitude distribution of the Gossip gaseous pixel detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco Carballo, V.M.; Chefdeville, M.A.; Colas, P.; Giomataris, Y.; van der Graaf, H.; Gromov, V.; Hartjes, F.; Kluit, R.; Koffeman, E.; Salm, Cora; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Smits, Sander M.; Timmermans, J.; Timmermans, J.; Visschers, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    The Gossip gaseous pixel detector is being developed for the detection of charged particles in extreme high radiation environments as foreseen close to the interaction point of the proposed super LHC. The detecting medium is a thin layer of gas. Because of the low density of this medium, only a few

  18. Analysis of Stability of a gaseous Muon Detector in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Maheshwari, Bhagesh

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this project is to analyze the stability of the Resistive Plate Chamber (RPCs) gaseous muon detectors based on the current drawn by the detector and eventually spots aging effects after 10 years from the construction of the chambers.

  19. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    Volume 1 is comprised of chapters on: background and description; environmental impacts of add-on gaseous diffusion plant; unavoidable adverse environmental effects; alternatives; relationship between short-term uses and long-term productivity; relationship of program to land-use plans, policies, and controls; irreversible and irretrievable commitments of resources; cost-benefit analysis; and response to comment letters. (LK)

  20. Thermodynamic and transport properties of gaseous tetrafluoromethane in chemical equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J. L.; Boney, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    Equations and in computer code are presented for the thermodynamic and transport properties of gaseous, undissociated tetrafluoromethane (CF4) in chemical equilibrium. The computer code calculates the thermodynamic and transport properties of CF4 when given any two of five thermodynamic variables (entropy, temperature, volume, pressure, and enthalpy). Equilibrium thermodynamic and transport property data are tabulated and pressure-enthalpy diagrams are presented.

  1. [The application of artificial protein premixes for nutritive support of patients with chronic renal insufficiency, being treated by perinateal dialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichugina, I S; Vetchinnikova, O N; Vereshchagina, V M; Gapparov, M M; Vatazin, A V

    2008-01-01

    As a result of a survey of 56 patients with chronic renal insufficiency, who undergone hemodialysis, it was established, that clinical condition of patients, biochemical and hematological blood indices as well as results of anthropometric research improve upon application of artificial balanced high-protein premixes -"Nutrinil" and "Nutrien-Nefro". Irrespective of way of administration - introperitoneal ("Nutrinil" solution) or enteral ("Nutrien-Nefro" mixture) protein-energetic insufficiency diminishes or totally disappears, body weight, fat and muscle content of the body weight, as well as indices of whole protein, albumine, lymphocytes, haemoglobin, pH approache the norm. Intraperitoneal way of administration of artificial protein premixes increase patients adherence to this procedure, though enteral way of their administration is more preferable from economic point of view.

  2. Characteristics and applications of small, portable gaseous air pollution monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKercher, Grant R; Salmond, Jennifer A; Vanos, Jennifer K

    2017-04-01

    Traditional approaches for measuring air quality based on fixed measurements are inadequate for personal exposure monitoring. To combat this issue, the use of small, portable gas-sensing air pollution monitoring technologies is increasing, with researchers and individuals employing portable and mobile methods to obtain more spatially and temporally representative air pollution data. However, many commercially available options are built for various applications and based on different technologies, assumptions, and limitations. A review of the monitor characteristics of small, gaseous monitors is missing from current scientific literature. A state-of-the-art review of small, portable monitors that measure ambient gaseous outdoor pollutants was developed to address broad trends during the last 5-10 years, and to help future experimenters interested in studying gaseous air pollutants choose monitors appropriate for their application and sampling needs. Trends in small, portable gaseous air pollution monitor uses and technologies were first identified and discussed in a review of literature. Next, searches of online databases were performed for articles containing specific information related to performance, characteristics, and use of such monitors that measure one or more of three criteria gaseous air pollutants: ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and carbon monoxide. All data were summarized into reference tables for comparison between applications, physical features, sensing capabilities, and costs of the devices. Recent portable monitoring trends are strongly related to associated applications and audiences. Fundamental research requires monitors with the best individual performance, and thus the highest cost technology. Monitor networking favors real-time capabilities and moderate cost for greater reproduction. Citizen science and crowdsourcing applications allow for lower-cost components; however important strengths and limitations for each application must be addressed

  3. Effects of Non-Equilibrium Plasmas on Low-Pressure, Premixed Flames. Part 1: CH* Chemiluminescence, Temperature, and OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-15

    chemistry. Qualitative imaging of CH* chemiluminescence indicates that during plasma discharge, the luminous flame zone is shifted upstream towards...The same research group also has observed an increase in premixed methane/air flame blow-off velocities by more than a factor of two by the...resolution and rotational line-specific features . Due to the large number of test cases (see Table 2) and the desire for spatially-resolved

  4. Numerical simulation of nitrogen oxide formation in lean premixed turbulent H2/O2/N2 flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Marc S.; Bell, John B.; Gao, Xinfeng

    2011-01-01

    Lean premixed hydrogen flames are thermodiffusively unstable and burn in cellular structures. Within these cellular structures the flame is locally enriched by preferential diffusion of hydrogen, leading to local hotspots that burn more intensely than an idealized flat steady flame at comparable...... examination of the reaction chemistry in these unsteady flames shows that at richer conditions the predominant path taken to convert nitrogen gas to nitric oxide is via NNH. For leaner flames a path through nitrous oxide becomes increasingly important....

  5. Extractive probe/TDLAS measurements of acetylene in atmospheric-pressure fuel-rich premixed methane/air flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gersen, S.; Mokhov, A.V.; Levinsky, H.B. [Laboratory for High Temperature Gas Kinetics, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2005-11-01

    The profiles of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} mole fractions were measured in flat atmospheric-pressure rich-premixed methane/air flames using microprobe gas sampling followed by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), and compared the results with predictions of one-dimensional flame calculations. Acetylene concentrations are also determined by spontaneous Raman scattering to quantify possible uncertainties due to chemical reactions on the probe surface or acceleration of the combustion products into the probe.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Study of Jet Controlled Compression Ignition on Combustion Phasing Control in Diesel Premixed Compression Ignition Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to directly control the premixed combustion phasing, a Jet Controlled Compression Ignition (JCCI for diesel premixed compression ignition systems is investigated. Experiments were conducted on a single cylinder natural aspirated diesel engine without EGR at 3000 rpm. Numerical models were validated by load sweep experiments at fixed spark timing. Detailed combustion characteristics were analyzed based on the BMEP of 2.18 bar. The simulation results showed that the high temperature jets of reacting active radical species issued from the ignition chamber played an important role on the onset of combustion in the JCCI system. The combustion of diesel pre-mixtures was initiated rapidly by the combustion products issued from the ignition chamber. Moreover, the flame propagation was not obvious, similar to that in Pre-mixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI. Consequently, spark timing sweep experiments were conducted. The results showed a good linear relationship between spark timing in the ignition chamber and CA10 and CA50, which indicated the ability for direct combustion phasing control in diesel PCCI. The NOx and soot emissions gradually changed with the decrease of spark advance angle. The maximum reduction of NOx and soot were both over 90%, and HC and CO emissions were increased.

  7. The effect of stratification on premixed swirl-flame flashback by using porous center-body injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaslin, Andrew; Ranjan, Rakesh; Clemens, Noel

    2016-11-01

    Boundary layer flashback must be prevented in order to stably operate stationary gas turbines. One strategy to avoid flashback is to create equivalence-ratio stratification, such as by reducing the fuel/air ratio in the boundary layer below the flammability limit. Typically, stratification is achieved by using radially non-uniform fuel injection. The goal of the current study is to reduce the propensity of flashback in a premixed annular swirl combustor that uses a premix section with center-body. A porous metal center-body (10 micron pore size) is used to bleed air directly into the boundary layer and thus locally reduce the equivalence ratio. Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of anisole-seeded flow is carried out to assess the stratification in the flow. Time-resolved PIV and chemiluminescence imaging are used to investigate flashback at atmospheric pressure conditions. A comparative study between fully premixed and stratified flame flashback is conducted to determine how stratification influences flashback physics. This work was sponsored by the DOE NETL under Grant DEFC2611-FE0007107. This source of funding is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. CFD Studies of Combustion in Direct Injection Single Cylinder Diesel Engine Using Non-Premixed Combustion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gavudhama Karunanidhi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study the simulation process of non-premixed combustion in a direct injection single cylinder diesel engine has been described. Direct injection diesel engines are used both in heavy duty vehicles and light duty vehicles. The fuel is injected directly into the combustion chamber. The fuel mixes with the high pressure air in the combustion chamber and combustion occurs. Due to the non-premixed nature of the combustion occurring in such engines, non-premixed combustion model of ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 can be used to simulate the combustion process. A 4-stroke diesel engine corresponds to one fuel injector hole without considering valves was modeled and combustion simulation process was studied. Here two types of combustion chambers were compared. Combustion studies of both chambers:- shallow depth and hemispherical combustion chambers were carried out. Emission characteristics of both combustion chambers had also been carried out. The obtained results are compared. It has been found that hemispherical combustion chamber is more efficient as it produces higher pressure and temperature compared to that of shallow depth combustion chamber. As the temperature increases the formation of NOx emissions and soot formation also get increased.

  9. The premixing and propagation phases of fuel-coolant interactions: a review of recent experimental studies and code developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antariksawan, A.R. [Reactor Safety Technology Research Center of BATAN (Indonesia); Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun-sun; Maruyama, Yu; Yang, Yanhua; Sugimoto, Jun

    1998-09-01

    A vapor explosion (or an energetic fuel-coolant interactions, FCIs) is a process in which hot liquid (fuel) transfers its internal energy to colder, more volatile liquid (coolant); thus the coolant vaporizes at high pressure and expands and does works on its surroundings. Traditionally, the energetic fuel-coolant interactions could be distinguished in subsequent stages: premixing (or coarse mixing), triggering, propagation and expansion. Realizing that better and realistic prediction of fuel-coolant interaction consequences will be available understanding the phenomenology in the premixing and propagation stages, many experimental and analytical studies have been performed during more than two decades. A lot of important achievements are obtained during the time. However, some fundamental aspects are still not clear enough; thus the works are directed to that direction. In conjunction, the model/code development is pursuit. This is aimed to provide a scaling tool to bridge the experimental results to the real geometries, e.g. reactor pressure vessel, reactor containment. The present review intends to collect the available information on the recent works performed to study the premixing and propagation phases. (author). 97 refs.

  10. Cellular burning in lean premixed turbulent hydrogen-air flames: Coupling experimental and computational analysis at the laboratory scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, M. S.; Bell, J. B.; Cheng, R. K.; Tachibana, S.; Beckner, V. E.; Lijewski, M. J.

    2009-07-01

    One strategy for reducing US dependence on petroleum is to develop new combustion technologies for burning the fuel-lean mixtures of hydrogen or hydrogen-rich syngas fuels obtained from the gasification of coal and biomass. Fuel-flexible combustion systems based on lean premixed combustion have the potential for dramatically reducing pollutant emissions in transportation systems, heat and stationary power generation. However, lean premixed flames are highly susceptible to fluid-dynamical combustion instabilities making robust and reliable systems difficult to design. Low swirl burners are emerging as an important technology for meeting design requirements in terms of both reliability and emissions for next generation combustion devices. In this paper, we present simulations of a lean, premixed hydrogen flame stabilized on a laboratory-scale low swirl burner. The simulations use detailed chemistry and transport without incorporating explicit models for turbulence or turbulence/chemistry interaction. Here we discuss the overall structure of the flame and compare with experimental data. We also use the simulation data to elucidate the characteristics of the turbulent flame interaction and how this impacts the analysis of experimental measurements.

  11. Site-Specific Earthquake Response Analysis for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), located near Paducah , Kentucky, under the same IAG and is reported under...Specific Earthquake Response Analysis for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant , Portsmouth, Ohio by David W. Sykora, Jennifer J. Davis Geotechnical Laboratory...PAPER Miscellaneous Paper GL-93-13 August 1993 Site-Specific Earthquke Response Analysis for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant , Portsmouth, Ohio by

  12. 78 FR 65389 - United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... COMMISSION United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The current CoC for PGDP is set to expire on December... operation of a uranium enrichment facility in Paducah, Kentucky, using the gaseous ] diffusion......

  13. Site-Specific Earthquake Response Analysis for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant , Paducah , Kentucky by David W. Sykora, Jennifer J. Davis Geotechnical Laboratory Approved For Public Release...1993 Site-Specific Earthquake Response Analysis for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant , Paducah , Kentucky by David W. Sykora, Jennifer J. Davis... Gaseous diffusion plants -- Kentucky -- Paducah . 3. Nuclear facilities - Kentucky -- Paducah . 1. Davis, Jennifer J. 11. United

  14. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 2. Appendices. [Appendices only

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liverman, James L.

    1977-09-01

    Volume 2 is comprised of appendices: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Existing Facilities; Ecology; Civic Involvement; Social Analysis; Population Projections; Toxicity of Air Pollutants to Biota at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and Assessment of Noise Effects of an Add-On to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. (LK)

  15. Catalytic combustion of propane in a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants - III. Role of catalyst load on reactor performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saracco, G; Veldsink, JW; Versteeg, GF; van Swaaij, WPM

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with a pilot plant study on the catalytic combustion of propane in a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants. The importance of the amount of catalyst (1% b.w. Pt on gamma-Al2O3), deposited on the pore walls of the membrane, is investigated. Two membranes were prepared by

  16. CATALYTIC COMBUSTION OF PROPANE IN A MEMBRANE REACTOR WITH SEPARATE FEED OF REACTANTS .2. OPERATION IN PRESENCE OF TRANS-MEMBRANE PRESSURE-GRADIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SARACCO, G; VELDSINK, JW; VERSTEEG, GF; VANSWAAIJ, WPM

    This is the second communication of a series dealing with an experimental and modelling study on propane catalytic combustion in a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants. In paper I the behaviour of the reactor in the absence of trans-membrane pressure gradients was presented and

  17. Catalytic combustion of propane in a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants II. Operation in presence of transmembrane pressure gradients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saracco, Guido; Veldsink, J.W.; Veldsink, Jan Willem; Versteeg, Geert; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1995-01-01

    This is the second communication of a series dealing with an experimental and modelling study on propane catalytic combustion in a membrane reactor with separate feed of reactants. In paper I the behaviour of the reactor in the absence of trans-membrane pressure gradients was presented and

  18. State-to-state differential cross sections for D2 + OH → D + DOH reaction: Influence of vibrational excitation of OH reactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Hua

    2016-10-01

    State-to-state differential cross sections (DCSs) are computed quantum mechanically in full dimensionality for the title reaction using a reactant-product decoupling scheme. The DCSs are calculated at three collision energies of 0.25, 0.28, and 0.34 eV, corresponding to the existing experimental results. In good agreement with experiment, the calculated DCSs are dominated by backward scattering, thanks to the direct rebound mechanism, and the DOH product has two quanta of OD stretching vibration in the newly formed OD bond. In addition, the vibrational excitation of the OH reactant is found to result in a very different but predictable vibrational distribution of the DOH product. It is further shown at the state-to-state level that the DCSs of the DOH(vOD, vb, vOH) product state from the OH(v = 1) reactant state resemble the ones of the DOH(vOD, vb, vOH-1) product state from the OH(v = 0) reactant state, thanks to the spectator nature of the OH moiety.

  19. In situ generation of steam and alkaline surfactant for enhanced oil recovery using an exothermic water reactant (EWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Eric P

    2011-05-24

    A method for oil recovery whereby an exothermic water reactant (EWR) encapsulated in a water soluble coating is placed in water and pumped into one or more oil wells in contact with an oil bearing formation. After the water carries the EWR to the bottom of the injection well, the water soluble coating dissolves and the EWR reacts with the water to produce heat, an alkali solution, and hydrogen. The heat from the EWR reaction generates steam, which is forced into the oil bearing formation where it condenses and transfers heat to the oil, elevating its temperature and decreasing the viscosity of the oil. The aqueous alkali solution mixes with the oil in the oil bearing formation and forms a surfactant that reduces the interfacial tension between the oil and water. The hydrogen may be used to react with the oil at these elevated temperatures to form lighter molecules, thus upgrading to a certain extent the oil in situ. As a result, the oil can flow more efficiently and easily through the oil bearing formation towards and into one or more production wells.

  20. Micro-Mixing Lean-Premix System for Ultra-Low Emission Hydrogen/Syngas Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlendur Steinthorsson; Brian Hollon; Adel Mansour

    2010-06-30

    The focus of this project was to develop the next generation of fuel injection technologies for environmentally friendly, hydrogen syngas combustion in gas turbine engines that satisfy DOE's objectives of reducing NOx emissions to 3 ppm. Building on Parker Hannifin's proven Macrolamination technology for liquid fuels, Parker developed a scalable high-performing multi-point injector that utilizes multiple, small mixing cups in place of a single conventional large-scale premixer. Due to the small size, fuel and air mix rapidly within the cups, providing a well-premixed fuel-air mixture at the cup exit in a short time. Detailed studies and experimentation with single-cup micro-mixing injectors were conducted to elucidate the effects of various injector design attributes and operating conditions on combustion efficiency, lean stability and emissions and strategies were developed to mitigate the impact of flashback. In the final phase of the program, a full-scale 1.3-MWth multi-cup injector was built and tested at pressures from 6.9bar (100psi) to 12.4bar (180psi) and flame temperatures up to 2000K (3150 F) using mixtures of hydrogen and natural gas as fuel with nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents. The injector operated without flash back on fuel mixtures ranging from 100% natural gas to 100% hydrogen and emissions were shown to be insensitive to combustor pressure. NOx emissions of 3-ppm were achieved at a flame temperature of 1750K (2690 F) when operating on a fuel mixture containing 50% hydrogen and 50% natural gas by volume with 40% nitrogen dilution and 1.5-ppm NOx was achieved at a flame temperature of 1680K (2564 F) using only 10% nitrogen dilution. NOx emissions of 3.5-ppm were demonstrated at a flame temperature of 1730K (2650 F) with only 10% carbon dioxide dilution. Finally, 3.6-ppm NOx emissions were demonstrated at a flame temperature over 1600K (2420 F) when operating on 100% hydrogen fuel with 30% carbon dioxide dilution. Superior

  1. Effect of Dimethyl Ether Mixing on Soot Size Distribution in Premixed Ethylene Flame

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zepeng

    2016-04-21

    As a byproduct of incomplete combustion, soot attracts increasing attentions as extensive researches exploring serious health and environmental effects from soot particles. Soot emission reduction requires a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and of soot formation and aging processes. Therefore, advanced experimental techniques and numerical simulations have been conducted to investigate this procedure. In order to investigate the effects of dimethyl ether (DME) mixing on soot particle size distribution functions (PSDFs), DME was mixed in premixed ethylene/oxygen/argon at flames at the equivalence ratio of 2.0 with a range of mixing ratio from 0% to 30% of the total carbon fed. Two series of atmospheric pressure flames were tested in which cold gas velocity was varied to obtain different flame temperatures. The evolution of PSDFs along the centerline of the flame was determined by burner stabilized stagnation probe and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) techniques, yielding the PSDFs for various separation distances above the burner surface. Meanwhile, the flame temperature profiles were carefully measured by a thermocouple and the comparison to that of simulated laminar premixed burner-stabilized stagnation flame was satisfactory. Additionally, to understand the chemical role of DME mixing in soot properties, characterization measurements were conducted on soot samples using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and elemental analysis (EA). Results of the evolution of PSDFs and soot volume fraction showed that adding DME into ethylene flame could reduce soot yield significantly. The addition of DME led to the decrease of both the soot nucleation rate and the particle mass growth rate. To explain the possible mechanism for the observation, numerical simulations were performed. Although DME addition resulted in the slight increase of methyl radicals from pyrolysis, the decrease in acetylene and propargyl radicals

  2. Correspondence Between Uncoupled Flame Macrostructures and Thermoacoustic Instability in Premixed Swirl-Stabilized Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Taamallah, Soufien

    2014-06-16

    In this paper, we conduct an experimental investigation of a confined premixed swirl-stabilized dump combustor similar to those found in modern gas turbines. We operate the combustor with premixed methane-air in the lean range of equivalence ratio ϕ ∈ [0.5–0.75]. First, we observe different dynamic modes in the lean operating range, as the equivalence ratio is raised, confirming observations made previously in a similar combustor geometry but with a different fuel [1]. Next we examine the correspondence between dynamic mode transitions and changes in the mean flame configuration or macrostructure. We show that each dynamic mode is associated with a specific flame macrostructure. By modifying the combustor length without changing the underlying flow, the resonant frequencies of the geometry are altered allowing for decoupling the heat release fluctuations and the acoustic field, in a certain range of equivalence ratio. Mean flame configurations in the modified (short) combustor and for the same range of equivalence ratio are examined. It is found that not only the same sequence of flame configurations is observed in both combustors (long and short) but also that the set of equivalence ratio where transitions in the flame configuration occur is closely related to the onset of thermo-acoustic instabilities. For both combustor lengths, the flame structure changes at similar equivalence ratio whether thermo-acoustic coupling is allowed or not, suggesting that the flame configuration holds the key to understanding the onset of self-excited thermo-acoustic instability in this range. Finally, we focus on the flame configuration transition that was correlated with the onset of the first dynamically unstable mode ϕ ∈ [0.61–0.64]. Our analysis of this transition in the short, uncoupled combustor shows that it is associated with an intermittent appearance of a flame in the outer recirculation zone (ORZ). The spectral analysis of this “ORZ flame flickering”

  3. Basal insulin therapy strategy is superior to premixed insulin therapy in the perioperative period blood glucose management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Qing-xian; LOU Fu-chen; WANG Ping; LIU Qian; WANG Kun; ZHANG Li; ZHU Lei

    2013-01-01

    Background The probability and risk of operations increase in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.For diabetic patients,blood glucose control is a key factor to improving the prognosis of surgery.During perioperative period,insulin therapy is usually advised to be used for surgical patients with type 2 diabetes.However,the insulin regimen which one is better remains controversial.In this study,we estimated the efficacy,safety and advantage of different insulin therapy strategy during perioperative period.Methods A total of 1086 cases of surgical patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus enrolled in the present study.According to the glucose level at admission,all patients were divided into relatively high glucose group (group A,fasting blood glucose (FBG) <13.9 mmol/L) and higher glucose group (group B,FBG >13.9 mmol/L).Patients in group A randomly accepted premixed insulin twice a day,or basal insulin plus oral medications,and were divided into group A1 and A2 respectively.Patients in group B randomly received premixed insulin twice daily,basal insulin plus oral hypoglycemic agents,or basal insulin plus preprandial insulin,and were divided into group B1,B2 and B3 respectively.The data of the preoperative preparation time,the daily doses of insulin used in different periods,postoperative incision healed installments,hypoglycemic events,the total hospitalization time,postoperative complications were all collected and statistically analyzed.Results Compared the main outcome measures in groups treated by premixed insulin therapy,both in preoperative preparation and postoperative period,the daily insulin dosage and the frequency of hypoglycemic events were decreased in groups treated by basal insulin therapy (P <0.05).The preoperative preparation time and the total hospitalization time in groups with basal insulin therapy were shorter than that in groups with premixed insulin therapy (P <0.05).The incision healing rate of stage Ⅰ,Ⅱ and Ⅲ among different

  4. Gaseous Structures in Barred Galaxies: Effects of the Bar Strength

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Woong-Tae; Kim, Yonghwi

    2012-01-01

    Using hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the physical properties of gaseous substructures in barred galaxies and their relationships with the bar strength. The gaseous medium is assumed to be isothermal and unmagnetized. The bar potential is modeled as a Ferrers prolate with index n. To explore situations with differing bar strength, we vary the bar mass fbar relative to the spheroidal component as well as its aspect ratio. We derive expressions as functions of fbar and the aspect ratio for the bar strength Qb and the radius r(Qb) where the maximum bar torque occurs. When applied to observations, these expressions suggest that bars in real galaxies are most likely to have fbar=0.25-0.5 and n0.2 and self-gravity is included.

  5. Gaseous Nitriding Process of Surface Nanocrystallized (SNCed) Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of gaseous nitriding on the surface nanocrystallized (SNCed) steel was investigated. The mild steel discs were SNCed on one side by using the method of ultrasonic shot peening. The opposite side of the discs maintained the original coarse-grained condition. The gaseous nitriding was subsequently carried out at three different temperatures:460, 500 and 560℃. The compound layer growth and diffusion behavior were then studied. It was revealed that SNC pretreatment greatly enhances both diffusion coefficient D and surface reaction rate. As a result, nitriding time could be reduced to the half. It was also found that the growth of compound layer with nitriding time conformed with parabolic relationship from the start of nitriding process in the SNCed samples.

  6. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results and compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Environmental monitoring at PGDP consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of liquid and gaseous discharges to the environment. Environmental surveillance is direct measurement or the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media. Environmental monitoring is performed to characterize and quantify contaminants, assess radiation exposures of members of the public, demonstrate compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, and detect and assess the effects (if any) on the local environment. Multiple samples are collected throughout the year and are analyzed for radioactivity, chemical content, and various physical attributes.

  7. Inspiral of double black holes in gaseous nuclear disks

    CERN Document Server

    Haardt, M D M C F

    2006-01-01

    We study the inspiral of double black holes orbiting inside a massive rotationally supported gaseous disk, with masses in the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) window of detectability. Using high-resolution SPH simulations, we follow the black hole dynamics in the early phase when gas-dynamical friction acts on the black holes individually, and continue our simulation until the form a close binary. We find that in the early sinking the black holes loose memory of their initial orbital eccentricity if they co-rotate with the gaseous disk. As a consequence the massive black holes form a binary with very low eccentricity. During the inspiral, gravitational capture of gas by the black holes occurs mainly when they move on circular orbits and may ignite AGN activity: eccentric orbits imply instead high relative velocities and weak gravitational focusing.

  8. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horak, C.M. [ed.] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental Report for 1992, is published annually. It reflects the results of an environmental monitoring program designed to quantify potential increases in the concentration of contaminants and potential doses to the resident human population. The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP`s neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, reduce the generation of waste, and minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials.

  9. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Counce-Brown, D. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    This two-part report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site Environmental Report for 1990, is published annually. It reflects the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) on the area's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation, and wildlife. In addition, an assessment of the effect of PGDP effluents on the resident human population is made. PGDP's overall goal for environmental management is to protect the environment and PGDP's neighbors and to maintain full compliance with all current regulations. The current environmental strategy is to identify any deficiencies and to develop a system to resolve them. The long-range goal of environmental management is to minimize the source of pollutants, to reduce the formation of waste, and to minimize hazardous waste by substitution of materials.

  10. Microstructural and compositional Evolution of Compound Layers during Gaseous Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Hong; Somers, Marcel A.J.; Ågren, John

    2000-01-01

    Compound layers developed at 848 K during gaseous nitrocarburizing of iron and iron-carbon specimens were investigated for several combinations of N and C activities imposed at the specimen surface by gas mixtures of NH3, N2, CO2 and CO. The microstructural evolution of the compound layer...... evolution and the growth kinetics of the compound layers formed is discussed for the iron substrate. The results indicate that the microstructure is governed by a fast C and a slow N absorption at the surface in an early stage of gaseous nitrocarburizing. The influence of carbon in the substrate...... on the microstructural and compositional evolution and on the growth kinetics was evaluated from comparing the results obtained for a normalised Fe-0.8C alloy with those for iron under identical nitrocar-burizing conditions....

  11. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF GASEOUS FLOW IN MICRO-CHANNELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jie; Gu Chuangang; Wang Tong

    2004-01-01

    The algorithm of gaseous flow in bi-dimensional micro-channels is set up and the corresponding program based on micro-flow theory is presented. Gaseous flow in micro-channels is numerically analyzed and the pressure drop along the duct as well as the velocity profile in the micro-channels is obtained. The numerical results agreed well with the experimental results in the references. Moreover, the effects of Kn, (σv and Re on the velocity profiles are analyzed. It is found that for Kn>0.001, with increasing Kn number, the slip velocity on the wall boundary increases; the tangential momentum coefficient (σv affects the slip velocity greatly. The slip velocity increases with decreasing (σv In the slip flow regime and for low Re numbers, the slip velocity is little influenced by the Re number.

  12. USE OF GASEOUS OZONE AS A DISINFECTANT IN MEAT INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Stella

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the possible use of gaseous ozone as a disinfectant for meat industry environments. Firstly microbial inactivation trials were conducted in laboratory conditions on Petri plates inoculated with some microorganisms of importance to the food industry. The treatment with 1 ppm of ozone resulted to be effective in 1 h on the strains in use. Then similar trials were conducted in a meat industry, 1 ppm of ozone was supplied for 3 h. The results confirmed the antimicrobial efficacy of ozone even if it was less active than in laboratory conditions. A different sensibility among the microorganisms was observed, the most resistant being P. fluorescens and B. thuringiensis. Our results confirm the suitability of gaseous ozone as a disinfectant for meat industry environments and underline the need to calibrate ozone treatment parameters on the real environmental conditions of work-room.

  13. Method of producing gaseous products using a downflow reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortright, Randy D; Rozmiarek, Robert T; Hornemann, Charles C

    2014-09-16

    Reactor systems and methods are provided for the catalytic conversion of liquid feedstocks to synthesis gases and other noncondensable gaseous products. The reactor systems include a heat exchange reactor configured to allow the liquid feedstock and gas product to flow concurrently in a downflow direction. The reactor systems and methods are particularly useful for producing hydrogen and light hydrocarbons from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons using aqueous phase reforming. The generated gases may find used as a fuel source for energy generation via PEM fuel cells, solid-oxide fuel cells, internal combustion engines, or gas turbine gensets, or used in other chemical processes to produce additional products. The gaseous products may also be collected for later use or distribution.

  14. Long flexible transfer lines for gaseous and liquid helium

    CERN Document Server

    Laeger, H; Rohner, P

    1978-01-01

    Screened flexible four-fold coaxial transfer lines for gaseous and liquid helium with lengths of 5 to 50 m have been successfully built and tested. The lines for gaseous helium have to supply and return a mass flow of 5 to 10 g s−1 at temperatures ranging between 350 and 20 K for cooldown or warmup of superconducting magnets. The lines for liquid helium have to supply up to 100 ℓ h−1 for final cooldown or up to 25 ℓ h−1 for normal operation of superconducting magnets. The hydrodynamic and thermal performance characteristics of the lines have been measured. The results are encouraging and it can be envisaged to use this kind of lines for superconducting magnets in high energy accelerators.

  15. Gaseous tracking at linear hadron collider: Pushing the limits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Sharma

    2003-05-01

    Gaseous detectors have been pushed to the limits when required to operate in the ferocious and aggressive rate environment of the new generation of HEP experiments. A great effort has resulted in the optimization and construction of large systems of gas detectors, some operational and some due for installation. In this paper some examples are presented along with the impediments that have been overcome; some open issues will be highlighted.

  16. Hydrodynamic vortices in the gaseous disks of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, V. A.; Zhelezniak, O. A.

    1989-08-01

    A two-dimensional gas stream with a velocity field vx proportional to y is considered which is assumed to be stationary with respect to a rotating coordinate system. This stream can serve as a model of the local kinematic of a galactic gaseous disk. It is shown the local uniform stream cannot develop into a soliton if self-gravitation, dissipation, and the nonuniformity of the vortex are neglected.

  17. Critical Initiation Conditions for Gaseous Diverging Spherical Detonations

    OpenAIRE

    Desbordes, D.

    1995-01-01

    The diverging spherical detonation wave in gaseous explosives is obtained either with a point source of explosion of energy E or through the transmission of a plane detonation from a cylindrical tube of diameter d into a large volume. The mechanism of detonation initiation in both cases is based on the shock to detonation transition. The experimental critical conditions lead to an initiation criterion for detonation resulting from the competition between the expansion behind the leading shock...

  18. Removing Gaseous NH3 Using Biochar as an Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung S. Ro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is a major fugitive gas emitted from livestock operations and fertilization production. This study tested the potential of various biochars in removing gaseous ammonia via adsorption processes. Gaseous ammonia adsorption capacities of various biochars made from wood shaving and chicken litter with different thermal conditions and activation techniques were determined using laboratory adsorption column tests. Ammonia adsorption capacities of non-activated biochars ranged from 0.15 to 5.09 mg·N/g, which were comparable to that of other commercial activated carbon and natural zeolite. There were no significant differences in ammonia adsorption capacities of steam activated and non-activated biochars even if the surface areas of the steam activated biochars were about two orders of magnitude greater than that of non-activated biochars. In contrast, phosphoric acid activation greatly increased the biochar ammonia adsorption capacity. This suggests that the surface area of biochar did not readily control gaseous NH3 adsorption. Ammonia adsorption capacities were more or less linearly increased with acidic oxygen surface groups of non-activated and steam-activated biochars. Phosphoric acid bound to the acid activated biochars is suspected to contribute to the exceptionally high ammonia adsorption capacity. The sorption capacities of virgin and water-washed biochar samples were not different, suggesting the potential to regenerate spent biochar simply with water instead of energy- and capital-intensive steam. The results of this study suggest that non-activated biochars can successfully replace commercial activated carbon in removing gaseous ammonia and the removal efficiency will greatly increase if the biochars are activated with phosphoric acid.

  19. 3D velocity measurements in a premixed flame by tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarev, M. P.; Sharaborin, D. K.; Lobasov, A. S.; Chikishev, L. M.; Dulin, V. M.; Markovich, D. M.

    2015-06-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) has become a standard tool for 3D velocity measurements in non-reacting flows. However, the majority of the measurements in flows with combustion are limited to small resolved depth compared to the size of the field of view (typically 1 : 10). The limitations are associated with inhomogeneity of the volume illumination and the non-uniform flow seeding, the optical distortions and errors in the 3D calibration, and the unwanted flame luminosity. In the present work, the above constraints were overcome for the tomographic PIV experiment in a laminar axisymmetric premixed flame. The measurements were conducted for a 1 : 1 depth-to-size ratio using a system of eight CCD cameras and a 200 mJ pulsed laser. The results show that camera calibration based on the triangulation of the tracer particles in the non-reacting conditions provided reliable accuracy for the 3D image reconstruction in the flame. The modification of the tomographic reconstruction allowed a posteriori removal of unwanted bright objects, which were located outside of the region of interest but affected the reconstruction quality. This study reports on a novel experience for the instantaneous 3D velocimetry in laboratory-scale flames by using tomographic PIV.

  20. Rich methane premixed laminar flames doped by light unsaturated hydrocarbons - Part I : allene and propyne

    CERN Document Server

    Gueniche, Hadj-Ali; Dayma, Guillaume; Fournet, Ren{é}; Battin-Leclerc, Fr{é}d{é}rique

    2006-01-01

    The structure of three laminar premixed rich flames has been investigated: a pure methane flame and two methane flames doped by allene and propyne, respectively. The gases of the three flames contain 20.9% (molar) of methane and 33.4% of oxygen, corresponding to an equivalence ratio of 1.25 for the pure methane flame. In both doped flames, 2.49% of C3H4 was added, corresponding to a ratio C3H4/CH4 of 12% and an equivalence ratio of 1.55. The three flames have been stabilized on a burner at a pressure of 6.7 kPa using argon as dilutant, with a gas velocity at the burner of 36 cm/s at 333 K. The concentration profiles of stable species were measured by gas chromatography after sampling with a quartz microprobe. Quantified species included carbon monoxide and dioxide, methane, oxygen, hydrogen, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, propyne, allene, propene, propane, 1,2-butadiene, 1,3-butadiene, 1-butene, isobutene, 1-butyne, vinylacetylene, and benzene. The temperature was measured using a PtRh (6%)-PtRh (30%) thermocou...

  1. Diffusion air effects on the soot axial distribution concentration in a premixed acetylene/air flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fassani, Fabio Luis; Santos, Alex Alisson Bandeira; Goldstein Junior, Leonardo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia Termica e de Fluidos]. E-mails: fassani@fem.unicamp.br; absantos@fem.unicamp.br; leonardo@fem.unicamp.br; Ferrari, Carlos Alberto [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Eletronica Quantica]. E-mail: ferrari@ifi.unicamp.br

    2000-07-01

    Soot particles are produced during the high temperature pyrolysis or combustion of hydrocarbons. The emission of soot from a combustor, or from a flame, is determined by the competition between soot formation and its oxidation. Several factors affect these processes, including the type of fuel, the air-to-fuel ratio, flame temperature, pressure, and flow pattern. In this paper, the influence of the induced air diffusion on the soot axial distribution concentration in a premixed acetylene/air flame was studied. The flame was generated in a vertical axis burner in which the fuel - oxidant mixture flow was surrounded by a nitrogen discharge coming from the annular region between the burner tube and an external concentric tube. The nitrogen flow provided a shield that protected the flame from the diffusion of external air, enabling its control. The burner was mounted on a step-motor driven, vertical translation table. The use of several air-to-fuel ratios made possible to establish the sooting characteristics of this flame, by measuring soot concentration along the flame height with a non-intrusive laser light absorption technique. (author)

  2. Effect of pointed and diffused air injection on premixed flame confined in a Rijke tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilaj N. Deshmukh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The coupling between pressure fluctuations and unsteady heat release in a combustion systems results in acoustic oscillations inside the combustion system. These acoustic oscillations, when grow sufficiently, may cause serious structural damage thereby reducing the lifespan of jet engines, gas turbines, and industrial burners. The aim of the first part of study is to define acoustically stable and unstable regions. The second part is focused on studying the effect of change in pressure field near the flame on the amplitude and frequency of the oscillations of instability. This study is carried out for three-burner positions and equivalence ratio of 0.7 by varying heat supply and total flow rate. The results show two acoustically unstable regions for 0.1 and 0.2 burner positions and only one acoustically unstable region for 0.25 burner position. The effect of pointed injection and diffused injection over a premixed flame on the sound pressure level was studied. The results show for burner position of x/L = 0.2 there is 25 dB suppression is possible using pointed injection at higher total flow rate. The experiment of diffused injection shows sound amplification more than 12 dB was observed.

  3. The effect of nitrogen on biogas flame propagation characteristic in premix combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggono, Willyanto; Suprianto, Fandi D.; Hartanto, Tan Ivan; Purnomo, Kenny; Wijaya, Tubagus P.

    2016-03-01

    Biogas is one of alternative energy and categorized as renewable energy. The main sources of biogas come from animal waste, garbage, and household waste that are organic waste. Primarily, over 50% of this energy contains methane (CH4). The other substances or inhibitors are nitrogen and carbon dioxide. Previously, carbon dioxide effect on biogas combustion is already experimented. The result shows that carbon dioxide reduces the flame propagation speed of biogas combustion. Then, nitrogen as an inhibitor obviously also brings some effects to the biogas combustion, flame propagation speed, and flame characteristics. Spark ignited cylinder is used for the premixed biogas combustion research. An acrylic glass is used as the material of this transparent cylinder chamber. The cylinder is filled with methane (CH4), oxygen (O2), and nitrogen (N2) with particular percentage. In this experiment, the nitrogen composition are set to 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50%. The result shows that the flame propagation speed is reduced in regard to the increased level of nitrogen. It can also be implied that nitrogen can decrease the biogas combustion rate.

  4. Measurements of Positively Charged Ions in Premixed Methane-Oxygen Atmospheric Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad B. S.

    2016-08-22

    Cations and anions are formed as a result of chemi-ionization processes in combustion systems. Electric fields can be applied to reduce emissions and improve combustion efficiency by active control of the combustion process. Detailed flame ion chemistry models are needed to understand and predict the effect of external electric fields on combustion plasmas. In this work, a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) is utilized to measure ion concentration profiles in premixed methane–oxygen argon burner-stabilized atmospheric flames. Lean and stoichiometric flames are considered to assess the dependence of ion chemistry on flame stoichiometry. Relative ion concentration profiles are compared with numerical simulations using various temperature profiles, and good qualitative agreement was observed for the stoichiometric flame. However, for the lean flame, numerical simulations misrepresent the spatial distribution of selected ions greatly. Three modifications are suggested to enhance the ion mechanism and improve the agreement between experiments and simulations. The first two modifications comprise the addition of anion detachment reactions to increase anion recombination at low temperatures. The third modification involves restoring a detachment reaction to its original irreversible form. To our knowledge, this work presents the first detailed measurements of cations and flame temperature in canonical methane–oxygen-argon atmospheric flat flames. The positive ion profiles reported here may be useful to validate and improve ion chemistry models for methane-oxygen flames.

  5. Effects of Radiative and Diffusive Transport Processes on Premixed Flames near Flammability Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbud-Madrid, Angel; Ronney, Paul D.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the mechanisms of flammability limits and the dynamics of flame extinguishment in premixed gas flames is described, a novel feature of which is the use of diluent gases having a wide range of radiative and diffusive transport properties. This feature enables an assessment of the importance of volumetric heat losses and Lewis number effects on these mechanisms. Additionally, effects of flame dynamics and flame front curvature are studied by employing spherically expanding flames obtained in a microgravity environment whereby natural convection is eliminated. New diagnostics include chamber pressure measurements and the first reported species concentration measurements in a microgravity combustion experiment. The limit mechanisms and extinguishment phenomena are found to be strongly influenced by the combined effects of radiant heat loss, Lewis number and flame curvature. Two new and as yet not well understood phenomena are reported: 'double flames' in rich H2-O2-CO2 mixtures and an 'inverse flammability region' in rich C3H8-O2-CO2 mixtures.

  6. Impact of flame-wall interaction on premixed flame dynamics and transfer function characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the response of a perforated-plate stabilized laminar methane-air premixed flame to imposed inlet velocity perturbations. A flame model using detailed chemical kinetics mechanism is applied and heat exchange between the burner plate and the gas mixture is incorporated. Linear transfer functions, for low mean inlet velocity oscillations, are analyzed for different equivalence ratio, mean inlet velocity, plate thermal conductivity and distance between adjacent holes. The oscillations of the heat exchange rate at the top of the burner surface plays a critical role in driving the growth of the perturbations over a wide range of conditions, including resonance. The flame response to the perturbations at its base takes the form of consumption speed oscillations in this region. Flame stand-off distance increases/decreases when the flame-wall interaction strengthens/weakens, impacting the overall dynamics of the heat release. The convective lag between the perturbations and the flame base response govern the phase of heat release rate oscillations. There is an additional convective lag between the perturbations at the flame base and the flame tip which has a weaker impact on the heat release rate oscillations. At higher frequencies, the flame-wall interaction is weaker and the heat release oscillations are driven by the flame area oscillations. The response of the flame to higher amplitude oscillations are used to gain further insight into the mechanisms. © 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved.

  7. Lagrangian analysis of premixed turbulent combustion in hydrogen-air flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darragh, Ryan; Poludnenko, Alexei; Hamlington, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Lagrangian analysis has long been a tool used to analyze non-reacting turbulent flows, and has recently gained attention in the reacting flow and combustion communities. The approach itself allows one to separate local molecular effects, such as those due to reactions or diffusion, from turbulent advective effects along fluid pathlines, or trajectories. Accurate calculation of these trajectories can, however, be rather difficult due to the chaotic nature of turbulent flows and the added complexity of reactions. In order to determine resolution requirements and verify the numerical algorithm, extensive tests are described in this talk for prescribed steady, unsteady, and chaotic flows, as well as for direct numerical simulations (DNS) of non-reacting homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The Lagrangian analysis is then applied to DNS of premixed hydrogen-air flames at two different turbulence intensities for both single- and multi-step chemical mechanisms. Non-monotonic temperature and fuel-mass fraction evolutions are found to exist along trajectories passing through the flame brush. Such non-monotonicity is shown to be due to molecular diffusion resulting from large spatial gradients created by turbulent advection. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) under Award No. FA9550-14-1-0273, and the Department of Defense (DoD) High Performance Computing Modernization Program (HPCMP) under a Frontier project award.

  8. Combustion chemistry of alcohols: Experimental and modeled structure of a premixed 2-methylbutanol flame

    KAUST Repository

    Lucassen, Arnas

    2014-06-14

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of 2-methylbutanol combustion chemistry in low-pressure premixed flames. This chemistry is of particular interest to study because this compound is potentially a lignocellulosic-based, next-generation biofuel. The detailed chemical structure of a stoichiometric low-pressure (25 Torr) flame was determined using flame-sampling molecular-beam mass spectrometry. A total of 55 species were identified and subsequently quantitative mole fraction profiles as function of distance from the burner surface were determined. In an independent effort, a detailed flame chemistry model for 2-methylbutanol was assembled based on recent knowledge gained from combustion chemistry studies for butanol isomers ([Sarathy et al. Combust. Flame 159 (6) (2012) 2028-2055]) and iso-pentanol (3-methylbutanol) [Sarathy et al. Combust. Flame 160 (12) (2013) 2712-2728]. Experimentally determined and modeled mole fraction profiles were compared to demonstrate the model\\'s capabilities. Examples of individual mole fraction profiles are discussed together with the most significant fuel consumption pathways to highlight the combustion chemistry of 2-methylbutanol. Discrepancies between experimental and modeling results are used to suggest areas where improvement of the kinetic model would be needed. © 2014.

  9. Determination of EDTA in feed and premix formulations by HPLC-DAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiumiento, Francesco; D'Aloise, Antonio; Marchegiani, Francesca; Melai, Valeria

    2015-05-15

    A simple analytical method for the quantitative determination of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in feed and premix formulations was developed and validated. The method involves an extraction with an acidic ferric chloride solution, to quantitatively convert EDTA species in the samples into the Fe(III)-EDTA complex, and its subsequent detection by Ion-Pair-Reversed Phase-High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detection (IP-RP-HPLC-DAD). A robust validation procedure was performed according to the Decision 2002/657/EC at concentrations ranging from 25 to 100 mg kg(-1) on sample. Good recoveries (85.6-92.8%) were obtained; repeatability of the method was in the range of 1.3-8.0%, with an intermediate precision ranging from 6.0% to 8.6%, both of them expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD). No interfering species hindered the straightforward detection of EDTA. Hence, the proposed method can be adopted for an effective and rapid routine analysis of products for livestock.

  10. Effects of temperature, moisture and choline chloride on vitamin A stability in broiler premix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Haixia; SHAN Anshan; SHI Baoming

    2007-01-01

    A 2×2×2 factorial design was adopted to study the effects of temperature, moisture and choline chloride on vitamin A stability in premix. The results indicated that temperature, moisture and choline chloride damaged vitamin A significantly. The regression equations of vitamin A disappearance rate and storage time were as follows: in room temperature (18±3) ℃, y=14.368Ln(x)+ 4.1425,R2=978; in high temperature (4℃), y=22.24Ln(x)+13.27, R2=O.9918; in low moisture (2%-3%), y=10.408Ln(x)+9.5418, R2=O.9322; in high moisture (8%-9%), y=26.199Ln(x)+7.8741, R2=0.9949; in the condition of choline chloride free, y=9.5125Ln(x)+ 8.9869, R2=O.9826; supplemented with choline chloride, y=27.094Ln(x)+8.4276, R2=0.9984. Temperature had highly significant interaction with moisure and choline chloride on destruction of vitamin A, respectively from the periods of two months storage. However, from the period of the first month storage, the interaction of moisture and choline chloride, as well as the interaction of temperature, moisture and choline destroyed vitamin A remarkably.

  11. Numerical Study of Pollutant Emissions in a Jet Stirred Reactor under Elevated Pressure Lean Premixed Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Mazaheri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical study of pollutant emissions (NO and CO in a Jet Stirred Reactor (JSR combustor for methane oxidation under Elevated Pressure Lean Premixed (EPLP conditions is presented. A Detailed Flow-field Simplified Chemistry (DFSC method, a low computational cost method, is employed for predicting NO and CO concentrations. Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS equations with species transport equations are solved. Improved-coefficient five-step global mechanisms derived from a new evolutionary-based approach were taken as combustion kinetics. For modeling turbulent flow field, Reynolds Stress Model (RSM, and for turbulence chemistry interactions, finite rate-Eddy dissipation model are employed. Effects of pressure (3, 6.5 bars and inlet temperature (408–573 K over a range of residence time (1.49–3.97 ms are numerically examined. A good agreement between the numerical and experimental distribution of NO and CO was found. The effect of decreasing the operating pressure on NO generation is much more than the effect of increase in the inlet temperature.

  12. Numerical study of premixed HCCI engine combustion and its sensitivity to computational mesh and model uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Song-Charng; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2003-06-01

    This study used a numerical model to investigate the combustion process in a premixed iso-octane homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The engine was a supercharged Cummins C engine operated under HCCI conditions. The CHEMKIN code was implemented into an updated KIVA-3V code so that the combustion could be modelled using detailed chemistry in the context of engine CFD simulations. The model was able to accurately simulate the ignition timing and combustion phasing for various engine conditions. The unburned hydrocarbon emissions were also well predicted while the carbon monoxide emissions were under predicted. Model results showed that the majority of unburned hydrocarbon is located in the piston-ring crevice region and the carbon monoxide resides in the vicinity of the cylinder walls. A sensitivity study of the computational grid resolution indicated that the combustion predictions were relatively insensitive to the grid density. However, the piston-ring crevice region needed to be simulated with high resolution to obtain accurate emissions predictions. The model results also indicated that HCCI combustion and emissions are very sensitive to the initial mixture temperature. The computations also show that the carbon monoxide emissions prediction can be significantly improved by modifying a key oxidation reaction rate constant.

  13. Hydrodynamic aspects of premixed flame stripes in two-dimensional stagnation-point flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.; Sohrab, S.H. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-06-01

    The behavior of cellular premixed flames of rich butane-air in the two-dimensional stagnation-point flow configuration has been investigated. It is found that the stretching of the cellular flame results in the alignment f the ridge (extinction) and the trough (combustion) zones of the individual cells such as to form a series of parallel flame stripes. The number of flame stripes as a function of the equivalence ratio for three different mean velocities at the nozzle have been determined. Through the introduction of a generalized form of the stream function periodic velocity fields are obtained as the exact solutions of the Euler equation for the nonreactive finite-jet two-dimensional stagnation flow. The predicted periodic velocity profiles are confirmed by the experimental observation of the streamlines in nonreactive flow made visible by laser-sheet lighting. The observed average size of the flame stripes is found to be in good agreement with the predicted value. Similar periodic velocity profiles are also obtained for the viscous flow within the laminar boundary layer by treatment of the unsteady vorticity equation first described by Taylor. The results support an earlier prediction by Williams that cellular flame structures that are affected mainly by diffusive-thermal phenomena may in fact be initiated by the hydrodynamic instability.

  14. Control of the low-load region in partially premixed combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingesson, Gabriel; Yin, Lianhao; Johansson, Rolf; Tunestal, Per

    2016-09-01

    Partially premixed combustion (PPC) is a low temperature, direct-injection combustion concept that has shown to give promising emission levels and efficiencies over a wide operating range. In this concept, high EGR ratios, high octane-number fuels and early injection timings are used to slow down the auto-ignition reactions and to enhance the fuel and are mixing before the start of combustion. A drawback with this concept is the combustion stability in the low-load region where a high octane-number fuel might cause misfire and low combustion efficiency. This paper investigates the problem of low-load PPC controller design for increased engine efficiency. First, low-load PPC data, obtained from a multi-cylinder heavy- duty engine is presented. The data shows that combustion efficiency could be increased by using a pilot injection and that there is a non-linearity in the relation between injection and combustion timing. Furthermore, intake conditions should be set in order to avoid operating points with unfavourable global equivalence ratio and in-cylinder temperature combinations. Model predictive control simulations were used together with a calibrated engine model to find a gas-system controller that fulfilled this task. The findings are then summarized in a suggested engine controller design. Finally, an experimental performance evaluation of the suggested controller is presented.

  15. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent non-premixed methane-air flames modeled with reduced kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, J. M.; Chen, J. H.; Day, M.; Mahalingam, S.

    1994-01-01

    Turbulent non-premixed stoichiometric methane-air flames modeled with reduced kinetics have been studied using the direct numerical simulation approach. The simulations include realistic chemical kinetics, and the molecular transport is modeled with constant Lewis numbers for individual species. The effect of turbulence on the internal flame structure and extinction characteristics of methane-air flames is evaluated. Consistent with earlier DNS with simple one-step chemistry, the flame is wrinkled and in some regions extinguished by the turbulence, while the turbulence is weakened in the vicinity of the flame due to a combination of dilatation and an increase in kinematic viscosity. Unlike previous results, reignition is observed in the present simulations. Lewis number effects are important in determining the local stoichiometry of the flame. The results presented in this work are preliminary but demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating reduced kinetics for the oxidation of methane with direct numerical simulations of homogeneous turbulence to evaluate the limitations of various levels of reduction in the kinetics and to address the formation of thermal and prompt NO(x).

  16. Dynamics of bluff-body-stabilized lean premixed syngas flames in a meso-scale channel

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Bok Jik

    2016-07-15

    Direct numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the dynamics of lean premixed syngas flames stabilized by a bluff-body in a meso-scale channel at near blow-off conditions, in order to provide fundamental insights into the physical mechanisms responsible for the critical phenomena. Flames in a two-dimensional meso-scale channel with a square flame holder are adopted as the model configuration, and a syngas mixture at an equivalence ratio of 0.5 with the CO:H ratio of 1 is considered. As the inlet velocity is increased, the initially stable steady flames undergo a transition to an unsteady mode of regular asymmetric fluctuation. When the inlet velocity is further increased, the flame is eventually blown off. Between the regular fluctuation mode and blow-off limit, there exists a narrow range of the inlet velocity where the flames exhibit periodic local extinction and recovery. Approaching further to the blow-off limit, the recovery mode fails to occur but the flame survives as a short kernel attached to the base of the bluff-body, until it is completely extinguished as the attached flames are gradually shrunk towards the bluff-body. The results are systematically compared with the hydrogen flame results reported in our earlier study. Examination of the characteristic time scales of relevant processes provided understanding of key mechanisms responsible for the observed differences, thereby allowing improved description of the local extinction and re-ignition dynamics that are critical to flame stabilization.

  17. Dynamics of flow-soot interaction in wrinkled non-premixed ethylene-air flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Paul G.; Lecoustre, Vivien R.; Roy, Somesh; Luo, Zhaoyu; Haworth, Daniel C.; Lu, Tianfeng; Trouvé, Arnaud; Im, Hong G.

    2015-09-01

    A two-dimensional simulation of a non-premixed ethylene-air flame was conducted by employing a detailed gas-phase reaction mechanism considering polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, an aerosol-dynamics-based soot model using a method of moments with interpolative closure, and a grey gas and soot radiation model using the discrete transfer method. Interaction of the sooting flame with a prescribed decaying random velocity field was investigated, with a primary interest in the effects of velocity fluctuations on the flame structure and the associated soot formation process for a fuel-strip configuration and a composition with mature soot growth. The temporally evolving simulation revealed a multi-layered soot formation process within the flame, at a level of detail not properly described by previous studies based on simplified soot models utilizing acetylene or naphthalene precursors for initial soot inception. The overall effect of the flame topology on the soot formation was found to be consistent with previous experimental studies, while a unique behaviour of localised strong oxidation was also noted. The imposed velocity fluctuations led to an increase of the scalar dissipation rate in the sooting zone, causing a net suppression in the soot production rate. Considering the complex structure of the soot formation layer, the effects of the imposed fluctuations vary depending on the individual soot reactions. For the conditions under study, the soot oxidation reaction was identified as the most sensitive to the fluctuations and was mainly responsible for the local suppression of the net soot production.

  18. Supplementary Material for: Measurements of Positively Charged Ions in Premixed Methane-Oxygen Atmospheric Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad B. S.

    2017-01-01

    Cations and anions are formed as a result of chemi-ionization processes in combustion systems. Electric fields can be applied to reduce emissions and improve combustion efficiency by active control of the combustion process. Detailed flame ion chemistry models are needed to understand and predict the effect of external electric fields on combustion plasmas. In this work, a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) is utilized to measure ion concentration profiles in premixed methane–oxygen argon burner-stabilized atmospheric flames. Lean and stoichiometric flames are considered to assess the dependence of ion chemistry on flame stoichiometry. Relative ion concentration profiles are compared with numerical simulations using various temperature profiles, and good qualitative agreement was observed for the stoichiometric flame. However, for the lean flame, numerical simulations misrepresent the spatial distribution of selected ions greatly. Three modifications are suggested to enhance the ion mechanism and improve the agreement between experiments and simulations. The first two modifications comprise the addition of anion detachment reactions to increase anion recombination at low temperatures. The third modification involves restoring a detachment reaction to its original irreversible form. To our knowledge, this work presents the first detailed measurements of cations and flame temperature in canonical methane–oxygen-argon atmospheric flat flames. The positive ion profiles reported here may be useful to validate and improve ion chemistry models for methane-oxygen flames.

  19. Modeling and numerical simulation of a pilot-stabilized turbulent premixed flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benarous, Abdallah [Hassiba Benbouali University, Chlef (Algeria); Abdelkrim, Liazid [National Polytechnic School, Oran (Algeria); Karmed, Djamel [Poitiers University, Chasseneuil Cedex (France)

    2013-08-15

    The present paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of turbulent reactive flows subjected to spatial variations of equivalence ratio. In such situations, the description of the local thermochemistry requires at least two variables. The mixture fraction and the fuel mass fraction are respectively chosen to describe the composition of the fresh mixture and the chemical reaction progress. In the present contribution, a generalization of the Libby-Williams (LW) approach to four delta probability density function (Pdf) is presented. Transport equations for the first and second-order (variance) of mean scalar quantities are numerically solved. Moreover, the so-called LW-P model solves an additional transport equation for the cross-correlation between the reactive and the passive scalars. The model is applied to the calculation of a turbulent lean-premixed flow of methane and air stabilized by a near-stoichiometric pilot-flame. Numerical results regarding flow dynamics and flame structure are compared with the experimental data of a laboratory-scale burner-chamber device.

  20. Pulsed Current-Voltage-Induced Perturbations of a Premixed Propane/Air Flame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob. B. Schmidt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of millisecond wide sub-breakdown pulsed voltage-current induced flow perturbation has been measured in premixed laminar atmospheric pressure propane/air flame. The flame equivalence ratios were varied from 0.8 to 1.2 with the flow speeds near 1.1 meter/second. Spatio-temporal flame structure changes were observed through collection of CH (A-X and OH (A-X chemiluminescence and simultaneous spontaneous Raman scattering from N2. This optical collection scheme allows us to obtain a strong correlation between the measured gas temperature and the chemiluminescence intensity, verifying that chemiluminescence images provide accurate measurements of flame reaction zone structure modifications. The experimental results suggest that the flame perturbation is caused by ionic wind originating only from the radial positive space-charge distribution in/near the cathode fall. A net momentum transfer acts along the annular space discharge distribution in the reaction zone at or near the cathode fall which modifies the flow field near the cathodic burner head. This radially inward directed body force appears to enhance mixing similar to a swirl induced modification of the flame structure. The flame fluidic response exhibit a strong dependence on the voltage pulse width ≤10 millisecond.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of stationary lean premixed methane-air flames under intense turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaran, Ramanan [ORNL; Hawkes, Evatt R [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Yoo, Chun S [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Chen, Jacqueline H [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Lu, Tianfeng [Princeton University; Law, Chung K [Princeton University

    2007-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a three-dimensional spatially- developing turbulent Bunsen flame has been performed at three different turbulence intensities. The simulations are performed using a reduced methane-air chemical mechanism which is specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration is used in which turbulent preheated methane-air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issues through a central jet and is surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow are selected such that combustion occurs in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity the conditions fall on the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime. At the highest turbulence intensity the conditions correspond to the boundary between the TRZ regime and the broken reaction zones regime. The data from the three simulations is analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Statistical analysis of the data shows that the thermal preheat layer of the flame is thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone is not significantly affected.

  2. Electron temperature measurement in a premixed flat flame using the double probe method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, J.; Kudrna, P.; Tichy, M. [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Nevrly, V.; Strizik, M.; Bitala, P.; Filipi, B. [VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, Faculty of Safety Engineering, Lumirova 13, 700 30 Ostrava-Vyskovice (Czech Republic); Zelinger, Z. [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, v.v.i., Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dolejskova 3, 182 23 Praha 8 (Czech Republic)

    2012-09-15

    The electron temperatures T{sub e} were measured using a double probe in a premixed methane flame produced by a calibration burner according to Hartung et al. The experiment was performed at atmospheric pressure. In contrast to other authors, we have managed to find typical nonlinearities corresponding to the retarding electron current region and to calculate electron temperatures using a suitable fit on the basis of the measured characteristics. A Pt-Rh thermocouple was used to measure temperatures T{sub h} corresponding to ''heavy'' species. Our results indicate that the flame plasma can be considered to be weakly non-isothermic - T{sub e} = (2400-4000) K, T{sub h} = (1400-1600) K. On the basis of measurement of the saturated ion current, the number density of the charged particles was estimated at (0.3-3.8) . 10{sup 17} m{sup -3}. The trends in T{sub e} and T{sub h} in dependence on the positions of the probes and thermocouple in the flame differ substantially; this fact has not yet been explained (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Asymptotic Analysis of Transport Properties and Burning Velocities for Premixed Hydrocarbon Flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Y. Law; H.K. Ma

    2001-01-01

    Based on premixed flame, the theoretical model of transport properties with temperature variation was established inside a preheated zone. Lewis number of the deficient-to-stoichiometric hydrocarbon/air mixture has been theoretically predicted over a wide range of preheated temperature. These predictions are compared with the experimental data on transport properties that exist in the literature. The response of the burning velocity to flame stretch can be parameterized by the laminar flame speed and Markstein length. Therefore, if the laminar flame speed and Markstein number could be accurately simulated by using an analytic expression of characterized temperature, equivalence ratio, and Lewis number, the results are applicable to the prediction of methane,acetylene, ethylene, ethane, and propane flames. Expanding previous studies on the extinction ofpremixed flames under the influence of stretch and incomplete reaction, the results were further classified and rescaled. Finally, it could be inferred that parameter Pq, the rescaled extinction Karlovitz number could be used to explain the degree of flame quench.

  4. Impact of chemical kinetic model reduction on premixed turbulent flame characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillo, Aaron; Niemeyer, Kyle

    2016-11-01

    The use of detailed chemical kinetic models for direct numerical simulations (DNS) is prohibitively expensive. Current best practice for the development of reduced models is to match laminar burning parameters such as flame speed, thickness, and ignition delay time to predictions of the detailed chemical kinetic models. Prior studies using reduced models implicitly assumed that matching the homogeneous and laminar properties of the detailed model will result in similar behavior in a turbulent environment. However, this assumption has not been tested. Fillo et al. recently demonstrated experimentally that real jet fuels with similar chemistry and laminar burning parameters exhibit different turbulent flame speeds under the same flow conditions. This result raises questions about the validity of current best practices for the development of reduced chemical kinetic models for turbulent DNS. This study will investigate the validity of current best practices. Turbulent burning parameters, including flame speed, thickness, and stretch rate, will be compared for three skeletal mechanisms of the Princeton POSF 4658 mechanism, reduced using current best practice methods. DNS calculations of premixed, high-Karlovitz flames will be compared to determine if these methods are valid. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1314109-DGE.

  5. Large scale Direct Numerical Simulation of premixed turbulent jet flames at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attili, Antonio; Luca, Stefano; Lo Schiavo, Ermanno; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Creta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    A set of direct numerical simulations of turbulent premixed jet flames at different Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers is presented. The simulations feature finite rate chemistry with 16 species and 73 reactions and up to 22 Billion grid points. The jet consists of a methane/air mixture with equivalence ratio ϕ = 0 . 7 and temperature varying between 500 and 800 K. The temperature and species concentrations in the coflow correspond to the equilibrium state of the burnt mixture. All the simulations are performed at 4 atm. The flame length, normalized by the jet width, decreases significantly as the Reynolds number increases. This is consistent with an increase of the turbulent flame speed due to the increased integral scale of turbulence. This behavior is typical of flames in the thin-reaction zone regime, which are affected by turbulent transport in the preheat layer. Fractal dimension and topology of the flame surface, statistics of temperature gradients, and flame structure are investigated and the dependence of these quantities on the Reynolds number is assessed.

  6. Investigation on Effect of Air Velocity in Turbulent Non-Premixed Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namazian Zafar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the turbulent non-premixed methane-air flame is simulated to determine the effect of air velocity on the length of flame, temperature distribution and mole fraction of species. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD technique is used to perform this simulation. To solve the turbulence flow, k-ε model is used. In contrast to the previous works, in this study, in each one of simulations the properties of materials are taken variable and then the results are compared. The results show that at a certain flow rate of fuel, by increasing the air velocity, similar to when the properties are constant, the width of the flame becomes thinner and the maximum temperature is higher; the penetration of oxygen into the fuel as well as fuel consumption is also increased. It is noteworthy that most of the pollutants produced are NOx, which are strongly temperature dependent. The amount of these pollutants rises when the temperature is increased. As a solution, decreasing the air velocity can decrease the amount of these pollutants. Finally, comparing the result of this study and the other work, which considers constant properties, shows that the variable properties assumption leads to obtaining more exact solution but the trends of both results are similar.

  7. Interest of 50% nitrous oxide and oxygen premix sedation in gerodontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Nicolas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Emmanuel Nicolas1,2, Claire Lassauzay1,21CHU de Clermont-Ferrand, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France; 2Université Clermont 1, EA 3847, Faculty of Dentistry, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, FranceAbstract: Elderly patients presenting cardiovascular, respiratory, or neurological disorders require a specific dental care approach, especially patients presenting Alzheimer’s disease. Sedative procedures can prevent dental care-induced stress, even when there is effective pain control, but they have to be adapted to accommodate age-induced physiological modifications, age-related pathologies, and the concomitant treatments. In many situations, routine sedative prescriptions for dental care, such as benzodiazepine or antihistaminics, are not recommended for these patients. Nitrous oxide inhalation together with a specific behavioral threshold is currently the only sedative procedure adapted to cognitively-impaired elderly patients. Nitrous oxide is able to curb stress and its cardiovascular consequences, improve oxygenation, and optimize cooperation during dental care, making not only rehabilitation treatments but also routine dental care a viable option.Keywords: nitrous oxide, oxygen, premix, sedation, gerodontology, dental care

  8. Melt water interaction tests. PREMIX tests PM10 and PM11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, A.; Schuetz, W.; Will, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe Inst. fuer Reaktorsicherheit, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    A series of experiments is being performed in the PREMIX test facility in which the mixing behaviour is investigated of a hot alumina melt discharged into water. The major parameters have been: the melt mass, the number of nozzles, the distance between the nozzle and the water, and the depth of the water. The paper describes the last two tests in which 20 kg of melt were released through one and three nozzles, respectively, directly into the water whose depth was 500 mm. The melt penetration and the associated phenomena of mixing are described by means of high-speed films and various measurements. The steam production and, subsequently, the pressure increased markedly only after the melt had reached the bottom of the pool. Spreading of the melt across the bottom caused violent boiling in both tests. Whereas the boiling lasted for minutes in the single-jet test, a steam explosion occurred in the triple-jet test about one second after the start of melt penetration. (author)

  9. Tip opening of premixed bunsen flames: Extinction with negative stretch and local Karlovitz number

    KAUST Repository

    Vu, Tranmanh

    2015-04-01

    The characteristics of tip openings in premixed bunsen flames have been studied experimentally by measuring OH radicals from laser-induced fluorescence and tip curvatures from chemiluminescent images. Results showed that the tip opening occurred at a constant equivalence ratio and was independent of the jet velocity in propane/air mixtures. The observation of a local extinction phenomenon of the negatively stretched flame due to the flame curvature could not be consistently explained based on flame stretch or the Karlovitz number, since they varied appreciably with the jet velocity. The concept of the local Karlovitz number (KaL) was introduced, which is defined as the ratio of the characteristic reaction time in the normal direction for a stretched flame to the characteristic flow time in the tangential direction for the stretched flame. The local Karlovitz number maintained a constant value under tip opening conditions, irrespective of the jet velocity. Tip opening occurred at a reasonably constant local Karlovitz number of about ~1.72 when the nitrogen dilution level in propane and n-butane fuels was varied.

  10. Effect of AC electric fields on the stabilization of premixed bunsen flames

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Minkuk

    2011-01-01

    The stabilization characteristics of laminar premixed bunsen flames have been investigated experimentally for stoichiometric methane-air mixture by applying AC voltage to the nozzle with the single-electrode configuration. The detachment velocity either at blowoff or partial-detachment has been measured by varying the applied voltage and frequency of AC. The result showed that the detachment velocity increased with the applied AC electric fields, such that the flame could be nozzle-attached even over five times of the blowoff velocity without having electric fields. There existed four distinct regimes depending on applied AC voltage and frequency. In the low voltage regime, the threshold condition of AC electric fields was identified, below which the effect of electric fields on the detachment velocity is minimal. In the moderate voltage regime, the flame base oscillated with the frequency synchronized to AC frequency and the detachment velocity increased linearly with the applied AC voltage and nonlinearly with the frequency. In the high voltage regime, two different sub-regimes depending on AC frequency were observed. For relatively low frequency, the flame base oscillated with the applied AC frequency together with the half frequency and the variation of the detachment velocity was insensitive to the applied voltage. For relatively high frequency, the stabilization of the flame was significantly affected by the generation of streamers and the detachment velocity decreased with the applied voltage. © 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental study of the effects of flameholder geometry on emissions and performance of lean premixed combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffe, G.; Venkataramani, K. S.; Duerr, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Emissions of NOx, CO and unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) are reported for a lean premixed propane-air system at inlet conditions of 800K and 1 MPa using twelve flameholder designs. The flameholders tested represent six design concepts with two values of blockage for each concept. Data were obtained at reference velocities of 35 m/s, 25 m/s and 20 m/s at combustor stations 10 cm and 30 cm downstream of the flameholders. Flameholder pressure drop was found to be a principal determinant of emissions performance. Designs producing larger pressure drops also produced less NOx, CO and UHC emissions. The lean stability limit equivalence ratio was found to be approximately 0.35 for all designs. Flashback velocities (axial components in the flameholder passages) varied between 30 m/s and 40 m/s. A perforated plate flameholder was operated with a velocity as low as 23 m/s through the perforations at equivalence ratio 0.7 without producing flashback.

  12. Temperature response of an acoustically forced turbulent lean premixed flame: A quantitative experimental determination

    KAUST Repository

    Chrystie, Robin

    2013-01-02

    Temperature measurements have been taken on an acoustically forced lean premixed turbulent bluff-body stabilized flame. The burner used in this study is a test-bed to investigate thermoacoustic instability in gas-turbine engines at the University of Cambridge. Numerous experiments have been performed on the burner, one of which used two-line OH planar laser induced fluorescence to measure temperature. Here, we employ vibrational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of nitrogen as an alternative to measure temperature, circumventing the limitations of the former method. The use of nitrogen CARS avoids the problem of probing regions of the flame with low OH concentrations that resulted in erroneous temperature. Such an application of CARS showed that the results from previous efforts were systematically biased up to 47% close to the bluff-body. We also critically review the limitations of CARS used in our experiments, pertaining to spatial resolution and associated biasing further downstream from the bluff-body. Using the more accurate results from this work, more up-to-date computational fluid dynamical (CFD) models of the burner can be validated, with the aim of improved understanding and prediction of thermoacoustic instability in gas turbines. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  13. Gaseous Detectors: Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, H J

    2011-01-01

    Gaseous Detectors in 'Charged Particle Detectors - Particle Detectors and Detector Systems', part of 'Landolt-Börnstein - Group I Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms: Numerical Data and Functional Relationships in Science and Technology, Volume 21B1: Detectors for Particles and Radiation. Part 1: Principles and Methods'. This document is part of Part 1 'Principles and Methods' of Subvolume B 'Detectors for Particles and Radiation' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Subsection '3.1.2 Gaseous Detectors' of Section '3.1 Charged Particle Detectors' of Chapter '3 Particle Detectors and Detector Systems' with the content: 3.1.2 Gaseous Detectors 3.1.2.1 Introduction 3.1.2.2 Basic Processes 3.1.2.2.1 Gas ionization by charged particles 3.1.2.2.1.1 Primary clusters 3.1.2.2.1.2 Cluster size distribution 3.1.2.2.1.3 Total number of ion pairs 3.1.2.2.1.4 Dependence of energy deposit on particle velocity 3.1.2.2.2 Transport of...

  14. Plasma-assisted cataluminescence sensor array for gaseous hydrocarbons discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Na; Liu, Haiyan; Han, Jiaying; Han, Feifei; Liu, Hualin; Ouyang, Jin

    2012-06-05

    Combining plasma activation and cross-reactivity of sensor array, we have developed a plasma-assisted cataluminescence (PA-CTL) sensor array for fast sensing and discrimination of gaseous hydrocarbons, which can be potentially used for fast diagnosis of lung cancer. Based on dielectric barrier discharge, a low-temperature plasma is generated to activate gaseous hydrocarbons with low cataluminescence (CTL) activities. Extremely increased CTL responses have been obtained, which resulted in a plasma assistance factor of infinity (∞) for some hydrocarbons. On a 4 × 3 PA-CTL sensor array made from alkaline-earth nanomaterials, gaseous hydrocarbons showed robust and unique CTL responses to generate characteristic patterns for fast discrimination. Because of the difference in the component of hydrocarbons in breath, exhaled breath samples from donors with and without lung cancer were tested, and good discrimination has been achieved by this technique. In addition, the feasibility of multidimentional detection based on temperature was confirmed. It had good reproducibility and gave a linear range of 65-6500 ng/mL or 77-7700 ppmv (R > 0.98) for CH(4) with a detection limit of 33 ng/mL (38 ppmv) on MgO. The PA-CTL sensor array is simple, low-cost, thermally stable, nontoxic, and has an abundance of alkaline-earth nanomaterials to act as sensing elements. This has expanded the applications of CTL-based senor arrays and will show great potential in clinical fast diagnosis.

  15. OH reactivity at a rural site (Wangdu) in the North China Plain: contributions from OH reactants and experimental OH budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Tan, Zhaofeng; Lu, Keding; Bohn, Birger; Broch, Sebastian; Brown, Steven S.; Dong, Huabin; Gomm, Sebastian; Häseler, Rolf; He, Lingyan; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Li, Xin; Liu, Ying; Lu, Sihua; Min, Kyung-Eun; Rohrer, Franz; Shao, Min; Wang, Baolin; Wang, Ming; Wu, Yusheng; Zeng, Limin; Zhang, Yinson; Wahner, Andreas; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2017-01-01

    In 2014, a large, comprehensive field campaign was conducted in the densely populated North China Plain. The measurement site was located in a botanic garden close to the small town Wangdu, without major industry but influenced by regional transportation of air pollution. The loss rate coefficient of atmospheric hydroxyl radicals (OH) was quantified by direct measurements of the OH reactivity. Values ranged between 10 and 20 s-1 for most of the daytime. Highest values were reached in the late night with maximum values of around 40 s-1. OH reactants mainly originated from anthropogenic activities as indicated (1) by a good correlation between measured OH reactivity and carbon monoxide (linear correlation coefficient R2 = 0.33) and (2) by a high contribution of nitrogen oxide species to the OH reactivity (up to 30 % in the morning). Total OH reactivity was measured by a laser flash photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence instrument (LP-LIF). Measured values can be explained well by measured trace gas concentrations including organic compounds, oxygenated organic compounds, CO and nitrogen oxides. Significant, unexplained OH reactivity was only observed during nights, when biomass burning of agricultural waste occurred on surrounding fields. OH reactivity measurements also allow investigating the chemical OH budget. During this campaign, the OH destruction rate calculated from measured OH reactivity and measured OH concentration was balanced by the sum of OH production from ozone and nitrous acid photolysis and OH regeneration from hydroperoxy radicals within the uncertainty of measurements. However, a tendency for higher OH destruction compared to OH production at lower concentrations of nitric oxide is also observed, consistent with previous findings in field campaigns in China.

  16. Control of lipopolysaccharide-high-density lipoprotein interactions by an acute-phase reactant in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, P S; McAdam, K P; Soldau, K; Ulevitch, R J

    1985-10-01

    We have recently described several phenomena involving the interactions of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Salmonella minnesota Re595 (Re595-LPS) with rabbit serum, which are different in and unique to acute-phase serum as compared with normal serum (P.S. Tobias and R.J. Ulevitch, J. Immunol. 131:1913-1916, 1983). To determine whether these phenomena could also be observed in acute-phase human serum (APHS), we used APHS obtained from volunteers injected with etiocholanolone. As observed in acute-phase rabbit serum, we found that (i) in APHS, Re595-LPS forms a protein complex with a density of 1.3 g/cm3 which does not form in normal human serum (NHS), (ii) in APHS, the t1/2 for LPS-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) complexation is at least a factor of 10 slower than the t1/2 for LPS-HDL complexation in NHS, (iii) when Re595-LPS serum mixtures are dialyzed against a low salt buffer, Re595-LPS precipitates in less soluble form from APHS than from NHS, and (iv) the precipitate from Re595-LPS-APHS mixtures includes a protein with a molecular weight of approximately 60,000 which does not precipitate from Re595-LPS-NHS mixtures or from NHS or APHS alone. These indications of an altered status of LPS in NHS and APHS suggest that one or more acute-phase reactants interact with Re595-LPS to modify its rate of binding to HDL.

  17. RADICAL QUENCHING OF METHANE-AIR PREMIXED FLAME IN MICROREACTORS USING DETAILED CHEMICAL KINETICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUNJIE CHEN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The steady hetero-/homogeneous combustion of lean methane-air mixtures in plane channel-flow microreactors was investigated numerically to elucidate the effects of wall material and initial sticking coefficient on radical quenching. Simulations were performed with a two-dimensional numerical model employing detailed reaction mechanisms to examine the interaction between heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions on platinum, alumina, quartz and copper. Comparisons among wall materials revealed that the wall chemical effect plays a vital role in the distribution of OH* radical. Homogeneous reaction of methane over platinum is significantly inhibited due to the rapid depletion of reactants on catalytic surfaces, rather than the radical adsorption. The inhibition of radical quenching on the surface of alumina is most pronounced. As the microreactor is smaller than the critical dimension of 0.7 mm, the wall chemical effect on flame characteristics becomes of great importance.

  18. Unstable Roche-Lobe Overflow of Gaseous Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Brian

    The discoveries of more than 100 roughly Earth-sized bodies with orbital periods less than 1 day, ultra-short-period planets or candidates (USPs), have challenged planet formation theories, and evidence suggests USPs may be the remnants of gaseous planets that shed their atmospheres. Indeed, many hot Jupiters are near Roche-Lobe overflow (RLO), and tidal decay can push them the rest of the way in. Recent work has shown stable RLO (atmospheres lost via a steady outflow and thin accretion disk) probably cannot produce USPs on its own but suggested unstable RLO (atmospheres quickly shed on dynamical timescales) may. In fact, stable RLO may drive overflowing hot Jupiters into unstable RLO, and by analogy with the common-envelope binaries, the core that remains can drive off the gaseous envelope at the cost of its orbital energy. Wellestablished mass-radius relations for gaseous planets, coupled to simple energy and angular momentum considerations, provide a connection between the observed masses and periods for USPs and their putative progenitor gaseous planets, with few free parameters. We propose to investigate the hypothesis that USPs originate through tidal decay and a combination of stable and unstable Roche-lobe overflow of short-period gaseous planets through the following studies: -We will explore the planetary masses, orbital periods, etc. that produce unstable RLO using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) suite. -We will relate the observed periods and masses of USPs to their putative progenitor masses and periods to see whether they are consistent with the unstable RLO hypothesis. This proposal is directly relevant to the Exoplanets Research Program since it seeks to "understand the ... physical processes of exoplanets" and "improve understanding of [their] origins" through "theoretical studies ... and modeling'". We also expect that it will have broad impacts on a variety of astrophysical topics: -Ultra-short period planets could

  19. Composition Independent Thermometry in Gaseous Combustion Using Spectral Lineshape Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenak, Dominic

    2016-11-01

    Temperature is an important thermochemical property that holds the key to revealing several combustion phenomena such as pollutant formation, flame extinction, and heat release. In a practical combusting environment, the local composition is unknown, hindering the effectiveness of established non-intrusive thermometry techniques. This study aims to offset this limitation by developing laser thermometry techniques that do not require prior knowledge of the local composition. Multiple methods for obtaining temperature are demonstrated, which make use of the spectral line broadening of an absorbing species (Kr) seeded into the flow. These techniques involve extracting the Doppler broadening from the Voight profile and utilizing compositional scaling of collisional broadening and shift to determine temperature. Doppler broadening-temperature scaling of two photon Kr-PLIF is provided. Lean-premixed and diffusion jet flames of CH4 will serve as the test bed for experimentation, and validation of the two methods will be made using the corresponding temperature determined from Rayleigh scattering imaging with adiabatic mixing and unity Lewis number assumptions. A ratiometric dual lineshape thermometry method for turbulent flames will also be introduced. AFOSR Grant FA9550-16-1-0190 with Dr. Chiping Li as Program Manager.

  20. The Effect of Different Levels of Minerals and Vitamins Premixes on Performance of Laying Hens fed by Wheat and Corn Base Diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nobakht

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to evaluate effects of different levels of mineral and vitamin premixes with wheat and corn base diets on performance and egg traits of laying hens. Experiment carried out as 2*5 factorial include wheat and corn base diets and 5 levels of minerals and vitamin premixes (0, 0.25, 0.35, 0.45 and 0.55 percentage in a completely randomized design with 360 Hi-Line (W36 laying hens from 65 to 77 weeks in 10 treatments, 3 replicates and 12 hens in each replicate for 12 weeks. The results showed that diets composition, level of mineral and vitamin premixes, and interaction between them significantly affected the performance and egg traits of laying hens (P