WorldWideScience

Sample records for premenstrual dysphoric symptoms

  1. Survey of premenstrual symptom severity and impairment in Korean adolescents: premenstrual dysphoric disorder, subthreshold premenstrual dysphoric disorder and premenstrual syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaewon; Joe, Sook-Haeng; Lee, Moon-Soo; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Jung, In-Kwa

    2014-06-01

    The aims of the study were to examine the prevalence of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), subthreshold PMDD and premenstrual syndrome (PMS) among adolescents, and to assess the nature of symptoms and the impact on daily life functions, especially for PMDD and subthreshold PMDD. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among adolescents from an urban area. Participants included 984 girls divided into the following four groups, using a premenstrual symptoms screening tool: PMDD, subthreshold PMDD, moderate/severe PMS and no/mild PMS. An Adolescent Mental Problem Questionnaire, Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale, and a menstrual information questionnaire were also used. Sixty-three (6.76%) of the subjects met the criteria for PMDD and 58 (6.2%) were subthreshold PMDD. The subthreshold PMDD group included 79.3% who met the symptom criteria for PMDD, but their impairment was moderate, and 21.7% who were falling short by the number of symptoms for PMDD diagnosis, though reporting severe impairment. The symptom intensity and frequency of the subthreshold PMDD subjects were similar to those in subjects with PMDD. In these two groups, 69% had moderate to severe physical symptoms. Psychiatric problems, including depression and anxiety, were higher in the PMDD and subthreshold PMDD groups than in the moderate/severe PMS and no/mild PMS group. In total, 20% of adolescents reported suffering from distressing premenstrual symptoms, and girls with PMDD and subthreshold PMDD were very similar in their symptom severity and characteristics. Prospective daily charting is needed to confirm the accurate diagnosis and management of PMDD. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Daily symptom ratings for studying premenstrual dysphoric disorder : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, Renske C.; Jung, Sophie E.; Miloserdov, Kristina; Schoevers, Robert A.; aan het Rot, Marije

    2016-01-01

    Background: To review how daily symptom ratings have been used in research into premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), and to discuss opportunities for the future. Methods: PsycINFO and Medline were systematically searched, resulting in the inclusion of 75 studies in which (1) participants met the

  3. Premenstrual Symptom Screening Tool: A Useful Tool for DSM-5 Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kadir Ozdel

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To assess the usefulness of Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool (PSST) in detecting Premenstrual Dysphoric Syndrome (PMDD) and Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) in a Turkish sample. Material and Method: One hundred and eighteen women were included in the study. Participants were menstruating women, between the ages of 18 and 49 years who work in various departments of Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit Teaching and Research Hospital. Sociodemographic data collection form, PSST, and Symptom Check List (...

  4. Prevalence of premenstrual symptoms and premenstrual dysphoric disorder among adolescents students of Zahedan

    OpenAIRE

    Nourmohammad Bakhshani; Zahra Hasanzadeh; Mahvash Raghibi

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is believed that adolescents suffer from dysmenorrhea but premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is not a common and prevalent disorder. Recently, some studies indicated that PMS and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) were common problems among students and prevalence of premenstrual symptoms reported differently due to socio-cultural characteristics. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of PMS and PMDD in a group of Iranian adolescent students.Materials and Me...

  5. Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD): Different from PMS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... between premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and premenstrual syndrome (PMS)? How is PMDD treated? Answers from Jacqueline M. Thielen, M.D. ... disabling extension of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Although regular PMS and PMDD both have physical and emotional symptoms, PMDD causes ...

  6. Premenstrual Symptom Screening Tool: A Useful Tool for DSM-5 Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Ozdel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the usefulness of Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool (PSST in detecting Premenstrual Dysphoric Syndrome (PMDD and Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS in a Turkish sample. Material and Method: One hundred and eighteen women were included in the study. Participants were menstruating women, between the ages of 18 and 49 years who work in various departments of Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit Teaching and Research Hospital. Sociodemographic data collection form, PSST, and Symptom Check List (SCL-90-R were given to the participants, filled out by participants and checked out by researchers. Participants were divided into three groups (i.e., women with subthreshold premenstrual symptoms, women with PMDD, and women with PMS according to the scores they get on the PSST. These groups were compared according to PSST scores and SCL-90-R scores. Results: Internal consistency was excellent (Cronbach %u03B1=0.928 for the items of the tool. In this sample, the prevalence of the PMDD and PMS were 15.2 % (n=18 and 32.2 % (n=38 respectively. When we compare the scores on SCL-90-R subscales there were significant differences between the PMDD, PMS, and women with subthreshold groups. Besides there were significant differences for the three groups in terms of percentages of women who reported moderate to severe symptoms on the four items that are essential to PMDD diagnosis. Discussion: Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool is a useful tool to detect candidates for PMDD and moderate to severe PMS.

  7. Attitudes of Spanish women toward premenstrual symptoms, premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: results of a nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lete, Iñaki; Dueñas, José Luis; Serrano, Isabel; Doval, José Luis; Martínez-Salmeán, Javier; Coll, Carme; Pérez-Campos, Ezequiel; Arbat, Agnès

    2011-11-01

    To assess the attitudes of women with premenstrual symptoms in relation to their perception of complaints and request for medical advice. Cross-sectional study of a representative cohort of 2018 Spanish women aged 15-49 years. Participants were personally interviewed at home and completed the premenstrual symptoms screening tool. A total of 1554 women (73.7%) complained of some of the premenstrual symptoms during the last 12 menstrual cycles. The prevalence of moderate or severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS) was 8.9% and the prevalence of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) 1.1%. Only 291 (18.7%) women had sought medical advice. The main reason given by 90.6% of symptomatic women for not seeking medical consultation was to consider that symptoms were normal. A total of 175 (60.1%) women received pharmacological treatment (hormonal contraceptives in 95% followed by analgesics in 50% and anti-inflammatory agents in 44%), 20% were not treated because physicians considered that symptoms were not important and would disappear spontaneously, and 12% received only advice to change life style. Women suffering from PMS or PMDD do not usually seek medical advice and among those seeking medical care, in many cases, an adequate response to their demands is not obtained. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A symptom diary to assess severe premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Carolyn; Kues, Johanna N; Andersson, Gerhard; Kleinstäuber, Maria; Weise, Cornelia

    2017-08-01

    The differentiation between premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) has been widely discussed. PMDD is listed as a mental disorder in the DSM-5, whereas PMS is not considered as a mental disorder in any diagnostic manual. Consequently, PMS is operationalized in different ways. Keeping a symptom diary is required to diagnose PMDD but is also recommended for PMS. The aim of our study was, therefore, to operationalize PMS and PMDD within a DSM-5-based symptom diary. We developed a symptom-intensity-score (SI-score) and an interference-score (INT-score) to evaluate the symptom diary. Ninety-eight women (aged 20-45 years) completed a symptom diary over two menstrual cycles, a retrospective screening for premenstrual symptoms, and answered additional impairment questionnaires from August 2013 to August 2015. The scores revealed moderate to good reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.83-0.96). Convergent validity was shown by significant correlations with a retrospective screening, the Pain Disability Index, and the German PMS-Impact Questionnaire. Discriminant validity was indicated by low correlations with the Big Five Inventory-10. These scores may facilitate the evaluation of prospective symptom ratings in research and clinical practice. Future research should focus on continuing to validate the scores (e.g., in an ambulatory setting).

  9. [Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is categorized as a subclass in depressive disorders of DSM-5. Speaking without fear of misunderstanding, my opinion is that patients with PMDD should be treated with medication, if there is no misdiagnosis as premenstrual syndrome (PMS). For the appropriate treatment of PMDD, it must be diagnosed accurately according to the DSM-5 criteria. The differential diagnosis and treatment of PMDD should be carried out by experienced psychiatrists.

  10. Acupuncture for premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Reina; Matsubara, Shigeki; Yoshimoto, Sazu; Imai, Kenji; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Kitakoji, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), a severe type of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), is characterized mainly by psychological symptoms confined to the premenstrual period, which reduce not only patients' quality of life, but also their working activities. Although various therapies have been employed for PMDD, some patients do not respond to them. We recently employed acupuncture treatment for a patient in PMDD. Symptoms ameliorated during the acupuncture (+) period, but deteriorated during the acupuncture (-) period. This review describes the clinical course of this case. The diagnosis and treatment of PMDD are briefly summarized and previous acupuncture treatment for PMS are reviewed. The difficulties in evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture for PMS/PMDD are addressed. It is suggested that acupuncture may be a treatment option for PMDD.

  11. Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder in Perimenopausal Women

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Soo-Ho; Kim, Tae-Hee; Lee, Hae-Hyeog; Lee, Arum; Jeon, Dong-Su; Park, Junsik; Kim, Yesol

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) of perimenopausal women at a university hospital along with their menstrual characters. Methods A questionnaire survey regarding premenstrual symptoms was carried out in 100 perimenopausal women (43 to 53, years). The pattern of menstruation and, the intensity of dysmenorrhea were assessed; and further, the symptoms were classified according to their number, intensity, and persisten...

  12. Biopsychosocial aspects of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tamaki; Asakura, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    A majority of women in their reproductive years experience a variety of symptoms premenstrually that can alter behavior and well-being and affect family, friends, and working relationships. Notwithstanding its prevalence, however, research has not yet clarified this inscrutable condition, commonly known as premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or more severe PMS, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). This comprehensive review discusses the diagnosis, epidemiology, symptoms, etiology, and the complex web of biopsychosocial factors that attends PMS.

  13. Are there differential symptom profiles that improve in response to different pharmacological treatments of premenstrual syndrome/premenstrual dysphoric disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbreich, Uriel; O'Brien, P M Shaughn; Eriksson, Elias; Bäckström, Torbjörn; Yonkers, Kimberly A; Freeman, Ellen W

    2006-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that the accepted treatments for premenstrual syndrome (PMS)/premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) have similar overall efficacy. While these treatments are more effective than placebo, response rates associated with them are far from satisfactory (PMS and PMDD, and may point to a more specific diagnosis of these conditions.

  14. Epidemiological Distribution and Subtype Analysis of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder Syndromes and Symptoms Based on TCM Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingqi Qiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed an epidemiological investigation of subjects with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD to identify the clinical distribution of the major syndromes and symptoms. The pathogenesis of PMDD mainly involves the dysfunction of liver conveyance and dispersion. Excessive liver conveyance and dispersion are associated with liver-qi invasion syndrome, while insufficient liver conveyance and dispersion are expressed as liver-qi depression syndrome. Additionally, a nonconditional logistic regression was performed to analyze the symptomatic features of liver-qi invasion and liver-qi depression. As a result of this analysis, two subtypes of PMDD are proposed, namely, excessive liver conveyance and dispersion (liver-qi invasion syndrome and insufficient liver conveyance and dispersion (liver-qi depression syndrome. Our findings provide an epidemiological foundation for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of PMDD based on the identification of different types.

  15. [The efficiency of oral contraception containing drospirenone in treating symptoms of premenstrual syndrome or premenstrual dysphoric disorder in gyneacology practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svojanovská, K

    2010-10-01

    The efficiency of oral contraception containing drospirenone in treating symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) was demonstrated in a number of studies. The objective of this observation was to use the "Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool" (PSST) to identify women who suffer from severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or PMDD and evaluate the benefits of their treatment through using the oral contraceptive containing drospirenone in regime 24/4 in gyneacology practice. The retrospective study was conducted from September 2008 to August 2009. Fifty-one women met by the PSST (Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool, Steiner et. al., 2003) the criteria of severe PMS/PMDD. Twenty-eight women took no contraception at the start of the evaluation and twenty-three already took oral contraceptives before changing to the oral contraceptive with drospirenone. The women completed the PSST and in the case of severe PMS/PMDD started treatment with the oral contraceptive containing 20 microg ethinylestradiol /EE/ + 3 mg drospirenone /drsp/ in regime 24/4. The next evaluation was conducted by the same PSST after 3 or 4 months of treatment with this oral contraceptive. The study involved 51 women between the ages of 15 and 44 years (average 25.7 years), who completed the PSST before and after 3 or 4 months of treatment with the oral contraceptive containing drospirenone. The summary score of all subjects significantly decreased from 24.6 before they started using the oral contraceptive with drospirenone to 7,2 after 3 or 4 months of treatment with this oral contraceptive. Significant declines in summary scores have been shown in both groups (in the group without oral contraception from 24.9 at the start of the observation to 8.2 after 3 or 4 months of using this oral contraceptive with drospirenone; and from 24.3 to 6.0 in the group with the change from using various oral contraceptives to using the contraceptive containing drospirenone). The application of PSST for detection

  16. [Assessment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder symptoms: population of women in Casablanca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHichi alami, Kh; Tahiri, S M; Moussaoui, D; Kadri, N

    2002-01-01

    Menstruation is a biological phenomenon that has been subject of myths and taboos within and among various cultures. These myths distort the reality surrounding menstruation and create ambivalent feelings about the value and usefulness of this function outside of its necessity as mean of reproduction. Thus studies concerning menstruation need to take into account cultural and psychosocial factors that define the meaning, values and behavior associated with this biological phenomenon. According to several studies, 70% of women experience psychological faintness during this menstrual phase, 40% of them have these symptoms at each menstruation and between 3 to 8% of them suffer severely reacquiring medical support. This entity called premenstrual dysphoric disorder is defined by the presence of several symptoms (distress, tension, irritability, moodiness.) with a significant impairment in work or social functioning beginning during the week before and ending within a few days after the onset of menses. Several studies conducted over the past few years suggested that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotoninergic tricyclic drugs may be more effective than other types of antidepressants in treating PMS symptoms. Two protocols are proposed; a continuous treatment or intermittent use during few days during pre-menstrual and menstrual phase for several cycles. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the prevalence of a potential premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) during one menstrual cycle, in a representative sample of general population of Casablanca, according the DSM IV criteria. On the other hand, a questionnaire, available from the authors, was used to explore socio-demographic data. Among 618 women interviewed, 310 met the criteria of a potential PMDD (50.2%). The mean age of the population with PMDD was 32.2 8 years ranging from 20 to 50 years; 54.8% of them were married, 33.9% of them were single and 66.5% of them had between 1

  17. Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder: Contemporary Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Robert L; Soares, Claudio N

    2018-02-01

    Most ovulatory women experience premenstrual symptoms (premenstrual syndrome, molimina) which indicate impending menstruation and are of little clinical relevance because they do not affect quality of life. A few women, however, experience significant physical and/or psychological symptoms before menstruation that, if left untreated, would result in deterioration in functioning and relationships. The precise etiology remains elusive, although new theories are gaining support in pre-clinical and early clinical trials. Refined diagnostic criteria allow better discrimination of this condition from other psychiatric diagnoses and the selection of symptom appropriate therapies that afford relief for most women. Pharmacotherapies (particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and SNRIs) represent the first-line treatment for premenstrual dysphoric disorder and severe, mood-related premenstrual syndrome. Continuous combined oral contraceptives have limited evidence for usefulness in premenstrual dysphoric disorder, whereas medical ovarian suppression is often recommended for patients who fail to respond or cannot tolerate first-line treatments (e.g., selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). The use of cognitive behavioural therapies is promising, but it remains limited by sparse data and restricted access to trained professionals. A proper diagnosis (particularly the distinction from other underlying psychiatric conditions) is crucial for the implementation of effective therapy and alleviation of this impairing condition. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: definitions and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ellen W

    2003-08-01

    Because of the prevalence, chronicity and distress caused by premenstrual symptoms (PMS), diagnosis and effective treatments are important information for clinicians. The DSM-IV requires at least five specified symptoms for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), a severe dysphoric form of PMS, while the ICD-10 requires only one distressing symptom for a diagnosis of PMS. Many women who seek treatment fall between these two diagnostic approaches, and standard diagnostic criteria for clinically significant PMS are needed. A diagnosis of PMS consists of determining the timing of the symptoms in relation to menses, meaningful change between post- and premenstrual symptom severity and a clinically significant severity of the symptoms. A differential diagnosis to distinguish PMS from other medical and psychiatric conditions is important for appropriate treatment. No hormone or laboratory test indicates a PMS diagnosis. The current diagnostic standard requires confirmation of subjective symptom reports by prospective daily diaries. Diagnostic criteria for PMS must recognize the broad range of symptoms, the temporal pattern of the symptoms and the critical issue of symptom severity, which differentiates clinically significant PMS from normal menstrual cycle changes.

  19. Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder in Japanese Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takashi; Imoto, Yoko; Nagasawa, Hiroyo; Muroya, Miyuki; Shiina, Masami

    2015-08-01

    To determine the prevalence and impact of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in Japanese collegiate athletes, with a focus on their disruption of athletic performance. Cross-sectional study. A university in Osaka, the largest city in western Japan. 232 female collegiate athletes. Premenstrual symptoms and social activities. The prevalence of each premenstrual symptom was high. The prevalence of moderate to severe PMS and PMDD was 8.6% and 2.9%, respectively, the same as in general high school students. The athletic performance of 44.3% of athletes was found to suffer in a game or in practice. "Elite athletes" (OR 8.63, 95% CI: 1.22-120.0), "Difficulty concentrating" (OR 3.15, 95% CI: 1.05-10.6), and "Fatigue or lack of energy" (OR 5.92, 95% CI: 1.32-34.5) increased the risk of poor athletic performance. This study showed that premenstrual symptoms affect not only the daily activities but also the athletic performance of collegiate athletes. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder: neuroendocrine interferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poiană, Cătălina; Muşat, Mădălina; Carsote, Mara; Chiriţă, Corina

    2009-01-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) consists in severe cognitive and mood changes, more aggressive as seen in premenstrual syndrome (PMS). These two syndromes are situated at the border between gynecology and psychiatry but the link between the two domains remains the neuroendocrine underlying mechanisms. In present, there are some molecular systems certainly proved as being involved, like estrogens. The hormonal pattern consists not in different levels of the hormones but different response to normal hormonal levels. The cyclical biochemical triggers are related to neurotransmitters as serotonin, endorphin and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). The heritability of the syndrome is sustained by genetic polymorphism in ESR1 gene. Thus, the PMDD is the result of multiple disturbances regarding neuroendocrine systems.

  1. Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder among Jordanian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaideh, S H; Al-Ashram, S A; Al-Modallal, H

    2014-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to detect the prevalence, severity and factors associated with premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) among Jordanian women, and to identify the most common self-treatment strategies used by women to alleviate the symptoms associated with PMS and/or PMDD. Data were collected from 254 women studying or working at one of the largest Jordanian governmental university using Shortened Premenstrual Assessment Form (SPAF), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition-Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) research criteria for diagnosis of PMDD. The findings indicated that the prevalence of PMS and PMDD were 80.2%, 10.2% respectively. Abdominal cramp, lower back pain and breast pain were reported to be the most severe symptoms associated with PMS and PMDD. Significant correlations were found between severity of premenstrual symptoms and perceived stress level, age, body mass index, marital status, perception of health in general and absent from work. The most frequently reported self-treatment strategies used by women to alleviate PMS and PMDD symptoms were: taking analgesics, increasing hot fluids intake, wearing heavy and warm clothes, and lying down on the abdomen. Understanding the prevalence, severity and self-treatment strategies for women experiencing PMS and PMDD symptoms help in improving women's quality of life and decrease their suffering from these symptoms. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Prevalence, Incidence and stability of premenstrual dysphoric disorder in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittchen, H.U.; Becker, E.S.; Lieb, R.; Krause, P.

    2002-01-01

    Background. Despite an abundance of clinical research on premenstrual and menstrual symptoms. few epidemiological data provide estimates of the prevalence, incidence, co-morbidity, stability and correlates of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in the community. Aims. To describe the prevalence,

  3. Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder: Epidemiology and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantsoo, Liisa; Epperson, C Neill

    2015-11-01

    Recently designated as a disorder in the DSM-5, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) presents an array of avenues for further research. PMDD's profile, characterized by cognitive-affective symptoms during the premenstruum, is unique from that of other affective disorders in its symptoms and cyclicity. Neurosteroids may be a key contributor to PMDD's clinical presentation and etiology, and represent a potential avenue for drug development. This review will present recent literature on potential contributors to PMDD's pathophysiology, including neurosteroids and stress, and explore potential treatment targets.

  4. Management strategies for premenstrual syndrome/premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Courtney I; Lynch, Ann M; Morin, Anna K

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the current nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment options for symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Literature was obtained through searches of MEDLINE Ovid (1950-March week 3, 2008) and EMBASE Drugs and Pharmacology (all years), as well as a bibliographic review of articles identified by the searches. Key terms included premenstrual syndrome, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, PMS, PMDD, and treatment. All pertinent clinical trials, retrospective studies, and case reports in human subjects published in the English language were identified and evaluated for the safety and efficacy of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments of PMS/PMDD. Data from these studies and information from review articles were included in this review. Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been proven safe and effective for the treatment of PMDD and are recommended as first-line agents when pharmacotherapy is warranted. Currently fluoxetine, controlled-release paroxetine, and sertraline are the only Food and Drug Administration-approved agents for this indication. Suppression of ovulation using hormonal therapies is an alternative approach to treating PMDD when SSRIs or second-line psychotropic agents are ineffective; however, adverse effects limit their use. Anxiolytics, spironolactone, and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs can be used as supportive care to relieve symptoms. Despite lack of specific evidence, lifestyle modifications and exercise are first-line recommendations for all women with PMS/PMDD and may be all that is needed to treat mild-to-moderate symptoms. Herbal and vitamin supplementation and complementary and alternative medicine have been evaluated for use in PMS/PMDD and have produced unclear or conflicting results. More controlled clinical trials are needed to determine their safety and efficacy and potential for drug interactions. Healthcare providers need to be aware of the symptoms of

  5. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder and severe premenstrual syndrome in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapkin, Andrea J; Mikacich, Judith A

    2013-06-01

    Numerous epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that premenstrual disorders (PMDs) begin during the teenage years. At least 20 % of adolescents experience moderate-to-severe premenstrual symptoms associated with functional impairment. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) consists of physical and/or psychological premenstrual symptoms that interfere with functioning. Symptoms are triggered by ovulation and resolve within the first few days of menses. The prevalence of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), a severe form of PMS accompanied by affective symptoms, is likely equal to or higher than in adults. The diagnosis of a PMD requires a medical and psychological history and physical examination but it is the daily prospective charting of bothersome symptoms for two menstrual cycles that will clearly determine if the symptoms are related to a PMD or to another underlying medical or psychiatric diagnosis. The number and type of symptoms are less important than the timing. Randomized controlled trials of pharmacologic treatments in teens with moderate-to-severe PMS and PMDD have yet to be performed. However, clinical experience suggests that treatments that are effective for adults can be used in adolescents. PMS can be ameliorated by education about the nature of the disorder, improving calcium intake, performing exercise and reducing stress, but to treat severe PMS or PMDD pharmacologic therapy is usually required. Eliminating ovulation with certain hormonal contraceptive formulations or gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists will be discussed. Serotonergic agonists are a first-line therapy for adults, and some serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as fluoxetine and escitalopram can be administered safely to teens.

  6. Evaluation and management of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frackiewicz, E J; Shiovitz, T M

    2001-01-01

    To review premenstrual disorders, their varied symptoms, possible etiology, and treatment options. Published articles identified through MEDLINE (1966-2001) using the search terms premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and the additional terms treatment and etiology. Additional references were identified from the bibliographies of the retrieved articles. PMS refers to a group of menstrually related disorders that are estimated to affect up to 40% of women of childbearing age. The varied symptoms of PMS include mood swings, tension, anger, irritability, headache, bloating, and increased appetite with food cravings. PMS symptoms occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and remit with the onset of menstruation or shortly afterward. Approximately 5% of women with PMS suffer from PMDD, a more disabling and severe form of PMS in which mood symptoms predominate. Because no tests can confirm PMS or PMDD, the diagnosis should be made on the basis of a patient-completed daily symptom calendar and the exclusion of other medical disorders. The causes of PMS and PMDD are uncertain, but are likely associated with aberrant responses to normal hormonal fluctuations during the menstrual cycle. For most women, symptoms can be relieved or reduced through lifestyle interventions, such as dietary changes and exercise, and drug therapy with hormonal or psychotropic agents. For PMDD, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have recently emerged as first-line therapy. Certain dietary supplements, including calcium, also may be an option for some women. PMS and PMDD are complex but highly treatable disorders. Pharmacists can improve the recognition and management of these common conditions by providing patient education on premenstrual symptoms and counseling women on lifestyle interventions and pharmacotherapy to relieve their discomfort.

  7. Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder in perimenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Soo-Ho; Kim, Tae-Hee; Lee, Hae-Hyeog; Lee, Arum; Jeon, Dong-Su; Park, Junsik; Kim, Yesol

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) of perimenopausal women at a university hospital along with their menstrual characters. A questionnaire survey regarding premenstrual symptoms was carried out in 100 perimenopausal women (43 to 53, years). The pattern of menstruation and, the intensity of dysmenorrhea were assessed; and further, the symptoms were classified according to their number, intensity, and persistence. The PMS criteria of American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG) and PMDD criteria by American Psychiatric Association (APA) were evaluated. The approximate prevalence of PMS criteria was 95% and that of PMDD criteria was 23%. The most dominant symptoms were 'breast tenderness', 'abdominal bloating', 'and headache'. PMDD was significantly associated with the severity of dysmenorrhea (P = 0.020). There was no significant relation with age, height, weight, body mass index and the cycle of menstruation. Most women experience PMS and PMDD, which and have a significant impact on the activity of perimenopause women. However in most women that do not know well about PMS and PMDD. We should educate and inform women of PMS and PMDD, thus helping them increase their quality of life.

  8. [Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) as an independent disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, D; Bolz, M

    2012-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and its clinical relevance in differentiation to premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Regarding recent research on epidemiology, aetiology, symptoms and therapy, PMDD is a discrete disorder and has a good prognosis in cases of appropriate diagnosis and therapy. The information provided in this review will help to better integrate PMDD into the psychiatric diagnostic process; options for diagnosis and treatment are also presented. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. The Cerebellum and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapkin, Andrea J; Berman, Steven M; London, Edythe D

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum constitutes ten percent of brain volume and contains the majority of brain neurons. Although it was historically viewed primarily as processing motoric computations, current evidence supports a more comprehensive role, where cerebro-cerebellar feedback loops also modulate various forms of cognitive and affective processing. Here we present evidence for a role of the cerebellum in premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), which is characterized by severe negative mood symptoms during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Although a link between menstruation and cyclical dysphoria has long been recognized, neuroscientific investigations of this common disorder have only recently been explored. This article reviews functional and structural brain imaging studies of PMDD and the similar but less well defined condition of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). The most consistent findings are that women with premenstrual dysphoria exhibit greater relative activity than other women in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior lobules VI and VII of the neocerebellum. Since both brain areas have been implicated in emotional processing and mood disorders, working memory and executive functions, this greater activity probably represents coactivation within a cerebro-cerebellar feedback loop regulating emotional and cognitive processing. Some of the evidence suggests that increased activity within this circuit may preserve cerebellar structure during aging, and possible mechanisms and implications of this finding are discussed.

  10. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder among medical students of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background/Objective: This study aimed at estimating the prevalence and associated factors of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) among medical students in a University in the ... symptoms and is associated with impairment of social and role functioning. .... includes depressed mood, anxiety, mood lability,.

  11. Prevalence of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder among college students of Bhavnagar, Gujarat

    OpenAIRE

    Raval, Chintan Madhusudan; Panchal, Bharat Navinchandra; Tiwari, Deepak Sachidanand; Vala, Ashok Ukabhai; Bhatt, Renish Bhupendrabhai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) characterized by mood changes, anxiety, and somatic symptoms experienced during the specific time of menstrual cycle. Prevalence data of PMS and PMDD is sparse among college girls in India. Aims: The aim of this study is to study the prevalence of PMS and PMDD among college students of Bhavnagar (Gujarat), its associated demographic and menstrual factors, to rank common symptoms and compare prem...

  12. [Premenstrual dysphoric disorder: diagnosis and therapeutic strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi-Demicheli, F

    2006-02-08

    Prementrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is considered to be a very severe form of the premenstrual syndrome (PMS) that occurs regularly in the last week of the luteal phase of the cycle and begin to remit after the onset of follicular phase and is absent in the week postmenses. What sets PMDD apart from PMS is its severity and its dominant psychiatric symptoms. PMDD includes depression, anxiety, tension, irritability and moodiness. Moreover, women with PMDD find that it has a very disruptive effect on their everyday lives. Although, many treatments have been used for PMDD over the years, PMDD remains difficult to be cured. Until recently, only few of these treatments were evaluated in carefully designed research studies and even fewer were shown to be effective. Here, we discuss the different therapeutic options for PMDD.

  13. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder: a review for the treating practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurjit; Gonsalves, Lilian; Thacker, Holly L

    2004-04-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), a severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), is characterized by physical and behavioral symptoms that cause marked social impairment during the last half of the menstrual cycle. Symptoms are believed to result from the interaction of central neurotransmitters and normal menstrual hormonal changes. Treatment usually begins with lifestyle changes, over-the-counter medications, and if needed, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Physicians should be aware of the risks of many of the alternative therapies commonly touted in the popular press.

  14. Advances in the diagnosis of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futterman, Lori A

    2010-01-01

    Premenstrual disorders negatively impact the quality of life and functional ability of millions of women. The two generally recognized premenstrual disorders are premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). These disorders are characterized by a wide variety of nonspecific mood, somatic and behavioral symptoms that occur only during the late luteal phase of a woman's cycle and disappear soon after the onset of menstruation. This paper reviews the diagnostic criteria for PMS and PMDD, describes some of the more common symptom diaries and other tools used to diagnose premenstrual disorders, and discusses the challenges inherent in diagnosing PMS and PMDD. A survey of peer-reviewed articles and relevant texts provided diagnostic criteria, descriptions of diagnostic tools and information about diagnostic challenges. The many nonspecific symptoms associated with premenstrual disorders complicate the diagnostic process. The use of proven symptom diaries and other diagnostic tools should aid in the differential diagnosis of premenstrual disorders. Patients need to report bothersome premenstrual symptoms, and clinicians should become more proficient in the diagnostic process in order to prevent underdiagnosis of these disorders.

  15. Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorders among Jordanian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albsoul-Younes, Abla; Alefishat, Eman; Farha, Rana Abu; Tashman, Lina; Hijjih, Enas; AlKhatib, Rasha

    2017-12-07

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency, associated factors, and management approaches of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and premenstrual syndrome (PMS) in Jordanian women. Three hundred premenopausal women completed a self-administered questionnaire. Moderate-severe PMS was reported by 29% of women, while 14% had PMDD. Younger unmarried women had the more severe condition. Herbal remedies and no medication were the most common approaches used to manage PMS/PMDD. High rates of PMS and PMDD found in this study highlight the need to increase awareness to this condition among health providers in order to facilitate its identification, diagnosis, and management. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool revised for adolescents (PSST-A): prevalence of severe PMS and premenstrual dysphoric disorder in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Meir; Peer, Miki; Palova, Eva; Freeman, Ellen W; Macdougall, Mary; Soares, Claudio N

    2011-02-01

    The Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool was modified for use in adolescents and piloted in 578 girls at three international sites. Nearly one third (29.6%) reported experiencing severe PMS or PMDD, with irritability being the most commonly reported symptom. Rates of menstrual-related pain were high, particularly in those with severe PMS or PMDD. Severe PMS and PMDD present with similar rates and symptoms in adolescents as in adults, and the Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool modified for adolescents is a fast, reliable tool to screen for these syndromes in adolescents.

  17. Predictors of premenstrual impairment among women undergoing prospective assessment for premenstrual dysphoric disorder: a cycle-level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalenberger, K M; Eisenlohr-Moul, T A; Surana, P; Rubinow, D R; Girdler, S S

    2017-07-01

    Women who experience significant premenstrual symptoms differ in the extent to which these symptoms cause cyclical impairment. This study clarifies the type and number of symptoms that best predict premenstrual impairment in a sample of women undergoing prospective assessment for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in a research setting. Central research goals were to determine (1) which emotional, psychological, and physical symptoms of PMDD are uniquely associated with premenstrual impairment, and (2) how many cyclical symptoms optimally predict the presence of a clinically significant premenstrual elevation of impairment. A total of 267 naturally cycling women recruited for retrospective report of premenstrual emotional symptoms completed daily symptom reports using the Daily Record of Severity of Problems (DRSP) and occupational, recreational, and relational impairment for 1-4 menstrual cycles (N = 563 cycles). Multilevel regression revealed that emotional, psychological, and physical symptoms differ in their associations with impairment. The core emotional symptoms of PMDD were predictors of impairment, but not after accounting for secondary psychological symptoms, which were the most robust predictors. The optimal number of premenstrual symptoms for predicting clinically significant premenstrual impairment was four. Results enhance our understanding of the type and number of premenstrual symptoms associated with premenstrual impairment among women being evaluated for PMDD in research contexts. Additional work is needed to determine whether cognitive symptoms should receive greater attention in the study of PMDD, and to revisit the usefulness of the five-symptom diagnostic threshold.

  18. Bipolar disorder and Premenstrual Syndrome or Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder comorbidity: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Patricia Carvalho; Passos, Roberta Benitez Freitas; Bevilaqua, Mario Cesar do Nascimento; López, Jose Ramón Rodriguez Arras; Nardi, Antônio Egidio

    2012-12-01

    This article aims to review the comorbidity of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and bipolar disorder (BD), identify variables requiring further investigation and to remind physicians that special care is required for diagnosis and therapy. A systematic review of articles published from 1987 to February 2012 was conducted in the Medline database with the following terms: (premenstrual syndrome OR premenstrual dysphoric disorder OR premenstrual) AND (bipolar OR mania OR manic). Seventeen articles were analyzed. PMS and PMDD were most often comorbid among BD-II patients and vice versa. Moreover, patients with PMS or PMDD also have an increased risk of having BD-I. In addition, bipolar women susceptible to hormonal changes exhibit more severe symptoms, more frequent relapses and a worse therapeutic response. Future investigations should attempt to stabilize hormonal levels through the continuous use of contraceptives to target a reduction in symptom severity. In addition, psychiatrists should note menstrual period dates and compare symptom intensity between the luteal and follicular phases. Finally, PMS and PMDD patients should be studied separately.

  19. Work Stress, Premenstrual Syndrome and Dysphoric Disorder: Are There Any Associations?

    OpenAIRE

    Namavar Jahromi, B; Pakmehr, S; Hagh-Shenas, H

    2011-01-01

    Background Women with recurrent and severe symptoms are diagnosed as having premenstrual syndrome (PMS), and if they suffer from severe affective symptoms, a diagnosis of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is made. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of work stress with PMS and PMDD. Methods Fifty-five female medical students in their internship program (ten 24-hour shifts per month) and 38 third-year female medical students without any shift duties were asked to pa...

  20. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder symptom cluster improvement by cycle with the combined oral contraceptive ethinylestradiol 20 mcg plus drospirenone 3 mg administered in a 24/4 regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Joachim; Niknian, Minoo; Shulman, Lee P; Lynen, Richard

    2011-07-01

    A combined oral contraceptive comprising ethinylestradiol (EE) 20 mcg/drospirenone 3 mg in a 24/4 regimen has been clinically shown to alleviate the symptoms associated with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). However, previous studies did not report data according to cycle-by-cycle improvement. This was a subanalysis of a Phase III, double-blind, multicenter, United States-based study. Women with confirmed PMDD were randomized to EE 20 mcg/drospirenone 3 mg 24/4 or placebo for three treatment cycles. Ten of the 21 emotional and physical items on the Daily Record of Severity of Problems scale were grouped to define three symptom clusters: (a) negative emotions, (b) food cravings and (c) water retention-related symptoms. The change from baseline at each treatment cycle was compared between groups using a weighted analysis of covariance model. The full analysis set comprised 449 women. Daily Record of Severity of Problems scores for each symptom cluster were significantly reduced from baseline with both EE 20 mcg/drospirenone 3 mg 24/4 and placebo (pemotions, food cravings and water retention-related symptoms to a significantly greater extent than placebo during all three cycles of treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mood disorder history and personality assessment in premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchlow, D G; Bond, A J; Wingrove, J

    2001-09-01

    Menstrually related dysphoria is known to be associated with other affective disorders, notably major depressive disorder and puerperal depression. The relationship between premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and maladaptive personality disorders and traits, however, is less established, at least in part because of the methodological and nosologic difficulties in the diagnosis of both PMDD and personality disorders. This study seeks to address this problem to elucidate the relationship between PMDD, other affective disturbances commonly experienced by women, and maladaptive personality. Axis I and II disorders were examined using standardized instruments and stringent diagnostic criteria (DSM-IV and the International Personality Disorders Examination) in 34 women with DSM-IV PMDD and 22 healthy women without severe premenstrual mood changes. Seventy-seven percent of the PMDD group had suffered from a past Axis I disorder in comparison with 17% of the control group. Two thirds of the parous women with PMDD had suffered from major depressive disorder in the puerperium. Personality disorder diagnoses were not highly represented in either group of women. The women with PMDD had significantly more obsessional personality traits (p personality disorder diagnoses. Obsessional symptoms are known to cluster with the affective disorders and may reflect underlying temperamental and biological vulnerability. This study provides further evidence of the link between serotonergic dysregulation, personality vulnerability, and mood changes related to the female reproductive cycle.

  2. Prevalence and predictors of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder in a population-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschudin, Sibil; Bertea, Paola Coda; Zemp, Elisabeth

    2010-12-01

    The study aimed at assessing the prevalence of premenstrual symptoms and of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in a population-based sample of women of the entire reproductive age range, as well as to analyse predictors of PMS and PMDD in terms of socio-demographic, health status and health behavioural factors. A set of questions on PMS-based on the premenstrual syndrome screening tool developed by Steiner et al., translated into German and piloted-was integrated into the written questionnaire of the 2007 Swiss Health Survey. Weighted prevalence rates and multivariable regression analysis for the outcome variables PMS and PMDD were calculated. A total of 3,913 women aged 15 to 54 years answered the questions on PMS symptoms, and 3,522 of them additionally answered the questions on interference of PMS with life. Ninety one percent of the participants reported at least one symptom, 10.3% had PMS and 3.1% fulfilled the criteria for PMDD. The prevalence of PMS was higher in non-married women, in women aged 35-44 years and in women of the Italian-speaking region of Switzerland. Both PMS and PMDD were strongly associated with poor physical health and psychological distress. Socio-cultural factors seem to determine the prevalence, perception and handling of PMS. Considering the association with poor physical health and high psychological distress, a broader underlying vulnerability in women qualifying for PMDD must be assumed and should be taken into account in clinical management as well as in future research in this field.

  3. Prevalence of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder in a population-based sample in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Mingqi; Zhang, Huiyun; Liu, Huimin; Luo, Songping; Wang, Tianfang; Zhang, Junlong; Ji, Lijin

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), and the frequency and severity of the symptoms in a population-based sample of Chinese women of reproductive age. Women aged 18-45 years were screened for suspected PMS and PMDD based on the ACOG recommendations for a diagnosis of PMS and diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV). For those who were consistent with PMS diagnostic criteria, the daily record of severity of problems (DRSP) questionnaire was used to assess the symptoms prospectively over 2 months. Participants were then categorized as having no perceived symptoms, mild PMS, moderate PMS, and PMDD, based on a validated algorithm. Among the study group, the incidence of PMDD was 2.1% and PMS was 21.1%. The most common symptoms were irritability (91.21%), breast tenderness (77.62%), depression (68.31%), abdominal bloating (63.70%) and angry outbursts (59.62%). The prevalence of PMS/PMDD and the frequency and severity of the symptoms have their own characteristics in Chinese women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationship of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder with major depression: relevance to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhy, Susanta Kumar; Sarkar, Sidharth; Beherre, Prakash B; Rathi, Rajesh; Panigrahi, Mahima; Patil, Pradeep Sriram

    2015-01-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS), premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and depressive disorder are fairly common; symptoms do overlap, often under-identified and under-emphasized, particularly in rural India. The objective was to assess the occurrence of PMS and PMDD in a sample of students and staff of a nursing college and to find their correlation with depression. A prospective cohort study; Tertiary Care Hospital in Rural India (Wardha, Maharashtra); 118 female nursing students or staff aged between 18 and 40 years, who were likely to stay within the institution for the study period. The participants were rated on Penn daily symptom report prospectively for a period of 3-month. Those who scored positive were applied diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4(th) edition, text revision (DSM-IV TR) criteria for PMDD; and were applied primary care evaluation of mental disorders depression screening followed by DSM-IV TR criteria for depression. Severity of depression was measured using Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Main outcome measures were frequency and severity of depression in individuals with PMS and PMDD and their clinical and sociodemographic correlation. The age range of the sample was 18-37 years. Some PMS symptoms were observed in 67%; diagnosis of PMDD in 10%; depressive symptoms in 28% of the sample. 46.4% of those with depressive symptoms had major depression. The diagnosis of major depression was significantly associated with the severity of PMS symptoms as well as the presence of PMDD. Premenstrual syndrome is present in a substantial proportion of young females. Concurrent depression is increased by the severity of PMS symptoms and the presence of PMDD. Gynecologist needs to screen such subjects for depression and refer to mental-health professional early, in routine clinical practice.

  5. Prevalence of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder among college students of Bhavnagar, Gujarat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Chintan Madhusudan; Panchal, Bharat Navinchandra; Tiwari, Deepak Sachidanand; Vala, Ashok Ukabhai; Bhatt, Renish Bhupendrabhai

    2016-01-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) characterized by mood changes, anxiety, and somatic symptoms experienced during the specific time of menstrual cycle. Prevalence data of PMS and PMDD is sparse among college girls in India. The aim of this study is to study the prevalence of PMS and PMDD among college students of Bhavnagar (Gujarat), its associated demographic and menstrual factors, to rank common symptoms and compare premenstrual symptom screening tool (PSST) with Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR defined PMDD (SCID-PMDD) for sensitivity and specificity. A cross-sectional survey was done in five colleges of Bhavnagar. Of 529 subjects approached, 489 college girls were finally analyzed for sociodemographic data, menstrual history, and PSST. SCID-PMDD was applied among those who were positive on PSST and 20% of those who were negative. The data were analyzed using OpenEpi Version 2. Chi-square test was done for qualitative variables and analysis of variance for quantitative variables. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were calculated for PSST. The prevalence of PMS was 18.4%. Moderate to severe PMS was 14.7% and PMDD was 3.7% according to DSM IV-TR and 91% according to International Classification of Diseases, 10(th) edition criteria. The symptoms commonly reported were "fatigue/lack of energy," "decrease interest in work," and "anger/irritability." The most common functional impairment item was "school/work efficiency and productivity." PSST has 90.9% sensitivity, 57.01% specificity, and 97.01% predictive value of negative test. Prevalence of PMS among college students is similar to other studies from Asia. PSST is a useful screening tool for PMS, and it should be confirmed by more specific tool as by SCID-PMDD. Routine screening with PSST can identify college girls who can improve with treatment.

  6. A lack of consistent evidence for cortisol dysregulation in premenstrual syndrome/premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesner, Jeff; Granger, Douglas A

    2016-03-01

    Although decades of research has examined the association between cortisol regulation and premenstrual syndrome/premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS/PMDD), no review exists to provide a general set of conclusions from the extant research. In the present review we summarize and interpret research that has tested for associations between PMS/PMDD and cortisol levels and reactivity (n=38 original research articles). Three types of studies are examined: correlational studies, environmental-challenge studies, and pharmacological-challenge studies. Overall, there was very little evidence that women with and without PMS/PMDD demonstrate systematic and predictable mean-level differences in cortisol, or differences in cortisol response/reactivity to challenges. Methodological differences in sample size, the types of symptoms used for diagnosis (physical and psychological vs. only affective), or the type of cortisol measure used (serum vs. salivary), did not account for differences between studies that did and did not find significant effects. Caution is recommended before accepting the conclusion of null effects, and recommendations are made that more rigorous research be conducted, considering symptom-specificity, within-person analyses, and multiple parameters of cortisol regulation, before final conclusions are drawn. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A review of treatment of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapkin, Andrea

    2003-08-01

    Severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and, more recently, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) have been studied extensively over the last 20 years. The defining criteria for diagnosis of the disorders according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) include at least one moderate to severe mood symptom and one physical symptom for the diagnosis of PMS and by DSM IV criteria a total of 5 symptoms with 1 severe mood symptom for the diagnosis of PMDD. There must be functional impairment attributed to the symptoms. The symptoms must be present for one to two weeks premenstrually with relief by day 4 of menses and should be documented prospectively for at least two cycles using a daily rating form. Nonpharmacologic management with some evidence for efficacy include cognitive behavioral relaxation therapy, aerobic exercise, as well as calcium, magnesium, vitamin B(6) L-tryptophan supplementation or a complex carbohydrate drink. Pharmacologic management with at least ten randomized controlled trials to support efficacy include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors administered daily or premenstrually and serotonergic tricyclic antidepressants. Anxiolytics and potassium sparing diuretics have demonstrated mixed results in the literature. Hormonal therapy is geared towards producing anovulation. There is good clinical evidence for GnRH analogs with addback hormonal therapy, danocrine, and estradiol implants or patches with progestin to protect the endometrium. Oral contraceptive pills prevent ovulation and should be effective for the treatment of PMS/PMDD. However, limited evidence does not support efficacy for oral contraceptive agents containing progestins derived from 19-nortestosterone. The combination of the estrogen and progestin may produce symptoms similar to PMS, such as water retention and irritability. There is preliminary evidence that a new oral contraceptive pill containing low-dose estrogen and the progestin drospirenone, a

  8. The prevalence, impairment, impact, and burden of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS/PMDD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbreich, Uriel; Borenstein, Jeff; Pearlstein, Terry; Kahn, Linda S

    2003-08-01

    Currently it is estimated that 3-8% of women of reproductive age meet strict criteria for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Assessment of published reports demonstrate that the prevalence of clinically relevant dysphoric premenstrual disorder is probably higher. 13-18% of women of reproductive age may have premenstrual dysphoric symptoms severe enough to induce impairment and distress, though the number of symptoms may not meet the arbitrary count of 5 symptoms on the PMDD list. The impairment and lowered quality of life for PMDD is similar to that of dysthymic disorder and is not much lower than major depressive disorder. Nevertheless, PMS/PMDD is still under-recognized in large published epidemiological studies, as well as assessments of burden of disease. It is demonstrated here that the burden of PMS/PMDD as well as the disability adjusted life years (DALY) lost due to this repeated-cyclic disorder is in the same magnitude as major recognized disorders. Appropriate recognition of the disorder and its impact should lead to treatment of more women with PMS/PMDD. Efficacious treatments are available. They should reduce individual suffering and impact on family, society, and economy.

  9. Fluctuating serotonergic function in premenstrual dysphoric disorder and premenstrual syndrome: findings from neuroendocrine challenge tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Y; Terao, T; Iwata, N; Okamoto, K; Kojima, H; Okamoto, T; Yoshimura, R; Nakamura, J

    2007-02-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) has been assumed to be a subtype of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) with depressive symptoms, such as depressive mood, tension, anxiety, and mood liability during luteal phase. At present, no conclusion has been established about serotonergic function in PMDD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the serotonergic function of PMDD subjects in comparison to PMS without PMDD subjects and normal controls via neuroendocrine challenge tests. Twenty-four women (seven with PMDD, eight with PMS without PMDD, and nine normal controls) were tested on three occasions (follicular phase, early luteal phase, and late luteal phase) receiving paroxetine 20 mg orally as a serotonergic probe at 8:00 A: .M: . Plasma ACTH and cortisol were measured prior to the administration and every hour for 6 h thereafter. As a whole, there were significant differences in serotonergic function measured by ACTH and cortisol responses to paroxetine challenge across these three groups. PMDD subjects showed higher serotonergic function in follicular phase but lower serotonergic function in luteal phase, compared with women with PMS without PMDD and normal controls. The present findings suggest that PMDD women have fluctuating serotonergic function across their menstrual cycles and that the pattern may be different from PMS without PMDD.

  10. Menstrual Cycle and the Prevalence of Premenstrual Syndrome/Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder in Adolescent Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowska, Mariola; Drosdzol-Cop, Agnieszka; Gałązka, Iwona; Naworska, Beata; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the menstrual cycle, menstrual disorders and premenstrual syndrome/premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS/PMDD) in girls and young women participating in competitive sports. The impact of PMS/PMDD symptoms on the quality of life was also analyzed. The prospective study encompassed 125 girls and young women with the aim to determine the presence of menstrual disorders and the prevalence of PMS/PMDD. The studied group was composed of 75 female athletes aged 16 to 22 years. The control group included 50 healthy girls and young women who did not practice competitive sports. The studied athletes and the controls prospectively evaluated their 2 consecutive menstrual cycles by using a questionnaire. The research tools were a purpose-built questionnaire, a daily log of PMS symptoms according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' guidelines, and a daily log of PMDD symptoms based on the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, diagnostic criteria. To determine the impact of competitive sports on the menstrual cycle, menstrual disorders, and the prevalence of PMS/PMDD in girls and young women. Intensive physical exercise delayed menarche. PMDD was diagnosed in 8% and PMS in 42.4% of all respondents. The prevalence of PMDD did not differ significantly between the groups (9.33% versus 6.00%). PMS was significantly more frequent among athletes than among controls (49.33% versus 32%, P = .045). The prevalence of PMS correlated significantly with mean age (P = .00001) and age at menarche (P = .03) in athletes. PMS was more frequent in older athletes and in girls with older age at menarche. Competitive sports, older mean age, older age at menarche, length of sporting career, and intensity of training are conducive to PMS. The prevalence of PMS increases with the duration and intensification of competitive exercises. Copyright © 2015 North American Society

  11. Prevalence of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder in Japanese high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takashi; Koga, Shoko; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2010-12-01

    To determine the prevalence and the impact of premenstrual symptoms among Japanese adolescent girls, a total of 618 high school students were assessed. Of them, 64.6% were found to suffer from premenstrual symptoms, which is lower than that in adult women. On the other hand, the rates of prevalence of moderate to severe PMS and PMDD in girls were higher than those in adult women. Premenstrual symptoms could have significant consequences by interfering with the daily functioning of adolescent girls.

  12. Timing of alcohol use and the incidence of premenstrual syndrome and probable premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth R; Hankinson, Susan E; Johnson, Susan R; Manson, JoAnn E

    2009-12-01

    Relatively little is known about factors that influence the initial development of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), although these conditions are common in reproductive age women and are associated with substantial impairment. Previous studies have observed higher alcohol use in prevalent PMS/PMDD patients compared with controls, but it is unknown if drinking predisposes women to developing these disorders or is instead influenced by symptom experience. To address this, we conducted a case-control study nested within the prospective Nurses' Health Study II (NHS2). Participants were a subset of women aged 27-44 and free from PMS at baseline (1991), including 1057 women who developed PMS over 10 years of follow-up, 762 of whom also met criteria consistent with PMDD, and 1968 control women. Alcohol use at various time periods, before and after onset of menstrual symptoms, was assessed by questionnaire. Overall, alcohol use was not strongly associated with the incidence of PMS and probable PMDD. Relative risks (RR) for women with the highest cumulative alcohol use vs. never drinkers were 1.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84-1.67) for PMS and 1.28 (95% CI 0.86-1.91) for PMDD, although results did suggest a positive relationship in leaner women (p trend=0.002). Women who first used alcohol before age 18 had an RR of PMS of 1.26 (95% CI 0.91-1.75) compared with never drinkers; the comparable RR for PMDD was 1.35 (95% CI 0.93-1.98). These findings suggest alcohol use is not strongly associated with the development of PMS and PMDD, although early age at first use and long-term use may minimally increase risk.

  13. A review of treatment and management modalities for premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelderhouse, Kelli; Taylor, Julie Smith

    2013-01-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) affects 5 to 8 percent of women and can significantly decrease their quality of life. Symptoms generally present during the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and can affect women emotionally, behaviorally, cognitively and physiologically. This article reviews the clinical literature on PMDD and the evidence behind various methods of symptom management. Evidence suggests that a holistic approach, including lifestyle modifications, pharmacotherapy and cognitive behavioral therapy, is most beneficial for symptom reduction and improvement in daily functioning and quality of life. © 2013 AWHONN.

  14. Prevalence and association of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder with academic performance among female university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein Shehadeh, Jumana; Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M

    2018-04-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is particularly a female psychological disorder that has consequences on female students' behavior, cognitive abilities, mental health status, and academic performance. To examine the prevalence of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and PMDD, and their relationship with academic performance among female university students in Jordan. Prospective-correlational design was employed among 858 university students. Data collected in regards to daily record of signs of PMDD and PMS, academic motivation, and student's involvement. Prevalence of PMS was 92.3% and that of PMDD was 7.7%. There were significant differences in self-determination levels between students with PMS and those with PMDD. PMDD symptoms have a negative impact on female students' academic performance; thus, mental health professionals have a major role in determining factors that buffer severity of PMDD among females. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Fish Consumption and Premenstrual Syndrome and Dysphoric Disorder in Japanese Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takashi; Imoto, Yoko; Nagasawa, Hiroyo; Takeshita, Atsuko; Shiina, Masami

    2016-08-01

    To determine the specific characteristics of premenstrual syndrome (PMS)/premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in Japanese collegiate athletes, with a focus on their fish consumption. Cross-sectional study. A university in Osaka, the largest city in western Japan. The participants were 312 female collegiate students. The study group was composed of 200 students who were members of sport clubs, and the control (nonathletes) group was composed of 112 members of cultural clubs. Premenstrual symptoms and social activities. The prevalence of moderate to severe PMS and PMDD in the study group was the same as in nonathletes. The prominent feature of premenstrual symptoms in athletes was that the severities of 'physical symptoms' and 'performance in training or competition' were much greater than those of nonathletes (P = .003 and P = .002, Mann-Whitney U test). There was a greater effect of PMS and PMDD on athletes, affecting their physical symptoms and performance compared with nonathletes. In terms of dietary habits, 'fish or dried fish' consumption was associated with a decreased risk of poor performance in athletes (odds ratio, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.92). The results from this study indicate that fish consumption might be positively associated with the relief of PMS/PMDD-induced athletic disturbance. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Vitex agnus castus for premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Raphael O; Frey, Benicio N; Leclerc, Emilie; Brietzke, Elisa

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether Vitex agnus castus is a safe and effective treatment for PMS and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and to discuss the implications of these findings for clinical practice. A systematic review of literature was conducted using PubMed and Scielo databases. The inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials (RCT) using V. agnus castus in individuals with PMS or PMDD that compared this intervention with placebo or an active comparator and included a description of blinding and dropouts/withdrawals. The search was conducted by two independent investigators who reached consensus on the included trials. A total of eight RCTs were included in this study. Most studies focused on PMS, and the diagnostic criteria of PMS and PMDD changed over the years. Three different preparations of V. agnus castus (VAC) were tested, and there was significant variability in the measurement of treatment outcomes between the studies. Nevertheless, all eight studies were positive for VAC in the treatment of PMS or PMDD and VAC was overall well tolerated. Main limitations were differences in definition of diagnostic criteria, the instruments used as main outcome measures, and different preparations of VAC extracts limit the comparison of results between studies. In conclusion, the RCTs using VAC for treatment of PMS/PMDD suggested that the VAC extract is a safe and efficacious alternative to be considered for the treatment of PMS/PMDD symptoms.

  17. Altered autonomic nervous system activity as a potential etiological factor of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tamaki; Ushiroyama, Takahisa; Kimura, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Moritani, Toshio

    2007-12-20

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) encompasses a wide variety of cyclic and recurrent physical, emotional, and behavioral symptoms occurring during the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and abating shortly following the beginning of menses. Although PMS is widely recognized, its etiopathogenesis is not yet understood. The present study investigates whether the activity of the autonomic nervous system, which plays a vital role in orchestrating physiological homeostasis within the human body, is altered during the menstrual cycle of women with different degrees of premenstrual symptomatology. Sixty-two women in their 20s to 40s with regular menstrual cycles participated in this study. All subjects were examined during the follicular and late luteal phases. Cycle phase was determined by the onset of menstruation and oral temperature and was verified by concentrations of ovarian hormones, estrone, and pregnanediol in a urine sample taken early in the morning. Autonomic nervous system activity was assessed by means of heart-rate variability (HRV) power spectral analysis during supine rest. The Menstrual Distress Questionnaire was used to evaluate physical, emotional, and behavioral symptoms accompanying the menstrual cycle of the subjects. The subjects were categorized in three groups, Control, PMS, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) groups, depending on the severity of premenstrual symptomatology. No intramenstrual cycle difference in any of the parameters of HRV was found in the Control group, which had no or a small increase in premenstrual symptoms. In contrast, Total power and high frequency power, which reflect overall autonomic and parasympathetic nerve activity, respectively, significantly decreased in the late luteal phase from the follicular phase in the PMS group. As for the PMDD group, which had more severe symptoms premenstrually, heart-rate fluctuation as well as all components of the power spectrum of HRV were markedly decreased regardless of the

  18. Fulfillment of the premenstrual dysphoric disorder criteria confirmed using a self-rating questionnaire among Japanese women with depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaoka, Yoshiko; Akimoto, Yoshie; Ueda, Kayoko; Ujiie, Yuri; Kametani, Machiko; Uchiide, Yoko; Kamo, Toshiko

    2011-05-02

    Some women with depressive disorders experience severe premenstrual symptoms. However, there have been few studies in which premenstrual symptoms in women suffering from depressive disorders were assessed. In this study, we aimed to investigate premenstrual symptoms in women with depressive disorders using the premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) scale. We administered questionnaires to 65 Japanese female outpatients who had been diagnosed with a major depressive disorder or dysthymic disorder and to 303 healthy women as control subjects. The questionnaire consisted of items on demographics and the PMDD scale, which was modified from the premenstrual symptoms screening tool (PSST) developed by Steiner et al. (Arch Womens Ment Health 2003, 6:203-209). Twenty-eight women (43.1%) with depressive disorder fulfilled certain items of the PMDD scale. These women are considered to have coexisting PMDD and a depressive disorder, or to have premenstrual exacerbation (PME) of a depressive disorder. On the other hand, 18 women (5.9%) in the control group were diagnosed as having PMDD. The depressive disorder group who fulfilled the PMDD criteria had more knowledge of the term premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and took more actions to attenuate premenstrual symptoms than the control group with PMDD. Our findings demonstrated that the occurrence of severe premenstrual symptoms is much higher in women with depressive disorders than in healthy subjects. This is partially due to this group containing women with PME, but mainly due to it containing women with PMDD. The higher percentage of PMDD suggests similarity between PMDD and other depressive disorders. Furthermore, educating healthy Japanese women and women with depressive disorders about premenstrual symptoms and evidence-based treatment for them is necessary.

  19. Fulfillment of the premenstrual dysphoric disorder criteria confirmed using a self-rating questionnaire among Japanese women with depressive disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kametani Machiko

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some women with depressive disorders experience severe premenstrual symptoms. However, there have been few studies in which premenstrual symptoms in women suffering from depressive disorders were assessed. In this study, we aimed to investigate premenstrual symptoms in women with depressive disorders using the premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD scale. Methods We administered questionnaires to 65 Japanese female outpatients who had been diagnosed with a major depressive disorder or dysthymic disorder and to 303 healthy women as control subjects. The questionnaire consisted of items on demographics and the PMDD scale, which was modified from the premenstrual symptoms screening tool (PSST developed by Steiner et al. (Arch Womens Ment Health 2003, 6:203-209. Results Twenty-eight women (43.1% with depressive disorder fulfilled certain items of the PMDD scale. These women are considered to have coexisting PMDD and a depressive disorder, or to have premenstrual exacerbation (PME of a depressive disorder. On the other hand, 18 women (5.9% in the control group were diagnosed as having PMDD. The depressive disorder group who fulfilled the PMDD criteria had more knowledge of the term premenstrual syndrome (PMS and took more actions to attenuate premenstrual symptoms than the control group with PMDD. Conclusions Our findings demonstrated that the occurrence of severe premenstrual symptoms is much higher in women with depressive disorders than in healthy subjects. This is partially due to this group containing women with PME, but mainly due to it containing women with PMDD. The higher percentage of PMDD suggests similarity between PMDD and other depressive disorders. Furthermore, educating healthy Japanese women and women with depressive disorders about premenstrual symptoms and evidence-based treatment for them is necessary.

  20. An overview of four studies of a continuous oral contraceptive (levonorgestrel 90 mcg/ethinyl estradiol 20 mcg) on premenstrual dysphoric disorder and premenstrual syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freeman, Ellen W; Halbreich, Uriel; Grubb, Gary S

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of four studies that evaluated a continuous oral contraceptive (OC) containing levonorgestrel (90 mcg) and ethinyl estradiol (20 mcg; LNG/EE) for managing premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and premenstrual syndrome (PMS).......This article presents an overview of four studies that evaluated a continuous oral contraceptive (OC) containing levonorgestrel (90 mcg) and ethinyl estradiol (20 mcg; LNG/EE) for managing premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and premenstrual syndrome (PMS)....

  1. [Psychic aspects of the premenstrual dysphoric disorders. New therapeutic strategies: our experience with Vitex agnus castus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciotta, L; Pagano, I; Stracquadanio, M; Di Leo, S; Andò, A; Formuso, C

    2011-06-01

    The premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is one of the main problems of the premenstrual phase. It consists of symptoms that sometimes invalidate the scope of employment, social and psycho-affective of patients, requiring thus a diagnostic and therapeutic approach as detailed and accurate as possible. The therapeutic strategies available for this disease are many, but recently the emphasis has been on Vitex agnus castus (VAC), considered by many as evidence drug of choice for both PMS and for the PMDD, being with satisfactory therapeutic properties and small side effects. Our study evaluated a group of patients suffering from PMDD and the clinical efficacy of treatment with VAC (and compared the effectiveness of the results of a more homogeneous group of patients treated with fluoxetine). This study confirms the data reported in the literature regarding the effectiveness of VAC therapy with no side effects.

  2. Prevalence of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder in Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, T; Tasaka, K; Sakata, M; Murata, Y

    2006-07-01

    To investigate the prevalence and impact of premenstrual symptoms in Japanese women, we developed the PSQ "The Premenstrual Symptoms Questionnaire" for the screening of premenstrual symptoms. The PSQ translates DSM-IV criteria into a rating scale with degrees of severity. One thousand one hundred and eighty-seven Japanese women between the ages of 20 and 49 yrs, who were seen at a clinic for uterine cancer screening, were assessed regarding their premenstrual symptoms using the PSQ. As many as 95% of these women were found to suffer from premenstrual symptoms. The rates of prevalence of moderate to severe PMS and PMDD in Japanese women were 5.3 and 1.2%, respectively, which are lower than those in Western women. Only 5.3% of women with moderate to severe PMS and PMDD were treated. The results of this study suggest that race and ethnicity influence the expression of premenstrual symptoms and that the current state of medical care for Japanese women with moderate to severe PMS and PMDD is not satisfactory.

  3. Effects and treatment methods of acupuncture and herbal medicine for premenstrual syndrome/premenstrual dysphoric disorder: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Su Hee; Kim, Dong Il; Choi, Min-Sun

    2014-01-10

    During their reproductive years about 10% of women experience some kind of symptoms before menstruation (PMS) in a degree that affects their quality of life (QOL). Acupuncture and herbal medicine has been a recent favorable therapeutic approach. Thus we aimed to review the effects of acupuncture and herbal medicine in the past decade as a preceding research in order to further investigate the most effective Korean Medicine treatment for PMS/PMDD. A systematic literature search was conducted using electronic databases on studies published between 2002 and 2012. Our review included randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) of acupuncture and herbal medicine for PMS/PMDD. Interventions include acupuncture or herbal medicine. Clinical information including statistical tests was extracted from the articles and summarized in tabular form or in the text. Study outcomes were presented as the rate of improvement (%) and/or end-of-treatment scores. The search yielded 19 studies. In screening the RCTs, 8 studies in acupuncture and 11 studies in herbal medicine that matched the criteria were identified. Different acupuncture techniques including traditional acupuncture, hand acupuncture and moxibustion, and traditional acupuncture technique with auricular points, have been selected for analysis. In herbal medicine, studies on Vitex Agnus castus, Hypericum perforatum, Xiao yao san, Elsholtzia splendens, Cirsium japonicum, and Gingko biloba L. were identified. Experimental groups with Acupuncture and herbal medicine treatment (all herbal medicine except Cirsium japonicum) had significantly improved results regarding PMS/PMDD. Limited evidence supports the efficacy of alternative medicinal interventions such as acupuncture and herbal medicine in controlling premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Acupuncture and herbal medicine treatments for premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder showed a 50% or better reduction of symptoms compared to

  4. Effects and treatment methods of acupuncture and herbal medicine for premenstrual syndrome/premenstrual dysphoric disorder: systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background During their reproductive years about 10% of women experience some kind of symptoms before menstruation (PMS) in a degree that affects their quality of life (QOL). Acupuncture and herbal medicine has been a recent favorable therapeutic approach. Thus we aimed to review the effects of acupuncture and herbal medicine in the past decade as a preceding research in order to further investigate the most effective Korean Medicine treatment for PMS/PMDD. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted using electronic databases on studies published between 2002 and 2012. Our review included randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) of acupuncture and herbal medicine for PMS/PMDD. Interventions include acupuncture or herbal medicine. Clinical information including statistical tests was extracted from the articles and summarized in tabular form or in the text. Study outcomes were presented as the rate of improvement (%) and/or end-of-treatment scores. Results The search yielded 19 studies. In screening the RCTs, 8 studies in acupuncture and 11 studies in herbal medicine that matched the criteria were identified. Different acupuncture techniques including traditional acupuncture, hand acupuncture and moxibustion, and traditional acupuncture technique with auricular points, have been selected for analysis. In herbal medicine, studies on Vitex Agnus castus, Hypericum perforatum, Xiao yao san, Elsholtzia splendens, Cirsium japonicum, and Gingko biloba L. were identified. Experimental groups with Acupuncture and herbal medicine treatment (all herbal medicine except Cirsium japonicum) had significantly improved results regarding PMS/PMDD. Conclusions Limited evidence supports the efficacy of alternative medicinal interventions such as acupuncture and herbal medicine in controlling premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Acupuncture and herbal medicine treatments for premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder showed a 50% or

  5. Fluoxetine improves functional work capacity in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, M; Brown, E; Trzepacz, P; Dillon, J; Berger, C; Carter, D; Reid, R; Stewart, D

    2003-02-01

    Interference with social and occupational functioning is a key criterion for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and distinguishes it from the less severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS). We conducted a post hoc analysis of the results of a previously reported study evaluating the efficacy of fluoxetine in the management of PMDD, to determine the extent to which women with PMDD perceived impairment in their functional work capacity during the luteal phase of their menstrual cycle. The effects of two doses of fluoxetine vs placebo in alleviating PMDD symptoms and restoring normal work capacity during this period were assessed. We measured baseline follicular vs luteal phase presence of 8 patient-rated functional work capacity-related symptoms on the Premenstrual Tension Scale-Self Rated in 320 women who met diagnostic criteria for late luteal phase dysphoric disorder, now known as PMDD. Women were then randomized to double-blind treatment with either fluoxetine 20 mg/d, fluoxetine 60 mg/d, or placebo daily for 6 menstrual cycles. All 8 work capacity-related symptoms were more likely to be present in the baseline luteal phase than in the baseline follicular phase. A statistically significant improvement from baseline to the average treatment score for the work capacity subscale was detected for both fluoxetine groups compared to the placebo group. This beneficial response to fluoxetine was evident by the first cycle of treatment. Our results demonstrate that fluoxetine at a relatively low dose of 20 mg/d quickly reduced symptoms that negatively affect work capacity and was well tolerated.

  6. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder in medical students residing in hostel and its association with lifestyle factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There is scant research on premenstrual syndrome (PMS and its more severe counterpart, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD in Indian females. This study aimed to evaluate symptoms of PMS in medical students and to find the association of sociodemographic variables and lifestyle factors with PMDD. Subjects and Methods: A total of 179 medical students residing in the hostel of an Indian medical college and its affiliated teaching hospital were approached, of which 100 (55.8% returned the completed questionnaires. Data related to lifestyle factors was collected. Self-screening quiz for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV-Text Revision PMDD and Shortened Premenstrual Assessment Form were used for diagnosis of PMDD and detection of symptomatology, respectively. Results: PMDD was present in 37% of the respondents. It was found at a higher rate in older and postgraduate students. PMDD was significantly associated with lifestyle factors, namely, sleep, physical activity, total tea/coffee intake, and change in tea/coffee and food intake under stress. The most common physical and psychological symptoms were body ache/joint pain and feeling depressed/blue, respectively. Conclusions: PMDD is fairly common in Indian medical students residing in hostel although cultural factors may influence symptom expression. This study suggests that PMDD is associated with lifestyle factors in young, professional, urban women. Modification in lifestyle may thus be an important approach for management of PMS/PMDD. Prospective studies with larger representative samples are needed to validate these findings.

  7. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder in medical students residing in hostel and its association with lifestyle factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Amrita; Banwari, Girish; Yadav, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    There is scant research on premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and its more severe counterpart, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in Indian females. This study aimed to evaluate symptoms of PMS in medical students and to find the association of sociodemographic variables and lifestyle factors with PMDD. A total of 179 medical students residing in the hostel of an Indian medical college and its affiliated teaching hospital were approached, of which 100 (55.8%) returned the completed questionnaires. Data related to lifestyle factors was collected. Self-screening quiz for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV-Text Revision PMDD and Shortened Premenstrual Assessment Form were used for diagnosis of PMDD and detection of symptomatology, respectively. PMDD was present in 37% of the respondents. It was found at a higher rate in older and postgraduate students. PMDD was significantly associated with lifestyle factors, namely, sleep, physical activity, total tea/coffee intake, and change in tea/coffee and food intake under stress. The most common physical and psychological symptoms were body ache/joint pain and feeling depressed/blue, respectively. PMDD is fairly common in Indian medical students residing in hostel although cultural factors may influence symptom expression. This study suggests that PMDD is associated with lifestyle factors in young, professional, urban women. Modification in lifestyle may thus be an important approach for management of PMS/PMDD. Prospective studies with larger representative samples are needed to validate these findings.

  8. Personality Traits of Suicidality Are Associated with Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder in a Suicidal Women Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Ducasse, D?borah; Jaussent, Isabelle; Oli?, Emilie; Guillaume, S?bastien; Lopez-Castroman, Jorge; Courtet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective Both Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) might increase the risk of suicidal behavior. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between personality dimensions specifically involved in suicidal vulnerability and PMS/PMDD. Method We collected data from 232 women consecutively hospitalized after a suicide attempt. We examined the relationship between impulsivity, aggressiveness/hostility, hopelessness, trait anger, affect intensity, emotio...

  9. Perceptions of health and somatic sensations in women reporting premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craner, Julia; Sigmon, Sandra; Martinson, Amber; McGillicuddy, Morgan

    2013-09-01

    Focus on bodily sensations may be involved in the etiology of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). This study investigated the relationship between two types of somatic self-focus (i.e., health anxiety and anxiety sensitivity) and health-related quality of life (QOL) in women with provision diagnoses of PMS and PMDD. On the basis of responses to a screening measure, 731 college women were divided into three groups: PMDD, Moderate/Severe PMS, and Mild/No PMS. Measures included health-related QOL, health anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and trait anxiety. Women with provisional diagnoses of PMDD and moderate/severe PMS reported higher levels of health anxiety and anxiety sensitivity. These relationships were not accounted for by trait anxiety. Furthermore, women in the PMDD and Moderate/Severe PMS groups reported lower health-related QOL. There is a significant health-related QOL burden for college women with PMDD and PMS. Health anxiety and anxiety sensitivity may contribute to the etiology of premenstrual disorders.

  10. Cost-effectiveness analysis of treatments for premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendas-Baum, Regina; Yang, Min; Gricar, Joseph; Wallenstein, Gene V

    2010-01-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is reported to affect between 13% and 31% of women. Between 3% and 8% of women are reported to meet criteria for the more severe form of PMS, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Although PMDD has received increased attention in recent years, the cost effectiveness of treatments for PMDD remains unknown. To evaluate the cost effectiveness of the four medications with a US FDA-approved indication for PMDD: fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine and drospirenone plus ethinyl estradiol (DRSP/EE). A decision-analytic model was used to evaluate both direct costs (medication and physician visits) and clinical outcomes (treatment success, failure and discontinuation). Medication costs were based on average wholesale prices of branded products; physician visit costs were obtained from a claims database study of PMDD patients and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Clinical outcome probabilities were derived from published clinical trials in PMDD. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated using the difference in costs and percentage of successfully treated patients at 6 months. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were used to assess the impact of uncertainty in parameter estimates. Threshold values where a change in the cost-effective strategy occurred were identified using a net benefit framework. Starting therapy with DRSP/EE dominated both sertraline and paroxetine, but not fluoxetine. The estimated ICER of initiating treatment with fluoxetine relative to DRSP/EE was $US4385 per treatment success (year 2007 values). Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves revealed that for ceiling ratios>or=$US3450 per treatment success, fluoxetine had the highest probability (>or=0.37) of being the most cost-effective treatment, relative to the other options. The cost-effectiveness acceptability frontier further indicated that DRSP/EE remained the option with the highest expected net monetary benefit for

  11. Sexual satisfaction in females with premenstrual symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowosielski, Krzysztof; Drosdzol, Agnieszka; Skrzypulec, Violetta; Plinta, Ryszard

    2010-11-01

    The impact of premenstrual symptoms, such as the premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and the premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), on sexual satisfaction, sexual distress, and sexual behaviors has not yet been established. To assess the correlates and risk factors of sexual satisfaction and to evaluate sexual behaviors among Polish women with premenstrual symptoms. 2,500 females, aged 18 to 45 years, from the Upper Silesian region of Poland were eligible for the questionnaire-based, prospective population study. All the inclusion criteria were met by 1,540 women who constituted the final study group. The participants were further divided into two subgroups: PMS+ (749 females) and PMS- (791 healthy subjects). Two additional subgroups were created: PMDD+ encompassing 32 subjects diagnosed with PMDD, and PMDD- comprising 32 healthy women, matched to the PMDD+ females for age, marital status, education level, employment status, place of living, and body mass index. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the influence of PMS on sexual satisfaction and adjust for potential confounders. To evaluate risk factors for sexual dissatisfaction in a population of Polish females of reproductive age, diagnosed with PMS and PMDD. Women from the PMS+ group were less sexually satisfied than PMS- (77.73% vs. 88.66%, P=0.001) and reported more sexual distress (28.65% vs. 15.24%, P=0.001). There were no significant differences in sexual satisfaction between PMDD- and PMDD+. Sexual satisfaction correlated positively with a higher frequency of sexual intercourses and a higher level of education. The presence of PMS correlated negatively with sexual satisfaction, even after adjusting for potential confounders in the multivariate logistic regression model (odds ratio=0.48; confidence interval: 0.26-0.89; P=0.02). The presence of PMS is a risk factor for sexual dissatisfaction in Polish women of reproductive age. © 2010 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  12. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustyk, M Kathleen B; Gerrish, Winslow G; Shaver, Shelley; Keys, Shaunie L

    2009-04-01

    We systematically reviewed empirical studies that investigated the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Our multi-database search identified seven published empirical reports. Three were identified as randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The methods utilized to investigate therapeutic efficacy of CBT in these studies varied widely from case reports to RCTs with pharmacotherapy comparison groups. Initially we provide a brief overview of CBT and justifications for its potential use to treat PMS/PMDD. Next, we provide critical evaluations of the analyses used in each study focusing on the detection of intervention effects assessed by statistically significant time by group interactions. When possible we calculate effect sizes to elucidate the clinical significance of results. Our review revealed a dearth of evidence providing statistically significant CBT intervention effects. Issues such as overall time investment, latency to treatment effects, and complementary and combined therapies are considered. We present a theoretical argument for applying mindfulness- and acceptance-based CBT interventions to PMS/PMDD and suggest future research in this area. In conclusion, to produce the necessary evidence-base support for PMS/PMDD given the limited empirical evidence reported here, researchers are called on to produce methodologically rigorous investigations of psychosocial interventions for PMS/PMDD.

  13. Treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) with a novel formulation of drospirenone and ethinyl estradiol

    OpenAIRE

    De Berardis, Domenico; Serroni, Nicola; Salerno, Rosa Maria; Ferro, Filippo Maria

    2007-01-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Pharmacologic options studied for treating severe PMS and PMDD may include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, anxiolytic agents, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists and the diuretic spironolactone. However, the use of combined oral contraceptives (COC) may be a therapeutic option in treating PMS and PMDD. The combination of drospirenone with ethinylestradiol (EE/drospirenone) was approved for mar...

  14. Luteal phase administration of agents for the treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ellen W

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on current information about luteal phase administration (i.e. typically for the last 2 weeks of the menstrual cycle) of pharmacological agents for the treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Compared with continuous administration, a luteal phase administration regimen reduces the exposure to medication and lowers the costs of treatment. Based on evidence from randomised clinical trials, SSRIs are the first-line treatment for PMDD at this time. Of these agents, sertraline, fluoxetine and paroxetine (as an extended-release formulation) are approved by the US FDA for luteal phase, as well as continuous, administration. Clinical trials of these agents and citalopram have demonstrated that symptom reduction is similar with both administration regimens. When used to treat PMDD, SSRI doses are consistent with those used for major depressive disorder. The medications are well tolerated; discontinuation symptoms with this intermittent administration regimen have not been reported. Other medications that have been examined in clinical trials for PMDD or severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS) using luteal phase administration include buspirone, alprazolam, tryptophan and progesterone. Buspirone and alprazolam show only modest efficacy in PMS (in some but not all studies), but there may be a lower incidence of sexual adverse effects with these medications than with SSRIs. Symptom reduction with tryptophan was significantly greater than with placebo, but the availability of this medication is strictly limited because of safety concerns. Progesterone has consistently failed to show efficacy for severe PMS/PMDD in large, randomised, placebo-controlled trials.

  15. The burden of moderate/severe premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder in a cohort of Latin American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiola, Alexandre; Lowin, Julia; Lindemann, Marion; Patel, Renu; Endicott, Jean

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between symptom severity, cost, and impairment in women with moderate/severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in a Latin American setting. A model was constructed based on analysis of an observational dataset. Data were included from four Latin American countries. Responder-level data were analysed according to four categories of symptom severity: Category 1 comprised Daily Record of Severity of Problems score 21 to 41.9, Category 2 score was 42 to 62.9, Category 3 score was 63 to 83.9, and Category 4 was a score of 84 or higher. Burden was estimated in terms of impact on job and activities using the modified work productivity and impairment questionnaire and affect on quality of life using the SF-12 questionnaire. Costs were estimated in Brazilian reals from a Brazilian private health care and societal perspective. The outputs of the analysis were estimates of burden, mean annual cost and affect on quality of life (as measured by quality adjusted life years) by symptom severity. Confidence intervals around key outcomes were generated through nonparametric bootstrapping. Analysis suggests a significant cost burden associated with moderate/severe PMS and PMDD with mean per patient annual costs estimated at 1618 BRL (95% confidence interval 957-2,481). Although the relationship between cost, quality of life, and severity was not clear, analysis showed a consistent relationship between disease severity and measures of disease burden (job and daily activity). Burden on activities increased with disease severity. Our analysis, conducted from a Latin American perspective, suggests a significant burden and an increasing impairment associated with moderate/severe PMS and PMDD. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder. A guide for the treating clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Hal

    2002-01-01

    Up to 75% of women report some premenstrual symptoms, but less than 10% have symptoms severe enough to qualify for a diagnosis of PMDD. A key to diagnosis is establishing a pattern of typical PMDD symptoms that recur during the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and remit after menses. Underlying psychiatric and medical disorders that might mimic PMDD should be ruled out or addressed. The clinician should recognize that severe PMS and PMDD are most likely caused by sensitivity to hormonal cycling rather than an abnormality of hormone levels. Current treatment is based on the hypothesis that serotonin depletion is responsible for the premenstrual irritability, dysphoria, and poor impulse control in PMDD. There is some evidence that GABA, endogenous opiates, allopregenolone, and various vitamins and minerals might play roles in severe PMS and PMDD. Treatment with oral contraceptives or supplementary progesterone or estrogen has not been effective. For the treating clinician, a reasonable approach to the patient with severe PMS or PMDD is shown in Table 2.

  17. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition: contributions from Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, N; Mehta, S

    2014-12-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder has been included as a separate diagnostic entity in the chapter of 'Depressive Disorders' of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5). The antecedent, concurrent, and predictive diagnostic validators of premenstrual dysphoric disorder have been reviewed by a sub-workgroup of the DSM-5 Mood Disorders Work Group, which includes a panel of experts on women's mental health. Contributions from the Asian continent have been mainly in the form of prevalence studies. Genetic and neurobiological domains of premenstrual dysphoric disorder largely remain untouched in Asia and offer a potential area for investigation.

  18. Treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder with luteal phase dosing of sertraline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbreich, Uriel; Kahn, Linda S

    2003-11-01

    Sertraline (Zoloft, Pfizer Inc.) is a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) which has been approved by the US FDA for the treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). PMDD is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) which affects at least 5 - 8% of women of reproductive age. It is characterised by cyclic appearance at the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, and disappearance following the beginning of menses, with no symptoms during at least 1 week of the cycle - usually during the mid-follicular phase. Due to the cyclic luteal occurrence of PMDD, luteal phase dosing of SSRIs has been suggested and proven effective for sertraline as well as several other SSRIs. The clinical response of sertraline is reported to be within several days following initiation of treatment. Despite repeated cyclic discontinuation, no significant discontinuation adverse effects have been reported. In addition to its proven clinical efficacy, luteal-phase dosing may offer the advantages of minimising adverse effects of SSRIs while reducing the personal and economic burden of taking a prescription medication continuously for long periods and thus increasing compliance.

  19. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder--review of actual findings about mental disorders related to menstrual cycle and possibilities of their therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukov, I; Ptácek, R; Raboch, J; Domluvilová, D; Kuzelová, H; Fischer, S; Kozelek, P

    2010-01-01

    It is known that mood disorders in women explicitly relates to estrogen production. Except for these findings phenomenon as Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, directly connected to menstrual cycle in women, is widely discussed. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a set of subjectively unpleasant mental and somatic symptoms. It appears in luteal phase of ovarian cycle. During menstruation it remits and disappears up to one week from its termination. DSM IV classified PMDD into the category of "Other specific depressive disorders" and further revision DSM IV-TR classifies PMDD as a separate strictly defined psychiatric diagnosis. The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) does not include any specific category as PMDD or similar. The closest category F38.8 does not represent the core of the phenomenon because it relates only to general depressive symptomatology and does not give specific diagnostic criteria to menstrual cycle related mood disorders (Grady-Weliky, 2003). In the presented article, possible effectivity of PMDD treatment with the focus to antidepressants of SSRI type (Serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors) is discussed. In spite of interesting and significant findings, the treatment of PMDD and accordingly PMS is above all multidisciplinary question and it must be treated like that.

  20. Work stress, premenstrual syndrome and dysphoric disorder: are there any associations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namavar Jahromi, B; Pakmehr, S; Hagh-Shenas, H

    2011-03-01

    Women with recurrent and severe symptoms are diagnosed as having premenstrual syndrome (PMS), and if they suffer from severe affective symptoms, a diagnosis of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is made. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of work stress with PMS and PMDD. Fifty-five female medical students in their internship program (ten 24-hour shifts per month) and 38 third-year female medical students without any shift duties were asked to participate in this study. A questionnaire was used to record demographic information and a self-report inventory was used to measure 13 symptoms relevant to PMS and PMDD according to DSM-IV criteria. All participants were asked to complete the inventory every night around midnight for those on shifts or before going to bed at home for 60 consecutive nights. Out of 55 volunteers in the shift-work group, 31 (56%) fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for PMS in contrast to 12 (32%) in the control group. The frequency of PMDD was 12 (22%) in the intern group and 5 (13%) in the control group. Twenty one students (55%) from the control group did not have PMS or PMDD, compared to 12 (22%) students from the shift workers. Decreased energy (70.9%) and irritability (65.4%) were the most frequent symptoms during the luteal phase in the shift-work group. Work stress and an increase in responsibility may produce or exacerbate PMS. Self-help approaches to induce self-awareness, along with psychological and psychiatric interventions, may help susceptible women to overcome this cyclic condition in order to increase their productivity as well as their quality of life.

  1. An overview of four studies of a continuous oral contraceptive (levonorgestrel 90 mcg/ethinyl estradiol 20 mcg) on premenstrual dysphoric disorder and premenstrual syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ellen W; Halbreich, Uriel; Grubb, Gary S; Rapkin, Andrea J; Skouby, Sven O; Smith, Lynne; Mirkin, Sebastian; Constantine, Ginger D

    2012-05-01

    This article presents an overview of four studies that evaluated a continuous oral contraceptive (OC) containing levonorgestrel (90 mcg) and ethinyl estradiol (20 mcg; LNG/EE) for managing premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials and one open-label, single-treatment substudy examined mean changes from baseline in the Daily Record of Severity of Problems (DRSP) or Penn Daily Symptom Rating (DSR). Improvements from baseline in mean DRSP and DSR scores were observed, but results were not consistent among the studies. Mean percent improvement of premenstrual symptoms ranged from 30% to 59% in controlled trials and 56% to 81% in an open-label substudy. A large placebo effect was also observed in the placebo-controlled studies. Continuous LNG/EE yielded a favorable safety profile. These data, although not consistent, indicate that continuous LNG/EE may reduce the symptoms of PMDD and PMS, providing an option for women who are appropriate candidates for a continuous OC as a contraceptive, the approved indication for this medication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Safety, efficacy, actions, and patient acceptability of drospirenone/ethinyl estradiol contraceptive pills in the treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley L Breech

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Lesley L Breech, Paula K BravermanDivision of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USAAbstract: Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD is estimated to affect 3%–8% of reproductive age women. Multiple therapeutic modalities have been evaluated with varying efficacy for the associated somatic and mood symptoms. The majority of older studies had shown that oral contraceptive pills (OCs were most effective for the physical symptoms. However, newer OCs containing a novel progestin, drospirenone, have shown promise in alleviating both the somatic and affective/behavioral symptoms. This progestin, which is a derivative of spironolactone, has both antimineralocorticoid and antiandrogenic activity. A 24/4 formulation containing 20 µg of ethinyl estradiol has been found effective in randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trials utilizing established scales documenting symptoms associated with PMDD. Multiple studies have shown that drospirenone-containing OCs are safe without evidence of clinically adverse effects on carbohydrate metabolism, lipids, blood pressure, weight, serum potassium or increased thrombotic events compared to other low dose OCs. In addition, significant improvements have been demonstrated in acne, hirsutism, and fluid retention symptoms. Several open label studies demonstrated good patient compliance and reported satisfaction with the method. Because of the significant placebo effect demonstrated in the blinded placebo-controlled trials, additional large randomized placebo-controlled trials are needed to confirm the efficacy of the drospirenone OCs in the treatment of PMDD. However, this OC formulation appears to be a promising therapeutic modality.Keywords: drospirenone, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, premenstrual syndrome, oral contraceptive pill

  3. Fluoxetine versus Vitex agnus castus extract in the treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Murad; Kumru, Selahattin; Tezcan, Ertan

    2003-04-01

    Clinical trials have demonstrated that serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) and the extract of Vitex agnus castus are effective for the treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). However, to the best of our knowledge, there has been no study comparing the efficacy of the SRIs with Vitex agnus castus (AC) extract. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), with that of the AC extract, a natural choice. After a period of 2 screening months to screen the patients for suitability, 41 patients with PMDD according to DSM-IV were recruited into the study. The patients were randomized to fluoxetine or AC for 2 months of single-blind, rater- blinded and prospective treatment period. The outcome measures included the Penn daily symptom report (DSR), the Hamilton depression rating scale (HAM-D), and the clinical global impression-severity of illness (CGI-SI) and -improvement (CGI-I) scales. At endpoint, using the clinical criterion for improvement, a similar percentage of patients responded to fluoxetine (68.4%, n = 13) and AC (57.9%, n = 11). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups with respect to the rate of responders. This preliminary study suggests that patients with PMDD respond well to treatment with both fluoxetine and AC. However, fluoxetine was more effective for psychological symptoms while the extract diminished the physical symptoms. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder as a correlate of suicidal ideation, plans, and attempts among a nationally representative sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilver, Corey E; Libby, Daniel J; Hoff, Rani A

    2013-03-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern and a leading cause of death in the United States. Psychopathology is an established risk factor for non-fatal suicidal behavior; however, it is unclear whether premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), a psychiatric disorder specific to women, is correlated with these outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine if PMDD status was associated with suicidal ideation, plans, and attempts, independent of socio-demographic factors and psychiatric comorbidity. We conducted a secondary data analysis of 3,965 American women aged 18-40 who participated in the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Survey. Descriptive statistics and forward stepwise logistic regression modeling were performed using SUDAAN software. The prevalence of non-fatal suicidal behaviors increased in a graded fashion according to PMDD status. Although the control for demographic characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity greatly attenuated the unadjusted association between PMDD and suicidal behaviors, women with PMDD remained significantly more likely than women with no premenstrual symptoms to report suicidal ideation (OR 2.22; 95% CI 1.40-3.53), plans (OR 2.27; 95% CI 1.20-4.28), and attempts (OR 2.10; 95% CI 1.08-4.08). Only the likelihood of suicidal ideation was significantly elevated among women with moderate/severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS; OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.17-1.88), compared to women with no premenstrual symptoms. PMDD was strongly and independently associated with non-fatal suicidal behaviors among a nationally representative sample. These findings suggest that clinicians treating women with PMDD should assess and be vigilant for signs of non-fatal suicidal behavior, and that clinicians should evaluate and treat the premenstrual symptoms of women who express these behaviors.

  5. Combined Oral Contraceptive Pill Initiation in a Patient With Major Depressive Disorder, Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, Social Anxiety, Panic Disorder, and Histrionic Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roi, Cody; Conrad, Erich J

    2017-01-01

    Comorbid psychiatric conditions present an added layer of challenge in managing patients, as each condition and associated set of symptoms exacerbate the complexity of the overall presentation. Premenopausal women may be at particular risk for inadequate care, as their comorbid conditions may present overlapping symptoms and mask independent premenstrual symptoms. The prevalence of premenstrual dysphoric disorder and associated conditions can be as high as 8% in women of reproductive age. Recognizing and assessing premenstrual symptoms that are comorbid with other psychiatric conditions can help contribute to a comprehensive treatment strategy and potentially improve the treatment response for the comorbid conditions. Combined oral contraceptive pills (COCPs) have been approved for premenstrual conditions and should be considered by the psychiatrist as an available treatment option. A 34-year-old Caucasian female patient with comorbid major depressive disorder, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, social anxiety, panic disorder, and histrionic personality disorder, with persistent suicidal ideation and distress intolerance, was treated with norgestimate-ethinyl estradiol with improvement in mood, anxiety, and menstrual cramping and with associated diminished suicidal ideation and improved distress tolerance. In this case, Beck Depression Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory scores, as well as self- and peer-reported functionality, all suggested improvement in symptoms following the introduction of COCPs. The neurohormonal contribution to psychiatric conditions continues to be studied and is becoming increasingly important. An understanding of the presence and etiology of premenstrual symptoms should be part of a comprehensive psychiatric assessment of female patients, and consideration of COCPs in the treatment plan adds a potentially potent option for symptom mitigation and remission.

  6. Personality Traits of Suicidality Are Associated with Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder in a Suicidal Women Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducasse, Déborah; Jaussent, Isabelle; Olié, Emilie; Guillaume, Sébastien; Lopez-Castroman, Jorge; Courtet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Both Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) might increase the risk of suicidal behavior. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between personality dimensions specifically involved in suicidal vulnerability and PMS/PMDD. We collected data from 232 women consecutively hospitalized after a suicide attempt. We examined the relationship between impulsivity, aggressiveness/hostility, hopelessness, trait anger, affect intensity, emotional lability, and PMS/PMDD. Notably, we created an algorithm from the shortened Premenstrual Assessment form in order to assess PMDD status. The proportions of PMS and PMDD among female suicide attempters were 50% and 23% respectively. Women with PMS or PMDD were more likely to endorse most of these personality traits to than those without even after controlling for potential confounders. We found an impulsive-aggressive pattern of personality in women with PMS or PMDD, independently from the time of the menstrual cycle. Interestingly, trait anger remained associated with both PMS and PMDD independently of every other personality traits. The higher the anger level, the higher the risk was to suffer from both PMS and PMDD. This study demonstrates a strong, independent association between PMS/PMDD and trait anger among a representative sample of female suicide attempters. It is of major interest for clinicians in view of addressing a substantial public health problem among women of reproductive age.

  7. Personality Traits of Suicidality Are Associated with Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder in a Suicidal Women Sample.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Ducasse

    Full Text Available Both Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD might increase the risk of suicidal behavior. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between personality dimensions specifically involved in suicidal vulnerability and PMS/PMDD.We collected data from 232 women consecutively hospitalized after a suicide attempt. We examined the relationship between impulsivity, aggressiveness/hostility, hopelessness, trait anger, affect intensity, emotional lability, and PMS/PMDD. Notably, we created an algorithm from the shortened Premenstrual Assessment form in order to assess PMDD status.The proportions of PMS and PMDD among female suicide attempters were 50% and 23% respectively. Women with PMS or PMDD were more likely to endorse most of these personality traits to than those without even after controlling for potential confounders. We found an impulsive-aggressive pattern of personality in women with PMS or PMDD, independently from the time of the menstrual cycle. Interestingly, trait anger remained associated with both PMS and PMDD independently of every other personality traits. The higher the anger level, the higher the risk was to suffer from both PMS and PMDD.This study demonstrates a strong, independent association between PMS/PMDD and trait anger among a representative sample of female suicide attempters. It is of major interest for clinicians in view of addressing a substantial public health problem among women of reproductive age.

  8. Emotional regulation difficulties and premenstrual symptoms among Israeli students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuveni, Inbal; Dan, Rotem; Segman, Ronen; Evron, Ron; Laufer, Sofia; Goelman, Gadi; Bonne, Omer; Canetti, Laura

    2016-12-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) reported to affect 3-8 % of women of reproductive age and resulting in marked emotional and occupational impairment. Despite its prevalence, the etiology of PMDD is largely unknown, and patients remain mostly undiagnosed and poorly treated. It has been suggested that PMDD is a manifestation of underlying depressive disorder which is associated with the inability to regulate emotions in an adaptive manner. Therefore, we hypothesized that women with PMDD would exhibit increased difficulty with emotional regulation. A total of 648 female Israeli college students were assessed by the Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool (PSST) and the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS). Of these women, 166 (25.6 %) met the criteria for PMS. Sixty-four (9.9 %) suffered from PMDD. More emotion regulation deficits were observed in the PMDD and PMS groups compared to the control group. Furthermore, there were more emotional regulation deficits among the predominantly psychological and mixed symptom subtype compared to the predominantly physical symptom subtype group. This is the first study to report an association between emotional dysregulation and PMDD. These findings may lead to development of more individually tailored treatment protocols focused on improving emotional regulation techniques.

  9. The inter-relationship of premenstrual symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, M; Abraham, S; McNeil, D; Vizzard, J; Macaskill, P; Fraser, I; Llewellyn-Jones, D

    1995-09-01

    The prospective symptom reports of women seeking treatment for premenstrual symptoms and control subjects was investigated. In order to compare symptom reports from premenstrual symptom sufferers and control subjects a method of combining and analysing prospectively collected menstrual cycle symptom data is required. A technique that uses the time of onset of menses and the time of ovulation (as measured by urinary luteinizing hormone excretion) to standardize each cycle into 14 time points was developed. Summary factors were then empirically derived from data collected prospectively from 30 premenstrual symptom sufferers and 19 control subjects. Twenty-two mood symptoms were summarized into a single factor and the 29 most frequently occurring physical symptoms were summarized into two factors. Factor scores were calculated on the basis of these factors and the effect of time during the menstrual cycle on these scores examined. Both physical symptom factor scores increased significantly in the luteal phase for both the premenstrual symptom sufferer group and the control group. The single mood factor score increased significantly in the luteal phase for the premenstrual sufferer group but not for the control group, suggesting that the only qualitative difference between the groups was the presence of cyclic mood symptoms in the premenstrual symptom sufferer group. The premenstrual symptom sufferer group recorded significantly higher scores on each of the three factors than the control group. The correlation between the scores on each of the factors over three cycles was high both in the follicular and luteal phase suggesting that these factor scores provide a reproducible measure of menstrual cycle symptomatology.

  10. Brain Structure and Function in Women with Comorbid Bipolar and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina K. Syan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionHormonal fluctuations associated with female reproductive life events may precipitate or worsen affective episodes in women with bipolar disorder (BD. Previous studies have shown that women with BD report higher rates of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD than controls. Further, bipolar women who report premenstrual worsening of mood display a worse course of their bipolar illness. Despite this, the neural correlates of comorbid BD and PMDD have not been investigated.MethodologyEighty-five [CTRL, n = 25; PMDD, n = 20; BD, n = 21; BD with comorbid PMDD (BDPMDD, n = 19], regularly cycling women, not on hormonal contraception, underwent two MRI scans: during their mid-follicular and late luteal menstrual phases. We investigated resting-state functional connectivity (Rs-FC, cortical thickness, and subcortical volumes of brain regions associated with the pathophysiology of BD and PMDD between groups, in the mid-follicular and late luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. All BD subjects were euthymic for at least 2 months prior to study entry.ResultsWomen in the BDPMDD group displayed greater disruption in biological rhythms and more subthreshold depressive and anxious symptoms through the menstrual cycle compared to other groups. Rs-FC was increased between the L-hippocampus and R-frontal cortex and decreased between the R-hippocampus and R-premotor cortex in BDPMDD vs. BD (FDR-corrected, p < 0.05. Cortical thickness analysis revealed decreased cortical thickness of the L-pericalcarine, L-superior parietal, R-middle temporal, R-rostral middle frontal, and L-superior frontal, as well as increased cortical thickness of the L-superior temporal gyri in BDPMDD compared to BD. We also found increased left-caudate volume in BDPMDD vs. BD (pCORR < 0.05.ConclusionWomen with BD and comorbid PMDD display a distinct clinical and neurobiological phenotype of BD, which suggests differential sensitivity to endogenous hormones.

  11. Premenstrual mood symptoms: study of familiality and personality correlates in mood disorder pedigrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Jennifer L; Klein, Sarah R; Zamoiski, Rachel B; Zandi, Peter P; Bienvenu, Oscar J; Mackinnon, Dean F; Mondimore, Francis M; Schweizer, Barbara; Swartz, Karen L; Crowe, Raymond P; Scheftner, William A; Weissman, Myrna M; Levinson, Douglas F; DePaulo, J Raymond; Potash, James B

    2009-02-01

    We sought to determine whether premenstrual mood symptoms exhibit familial aggregation in bipolar disorder or major depression pedigrees. Two thousand eight hundred seventy-six women were interviewed with the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies as part of either the NIMH Genetics Initiative Bipolar Disorder Collaborative study or the Genetics of Early Onset Major Depression (GenRED) study and asked whether they had experienced severe mood symptoms premenstrually. In families with two or more female siblings with bipolar disorder (BP) or major depressive disorder (MDD), we examined the odds of having premenstrual mood symptoms given one or more siblings with these symptoms. For the GenRED MDD sample we also assessed the impact of personality as measured by the NEO-FFI. Premenstrual mood symptoms did not exhibit familial aggregation in families with BP or MDD. We unexpectedly found an association between high NEO openness scores and premenstrual mood symptoms, but neither this factor, nor NEO neuroticism influenced evidence for familial aggregation of symptoms. Limitations include the retrospective interview, the lack of data on premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and the inability to control for factors such as medication use.

  12. Beta-Arrestin1 Levels in Mononuclear Leukocytes Support Depression Scores for Women with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Farzana; Nayyar, Sanket; Richie, William; Archibong, Anthony; Nayyar, Tultul

    2015-12-22

    Depression is very common in reproductive women particularly with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), which is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Beta-arrestins were previously implicated in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment for mood disorders. This study examined whether a measurement for beta-arrestin1 levels in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBMC), could aid to distinguish between PMDD and PMS. Study participants (n = 25) were non-pregnant women between 18-42 years of age with the symptoms of PMS/PMDD, but not taking any antidepressants/therapy and at the luteal phase of menstruation. The levels of beta-arrestin1 protein in the PBMCs were determined by ELISA using human beta-arrestin1 kit. The beta-arrestin1 levels were compared with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores among these women. The magnitude of the different parameters for Axis 1 mental disorders were significantly higher and beta arrestin1 protein levels in PBMCs were significantly lower in women with PMDD as compared to PMS women. The reduction in beta arrestin1 protein levels was significantly correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms. Beta-arrestin1 measurements in women may potentially serve for biochemical diagnostic purposes for PMDD and might be useful as evidence-based support for questionnaires.

  13. Beta-Arrestin1 Levels in Mononuclear Leukocytes Support Depression Scores for Women with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Alam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Depression is very common in reproductive women particularly with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD, which is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS. Beta-arrestins were previously implicated in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment for mood disorders. This study examined whether a measurement for beta-arrestin1 levels in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBMC, could aid to distinguish between PMDD and PMS. Study participants (n = 25 were non-pregnant women between 18–42 years of age with the symptoms of PMS/PMDD, but not taking any antidepressants/therapy and at the luteal phase of menstruation. The levels of beta-arrestin1 protein in the PBMCs were determined by ELISA using human beta-arrestin1 kit. The beta-arrestin1 levels were compared with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores among these women. The magnitude of the different parameters for Axis 1 mental disorders were significantly higher and beta arrestin1 protein levels in PBMCs were significantly lower in women with PMDD as compared to PMS women. The reduction in beta arrestin1 protein levels was significantly correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms. Beta-arrestin1 measurements in women may potentially serve for biochemical diagnostic purposes for PMDD and might be useful as evidence-based support for questionnaires.

  14. Association of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder with bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder in a nationally representative epidemiological sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, Carrie J; Thomas, Jennifer J; Valentine, Sarah E; Gerber, Monica W; Vaewsorn, Adin S; Marques, Luana

    2016-07-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge-eating disorder (BED) are associated with significant health impairment. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) comprise both psychological (disturbances in mood and affect) and physiological (bloating and changes in appetite) symptoms that may trigger binge-eating and/or purging. Female participants were drawn from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiological Surveys, conducted from 2001 to 2003. Weighted multivariable logistic regression modeled the association between lifetime PMS and PMDD and lifetime odds of BN or BED. Among 8,694 participants, 133 (1.0%) had BN and 185 (1.8%) BED. Additionally, 366 (4.2%) had PMDD and 3,489 (42.4%) had PMS. Prevalence of PMDD and PMS were 17.4 and 55.4% among those with BN, 10.7 and 48.9% among those with BED and 3.4 and 59.1% among those with subthreshold BED. After adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, income, education, body mass index, age at menarche, birth control use, and comorbid mental health conditions, PMDD was associated with seven times the odds of BN (OR 7.2, 95% CI 2.3, 22.4) and PMS with two times the odds of BN (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1, 5.7). Neither PMDD nor PMS were significantly associated with BED. Women with PMS and PMDD have a higher odds of BN, independent of comorbid mental health conditions. PMS and PMDD may be important comorbidities to BN to consider in clinical settings, and future research should investigate whether PMS and PMDD affect the onset and duration of bulimic symptoms as well as the potential for shared risk factors across disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:641-650). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Association of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder with bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder in a nationally representative epidemiological sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, Carrie J.; Thomas, Jennifer J.; Valentine, Sarah E.; Gerber, Monica W.; Vaewsorn, Adin S.; Marques, Luana

    2016-01-01

    Objective Bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) are associated with significant health impairment. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) comprise both psychological (disturbances in mood and affect) and physiological (bloating and changes in appetite) symptoms that may trigger binge eating and/or purging. Method Female participants were drawn from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiological Surveys, conducted from 2001–2003. Weighted multivariable logistic regression modeled the association between lifetime PMS and PMDD and lifetime odds of BN or BED. Results Among 8,694 participants, 133 (1.0%) had BN and 185 (1.8%) BED. Additionally, 366 (4.2%) had PMDD and 3,489 (42.4%) had PMS. Prevalence of PMDD and PMS were 17.4% and 55.4% among those with BN, 10.7% and 48.9% among those with BED and 3.4% and 59.1% among those with subthreshold BED. After adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, income, education, body mass index, age at menarche, birth control use and comorbid mental health conditions, PMDD was associated with 7-times the odds of BN (OR 7.2, 95% CI 2.3, 22.4) and PMS with 2-times the odds of BN (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1, 5.7). Neither PMDD nor PMS were significantly associated with BED. Discussion Women with PMS and PMDD have a higher odds of BN, independent of comorbid mental health conditions. PMS and PMDD may be important comorbidities to BN to consider in clinical settings, and future research should investigate whether PMS and PMDD affect the onset and duration of bulimic symptoms as well as the potential for shared risk factors across disorders. PMID:27206163

  16. A diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders history of premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachar, Peter; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2014-04-01

    The proposals to include a menstruation-related mood disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Revised Third Edition (DSM-III-R), and DSM-IV led to intense public and behind-the-scenes controversy. Although the controversies surrounding the DSM-5 revision were greater in number than the controversies of the earlier revisions, the DSM-5 proposal to include a menstruation-related mood disorder was not among them. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder was made an official disorder in the DSM-5 with no significant protest. To understand the factors that led to this change, we interviewed those psychiatrists and psychologists who were most involved in the DSM-IV revision. On the basis of these interviews, we offer a list of empirical and nonempirical considerations that led to the DSM-IV compromise and explore how key alterations in these considerations led to a different outcome for the DSM-5.

  17. Herbal treatments for alleviating premenstrual symptoms: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dante, Giulia; Facchinetti, Fabio

    2011-03-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a condition of cyclical and recurrent physical and psychological discomfort occurring 1 to 2 weeks before menstrual period. More severe psychological symptoms have been described for the premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). No single treatment is universally recognised as effective and many patients often turn to therapeutic approaches outside of conventional medicine. This systematic review is aimed at analysing the effects of herb remedies in the above conditions. Systematic literature searches were performed in electronic databases, covering the period January 1980 to September 2010. Randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) were included. Papers quality was evaluated with the Jadad' scale. A further evaluation of PMS/PMDD diagnostic criteria was also done. Of 102 articles identified, 17 RCTs were eligible and 10 of them were included. The heterogeneity of population included, study design and outcome presentation refrained from a meta-analysis. Vitex agnus castus was the more investigated remedy (four trials, about 500 women), and it was reported to consistently ameliorate PMS better than placebo. Single trials also support the use of either Gingko biloba or Crocus sativus. On the contrary, neither evening primrose oil nor St. John's Wort show an effect different than placebo. None of the herbs was associated with major health risks, although the reduced number of tested patients does not allow definitive conclusions on safety. Some herb remedies seem useful for the treatment of PMS. However, more RCTs are required to account for the heterogeneity of the syndrome.

  18. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder and suicide attempts as a correlation among women in reproductive age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams-Alizadeh, Narges; Maroufi, Azad; Rashidi, Mahsa; Roshani, Daem; Farhadifar, Fariba; Khazaie, Habibolah

    2018-01-01

    Women likely attempt suicide more than men and sex hormones or menstrual cycle may be associated with female suicide attempts. There are debates regarding the correlation of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and suicidal behaviors. The objective of this study was to examine if PMDD was associated with suicidal attempts as sex hormones are contributed in its pathogenesis. As a case-control study 120 fertile woman with regular menstrual cycles attempting suicide and admitted to a general hospital were compared with a matched control group of 120 women selected among those accompanying other patients in other wards. Psychiatric interview based on DSM-5 criteria was conducted for diagnosing PMDD. There was a significantly higher frequency of PMDD in suicide attempters than in the controls (P = 0.001); while no remarkable difference was seen in frequency of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) between the two groups (P = 0.294) and attempting suicide was not related to the menstrual cycle (P = 0.52). This study suggests that PMDD may be associated with suicidal attempts, however it is not related to menstrual cycle. No relationship was found between PMS and suicidal acts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) with a novel formulation of drospirenone and ethinyl estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Berardis, Domenico; Serroni, Nicola; Salerno, Rosa Maria; Ferro, Filippo Maria

    2007-08-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Pharmacologic options studied for treating severe PMS and PMDD may include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, anxiolytic agents, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists and the diuretic spironolactone. However, the use of combined oral contraceptives (COC) may be a therapeutic option in treating PMS and PMDD. The combination of drospirenone with ethinylestradiol (EE/drospirenone) was approved for marketing as an oral contraceptive in Europe and the United States. The preparation is characterized by a high contraceptive efficacy in combination with excellent cycle control, good tolerability, and a favourable impact on lipid and glucose metabolism. Recently, some placebo-controlled, randomized studies have tested clinical efficacy and tolerability of this COC in the treatment of PMDD. The aim of the present review was to elucidate the possible benefits or disadvantages of PMDD treatment with this novel formulation of EE/drospirenone. The results of trials evaluating the use of EE/drospirenone combination in the treatment of PMDD are encouraging but further studies are needed. However, the reported clinical efficacy and the relative good tolerability of EE/drospirenone may contribute to widen the therapeutic spectrum of PMDD.

  20. Examination of premenstrual symptoms as a risk factor for depression in postpartum women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttner, Melissa M; Mott, Sarah L; Pearlstein, Teri; Stuart, Scott; Zlotnick, Caron; O'Hara, Michael W

    2013-06-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a significant public health concern with prevalence of major and minor depressions reaching 20 % in the first three postpartum months. Sociodemographic and psychopathology correlates of PPD are well established; however, information on the relationship between premenstrual disorders and the development of PPD is less well established. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the role of premenstrual syndrome (PMS)/premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) as a risk factor for PPD. Premenstrual symptoms were assessed retrospectively using the premenstrual symptoms screening tool (PSST) and depression was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria and assessed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). A two-stage screening procedure was applied. In the first stage, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) was employed. In the second stage, women endorsing ≥5 symptoms on the PHQ-9 were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, HDRS, and PSST. Hierarchical linear regression showed that history of depression and PMS/PMDD contributed an additional 2 % of the variance (p PMS/PMDD and PPD (OR = 1.97). The findings of this study suggest that PMS/PMDD is an important risk factor for PPD. Women endorsing a history of PMS/PMDD should be monitored during the perinatal period.

  1. Premenstrual disorders and rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craner, Julia R; Sigmon, Sandra T; Martinson, Amber A; McGillicuddy, Morgan L

    2014-01-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) involve emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms; however, there is little understanding of psychological factors that contribute to these disorders. It was hypothesized that rumination, a form of depressive self-focused attention, is related to premenstrual distress. Study 1 involved women (N = 735) meeting criteria for No/Mild PMS, Moderate/Severe PMS, and PMDD using retrospective self-report. Study 2 involved women (N = 85) meeting diagnostic criteria for PMS or PMDD (i.e., PMD group) and healthy controls (i.e., No PMD group) following 60-day symptom monitoring. Participants in both studies completed questionnaires of rumination, anxiety sensitivity, and coping styles. Rumination was strongly related to premenstrual disorders using both retrospective and prospective reports, as well as both categorical and continuous approaches to classification of premenstrual distress. Rumination, a transdiagnostic factor in psychopathology, may contribute to the onset and maintenance of premenstrual distress. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Addressing concerns about the inclusion of premenstrual dysphoric disorder in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlage, S Ann; Breaux, Cynthia A; Yonkers, Kimberly A

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) into the main text of the DSM has been a point of controversy for many years. The purpose of this article is to address the main concerns raised by opponents to its inclusion. Concerns are presented and countered in turn. To identify the most prevalent arguments against inclusion of PMDD, we searched MEDLINE (1966-2012), PsycINFO (1930-2012), the Internet, and reference lists of identified articles during September 1-17, 2012, using the keywords PMDD, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), DSM, DSM-5, concerns, controversy, women, political power, workforce, courts, and history. The search was restricted to English-language publications. A total of 55 articles were identified and included. The most pressing arguments against inclusion were grouped by similarity and addressed if they were reported 5 or more times. Our review of the sources yielded 38 concerns regarding PMDD; 6 concerns were reported at least 5 times and are addressed in this article. Evidence culled from historical and legal trends does not support the alleged societal use of PMS to harm women (eg, keeping women out of the workforce or using PMS against women in child custody disputes). Further, current epidemiologic research has answered all of the methodology criticisms of opponents. Studies have confirmed the existence of PMDD worldwide. The involvement of pharmaceutical companies in research has been questioned. However, irrespective of the level of association with industry, current research on PMDD has consistent results: PMDD exists in a minority of women. Historically, the pain and suffering of women have been dismissed, minimized, and negated. Similarly, women with PMDD have often had their experience invalidated. With the preponderance of evidence in its favor, PMDD has been placed in the main text of the DSM-5, opening the door for affected women to receive the attention full diagnostic status provides. © Copyright 2014 Physicians Postgraduate

  3. How to measure the impact of premenstrual symptoms? Development and validation of the German PMS-Impact Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kues, Johanna N; Janda, Carolyn; Kleinstäuber, Maria; Weise, Cornelia

    2016-10-01

    With 75% of women of reproductive age affected, premenstrual symptoms are very common, ranging from emotional and cognitive to physical symptoms. Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder can lead to substantial functional interference and psychological distress comparable to that of dysthymic disorders. The assessment of this impact is required as a part of the diagnostic procedure in the DSM-5. In the absence of a specific measure, the authors developed the PMS-Impact Questionnaire. A sample of 101 women reporting severe premenstrual complaints was assessed with the twenty-two items in the questionnaire during their premenstrual phase in an ongoing intervention study at the Philipps-University Marburg from August 2013 until January 2015. An exploratory factor analysis revealed a two-factor solution (labeled Psychological Impact and Functional Impact) with 18 items. A Cronbach's alpha of 0.90 for Psychological Impact and of 0.90 for Functional Impact indicated good reliability. Convergent construct validity was demonstrated by moderate to high correlations with the Pain Disability Index. Low correlations with the Big Five Inventory-10 indicated good divergent validity. The PMS-Impact Questionnaire was found to be a valid, reliable, and an economic measure to assess the impact of premenstrual symptoms. In future research, cross validations and confirmatory factor analyses should be conducted.

  4. Bipolar disorder and Premenstrual Syndrome or Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder comorbidity: a systematic review Comorbidade entre o Transtorno Bipolar e Síndrome Pré-menstrual ou Transtorno Disfórico Pré-menstrual: uma revisão sistemática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Carvalho Cirillo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This article aims to review the comorbidity of premenstrual syndrome (PMS or premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD and bipolar disorder (BD, identify variables requiring further investigation and to remind physicians that special care is required for diagnosis and therapy. METHOD: A systematic review of articles published from 1987 to February 2012 was conducted in the Medline database with the following terms: (premenstrual syndrome OR premenstrual dysphoric disorder OR premenstrual AND (bipolar OR mania OR manic. Seventeen articles were analyzed. RESULTS: PMS and PMDD were most often comorbid among BD-II patients and vice versa. Moreover, patients with PMS or PMDD also have an increased risk of having BD-I. In addition, bipolar women susceptible to hormonal changes exhibit more severe symptoms, more frequent relapses and a worse therapeutic response. CONCLUSION: Future investigations should attempt to stabilize hormonal levels through the continuous use of contraceptives to target a reduction in symptom severity. In addition, psychiatrists should note menstrual period dates and compare symptom intensity between the luteal and follicular phases. Finally, PMS and PMDD patients should be studied separately.OBJETIVO: Esse artigo tem como objetivo revisar a comorbidade entre a Síndrome Pré-Menstrual (SPM ou Transtorno Disfórico Pré-Menstrual (TDPM e o Transtorno Bipolar (TB, identificar as variáveis que exigem uma investigação mais aprofundada e lembrar os médicos que as mulheres necessitam de cuidados especiais para diagnóstico e tratamento. MÉTODO: Foi realizada uma revisão sistemática de 1987 a fevereiro de 2012 através da base de dados Medline utilizando os seguintes descritores: (premenstrual syndrome OR premenstrual dysphoric disorder OR premenstrual AND (bipolar OR mania OR manic. Dezessete artigos foram analisados. RESULTADOS: Pacientes com SPM ou TDPM possuem comorbidade com TB-II com maior frequência e vice

  5. Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... relationships, you may have premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). PMDD is a severe type of PMS that affects a small percentage of women. Drugs ... selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can help treat PMDD in some women. ... depression. Can PMS be treated? If your symptoms are mild to ...

  6. Transtorno disfórico pré-menstrual revisão: conceito, história, epidemiologia e etiologia Premenstrual dysphoric disorder review: concept, history, epidemiology and etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislene C. Valadares

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudos epidemiológicos demonstram que até 80% das mulheres apresentam sintomas físicos e/ou psíquicos no período pré-menstrual e que cerca de 3% a 11% os apresentam de maneira severa, havendo prejuízos sociais, familiares ou profissionais, o que caracteriza o transtorno disfórico pré-menstrual (TDPM. O TDPM apresenta sintomas que aparecem na semana que antecede a menstruação, cessando nos primeiros dias após o início desta. Diversas teorias têm sido propostas para justificar a sua etiologia. Fatores hormonais, psicológicos e ambientais parecem estar envolvidos; no entanto, ainda não há conclusões precisas que justifiquem essa patologia.Epidemiologic studies show that till 80% of the women have physical and/or psychiatric symptoms in the premenstrual period, and in about 3% till 11% of them, this disease has serious consequences, causing familiar or professional damages; characterizing the premenstrual dysphoric disorder. The premenstrual dysphoric symptoms happen in the week before menstruation, stopping in the first days after menstruation beginning. A lot of theories have been proposed to justify its etiology. Hormonals, psychological and environmental factors seem to be involved, however there are no strict conclusions to justify this pathology.

  7. EVALUATION OF NURSING STUDENTS' PREMENSTRUAL SYMPTOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerime Derya TASCI

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted as a descriptive study for the purpose of determining the kinds of premenstrual symptoms that Denizli Health Sciences School Nursing Students experience and what they do to treat them. The research population included the 126 female students in the Pamukkale University Denizli Health Sciences School Nursing School. Data collects in the classroom. In the examination of the students' menstrual complaints, 47.5% experienced back pain, 59% experienced abdominal pain, 44.3% experienced irritability, 39.3% experienced breast sensitivity/pain, 41% experienced facial or body acne and 32.8% experienced increased appetite every cycle. An examination of the students' responses about procedures during menstruation, 86.9% stated that having a bath was not contraindicated and 60.7% that aspirin-type analgesics should not be used for dysmenorrhea. 77.9% of the students stated that it was normal to have pain during menstruation and 63.9% that walking is beneficial for decreasing menstrual pain. There was a significant difference in the students' answers based on age group and class for experience of menstrual complaints and procedures used (p<0.05. The students' were lived premenstrual symptoms and they had insufficient knowledge of procedures for relief. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(6.000: 434-443

  8. Mental and Reproductive Health Correlates of Academic Performance among Debre Berhan University Female Students, Ethiopia : The Case of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alemu, Sisay Mulugeta; Habtewold, Tesfa Dejenie; Haile, Yohannes Gebreegziabhere

    2017-01-01

    Background. Globally 3 to 8% of reproductive age women are suffering from premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Several mental and reproductive health-related factors cause low academic achievement during university education. However, limited data exist in Ethiopia. The aim of the study was to

  9. Sleep, Hormones, and Circadian Rhythms throughout the Menstrual Cycle in Healthy Women and Women with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Shechter

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A relationship exists between the sleep-wake cycle and hormone secretion, which, in women, is further modulated by the menstrual cycle. This interaction can influence sleep across the menstrual cycle in healthy women and in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD, who experience specific alterations of circadian rhythms during their symptomatic luteal phase along with sleep disturbances during this time. This review will address the variation of sleep at different menstrual phases in healthy and PMDD women, as well as changes in circadian rhythms, with an emphasis on their relationship with female sex hormones. It will conclude with a brief discussion on nonpharmacological treatments of PMDD which use chronotherapeutic methods to realign circadian rhythms as a means of improving sleep and mood in these women.

  10. Sleep, Hormones, and Circadian Rhythms throughout the Menstrual Cycle in Healthy Women and Women with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Ari; Boivin, Diane B

    2010-01-01

    A relationship exists between the sleep-wake cycle and hormone secretion, which, in women, is further modulated by the menstrual cycle. This interaction can influence sleep across the menstrual cycle in healthy women and in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), who experience specific alterations of circadian rhythms during their symptomatic luteal phase along with sleep disturbances during this time. This review will address the variation of sleep at different menstrual phases in healthy and PMDD women, as well as changes in circadian rhythms, with an emphasis on their relationship with female sex hormones. It will conclude with a brief discussion on nonpharmacological treatments of PMDD which use chronotherapeutic methods to realign circadian rhythms as a means of improving sleep and mood in these women.

  11. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder and prefrontal reactivity during anticipation of emotional stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingnell, Malin; Bannbers, Elin; Wikström, Johan; Fredrikson, Mats; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2013-11-01

    Premenstrual disorder (PMDD) affects around 5% of women in childbearing ages. An increased sensitivity in emotion processing areas of the brain to variations in ovarian steroid levels has been suggested as part of the pathophysiology in PMDD, but prior neuroimaging studies of emotion processing are yet inconclusive. Previous behavioral studies of women with PMDD have, however, reported enhanced luteal phase startle responsivity during emotional anticipation. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate central neural circuitry activity during anticipation of, and exposure to, emotional stimuli across the menstrual cycle in women with and without PMDD. As compared to healthy controls, women with PMDD displayed significantly enhanced reactivity in the prefrontal cortex during anticipation of, but not exposure to, negative emotional stimuli during the luteal phase. In PMDD patients, BOLD reactivity during anticipation or viewing of negative emotional stimuli was not dependent on absolute levels of estradiol or progesterone. However, progesterone levels were positively correlated with emotion-induced reactivity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to positive emotional stimuli. These findings suggest that cortical emotional circuitry reactivity during anticipation is altered in PMDD during the luteal phase, which might be part of the pathophysiology behind the emotional symptoms or lack of emotional control reported by women with PMDD. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  12. Premenstrual symptoms and posttraumatic stress disorder in Japanese high school students 9 months after the great East-Japan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takashi; Tadakawa, Mari; Koga, Shoko; Nagase, Satoru; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2013-07-01

    On March 11, 2011, the Great East-Japan Earthquake occurred and a massive tsunami hit the northeastern coast of Japan. Catastrophic disasters such as earthquakes and war cause tremendous damage, not only physically but also mentally. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that occurs in the aftermath of a traumatic event. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a cluster of psychological and somatic symptoms that are limited to the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is considered a severe form of PMS. To determine the relationship between premenstrual symptoms and natural disaster-induced PTSD among Japanese adolescent girls, we conducted a cross-sectional study. Overall, 1489 high school students who belong to two high schools in Sendai, the largest city in northeastern Japan, were assessed 9 months after the earthquake. These schools are located inland, far from the seashore, and were not damaged by the tsunami. Premenstrual symptoms were assessed using the Premenstrual Symptoms Questionnaire, and PTSD symptoms were assessed using the Japanese-language version of Impact of Event Scale-Revised, which is a widely used self-assessment questionnaire about PTSD symptoms. We analyzed the data of 1,180 girls who completed the questionnaires and 118 girls (10.0%) were classified as having PTSD. The prevalence rates of PMDD and moderate to severe PMS increased according to the comorbidity of PTSD (p PMS/PMDD and natural disaster-induced PTSD. The comorbidity of PMS/PMDD and PTSD may complicate the follow-up of both conditions.

  13. Specific Dysphoric Symptoms Are Predicted by Early Maladaptive Schemas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Trincas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early maladaptive schemas (EMSs are cognitive patterns resulting from unmet core emotional needs in childhood that have been linked to the development of psychopathology. As depression is a multifaceted phenomenon, we hypothesized that specific dysphoric symptoms would be predicted by different EMSs. Four hundred and fifty-six participants completed a measure of EMSs (Young Schema Questionnaire and reported on the severity of the symptoms of criterion A for major depression in DSM-IV during the occurrence of a dysphoric episode in the previous 12 months. A series of stepwise multiple regression analyses were performed to investigate the predictive power of the EMSs for the severity of each specific depressive symptom. When controlling for gender and current levels of depression, specific symptoms were predicted by different EMSs: sadness by Negativity/Pessimism; anhedonia by Failure; self-harm by Emotional Deprivation and Vulnerability to Harm or Illness; worthlessness by Failure and Negativity/Pessimism; psychomotor retardation/restlessness by Vulnerability to Harm or Illness and Entitlement/Grandiosity; and poor concentration by Insufficient Self-Control/Self-Discipline. The more physical symptoms of fatigue, insomnia/hypersomnia, and appetite loss/appetite gain were not predicted by any of the EMSs. Although the cross-sectional design of the study does not allow for conclusions about the direction of effects, results suggest that depression is not a unitary phenomenon and provide a possible explanation for previous inconsistent findings.

  14. Premenstrual symptoms and associated morbidity in a family practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippy, P K; Falvo, D R; Smaga, S A

    1986-01-01

    Women at two family practice clinics were given questionnaires to determine the nature, severity, and treatment of symptoms experienced premenstrually; the degree to which symptoms affected activities of daily living; the relationship of selected variables to women's perception of their symptoms; and the degree of physician involvement in discussion and/or treatment of symptoms. From the study group of 219 women, 76% reported symptoms severe enough to interfere with daily activities every month. The activity most affected by symptoms was relationship with family and friends, while work activities were affected least. Women's perception of the degree to which their mothers' activities had been affected by premenstrual symptoms was significantly related to their own incapacitation by them. Fifty-eight percent of women experiencing symptoms took medication for their symptoms, with over-the-counter medication being the most frequent treatment. Only 14% of the total sample had discussed these symptoms with their physician. Sixty-nine percent of the sample believed they had premenstrual syndrome (PMS). There was a significant relationship between women's belief that they had PMS and the degree of incapacitation experienced from their symptoms.

  15. What Are Women Being Exposed to? A Review of the Quality, Content and Ownership of Websites on Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Claire; Sillence, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of people are now turning to the Internet for health information. Internet use is especially likely in women with the clinical condition premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), which affects approximately 8% of premenopausal women. However, to date, there has not been a review of the quality of these online resources on PMDD. The aim of the present study was to address this gap by reviewing websites containing PMDD information. A search was conducted on three commonly used search engines (Google, Yahoo, and Bing). The first 50 results were extracted and compared across each search engine results to determine unique resources. After removing inaccessible links, a total of 69 unique websites were reviewed to evaluate their general quality, condition-specific content quality, and ownership. The websites varied widely in terms of their quality and ownership. Most returned websites were from web providers, U.S. health care providers, and media companies. General quality (e.g., design) was modest; yet, condition-specific content quality was far poorer. Women are being exposed to a varying degree of quality information about PMDD. Health professionals and website owners of this information should consider this and encourage better online resources to help this patient group. The paper presents the five highest scoring websites that may be used by those with a vested interest in PMDD, such as health professionals or women with PMDD. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Lower peripheral circulation in eumenorrheic young women with premenstrual symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsumi Noriyuki

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A majority of women from all cultures and socioeconomic levels experience diverse psychosomatic and behavioral symptoms premenstrually, a phenomenon commonly termed premenstrual syndrome, although symptoms and discomfort levels vary from woman to woman. The underlying pathological mechanisms of premenstrual syndrome remain unknown; however, altered function or even slight disorder of the blood circulation system, which contributes to the orchestrations of the human internal environment, could cause bio-psychological changes leading to complaints and ultimately compromising a woman's overall health. The present study, therefore, investigates to what extent and how the menstrual cyclicity of peripheral circulation is associated with premenstrual symptomatology. Methods Twenty-one eumenorrheic young women participated in this study. All subjects were investigated during the follicular and late luteal phases. Cycle phase was determined by the onset of menstruation and oral temperature and was verified by concentrations of ovarian hormones, estrone, and pregnanediol in a urine sample taken early in the morning. Peripheral circulation was evaluated with the Astrim (Sysmex, Kobe, a portable non-invasive monitoring device using the principle of near-infrared spectroscopy, which calculates the venous oxygenation index (VOI based on the ratio of light absorption of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin, a proven reliable indicator of peripheral blood circulation. The Menstrual Distress Questionnaire was applied to measure physical, emotional, and behavioral symptoms accompanying the menstrual cycle of the subjects. Results The oral temperature and urinary ovarian hormones adjusted for creatinine significantly increased in the late luteal phase in all subjects. While 10 subjects experienced no symptoms during the menstrual cycle, 11 subjects had apparent physical and psychological discomfort in the late luteal phase. We found that VOI

  17. Repercussões do transtorno disfórico pré-menstrual entre universitárias Effects of premenstrual dysphoric disorder among college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Conceição Passos de Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O transtorno disfórico pré-menstrual (TDPM é uma variante mais grave da síndrome pré-menstrual que apresenta a oscilação do humor como fator mais perturbador e debilitante, repercutindo na qualidade de vida das mulheres em idade reprodutiva. O objetivo deste estudo foi identificar as principais repercussões físicas e emocionais causadas pela TDPM entre universitárias de Fisioterapia. MÉTODO: Estudo do tipo corte transversal, descritivo e analítico, realizado no período de agosto a dezembro de 2008 em 259 universitárias. Os instrumentos utilizados para a realização desta pesquisa foram: um questionário contendo questões socioeconômicas, o Questionário de Sintomas Menstruais (Menstrual Symptom Questionnaire, MSQ, a escala de autoavaliação de síndrome de transtorno pré-menstrual de Steiner e o Questionário de Autoavaliação da Escala de Hamilton para Depressão. A análise estatística foi descritiva e analítica, sendo utilizado o teste qui-quadrado ou o teste exato de Fisher, sendo que todas as conclusões foram tomadas ao nível de significância de 5%. RESULTADOS: Encontramos alta prevalência de repercussões somáticas e emocionais. Através dos sinais e sintomas pesquisados pelo MSQ entre as portadoras de TDPM, observou-se uma associação do transtorno com os sintomas depressivos (p = 0,048. Os demais sintomas como ansiedade, labilidade de humor, sintomas somáticos, habilidade para realizar tarefas e dor não apresentaram correlação. CONCLUSÃO: O TDPM provocou desconforto físico e emocional e revelou uma correlação significativa com os sintomas depressivos, sugerindo tratar-se de uma expressão clínica de transtorno de humor.INTRODUCTION: Maternal premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD is a severe variant of premenstrual syndrome in which mood swings is the most disturbing and debilitating symptom, affecting the quality of life of women of reproductive age. The objective of this study was to

  18. Characterization of symptoms and edema distribution in premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tacani PM

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pascale Mutti Tacani,1 Danielle de Oliveira Ribeiro,1 Barbara Evelyn Barros Guimarães,1 Aline Fernanda Perez Machado,2 Rogério Eduardo Tacani1,2 1Physical Therapy Department, São Camilo University Center, 2Physical Therapy Department, São Paulo City University (UNICID, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Premenstrual syndrome is a group of symptoms linked to the menstrual cycle, and edema is among these symptoms. Physiotherapy is often sought by many patients for the treatment of edema; however, for an adequate prescription of physiotherapeutic procedures, the distribution of edema throughout the body has yet to be characterized. Objective: To determine the most frequent symptoms and body regions that present with edema in women during the premenstrual period.Subjects and methods: Sixty women with a mean age of 24.6±4.7 years were evaluated during their premenstrual (between days 21 and 28 and menstrual period (between days 1 and 3, and the collected data included body mass, height, biotype (body-fat distribution, face, breast, limb-circumference measurements, and limb-volume estimate, and an adapted version of the Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool was used. Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s t-test and the test for equality of two proportions (P≤0.05.Results: Premenstrual syndrome was identified in 91.7% of the women, and the most frequent symptoms were irritability (73.33% and physical symptoms, including swelling (65%, and anxiety (58.3%. Edema was detected in the following areas: facial, epigastric, mammary, umbilical, and pubic, the mid-third of the arms, distal forearm, in both thighs and in the mid-third of the legs determined by circumference measurements, and in both upper and lower limbs, according to the estimated volume.Conclusion: In this study population, the most frequent symptoms were irritability, physical symptoms, and anxiety, with distribution of edema in the face, breast, abdomen, pubic area, distal

  19. Premenstrual Syndrome and Self-Medication With Opioids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qurishi, R.; Sonneborn, C.; Jong, M. de; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2013-01-01

    We have described a patient in opioid substitution treatment using heroin to treat her premenstrual complaints. After a short review of the diagnosis and etiology of premenstrual syndrome or premenstrual dysphoric disorder, the relation between premenstrual syndrome/premenstrual dysphoric disorder

  20. Premenstrual Syndrome Diagnosis: A Comparative Study between the Daily Record of Severity of Problems (DRSP) and the Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool (PSST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henz, Aline; Ferreira, Charles Francisco; Oderich, Carolina Leão; Gallon, Carin Weirich; Castro, Juliana Rintondale Sodré de; Conzatti, Maiara; Fleck, Marcelo Pio de Almeida; Wender, Maria Celeste Osório

    2018-01-01

     To validate the premenstrual symptoms screening tool (PSST) in relation to the daily record of severity of problems (DRSP) for premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) diagnoses.  A cross-sectional study with 127 women (20-45 years) with PMS complaints. The women were evaluated in terms of weight, height and body mass index (BMI). After using the primary care evaluation of mental disorders (PRIME-MD) questionnaire to exclude the diagnosis of depression, the PSST was completed and the women were instructed to fill out the DRSP for two consecutive menstrual cycles. The agreement between the two questionnaires was assessed by the Kappa (k) and the prevalence-adjusted, bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) values.  Two-hundred and eighty-two women met the eligibility criteria and answered the PSST. The DRSP was completed for two cycles by 127 women. The percentages of women with PMS and PMDD diagnoses by the DRSP were 74.8% and 3.9% respectively; by PSST, the percentages were41.7% and 34.6% respectively. The number of patients considered "normal" (with symptoms below the threshold for the diagnosis of PMS) was similar in both questionnaires. There was no agreement (Kappa = 0.12) in the results of PMS/ PMDD diagnosis (the PABAK coefficient confirmed this result = 0.39). The PSST had a high sensitivity (79%) and a low specificity (33.3%) for PMS/PMDD diagnosis.  The PSST should be considered a diagnostic screening tool. Positive PMS/PMDD cases by PSST should be further evaluated by DRSP to confirm the diagnosis. Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  1. Plasma melatonin circadian rhythms during the menstrual cycle and after light therapy in premenstrual dysphoric disorder and normal control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, B L; Berga, S L; Mostofi, N; Klauber, M R; Resnick, A

    1997-02-01

    The aim of this study was to replicate and extend previous work in which the authors observed lower, shorter, and advanced nocturnal melatonin secretion patterns in premenstrually depressed patients compared to those in healthy control women. The authors also sought to test the hypothesis that the therapeutic effect of bright light in patients was associated with corrective effects on the phase, duration, and amplitude of melatonin rhythms. In 21 subjects with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and 11 normal control (NC) subjects, the authors measured the circadian profile of melatonin during follicular and luteal menstrual cycle phases and after 1 week of light therapy administered daily, in a randomized crossover design. During three separate luteal phases, the treatments were either (1) bright (> 2,500 lux) white morning (AM; 06:30 to 08:30 h), (2) bright white evening (PM; 19:00 to 21:00 h), or (3) dim (compressed, and area under the curve, amplitude, and mean levels were decreased. In NC subjects, melatonin rhythms did not change significantly during the menstrual cycle. After AM light in PMDD subjects, onset and offset times were advanced and both duration and midpoint concentration were decreased as compared to RED light. After PM light in PMDD subjects, onset and offset times were delayed, midpoint concentration was increased, and duration was decreased as compared to RED light. By contrast, after light therapy in NC subjects, duration did not change; onset, offset, and midpoint concentration changed as they did in PMDD subjects. When the magnitude of advance and delay phase shifts in onset versus offset time with AM, PM, or RED light were compared, the authors found that in PMDD subjects light shifted offset time more than onset time and that AM light had a greater effect on shifting melatonin offset time (measured the following night in RED light), whereas PM light had a greater effect in shifting melatonin onset time. These findings replicate the

  2. Premenstrual disorders: prevalence and associated factors in a sample of Iranian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delara, Mahin; Borzuei, Hamed; Montazeri, Ali

    2013-08-01

    Premenstrual disorders usually refer to Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD). This study was designed to find out the frequency of premenstrual disorders and evaluate the associated factors in a sample of Iranian adolescents. This study was conducted to investigate the frequency of premenstrual disorders (PMS and PMDD) based on Premenstrual Assessment Scale (PAS) and also to determine the association of some demographic and menstrual characteristics with these disorders in adolescent girls. This was a cross sectional study. A sample of adolescent school girls aged between 14 and 19 years were included in the study. Diagnostic assessments were based on Premenstrual Assessment Scale (PAS). The data were analyzed in a descriptive fashion and were compared among subgroups of the study sample. In addition, demographic and menstrual factors associations with premenstrual disorders were assessed. In all 1379 female students were included in the study. About 99.5 % of the students reported at least one premenstrual symptom. Of these, 66.3% was mild, 31.4% moderate and 2.3% severe. A total of 814 girls (59%) met the diagnostic criteria for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Most frequently reported symptoms were back pain, lethargy, fatigue and anxiety. Early menarche, lower education was associated with higher scores on PAS. Premenstrual disorders are common in adolescent girls. Preventive and treatment strategies are highly recommended.

  3. Validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool (PSST) and association of PSST scores with health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Câmara, Rachel de A; Köhler, Cristiano A; Frey, Benicio N; Hyphantis, Thomas N; Carvalho, André F

    2017-01-01

    To develop and validate a Brazilian Portuguese version of the Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool (PSST), a questionnaire used for the screening of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and of the most severe form of PMS, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). The PSST also rates the impact of premenstrual symptoms on daily activities. A consecutive sample of 801 women aged ≥ 18 years completed the study protocol. The internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and content validity of the Brazilian PSST were determined. The independent association of a positive screen for PMS or PMDD and quality of life determined by the World Health Organization Quality of Life instrument-Abbreviated version (WHOQOL-Bref) was also assessed. Of 801 participants, 132 (16.5%) had a positive screening for PMDD. The Brazilian PSST had adequate internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.91) and test-retest reliability. The PSST also had adequate convergent/discriminant validity, without redundancy. Content validity ratio and content validity index were 0.61 and 0.94 respectively. Finally, a positive screen for PMS/PMDD was associated with worse WHOQOL-Bref scores. These findings suggest that PSST is a reliable and valid instrument to screen for PMS/PMDD in Brazilian women.

  4. Clinical epidemiology of premenstrual disorder: informing optimized patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson LLL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lynne LL Robinson,1 Khaled MK Ismail1,21Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Birmingham Women’s Hospital, Birmingham, UK; 2Birmingham Centre for Women’s and Children’s Health, School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UKAbstract: Premenstrual disorders encompass a spectrum that ranges from mild cyclical psychological and somatic symptoms to the rarer but much-more-severe premenstrual dysphoric disorder. This condition is serious and the etiology is unclear, but possible causes include genetic factors, hormonal fluctuations, and neurotransmitter dysfunctions. Differentiation from other affective disorders can be difficult but is key to providing appropriate management. This comprehensive review will discuss the most-recent classification of premenstrual disorders, etiology, diagnosis, and potential current management strategies.Keywords: premenstrual dysphoric disorder, progesterone, oestrogen, oophrectomy, GNRH analogues

  5. Mental and Reproductive Health Correlates of Academic Performance among Debre Berhan University Female Students, Ethiopia: The Case of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu, Sisay Mulugeta; Habtewold, Tesfa Dejenie; Haile, Yohannes Gebreegziabhere

    2017-01-01

    Globally 3 to 8% of reproductive age women are suffering from premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Several mental and reproductive health-related factors cause low academic achievement during university education. However, limited data exist in Ethiopia. The aim of the study was to investigate mental and reproductive health correlates of academic performance. Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted with 667 Debre Berhan University female students from April to June 2015. Academic performance was the outcome variable. Mental and reproductive health characteristics were explanatory variables. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test of association was applied to examine group difference in academic performance. Among 529 students who participated, 49.3% reported mild premenstrual syndrome (PMS), 36.9% reported moderate/severe PMS, and 13.8% fulfilled PMDD diagnostic criteria. The ANOVA test of association revealed that there was no significant difference in academic performance between students with different level of PMS experience ( F -statistic = 0.08, p value = 0.93). Nevertheless, there was a significant difference in academic performance between students with different length of menses ( F -statistic = 5.15, p value = 0.006). There was no significant association between PMS experience and academic performance, but on the other hand, the length of menses significantly associated with academic performance.

  6. Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stressful life events and a family history of PMS or PMDD may increase your chances of getting PMDD. Major ... Questions to Ask Your Doctor Do I have PMDD or PMS? What is the difference between PMDD and PMS? ...

  7. The Relationship Between Severity of Premenstrual Syndrome and Psychiatric Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Shirmohammadi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Premenstrual syndrome is a common disorder experienced by up to 50% of women during reproductive age. The prevalence of severe form of PMS (PMDD is 3 % to 8%. Psychiatric disorders in PMS patients have resulted in significant morbidity and in some cases caused resistance to the treatment process Material and Method: 390 participants (264 with PMS/PMDD, and 126 healthy students of University of Guilan who completed the demographic questionnaire, daily symptom rating (DSR and the checklist 90-revised (SCL-90-R took part in this study. This study was conducted using a cross sectional method. Results: According to repeated measure variance, the mean scores of psychiatric symptoms (Depression, Anxiety, Aggression, Interpersonal sensitivity in the PMS group were significantly higher than the healthy group (p< 0/05, and increase in severity of PMS from mild to severe was accompanied by increase in mean score of these subscales. There was a significant difference in mean score of depression, anxiety, aggression and interpersonal sensitivity between the 3rd and the 13th day of the cycle. Significant effect of the DSR grouping (PMS and Healthy group and time interaction emerged in interpersonal sensitivity and aggression, significant effect on the DSR grouping (Mild, Moderate, Severer and time interaction demonstrated in interpersonal sensitivity. Conclusion: Patients with prospective confirmed PMDD seemed to suffer from psychiatric symptoms. Therefore, recognizing co-morbid psychiatric symptoms in patients with PMDD is of prime importance. All healthcare providers should be sensitive to mental status of women with PMS.

  8. Premenstrual symptoms and remedies practiced by Malaysian women attending a rural primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairani Omar

    2009-06-01

    Method: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a rural primary care clinic situated in Hulu Langat, Malaysia. All women of reproductive age (18 to 44 years old attending the clinic during the study period and who fit the selection criteria were included. Premenstrual symptoms and severity were assessed using a self-report questionnaire, the Shortened Premenstrual Assessment Form (SPAF. It consists of 10 items that measure changes in mood, behaviour and physical symptoms. The respondents were also asked if they had used any remedy to relieve their symptoms. Results: A total of 158 women were included in the study. The majority of the respondents were Malay (70.3%, followed by Indian (16.5% and Chinese (10.8% women. About 75% of the women experienced at least one of the premenstrual symptoms. Approximately 7% of them reported experiencing severe symptoms in all three subscales of the SPAF. The frequently reported symptoms were body ache (75.3%, abdominal pain (75.3%, irritable feeling (63.9% and breast discomfort (61.4%. The symptom score was higher among Malay women (p = 0.034, and those with a higher household income (p = 0.037 and higher educational level (p = 0.01. There was no significant association between premenstrual symptoms and age, marital status, menstrual cycle and age of menarche. The common remedies used were vitamins (19%, a healthy diet (15.8% and analgesics (13.3%. Approximately 60% of the women did not use any remedy to reduce their premenstrual symptoms. Conclusion: Premenstrual symptoms were common among women attending the clinic. The symptoms affect them significantly both physically and emotionally. Thus, it is essential for primary care providers to take an active role in identifying, educating and managing premenstrual symptoms among women.

  9. Non-contraceptive oestrogen-containing preparations for controlling symptoms of premenstrual syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naheed, Bushra; Kuiper, Jan Herman; Uthman, Olalekan A; O'Mahony, Fidelma; O'Brien, Patrick Michael Shaughn

    2017-03-03

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a psychological and somatic disorder of unknown aetiology, with symptoms typically including irritability, depression, mood swings, bloating, breast tenderness and sleep disturbances. About 3% to 10% of women who experience these symptoms may also meet criteria for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). PMS symptoms recur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and reduce by the end of menstruation. PMS results from ovulation and may be due to ovarian steroid interactions relating to neurotransmitter dysfunction. Premenstrual disorders have a devastating effect on women, their families and their work.Several treatment options have been suggested for PMS, including pharmacological and surgical interventions. The treatments thought to be most effective tend to fall into one of two categories: suppressing ovulation or correcting a speculated neuroendocrine anomaly.Transdermal oestradiol by patch, gel or implant effectively stops ovulation and the cyclical hormonal changes which produce the cyclical symptoms. These preparations are normally used for hormone therapy and contain lower doses of oestrogen than found in oral contraceptive pills. A shortened seven-day course of a progestogen is required each month for endometrial protection but can reproduce premenstrual syndrome-type symptoms in these women. To determine the effectiveness and safety of non-contraceptive oestrogen-containing preparations in the management of PMS. On 14 March 2016, we searched the following databases: the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group (CGF) Specialised Register; Cochrane Central Register of Studies (CRSO); MEDLINE; Embase; PsycINFO; CINAHL; ClinicalTrials.gov; metaRegister of Controlled trials (mRCT); and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) Search Portal. In addition, we checked the reference lists of articles retrieved. We included published and unpublished randomized placebo or active

  10. Young Japanese college students with dysmenorrhea have high frequency of irregular menstruation and premenstrual symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Tomoko; Nakata, Rieko

    2007-01-01

    In this study, to estimate the current status of young women with menstrual disorders, the relation among dysmenorrhea, irregular menstruation and premenstrual symptoms was investigated by a questionnaire. Subjects ranging from 18 to 20 years old were recruited from 522 female students at Ashiya College in Japan. The intensity of dysmenorrhea was classified into 3 grades (score 1, not requiring analgesic; score 2, painful, requiring analgesic; score 3, painful, not relieved by analgesic). All participants were further divided into subsequent groups as having premenstrual symptoms or not and those having regular or irregular menstruation. Dysmenorrhea scores in the students with premenstrual symptoms or irregular menstruation were significantly higher than those without these symptoms (1.66+/-0.66 vs 1.41+/-0.59; 1.62+/-0.68 vs 1.49+/-0.61, respectively). There was no significant relation in the incidence between premenstrual symptoms and irregular menstruation. These findings suggest that considerable numbers of young women with dysmenorrhea are associated with premenstrual symptoms.

  11. Relationship of premenstrual and menstrual symptoms to alexithymia among nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öksüz, Emine; Guvenc, Gulten

    2018-03-23

    The aim of this study is to determine the relationship of premenstrual and menstrual symptoms to alexithymia among nursing students. This descriptive study was conducted with 284 undergraduate nursing students. Data were collected using Premenstrual Syndrome Scale (PMSS), Menstrual Symptom Scale (MSQ), and Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20). The PMSS, MSQ, and TAS-20 mean scores were 103.56 ± 35.08, 2.92 ± 0.8, and 45.22 ± 9.17, respectively. There was statistically significant positive correlation between TAS-20 and PMSS and MSQ mean scores (p < .05). Women should be evaluated for alexithymia to prevent the adverse effects of premenstrual and menstrual symptoms. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The prevalence of self-reported premenstrual symptoms and evaluation of regular exercise with premenstrual symptoms among female employees in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Su-Ying; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Kuo, Hsin-Chih; Liao, Li-Ling

    2018-03-01

    Few studies have focused on premenstrual symptoms in employees. This study explored the prevalence of premenstrual symptoms in 7,193 female employees aged 18-55 years in a large electronics manufacturer in Taiwan from August 2014 to December 2014 and examined whether regular exercise was associated with premenstrual symptoms. Information was collected on demographics, lifestyle, menstrual history, menstrual pain, and premenstrual symptoms. Half of the participants reported irregular menstruation; 79.4% reported a moderate menstruation amount, and half reported little impact of menstrual pain at work. In order of prevalence, symptoms were "easy to fatigue" (24%), "backache" (21.2%), and "abdominal bloating" (17.4%). Participants who engaged in regular exercise reported fewer backaches (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.68-0.91), somatic discomfort (aOR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.63-0.96), headache (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.69-0.98), diarrhea (aOR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.60-0.96), constipation (aaOR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.44-0.78), less irritability (aOR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.65-0.94), feeling morose and depressed (aOR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.58-0.95), crying (aOR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.27-0.87), and emotional lability (aOR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.58-0.91). Regular exercise was associated with decreased menstrual pain (aOR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.76-0.96). Our findings provide a better understanding of premenstrual symptoms in female workers, allowing for the development of premenstrual health programs to improve their health and quality of life.

  13. Premenstrual Syndromes - An Approach to Diagnosis and Treatment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article discusses the differences between premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder and .... such as Major Depressive Disorder, Panic Disorder, Dysthymic Disorder, or a ... even less convincing scientific evidence.

  14. Steroid withdrawal in the mouse results in anxiogenic effects of 3alpha,5beta-THP: a possible model of premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheryl S; Ruderman, Yevgeniy; Frye, Cheryl; Homanics, Gregg; Yuan, Maoli

    2006-06-01

    3alpha-OH-5alpha[beta]-pregnan-20-one (THP) is a positive modulator of the GABAA receptor (GABAR), which underlies its reported anxiolytic effect. However, there are conditions such as premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) where increases in THP levels can be associated with adverse mood. In order to test for conditions where THP might be anxiogenic, we developed a mouse model of THP withdrawal. Because delta-containing GABAR are highly sensitive to THP modulation, results were compared in wild-type and delta knockout mice. Finasteride, a 5alpha-reductase blocker, was administered for 3 days to female wild-type or delta knockout mice. Then, animals were tested in the elevated plus maze, following acute administration of THP, lorazepam, flumazenil, or 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), and results compared to vehicle-injected controls. CA1 hippocampal GABAR alpha4 subunit levels were assessed by Western blot. After THP withdrawal, THP produced anxiogenic effects, decreasing open arm entries on the elevated plus maze, following a brief shock, in contrast to its expected anxiolytic effects. As we have shown in rats, THP withdrawal also resulted in increased expression of the alpha4 subunit in mouse CA1 hippocampus. As expected for increases in alpha4-containing GABAR, THP withdrawn mice were relatively insensitive to the benzodiazepine (BDZ) lorazepam and had atypical responses to the BDZ antagonist flumazenil when tested on the plus maze. In contrast, they showed a greater anxiolytic response to THIP, which has greater efficacy at alpha4betadelta than other GABAR. Although THP withdrawal in delta knockout mice also increased the alpha4 GABAR subunit, the anxiogenic effects of THP and the anxiolytic effects of THIP were not observed, implicating alpha4betadelta GABAR in these effects. Based on these behavioral and pharmacological findings, we suggest that THP withdrawal in the mouse may serve as a rodent model of PMDD.

  15. Pilot investigation of the circadian plasma melatonin rhythm across the menstrual cycle in a small group of women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Shechter

    Full Text Available Women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD experience mood deterioration and altered circadian rhythms during the luteal phase (LP of their menstrual cycles. Disturbed circadian rhythms may be involved in the development of clinical mood states, though this relationship is not fully characterized in PMDD. We therefore conducted an extensive chronobiological characterization of the melatonin rhythm in a small group of PMDD women and female controls. In this pilot study, participants included five women with PMDD and five age-matched controls with no evidence of menstrual-related mood disorders. Participants underwent two 24-hour laboratory visits, during the follicular phase (FP and LP of the menstrual cycle, consisting of intensive physiological monitoring under "unmasked", time-isolation conditions. Measures included visual analogue scale for mood, ovarian hormones, and 24-hour plasma melatonin. Mood significantly (P≤.03 worsened during LP in PMDD compared to FP and controls. Progesterone was significantly (P = .025 increased during LP compared to FP, with no between-group differences. Compared to controls, PMDD women had significantly (P<.05 decreased melatonin at circadian phases spanning the biological night during both menstrual phases and reduced amplitude of its circadian rhythm during LP. PMDD women also had reduced area under the curve of melatonin during LP compared to FP. PMDD women showed affected circadian melatonin rhythms, with reduced nocturnal secretion and amplitude during the symptomatic phase compared to controls. Despite our small sample size, these pilot findings support a role for disturbed circadian rhythms in affective disorders. Possible associations with disrupted serotonergic transmission are proposed.

  16. Effects of ethinyl estradiol plus desogestrel on premenstrual symptoms in Iranian women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Norouzi Javidan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Marvelon®, a combined oral contraceptive, contains 30 μg ethinyl estradiol (EE and 150 μg desogestrel (DE, and has been shown to be a well-tolerated and effective combination that provides high contraceptive reliability and good cycle control. However, its efficacy has not been yet evaluated among Iranian women. Thus, the study aimed to determine the effect of oral contraceptive pill on treating premenstrual symptoms and on various parameters associated with well-being and health in a sample of Iranian. This clinical trial (before- after study was performed at the family-planning clinic of the centers under the supervision of Tehran University of Medical Sciences on sixty-one women. The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of Tehran University of Medical Sciences and all participants received a 21/7-day regimen of oral contraceptive containing 150 μg desogestrel (DE and 30 μg ethinyl estradiol (EE for six cycles. Efficacy parameters included changes in premenstrual symptoms were also assessed. Clinical data was collected by calendar of premenstrual experiences (COPE at baseline and treatment cycles 1,2, 3 and 6. Clinical variables were measured including low-density lipoprotein (LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL and triglyceride levels for two timing periods (baseline and last visit. Linear mixed model analyses were used to analyze differences in changes of the four factors of premenstrual syndrome (PMS, weight and blood pressure during these timing periods. The mean age of the women was 28.52 (SD=6.75 years. Participants on average had been pregnant 1.13 (SD=1.16 times. The linear mixed model analyses indicated that premenstrual syndrome symptoms reduced significantly over time (P0.05. A combined oral contraceptive containing ethinyl estradiol and desogestrel has a positive effect on women's health and reduces premenstrual symptoms.

  17. Prevalence of psychological and physical symptoms of pre-menstrual syndrome in female students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awanish Kumar Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-menstrual syndrome is a group of physical and psychological symptoms that appears before the menstrual bleeding. The study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of physical and psychological symptoms of pre-menstrual syndrome among female students of technical institution in Gorakhpur. Two hundred students aged between 15 to 30 years participated in the study and revealed that all the participants of study experienced at least 1 symptom of PMS. The most common physical symptom was joint\\muscle pain (77.5%. Lethargy (83% was reported as most common psychological symptom in the study. The study concluded that prevalence of PMS is 100%, and most of the participants (42.5% have more than 5 symptoms of PMS.

  18. Methods for coping with premenstrual change: Development and validation of the German Premenstrual Change Coping Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Gudrun; Kues, Johanna N; Kleinstäuber, Maria; Andersson, Gerhard; Weise, Cornelia

    2017-11-07

    During the premenstrual phase, psychological and physiological changes can occur, which are associated with different levels of disability. When they appear with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD), different coping strategies may be used by women to deal with premenstrual changes. Currently no German measure exists for assessing premenstrual symptom-related coping strategies. Therefore, we developed the Premenstrual Change Coping Inventory (PMS-Cope). First, the 33-item questionnaire was tested with an exploratory factor analytic approach (EFA) in a sample of 150 women prospectively diagnosed with PMDD or severe Premenstrual Syndrome from August 2013 until March 2016. The EFA resulted in a 12-item scale with a two-factor structure: "seeking positive affect-inducing activities" and "seeking support"; Cronbach`s alpha of 0.73 and 0.71, respectively, demonstrated good reliability for both factors. Confirmatory factor analysis based on a second sample of 89 women conducted from May 2016 until June 2016 confirmed the two-factor structure. Additionally, a potential third factor "healthcare use behavior" was tested with an EFA. For the three-factor solution, satisfactory Cronbach's alpha values (0.70-0.72) were detected. The PMS-Cope was shown to be a valid, reliable, and economic measure. In future research, cross validations and confirmatory factor analyses with the three-factor solution should be conducted.

  19. Intercountry assessment of the impact of severe premenstrual disorders on work and daily activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Lothar A J; Minh, Thai Do; Heinemann, Klaas; Lindemann, Marion; Filonenko, Anna

    2012-01-01

    We explored the effects of premenstrual symptoms in women suffering from moderate-to-severe premenstrual syndrome/premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS/PMDD) on work productivity, absenteeism, and daily life activities in a large, worldwide exploratory study. Women aged 15-45 years from 19 countries in North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia, and Australia were screened for suspected PMS and PMDD and invited to participate in this 2-month web-based survey. Overall, 4,032 women completed all administered questionnaires and represent the analysis set. Women suffering from moderate-to-severe PMS/PMDD had increased work absenteeism and work productivity impairment due to premenstrual symptoms relative to those with mild PMS/no perceived symptoms.

  20. Effect of Yoga Exercise on Premenstrual Symptoms among Female Employees in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Ying Tsai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yoga classes designed for women with premenstrual syndrome are available, but their efficacy is unclear. We investigated the effects of 12 weeks’ yoga exercise (yoga intervention on premenstrual symptoms in menstruating females in Taiwan. Sixty-four subjects completed the yoga intervention, and before and after the intervention filled out a structured self-report questionnaire about their demographics, personal lifestyle, menstrual status, baseline menstrual pain scores, premenstrual symptoms, and health-related quality of life. Of 64 subjects, 90.6% reported experiencing menstrual pain during menstruation. After the yoga intervention, subjects reported decreased use of analgesics during menstruation (p = 0.0290 and decreased moderate or severe effects of menstrual pain on work (p = 0.0011. The yoga exercise intervention was associated with the improvement of the scale of physical function (p = 0.0340 and bodily pain (p = 0.0087 of the SF-36, and significantly decreased abdominal swelling (p = 0.0011, breast tenderness (p = 0.0348, abdominal cramps (p = 0.0016, and cold sweats (p = 0.0143. Menstrual pain mitigation after yoga exercise correlated with improvement in six scales of the SF-36 (physical function, bodily pain, general health perception, vitality/energy, social function, mental health. Employers can educate female employees about the benefits of regular exercise such as yoga, which may decrease premenstrual distress and improve female employee health.

  1. Premenstrual Symptoms in Dysmenorrheic College Students: Prevalence and Relation to Vitamin D and Parathyroid Hormone Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayan A. Obeidat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the prevalence of premenstrual symptoms (PMS due to primary dysmenorrhea among a sample of university female students, and to explore possible association with vitamin D and parathyroid (PTH levels, as well as frequency of consumption of dairy products. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: One Jordanian university. Subjects: A total of 177 female students aged between 18 and 24 years who experienced primary dysmenorrhea participated in the study and completed a self administered questionnaire to collect information concerning demographics, menstruation- related information, associated specified premenstrual symptoms, and consumption of dairy products. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin vitamin D level and intact parathyroid hormone level were measured. Results: Of the 177 participants 91.5% had two or more symptoms among which fatigue, mood swings, anxiety, abdominal bloating, and depression were the most prevalent symptoms. There was no evident association between presence of symptoms and vitamin D status, PTH level or dairy products consumption. Headaches and social withdrawal were significantly lower in those women who consumed high amounts of dairy products. Conclusion: Premenstrual symptoms are very common in young women with primary dysmenorrhea. PMS has no relation to levels of vitamin D, parathyroid hormone or dairy products consumption. Headache and social withdrawal may be affected by dairy product consumption.

  2. Sleep and Premenstrual Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehan, Shazia; Auguste, Evan; Hussain, Mahjabeen; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R.; Brzezinski, Amon; Gupta, Ravi; Attarian, Hrayr; Jean-Louis, Giradin; McFarlane, Samy I.

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is unknown; it may be due to the normal effect of hormones during the menstrual cycle as it occurs in the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle.PMS affects women of childbearing age and remits with the onset of menstruation. The menstrual phase is known to influence stage 2 and REM sleep in women, irrespective of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Women with PMDD showed a decreased response to melatonin in their luteal phase as compared to the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. However, melatonin duration or timing of offset in the morning has not been reported to correlate with the mood. Rather, improvement in mood-related symptoms of PMDD has been found to be influenced by sleep deprivation, be it sleep restrictions in early or late night. Sleep disturbance and decreased melatonin secretions due to hormonal fluctuations during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle could explain the sleep complaints of PMDD. PMID:28239684

  3. DO FOOT REFLEXOLOGY AND RELAXATION TRAINING DECREASE PREMENSTRUAL SYMPTOMS IN ADOLESCENT FEMALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa A. Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premenstrual syndrome is a current condition characterized by troublesome symptoms as tension, irritability, depression, headache, anxiety and loss of self-control, so the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of foot reflexology augmented with relaxation training on premenstrual syndrome in adolescent females. Methods: A sample of 50 volunteers, virgin females diagnosed as premenstrual syndrome was selected from the students of Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University. Their age was ranged between 19 to 23 years with mean value of (21.53±2.27 yrs and BMI was ≤28 Kg/m² with mean value of (24.04±2.41 Kg/m².A detailed medical history was obtained to screen other pathological conditions that may affect the results. Females were randomly assigned into two equal groups. Group (A consisted of 25 subjects who received foot reflexology in addition to relaxation training techniques twice a week for 8 weeks. Group (B consisted of 25 patients, who received relaxation training techniques only twice a week for 8 weeks. Assessment of all subjects in both groups was carried out before and after the treatment program through heart rate, respiratory rate in addition to plasma cortisol level and daily symptoms report chart. Results: Showed a statistical highly significant decrease (p<0.001 in heart rate, respiratory rate, plasma cortisol level as well as daily symptoms report score in group (A while there was a statistical significant decrease (p<0.05 in all variables in group (B. Conclusions: Adding foot reflexology to relaxation training had a great positive effect on premenstrual syndrome in adolescent females than relaxation training only.

  4. The relationship between premenstrual symptoms, menstrual pain, irregular menstrual cycles, and psychosocial stress among Japanese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Okazaki, Ai; Sakamoto, Yoko; Funatsu, Michiko

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between menses-associated health problems of women, such as premenstrual symptoms, menstrual pain and irregular menstrual cycles, and psychosocial stress. A cross-sectional study was conducted among Japanese college students, measuring psychosocial stress levels by means of IMPS (The Inventory to Measure Psychosocial Stress). A total of 264 female students (mean age 19.4 years), who were invited to participate in the study in October 2007, completed the questionnaire, which dealt with anthropometric data, lifestyle, menstrual history, and menstrual health status. Forty-three students were excluded due to missing data, and the remaining 221 were analyzed. The proportions of students who reported premenstrual symptoms, menstrual pain, and the experience of irregular menstrual cycles were 79%, 79%, and 63%, respectively. Students who reported premenstrual symptoms, menstrual pain, and the experience of irregular menstrual cycles had higher stress scores than those who did not. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to identify independent factors associated with having premenstrual symptoms, menstrual pain, and the experience of irregular menstrual cycles. Stress score, heavy menstrual flow, and menstrual pain were significant predictors for premenstrual symptoms, while age at menarche and having premenstrual symptoms were significant predictors for menstrual pain. Both stress score and body mass index were found to be significant predictors for having experienced irregular menstrual cycles. The results suggest that psychosocial stress is independently associated with premenstrual symptoms and the experience of irregular menstrual cycles among college students, implying that changes in the functional potentiality of women as a result of stress are related with changes in their menstrual function.

  5. 大学生睡眠质量与经前期烦躁障碍%Sleep quality in university students with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Habibolah KHAZAIE; Mohammad Rasoul GHADAMI; Behnam KHALEDI-PAVEH; Azita CHEHRI; Marzieh NASOURI

    2016-01-01

    Background:Up to 8% of women in their reproducitve years are affected by Premenstral Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD). Sleep disturbances such as insomnia or hypersomnia are one of the DSM-IV-TR’s deifning criteria for the diagnosis of PMDD and are found in about 70% of women with the disorder. However, studies are lacking that speciifcally address the effects of PMDD on quality of sleep. Aim:This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of Premenstrual DysphoricDisorder (PMDD) and its impact on sleep quality in female university students. Methods:We developed an 18-item PMDD scale based on The Diagnositc and Staitsitcal Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) to diagnose PMDD in female university studentswho ranged in age from 18 to 30 years and had regular menstrual cycles.Paritcipants were categorized into a PMDD group or a No/PMDD group and sleep quality was compared between the two groups. The evaluaiton tool used to measure sleep quality was the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Results:The prevalence of PMDD in female universitystudents was 25.5%. Analysis of the PSQI demonstrated that 80.5% of those in PMDD group had a PSQI that scored >5; however, only 56.4% in the No/PMDD grouphad a PSQI that scored >5 (χ2=12.459,p<0.001). The mean PSQI score was 8.2(3.4) in the PMDD group and was 6.5(3.1) in the No/PMDD group (t=3.648,p<0.001). Conclusions:Female university students who experience PMDD are deeply affected by sleep problems. Lower sleep quality, dayitme dysfunciton, and sleep disturbance are common sleep problems among female university students with PMDD.%背景:高达8%的育龄妇女受经前期烦躁障碍(PMDD)所困。DSM-IV-TR把失眠或嗜睡等睡眠紊乱作为PMDD的诊断标准之一。大约70%的PMDD患者存在睡眠紊乱。然而,专注解决PMDD对睡眠质量影响的有关研究却非常缺乏。目标:本研究旨在评估女大学生中PMDD的患病率及其对睡眠质量的影响。

  6. Premenstrual syndrome: A mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Aeli; Kim, Tae-Hee

    2015-12-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is characterized by recurrent, moderate-to-severe affective, physical, and behavioral symptoms that develop during the luteal menstrual cycle and disappear within a few days of menstruation. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe and disabling condition that can affect personal relationships and occupational activities. PMS occurs in 30-40% of reproductive-age females; PMDD affects 3-8% of this population. Although the etiology of PMS is unclear, several theories suggest increased sensitivity to normal hormonal changes and neurotransmitter abnormalities. The diagnostic method of PMS is the Daily Record of Severity of Problems, which women with PMS can use to self-report several symptoms and their severity. Although combined oral contraceptives and serotonergic antidepressants are effective drugs, each is a different option for treating PMS/PMDD. Serotonergic antidepressants are the drugs of choice for improving both physical and mood symptoms. Combined oral contraceptives appear to primarily improve physical symptoms. Clinicians should consider each patient's situation individually. Other treatment options include lifestyle modification, cognitive behavioral therapy, and herbal medicine (e.g., chasteberry). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between Hardness (Difficulty of Chewing of the Habitual Diet and Premenstrual Symptoms in Young Japanese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Murakami

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that voluntary rhythmic movements such as chewing may increase blood serotonin and subsequently brain serotonin, which in turn acts to alleviate premenstrual symptoms. In this observational cross-sectional study, we tested the hypothesis that hardness (difficulty of chewing of the habitual diet (i.e. dietary hardness is associated with decreased premenstrual symptoms. Subjects were 640 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18–22 years. Dietary hardness was assessed as an estimate of masticatory muscle activity for the habitual diet (i.e. the difficulty of chewing the food. The consumption of a total of 107 foods was estimated by means of a self-administered, comprehensive diet history questionnaire, and masticatory muscle activity during the ingestion of these foods was estimated according to published equations. Menstrual cycle symptoms were assessed using the retrospective version of the Moos Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, from which total score and subscale scores (i.e. pain, concentration, behavioral change, autonomic reactions, water retention, and negative affect in the premenstrual phase were calculated and expressed as percentages relative to those in the intermenstrual phase. Dietary hardness was not associated with total score in the premenstrual phase (P for trend = 0.48. Further, no association was seen for any subscale score in the premenstrual phase (P for trend = 0.18–0.91. In conclusion, this preliminary study failed to substantiate a hypothesized inverse relationship between hardness of the habitual diet and premenstrual symptoms. Considering the plausibility of the putative mechanism, however, further investigation using more relevant measures of chewing and premenstrual symptoms is warranted.

  8. Association between Hardness (Difficulty of Chewing of the Habitual Diet and Premenstrual Symptoms in Young Japanese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Murakami

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that voluntary rhythmic movements such as chewing may increase blood serotonin and subsequently brain serotonin, which in turn acts to alleviate premenstrual symptoms. In this observational cross-sectional study, we tested the hypothesis that hardness (difficulty of chewing of the habitual diet (i.e. dietary hardness is associated with decreased premenstrual symptoms. Subjects were 640 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18-22 years. Dietary hardness was assessed as an estimate of masticatory muscle activity for the habitual diet (i.e. the difficulty of chewing the food. The consumption of a total of 107 foods was estimated by means of a self-administered, comprehensive diet history questionnaire, and masticatory muscle activity during the ingestion of these foods was estimated according to published equations. Menstrual cycle symptoms were assessed using the retrospective version of the Moos Menstrual Distress Questionnaire, from which total score and subscale scores (i.e. pain, concentration, behavioral change, autonomic reactions, water retention, and negative affect in the premenstrual phase were calculated and expressed as percentages relative to those in the intermenstrual phase. Dietary hardness was not associated with total score in the premenstrual phase ( P for trend = 0.48. Further, no association was seen for any subscale score in the premenstrual phase ( P for trend = 0.18-0.91. In conclusion, this preliminary study failed to substantiate a hypothesized inverse relationship between hardness of the habitual diet and premenstrual symptoms. Considering the plausibility of the putative mechanism, however, further investigation using more relevant measures of chewing and premenstrual symptoms is warranted.

  9. Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) ‎.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddineshat, Maryam; Keyvanloo, Sodabe; Lashkardoost, Hossein; Arki, Mina; Tabatabaeichehr, Mahbubeh

    2016-01-01

    Standards of care and treatment of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) vary. Non-drug ‎psychosocial intervention therapy is recommended for women with any kind of ‎discomfort or distress caused by PMS. The current study examined the effectiveness of ‎group cognitive-behavioral therapy on the symptoms of PMS at a girls' dormitory of ‎North Khorasan University of Medical Sciences. In this quasi-experimental study, 32 female students with PMS who were majoring in ‎nursing and midwifery and residing in the dormitory were selected using the ‎convenience sampling method and were assigned to experimental and control groups. ‎The Standardized Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool was used as the research ‎tool. Eight sessions of cognitive-behavioral group therapy were held for the students Results: There was a significant difference in psychological symptoms before and after ‎cognitive-behavioral therapy (p=0.012). Furthermore, cognitive-behavioral therapy was ‎effective on social interferences caused by PMS symptoms (p=0.012).‎ Group cognitive-behavioral therapy effectively alleviates PMS symptoms in female ‎college students.‎.

  10. Attitudes toward menstruation, menstrual-related symptoms, and premenstrual syndrome among adolescent girls: a rural school-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Li Ping

    2011-06-21

    Folk culture surrounding menstrual-related matters has considerable implications for symptom expression and treatment-seeking behavior. A cross-sectional survey of 1,295 rural adolescent girls aged 13 to 19 years was conducted between February 4 and April 16, 2009 to examine these associations. With a higher score indicating a more positive attitude toward menstruation, the mean attitude score was 3.84 (SD ± 1.62) out of a maximum of six. No significant association was observed between the severity of menstrual symptoms and attitudes. Most (63.1%) of the participants identified themselves as having premenstrual symptoms, and 61.1% viewed premenstrual symptoms as a normal part of menstrual cycle. Participants with a higher severity of symptoms in the premenstrual (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.10) and menstrual phase (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.07), were more likely to consult a physician for premenstrual symptoms, and having a divorced/separated parents was associated with a reduced odds of consulting a physician compared to those having parents that were married (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.05-0.83). The findings imply the need for education to help adolescent girls manage menstrual symptoms and increase awareness of the benefit of treating them. Given that menstrual-related information was widely available from mothers, family, and social culture are potentially important in shaping good menstrual attitudes.

  11. A Comparative Efficacy of Low-Dose Combined Oral Contraceptives Containing Desogestrel and Drospirenone in Premenstrual Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirath Wichianpitaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the efficacy of low-dose COC containing desogestrel (DSG with drospirenone (DRSP in the changes of premenstrual symptoms. Methods. In an open-label randomized controlled trial, 90 women with premenstrual syndrome who required COC were randomly recruited and allocated equally to receive either 6 cycles of 20 micrograms ethinyl estradiol (EE/150 micrograms DSG (DSG group or 20 micrograms EE/3 mg DRSP (DRSP group in 24/4 extended regimen. Analysis of covariance and repeated analysis of variance were used to determine the difference of mean Women's Health Assessment Questionnaire (WHAQ scores changes between groups, within group, and in premenstrual, menstrual, and postmenstrual phases. Results. Baseline characteristics and WHAQ scores were comparable. At the ends of the 3rd and the 6th cycles, mean WHAQ scores of all the 3 phases in DRSP group showed significant reduction and were significantly lower than those in DSG group. DSG group showed significant reduction in both premenstrual and menstrual phases after the 6th cycle. Adverse effects were comparable in both groups. In conclusion, low-dose COC containing either DSG or DRSP reduced premenstrual symptoms, but the latter showed greater efficacy and earlier reduction.

  12. Premenstrual mood and empathy after a single light therapy session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aan Het Rot, Marije; Miloserdov, Kristina; Buijze, Anna L F; Meesters, Ybe; Gordijn, Marijke C M

    2017-10-01

    To examine whether acute changes in cognitive empathy might mediate the impact of light therapy on mood, we assessed the effects of a single light-therapy session on mood and cognitive empathy in 48 premenstrual women, including 17 who met Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool criteria for moderate-to-severe premenstrual syndrome / premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS/PMDD). Using a participant-blind between-groups design, 23 women underwent 30min of morning light therapy (5,000lx; blue-enriched polychromatic light, 17,000K) while 25 women had a sham session (200lx, polychromatic light, 5,000K). We administered the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule and the Affect Grid right before and after the intervention, and 60min later upon completion of a computerized empathic accuracy task. There were no significant effects of light condition on cognitive empathy as assessed using the computer task. Nonetheless, bright light reduced negative affect, specifically in women not using hormonal contraceptives. No effects of bright light on mood were observed in women who were using contraceptives. If a single light-therapy session does not alter cognitive empathy, then cognitive empathy may not mediate the impact of light therapy on mood in premenstrual women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Affective Forecasting and Self-Rated Symptoms of Depression, Anxiety, and Hypomania: Evidence for a Dysphoric Forecasting Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerger, Michael; Quirk, Stuart W.; Chapman, Benjamin P.; Duberstein, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging research has examined individual differences in affective forecasting; however, we are aware of no published study to date linking psychopathology symptoms to affective forecasting problems. Pitting cognitive theory against depressive realism theory, we examined whether dysphoria was associated with negatively biased affective forecasts or greater accuracy. Participants (n = 325) supplied predicted and actual emotional reactions for three days surrounding an emotionally-evocative relational event, Valentine’s Day. Predictions were made a month prior to the holiday. Consistent with cognitive theory, we found evidence for a dysphoric forecasting bias – the tendency of individuals in dysphoric states to overpredict negative emotional reactions to future events. The dysphoric forecasting bias was robust across ratings of positive and negative affect, forecasts for pleasant and unpleasant scenarios, continuous and categorical operationalizations of dysphoria, and three time points of observation. Similar biases were not observed in analyses examining the independent effects of anxiety and hypomania. Findings provide empirical evidence for the long assumed influence of depressive symptoms on future expectations. The present investigation has implications for affective forecasting studies examining information processing constructs, decision making, and broader domains of psychopathology. PMID:22397734

  14. Affective forecasting and self-rated symptoms of depression, anxiety, and hypomania: evidence for a dysphoric forecasting bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerger, Michael; Quirk, Stuart W; Chapman, Benjamin P; Duberstein, Paul R

    2012-01-01

    Emerging research has examined individual differences in affective forecasting; however, we are aware of no published study to date linking psychopathology symptoms to affective forecasting problems. Pitting cognitive theory against depressive realism theory, we examined whether dysphoria was associated with negatively biased affective forecasts or greater accuracy. Participants (n=325) supplied predicted and actual emotional reactions for three days surrounding an emotionally evocative relational event, Valentine's Day. Predictions were made a month prior to the holiday. Consistent with cognitive theory, we found evidence for a dysphoric forecasting bias-the tendency of individuals in dysphoric states to overpredict negative emotional reactions to future events. The dysphoric forecasting bias was robust across ratings of positive and negative affect, forecasts for pleasant and unpleasant scenarios, continuous and categorical operationalisations of dysphoria, and three time points of observation. Similar biases were not observed in analyses examining the independent effects of anxiety and hypomania. Findings provide empirical evidence for the long-assumed influence of depressive symptoms on future expectations. The present investigation has implications for affective forecasting studies examining information-processing constructs, decision making, and broader domains of psychopathology.

  15. A lecithin phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid complex (PAS) reduces symptoms of the premenstrual syndrome (PMS): Results of a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Katja; Weber, Nicole; Steiner, Meir; Meyer, Nadin; Dubberke, Anne; Rutenberg, David; Hellhammer, Juliane

    2018-04-01

    Many women experience emotional and physical symptoms around the time of ovulation and more so before menstruation interfering with their daily normal life also known as premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Recent observational data suggest that supplementation with Lipogen's phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidic acid (PA) complex (PAS) alleviates these PMS symptoms. The aim of this study was to confirm these observations on the effects of PAS on PMS symptom severity within a controlled clinical trial setting. Forty women aged 18-45 years with a diagnosis of PMS were assigned to either take PAS (containing 400 mg PS & 400 mg PA per day) or a matching placebo. The study comprised 5 on-site visits including 1 baseline menstrual cycle followed by 3 treatment cycles. Treatment intake was controlled for by using an electronic device, the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS ® ). Primary outcome of the study was the PMS symptoms severity as assessed by using the Daily Record of Severity of Problems (DRSP). Further, SIPS questionnaire (a German version of the Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool (PSST)), salivary hormone levels (cortisol awakening response (CAR) and evening cortisol levels) as well as serum levels (cortisol, estradiol, progesterone and corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG)) were assessed. PMS symptoms as assessed by the DRSP Total score showed a significantly better improvement (p = 0.001) over a 3 cycles PAS intake as compared to placebo. In addition, PAS treated women reported a greater improvement in physical (p = 0.002) and depressive symptoms (p = 0.068). They also reported a lower reduction of productivity (p = 0.052) and a stronger decrease in interference with relationships with others (p = 0.099) compared to the placebo group. No other DRSP scale or item showed significant results. Likewise, the reduction in the number of subjects fulfilling PMS or premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) criteria as classified by the SIPS did not

  16. The Relationship of Premenstrual Syndrome Symptoms with Menstrual Attitude and Sleep Quality in Turkish Nursing Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Aşcı

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Symptoms induced by premenstrual syndrome (PMS adversely affect the women in reproduction period and decrease their quality of life. In literature, it is a common opinion thought that PMS could be associated with both sleep quality and menstrual attitudes. However, there has been no sufficient number of studies to define in what ways the PMS symptoms are correlated with sleep quality and menstrual attitudes. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship of PMS symptoms with menstrual attitude and sleep quality. Methods: The data were collected from 183 nursing students at Health School of Artvin Çoruh University by using a correlational design. Voluntary students completed a questionnaire involving socio-demographic characteristics, Premenstrual Syndrome Scale (PMSS, Menstrual Attitude Questionnaire (MAQ, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Results: Average age was 19.9 (1.8. The study determined a positively significant correlation between score of PMSS and mean scores of PSQI (r=0.306; P<0.001, and a negatively significant correlation between score of PMSS and total mean score of MAQ (r=-0.317; P<0.01. Similarly, multiple linear regression analysis showed that PSQI total score (​b=5.412; P<0.001 and MAQ total score (​ b=-27.455; P=0.001 significantly affected total score of PMSS.Conclusion: The intensity of PMS symptoms is associated with poor sleep quality and negative menstrual attitudes. Determining the methods of coping with PMS and strengthening the young girls on this subject may enhance their quality of future life.

  17. Stress fracture and premenstrual syndrome in Japanese adolescent athletes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takashi; Imoto, Yoko; Nagasawa, Hiroyo; Takeshita, Atsuko; Shiina, Masami

    2016-10-18

    To investigate the relationship between the occurrence of stress fracture and premenstrual syndrome (PMS)/premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in Japanese adolescent athletes. Cross-sectional study. Osaka, Japan. A school-based survey on menstruation and school life was conducted using a sample of 1818 Japanese female students who belonged to two public high schools in Japan. Among them, we recruited 394 athletes who had regular menstrual cycles (25-38 days) and completed a questionnaire about their premenstrual symptoms and their competitive career. Premenstrual symptoms and the occurrence of stress fracture. The prevalences of moderate-to-severe PMS and PMDD were 8.9% and 1.3%, respectively, which were the same as in collegiate athletes in a previous study. Premenstrual symptoms disturbed 'Work efficiency or productivity, home responsibilities', 'Relationships with coworkers or family' and 'Athletic performance in training or competition' more severely than menstrual pain (p=0.031, p=0.004 and p<0.001, respectively). 66 athletes (16.8%) reported having experienced a stress fracture. The severity of 'Overeating or food cravings', 'Physical symptoms' and 'Performance in training or competition' in athletes with previous stress fractures were much higher than in those without a history of stress fractures (p=0.015, p=0.008 and p=0.006, respectively). In terms of premenstrual symptoms, 'Physical symptoms' was associated with an increased risk of stress fractures in athletes (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.62). The results from this study indicated that premenstrual symptoms may affect athletic performance and has the risk of stress fractures in adolescent athletes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Personality disorders in women with severe premenstrual syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassoon, Stephanie A; Colrain, Ian M; Baker, Fiona C

    2011-06-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and its more severe form, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, affect up to 18% of women. Both are commonly associated with other mood-related disorders such as major depression, and cause significant life impairment, but their relationship with personality disorders is less clear. After completing the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR disorders, 33 women with severe PMS and 26 asymptomatic women, counterbalanced for menstrual cycle phase, were administered the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders, a diagnostic interview with low transparency, strong inter-rater reliability, and good diagnostic clarity. Women with severe PMS had a higher prevalence of personality disorders (p = 0.003) than asymptomatic women (27% versus 0%), and were more likely to have odd-eccentric, dramatic-erratic, and anxious-fearful personality disorder traits (p OCPD) was the most common character pathology in the PMS group (n = 6, 18%). OCPD, although not necessarily associated with greater severity of premenstrual symptoms, was related to poorer life functioning in women with PMS. The comorbidity of a personality disorder and severe PMS places an additive burden on general life functioning and may have implications for psychiatric treatment or medication given to those with severe premenstrual symptoms.

  19. The Effect of Relaxation and Positive Self-Talk on Symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimiyaee Asadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Premenstrual syndrome (PMS is characterized by recurrent, moderate-to-severe affective, physical, and behavioral symptoms that develop during the luteal menstrual cycle and disappear within a few days of menstruation. Objectives This article aims to identify the effects of relaxation, positive self-talk, and a combination of relaxation and positive self-talk on premenstrual syndrome. Methods In this quasi-experimental study, 80 women with PMS disorder were selected using a simple random sampling method, in Hamadan, west of Iran. They were randomly divided into four groups. The first and second groups underwent positive self-talk and relaxation, respectively. The third group experienced positive self-talk and relaxation at the same time. The fourth group did not receive any treatment. The duration of treatment was 8 one-hour sessions. Data were collected using a PMS symptom severity questionnaire. All groups were followed up for six months after the intervention. Finally, data analysis was performed using SPSS version 18 for ANCOVA and Bonferroni tests. Results The results showed that compared to the control group, relaxation (23.2 and positive self-talk (21.25 treatment methods alone can reduce PMS (P < 0.001. On the other hand, a combined (relaxation + positive self-talk treatment method (13.75 was more effective in reducing PMS compared to relaxation or positive self-talk alone. Conclusions It seems that psychological therapy based on relaxation and positive self-talk can be significantly effective in reducing PMS.

  20. Effect of Combined Use of Calcium and Vitamin B6 on Premenstrual Syndrome Symptoms: a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Zahra Masoumi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Premenstrual syndrome is one of the most common disorders in women, which includes a group of psychological and physical symptoms. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of combined use of calcium and vitamin B6 on premenstrual syndrome symptoms. Methods: This double blind randomized controlled was carried out on 76 students of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences. Students were randomly allocated to two groups. (38 people in each group. Student in intervention groups received calcium tablet (500mg and vitamin B6 (40 mg and student in intervention groups received only vitamin B6 twice a day for two consecutive months. The symptoms were assessed by Beck depression inventory (BDI and daily symptom records (DSR questionnaires. Analyses were carried out by test-retest method, Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, Independent t-test, and paired t-test using SPSS software ver.13. Results: The result showed that although the severity of symptoms decreased in both groups, but this reduction was more significant in the combined calcium and vitamin B6 group. Conclusion: According to the result, using of combination of calcium and vitamin B6 leads to better controlling of the premenstrual syndrome symptoms. Therefore it is recommended for women who suffer from these syndromes.

  1. Comparing the Effects of Yoga & Oral Calcium Administration in Alleviating Symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome in Medical Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Bharati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical undergraduates are heavily burdened by their curriculum. The females, in addition, suffer from vivid affective or somatic premenstrual syndrome (PMS symptoms such as bloating, mastalgia, insomnia, fatigue, mood swings, irritability, and depression. The present study was proposed to attenuate the symptoms of PMS by simple lifestyle measures like yoga and/or oral calcium. Methods: 65 medical female students (18-22 years with a regular menstrual cycle were asked to self-rate their symptoms, along with their severity, in a validated questionnaire for two consecutive menstrual cycles. Fifty-eight students were found to have PMS. Twenty girls were given yoga training (45 minutes daily, five days a week, for three months. Another group of 20 was given oral tablets of calcium carbonate daily (500 mg, for three months and rest 18 girl served as control group. Data were analyzed by SPSS ver.13 software. Results: The yoga and calcium groups showed a significant decrease in number and severity of premenstrual symptoms whereas in the control group there was not the significant difference. Conclusion: Encouraging a regular practice of yoga or taking a tablet of calcium daily in the medical schools can decrease the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome.

  2. Effect of menstrual cycle phase on glucose kinetics in healthy women & women with premenstrual symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena K. Nandimath

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the blood glucose levels during the two phases of the menstrual cycle between healthy women and patients with premenstrual syndrome (PMS.Methods: From January of 2012 to the August of 2013, a descriptive cross-sectional study was performed among staff of tertiary care hospital.Inclusion Criteria: 1100 women aged 18 to 45 years, 2 Regular Menstrual cycle.Exclusion Criteria: 1 Menopause 2 Patient on Oral Contraceptive pills.After approval from IEC and informed consent from the 100 enrolled subjects with either the most severe symptoms of PMS or healthy controls. 2ml of venous blood was collected on fasting condition during the follicular phase (5-11 days of  menstrual cycleand the luteal phase of the cycle (19-28 days menstrual cycle and analyzed the serum concentrations of glucose by using the glucose oxidase method.Results: The statistical analysis was done using student's paired T test. P value less than 0.0001was taken as significant.No significant differences between the demographic data of the control and PMS groups were observed. The mean concentrations of glucose were significantly different during the follicular and luteal phases.

  3. Assessing a dysphoric arousal model of acute stress disorder symptoms in a clinical sample of rape and bank robbery victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Maj; Armour, Cherie; Elklit, Ask

    2012-01-01

    Since the introduction of Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) into the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) research has focused on the ability of ASD to predict PTSD rather than focusing on addressing ASD's underlying latent structure. The few existing confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) studies of ASD have failed to reach a clear consensus regarding ASD's underlying dimensionality. Although, the discrepancy in the results may be due to varying ASD prevalence rates, it remains possible that the model capturing the latent structure of ASD has not yet been put forward. One such model may be a replication of a new five-factor model of PTSD, which separates the arousal symptom cluster into Dysphoric and Anxious Arousal. Given the pending DSM-5, uncovering ASD's latent structure is more pertinent than ever. USING CFA, FOUR DIFFERENT MODELS OF THE LATENT STRUCTURE OF ASD WERE SPECIFIED AND TESTED: the proposed DSM-5 model, the DSM-IV model, a three factor model, and a five factor model separating the arousal symptom cluster. The analyses were based on a combined sample of rape and bank robbery victims, who all met the diagnostic criteria for ASD (N = 404) using the Acute Stress Disorder Scale. The results showed that the five factor model provided the best fit to the data. The results of the present study suggest that the dimensionality of ASD may be best characterized as a five factor structure which separates dysphoric and anxious arousal items into two separate factors, akin to recent research on PTSD's latent structure. Thus, the current study adds to the debate about how ASD should be conceptualized in the pending DSM-5.

  4. Assessing a dysphoric arousal model of acute stress disorder symptoms in a clinical sample of rape and bank robbery victims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maj Hansen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since the introduction of Acute Stress Disorder (ASD into the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV research has focused on the ability of ASD to predict PTSD rather than focusing on addressing ASD's underlying latent structure. The few existing confirmatory factor analytic (CFA studies of ASD have failed to reach a clear consensus regarding ASD's underlying dimensionality. Although, the discrepancy in the results may be due to varying ASD prevalence rates, it remains possible that the model capturing the latent structure of ASD has not yet been put forward. One such model may be a replication of a new five-factor model of PTSD, which separates the arousal symptom cluster into Dysphoric and Anxious Arousal. Given the pending DSM-5, uncovering ASD's latent structure is more pertinent than ever. Objective:Using CFA, four different models of the latent structure of ASD were specified and tested: the proposed DSM-5 model, the DSM-IV model, a three factor model, and a five factor model separating the arousal symptom cluster. Method:The analyses were based on a combined sample of rape and bank robbery victims, who all met the diagnostic criteria for ASD (N = 404 using the Acute Stress Disorder Scale. Results:The results showed that the five factor model provided the best fit to the data. Conclusions:The results of the present study suggest that the dimensionality of ASD may be best characterized as a five factor structure which separates dysphoric and anxious arousal items into two separate factors, akin to recent research on PTSD's latent structure. Thus, the current study adds to the debate about how ASD should be conceptualized in the pending DSM-5.

  5. Assessing a dysphoric arousal model of acute stress disorder symptoms in a clinical sample of rape and bank robbery victims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Maj; Armour, Cherie; Elklit, Ask

    2012-01-01

    Background Since the introduction of Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) into the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) research has focused on the ability of ASD to predict PTSD rather than focusing on addressing ASD's underlying latent structure. The few existing confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) studies of ASD have failed to reach a clear consensus regarding ASD's underlying dimensionality. Although, the discrepancy in the results may be due to varying ASD prevalence rates, it remains possible that the model capturing the latent structure of ASD has not yet been put forward. One such model may be a replication of a new five-factor model of PTSD, which separates the arousal symptom cluster into Dysphoric and Anxious Arousal. Given the pending DSM-5, uncovering ASD's latent structure is more pertinent than ever. Objective Using CFA, four different models of the latent structure of ASD were specified and tested: the proposed DSM-5 model, the DSM-IV model, a three factor model, and a five factor model separating the arousal symptom cluster. Method The analyses were based on a combined sample of rape and bank robbery victims, who all met the diagnostic criteria for ASD (N = 404) using the Acute Stress Disorder Scale. Results The results showed that the five factor model provided the best fit to the data. Conclusions The results of the present study suggest that the dimensionality of ASD may be best characterized as a five factor structure which separates dysphoric and anxious arousal items into two separate factors, akin to recent research on PTSD's latent structure. Thus, the current study adds to the debate about how ASD should be conceptualized in the pending DSM-5. PMID:22893845

  6. Mid-cycle headaches and their relationship to different patterns of premenstrual stress symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesner, Jeff; Martin, Vincent T

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has shown that affective changes associated with the menstrual cycle may follow diverse patterns, including a classic premenstrual syndrome pattern, as well as the mirror opposite pattern, referred to as a mid-cycle pattern. Test for the presence of a mid-cycle pattern of headaches, in addition to a menstrual pattern and a noncyclic pattern; test for an association between experiencing a specific pattern of headaches and a specific (previously identified) pattern of depression/anxiety; and test for mean-level differences, across headache pattern groups, in average headache index and depression/anxiety scores (averaged across 2 menstrual cycles for each participant). A sample of 213 female university students completed daily questionnaires regarding symptoms of headaches and depression/anxiety for 2 menstrual cycles. Hierarchical linear modeling, polynomial multiple regression, analyses of variance, and chi-square analyses were used to test the hypotheses. Confirmed the existence of a mid-cycle pattern of headaches (16%), in addition to a menstrual pattern (51%), and a noncyclic pattern of headaches (33%). Patterns of headaches and affective change were significantly associated (χ(2) = 21.33, P = .0003; 54% correspondence), as were the average headache index and depression/anxiety scores (r = .49; P headache pattern groups on the average headache index scores or depression/anxiety scores. A significant number of women experience a mid-cycle pattern of headaches during the menstrual cycle. Moreover, women often, but not always, demonstrate the same pattern of headaches and depression/anxiety symptoms. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  7. Effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy ‎on ‎symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS ‎

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maddineshat

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Standards of care and treatment of premenstrual syndrome (PMS vary. Non-drug ‎psychosocial intervention therapy is recommended for women with any kind of ‎discomfort or distress caused by PMS. The current study examined the effectiveness of ‎group cognitive-behavioral therapy on the symptoms of PMS at a girls’ dormitory of ‎North Khorasan University of Medical Sciences.Method: In this quasi-experimental study, 32 female students with PMS who were majoring in ‎nursing and midwifery and residing in the dormitory were selected using the ‎convenience sampling method and were assigned to experimental and control groups. ‎The Standardized Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool was used as the research ‎tool. Eight sessions of cognitive-behavioral group therapy were held for the studentsResults: There was a significant difference in psychological symptoms before and after ‎cognitive-behavioral therapy (p=0.012. Furthermore, cognitive-behavioral therapy was ‎effective on social interferences caused by PMS symptoms (p=0.012.‎Conclusion: Group cognitive-behavioral therapy effectively alleviates PMS symptoms in female ‎college students.‎

  8. Effects of Magnesium and Vitamin B6 on the Severity of Premenstrual Syndrome Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Ebrahimi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of resolving the problem of premenstrual syndrome for patients has been emphasized due to its direct and indirect economical effects on the society. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effects of magnesium and vitamin B6 on the severity of premenstrual syndrome in patients referring to health centers affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during 2009-10. Methods: This two-stage double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 126 women who were randomly allocated into 3 groups to receive magnesium, vitamin B6, or placebo. The study was performed in 10 selected health centers in Isfahan and lasted for 4 months. To confirm premenstrual syndrome, the participants were asked to complete a menstrual diary for 2 months at home. Drug interventions were continued for two cycles and the results of before and after the intervention were compared. Results: The findings of this study showed that the mean scores of premenstrual syndrome significantly decreased after the intervention in all groups (p < 0.05. Conclusion: According to our findings, vitamin B6 and placebo had the most and least efficiency in improving the mean premenstrual syndrome score.

  9. Women with Premenstrual Dysphoria Lack the Seemingly Normal Premenstrual Right-Sided Relative Dominance of 5-HTP-Derived Serotonergic Activity in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortices - A Possible Cause of Disabling Mood Symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olle Eriksson

    Full Text Available To investigate potential quantitative and qualitative differences in brain serotonergic activity between women with Premenstrual Dysphoria (PMD and asymptomatic controls.Serotonin-augmenting drugs alleviate premenstrual mood symptoms in the majority of women with PMD while serotonin-depleting diets worsen PMD symptoms, both indicating intrinsic differences in brain serotonergic activity in women with PMD compared to asymptomatic women.Positron-emission tomography with the immediate precursor of serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP, radiolabelled by 11C in the beta-3 position, was performed in the follicular and luteal phases for 12 women with PMD and 8 control women. Brain radioactivity-a proxy for serotonin precursor uptake and synthesis-was measured in 9 regions of interest (ROIs: the right and left sides of the medial prefrontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, putamen and caudate nucleus, and the single "whole brain".There were no significant quantitative differences in brain 5-HTP-derived activity between the groups in either of the menstrual phases for any of the 9 ROIs. However, multivariate analysis revealed a significant quantitative and qualitative difference between the groups. Asymptomatic control women showed a premenstrual right sided relative increase in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex 5-HTP derived activity, whereas PMD women displayed the opposite (p = 0.0001. Menstrual phase changes in this asymmetry (premenstrual-follicular correlated with changes in self ratings of 'irritability' for the entire group (rs = -0.595, p = 0.006. The PMD group showed a strong inverse correlation between phase changes (premenstrual-follicular in plasma levels of estradiol and phase changes in the laterality (dx/sin of radiotracer activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal ROI (rs = -0.635; 0.027. The control group showed no such correlation.Absence of increased premenstrual right-sided relative 5-HTP-derived activity of the dorsolateral

  10. Influence of Toxoplasma Gondii Infection on Symptoms and Signs of Premenstrual Syndrome: A Cross-sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Pérez-Álamos, Alma Rosa; Rico-Almochantaf, Yazmin del Rosario; Estrada-Martínez, Sergio; Vaquera-Enriquez, Raquel; Díaz-Herrera, Arturo; Ramos-Nevarez, Agar; Sandoval-Carrillo, Ada Agustina; Salas-Pacheco, José Manuel; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Antuna-Salcido, Elizabeth Irasema; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Guido-Arreola, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Toxoplasma gondii in brain may cause some symptoms that resemble those in women with premenstrual syndrome. To determine the association of T. gondii infection with symptoms and signs of premenstrual syndrome, we examined 489 women aged 30–40 years old. Sera of participants were analyzed for the presence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies using enzyme-linked immunoassays (EIA) and T. gondii DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies were found in 38 (7.8%) of the women studied. Anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies were found in 13 (34.2%) of the 38 IgG seropositive women. Logistic regression showed two variables associated with seropositivity to T. gondii: presence of diarrhea (odds ratio [OR] = 6.10; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.37–27.85; P = 0.01) and weight gain (OR = 2.89; 95% CI: 1.37–6.07; P = 0.005), and two variables associated with high (>150 IU/ml) levels of IgG against T. gondii: presence of diarrhea (OR = 7.40; 95% CI: 1.79–30.46; P = 0.006) and abdominal inflammation (OR = 3.38; 95% CI: 1.13–10.10; P = 0.02). Positivity to EIA IgG and PCR was positively associated with obesity and negatively associated with joint pain by bivariate analysis. Our study for the first time reveals a potential association of T. gondii infection with clinical manifestations of premenstrual syndrome. PMID:27980858

  11. Comparison of the effects of PMDD and pre-menstrual syndrome on mood disorders and quality of life: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balık, Gülşah; Hocaoğlu, Çiçek; Kağıtcı, Mehmet; Güvenda Güven, Emine Seda

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we compared psychiatric symptoms, quality of life and disability in patients with pre-menstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS). Forty-nine women with PMDD were compared with 43 women with PMS. All participants were asked to complete a socio-demographic data collection form, a Brief Disability Questionnaire, a medical study short form-36 (SF-36) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) forms. The patients with PMDD had higher HAD-A and HAD-D scores than the patients in PMS group (p 0.05), but both groups had medium level of brief disability. The PMDD group had a lower SF-36 scoring than the PMS group in every compared parameters (p PMS and PMDD may lead to brief disability, and PMDD may cause loss of quality of life and psychological problems. The evaluation of patients with PMS and PMDD pre-menstrual disorders should be more detailed.

  12. Stress and premenstrual symptoms among Korean women studying in the U.S. and South Korea: A longitudinal web-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yaelim; Im, Eun-Ok

    2017-07-01

    Premenstrual symptoms have been reported to be highly correlated with levels of perceived stress; however, the magnitude of the relationship remains unclear. The purpose of the study was to identify the relationships among perceived stress, acculturative stress, and premenstrual symptoms. The study used a 10-week longitudinal web-based design. A total of 98 female Korean international students studying in the U.S. and 89 Korean domestic students studying in South Korea were recruited using convenience sampling. Data collection was conducted between November 2014 and February 2015. The participants completed 10 weekly web-based surveys. Data were analyzed through descriptive analyses, linear multivariable mixed model regressions, t-tests, and hierarchical multiple regressions. The levels of both perceived stress and menstrual-related symptoms were higher during the premenstrual phase in Korean international students than in domestic students (p Korean international students, perceived stress (β = 0.30; p Korean domestic students, a history of sexual abuse was the strongest related factor (β = -0.28; p < .001). Because stress is a potentially modifiable factor, understanding its relationship to premenstrual symptoms can contribute to relieving these symptoms.

  13. The prevalence and risk factors of school absenteeism due to premenstrual disorders in Japanese high school students-a school-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadakawa, Mari; Takeda, Takashi; Monma, Yasutake; Koga, Shoko; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    Premenstrual disorders such as premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) interfere with the daily lives of adolescents. The causes of PMS and PMDD are unknown, but lifestyle habits, such as regular exercise and taste preference are known to be associated. This study was conducted to investigate how premenstrual symptoms affect the school life in Japanese high school students and whether there was a risk factor for school absenteeism that is dependent on the types of premenstrual symptoms or lifestyle habits. A school-based survey was conducted in Sendai, an industrial city in Japan. A total of 901 girls aged 15-19 with regular menstrual cycles were assessed using the self-reporting premenstrual symptoms questionnaire (PSQ) and questions regarding school absence, taste preference, and exercise. We classified the girls into 'no/mild PMS', 'moderate-to-severe PMS' and 'PMDD' according to the PSQ. The girls were classified into the 'absent' group if they were absent for more than 1 day per month. We used multivariate logistic analysis to examine the risk factors for school absenteeism. The rates of 'moderate-to-severe PMS' and 'PMDD' were 9.9 and 3.1 %, respectively. A total of 107 girls (11.9 %) were classified into the 'absent' group. Significant differences were observed in the prevalence of all premenstrual symptoms (p < 0.001), 'age' (p < 0.001), 'a preference for salty food' (p = 0.001), and 'lack of regular exercise' (p = 0.03) between the 'absent' and 'non-absent' groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that premenstrual symptoms such as 'insomnia or hypersomnia' (odds ratio [OR] 2.27, 95 % confidence interval [CI]: 1.46-4.17) and 'physical symptoms' (OR 2.24, 95 % CI: 1.37-3.66), 'reduced social life activities' (OR 2.71, 95 % CI 1.31-5.59), and 'a preference for salty food' (OR 1.89, 95 % CI: 1.20-2.98) were risk factors for school absenteeism. One in nine Japanese female high school students were absent from

  14. Disturbances Caused by Premenstrual Syndrome among College Female Students

    OpenAIRE

    北村, 陽英; 内, さゆり

    2002-01-01

    Using a questionnaire which asseses premenstrual syndrome and dysmenorrhea symptoms, we investigated 308 college female students in December, 2001. Ninety-nine percent of these students were suffering from premenstrual syndrome, and all students were suffering from dysmenorrhea symptoms. Comparing symtoms of premenstrual syndrome with dysmenorrhea, there are a lot of somatic symptoms in both conditions, but premenstrual syndrome has more mental symptoms than dysmenorrhea. Symptomatically, it ...

  15. Explorative Evaluation of the Impact of Premenstrual Disorder on Daily Functioning and Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Lothar A.J. Heinemann; Thai Do Minh; Anna Filonenko; Kerstin Uhl-Hochgrber

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effects of premenstrual disorders on health-related quality of life (HR-QOL), hobbies and social activities, and relationships with others in the multinational IMPACT study. Methods: Women aged 15-45 years were screened for suspected premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and invited to participate in this web-based study. Based on the Daily Record of Severity of Problems (DRSP), prospectively assessed over two observational cycles, pa...

  16. Premenstrual disorders: prevalence, etiology and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Sharon A; Rapkin, Andrea J

    2006-04-01

    Millions of reproductive-age U.S. women experience premenstrual symptoms with varying degrees of severity. The large number and variety of premenstrual symptoms reported have made premenstrual disorders difficult to characterize. A number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the etiology of premenstrual symptoms. Some women appear to have a genetic predisposition toward severe premenstrual symptoms or to have vulnerability traits that increase their risk. It has been suggested that 1 or more neurotransmitters and/or neurohormonal systems in certain women may have an abnormal response to normal fluctuations in gonadal hormones across the menstrual cycle. Premenstrual disorders can have a significant negative impact on a woman's quality of life and work productivity.

  17. Progesterone for premenstrual syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ford, Olive; Lethaby, Anne; Roberts, Helen; Mol, Ben Willem J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: About 5% of women experience severe symptoms called premenstrual syndrome (PMS), only in the two weeks before their menstrual periods. Treatment with progesterone may restore a deficiency, balance menstrual hormone levels or reduce effects of falling progesterone levels on the brain or

  18. Progesterone for premenstrual syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ford, Olive; Lethaby, Anne; Roberts, Helen; Mol, Ben Willem J.

    2012-01-01

    Background About 5% of women experience severe symptoms called premenstrual syndrome (PMS), only in the two weeks before their menstrual periods. Treatment with progesterone may restore a deficiency, balance menstrual hormone levels or reduce effects of falling progesterone levels on the brain or on

  19. Explorative evaluation of the impact of severe premenstrual disorders on work absenteeism and productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Lothar A J; Minh, Thai Do; Filonenko, Anna; Uhl-Hochgräber, Kerstin

    2010-01-01

    To assess the effects of premenstrual disorders on work productivity and absenteeism in the multinational Impact study. Women aged 15-45 years were screened for suspected premenstrual dysphoric disorders (PMDD) and premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and invited to participate in this web-based study. Based on the Daily Record of Severity of Problems (DRSP) questionnaire, symptoms were assessed prospectively over 2 months. Participants were categorized as having no perceived symptoms/mild PMS or moderate-to-severe PMS/PMDD based on a validated algorithm. Work productivity impairment and absenteeism were assessed retrospectively using the Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool (PSST) and a modified version of the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI) questionnaire. Work productivity impairment was also assessed prospectively over 2 months using the DRSP questionnaire. Overall 1,477 women started the study-of these, 822 (56%) completed the study as planned and represent the full analysis set. Employed women with moderate-to-severe PMS/PMDD had higher rate of productivity impairment on the modified version of the WPAI questionnaire (values >/=7) relative to those with no perceived symptoms/mild PMS (adjusted odds ratio, 3.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.75-5.57). Similar outcomes were obtained for impairment of working productivity or efficiency using the PSST scale (value 4). The mean number of days on the DRSP with at least moderate reduction in productivity or efficiency in daily routine was higher for women with moderate-to-severe PMS/PMDD (5.6 vs. 1.1). Women with moderate-to-severe PMS/PMDD had a higher rate of absenteeism (>8hours per cycle; 14.2% vs. 6.0%). Moderate-to-severe PMS/PMDD seems to be associated with work productivity impairment and increased absenteeism, and thus poses a potential economic burden. Copyright 2010 Jacobs Institute of Women

  20. Menstrual disorders and premenstrual symptoms in adolescents: prevalence and relationship to serum calcium and vitamin D concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Afsane; Bahrami-Taghanaki, Hamidreza; Afkhamizadeh, Mozhgan; Avan, Amir; Mazloum Khorasani, Zahra; Esmaeili, Habibollah; Amin, Bahareh; Jazebi, Samine; Kamali, Delaram; Ferns, Gordon A; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid

    2018-03-21

    There have been several studies evaluating the association between vitamin and mineral status and menstrual disturbance. In the present study, we aimed to assess the relationship between the menstrual bleeding pattern and premenstrual syndrome (PMS) symptoms with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and calcium levels in adolescent girls. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 897 high school girls from northeastern Iran. The prevalence of hypocalcaemia, normal serum calcium and hypercalcaemia was 27.1, 59.8 and 13.1%, respectively. The menstrual flow of participants differed significantly between the calcium status groups (p = .005). There was no significant association between the symptoms of PMS, as assessed by the questionnaire and serum vitamin D status, or serum calcium concentrations, apart from the irritability. There appears to be an association between serum calcium, menstrual blood loss and irritability in adolescent girls. Impact statement What is already known on this subject? Several studies have evaluated the association of vitamin and mineral status with menstrual disturbance, although these relationships are not consistent, specifically among calcium and vitamin D levels with a menstrual bleeding pattern. What do the results of this study add? In the present study, we investigated the correlation of menstrual bleeding patterns and PMS with calcium and vitamin D levels in a large population in adolescent girls. We found that the level of calcium was associated with the level of menstrual blood loss and irritability. However, no significant association was observed between the menstrual bleeding pattern or the PMS symptoms with a vitamin D status. What are the implications of these findings for future clinical practise/research? Further studies are required to assess the value of a calcium adequate intake or a calcium supplementation for the amelioration of PMS and a better understanding the role of calcium in PMS.

  1. No Menstrual Cyclicity in Mood and Interpersonal Behaviour in Nine Women with Self-Reported Premenstrual Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, Renske C; Albers, Casper J; de Jong, Jettie; Batalas, Nikolaos; Aan Het Rot, Marije

    2018-06-06

    Before diagnosing premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), 2 months of prospective assessment are required to confirm menstrual cyclicity in symptoms. For a diagnosis of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), this is not required. Women with PMDD and PMS often report that their symptoms interfere with mood and social functioning, and are said to show cyclical changes in interpersonal behaviour, but this has not been examined using a prospective approach. We sampled cyclicity in mood and interpersonal behaviour for 2 months in women with self- reported PMS. Participants met the criteria for PMS on the Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool (PSST), a retrospective questionnaire. For 2 menstrual cycles, after each social interaction, they used the online software TEMPEST to record on their smartphones how they felt and behaved. We examined within-person variability in negative affect, positive affect, quarrelsomeness, and agreeableness. Participants evaluated TEMPEST as positive. However, we found no evidence for menstrual cyclicity in mood and interpersonal behaviour in any of the individual women (n = 9). Retrospective questionnaires such as the PSST may lead to oversampling of PMS. The diagnosis of PMS, like that of PMDD, might require 2 months of prospective assessment. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Association of a trait-like bias towards the perception of negative subjective life events with risk of developing premenstrual symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Xenia; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Csukly, Gabor; Telek, Tamas; Pap, Dorottya; Rihmer, Zoltan; Bagdy, Gyorgy

    2010-04-16

    Premenstrual symptoms affect the majority of healthy women. Premenstrual symptomatology has earlier been linked to stress and a state-like alteration in the perception of life events in the late-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. We hypothesised that there is also a trait-like negative bias in the perception of life events evident throughout the whole cycle which is associated with the likelihood to manifest more marked symptoms in the late-luteal phase of the cycle. 88 healthy women completed the PRISM calendar for three consecutive cycles and the Objective and Subjective Event Checklist during the follicular phase of the first cycle. Association between PRISM score change from the follicular through the late-luteal phase and life event variables was investigated by Generalized Linear Model Analysis (GENMOD). The PRISM score change showed a significant negative association with the ratio of positive subjective life events and a significant positive association with the ratio of negative subjective life events. There were no significant results in case of the objective life events. Our results indicate that women manifesting a more marked increase of symptoms from the late follicular through the late-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle are more likely to notice negative subjective life events and less likely to notice positive subjective life events. This suggest a trait-like negative bias in the perception of life events present throughout the whole reproductive cycle which may play an important role in the emergence of premenstrual symptoms. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Premenstrual Syndrome: Symptomatic and Diagnosed Prevalence, Dualistic Treatment Approach - A Cross-Sectional Study in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Edith Meszaros; Jeannot, Emilien

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosing and treatment of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) still pose a challenge in the routine medical practice which usually focuses on single pharmacological therapy. Recent research suggests that the combination of treatments including complementary alternative medicine (CAM) therapies may be more beneficial. The objective of this study was to assess the percentage of diagnosed and nondiagnosed PMS/premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) based on the presence of adequate symptoms and to compare population using hormonal or pharmaceutical agents versus CAM therapies. This is a cross-sectional study targeting sample population of 160 females of potentially reproductive age done in Ukraine between May 2014 and April 2015. According to declared symptoms, 29% females versus 26% previously diagnosed by a medical professional qualify for "moderate/severe PMS," P > 0.05. In 30% persons using pharmacological agents, major side effects, namely, nausea, insomnia, headache was caused by painkillers, contraceptives, and antidepressants. Only 37.5% of study population has been using CAM therapy methods to deal with the symptoms of PMS. Of these, 22% have achieved moderate degree in relief of the symptoms long term. We have concluded that when dealing with the burden of PMS/PMDD, the affected treatment-seeking women should have choice and access to the variety of therapies within integrative medicine (both conventional and nonconventional).

  4. Evaluating therapeutic effect in symptoms of moderate-to-severe premenstrual syndrome with Vitex agnus castus (BNO 1095) in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Linlin; Lin, Shouqing; Chen, Rong; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Fengling; Wang, Xiuli

    2010-04-01

    To assess therapeutic effect of an extract of Vitex agnus castus (VAC, BNO 1095) in premenstrual syndrome (PMS) in Chinese women. It was a prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study carried out in China. Eligible patients were treated with VAC extract or placebo for three cycles. Symptoms were documented with PMS diary (PMSD), a daily rating scale with 17 items. Main efficacy variable was the reduction percentage of 17 symptom score documented in PMSD during the luteal phase of the third treatment cycle. A total of 67 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to VAC group or placebo group. Of these, 64 patients completed the study (31 vs. 33). All the 17 symptoms showed a significantly greater improvement with VAC than placebo (P 0.05). Vitex agnus castus is more effective than placebo in the treatment of moderate-to-severe PMS in Chinese women, especially in symptoms of negative effect and insomnia.

  5. Genetics of premenstrual syndrome: investigation of specific serotonin receptor polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Dhingra, Vandana

    2014-01-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a distressing and disabling syndrome causing a significant degree of impairment on daily functioning and interpersonal relationships in 3-8% of the women. With the convincing evidence that PMS is inheritable and that serotonin is important in the pathogenesis of PMS, and failure of initial studies to demonstrate significant associations between key genes controlling the synthesis, reuptake and catabolism of serotonin and PMDD, the main aim of this the...

  6. The treatment of premenstrual syndrome with preparations of Vitex agnus castus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkaik, Saskia; Kamperman, Astrid M; van Westrhenen, Roos; Schulte, Peter F J

    2017-08-01

    Premenstrual syndrome is characterized by the cyclic occurrence of physical, behavioral and psychological symptoms during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle disappearing within a few days of the onset of menstruation. Generally symptoms are mild, but 5-8% of women suffer from severe PMS. Apart from conventional drugs, like serotonin reuptake inhibitors and oral contraceptives, complementary and alternative medicines such as Vitex agnus castus are used by many women experiencing PMS. Our objective was to determine the efficacy, tolerability, and acceptability of Vitex agnus castus preparations for treatment of premenstrual syndrome. All journals in the Ovid software from inception through January 2016 were searched, including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO. Gray literature was searched by Google Scholar and manufacturers of Vitex agnus castus preparations were contacted for information about unpublished trials. We included randomized controlled trials with Vitex agnus castus in women with premenstrual syndrome and/or premenstrual dysphoric disorder with a minimal duration of 2 menstrual cycles. The eligibility of the manuscripts was assessed by 2 reviewers independently. The data abstracted included characteristics of the study design, characteristics of the patient population, intervention details, type of comparator, method of diagnosis, and outcome measures. We adhered to the PRISMA guidelines. We found 17 randomized controlled trials of Vitex agnus castus in the treatment of premenstrual syndrome. Fourteen of these could be included in the quantitative analysis. Thirteen of 14 studies with placebo, dietary supplements, or herbal preparations as controls reported positive effects of Vitex agnus castus on total premenstrual syndrome symptoms. Unfortunately most of the trials are associated with a high risk of bias. The pooled effect of Vitex agnus castus in placebo-controlled trials was large (Hedges g, -1

  7. Premenstrual syndrome: Symptomatic and diagnosed prevalence, dualistic treatment approach – A cross-sectional study in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Meszaros Crow

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnosing and treatment of premenstrual syndrome (PMS still pose a challenge in the routine medical practice which usually focuses on single pharmacological therapy. Recent research suggests that the combination of treatments including complementary alternative medicine (CAM therapies may be more beneficial. The objective of this study was to assess the percentage of diagnosed and nondiagnosed PMS/premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD based on the presence of adequate symptoms and to compare population using hormonal or pharmaceutical agents versus CAM therapies. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study targeting sample population of 160 females of potentially reproductive age done in Ukraine between May 2014 and April 2015. Results: According to declared symptoms, 29% females versus 26% previously diagnosed by a medical professional qualify for “moderate/severe PMS,” P > 0.05. In 30% persons using pharmacological agents, major side effects, namely, nausea, insomnia, headache was caused by painkillers, contraceptives, and antidepressants. Only 37.5% of study population has been using CAM therapy methods to deal with the symptoms of PMS. Of these, 22% have achieved moderate degree in relief of the symptoms long term. Conclusions: We have concluded that when dealing with the burden of PMS/PMDD, the affected treatment-seeking women should have choice and access to the variety of therapies within integrative medicine (both conventional and nonconventional.

  8. Explorative evaluation of the impact of premenstrual disorder on daily functioning and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Lothar A J; Do Minh, Thai; Filonenko, Anna; Uhl-Hochgräber, Kerstin

    2010-06-01

    : To assess the effects of premenstrual disorders on health-related quality of life (HR-QOL), hobbies and social activities, and relationships with others in the multinational IMPACT study. : Women aged 15-45 years were screened for suspected premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and invited to participate in this web-based study. Based on the Daily Record of Severity of Problems (DRSP), prospectively assessed over two observational cycles, participants were grouped into two categories: no perceived symptoms/mild PMS or moderate-to-severe PMS/PMDD. HR-QOL was assessed retrospectively at baseline using the SF-12. : Overall, 1477 women started the study. Of these, 822 (56%) completed the DRSP and SF-12 questionnaires as planned. Moderate-to-severe PMS/PMDD was associated with a reduction in HR-QOL compared with no perceived symptoms/mild PMS for both mental component scores (34.5 ± 8.7 vs 39.0 ± 9.5) and physical component scores (48.9 ± 7.9 vs 51.1 ± 7.2). Women with moderate-to-severe PMS/PMDD experienced a significantly greater mean number of days with at least moderate interference with hobbies or social activities (5.6 vs 1.1 day; p PMS. : Moderate-to-severe PMS/PMDD has a negative impact on HR-QOL, hobbies and social activities, and relationships with others. Studies with a confirmatory design are needed to confirm these results.

  9. Recreational Physical Activity and Premenstrual Syndrome in Young Adult Women: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee R Kroll-Desrosiers

    Full Text Available It is estimated that up to 75% of premenopausal women experience at least one premenstrual symptom and 8-20% meet clinical criteria for premenstrual syndrome. Premenstrual syndrome substantially reduces quality of life for many women of reproductive age, with pharmaceutical treatments having limited efficacy and substantial side effects. Physical activity has been recommended as a method of reducing menstrual symptom severity. However, this recommendation is based on relatively little evidence, and the relationship between physical activity, premenstrual symptoms, and premenstrual syndrome remains unclear.We evaluated the relationship between physical activity and premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual symptoms among 414 women aged 18-31. Usual premenstrual symptom experience was assessed with a modified version of the Calendar of Premenstrual Experiences. Total, physical, and affective premenstrual symptom scores were calculated for all participants. Eighty women met criteria for moderate-to-severe premenstrual syndrome, while 89 met control criteria. Physical activity, along with dietary and lifestyle factors, was assessed by self-report.Physical activity was not significantly associated with total, affective, or physical premenstrual symptom score. Compared to the women with the lowest activity, women in tertiles 2 and 3 of activity, classified as metabolic equivalent task hours, had prevalence odds ratios for premenstrual syndrome of 1.5 (95% CI: 0.6-3.7 and 0.9 (95% CI: 0.4-2.4, respectively (p-value for trend = 0.85.We found no association between physical activity and either premenstrual symptom scores or the prevalence of premenstrual syndrome.

  10. Premenstrual mood and empathy after a single light therapy session

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    aan het Rot, Marije; Miloserdov, Kristina; Buijze, Anna L. F.; Meesters, Ybe; Gordijn, Marijke C. M.

    2017-01-01

    To examine whether acute changes in cognitive empathy might mediate the impact of light therapy on mood, we assessed the effects of a single light-therapy session on mood and cognitive empathy in 48 premenstrual women, including 17 who met Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool criteria for

  11. Women with Premenstrual Dysphoria Lack the Seemingly Normal Premenstrual Right-Sided Relative Dominance of 5-HTP-Derived Serotonergic Activity in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortices - A Possible Cause of Disabling Mood Symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Olle; Wall, Anders; Olsson, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    -follicular) correlated with changes in self ratings of 'irritability' for the entire group (rs = -0.595, p = 0.006). The PMD group showed a strong inverse correlation between phase changes (premenstrual-follicular) in plasma levels of estradiol and phase changes in the laterality (dx/sin) of radiotracer activity...... here seems plausible, and the findings give further support to an underlying frontal brain disturbance in hormonally influenced serotonergic activity in women with PMD. Because of the small number of subjects in the study, these results should be considered preliminary, requiring verification in larger...

  12. Caffeine-containing beverages, total fluid consumption, and premenstrual syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, A M; Bonnlander, H

    1990-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate whether daily consumption of caffeine-containing beverages is related to the prevalence and severity of premenstrual syndrome apart from any effects of daily total fluid consumption. A secondary objective was to determine whether daily total fluid consumption itself is related to premenstrual syndrome. The study is based on 841 responses to a questionnaire probing menstrual and premenstrual health, and daily fluid consumption, which was mailed to female university students in Oregon. Analysis of the data revealed that consumption of caffeine-containing beverages was strongly related to the prevalence of premenstrual syndrome. Among women with more severe symptoms, the relation between consumption of caffeine-containing beverages and premenstrual syndrome was dose-dependent, with prevalence odds ratios equal to 1.3 for consumers of one cup of a caffeine-containing beverage per day and increasing steadily to 7.0 for consumers of eight to 10 cups per day. The effects were apparent among both caffeine-containing tea/coffee consumers and caffeine-containing soda consumers. The observed effects were only slightly reduced when daily total fluid consumption was controlled. Daily total fluid consumption also was related to the prevalence of premenstrual symptoms although the effects were large only for consumers of 13-19 cups of fluid per day (the largest amount studied).

  13. Drenagem linfática manual nos sintomas da síndrome pré-menstrual: estudo piloto Manual lymphatic drainage for premenstrual syndrome symptoms: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Jesus Ferreira

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome pré-menstrual é um complexo de sintomas - dentre os quais o edema pré-menstrual - entre o 10o e o 14o dias que antecedem a menstruação e cessam no início do fluxo menstrual. A técnica de drenagem linfática manual (DLM drena o excesso de líquido acumulado, atua no edema e poderia aliviar esses sintomas. O objetivo deste estudo piloto foi verificar o efeito da DLM no alívio dos sintomas da síndrome pré-menstrual e a qualidade de vida relacionada à saúde em quatro mulheres jovens. O estudo foi realizado ao longo de dois ciclos menstruais, ciclo 1 sem intervenção terapêutica, e o segundo ciclo, com aplicação da técnica de DLM. As participantes foram avaliadas, no início do ciclo 1 e final do ciclo 2, por anamnese, mensuração de estatura e massa, estimativa da composição corporal, diário de sintomas e quanto à qualidade de vida relacionada à saúde, pelo WHOQoL-bref. Os resultados mostraram redução significativa apenas do diâmetro de abdome superior nos níveis xifóide e umbilical; as médias total e individual dos sintomas do diário reduziram-se, porém sem significância, tal como ocorreu no aumento dos escores no WHOQoL-bref. A drenagem linfática manual foi eficaz na diminuição de um sintoma da síndrome pré-menstrual, o edema em região superior abdominal, e não alterou a qualidade de vida dessas jovens.Premenstrual syndrome is a symptomatology - including premenstrual edema - that affects women between the 10th and 14th days prior to menstruation and ends at the onset of menstrual flux. The technique of manual lymphatic drainage (MLD draws off accumulated fluid excess, acts on edema and might help relieve such symptoms. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the effect of MLD on premenstrual symptoms and on health-related quality of life of four young women. The study was carried out along two menstrual cycles, the first with no intervention; MLD was applied along the second cycle

  14. Semi-Individualized Homeopathy Add-On Versus Usual Care Only for Premenstrual Disorders: A Randomized, Controlled Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Laansma, Christien T; Jong, Mats; von Hagens, Cornelia; Jansen, Jean Pierre C H; van Wietmarschen, Herman; Jong, Miek C

    2018-03-22

    Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS/PMDD) bother a substantial number of women. Homeopathy seems a promising treatment, but it needs investigation using reliable study designs. The feasibility of organizing an international randomized pragmatic trial on a homeopathic add-on treatment (usual care [UC] + HT) compared with UC alone was evaluated. A multicenter, randomized, controlled pragmatic trial with parallel groups. The study was organized in general and private homeopathic practices in the Netherlands and Sweden and in an outpatient university clinic in Germany. Women diagnosed as having PMS/PMDD, based on prospective daily rating by the daily record of severity of problems (DRSP) during a period of 2 months, were included and randomized. Women were to receive UC + HT or UC for 4 months. Homeopathic medicine selection was according to a previously tested prognostic questionnaire and electronic algorithm. Usual care was as provided by the women's general practitioner according to their preferences. Before and after treatment, the women completed diaries (DRSP), the measure yourself concerns and well-being, and other questionnaires. Intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol (PP) analyses were performed. In Germany, the study could not proceed because of legal limitations. In Sweden, recruitment proved extremely difficult. In the Netherlands and Sweden, 60 women were randomized (UC + HT: 28; UC: 32), data of 47/46 women were analyzed (ITT/PP). After 4 months, relative mean change of DRSP scores in the UC + HT group was significantly better than in the UC group (p = 0.03). With respect to recruitment and different legal status, it does not seem feasible to perform a larger, international, pragmatic randomized trial on (semi-)individualized homeopathy for PMS/PMDD. Since the added value of HT compared with UC was demonstrated by significant differences in symptom score changes, further studies are warranted.

  15. Altered fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation in premenstrual syndrome: A resting state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hai; Duan, Gaoxiong; Liu, Peng; Liu, Yanfei; Pang, Yong; Liu, Huimei; Tang, Lijun; Tao, Jien; Wen, Danhong; Li, Shasha; Liang, Lingyan; Deng, Demao

    2017-08-15

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is becoming highly prevalent among female and is characterized by emotional, physical and behavior symptoms. Previous evidence suggested functional dysregulation of female brain was expected to be involved in the etiology of PMS. The aim of present study was to evaluate the alterations of spontaneous brain activity in PMS patients based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). 20 PMS patients and 21 healthy controls underwent resting-state fMRI scanning during luteal phase. All participants were asked to complete a prospective daily record of severity of problems (DRSP) questionnaire. Compared with healthy controls, the results showed that PMS patients had increased fALFF in bilateral precuneus, left hippocampus and left inferior temporal cortex, and decreased fALFF in bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and cerebellum at luteal phase. Moreover, the DRSP scores of PMS patients were negatively correlated with the mean fALFF in ACC and positively correlated with the fALFF in precuneus. (1) the study did not investigate whether or not abnormal brain activity differences between groups in mid-follicular phase, and within-group changes. between phases.(2) it was relatively limited sample size and the participants were young; (3) fALFF could not provide us with more holistic information of brain network;(4) the comparisons of PMS and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) were not involved in the study. The present study shows abnormal spontaneous brain activity in PMS patients revealed by fALFF, which could provide neuroimaging evidence to further improve our understanding of the underlying neural mechanism of PMS. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Therapeutic management of premenstrual syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ellen W

    2010-12-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is among the most common health problems reported by reproductive-age women. Estimates indicate that up to 25% of women may warrant treatment for the distress or impaired functioning associated with the symptoms. The primary focus of this review is the clinical condition of PMS and randomized, placebo-controlled trials of PMS treatment. A literature search in PubMed was conducted for these topics. The most recent reports of specific treatments in controlled treatment studies and all meta-analyses were selected. Reports consistently indicate that serotonergic antidepressants reduce PMS symptoms compared to a placebo. Hormonal treatments are the most widely prescribed medical treatment. Some oral contraceptives and gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs have demonstrated efficacy, particularly for women who want contraception and PMS symptom control. Numerous non-pharmacologic treatments are utilized, but efficacy is reported only for calcium supplements, Vitex agnus castus (chasteberry), and cognitive-behavioral therapies. Further research to develop new therapies for the 40% of women with PMS who do not respond to the currently available treatments is needed. There are treatments with demonstrated efficacy for PMS, and the majority of women can be helped.

  17. The Incidence and the Contributing factors of premenstrual syndrome in health working women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Demir

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To report the incidence of premenstrual syndrome in working women and the association of premenstrual syndrome with social and demographical factors, menstrual cycle, and nutritional status. The second aim of this study is to investigate the influence\tof premenstrual syndrome on working performance. Finally, to contribute to decrease the waste of labor time and unnecessary drugs usage caused by premenstrual syndrome.\tMATERIAL-METHODS: Totally 254 women aged between 19-49 years old who work in Dicle University Faculty of Medicine Hospital were enrolled for this prospective study. Data were obtained by face to face interview questionnaires.\tRESULTS: The incidence of premenstrual syndrome was 20.1%. The 91.7% of women had experienced mild or moderate symptoms in premenstrual period. The most common complains were pelvic pain, tension or restlessness, irritability or agitation, abdominal bloating and breast tenderness. Furthermore, in the presence of following factors; women with young ages ( CONCLUSION: The incidence of premenstrual syndrome is higher in working women and this condition may affect the whole population. In order to decrease the incidence of premenstrual syndrome and to increase the life quality of women; more attention\tshould be paid to this condition and proper precautions should be taken.

  18. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS among high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddhabunyakan N

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nattapong Buddhabunyakan, Srinaree Kaewrudee, Chompilas Chongsomchai, Sukree Soontrapa, Woraluk Somboonporn, Jen Sothornwit Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand Background: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS is a common health problem among adolescents.Objective: To assess the prevalence of PMS in Thai high school students.Materials and methods: This was a prospective study conducted among menstruating high school students in Khon Kaen, Thailand, from September to December, 2015. Participants were asked to prospectively complete an anonymous questionnaire, which included information about demographic data, menstrual patterns, and symptoms to be recorded on a daily calendar of premenstrual experiences according to the diagnostic criteria proposed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. All of the data were prospectively recorded for 90 consecutive days.Results: Of the 399 participants, 289 (72.4% completed the self-report questionnaire. Eighty-six participants (29.8%; 95% CI, 24.5%–35.4% reported having PMS. The most common somatic and affective symptoms among participants with PMS were breast tenderness (74.4% and angry outbursts (97.7%. There were significant differences between the PMS and non-PMS groups, and PMS was associated with various problems related to educational activities, including lack of concentration and motivation, poor individual work performance, poor collaborative work performance, and low scores. However, there were no significant differences regarding interpersonal relationships between the PMS and non-PMS groups.Conclusions: PMS is a common menstrual disorder among Thai high school students. The most common symptoms reported in this study were angry outbursts and breast tenderness. Keywords: premenstrual symptoms, prevalence, association, high school students

  19. [The premenstrual syndrome: effectiveness of Vitex agnus castus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döll, Michaela

    2009-05-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a complex combination of a variety of symptoms including mood swings, anxiety, depression, tender breasts and food cravings. For some women the physical pain and emotional stress are severe enough to affect their daily routines and activities. The causes of the premenstrual syndrome have not yet been understood clearly, but have been attributed to hormonal and neuronal dysbalance, diet and lifestyle. Hyperprolactinemia seems to be an important factor which is considered to be part of the endocrine disorder. Different clinical investigations and double blind trials have shown that preparations containing Vitex agnus castus fruit extract are a useful tool to decrease pathophysiologicaly increased prolactin serum levels and though could be an effective treatment for women suffering from premenstrual syndrome.

  20. Diagnosing and treating premenstrual syndrome in five western nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, George; Knaapen, Loes

    2009-04-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and its derivative Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) are controversial medical diagnoses. On one hand they are ubiquitous in English-language cultures; on the other they are for many emblematic of unnecessary medicalization of natural physiological processes. In this paper, we use data produced by IMS, a health care information and research firm, to analyze office-based medical practice related to PMS/PMDD in five countries. We come to several conclusions: 1. Relatively few doctors in any country diagnose women as suffering from PMS/PMDD, despite significant national variations in frequency of diagnosis; 2. Women diagnosed with this condition are usually prescribed a medication no matter what kind of specialist they see; and 3. In North America and the UK, practitioners generally follow USA practice guidelines which favour use of anti-depressive drugs like SSRIs but this is not the case in France and Germany which exhibit unique prescription patterns. In France hormonal treatment and analgesics dominate; in Germany the plant extract Vitex agnus-castus, considered an alternative therapy in much of the English-speaking world, is most common. We go on to discuss the relevance of these conclusions to discussions of variations in medical practices, to the existing PMS literature that claims high rates of prevalence for this condition, and to recent studies of "demedicalization" in certain domains.

  1. Premenstrual syndrome: messes with my academic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, R.; Ayyub, A.; Hameed, S.; Qamar, K.; Raza, G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to determine the educational impact of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) on various academic activities of undergraduate female medical students. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Army Medical College, National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST), Islamabad, Pakistan from June 2013 to November 2013 Material and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted at Army Medical College, National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST) Islamabad. Data were collected from 224 undergraduate female medical students of all professional years. PMS was diagnosed according to WHO's ICD-10 criteria. Impact of premenstrual syndrome on academic activities of female medical students was assessed using a 22-itemed, structured questionnaire. Results: Two hundred and twenty four female undergraduate medical students gave their written consent to participate in this study. PMS was present among 207 (92.4%) female students. Major PMS symptoms experienced by the female students were backache (87.5%), fatigue (80.2%), depressed mood (78.2%), anxiety (76.8%), hypersomnia (71%) and poor emotional control (64.3%). The frequency of various PMS symptoms interfered with their academic activities (76.3%), with large group discussion sessions (79.2%), with small group discussion sessions (72.9%), written assessment (66.6%) and oral assessment (70.0%). Conclusion: The study findings affirm the fact that premenstrual syndrome profoundly affects the academic activities of young female medical students. In the light of these pertinent findings we recommend that health education and counselling services are essential to be provided at medical college campuses for female undergraduates. This will not only help them alleviate the negative effects of PMS but also develop an understanding about their problems, enhancing their academic output and performance in early medical carrier. (author)

  2. Prescribing patterns in premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Paul W

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over 300 therapies have been proposed for premenstrual syndrome. To date there has been only one survey conducted in the UK of PMS treatments prescribed by GPs, a questionnaire-based study by the National Association of Premenstrual Syndrome in 1989. Since then, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors have been licensed for severe PMS/PMDD, and governmental recommendations to reduce the dosage of vitamin B6 (the first choice over-the-counter treatment for many women with PMS have been made. This study investigates the annual rates of diagnoses and prescribing patterns for premenstrual syndrome (1993–1998 within a computerised general practitioner database. Methods Retrospective survey of prescribing data for premenstrual syndrome between 1993–1998 using the General Practice Research Database for the West Midlands Region which contains information on 282,600 female patients Results Overall the proportion of women with a prescription-linked diagnosis of premenstrual syndrome has halved over the five years. Progestogens including progesterone were the most commonly recorded treatment for premenstrual syndrome during the whole study period accounting for over 40% of all prescriptions. Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors accounted for only 2% of the prescriptions in 1993 but rose to over 16% by 1998, becoming the second most commonly recorded treatment. Vitamin B6 accounted for 22% of the prescriptions in 1993 but dropped markedly between 1997 and 1998 to 11%. Conclusions This study shows a yearly decrease in the number of prescriptions linked to diagnoses for premenstrual syndrome. Progestogens including progesterone, is the most widely prescribed treatment for premenstrual syndrome despite the lack of evidence demonstrating their efficacy.

  3. Assessment of the effects of massage therapy on premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leily Ghaedi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premenstrual syndrome is characterized by the cyclic occurrence physical, psychological and behavioral symptoms during the luteal phase of the menstruation cycle and will be disappear within a few days of the onset of menstruation. The aim of this research was to assess the effect of massage therapy on premenstrual syndrome. Materials and Method: A randomized clinical trial was carried out on 30 volunteer students of Tehran University with PMS diagnosis. After surveying two menstruation cycles and confirming PMS existence, subjects were randomly assigned into massage and control group. Massage protocol was performed for eight weeks. Volunteers completed Daily Symptom Rating (DSR during 2 cycles before and 2 cycles after intervention. Data collected via data gathering form, criteria for PMS (DSM- IV, DSR and Beck test. Data were analyzed by descriptive and analytic statistics (χ2, Fischer's exact test, paired and independent t tests.Results: In comparison between before and after intervention, massage group showed significant decrease averagely in mean of somatic (56.7%, psychological (64.8% (p<0.001.This is while, in control group only mean of somatic symptoms (averagely 21.2% relieved obviously (p=0.02. comparing two groups often intervention, we did not found any significant difference in mean of somatic symptoms while psychological (p=0.01 and total symptoms (p=0.03 in massage group was significantly less than controls.Conclusion: The authors concluded that massage therapy is an effective method for relieving symptoms of premenstrual syndrome

  4. Premenstrual Syndrome and Psychiatric Co-morbidities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziba Taghizadeh

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "n    "nObjective: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS is a common disorder with prevalence rate of approximately 30%; its concurrence with psychiatric symptoms will make it a disabling condition that resists usual treatment. Objective: This study was enrolled to assess the co-morbidity of PMS and psychiatric disorders in a sample of girls with PMS compared to those without PMS. "n    "nMaterial and method : This study was conducted through a cross sectional method with 362 participants (166 with PMS and 196 healthy girls who were selected randomly and completed the demographic questionnaire, premenstrual syndrome symptom daily record scale and the symptom checklist 90-revised (SCL-90-R. "n    "nResult: According to the result of the independent t test, the mean score of all the psychiatric symptoms in the PMS group was significantly higher than those in healthy group (P<0.001. According to SCL-90-R measurement, most of the participants in the PMS group were categorized as extremely sick for somatization (44% ,obsessive-compulsive (59%, depression (58.4%, anxiety (64.5%, hostility (47% and psychoticism (69.3%; most of the participants were diagnosed as having borderline severity of disorders for interpersonal sensitivity (44.6% and paranoid (42.8% and most of the respondents with PMS (46.4% were diagnosed as healthy only for phobic anxiety. "n    "nConclusion: There is a considerable relationship between PMS and different psychiatric symptoms that can complicate the diagnosis of PMS and its treatment for the health care providers. Therefore, all health care providers who are in contact with women in their reproductive age should be sensitive to mental health status in women with PMS.

  5. The prevalence of premenstrual syndrome in young woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kozłowski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Regular menstrual cycles reflect the condition of a woman's health. However, they are influenced by many external factors. Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS is a syndrome of somatic and mental symptoms including irritability, fatigue, irritability, depression, crying, self-deprecation, breast hypersensitivity, feeling water retention, diarrhea and constipation, headaches. These symptoms are most noticeable at the age of 25-35.             The aim of the study was to evaluate premenstrual syndrome prevalence in young, healthy women. The questioned women were also asked about education, age, premenstrual syndrome, oral contraceptives, pain during menstruation and the frequency of visits to a gynecologist. The study included 122 female participants. The age of participants ranged from 16 to 45 years. The study conducted in the period from January 2017 to April 2017 and it employed standardized interview research method. Research tool, which was used for data collection was a questionnaire consisted of 19 questions single-choice questions and 3 multiple-choice questions.. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test. All values for which p <0.05 (probability of error were considered statistically significant. Respondents were asked about education, work and knowledge about eye diseases.             All respondents reported premenstrual symptoms, and 26.2% indicated that they felt PMS symptoms regularly or frequently (48.4%. 72.1% (p <0.05 of the questioned women considered that the most severe symptoms of PMS were psychological. Emotional depression affects 73.8% of respondents, the feeling of self-esteem affects or  anxious affects 52.5% of respondents. Concentration problems were reported by 23.8% of respondents. The most common somatic symptom of PMS was water retention (69.8%. Respondents also indicated that they have more problems with their complexion (45.9%.

  6. Emotional reasoning processes and dysphoric mood: cross-sectional and prospective relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Berle

    Full Text Available Emotional reasoning refers to the use of subjective emotions, rather than objective evidence, to form conclusions about oneself and the world. Emotional reasoning appears to characterise anxiety disorders. We aimed to determine whether elevated levels of emotional reasoning also characterise dysphoria. In Study 1, low dysphoric (BDI-II≤4; n = 28 and high dysphoric (BDI-II ≥14; n = 42 university students were administered an emotional reasoning task relevant for dysphoria. In Study 2, a larger university sample were administered the same task, with additional self-referent ratings, and were followed up 8 weeks later. In Study 1, both the low and high dysphoric participants demonstrated emotional reasoning and there were no significant differences in scores on the emotional reasoning task between the low and high dysphoric groups. In Study 2, self-referent emotional reasoning interpretations showed small-sized positive correlations with depression symptoms. Emotional reasoning tendencies were stable across an 8-week interval although not predictive of subsequent depressive symptoms. Further, anxiety symptoms were independently associated with emotional reasoning and emotional reasoning was not associated with anxiety sensitivity, alexithymia, or deductive reasoning tendencies. The implications of these findings are discussed, including the possibility that while all individuals may engage in emotional reasoning, self-referent emotional reasoning may be associated with increased levels of depressive symptoms.

  7. Emotional reasoning processes and dysphoric mood: cross-sectional and prospective relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berle, David; Moulds, Michelle L

    2013-01-01

    Emotional reasoning refers to the use of subjective emotions, rather than objective evidence, to form conclusions about oneself and the world. Emotional reasoning appears to characterise anxiety disorders. We aimed to determine whether elevated levels of emotional reasoning also characterise dysphoria. In Study 1, low dysphoric (BDI-II≤4; n = 28) and high dysphoric (BDI-II ≥14; n = 42) university students were administered an emotional reasoning task relevant for dysphoria. In Study 2, a larger university sample were administered the same task, with additional self-referent ratings, and were followed up 8 weeks later. In Study 1, both the low and high dysphoric participants demonstrated emotional reasoning and there were no significant differences in scores on the emotional reasoning task between the low and high dysphoric groups. In Study 2, self-referent emotional reasoning interpretations showed small-sized positive correlations with depression symptoms. Emotional reasoning tendencies were stable across an 8-week interval although not predictive of subsequent depressive symptoms. Further, anxiety symptoms were independently associated with emotional reasoning and emotional reasoning was not associated with anxiety sensitivity, alexithymia, or deductive reasoning tendencies. The implications of these findings are discussed, including the possibility that while all individuals may engage in emotional reasoning, self-referent emotional reasoning may be associated with increased levels of depressive symptoms.

  8. Emotional Reasoning Processes and Dysphoric Mood: Cross-Sectional and Prospective Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berle, David; Moulds, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Emotional reasoning refers to the use of subjective emotions, rather than objective evidence, to form conclusions about oneself and the world [1]. Emotional reasoning appears to characterise anxiety disorders. We aimed to determine whether elevated levels of emotional reasoning also characterise dysphoria. In Study 1, low dysphoric (BDI-II≤4; n = 28) and high dysphoric (BDI-II ≥14; n = 42) university students were administered an emotional reasoning task relevant for dysphoria. In Study 2, a larger university sample were administered the same task, with additional self-referent ratings, and were followed up 8 weeks later. In Study 1, both the low and high dysphoric participants demonstrated emotional reasoning and there were no significant differences in scores on the emotional reasoning task between the low and high dysphoric groups. In Study 2, self-referent emotional reasoning interpretations showed small-sized positive correlations with depression symptoms. Emotional reasoning tendencies were stable across an 8-week interval although not predictive of subsequent depressive symptoms. Further, anxiety symptoms were independently associated with emotional reasoning and emotional reasoning was not associated with anxiety sensitivity, alexithymia, or deductive reasoning tendencies. The implications of these findings are discussed, including the possibility that while all individuals may engage in emotional reasoning, self-referent emotional reasoning may be associated with increased levels of depressive symptoms. PMID:23826276

  9. Social support and pregnancy: II. Its relationship with depressive symptoms among Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, T; Toda, M A; Shima, S; Sugawara, K; Sugawara, M

    1998-02-01

    In a questionnaire survey among 1329 first-trimester pregnant women, both the husband support measures and unwanted pregnancy ('stressor' agent in pregnancy) showed significant effects on an elevated score of the cognitive disturbance subscale of the Zung's self-rating depression scale (SDS), while only unwanted pregnancies showed an effect on an elevated score of the dysphoric mood subscale of the SDS. However, no interaction was observed between the husband support measures and unwanted pregnancy, therefore the effect of the husband's social support on the cognitive disturbance score was not that of a buffer, but rather a main effector. Finally, multiple regression analyses showed that the dysphoric mood score was preceded by unwanted pregnancy, premenstrual irritability, public self-consciousness, and maternal overprotection; while the cognitive disturbance score was preceded by unwanted pregnancy, husband reduced 'given' and 'giving' support, maternal reduced care and overprotection, paternal reduced care, low annual income, low private self-consciousness, and smoking. These findings suggest that the husband's support for a pregnant woman is effective only in reducing cognitive symptoms, and that different symptomatic constellations have different sets of psychosocial correlates.

  10. Zespół napięcia przedmiesiączkowego – mit czy rzeczywistość = Premenstrual syndrome – myth or reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Pałucka

    2016-06-01

    may indicate pathology. Aim of the study. The aim of this study was to explain what the premenstrual syndrome is, how to recognize it and treat a sick woman. Material and methods. The university database, Pubmed and MEDLINE was searched, using subject headings.  The electronic search was limited to the Polish and English papers, published in the period 2005-2015.  A total of 55 items (mostly medical was selected and 34 of them were used. One of the sources was the website of American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologist. Description of the collected material. A review of the literature shows that the premenstrual syndrome is not a myth, but a real personal and medical problem. It impairs the functioning of women in the social and professional lives. The diagnosis requires a minimum of two-month observation of symptoms and the exclusion of other diseases. The lifestyle modification and possible pharmacological treatment improve the well-being and quality of women’s lives. The reviewed literature revealed a large discrepancy in the views of the authors on these issues and suggested directions for the future research.   Key words: menstrual cycle, premenstrual syndrome, premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

  11. The effect of continuous aerobic exercise on premenstrual syndrome: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosallanejad Z

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premenstrual syndrome is one of the most incidencial problems in women's during reproductive age. That effect personal performance in family and society status. Varied therapeutic treatment has been studied for its promotion. The main attention was to find a method without complications. This study performed with aim of assessing effect of one period of continuous aerobic exercise on premenstrual syndrome in 18-25 years female students in jahrom medical school."nMethods: This study was a kind of semi experimental study with two group plane. Forty students were assessed for premenstrual syndrome with regular mense, without previous history of Diabetes mellitus and Thyroid, Gynecologic and psychological disease. Twenty subjects (with similar VO2 MAX were selected and randomly divided to two experimental and control groups. Data gathering was from ILPDD questionnaire concluded 11 question about signs and symptoms of mental and physical complain related to premenstrual syndrome that filled by samples. All samples have positive five complain that four of them depend on mental symptoms of premenstrual syndrome. Intensity of quantity of premenstrual syndrome and levels of estrogen and progesterone were measured. Then, exercise regime including continuous aerobic exercise, were performed for eight weeks, with frequency of three sessions every week. At the end of 8th week, posttests were repeated in the situation similar to pretest. Analytic statistic as a Nonparametric Mann-whitney test, and nonparametric Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used for comparing variables."nResults: This study showed that after two method of aerobic exercise, somatic and effective complain was decrease in case group (p>0.05. Hormonal change in two groups was not significant."nConclusion: Releaving aerobic experiences is effective for somatic and affective complains secondary to premenstrual syndrome and this plan can be replace by other methods of medical

  12. PTSD's latent structure in Malaysian tsunami victims: assessing the newly proposed Dysphoric Arousal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Raudzah Ghazali, Siti; Elklit, Ask

    2013-03-30

    The underlying latent structure of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is widely researched. However, despite a plethora of factor analytic studies, no single model has consistently been shown as superior to alternative models. The two most often supported models are the Emotional Numbing and the Dysphoria models. However, a recently proposed five-factor Dysphoric Arousal model has been gathering support over and above existing models. Data for the current study were gathered from Malaysian Tsunami survivors (N=250). Three competing models (Emotional Numbing/Dysphoria/Dysphoric Arousal) were specified and estimated using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). The Dysphoria model provided superior fit to the data compared to the Emotional Numbing model. However, using chi-square difference tests, the Dysphoric Arousal model showed a superior fit compared to both the Emotional Numbing and Dysphoria models. In conclusion, the current results suggest that the Dysphoric Arousal model better represents PTSD's latent structure and that items measuring sleeping difficulties, irritability/anger and concentration difficulties form a separate, unique PTSD factor. These results are discussed in relation to the role of Hyperarousal in PTSD's on-going symptom maintenance and in relation to the DSM-5. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychosexual outcome of gender-dysphoric children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallien, M.S.C.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To establish the psychosexual outcome of gender-dysphoric children at 16 years or older and to examine childhood characteristics related to psychosexual outcome. Method: We studied 77 children who had been referred in childhood to our clinic because of gender dysphoria (59 boys, 18 girls;

  14. Systematic Review of Premenstrual, Postmenstrual and Infertility Disorders of Vitex Agnus Castus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Movahedi, Mino

    2017-01-01

    Vitex agnus-castus, also called vitex is aboriginal to the Mediterranean region, with long leaves, tender stem, flowers and ripening seeds. The aim of this study was to overview premenstrual, postmenstrual and infertility disorder of Vitex agnus-castus. This review article was carried out by searching studies in PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, and IranMedex databases. The initial search strategy identified about 87 references. In this study, 43 studies were accepted for further screening, and met all our inclusion criteria (in English, full text, therapeutic effects of Vitex agnus-castus and dated mainly from the year 2009 to 2016). The search terms were Vitex agnus-castus, premenstrual, postmenstrual, infertility disorder properties and pharmacological effects. Vitex agnus-castus was shown to contribute to the treatment of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Moreover, the result of the present study showed that this valuable plant is helpful in alleviation of pain resulting from postmenstrual disease. Furthermore, it was found that Vitex agnus-castus is beneficial in infertility disorder. Vitex agnus-castus (AC) is a phytopharmaceutical compound and is shown to be widely used to treat PMS and PMDD. In addition, it was shown to be beneficial in post-menstrual cases and it can also contribute to treatment of infertility cases in both men and women. Dopaminergic compounds available in this plant help to treat premenstrual mastodynia as well as other symptoms of the premenstrual syndrome.

  15. Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physical signs and symptoms Joint or muscle pain Headache Fatigue Weight gain related to fluid retention Abdominal bloating Breast tenderness Acne flare-ups Constipation or diarrhea Alcohol intolerance For some, the physical pain and emotional stress are severe enough to affect their daily lives. ...

  16. Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Premenstrual Syndrome Through Compliance to Treatment in an Iranian Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Babajani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy on reducing the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome based on the moderator variable of therapy compliance in an Iranian sample. Methods This was a semi-experimental study, in which 56 patients with premenstrual syndrome disorder were selected using the accessible sampling method. They were all the female patients who had been referred to the gynecologic and psychiatric centers in Isfahan city, and were randomly assigned into two experimental and control groups, each one comprising 28 patients. The experimental group received 10 sessions of cognitive-behavioral therapy. The patients were tested before and after intervention using the screening questionnaires of premenstrual syndrome symptoms. Additionally, subjects in both experimental and control groups were divided into two groups based on the rate of their therapy compliance (from high to low or noncompliant. Data was Analyzed using of covariance and Cohen’s size effect with SPSS-22. Results The results showed that the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy on reducing the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome was statistically significant. Moreover, research findings have shown that the therapy was more effective on the compliant group. Conclusion According to the results, cognitive behavior therapy can be suggested as an effective therapeutic approach in reducing the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome, especially for the patients who are complient.

  17. Interdisciplinary consensus on management of premenstrual disorders in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stute, Petra; Bodmer, Christine; Ehlert, Ulrike; Eltbogen, Roger; Ging, Ankica; Streuli, Isabelle; von Wolff, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Premenstrual disorders (PMD) can affect women throughout their entire reproductive years. In 2016, an interdisciplinary expert meeting of general gynecologists, gynecological endocrinologists, psychiatrists and psychologists from Switzerland was held to provide an interdisciplinary algorithm on PMD management taking reproductive stages into account. The Swiss PMD algorithm differentiates between primary and secondary PMD care providers incorporating different levels of diagnostic and treatment. Treatment options include cognitive behavioral therapy, alternative therapy, antidepressants, ovulation suppression and diuretics. Treatment choice depends on prevalent PMD symptoms, (reproductive) age, family planning, cardiovascular risk factors, comorbidities, comedication and the woman's preference. Regular follow-ups are mandatory.

  18. Fourth consensus of the International Society for Premenstrual Disorders (ISPMD): auditable standards for diagnosis and management of premenstrual disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaili, Elgerta; Walsh, Sally; O'Brien, Patrick Michael Shaughn; Bäckström, Torbjorn; Brown, Candace; Dennerstein, Lorraine; Eriksson, Elias; Freeman, Ellen W; Ismail, Khaled M K; Panay, Nicholas; Pearlstein, Teri; Rapkin, Andrea; Steiner, Meir; Studd, John; Sundström-Paromma, Inger; Endicott, Jean; Epperson, C Neill; Halbreich, Uriel; Reid, Robert; Rubinow, David; Schmidt, Peter; Yonkers, Kimberley

    2016-12-01

    Whilst professional bodies such as the Royal College and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have well-established standards for audit of management for most gynaecology disorders, such standards for premenstrual disorders (PMDs) have yet to be developed. The International Society of Premenstrual Disorders (ISPMD) has already published three consensus papers on PMDs covering areas that include definition, classification/quantification, clinical trial design and management (American College Obstetricians and Gynecologists 2011; Brown et al. in Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2:CD001396, 2009; Dickerson et al. in Am Fam Physician 67(8):1743-1752, 2003). In this fourth consensus of ISPMD, we aim to create a set of auditable standards for the clinical management of PMDs. All members of the original ISPMD consensus group were invited to submit one or more auditable standards to be eligible in the inclusion of the consensus. Ninety-five percent of members (18/19) responded with at least one auditable standard. A total of 66 auditable standards were received, which were returned to all group members who then ranked the standards in order of priority, before the results were collated. Proposed standards related to the diagnosis of PMDs identified the importance of obtaining an accurate history, that a symptom diary should be kept for 2 months prior to diagnosis and that symptom reporting demonstrates symptoms in the premenstrual phase of the menstrual cycle and relieved by menstruation. Regarding treatment, the most important standards were the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) as a first line treatment, an evidence-based approach to treatment and that SSRI side effects are properly explained to patients. A set of comprehensive standards to be used in the diagnosis and treatment of PMD has been established, for which PMD management can be audited against for standardised and improved care.

  19. Psychosexual outcome of gender-dysphoric children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallien, Madeleine S C; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T

    2008-12-01

    To establish the psychosexual outcome of gender-dysphoric children at 16 years or older and to examine childhood characteristics related to psychosexual outcome. We studied 77 children who had been referred in childhood to our clinic because of gender dysphoria (59 boys, 18 girls; mean age 8.4 years, age range 5-12 years). In childhood, we measured the children's cross-gender identification and discomfort with their own sex and gender roles. At follow-up 10.4 +/- 3.4 years later, 54 children (mean age 18.9 years, age range 16-28 years) agreed to participate. In this group, we assessed gender dysphoria and sexual orientation. At follow-up, 30% of the 77 participants (19 boys and 4 girls) did not respond to our recruiting letter or were not traceable; 27% (12 boys and 9 girls) were still gender dysphoric (persistence group), and 43% (desistance group: 28 boys and 5 girls) were no longer gender dysphoric. Both boys and girls in the persistence group were more extremely cross-gendered in behavior and feelings and were more likely to fulfill gender identity disorder (GID) criteria in childhood than the children in the other two groups. At follow-up, nearly all male and female participants in the persistence group reported having a homosexual or bisexual sexual orientation. In the desistance group, all of the girls and half of the boys reported having a heterosexual orientation. The other half of the boys in the desistance group had a homosexual or bisexual sexual orientation. Most children with gender dysphoria will not remain gender dysphoric after puberty. Children with persistent GID are characterized by more extreme gender dysphoria in childhood than children with desisting gender dysphoria. With regard to sexual orientation, the most likely outcome of childhood GID is homosexuality or bisexuality.

  20. [Evaluating the relation of premenstrual syndrome and primary dysmenorrhea in women diagnosed with fibromyalgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, Rabia; Terzi, Hasan; Kale, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the presence of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), primary dysmenorrhea (PD) and depression among women with fibromyalgia (FM) and healthy females and to determine possible factors related with PMS and PD in FM. The present study was conducted on 98 female patients diagnosed with FM and 102 age and sex-matched healthy controls. All patients were evaluated for premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and primary dysmenorrhea (PD). Premenstrual syndrome was assessed among the patients for the presence of one or more affective or somatic symptoms within the five days preceding menses. The diagnosis of primary dysmenorrhea was defined as having abdominal pain or lower back pain lasting at least two days during a menstrual period. Dysmenorrhea was assessed via visual analog scale. Dysmenorrhea was rated via Multidimensional Scoring System. The Hamilton depression scale was applied to all patients. Primary dysmenorrhea was established in 41% of FM patients and 28% of the control group. A statistically significant difference was found in PD between the two groups (p=0.03). PMS was established in 42% of the FM patients and 25% of the control group. A statistically significant difference was found in PMS between the two groups (p=0.03). There is an increased frequency of premenstrual syndrome and dysmenorrhea in FM patients. The patients with high symptom severity scores and high depression scores among the FM patients are at risk of PMS and PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. The efficacy of Femal in women with premenstrual syndrome: a randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, multicentre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerhardsen, G.; Hansen, A.V.; Killi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, parallel-group, multicentre study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a pollen-based herbal medicinal product, Femal (R) (Sea-Band Ltd, Leicestershire, UK), on premenstrual sleep disturbances (PSD) in women with premenstrual syndrome...... as the main symptom cluster makes this herbal medicinal product a promising addition to the therapeutic arsenal for women with PMS Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6...

  2. Premenstrual syndrome and quality of life in Iranian medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokh-Eslamlou, Hamidreza; Oshnouei, Sima; Heshmatian, Behnam; Akbari, Elham

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the prevalence of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) in medical students and to evaluate the hypothesis that PMS may result in a decrease in quality of life. In a cross-sectional study, 142 female medical students who study at Urmia University of Medical Sciences were included. The data were compiled using a PMS questionnaire based on the fourth version (DSM-IV) criteria, the questionnaire of "Premenstrual Syndrome Scale" as well as the "World Health Organization's Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF)" questionnaire. In total, 56 out of 142 (39.4%) female medical students met the DSM-IV criteria for PMS. In the PMS group, more than half of the girls, i.e. 60.6% had mild, 25.1% had moderate and 14.2% had severe PMS. PMS was found to be significantly high in students who have positive history of PMS in their first degree relatives and who have used drugs to relieve PMS symptoms (PLife quality score was low in more than half of the medical students, especially in psychological and social components (P>0.05). However, the quality of life score means in mental health (P=0.02) and environmental health (P=0.002) decreases as the PMS score average increases. The results of premenstrual syndrome prevalence and their severity suggest that PMS is common in medical students and this adversely affects some domains of the quality of life. Improving the life quality of female medical students needs some interventions related to the PMS and also other interventions not related to PMS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment of Moderate to Severe of Premenstrual Syndrome with

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Delaram

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS is the appearance of annoying symptoms, disrupting women's daily activities as well as inducing problems. Different treatment were suggested for its and the method with the least side effects will be preferred. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Echinophora platyloba extract on PMS in the students of Shahr-e-Kord University Of Medical sciences in Iran. Materials and Methods: Sixty students having moderate to severe PMS, participated in a single-blind randomized clinical trial. The students were randomly assigned into two equal groups. The first group received the Echinophora platyloba (E. platyloba extract and the second group received placebo. The Daily Record of Severity of Problem (DRSP questionnaire was used to quantify PMS severity before and after the intervention. At the end of first and second cycles after the intervention, the severity of PMS was detected and compared with before intervention. Data analysis was performed by using Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon and Pearson correlation test. Results: There was not a significant difference in the severity of premenstrual syndrome between the E. platyloba and placebo group before the intervention (100.8±22.1 vs. 104.3±19.5. A significant difference was found between two groups after the intervention [(49.7±23.2 vs. 79.1±28.1, p=0.002]. Conclusion: E. platyloba extract is probably effective in the treatment of premenstrual syndrome. Using of this herbal extract is suggested for the treatment of PMS.

  4. Effect of Premenstrual Syndrome on Work-Related Quality of Life in Turkish Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahyaoglu Sut, Hatice; Mestogullari, Elcin

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the effects of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) on work-related quality of life in nurses. We aimed to investigate the effect of PMS on work-related quality of life in Turkish nurses. A total of 134 volunteer nurses were included in this cross-sectional study between January 2015 and March 2015. One hundred and thirty-four nurses completed a questionnaire regarding demographic data, the Premenstrual Syndrome Scale (PMSS), and the Work-Related Quality of Life Scale (WRQoL). The nurses were classified as having or not having premenstrual syndrome according to the PMSS. The average age was 29.5 ± 7.1 years and the prevalence of PMS was 38.1%. The total score of PMSS was significantly negatively correlated with the overall score (r = -0.341; p work (p = 0.179) in nurses with PMS were significantly lower than those of nurses without PMS (p work-related quality of life in their professional lives. Methods to help cope with cyclic premenstrual symptoms may be used, and as a result, productivity and work-related quality of life may increase.

  5. Cows Milk-Dependent Exercise- Induced Anaphylaxis under the Condition of a Premenstrual or Ovulatory Phase Following Skin Sensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinori Bito

    2008-01-01

    Discussion: The symptoms against cows milk began when she took baths with bath salts containing cows milk as its main ingredient for one year at the age 15 years. Sensitization to cows milk through eczematous skin is indicated from this history. Hormonal change during a premenstrual or ovulatory phase is also an important factor for the development of FDEIA in this case.

  6. Perception of premenstrual syndrome and attitude of evaluations of work performance among incoming university female students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shu Hui; Sun, Zih-Jie; Lee, I Hui; Shih, Chi-Chen; Chen, Kao Chin; Lin, Shih-Hsien; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Yang, Yi-Ching; Yang, Yen Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a common condition, and for 5% of women, the influence is so severe as to interfere with their mental health, interpersonal relationships, or studies. Severe PMS may result in decreased occupational productivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of perception of PMS on evaluation of work performance. A total of 1971 incoming female university students were recruited in September 2009. A simulated clinical scenario was used, with a test battery including measurement of psychological symptoms and the Chinese Premenstrual Symptom Questionnaire. When evaluating employee performance in the simulated scenario, 1565 (79.4%) students neglected the impact of PMS, while 136 (6.9%) students considered it. Multivariate logistic regression showed that perception of daily function impairment due to PMS and frequency of measuring body weight were significantly associated with consideration of the influence of PMS on evaluation of work performance. It is important to increase the awareness of functional impairments related to severe PMS.

  7. Assessing the fit of the Dysphoric Arousal model across two nationally representative epidemiological surveys: The Australian NSMHWB and the United States NESARC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Carragher, Natacha; Elhai, Jon D

    2013-01-01

    Since the initial inclusion of PTSD in the DSM nomenclature, PTSD symptomatology has been distributed across three symptom clusters. However, a wealth of empirical research has concluded that PTSD's latent structure is best represented by one of two four-factor models: Numbing or Dysphoria. Recently, a newly proposed five-factor Dysphoric Arousal model, which separates the DSM-IV's Arousal cluster into two factors of Anxious Arousal and Dysphoric Arousal, has gathered support across a variety of trauma samples. To date, the Dysphoric Arousal model has not been assessed using nationally representative epidemiological data. We employed confirmatory factor analysis to examine PTSD's latent structure in two independent population based surveys from American (NESARC) and Australia (NSWHWB). We specified and estimated the Numbing model, the Dysphoria model, and the Dysphoric Arousal model in both samples. Results revealed that the Dysphoric Arousal model provided superior fit to the data compared to the alternative models. In conclusion, these findings suggest that items D1-D3 (sleeping difficulties; irritability; concentration difficulties) represent a separate, fifth factor within PTSD's latent structure using nationally representative epidemiological data in addition to single trauma specific samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychosocial Profile of Women with Premenstrual Syndrome and Healthy Controls: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstäuber, Maria; Schmelzer, Katarina; Ditzen, Beate; Andersson, Gerhard; Hiller, Wolfgang; Weise, Cornelia

    2016-12-01

    According to modern bio-psychosocial theories of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), the aim of this study is to investigate systematically associations between selected psychosocial factors and premenstrual symptoms in different menstrual cycle phases. Several psychosocial variables were assessed, in a sample of German women with PMS (N = 90) and without premenstrual complaints (N = 48) during the follicular and luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Presence of PMS was indicated by analysis of contemporary daily ratings of premenstrual symptom severity and impairment for one menstrual cycle. Regarding perceived chronic stress (ƞ 2  = 0.34), self-efficacy (ƞ 2  = 0.12), and two dimensions of self-silencing (0.06 ≤ ƞ 2  ≤ 0.11) analyses revealed only a significant effect of group. Regarding body dissatisfaction and somatosensory amplification, a significant effect of group (0.07 ≤ ƞ 2  ≤ 0.16) and additionally a group by menstrual cycle phase interaction (ƞ 2  = 0.06) was identified. Regarding relationship quality, a significant effect of menstrual cycle phase (ƞ 2  = 0.08) and a group by menstrual cycle phase interaction (ƞ 2  = 0.06) was demonstrated. In respect to sexual contentment, acceptance of premenstrual symptoms, and the remaining two dimensions of self-silencing statistical analyses revealed no effects at all. Linear multiple regression analysis revealed that 20 % of the variance in PMS symptom severity was explained by the psychosocial variables investigated. Body dissatisfaction (ß = 0.26, p = 0.018) and the divided self-dimension of self-silencing (ß = 0.35, p = 0.016) were significant correlates of PMS severity. Results of this study are consistent with previous research and additionally show patterns of associations between specific psychosocial factors and PMS in dependence of menstrual cycle phase that have not been researched before. The role of the psychosocial variables we

  9. Premenstrual syndrome and attitudes toward menstruation in a sample of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvenc, Gulten; Kilic, Ayse; Akyuz, Aygul; Ustunsoz, Ayfer

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate baccalaureate nursing students' attitudes toward menstruation, and to analyze the frequency of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) symptoms, as well as the relationship between attitudes toward menstruation and PMS symptoms. This cross-sectional study was carried out between February 15 and March 10, 2009, in Ankara Turkey. The study participants were 250 undergraduate nursing student volunteers. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, the validated Turkish version of the Menstrual Attitude Questionnaire (MAQ), and the validated Turkish Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) Scale. Obtained data were analyzed using SPSS version 15.0. The average age of participants was 19.89 ± 1.43. The MAQ's five subscales' mean scores ranged from 2.67 ± 0.58 to 3.37 ± 0.52, indicating natural to moderate attitudes toward menstruation. The mean PMS score was 114.86 ± 35.15, indicating moderate PMS symptoms. PMS symptoms were detected in 36.4% of the nursing students. Thirty one percent of the students reported having dysmenorrhoea during every menstrual cycle. Students who had PMS symptoms scored significantly higher on the debilitation subscale and scored significantly lower on the denial subscale of the MAQ (p menstruation was considered to be a natural event by most of the nursing students. In addition, dysmenorrhea was found to be the most common menstrual problem and the rate of PMS was found lower than that found in previous researches conducted in Turkey.

  10. Peer Group Status of Gender Dysphoric Children: A Sociometric Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallien, M.S.C.; Veenstra, R.; Kreukels, B.P.C.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.

    2010-01-01

    In this sociometric study, we aimed to investigate the social position of gender-referred children in a naturalistic environment. We used a peer nomination technique to examine their social position in the class and we specifically examined bullying and victimization of gender dysphoric children. A

  11. Study Protocol for a Randomized Double Blind, Treatment Control Trial Comparing the Efficacy of a Micronutrient Formula to a Single Vitamin Supplement in the Treatment of Premenstrual Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retallick-Brown, Hannah; Rucklidge, Julia; Blampied, Neville

    2016-12-07

    Background: The recent addition of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (5th ed.) has highlighted the seriousness of this disorder. Many alternatives to psychoactive medication in the form of vitamins, minerals, and plant extracts have been trialled by women seeking a natural treatment approach. We plan to explore whether a well validated micronutrient formula, EMPowerplus Advanced, can outperform a recognized single nutrient treatment, vitamin B6, for the treatment of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). Methods: This will be a randomized treatment control study. Eighty women will be recruited and assigned to one of two treatment groups; EMPowerplus Advanced or vitamin B6. Baseline daily data will be collected for an initial two cycles, followed by three months of active treatment. A natural follow up will take place three cycles post treatment. Results: The primary outcome measure will be PMS change scores as based on results from the Daily Record of Severity of Problems (DRSP). The number of treatment responders for each of the two groups will yield a comparison score between the two treatments, with participants deemed as a responder if they show a total PMS score improvement of 50% from their baseline scores on the DRSP. Conclusion: If a micronutrient formula proves more effective for treating PMS, not only does it give women suffering from the condition a viable treatment option, but it may also suggest one cause of PMS; that is insufficient minerals and vitamins.

  12. The Prevalence of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder and Its Modulation by Lifestyle and Psychological Factors in High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hapsari, Elsi Dwi; Mantani, Yuria; Matsuo, Hiroya

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the prevalence of PMDD in Japanese adolescent girls and identify PMDD modulation by lifestyle and psychological factors and compared the result with those in PMS. Self-reported questionnaires were delivered to 675 high school students in Kobe City from June to July 2004. Items of questionnaires have included student's background, menstruation, lifestyle factors and health difficulties. Diagnosis criteria of PMS from Mortola et al. and diagnosis o...

  13. Prevalência da Síndrome Pré-menstrual e seus Principais Sintomas Observados em Acadêmicas do Curso de Medicina de uma Faculdade do Sul de Minas Gerais Prevalence of Premenstrual Syndrome and its Main Symptoms Observed in Students of a Medical School Course in the South of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prevalência da Síndrome Pré-menstrual e seus Principais Sintomas Observados em Acadêmicas do Curso de Medicina de uma Faculdade do Sul de Minas Gerais/Prevalence of Premenstrual Syndrome and its Main Symptoms Observed in Students of a Medical School Cours

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Avaliar a presença da síndrome pré-menstrual (SPM e sua intensidade, bem como os principais sintomas relacionados em acadêmicas do curso de medicina da Faculdade de Medicina de Itajubá. Materiais e Métodos: Foi realizado um inquérito com mulheres que ingressaram no curso entre os anos de 2005 a 2011, através de um questionário em que as acadêmicas eram classificadas de acordo com a intensidade dos sintomas de SPM e agrupadas em um tipo de sintoma principal. Resultados e Discussão: A ocorrência da SPM foi observada em 100% das acadêmicas entrevistadas em todos os anos, independentemente da série, ou seja, todas as acadêmicas apresentaram algum sintoma, mesmo que leve, da SPM. No entanto, o 2° ano letivo foi o que teve a maior média de sintomas (média de 41,7 pontos da SPM, e o 6°, a menor (média de 36,1. Quanto às características de sintomas das acadêmicas, as manifestações mais citadas foram a irritabilidade e compulsividade. Conclusão: A alta prevalência da SPM foi observada em todos os anos entrevistados, indo de encontro com a literatura, que indica a presença da síndrome em mulheres de todo o mundo, tornando necessária a existência de estudos que facilitem o diagnostico precoce com seu respectivo tratamento mais adequado, reduzindo seus efeitos no cotidiano das mulheres. Objectives: To evaluate the presence of Premenstrual syndrome (PMS and its intensity, as well as major academic-related symptoms in the course of medicine at Medical College of Itajubá. Materials and Methods: A survey was conducted with women who entered the course between the years 2005 to 2011, through a questionnaire the students were classified according to the intensity of the symptoms of PMS and grouped into one type of symptom page. Results and Discussion: The occurrence of PMS was observed in 100% of academic respondents in every year, regardless of the series, all academic exhibited some symptoms, even mild PMS. However

  14. Treatment of moderate to severe premenstrual syndrome with Vitex agnus castus (BNO 1095) in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Linlin; Lin, Shouqing; Chen, Rong; Wang, Xiuli

    2010-08-01

    To assess efficacy of the extract of Vitex agnus castus (VAC, BNO 1095) in the treatment of Chinese women suffering from moderate to severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS). It was a prospective randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study conducted in Chinese women. Eligible patients were randomly assigned into VAC or placebo group. Symptoms were documented with a daily rating scale with four symptom factors (negative affect, water retention, food cravings and pain). Sixty-seven patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive one tablet of VAC or placebo once a day. The premenstrual syndrome diary (PMSD) sum score decreased from 29.38 +/- 7.63 score points at baseline to 4.28 +/- 5.76 at the 3rd cycle in the treatment group, while it decreased from 28.76 +/- 8.23 to 11.79 +/- 11.78 in the placebo group. All the four symptom factor scores were significantly reduced by the 3rd treatment cycle. There was significant difference in PMSD sum score, score of negative affect and water retention between two groups at cycle 3 (P Vitex agnus castus extract BNO 1095 shows effective in treating moderate to severe PMS in Chinese women, especially in symptoms of negative affect and water retention.

  15. Ethinyl Estradiol-Drospirenon Versus Vitex Agnus-Castus Extract in Efficacy of the Treatment of Premenstrual Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Kaplanoglu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The premenstrual syndrome (PMS), which causes emotional and physical symptoms, is a common problem in reproductive age women. Several treatment modalities has been used in PMS. But controversial results has been observed in treatment . The present study was performed to compare vitex agnus castus (VAC) and ethinyl estradiol-drospirenone (EE-Drs) in the treatment of PMS. Material ve Method: It was a prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled study carried out in our clinic. A total of 12...

  16. Premenstrual syndrome and fibromyalgia: the frequency of the coexistence and their effects on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyupek, Feray; Aydogan, Cigdem; Guney, Mehmet; Kose, Seyit Ali

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to investigate the association between Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), to assess common symptoms and quality of life (QOL) of them. Patients with PMS formed the PMS group and age-matched healthy normal controls were included in the control group. The diagnosis of the FMS and PMS were based on new American College of Rheumatology FMS criteria and DSM-IV PMS criteria. FMS-related symptoms assessed by visual analog scale and number of tender points (TePs) were analyzed. QOL, PMS severity and FMS severity were assessed with SF-36, fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ) and premenstrual assessment form (PAF), respectively. Patients with PMS were divided into two subgroups according to coexistence of FMS or not. The frequency of FMS in PMS and control group were 20 and 0%, respectively (p = 0.002). FMS-related symptoms, number of TePs in the PMS group were higher than those in the control group. The mean mental component summary (MCS) score of SF-36 was low in the PMS group. The mean PAF score in PMS with FMS subgroup was higher than those in without FMS subgroup. The mean physical component summary of SF-36 was low in the PMS patient with FMS. There was correlation between PAF score and FIQ score (r = 0.476, p < 0.001). FMS was common among the patients with PMS and frequently seen in the PMS patients having severe premenstrual complaints. Mental QOL was distressed in the patients with PMS but while FMS accompanied to PMS, the physical QOL was decreased.

  17. Treatment for the premenstrual syndrome with agnus castus fruit extract: prospective, randomised, placebo controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, R

    2001-01-20

    To compare the efficacy and tolerability of agnus castus fruit (Vitex agnus castus L extract Ze 440) with placebo for women with the premenstrual syndrome. Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled, parallel group comparison over three menstrual cycles. General medicine community clinics. 178 women were screened and 170 were evaluated (active 86; placebo 84). Mean age was 36 years, mean cycle length was 28 days, mean duration of menses was 4.5 days. Agnus castus (dry extract tablets) one tablet daily or matching placebo, given for three consecutive cycles. Main efficacy variable: change from baseline to end point (end of third cycle) in women's self assessment of irritability, mood alteration, anger, headache, breast fullness, and other menstrual symptoms including bloating. Secondary efficacy variables: changes in clinical global impression (severity of condition, global improvement, and risk or benefit) and responder rate (50% reduction in symptoms). Improvement in the main variable was greater in the active group compared with placebo group (Pagnus castus fruit is an effective and well tolerated treatment for the relief of symptoms of the premenstrual syndrome.

  18. Premenstrual syndrome in Turkish medical students and their quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goker, A; Artunc-Ulkumen, B; Aktenk, F; Ikiz, N

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to analyse the frequency and symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and its effect on quality of life in medical students. Sociodemographic data, a symptom calendar for the following consecutive two menstrual periods and SF-36 quality of life questionnaire were collected. A total of 228 students joined the survey. The average age of the students was 20.77 ± 1.90. The frequency of PMS was 91.8%. The most frequent symptoms were abdominal bloating (89.5%), irritability (88.3%) and breast tenderness (82.6%). Quality of life scores ranged from 17.00 to 97.00 and were lowest in the severe PMS group. Alcohol consumption, stress events and fat rich diets increased the severity of PMS. Family history significantly affected the severity of PMS and quality of life scores. Premenstrual syndrome was found to be a frequent entity among medical students and seemed to affect quality of life in a moderate way.

  19. The interictal dysphoric disorder in patients with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amiri, Moshgan; Pilebæk Hansen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine adult epilepsy outpatients for the existence of the interictal dysphoric disorder (IDD) using the interictal dysphoric disorder inventory (IDDI), the overlap between IDD, depression, and anxiety, and the reproducibility of IDDI. METHODS: Epilepsy outpatients were assessed...... with the Danish IDDI and self-report inventories for depression and anxiety. Patients with abnormal scores were further assessed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Patients with IDD were asked to repeat IDDI for evaluating the reproducibility. Quality of life, well-being and adverse...... effects to antiepileptic drugs were determined. RESULTS: We included 169 patients, and 32 (19%) were diagnosed with IDD. Thirty patients were further assessed with MINI, and 17 (57%) were diagnosed with additional psychiatric disorders, mainly depression, dysthymia, and anxiety. Patients with IDD...

  20. Comparing the Effects of Vitamin B1 and Calcium on Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS among Female Students, Ilam- Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Samieipour

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Premenstrual syndrome (PMS is a combination of physical, psychological and emotional symptoms that occur periodically before menstruation and disappear with the onset of menstruation. There are some therapeutic methods mostly according to the clinical trials that reduce the prevalence and intensity of symptoms of PMS by unknown mechanisms. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Calcium and vitamin B1 on Premenstrual syndrome among female students. Materials and Methods: This is a triple-blind clinical trial conducted on 210 female students living in dormitories of Ilam University of Medical Sciences who had PMS. PMS symptoms questionnaire was used to investigate the symptoms. Participants were assigned in 3 groups of 70 people with the following regimen: group 1 received one pill containing 100 milligrams vitamin B1, group 2 received Calcium pills and group 3 received placebo. The participants in all groups took medicines for 2 months and then reported the intensity of their symptoms by the questionnaire. The collected data was analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics, using SPSS-16. Results: In groups receiving vitamin B1, Calcium and placebo, the intensity of physical and psychological symptoms as well as general symptoms of PMS had a remarkable reduction (P

  1. Factors associated with premenstrual syndrome — A survey of new female university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Hui Cheng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Premenstrual syndrome (PMS can impact an individual's interpersonal relationships, social interactions, productivity, lifestyle, school performance and emotional well-being. This study was designed to explore the factors associated with PMS in new female university students in Taiwan. The test battery included a self-administered structured questionnaire, the five-item brief symptoms rating scale, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Chinese Premenstrual Symptom Questionnaire. Additionally, details of the participants' lifestyles and family and personal histories of physical illness were recorded. Serum lipids were also measured. Of all the participants (N = 1699, 39.85% were defined as having PMS. Using logistical regression analysis, we found a positive relationship between PMS and consuming more foods containing egg yolk, greater alcohol intake, poorer sleep quality, higher likelihood of psychiatric morbidity, family history of dyslipidemia, and a higher serum cholesterol level. The results show that PMS is prevalent among new female university students and that lifestyle and nutritional/metabolic factors may play a role in this disorder.

  2. Factors associated with the severity of premenstrual syndrome among Iranian college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Maryam; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Khalili, Davood; Amin, Gholamreza; Negarandeh, Reza

    2017-11-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is characterized by physical, cognitive, and behavioral symptoms that occur cyclically, from several days to 2 weeks before menses, which resolve either quickly or during the early days of menstruation. The aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with the severity of PMS in Iranian college students. The cross-sectional study was performed among 298 college students (aged 18-35 years) with PMS, of whom, 271 college students completed the Iranian version of the Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool questionnaire to determine the severity of PMS. Factors associated with PMS severity were identified using linear regression analysis with a stepwise method. Factors associated with severity of PMS were age (years), family income (low vs high income), marital status (unmarried vs married), and familial history of dysmenorrhea or PMS after adjustment for dysmenorrheal severity with β (95% confidence interval) of 0.31 (0.45-0.57), 11.6 (1.2-23.54), 3.2 (0.4-5.2), and 2.22 (0.04-4.4), respectively. In this study, factors associated with severity of PMS were age, marital status, family income, and familial history of PMS. We observed that some outcomes were consistent with some previously reported results, which indicates the need for further studies. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  3. Perception of premenstrual syndrome and attitude of evaluations of work performance among incoming university female students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Hui Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS is a common condition, and for 5% of women, the influence is so severe as to interfere with their mental health, interpersonal relationships, or studies. Severe PMS may result in decreased occupational productivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of perception of PMS on evaluation of work performance. Methods: A total of 1971 incoming female university students were recruited in September 2009. A simulated clinical scenario was used, with a test battery including measurement of psychological symptoms and the Chinese Premenstrual Symptom Questionnaire. Results: When evaluating employee performance in the simulated scenario, 1565 (79.4% students neglected the impact of PMS, while 136 (6.9% students considered it. Multivariate logistic regression showed that perception of daily function impairment due to PMS and frequency of measuring body weight were significantly associated with consideration of the influence of PMS on evaluation of work performance. Conclusion: It is important to increase the awareness of functional impairments related to severe PMS.

  4. Stress reactivity and emotion in premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Q

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Qing Liu,1 Yongshun Wang,2 Cornelis Hermanus van Heck,3 Wei Qiao4 1Department of Nuclear Medicine and Medical PET Center, The Second Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 2School of Physical Education and Sport, Huaqiao University, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China; 3DCC, Donders Institute for Neuroscience and Neurocognition, Arnhem, the Netherlands; 4Department of Physical Education, Xiamen Institute of Technology, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China Background: Hormone level fluctuation across the menstrual cycle causes women to experience negative emotions and also affects their mood regulation and stress sensitivity. However, the stress reactivity and emotional variations in women with premenstrual syndrome (PMS, who are especially sensitive to the variations in hormone cycles, have not been explained. Methods: The present study used an electroencephalogram (EEG stress evaluation test, a physiology stress evaluation test, and the positive affect and negative affect scale (PANAS to evaluate the stress reactivity pattern and emotional state of women with PMS. Results: The results showed that women with PMS had higher negative affect and lower positive affect compared with controls. Moreover, under stressful conditions, the women with PMS had a higher alpha activity and a lower respiration rate than the controls. The differences in stress reactivity and emotional states between women with PMS and controls were based on a covariant analysis with menstrual cycle (luteal and follicular phases as the covariate. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that, compared with controls, women suffering from PMS have a continuous abnormality in emotional state and stress reactivity, which was independent of the menstrual cycle. Keywords: premenstrual syndrome, stress reactivity, emotion, EEG stress evaluation test, physiology stress evaluation test

  5. The relationship between Exercise and premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameneh Safarzadeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Premenstrual syndrome (PMS starts during puberty years and it continues to the menopausal period. PMS manifests itself during every monthly luteal stage in the form of a complex of somatic, psychological and behavioral disorders. Exercises such as walking, cycling, swimming and slow running are a few suitable methods for settling down the tension and eliminating the PMS. It is evident that sport in comparison to the therapeutically drugs is free from side effects and it is devoid of any risks. Therefore, the objective of the present study is assessing the relationship between exercises and premenstrual syndrome (PMS. The present descriptive-analytical study has been conducted on 160 students of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences in 2014-2015 academic year. For gathering data a two-section questionnaire was used. The first section was related to the demographic features and the second section pertained to PSTT standard questionnaire. The questionnaires were completed in three consecutive periods of the menstrual cycle by the students based on a self-report method. Gathered data w analyzed by through SPSS 19.0. The statistical tests were used such as the descriptive statistical tests, Chi square and independent samples t-test. The participators’ average age was 21.06 ± 2.19. The subjects did exercise s ( 86 students less than twice a week, did physical activities between 2 and 4 days in a week (44 students and 30 subjects did exercises more than 4 times weekly. They had experiences of dysmenorrhea during their menstrual cycle (120 subjects. There was not observed a significant relationship between age and PMS (P>0.05. The relationship between the individuals citizenship with PMS was statistically significant (P=0.04. The relationship between sport and PMS in three measured periods was statistically significant (P<0.05. The results obtained from the present study indicated that doing regular physical exercises and continuous sport can be

  6. Premenstrual syndrome and perception of impact on sport performance from Brazilian indoor soccer athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Aparecida Gaion

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study’s objective was to verify the association between Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS and perceived impact on sport performance from Brazilian indoor soccer athletes. A total of 112 athletes were enrolled, with ages varying from 18 to 31years old, and who participated in the Brazilian Clubs Cup in 2007. The instruments used were: a self-reported sheet based on criteria from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologist (2000 for the diagnosis of PMS and a sport performance impact perception sheet, organized in a Likert scale with values ranging from 0 (“notaffected” to 3 (“extremely affected”. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test, Pearson’s chi-square and Poisson regression with robust variance. The prevalence of PMS was 47.32% and the perceived impact on sport performance for those with PMS was RP 1.71 (95%CI 1.23 to 2.38. The symptoms associated with sport performanceimpact were depression, irritability, breast tenderness, difficulty concentrating, back pain and tiredness. The intensity with which the athletes with PMS feel their performance affected during the premenstrual phase was significant in the “lowly affected “(RP 2.195%CI 1.26 to 3.55 and “extremely affected” (RP 3.5 95%CI 2.23 to 5.62 categories. Athletes with 6 to 9 symptoms presented higher risk (RP 3.20 95%CI 1.53 to 6.71 than athletes with 4 to 5 symptoms (RP 2.82 95%CI 1.32 to 6.05 or with 2 to 3 symptoms (RP 2.57 95%CI 1.25 to 5.30. In conclusion, the presence of PMS, the number and thekind of symptoms all exhibited associations with the sport performance impact perceived by Brazilian indoor soccer athletes.

  7. Femicomfort in the Treatment of Premenstrual Syndromes: A Double-Blind, Randomized and Placebo Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Akhondzadeh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective:Premenstrual syndromes (PMS affecting 20-40% of women of reproductive age. The aim of this double blind and placebo controlled trial was to investigate whether femicofort a supplement contains Vitamin B6, Vitamin E and evening primrose oil could relieve symptoms of PMS. "nMethod: This was a randomized and double blind clinical trial. The trial was conducted between November 2009 and April March 2010. Women aged 20 to 45 years with regular menstrual cycles and experience of PMS symptoms (According to the current diagnostic criteria proposed by the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology for at least 6 months were eligible for the study. Patients were randomized to receive femicomfort or placebo in a 1: ratio using a computer-generated code. The assignments were kept in sealed, opaque envelopes until the point of analysis of data. In this double-blind, patients were randomly assigned to receive capsule of femicomfort (Group A or capsule placebo for two menstrual cycles (cycles 3 and 4. The primary outcome measure was the Daily Symptom Report, a checklist of 17 premenstrual symptoms rated from 0 to 4 according to their severity throughout the menstrual cycle. Secondary outcome measure was Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (17-item. "nResults:Femicomfort at this dose was found to be effective in relieving symptoms of PMS. The difference between the femicomfort and placebo in the frequency of side effects was not significant. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate the efficacy of femicomfort in the treatment of PMS.

  8. Evaluation of the relative efficacy of a couple cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) for Premenstrual Disorders (PMDs), in comparison to one-to-one CBT and a wait list control: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussher, Jane M; Perz, Janette

    2017-01-01

    A randomised control trial (RCT) was conducted to examine the efficacy of couple-based cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for Premenstrual Disorders (PMDs), in comparison to one-to-one CBT and a wait-list control. Triangulation of quantitative and qualitative outcome measures evaluated changes pre-post intervention. Eighty three women were randomly allocated across three conditions, with 63 completing post-intervention measures, a retention rate of 76%. Repeated measures analysis of variance found a significant time by group interaction identifying that women in the two CBT conditions reported lower total premenstrual symptoms, emotional reactivity/mood, and premenstrual distress, in comparison to the wait list control. Significantly higher active behavioural coping post-intervention was found in the couple condition than in the one-to-one and wait list control groups. Qualitative analysis provided insight into the subjective experience of PMDs and participation in the intervention study. Across groups, women reported increased awareness and understanding of premenstrual change post-intervention. A larger proportion of women in the CBT conditions reported reduction in intensity and frequency of negative premenstrual emotional reactivity, increased communication and help-seeking, increased understanding and acceptance of embodied change, and the development of coping skills, post-intervention. Increased partner understanding and improved relationship post-intervention was reported by a greater proportion of participants in the CBT conditions, most markedly in the couple condition. These findings suggest that one-to-one and couple CBT interventions can significantly reduce women's premenstrual symptomatology and distress, and improve premenstrual coping. Couple based CBT interventions may have a greater positive impact upon behavioural coping and perceptions of relationship context and support. This suggests that CBT should be available for women reporting moderate

  9. Using micronized progesterone for treatment of premenopausal age women suffering from severe premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horbatiuk Olha

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we carried out the clinical and laboratory research of severe PMS (premenstrual syndrome treatment in premenopausal age women. Herein, 37 women were examined and observed before the beginning of treatment and three months after it. Medication containing micronized progesterone was used for treatment (sublingually, 100 mg from 11 to 25 days of menstrual cycle. After three months of micronized progesterone treatment, 86.5% of all women-participants of the study were observed to have full regression of clinical symptoms, while 13.5% of all patients were observed to have decrease in clinical symptoms of severe PMS. Moreover, hormonal research results revealed significant (1.3 times decrease in LH (Luteinizing hormone level and (1.3 times increase in progesterone level after three months of treatment (р<0.05. The high bio-accessibility of the medication and its natural structure made it possible to decrease the dose and avoid risks of hepatotoxicity.

  10. Therapeutic Effect of Vitex Agnus Castus in Patients with Premenstrual Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadat Torabian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Medical therapies have been widely used for premenstrual syndrome (PMS, but in all of them side effects are predominant. Herbal remedies rarely have side effects and people have more tendencies toward them than chemical therapies. In this study the therapeutic effect of Vitexagnuscastus on women who had the PMS, in comparison with placebo, were investigated. In this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study, from134 selected patients 128 women suffered from PMS were evaluated (active 62, placebo 66.All patients answered to a self assessment questionnaire about their headache, anger, irritability, depression, breast fullness and bloating and tympani during the premenstrual period before the study. Forty drops of Vitexagnus extract or matching placebo, administrated for 6 days before mensesfor 6 consecutive cycles. Patients answered the self-assessment questionnaires after 6 menstrual cycles, again. Each item rated using a visual analogue scale (VAS. The mean age was 30.77 (SD=4.37 years in the active group and 30.89 (SD=4.02 years in the placebo group.Rank of variables had significantly difference in active and placebo group before and after the study (P<0.0001also we noticed significant differences on the use of VitexAgnus in comparison with placebo (P<0.0001.Vitexagnus can be considered as an effective and well tolerated treatment for the relief of symptoms of mild and moderate PMS.

  11. Therapeutic effect of Vitex agnus castus in patients with premenstrual syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Mehrangiz; Neghab, Nosrat; Torabian, Saadat

    2012-01-01

    Medical therapies have been widely used for premenstrual syndrome (PMS), but in all of them side effects are predominant. Herbal remedies rarely have side effects and people have more tendencies toward them than chemical therapies. In this study the therapeutic effect of Vitex agnus castus on women who had the PMS, in comparison with placebo, were investigated. In this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study, from 134 selected patients 128 women suffered from PMS were evaluated (active 62, placebo 66). All patients answered to a self assessment questionnaire about their headache, anger, irritability, depression, breast fullness and bloating and tympani during the premenstrual period before the study. Forty drops of Vitex agnus extract or matching placebo, administrated for 6 days before menses for 6 consecutive cycles. Patients answered the self-assessment questionnaires after 6 menstrual cycles, again. Each item rated using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The mean age was 30.77 (SD=4.37) years in the active group and 30.89 (SD=4.02) years in the placebo group.Rank of variables had significantly difference in active and placebo group before and after the study (PVitex agnus in comparison with placebo (PVitex agnus can be considered as an effective and well tolerated treatment for the relief of symptoms of mild and moderate PMS.

  12. The accuracy of dysphoric and nondepressed groups' predictions of life events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapçi, E G; Cramer, D

    1998-11-01

    The phenomenon of depressive realism was examined in relation to the future prediction of positive and negative life events. A group of dysphoric (n = 20) and nondepressed (n = 38) British undergraduates participated in a prospective study lasting 3 months. Partly consistent with the depressive realism hypotheses, dysphoric participants were more realistic concerning the negative life events they would experience, but they were less realistic concerning the negative life events they would not experience. Although no difference was found for predicting the occurrence of positive life events, dysphoric participants were found to be more realistic concerning positive life events that they would not experience.

  13. Comparing the effects of aerobic exercise and Foeniculum vulgare on pre-menstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Pazoki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS has been identified by a number of psychological and physical symptoms which occur cyclically in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The present study has been carried out to compare the effects of regular exercise and Foeniculum vulgare extract (fennel together and separately on PMS in high school girls. Materials and methods: In this randomized clinical trial 48 students aged 16–18 years were selected by filling the daily record of severity of problem questionnaire (DRSP-Q. The participants were divided into four equal groups: the first group received fennel, the second group had aerobic exercise, the third group received fennel along with exercise and the last group was control group without fennel and exercise. Participants filled DRSP-Q three times: the first menstrual cycle before the intervention, the first menstrual cycle after four weeks and finally the first menstrual cycle after eight weeks of intervention. Results: After 8 weeks of intervention the severity of PMS symptoms reduced significantly in experimental groups (fennel, exercise and fennel + exercise compared to control group (P < 0.05. Meanwhile, there were not any significant differences in age, body mass index, age at menarche, age at dysmenorrhea onset and duration of menstruation among the four groups. Discussions: The result of this study indicated that fennels and exercise could reduce the severity of premenstrual syndrome. In addition, fennel extract and exercise together seem to be more effective on symptoms of anxiety and depression compared with using them alone.

  14. Pre-Menstrual Syndrome in Women with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Linda; Cunningham, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) may be higher in women with Down syndrome due to syndrome specific characteristics in biochemistry, psychopathology and lifestyle. Recognition of PMS may be difficult for women with intellectual disabilities and their carers. Method: A daily diary, used to diagnose PMS with typical women, was…

  15. The premenstrual period and exacerbations in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zorgdrager, A; De Keyser, J

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether an association exists between the premenstrual period and exacerbations of multiple sclerosis (MS). The subjects were 56 premenopausal patients with relapsing MS and a regular menstrual cycle. Data over the previous 2 years were gathered from a structured

  16. HUBUNGAN ANTARA HIPERTENSI DENGAN PREMENSTRUAL SYNDROME PADA WANITA USIA REPRODUKTIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhim Rahmawati

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Premenstrual syndrome (PMS is a cycle disorder which is commonly occured during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and will dissapear at the time of menstruation. Ninety percent of women on reproductive ages experience symptomps of PMS and 10% of them experience severe premenstrual symptomps that cuse physical disturbance, medical care necessity, even worst death. Hypertension is a risk factor for a PMS. The aim of this research is to find out a conection between PMS and hypertension. This research was designated using analytic observational with cross sectional approach. We used purposive sampling to get sample. Based on sample formula, we got 104 respondents which is consist of 52 women with hypertension and 52 women normotensive. To obtain data, we used shortened premenstrual syndrome assesment form (SPAF. Data collected were analyzed by chi square test. The result showed that the value of p = 0.00 (p<0.005. This result indicated that there is a conection between hypertension and PMS occurence in reproductive age. The probability of hypertension women to get PMS is 6.75. Keywords: Hypertension, Premenstrual Syndrome, reproductive age

  17. Pregnancy loss: a rare consequence of premenstrual endometrial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two cases of pregnancy loss - a rare complication of pre-menstrual endometrial biopsy (PMEB) are reported. PMEB is an investigation performed for infertile women to assess ovulation and endometrial factors. It is usually performed during the secretory phase of the cycle. This implies that ovulation and possibly fertilization ...

  18. The Effectiveness of Combined Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Calcium Supplementation Plus Vitamin D on Reducing the Premenstrual Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Karimi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS consists of repetitious physical and psychological symptoms that occurs in luteal phase of menstrual period and will be over when menstrual period starts. The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of calcium therapy plus vitamin D and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT on the parameters of PMS symptoms in women suffering from PMS. Materials and Methods: This study has an experimental plan of pretest and post-test of the control group. The statistical society is 250 female staff of Tehran Universities in academic year 2013-2014. Premenstrual syndrome screening tool (PSST questionnaire was used as an evaluation tool. The collected data were analyzed using the indexes of the descriptive statistics and covariance analysis (p<0.05. Results: The minimum age of the statistical society was 24, 52.5 % of them held a master's degree and 60% were single. Cognitive behavioral therapy method, calcium and vitamin D therapy were significant in improving the parameters of symptoms at p<0.05 level of significance. Conclusion: Combining cognitive behavioral therapy and calcium supplementation and vitamin D is significantly effective in improving components of PMS sympotoms and applying these methods is recommended by the consultants and gynecologists.

  19. Emotional Reasoning Processes and Dysphoric Mood: Cross-Sectional and Prospective Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Berle, David; Moulds, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Emotional reasoning refers to the use of subjective emotions, rather than objective evidence, to form conclusions about oneself and the world [1]. Emotional reasoning appears to characterise anxiety disorders. We aimed to determine whether elevated levels of emotional reasoning also characterise dysphoria. In Study 1, low dysphoric (BDI-II?4; n?=?28) and high dysphoric (BDI-II ?14; n?=?42) university students were administered an emotional reasoning task relevant for dysphoria. In Study 2, a ...

  20. Rumination decreases parental problem-solving effectiveness in dysphoric postnatal mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahen, Heather A; Boyd, Alex; Gashe, Caroline

    2015-06-01

    Postnatal depression is associated with poorer parenting quality, but there are few studies examining maternal-specific cognitive processes that may impact on parenting quality. In this study, we examined the impact of rumination on parental problem-solving effectiveness in dysphoric and non-dysphoric postnatal mothers. Fifty-nine mothers with a infant aged 12 months and under, 20 of whom had a Beck Depression Score II (BDI-II) score ≥ 14, and 39 who scored less than 14 on the BDI-II were randomly assigned to either a rumination or distraction condition. Problem-solving effectiveness was assessed post-induction with the "Postnatal Parental Problem-Solving Task" (PPST), which was adapted from the Means Ends Problem-solving task. Parental problem-solving confidence was also assessed. Dysphoric ruminating mothers exhibited poorer problem-solving effectiveness and poorer confidence regarding their problem-solving compared to dysphoric distracting, non-dysphoric distracting, and non-dysphoric ruminating mothers. A self-report measure of depressed mood was used. Rumination may be a key mechanism associated with both depressive mood and maternal parenting quality during the postnatal period. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The influence of self-relevant materials on working memory in dysphoric undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qin; Rahman, Shaoon; Lau, Becky; Sook Kim, Hyang; Deldin, Patricia

    2015-10-30

    Difficulties in updating working memory (WM) may underlie problems with regulating emotions that contribute to depression. To examine the ability of updating affective materials in WM, 33 dysphoric and 34 non-dysphoric participants were asked to evaluate the self-descriptiveness of emotional adjectives and provide answers to self-relevant questions. Within 3-7 days, they completed a two-back task with a series of self-irrelevant or self-relevant emotional words (they had generated previously) and four conditions (match-set, break-set, perseveration-set, and no-set). After the WM task, an unexpected recall task was administered; controls recalled more positive self-relevant words and intrusions while dysphoric participants recalled more negative self-relevant words and intrusions. In break-set trials of the two-back task, dysphoric individuals showed slower response to self-relevant words regardless of valence. In the match-set and perseveration-set trials, dysphoric participants showed delayed response to self-related negative words. Moreover, longer reaction times for self-relevant negative words were correlated with higher rumination and worse depression. The results suggest that dysphoric undergraduates are interfered more by and have a better memory of self-relevant negative stimuli in WM, which is closely correlated with rumination. This study is among the first to confirm the potential mechanism that could underwrite the involvement of self-schema in effectively regulating negative affect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The evolution of extreme cooperation via shared dysphoric experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Harvey; Jong, Jonathan; Buhrmester, Michael D; Gómez, Ángel; Bastian, Brock; Kavanagh, Christopher M; Newson, Martha; Matthews, Miriam; Lanman, Jonathan A; McKay, Ryan; Gavrilets, Sergey

    2017-03-14

    Willingness to lay down one's life for a group of non-kin, well documented historically and ethnographically, represents an evolutionary puzzle. Building on research in social psychology, we develop a mathematical model showing how conditioning cooperation on previous shared experience can allow individually costly pro-group behavior to evolve. The model generates a series of predictions that we then test empirically in a range of special sample populations (including military veterans, college fraternity/sorority members, football fans, martial arts practitioners, and twins). Our empirical results show that sharing painful experiences produces "identity fusion" - a visceral sense of oneness - which in turn can motivate self-sacrifice, including willingness to fight and die for the group. Practically, our account of how shared dysphoric experiences produce identity fusion helps us better understand such pressing social issues as suicide terrorism, holy wars, sectarian violence, gang-related violence, and other forms of intergroup conflict.

  3. Changes in Australian women's perception of the menopause and menopausal symptoms before and after the climacteric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, S; Llewellyn-Jones, D; Perz, J

    1994-12-01

    The symptoms and perceptions of menopause of 60 Australian women were studied, by questionnaire, when they were premenopausal and 10 years later when they were postmenopausal. Menopausal symptoms expected and experienced by the women were compared, fewer women experiencing hot flushes, headache, depression and nervousness and more experiencing insomnia, increase in appetite, abdominal fullness, numbness and muscular problems. The symptoms women thought were due to hormonal changes at menopause were compared. In 1993 more women cited osteoporosis, insomnia, loss of libido, obesity and loss of muscle tone as due to hormone change while fewer cited depression. The premenstrual symptoms and their severity experienced by a woman when she was premenopausal significantly predicts the type and severity of the menopausal symptoms experienced by the woman. The expected menopausal symptoms and their severity cited by a woman also significantly predicts the type of severity of the menopausal symptoms experienced. More premenstrual symptoms predict the menopausal symptoms than those menopausal symptoms the women expected. The expectation menopause will be 'a relief' or 'a nuisance' significantly predicted the overall menopause experience described by the women. Their negative attitudes about doctors' understanding and information available about menopause remained unchanged but they forget menstrual cycle problems over the 10 years. The results suggest a possible physiological basis for premenstrual and menopausal symptoms. Assistance for women with their premenstrual and menstrual cycle symptoms may improve their quality of life at menopause.

  4. Subtle persistent working memory and selective attention deficits in women with premenstrual syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyepchenko, Anastasiya; Lokuge, Sonali; Nicholls, Brianne; Steiner, Meir; Hall, Geoffrey B C; Soares, Claudio N; Frey, Benicio N

    2017-03-01

    As a recurrent, cyclical phenomenon, premenstrual syndrome (PMS) affects a significant proportion of women of the reproductive age, and leads to regular monthly days of functional impairment. Symptoms of PMS include somatic and psychological symptoms, such as headaches, sleep disturbances, social withdrawal and mood changes, during the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, which alleviate during the follicular phase. This study investigated neurocognitive functioning in women with moderate to severe PMS symptoms (n=13) compared to women with mild/no PMS (n=27) through administration of a battery of neuropsychological tests during the asymptomatic follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Relative to women with mild/no PMS symptoms, women with moderate to severe PMS showed significantly poorer accuracy and more errors of omission on the N-0-back, as well as more errors of omission on the N-2-back task, indicating the presence of impairment in selective attention and working memory. This study provides evidence of persistent, subtle working memory and selective attention difficulties in those with moderate to severe PMS during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Premenstrual syndrome and perception of impact on sport performance from brazilian indoor soccer athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Aparecida Gaion

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2009v11n1p73   This study’s objective was to verify the association between Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS and perceived impact on sport performance from Brazilian indoor soccer athletes. A total of 112 athletes were enrolled, with ages varying from 18 to 31years old, and who participated in the Brazilian Clubs Cup in 2007. The instruments used were: a self-reported sheet based on criteria from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologist (2000 for the diagnosis of PMS and a sport performance impact perception sheet, organized in a Likert scale with values ranging from 0 (“not affected” to 3 (“extremely affected”. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test, Pearson’s chi-square and Poisson regression with robust variance. The prevalence of PMS was 47.32% and the perceived impact on sport performance for those with PMSwas RP 1.71 (95%CI 1.23 to 2.38. The symptoms associated with sport performance impact were depression, irritability, breast tenderness, difficulty concentrating, back pain and tiredness. The intensity with which the athletes with PMS feel their performance affected during the premenstrual phase was significant in the “lowly affected “(RP 2.1 95%CI 1.26 to 3.55 and “extremely affected” (RP 3.5 95%CI 2.23 to 5.62 categories. Athletes with 6 to 9 symptoms presented higher risk (RP 3.20 95%CI 1.53 to 6.71 than athletes with 4 to 5 symptoms (RP 2.82 95%CI 1.32 to 6.05 or with 2 to 3 symptoms (RP 2.57 95%CI 1.25 to 5.30. In conclusion, the presence of PMS, the number and the kind of symptoms all exhibited associations with the sport performance impact perceived by Brazilian indoor soccer athletes.

  6. The phenomenology of premenstrual syndrome in female medical students: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy Hassan Balaha

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The premenstrual syndrome (PMS is particularly common in the younger age groups and, therefore represents a significant public health problem in young girls. This study aims to estimate the prevalence, severity, determinants of premenstrual syndrome (PMS and its impact among the female medical students in Al-Ahsa, Saudi Arabia. METHODS: This study was performed at the College of Medicine, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia, from June through December 2009. It included 250 medical students. They filled different questionnaires covering American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG criteria to diagnose PMS, demographic and reproductive factors, physical activity and mental condition. Regression analysis was conducted for all the predictors. RESULTS: PMS was diagnosed in 35.6% of cases, distributed as 45% mild, 32.6% moderate and 22.4% severe. There were significant trends for older age, rural residence, family income and family history of PMS. The dominant limited activity was concentration in class (48.3%. Limitations of activities were significantly more frequent among severe cases. The preva lence of anxiety and depression was statistically more evident in the PMS group. Regression analysis revealed that, PMS was significantly associated with older age groups, rural residence, lower age at menarche, regularity of menses and family history. CONCLUSION: PMS is a common problem in young Saudi students in Al Ahsa. Severe PMS was associated with more impairment of daily activities and psychological distress symptoms. Older student age, rural residence, earlier age of menarche, regular cycles and positive family history are possible risk factors for PMS.

  7. The interrelation between premenstrual syndrome and major depression: Results from a population-based sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Carine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research about the relationship between premenstrual syndrome (PMS and major depression is limited. This study examined the relationship between moderate to severe PMS and major depression in a population-based sample of women of reproductive age. The objectives of the study were to assess the association between premenstrual syndrome and major depression, to analyse how PMS and major depression differ and to characterise the group of women who report both PMS and major depression. Methods Data were obtained from the Swiss Health Survey 2007. Included in the analysis was data from women under the age of 55 without hysterectomy and who answered the questions on PMS symptoms. The population-based sample consisted of 3518 women. Weighted prevalence rates were calculated and relative risk ratios for PMS, major depression and women who reported both PMS and major depression, were calculated with logistic multinominal logit regression. Results The prevalence of major depression was 11.3% in women screening positive for moderate PMS and 24.6% in women screening positive for severe PMS. Compared to women without any of these conditions, women who reported moderate to severe alcohol consumption had a lower risk for PMS. Women reporting use of antidepressants, and use of oral contraceptives had a higher risk for major depression compared to women without any of these conditions. Women reporting work dissatisfaction had a higher risk for PMS. A higher relative risk to report both PMS and major depression compared to women without PMS or major depression was related to factors such as high psychological distress, low mastery, psychotropic drug consumption, and low self-rated health. Conclusions The results suggested that women who suffer from both PMS and major depression are more impaired compared to women with only one disorder. The results further indicated that PMS and major depression are different disorders that can, however, co-occur.

  8. Changes in functioning of mesolimbic incentive processing circuits during the premenstrual phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Lindsey; van Wingen, Guido A.; Kooijman, Sabine C.; Bäckström, Torbjörn; Fernández, Guillén; Hermans, Erno J.

    2011-01-01

    The premenstrual phase of the menstrual cycle is associated with marked changes in normal and abnormal motivated behaviors. Animal studies suggest that such effects may result from actions of gonadal hormones on the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system. We therefore investigated premenstrual changes in

  9. The psychosomatic symptom and the self: a sirens' song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kradin, R L

    1997-07-01

    This paper examines the symbolic nature of the psychosomatic symptom. It is suggested that the psychosomatic symptom is an informationally rich symbolic derivative of the Self that serves to focus attention on developmental disturbances in the archetypal processes of constructing body image and interpreting dysphoric somatic sensations. Clinical examples are offered to illustrate the changing nature of the psychomatic symptom in society. The therapeutic importance of monitoring affectual transactions in the transference-countertransference field is stressed.

  10. Comparison of the effect of omega-3 fatty acids and perforan (Hypericum perforatum on severity of premenstrual syndrome (PMS: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh kheirkhah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Premenstrual syndrome (PMS encompasses a wide variety of cyclic and recurrent physical, emotional, and behavioral symptoms that occur before menstruation and has negative impact on activities of daily living, social activities, sexual functioning and quality of life. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of omega-3 fatty acid and perforan (Hypericum perforatum on severity of premenstrual syndrome (PMS. This study is a triple-blind clinical trial that was carried out across three groups with 150 students after considering inclusion and exclusion criteria. The subjects of this study were randomly divided into three groups include omega-3 fatty acid group, perforan group and control (placebo group. Every subject in this study took drugs during three subsequent cycles so they took capsules daily in the first cycle for one month and in the second and third cycles they took them from eight days before menstruation to two days after and recorded the severity of premenstrual syndrome questionnaire. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS version 17. The repeated measures ANOVA, chi-square and Wilcoxon tests were used to compare mean differences in three groups. The data showed that there were no significant differences between 3 groups before the intervention but 1, 2 and 3 months after consumption of perforan and omega-3 capsules, the severity of PMS was significantly lower than that in control group (p<0.001. perforan and omega-3 significantly reduce the severity of PMS.

  11. [PMS and PMDD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leminen, Henri; Paavonen, Jorma

    2013-01-01

    The symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) significantly impair daily functioning. Symptoms occur in the late luteal phase. There must be a symptom-free interval between the end of menstruation and the time of ovulation. A two-month daily rating of symptoms is required for the diagnosis. The etiology is not well-known. Premenstrual disorders do not occur in anovulatory states. Hormonal therapy suppressing ovulation and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are effective treatments. PMS and PMDD can be successfully managed in general practice.

  12. The Relationship Between Premenstrual Syndrome and Food Patterns in University Student Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darabi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Premenstrual syndrome (PMS is a group of disorders that many girls and women suffer from. It is well known that an appropriate diet as well as environmental factors plays a major role in quality of life. Objectives This study evaluates food patterns for university student girls who suffer from PMS and are healthy. Materials and Methods Eighty-six university student girls from Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences participated in the survey and PMS was diagnosed using the diagnostic criteria of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. They completed a daily symptom-rating questionnaire for PMS symptoms. The score of categorical symptoms (mood-emotional and gastrointestinal disorders, pain, fatigue-focus, and other disorders were determined separately. Student food pattern was determined according to the Iranian food pyramid. The correlation between symptom scores and food group servings was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results The score for each categorical symptom showed significant differences between healthy and students who suffered from PMS (P < 0.001. A significant negative relationship was observed between milk consumption and pain score (P = 0.038, r = -0.224, and between total dairy consumption and pain score (P = 0.019, r = -0.253. Total disorder scores showed a significant negative relationship with total dairy product (P = 0.024, r = -0.243. Conclusions The results of the survey indicate that PMS symptoms are related to consuming less milk or dairy products. Therefore, an appropriate intake of foods according to standard food patterns (like the Iranian food pyramid is recommended.

  13. Factors Mediating Dysphoric Moods and Help Seeking Behaviour Among Australian Parents of Children with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Matthew; Donnelly, James

    2016-06-01

    This study compared levels of state affect, dysphoric mood, and parenting sense of competence in Australian parents of children with or without autism. The effects of personality and location on the parents' experience were also examined, while controlling for current affect. Possible relationships among personality, location factors and help-seeking behavior were also explored in parents of children with autism. Prior findings of higher dysphoric mood levels in parents of children with autism were supported, as was the positive correlation between dysphoric moods and Neuroticism levels. Parenting Sense of Competence did not differ across locations, and there were no parent type by location interactions. Access to services among parents of a child with autism did not moderate dysphoria levels.

  14. Comparison the effects of Ginger and Curcumin in treatment of premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira khayat

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most women at reproductive ages experience the premenstrual syndrome (PMS. Different methods have been suggested for the treatment of this syndrome and one of them is using herbal medicine. This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of ginger and curcumin on severity of symptoms of PMS. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind clinical trial, 105 students with PMS symptoms were randomly assigned to ginger, curcumin and placebo groups. Participants received two capsules daily from seven days before menstruation to three days after menstruation for three cycles and they recorded severity of the symptoms by Daily Record of Severity of Problems (DRSP questionnaire. Data of before interventions and 1, 2 and 3 months after interventions were analyzed by repeated measurement ANOVA and indepented t-test. SPSS-18 software was used for analyses and P<0/05 was considered significant. Results: The mean of PMS symptoms severity were similar in three groups before the intervention [( 110/2±30/7 in ginger group, 103/6±39/1 in curcumin group and106/7±44/65 in placebo group p=0/79], but after interventions there were significant differences between groups [(47/06 ±33/4 in ginger group, 29/74±11/6 in curcumin group and106±48/7 in placebo group P<0/0001]. Also, there was a significant difference between effects of curcumin and ginger (P=0/008. Conclusion: Ginger and curcumin are effective in reduction of severity of psychological, physical and behavioral symptoms of PMS and the effect of curcumin is more than ginger. Results of present study suggest curcumin and ginger as treatment for PMS.

  15. Treatment of premenstrual syndrome with a phytopharmaceutical formulation containing Vitex agnus castus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, E G; Selle, H; Boblitz, N

    2000-04-01

    A multicentric noninterventional trial (open study without control) to investigate the efficacy and tolerance of a drug in a large number of patients under routine medical conditions was performed for a new solid preparation from an extract of the fruit of Vitex agnus castus (VAC, Vitex, chaste tree, Chasteberry) in 1634 patients suffering from premenstrual syndrome (PMS). A specific questionnaire was developed for determining the effect of Vitex on psychic and somatic complaints, on the four characteristic PMS symptom complexes depression, anxiety, craving, and hyperhydration (DACH), and on single groups of symptoms. After a treatment period of three menstrual cycles 93% of patients reported a decrease in the number of symptoms or even cessation of PMS complaints. To a certain extent, this effect was observed within all symptom complexes and correlated with the global assessment of therapeutic efficacy. Whereas 85% of physicians rated it as good or very good, 81% of patients assessed their status after treatment as very much or much better. Analysis of frequency and severity of mastodynia as the predominant symptom revealed that complaints still present after 3 months of therapy were mostly less severe. Ninety-four percent of patients assessed the tolerance of Vitex treatment as good or very good. Adverse drug reactions were suspected by physicians in 1.2% of patients, but there were no serious adverse drug reactions. Hence, the risk/benefit ratio of the new Vitex preparation can be rated as very good, with significant efficacy for all aspects of the multifaceted and inhomogeneous clinical picture of PMS, with a safety profile comparable to other Vitex preparations.

  16. Estudo populacional de síndrome pré-menstrual Population study of premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celene Maria Longo da Silva

    2006-02-01

    -sectional population-based study, involving 1,395 women aged 15 to 49 years old in a medium-sized municipality in Southern Brazil, carried out in 2003. Questionnaires were applied to measure the prevalence of premenstrual syndrome by means of a score based on five premenstrual symptoms that interfered with family life or led to absence from work or school. Associations with socioeconomic, demographic and behavioral variables were investigated. Self-reported syndrome was investigated with regard to its sensitivity and specificity, taking the score as the gold standard. The statistical analyses performed were Pearson chi2, Mantel-Haenszel and Poisson regression, with Kappa coefficients to verify the concordance of the responses. RESULTS: The obtained prevalence was 25.2% (95% CI: 22.5-27.9 and the self-reported prevalence was 60.3% (95% CI: 57.4-63.3. The principal premenstrual symptoms found were: irritability, abdominal discomfort, nervousness, headache, fatigue and breast pain; all of these showed prevalence of over 50%. Higher risk was presented by women of higher socioeconomic level, better schooling level, aged under 30 years and with white skin color. Psychotropic drug users and women who were not using any hormonal contraceptive presented higher prevalence of the syndrome. The sensitivity of the test was 94%, specificity 51% and accuracy 62%. CONCLUSIONS: A high prevalence of premenstrual syndrome was found. Even though the women's perception of the syndrome was higher than the result measured by the symptom score, one quarter of the women presented this health problem.

  17. Adult attention deficit hyperactivity symptoms and psychosis: Epidemiological evidence from a population survey in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwaha, Steven; Thompson, Andrew; Bebbington, Paul; Singh, Swaran P; Freeman, Daniel; Winsper, Catherine; Broome, Matthew R

    2015-09-30

    Despite both having some shared features, evidence linking psychosis and adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is sparse and inconsistent. Hypotheses tested were (1) adult ADHD symptoms are associated with auditory hallucinations, paranoid ideation and psychosis (2) links between ADHD symptoms and psychosis are mediated by prescribed ADHD medications, use of illicit drugs, and dysphoric mood. The Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2007 (N=7403) provided data for regression and multiple mediation analyses. ADHD symptoms were coded from the ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS). Higher ASRS total score was significantly associated with psychosis, paranoid ideation and auditory hallucinations despite controlling for socio-demographic variables, verbal IQ, autism spectrum disorder traits, childhood conduct problems, hypomanic and dysphoric mood. An ASRS score indicating probable ADHD diagnosis was also significantly associated with psychosis. The link between higher ADHD symptoms and psychosis, paranoia and auditory hallucinations was significantly mediated by dysphoric mood, but not by use of amphetamine, cocaine or cannabis. In conclusion, higher levels of adult ADHD symptoms and psychosis are linked and dysphoric mood may form part of the mechanism. Our analyses contradict the traditional clinical view that the main explanation for people with ADHD symptoms developing psychosis is illicit drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors Mediating Dysphoric Moods and Help Seeking Behaviour among Australian Parents of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Matthew; Donnelly, James

    2016-01-01

    This study compared levels of state affect, dysphoric mood, and parenting sense of competence in Australian parents of children with or without autism. The effects of personality and location on the parents' experience were also examined, while controlling for current affect. Possible relationships among personality, location factors and…

  19. Ethical Issues in the Mental Health Treatment of Gender Dysphoric Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Stephanie; Herbert, Sarah E.

    1999-01-01

    Examines ethical dilemmas arising when treating adolescents with gender dysphoria, discussing ethical and legal issues pertinent to treating any adolescent and highlighting gender dysphoric adolescents. Reviews legal decisions, existing data on adolescent decision making, and ethical principles for resolving complex situations. Illustrates ethical…

  20. Are Dysphoric Individuals More Suggestible or Less Suggestible Than Nondysphoric Individuals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarland, Wendy L.; Morris, Steven J.

    1998-01-01

    Dysphoric individuals are shown to be susceptible to interrogative suggestion, whether in the form of leading questions or interrogative pressure. The association of a clinically relevant condition of dysphoria (depression) with relatively high levels of suggestibility was investigated in a college student population (N=139). Applicability to…

  1. Evaluating the effects of vitamin D and vitamin E supplement on premenstrual syndrome: A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Dadkhah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS can cause problems in daily work and relationships. Materials and Methods: Eighty-six women were randomly assigned to two intervention groups and one control group. Patients were asked to fill out the PMS Daily Symptoms Record for 2 months, and then the participants were randomly assigned to one of the three study groups. Medical intervention was carried out for 2 months with the participants in each group receiving either a tablet containing 200 mg vitamin D, 100 mg vitamin E, or a placebo each day, respectively. After 2 months, the results of pre- and post-intervention were compared. P 0.05. Conclusions: Supplemental therapy with vitamins D and E is an effective and affordable treatment for PMS.

  2. Effects of kinesio taping and hot packs on premenstrual syndrome in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2017-09-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the effects of taping and hot packs on premenstrual syndrome, in an attempt to generate basic data for physical therapy intervention for premenstrual syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-two females in their 20s with premenstrual syndrome were randomly assigned to a taping group (n=10), hot pack group (n=11), and taping with hot pack group (n=11). Premenstrual syndrome was assessed using the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire in each participant prior to intervention and was re-assessed after applying kinesio taping and/or hot pack from 10 days before the estimated date of menstruation until the first day of menstruation. [Results] Data revealed that the taping and taping with hot pack groups showed significantly reduced premenstrual syndrome following intervention. In terms of the differences in the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire total score among the groups, the taping with hot pack and hot pack groups showed a significant difference. [Conclusion] These findings indicate that kinesio taping is an easy, non-drug intervention for female college students with premenstrual syndrome.

  3. Estimating direct and indirect costs of premenstrual syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borenstein, Jeff; Chiou, Chiun-Fang; Dean, Bonnie; Wong, John; Wade, Sally

    2005-01-01

    To quantify the economic impact of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) on the employer. Data were collected from 374 women aged 18-45 with regular menses. Direct costs were quantified using administrative claims of these patients and the Medicare Fee Schedule. Indirect costs were quantified by both self-reported days of work missed and lost productivity at work. Regression analyses were used to develop a model to project PMS-related direct and indirect costs. A total of 29.6% (n = 111) of the participants were diagnosed with PMS. A PMS diagnosis was associated with an average annual increase of $59 in direct costs (P increase in direct medical costs and a large increase in indirect costs.

  4. Chronic periodontitis as an etiology of sleep disturbances and premenstrual syndrome (PMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryono Utomo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious that sleep disturbances may induced by acute pulpal or periodontal pain. Other causes of sleep disturbances which also termed as sleep dysfunction, or insomnia, according to the patient has to be treated by physician. Nevertheless, in a case report, surprisingly, periodontal treatment relieved sleep disturbances and premenstrual syndrome (PMS. Coincidentally, women also more vulnerable to sleep disturbances and periodontal disease. It is also interesting that the exact etiology of PMS is still unknown, and 80% women who suffered from PMS also experience sleep disturbances. Recently, there has been increasing numbers of literatures and evidence-based cases linking periodontal disease to systemic diseases. However, systemic effects of periodontal disease that lead to PMS which associated with sleep disturbances are rarely discussed. Several mechanisms had been proposed to involve in these symptoms: female sexual hormonal imbalance, stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis and neurogenic switching mechanism. In addition, as estrogen makes women more susceptible to stress, it worsen the symptoms. The glucocorticoid hormones synthesized upon stimulation of the HPA-axis, either by stress or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may disrupt the sleep-wake cycle; and also create estrogen dominance. The aim of this study is to propose the etiopathogenesis of PMS which associated with sleep disturbances that may be related to chronic periodontitis. Since in this case report scaling and curettage resulted in the disappearing of PMS and sleep disturbances; the conclusion is that chronic periodontal disease may act as one of the etiologies of PMS and sleep disturbance.

  5. Dose-dependent efficacy of the Vitex agnus castus extract Ze 440 in patients suffering from premenstrual syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Ruediger; Zimmermann, Christian; Drewe, Jürgen; Hoexter, Godehard; Zahner, Catherine

    2012-11-15

    Preparations of Vitex agnus castus L. (VAC) have been shown to be effective to treat irregular menstrual cycles, cyclical mastalgia and symptoms of the premenstrual syndrome (PMS). However, the dose-effect relationship for the treatment of PMS has not yet been established. This study aimed to investigate the clinical effects of three different doses of the VAC extract Ze 440 in comparison to placebo in patients suffering from PMS. In a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study, 162 female patients with PMS (18-45 years) were randomized to either placebo or different doses of Ze 440 (8, 20 and 30 mg) over three menstrual cycles. PMS symptoms' severity was assessed by patients using visual analog scales (VAS) for the symptoms irritability, mood alteration, anger, headache, bloating and breast fullness. Each of the treatments was well tolerated. Improvement in the total symptom score (TSS) in the 20mg group was significantly higher than in the placebo and 8 mg treatment group. The higher dose of 30 mg, on the other hand, did not significantly decrease symptom severity compared to the 20mg treatment, providing a rational for the usage of 20mg. Corresponding results were observed with the single PMS symptom scores. This study demonstrated that the VAC extract Ze 440 was effective in relieving symptoms of PMS, when applied in a dose of 20mg. Therefore, for patients suffering from PMS, 20mg Ze 440 should be the preferred daily dose. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Ethinyl Estradiol-Drospirenon Versus Vitex Agnus-Castus Extract in Efficacy of the Treatment of Premenstrual Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kaplanoglu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The premenstrual syndrome (PMS, which causes emotional and physical symptoms, is a common problem in reproductive age women. Several treatment modalities has been used in PMS. But controversial results has been observed in treatment . The present study was performed to compare vitex agnus castus (VAC and ethinyl estradiol-drospirenone (EE-Drs in the treatment of PMS. Material ve Method: It was a prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled study carried out in our clinic. A total of 120 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to EE-Drs, VAC group or placebo group. Eligible patients were treated with EE-Drs, VAC extract and placebo for consecutive three cycles. Symptoms were documented with PMS diary (PMSD. Main efficacy variable was the reduction percentage of 15 symptom score documented in PMSD during the luteal phase of the third treatment cycle. Visual Anolog Scale (VAS was used in assessment of PMS semptoms. Results: After the treatment, there was statistically significant difference between the groups for anxiety (p

  7. Ethinyl Estradiol-Drospirenon Versus Vitex Agnus-Castus Extract in Efficacy of the Treatment of Premenstrual Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kaplanoglu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The premenstrual syndrome (PMS, which causes emotional and physical symptoms, is a common problem in reproductive age women. Several treatment modalities has been used in PMS. But controversial results has been observed in treatment . The present study was performed to compare vitex agnus castus (VAC and ethinyl estradiol-drospirenone (EE-Drs in the treatment of PMS. Material ve Method: It was a prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled study carried out in our clinic. A total of 120 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to EE-Drs, VAC group or placebo group. Eligible patients were treated with EE-Drs, VAC extract and placebo for consecutive three cycles. Symptoms were documented with PMS diary (PMSD. Main efficacy variable was the reduction percentage of 15 symptom score documented in PMSD during the luteal phase of the third treatment cycle. Visual Anolog Scale (VAS was used in assessment of PMS semptoms. Results: After the treatment, there was statistically significant difference between the groups for anxiety (p

  8. Behavioral and Emotional Problems on the Teacher's Report Form: A Cross-National, Cross-Clinic Comparative Analysis of Gender Dysphoric Children and Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensma, T.D.; Zucker, K.J.; Kreukels, B.P.C.; VanderLaan, D.P.; Wood, H.; Fuentes, A.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.

    2014-01-01

    For gender dysphoric children and adolescents, the school environment may be challenging due to peer social ostracism and rejection. To date, information on the psychological functioning and the quality of peer relations in gender dysphoric children and adolescents has been studied via parental

  9. Assessing a five factor model of PTSD: is dysphoric arousal a unique PTSD construct showing differential relationships with anxiety and depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Elhai, Jon D; Richardson, Don; Ractliffe, Kendra; Wang, Li; Elklit, Ask

    2012-03-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder's (PTSD) latent structure has been widely debated. To date, two four-factor models (Numbing and Dysphoria) have received the majority of factor analytic support. Recently, Elhai et al. (2011) proposed and supported a revised (five-factor) Dysphoric Arousal model. Data were gathered from two separate samples; War veterans and Primary Care medical patients. The three models were compared and the resultant factors of the Dysphoric Arousal model were validated against external constructs of depression and anxiety. The Dysphoric Arousal model provided significantly better fit than the Numbing and Dysphoria models across both samples. When differentiating between factors, the current results support the idea that Dysphoric Arousal can be differentiated from Anxious Arousal but not from Emotional Numbing when correlated with depression. In conclusion, the Dysphoria model may be a more parsimonious representation of PTSD's latent structure in these trauma populations despite superior fit of the Dysphoric Arousal model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Intake of Selected Minerals and Risk of Premenstrual Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chocano-Bedoya, Patricia O.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Johnson, Susan R.; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Ronnenberg, Alayne G.; Bigelow, Carol; Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth R.

    2013-01-01

    Iron, potassium, zinc, and other minerals might impact the development of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) through multiple mechanisms, but few studies have evaluated these relations. We conducted a case-control study nested within the prospective Nurses' Health Study II (1991–2001). Participants were free from PMS at baseline. After 10 years, 1,057 women were confirmed as PMS cases and 1,968 as controls. Mineral intake was assessed using food frequency questionnaires completed in 1991, 1995, and 1999. After adjustment for calcium intake and other factors, women in the highest quintile of nonheme iron intake had a relative risk of PMS of 0.64 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44, 0.92; P for trend = 0.04) compared with women in the lowest quintile. Women in the highest quintile of potassium intake had a relative risk of 1.46 (95% CI: 0.99, 2.15; P for trend = 0.04) compared with women in the lowest quintile. High intake of zinc from supplements was marginally associated with PMS (for intake of ≥25 mg/day vs. none, relative risk = 0.69, 95% CI: 0.46, 1.02; P for trend = 0.05). Intakes of sodium, magnesium, and manganese were unrelated to PMS risk. These findings suggest that dietary minerals may be useful in preventing PMS. Additional studies are needed to confirm these relations. PMID:23444100

  11. Dimensional structure of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress symptoms in Spanish trauma victims

    OpenAIRE

    Sober?n, Carmen; Crespo, Mar?a; del Mar G?mez-Guti?rrez, Mar?a; Fern?ndez-Lansac, Violeta; Armour, Cherie

    2016-01-01

    Background Confirmatory factor analytic studies have shown that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms included in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Disorders (DSM-5) may be better explained by two 6-factor models (the Externalizing Behaviours model and the Anhedonia model) and a 7-factor Hybrid model. The latter model comprises the symptom clusters of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behaviours, and anxious and dysphoric arousal....

  12. Use of Vitex agnus-castus in migrainous women with premenstrual syndrome: an open-label clinical observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Anna; Di Lorenzo, Cherubino; Coppola, Gianluca; Pierelli, Francesco

    2013-03-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) affects most women during their reproductive life. Headache is regarded as a typical symptom of PMS and, close to menses, migrainous women could experience their worst migraine attacks. Vitex agnus-castus (VAC) is a phytopharmaceutical compound, considered worldwide to be a valid tool to treat PMS. Aim of this study is to explore if headache is ameliorate in migrainous women treated with VAC for PMS by an open-label clinical observation. Migrainous women with PMS were enrolled in the study and advised to assume a treatment with VAC (40 mg/day) for PMS for a 3-month period. Effects both on PMS and headache were assessed. Out of 107 women, 100 completed the 3-month treatment for PMS. Out of them, 66 women reported a dramatic reduction of PMS symptoms, 26 a mild reduction, and 8 no effect. Concerning migraine, 42 % of patients experienced a reduction higher than 50 % in frequency of monthly attacks, and 57 % of patients experienced a reduction higher than 50 % in monthly days with headache. No patients reported remarkable side effects. Pending a placebo-controlled trial to confirm our results, we observed that the use of VAC in migrainous women affected by PMS resulted to be safe and well tolerated, and may positively influence the frequency and duration of migraine attacks.

  13. Loss of sexual interest and premenstrual mood change in women with postpartum versus non-postpartum depression: A nationwide community sample of Korean adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiwon; Hong, Jin Pyo; Cho, Maeng Je; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David; Lee, Dong-Woo; Heo, Jung-Yoon; Jeon, Hong Jin

    2016-02-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a type of clinical depression that can affect women after childbirth. Few previous studies have explored the association of depressive and physical symptoms among women with PPD in a nationwide community study. A total of 18,807 adults, randomly selected, completed a face-to-face interview using the Korean version of Composite International Diagnostic Interview (K-CIDI) (response rate 80.2%). PPD was defined as a major depressive episode that began within 4 weeks after delivery. Of 679 female subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD), 14.0% (n=95) experienced PPD. Subjects with PPD were significantly more likely to have higher income, education, and reside in an urban area, compared to those with non-PPD. No significant differences were found in number of children. Multiple logistic regression revealed that the loss of sexual interest was the only symptom among 23 depressive symptoms that was significantly associated with depressive episodes among individuals with PPD (AOR=1.91, 95% CI 1.01-3.60) when compared with non-PPD. Loss of sexual interest was also significantly associated with the subjects with lifetime PPD regardless of depressive episode (AOR=1.93, 95% CI 1.12-3.31). Conversely, loss of confidence and loss of pleasure were less frequent in subjects with PPD. Premenstrual mood change (χ(2)=5.57, p=0.0036) and comorbid alcohol use disorder (χ(2)=5.11, p=0.031) showed a valid association with PPD. Loss of sexual interest and premenstrual mood change were associated with women with PPD, whereas those with non-PPD were not, thereby suggesting the possible link between sexual hormones and PPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Women Treated with Toremifene for Premenstrual Mastalgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oksa, S.; Parkkola, R.; Luukkaala, T.; Maeenpaeae, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Toremifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, has been shown to be effective in alleviating premenstrual breast pain. However, the exact mechanism by which toremifene and related compounds work in premenstrual mastalgia is poorly understood. Purpose: To find out if the effect of toremifene on breast would be detectable with dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: This randomized, double-blind crossover study was performed on women suffering from marked premenstrual mastalgia. Ten women were randomized to receive either toremifene (20 mg) or placebo from cycle day 15 until next menstruation for three menstrual cycles. After a washout period, the treatment was crossed over for three additional cycles. The MRI evaluations were performed premenstrually at the end of each treatment phase. Breast pain and quality-of-life scores were collected from one baseline cycle and from all the treatment cycles. Results: Nine patients were evaluable for this analysis. Both the enhancement ratio and the maximum slope of enhancement tended to be smaller during the toremifene cycles as compared to placebo. On the left side, the difference in the maximum slope of enhancement between toremifene and placebo was statistically significant (median 5.150 [range 3.7-6.7] and 6.500 [range 4.9-9.5], respectively; P=0.047). T2 relaxation times as well as breast pain and quality-of-life scores were inconsistent. Conclusion: Use of toremifene is associated with measurable changes in dynamic breast MRI findings in women with cyclic breast pain

  15. Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Women Treated with Toremifene for Premenstrual Mastalgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksa, S. (Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Satakunta Central Hospital, Pori (Finland)); Parkkola, R. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Turku, Turku (Finland)); Luukkaala, T.; Maeenpaeae, J. (Medical School, Univ. of Tampere, Tampere (Finland))

    2009-11-15

    Background: Toremifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, has been shown to be effective in alleviating premenstrual breast pain. However, the exact mechanism by which toremifene and related compounds work in premenstrual mastalgia is poorly understood. Purpose: To find out if the effect of toremifene on breast would be detectable with dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: This randomized, double-blind crossover study was performed on women suffering from marked premenstrual mastalgia. Ten women were randomized to receive either toremifene (20 mg) or placebo from cycle day 15 until next menstruation for three menstrual cycles. After a washout period, the treatment was crossed over for three additional cycles. The MRI evaluations were performed premenstrually at the end of each treatment phase. Breast pain and quality-of-life scores were collected from one baseline cycle and from all the treatment cycles. Results: Nine patients were evaluable for this analysis. Both the enhancement ratio and the maximum slope of enhancement tended to be smaller during the toremifene cycles as compared to placebo. On the left side, the difference in the maximum slope of enhancement between toremifene and placebo was statistically significant (median 5.150 [range 3.7-6.7] and 6.500 [range 4.9-9.5], respectively; P=0.047). T2 relaxation times as well as breast pain and quality-of-life scores were inconsistent. Conclusion: Use of toremifene is associated with measurable changes in dynamic breast MRI findings in women with cyclic breast pain

  16. Vitamin B6 in the treatment of the premenstrual syndrome--a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, J.; ter Riet, G.; Knipschild, P.

    1990-01-01

    A search of the literature yielded 12 controlled trials on vitamin B6 in the treatment of the premenstrual syndrome. These are discussed with emphasis on methodological aspects. A major drawback of the trials is the limited number of patients included. The existing evidence of positive effects of

  17. Predicting Diagnosed Depression and Anti-depressant Treatment in Institutionalized Older Adults by Symptom Profiles: A Closer Look at Anhedonia and Dysphoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stones, Michael J.; Clyburn, Leah D.; Gibson, Margaret C.; Woodbury, M. Gail

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships of diagnosis and treatment of depression with anhedonic and dysphoric symptom presentation, using the Minimum Data Set 2.0. Participants were from two sectors of longterm care: 70 nursing home residents and 92 residents in a Veterans' Care Service. The samples differed in their sex…

  18. A comparative study of the effects of Vitex agnus castus upon premenstrual syndrome in a mother tincture preparation and in a 3X homoeopathic preparation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Tech. (Homeopathy) The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a mother tincture preparation of Vitex agnus-castus and a hornoeopathic 3x preparation of Vitex agnus-castus in the treatment of premenstrual syndrome. A sample of 15 subjects suffering from premenstrual syndrome was selected. The subjects were selected according to the diagnostic criteria of premenstrual syndrome and certain other criteria requtred for the study. The subjects were given questionnaires to co...

  19. Pituitary-adrenal hormones and testosterone across the menstrual cycle in women with premenstrual syndrome and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, M; Schmidt, P J; Su, T P; Tobin, M B; Rubinow, D R

    1998-06-15

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a cyclic mood disorder, widely believed, yet not conclusively shown, to be of endocrine etiology. This study examines basal levels of several hormones reported, albeit inconsistently, to differ in women with PMS compared with controls. Subjects (10 PMS patients and 10 controls) had their blood drawn for one full menstrual cycle. Subjects' mood and behavioral symptoms were assessed by daily self-ratings and objective ratings. Plasma was assayed for total and free testosterone (T), beta-endorphin (beta-EP), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and cortisol. No differences were observed between the PMS and control groups for beta-EP, ACTH, or cortisol. PMS subjects had significantly lower total and free T plasma levels with a blunting of the normal periovulatory peak, a finding that may be epiphenomenal to age. This study does not confirm previous reports of abnormalities in plasma levels of either ACTH or beta-EP in women with PMS; it also fails to replicate a previous observation of high free T levels in women with PMS. These results are not supportive of a primary endocrine abnormality in PMS patients.

  20. Efficacy of Vitex agnus castus L. extract Ze 440 in patients with pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, D; Schaffner, W; Schrader, E; Meier, B; Brattström, A

    2000-11-01

    In a prospective, multicentre trial the efficacy of an Vitex agnus castus L extract Ze 440 was investigated in 50 patients with pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS). The patients were treated daily with one tablet (20 mg native extract) during three menstrual cycles. 43 patients completed the study protocol which encompassed 8 menstrual cycles (2 baseline, 3 treatment and 3 post-treatment). 13/43 patients were receiving concomitant oral contraceptives. 6 patients did not complete the study for reasons not related to study medication, and one patient complained of fatigue possibly related to study medication. All evaluated patients took at least 85% of the prescribed medication. The main effect parameter was the validated Moos' menstrual distress questionnaire (MMDQ), and secondary parameters were a visual analogue scale (VAS; self-assessment) and a global impression scale (GI, self-assessment). The study population was homogenous in age (31.3+/-7.7 years) weight (58.9+/-6.9 kg) and cycle length (28.4+/-0.3 d). The diagnosis was according to DMS-III. At the end of the study, PMS-related symptoms were reduced by treatment. There was a significant score reduction (42.5%) of the MMDQ as the main effect parameter (pVitex agnus-castus extract Ze 440, as indicated by clear improvement in the main effect parameter during treatment and the gradual return after cessation of treatment. The main response to treatment seems related to symptomatic relief rather than to the duration of the syndrome.

  1. Prevalência de síndrome pré-menstrual em atletas Prevalence of premenstrual syndrome in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Aparecida Gaion

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome pré-menstrual (SPM é um conjunto de sintomas emocionais e físicos que afeta negativamente as atividades diárias das mulheres durante o período pré-menstrual. Embora seja um tema bastante estudado na população em geral, existe uma lacuna na literatura a respeito da presença de SPM em atletas. Dessa forma, o objetivo do estudo foi analisar a prevalência de SPM em atletas. Foi desenvolvido um estudo do tipo inquérito, com 57 atletas, com idade entre 18 e 47 anos, de 11 modalidades esportivas. Para identificar a presença de SPM, utilizou-se uma ficha autoaplicável baseada nos critérios do American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG, 2000; a confirmação diagnóstica foi feita através do preenchimento de um diário de sintomas durante dois ciclos menstruais consecutivos (baseado no ACOG, 2000. Para análise dos dados utilizou-se teste de Shapiro-Wilk e teste exato de Fisher, adotando P The premenstrual syndrome (PMS is a set of emotional and physical symptoms that adversely affects the daily activities of women during the pre-menstrual period. Despite being a theme quite discussed in the general population, there is still a gap in the literature concerning the presence of PMS in athletes. Thus, the objective of the study was to analyze the prevalence of PMS in athletes. An inquiry study with 57 athletes age range of 18 and 47 years from 11 sport modalities was developed. A self-applicable sheet based on the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists criteria (ACOG, 2000 was used to identify the presence of PMS ; the diagnostic confirmation was performed through the answer of a symptoms diary during two consecutive menstrual cycles (based on ACOG, 2000. Shapiro Wilks test and Fisher's exact test, adopting a P<0.05 were used for the data analysis. The prevalence of PMS retrospectively estimated was of 68% while the estimated prevalence through the follow-up with the diaries was of 48%. Breast soreness

  2. Behavioral and emotional problems on the Teacher's Report Form: a cross-national, cross-clinic comparative analysis of gender dysphoric children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensma, Thomas D; Zucker, Kenneth J; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Vanderlaan, Doug P; Wood, Hayley; Fuentes, Amanda; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T

    2014-05-01

    For gender dysphoric children and adolescents, the school environment may be challenging due to peer social ostracism and rejection. To date, information on the psychological functioning and the quality of peer relations in gender dysphoric children and adolescents has been studied via parental report, peer sociometric methods, and social interactions in laboratory play groups. The present study was the first cross-national investigation that assessed behavior and emotional problems and the quality of peer relations, both measured by the Teacher's Report Form (TRF), in a sample of 728 gender dysphoric patients (554 children, 174 adolescents), who were referred to specialized gender identity clinics in the Netherlands and Canada. The gender dysphoric adolescents had significantly more teacher-reported emotional and behavioral problems than the gender dysphoric children. In both countries, gender dysphoric natal boys had poorer peer relations and more internalizing than externalizing problems compared to the gender dysphoric natal girls. Furthermore, there were significant between-clinic differences: both the children and the adolescents from Canada had more emotional and behavioral problems and a poorer quality of peer relations than the children and adolescents from the Netherlands. In conclusion, gender dysphoric children and adolescents showed the same pattern of emotional and behavioral problems in both countries. The extent of behavior and emotional problems was, however, higher in Canada than in the Netherlands, which appeared, in part, an effect of a poorer quality of peer relations. Per Bronfenbrenner's (American Psychologist, 32, 513-531, 1977) ecological model of human development and well-being, we consider various interpretations of the cross-national, cross-clinic differences on TRF behavior problems at the level of the family, the peer group, and the culture at large.

  3. Assessing the specificity of posttraumatic stress disorder's dysphoric items within the dysphoria model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Shevlin, Mark

    2013-10-01

    The factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) currently used by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), has received limited support. A four-factor dysphoria model is widely supported. However, the dysphoria factor of this model has been hailed as a nonspecific factor of PTSD. The present study investigated the specificity of the dysphoria factor within the dysphoria model by conducting a confirmatory factor analysis while statistically controlling for the variance attributable to depression. The sample consisted of 429 individuals who met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD in the National Comorbidity Survey. The results concluded that there was no significant attenuation in any of the PTSD items. This finding is pertinent given several proposals for the removal of dysphoric items from the diagnostic criteria set of PTSD in the upcoming DSM-5.

  4. Systematic Review of Premenstrual, Postmenstrual and Infertility Disorders of Vitex Agnus Castus

    OpenAIRE

    Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Movahedi, Mino

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Vitex agnus-castus, also called vitex is aboriginal to the Mediterranean region, with long leaves, tender stem, flowers and ripening seeds. The aim of this study was to overview premenstrual, postmenstrual and infertility disorder of Vitex agnus-castus. Methods This review article was carried out by searching studies in PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, and IranMedex databases. The initial search strategy identified about 87 references. In this study, 43 studies were accepted for ...

  5. Ansiedad y diagnóstico del síndrome premenstrual (SPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARMEN BORRÁS SANSALONI

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available La falta de una definición clara y unánime del trastorno constituye uno de los principales problemas metodológicos en la evaluación del síndro m e premenstrual (SPM, dificultando enormemente la diferenciación entre los denominados cambios premenstruales negativos (CPM- y el verdadero síndrome premenstrual (SPM. Algunos autores, con el objeto de solucionar este problema, han propuesto una serie de criterios para el correcto diagnóstico del SPM, criterios que hacen referencia a síntomas tanto emocionales como comportamentales relacionados con la fase premenstrual del ciclo ovárico y cuya severidad interfiere significativamente en la vida cotidiana de las mujeres que los padecen No obstante, por una parte, algunos autores han señalado que dichos criterios diagnósticos se refieren a una manifestación ideal del trastorno y, por otra, numerosos estudios han demostrado que el patrón general de ansiedad constituye uno de los principales factores implicados en el padecimiento del SPM. En el presente trabajo, realizado con una muestra de 133 mujeres se analiza la posible relación entre el patrón general de ansiedad así como de las respuestas emocionales manifestadas en las diferentes fases del ciclo menstrual y los criterios diagnósticos del SPM.

  6. Efficacy and safety of Vitex agnus-castus extract for treatment of premenstrual syndrome in Japanese patients: a prospective, open-label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoeda, Mikio; Sasaki, Hidetaka; Tagashira, Eiko; Ogishima, Masayuki; Takano, Yuichi; Ochiai, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    Herbal medicine containing Vitex agnus-castus (VAC) extract is widely used by women with premenstrual syndrome (PMS) in Europe, however, in Japan, clinical evidence remains to be determined. This study attempted to investigate the efficacy and safety profiles of VAC extract in Japanese patients with PMS. A multi-center, prospective, open-label, single-arm, phase 3 study was performed in Japanese women with PMS and aged 18-44 years. The patients received Prefemin® (Max Zeller Söhne AG, Romanshorn, Switzerland), containing 20 mg of VAC extract, once daily for three menstrual cycles. The efficacy profile was examined based on the intensity of ten PMS symptoms-irritability, depressed mood, anger, headache, bloating, breast fullness, skin disorder, fatigue, drowsiness, and sleeplessness-recorded by patients via a visual analog scale (VAS). In addition, the responder rate was calculated based on the total VAS score defined by the sum of the VAS scores of the first six symptoms mentioned above. Furthermore, physician's global assessment (PGA) scores were recorded. Adverse events including vital signs and laboratory test values were monitored as safety evaluation. Sixty-nine patients received Prefemin®. After the first menstrual cycle, a statistically significant decrease in total VAS score was observed (P<0.001), and the score continued to diminish for the following two cycles. Each of the ten symptom scores decreased significantly in this manner. In addition, the responder rate increased in a time-dependent manner; the rate at the third menstrual cycle was 91.0%, and almost all of the patients were without symptoms or exhibited only mild symptoms based on PGA. Eight patients exhibited non-serious adverse events, one of which was allergic dermatitis whose causal relationship with VAC was not ruled out. VAC extract improved PMS symptoms in Japanese patients, with no substantial adverse events. This is the first study to report the effect of VAC extract in Japanese

  7. SUPLEMENTASI DAUN TORBANGUN (COLEUS AMBOINICUS LOUR UNTUK MENURUNKAN KELUHAN SINDROM PRAMENSTRUASI PADA REMAJA PUTRI (SUPPLEMENTATION OF TORBANGUN LEAVES [COLEUS AMBOINICUS LOUR] IN REDUCING THE COMPLAINST OF PRE-MENSTRUAL SYNDROME [PMS] AMONG TEENAGE G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazarina Devi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Torbangun leaves (Coleus ambonicus Lour is one of type of species from Labiatae family which contains a lot of micronutrient and active element which have been examined as beneficial for human health and quality of life. The plants containing iridoid and flavonoid as well as phytochemical which deal with reproduction hormone is applicable to traditional medication toward PMS cases. Methods: The present study was aimed to assess the efficacy of CAL leaves in the management of PMS. An experimental clinical trial was conducted in 35 teenagers with PMS. Three intervention groups were defined: CAL leaves; commercial preparation; and placebo. Participants were followed-up individually for 1 month. Result: The results showed average menarche occurred around age 13 years, with menstruation lasting 5 days. During each successive treatment cycle, participants experienced a lower pain intensity score. Chi Square test, after adjusting each cycle for baseline pain, treatment compliance and other variables, showed that the group receiving CAL extract had significantly reduced pain intensity (p<0.05 compared with commercial preparation and placebo. Conclusion: The torbangun leaves supplement can be used as treatment to relief symptoms of the premenstrual syndrome. [Penel Gizi Makan 2010, 33(2:180-194]   Keywords: Torbangun leaves (Coleus amboinicus Lour, pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS, teenage girls

  8. Depressive symptoms and the risk of incident delirium in older hospitalized adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAvay, Gail J; Van Ness, Peter H; Bogardus, Sidney T; Zhang, Ying; Leslie, Douglas L; Leo-Summers, Linda S; Inouye, Sharon K

    2007-05-01

    To determine whether specific subsets of symptoms from the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), assessed at hospital admission, were associated with the incidence of delirium. Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study of patients from the Delirium Prevention Trial. General medicine service at Yale New Haven Hospital, March 25, 1995, through March 18, 1998. Four hundred sixteen patients aged 70 and older who were at intermediate or high risk for delirium and were not taking antidepressants at hospital admission. Depressive symptoms were assessed GDS, and daily assessments of delirium were obtained using the Confusion Assessment Method. Of the 416 patients in the analysis sample, 36 (8.6%) developed delirium within the first 5 days of hospitalization. Patients who developed delirium reported 5.7 depressive symptoms on average, whereas patients without delirium reported an average of 4.2 symptoms. Using a Cox proportional hazards model, it was found that depressive symptoms assessing dysphoric mood and hopelessness were predictive of incident delirium, controlling for measures of physical and mental health. In contrast, symptoms of withdrawal, apathy, and vigor were not significantly associated with delirium. These findings suggest that assessing symptoms of dysphoric mood and hopelessness could help identify patients at risk for incident delirium. Future studies should evaluate whether nonpharmacological treatment for these symptoms reduces the risk of delirium.

  9. Dysphoric mood states are related to sensitivity to temporal changes in contingency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. eMsetfi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A controversial finding in the field of causal learning is that mood contributes to the accuracy of perceptions of uncorrelated relationships. When asked to report the degree of control between an action and its outcome, people with dysphoria or depression are claimed to be more realistic in reporting non-contingency (e.g., Alloy & Abramson, 1979. The strongest evidence for this depressive realism (DR effect is derived from data collected with experimental procedures in which the dependent variables are verbal or written ratings of contingency or cause, and, perhaps more importantly, the independent variable in these procedures may be ambiguous and difficult to define. In order to address these possible confounds, we used a two-response free-operant causal learning task in which the dependent measures were performance based. Participants were required to respond to maximise the occurrence of a temporally contiguous outcome that was programmed with different probabilities, which also varied temporally across two responses. Dysphoric participants were more sensitive to the changing outcome contingencies than controls even though they responded at a similar rate. During probe trials, in which the outcome was masked, their performance recovered more quickly than that of the control group. These data provide unexpected support for the depressive realism hypothesis suggesting that dysphoria is associated with heightened sensitivity to temporal shifts in contingency.

  10. Dysphoric Mood States are Related to Sensitivity to Temporal Changes in Contingency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msetfi, Rachel M; Murphy, Robin A; Kornbrot, Diana E

    2012-01-01

    A controversial finding in the field of causal learning is that mood contributes to the accuracy of perceptions of uncorrelated relationships. When asked to report the degree of control between an action and its outcome, people with dysphoria or depression are claimed to be more realistic in reporting non-contingency (e.g., Alloy and Abramson, 1979). The strongest evidence for this depressive realism (DR) effect is derived from data collected with experimental procedures in which the dependent variables are verbal or written ratings of contingency or cause, and, perhaps more importantly, the independent variable in these procedures may be ambiguous and difficult to define. In order to address these possible confounds, we used a two-response free-operant causal learning task in which the dependent measures were performance based. Participants were required to respond to maximize the occurrence of a temporally contiguous outcome that was programmed with different probabilities, which also varied temporally across two responses. Dysphoric participants were more sensitive to the changing outcome contingencies than controls even though they responded at a similar rate. During probe trials, in which the outcome was masked, their performance recovered more quickly than that of the control group. These data provide unexpected support for the DR hypothesis suggesting that dysphoria is associated with heightened sensitivity to temporal shifts in contingency.

  11. [Trauma & the reproductive lifecycle in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Leslie; Phillips, Shauna Dae; Steiner, Meir; Soares, Claudio N

    2005-10-01

    Women are at significantly higher risk for developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than men, resulting in increased psychosocial burden and healthcare related costs. Recent research has shown complex interactions between the impact of traumatic experiences, and the reproductive lifecycle in women. For example, women suffering from premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) who also report a history of sexual or physical abuse are more likely to present with different neuroendocrine reactivity to stressors, when compared to premenstrual dysphoric disorder subjects without prior history of trauma or abuse or non-premenstrual dysphoric disorder subjects. In addition, women with a history of abuse or trauma may experience re-emergence of symptoms during pregnancy. Lastly, females who experience miscarriage may present with even higher prevalence rates of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. In this manuscript we examine the existing data on gender differences in post-traumatic stress disorder, with particular focus on psychological and physiological factors that might be relevant to the development of symptoms after exposure to traumatic events associated with the reproductive life cycle. Current options available for the treatment of such symptoms, including group and counselling therapies and debriefing are critically reviewed.

  12. Premenstrual syndrome and life quality in Turkish health science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İşik, Hatice; Ergöl, Şule; Aynioğlu, Öner; Şahbaz, Ahmet; Kuzu, Ayşe; Uzun, Müge

    2016-04-19

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the incidence of PMS, risk factors affecting PMS symptoms, and life quality in health science students. A total of 608 volunteer female students studying at the health campus of a state university in Turkey were included in the study. The participants were asked to fill out questionnaires on sociodemographic data, PMS symptoms, and SF-36 life quality tests. The overall frequency of PMS among participants was 84.5%. The average PMS and general health SF scores were 118.34 ± 37.3 and 20.03 ± 3.72, respectively. Students who had irregular breakfast, drank ≥2 cups of coffee/day, and consumed alcohol or fast food had higher PMS scores. Irregular menstruation and family history increased PMS scores and decreased life quality (P life quality of the students significantly decreased as the severity of PMS increased (P life quality, students should be informed about the symptoms, risk factors, and management options of PMS.

  13. RELACIÓN ENTRE RENDIMIENTO LABORAL Y SÍNDROME PREMENSTRUAL

    OpenAIRE

    Espina V.,Natalia; Fuenzalida A.,Alejandra; Urrutia S.,María Teresa

    2005-01-01

    El Síndrome Premenstrual (SPM) afecta a gran cantidad de mujeres en edad reproductiva y se caracteriza por una repetición cíclica de síntomas físicos y psicológicos que, en algunos casos, pueden llegar a ser lo suficientemente severos como para interferir en los patrones de vida. El objetivo de esta revisión bibliográfica es conocer cómo afecta el SPM el rendimiento laboral de las mujeres. A pesar de las significativas repercusiones personales y económicas, existen pocas investigaciones que e...

  14. Depressive symptoms and bias in perceived social competence among young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Sarah W; Larson, Justine J; Hauser, Stuart T

    2008-07-01

    We examined associations between depressive symptoms and young adults' self-perceptions of social competence to explore whether higher symptoms are associated with self-evaluations that are more accurate (i.e., depressive realism), negatively biased (i.e., cognitive distortion), or less accurate (i.e., self-verification perspective). In 133 young adults, depressive symptoms and discrepancies between self- and peer ratings of social competence were assessed. Results demonstrated a linear relationship between depressive symptoms and self-peer discrepancies, such that higher symptoms were associated with underestimation of the self and low symptom levels were linked with overestimation of the self relative to peer evaluations. These findings suggest negative bias in dysphorics' self-perceptions, supporting cognitive distortion models, as well as positive bias in self-perceptions of those with low depressive symptoms. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A dysphoric's TALE: The relationship between the self-reported functions of autobiographical memory and symptoms of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Lydia; Dewhurst, Stephen A; Anderson, Rachel J

    2016-10-01

    Autobiographical memory (AM) is believed to serve self, social and directive functions; however, little is known regarding how this triad of functions operates in depression. Using the Thinking About Life Experiences questionnaire [Bluck, S., & Alea, N. (2011). Crafting the TALE: Construction of a measure to assess the functions of autobiographical remembering. Memory, 19, 470-486.; Bluck, S., Alea, N., Habermas, T., & Rubin, D. C. (2005). A TALE of three functions: The self-reported uses of autobiographical memory. Social Cognition, 23, 91-117.], two studies explored the relationship between depressive symptomology and the self-reported frequency and usefulness of AMs for self, social and directive purposes. Study 1 revealed that thinking more frequently but talking less frequently about past life events was significantly associated with higher depression scores. Recalling past events more frequently to maintain self-continuity was also significantly associated with higher depressive symptomology. However, results from Study 2 indicated that higher levels of depression were also significantly associated with less-frequent useful recollections of past life events for self-continuity purposes. Taken together, the findings suggest atypical utilisations of AM to serve self-continuity functions in depression and can be interpreted within the wider context of ruminative thought processes.

  16. Assessing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder's Latent Structure in Elderly Bereaved European Trauma Victims: Evidence for a Five Factor Dysphoric and Anxious Arousal Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armour, Cherie; O'Connor, Maja; Elklit, Ask

    2013-01-01

    to provide superior fit over the existing four-factor models. The present study investigated the fit of the five-factor model against the existing four-factor models and assessed the resultant factors association with depression in a bereaved European trauma sample (N=325). Participants were assessed...... for PTSD via the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and depression via the Beck Depression Inventory. The five-factor model provided superior fit to the data compared to the existing four-factor models. In the Dysphoric Arousal model depression was equally related to both Dysphoric Arousal and Emotional Numbing...

  17. Diagnostic depressive symptoms of the mixed bipolar episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, F; Ahearn, E; Murry, E; Forest, K; Carroll, B J

    2000-03-01

    There is not yet consensus on the best diagnostic definition of mixed bipolar episodes. Many have suggested the DSM-III-R/-IV definition is too rigid. We propose alternative criteria using data from a large patient cohort. We evaluated 237 manic in-patients using DSM-III-R criteria and the Scale for Manic States (SMS). A bimodally distributed factor of dysphoric mood has been reported from the SMS data. We used both the factor and the DSM-III-R classifications to identify candidate depressive symptoms and then developed three candidate depressive symptom sets. Using ROC analysis we determined the optimal threshold number of symptoms in each set and compared the three ROC solutions. The optimal solution was tested against the DSM-III-R classification for crossvalidation. The optimal ROC solution was a set, derived from both the DSM-III-R and the SMS, and the optimal threshold for diagnosis was two or more symptoms. Applying this set iteratively to the DSM-III-R classification produced the identical ROC solution. The prevalence of mixed episodes in the cohort was 13.9% by DSM-III-R, 20.2% by the dysphoria factor and 27.4% by the new ROC solution. A diagnostic set of six dysphoric symptoms (depressed mood, anhedonia, guilt, suicide, fatigue and anxiety), with a threshold of two symptoms, is proposed for a mixed episode. This new definition has a foundation in clinical data, in the proved diagnostic performance of the qualifying symptoms, and in ROC validation against two previous definitions that each have face validity.

  18. 'Get with the Program!': pharmaceutical marketing, symptom checklists and self-diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebeling, Mary

    2011-09-01

    During more than a decade of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTC) of pharmaceuticals in the United States, several highly controversial and contested disease states have been promoted to affect diagnostic and prescribing outcomes that are favorable to a company's branded drug. Influencing medical diagnosis is essential to the branding of a disease, which helps to protect pharmaceutical intellectual property and assures higher profits for drug companies. Enormous marketing as well as medical resources are deployed to ensure that new diagnoses of disease states are recognized. While much work has been done investigating the marketing processes necessary to shape and define diagnoses for many of these new disease states, such as Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD), the promotion of self-diagnosis within pharmaceutical marketing campaigns garner little sociological attention. This article reviews and analyzes branded disease awareness campaigns sponsored by pharmaceutical companies that employ self-diagnostic "tools". By using the example of one specific disease state, PMDD, I illustrate how the marketing of self-diagnosis transforms the patient into a consumer in order to achieve the aims of a drug company. This example is contextualized within the larger theoretical framework on the sociology of diagnosis. Consideration is given to how the marketing of self-diagnosis goes beyond Jutel's (2009) description of diagnosis as being the "classification tool of medicine" and becomes a marketing tool to construct a well-educated consumer who will demand medical diagnoses inline with a drug company's objectives. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. FORMULASI MINUMAN SUPLEMEN DAUN TORBANGUN (Coleus amboinicus Lour. UNTUK WANITA YANG MENDERITA PMS (PREMENSTRUAL SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramadya Alfitra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Torbangun (Coleus amboinicus Lour is one of Labiatae family containing a lot of micronutrients and active components. The plant is used as traditional medicine for relieving premenstrual syndromes (PMS. Based on the results of previous studies, a capsule containing 750 mg of dried Torbangun leaves can relieve PMS as well as commercial herbal, and better than placebo. Capsule supplement form seems less acceptable because it tastes like taking a drug. Therefore, it requires development for Torbangun supplement product in other forms, and one of them is a supplement drink. The study is aimed to formulate  a supplement drink from Torbangun leaves as the basic ingredients. Supplement drink formulation is made in trial and error by combining extract of torbangun leaves, sucrose, and lemon, obtaining three formulas: DT1 contains 10 g extract of torbangun leaves and 16 g sucrose, DT2 contains 10 g extract of torbangun leaves, 2 g lemon, 22 g sucrose, and DT3 contains 10 g extract of torbangun leaves, 4 g lemon, and 28 g sucrose. These formulas are then tested by organoleptic, physical, and chemical. The results show that the formula DT3 has the highest average score. Blanching treatment improves organoleptic properties of supplement drinks. Mean scores in color, aroma, and taste of the blanched supplement drink are different (p Key words: Torbangun leaves, premenstrual syndrome, supplement drink, blanching.

  20. Relations between anger and DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Tory A; Byllesby, Brianna M; Armour, Cherie; Forbes, David; Elhai, Jon D

    2016-10-30

    The present study investigated the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anger. Anger co-occurring with PTSD is found to have a severe effect across a wide range of traumatic experiences, making this an important relationship to examine. The present study utilized data regarding dimensions of PTSD symptoms and anger collected from a non-clinical sample of 247 trauma-exposed participants. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to determine the underlying factor structure of both PTSD and anger by examining anger in the context of three models of PTSD. Results indicate that a five-factor representation of PTSD and one-factor representation of anger fit the data best. Additionally, anger demonstrated a strong relationship with the dysphoric arousal and negative alterations in cognitions and mood (NACM) factors; and dysphoric arousal was differentially related to anger. Clinical implications include potential need to reevaluate PTSD's diagnostic symptom structure and highlight the potential need to target and treat comorbid anger in individuals with PTSD. In regard to research, these results support the heterogeneity of PTSD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessing the fit of the Dysphoric Arousal model across two nationally representative epidemiological surveys: The Australian NSMHWB and the United States NESARC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armour, C.; Carragher, N.; Elhai, J. D.

    2013-01-01

    samples. Results revealed that the Dysphoric Arousal model provided superior fit to the data compared to the alternative models. In conclusion, these findings suggest that items D1-D3 (sleeping difficulties; irritability; concentration difficulties) represent a separate, fifth factor within PTSD's latent...

  2. Premenstrual Exacerbation of Life-Threatening Asthma: Effect of Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone Analogue Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alun L Edwards

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Variability in the severity of asthma during various phases of the menstrual cycle has been frequently suspected. However, the hormonal changes that might affect mediators of bronchospasm have yet to be elucidated. The case of a 41-year-old woman suffering from longstanding asthma with life-threatening exacerbations is reported. The patient was treated with buserelin, a gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH analogue, which created a temporary chemical menopause and thus permitted diagnosis of a premenstrual exacerbation of asthma and offered insight into potential therapy. GnRH analogues may therefore be of value in assessing women with severe asthma suspected to vary with the menstrual cycle. The addition of estrogens and progestins at the same time as treatment with GnRH analogue may be of value in determining the role of these hormones in the pathogenesis of menstrually related exacerbations of asthma.

  3. Dimensional structure of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress symptoms: support for a hybrid Anhedonia and Externalizing Behaviors model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Tsai, Jack; Durham, Tory A; Charak, Ruby; Biehn, Tracey L; Elhai, Jon D; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    Several revisions to the symptom clusters of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been made in the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). Central to the focus of this study was the revision of PTSD's tripartite structure in DSM-IV into four symptom clusters in DSM-5. Emerging confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) studies have suggested that DSM-5 PTSD symptoms may be best represented by one of two 6-factor models: (1) an Externalizing Behaviors model characterized by a factor which combines the irritability/anger and self-destructive/reckless behavior items; and (2) an Anhedonia model characterized by items of loss of interest, detachment, and restricted affect. The current study conducted CFAs of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms assessed using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5) in two independent and diverse trauma-exposed samples of a nationally representative sample of 1484 U.S. veterans and a sample of 497 Midwestern U.S. university undergraduate students. Relative fits of the DSM-5 model, the DSM-5 Dysphoria model, the DSM-5 Dysphoric Arousal model, the two 6-factor models, and a newly proposed 7-factor Hybrid model, which consolidates the two 6-factor models, were evaluated. Results revealed that, in both samples, both 6-factor models provided significantly better fit than the 4-factor DSM-5 model, the DSM-5 Dysphoria model and the DSM-5 Dysphoric Arousal model. Further, the 7-factor Hybrid model, which incorporates key features of both 6-factor models and is comprised of re-experiencing, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behaviors, and anxious and dysphoric arousal symptom clusters, provided superior fit to the data in both samples. Results are discussed in light of theoretical and empirical support for the latent structure of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sexual desire changes during menstrual cycle and relationship with premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiani Asiabar A.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sexual function in women may be affected by their menstrual cycle. Lack of sexual drive is a deficiency or absence of sexual fantasies and desire for sexual activity. This study aims at determining the changes in sexual desire during the menstrual cycle and those associated with premenstrual syndrome (PMS and evaluates sexual desire during the menstrual cycle and the associated changes with PMS. Methods: The sample for this cross-sectional study includes 150 women employed in factories in Tehran. The instruments for data collection were questionnaires and journals of premenstrual experiences.Results: Analysis of the data showed that the mean age of the subjects was 31 years standard deviation = 8.46(. The most frequent decrease in sexual desire was during the week prior to the start of menstrual bleeding (27.3% and the least frequent was from the end of bleeding to one week before the next period of menstrual bleeding (5.3%. In 24.7% of the cases, an increase in sexual desire occurred during the middle of the menstrual cycle and 27.3% during the course of menstrual bleeding. Moreover, 10.7% of the subjects had an increase in sexual desire during the week before bleeding. Furthermore, a positive correlation was found between changes in sexual desire and PMS (p<0.001. In addition, a positive correlation was found between changes in sexual desire and breast tenderness, joint and muscle pain. Conclusions: The sexual desire of women, with or without PMS, changes during the menstrual cycle. The greatest decrease in sexual desire occurs during the first week before menstrual bleeding in women with PMS. Such information can greatly help toward understanding and treatment in sexual therapy for couples.

  5. Construct validation of the hybrid model of posttraumatic stress disorder: Distinctiveness of the new symptom clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Madison W; Dieujuste, Nathalie; Kramer, Lindsay B; Lee, Daniel J; Weathers, Frank W

    2018-03-01

    Despite the factor analytic support for the seven-factor hybrid model (Armour et al., 2015) of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), little research has examined the degree to which newly established symptom clusters (i.e., negative affect, anhedonia, dysphoric arousal, anxious arousal, externalizing behavior) functionally and meaningfully differ in their associations with other clinical phenomena. The aim of the current study was to examine the degree to which newly established PTSD symptom clusters differentially relate to co-occurring psychopathology and related clinical phenomena through Wald testing using latent variable modeling. Participants were 535 trauma-exposed undergraduates who completed the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5; Weathers et al., 2013) and Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991). As expected and in line with results from previous studies, significant heterogeneity emerged for dysphoric arousal, anxious arousal, and externalizing behavior. However, there was less evidence for the distinctiveness of negative affect and anhedonia. Results indicate that only some of the newly established symptom clusters significantly differ in their associations with related clinical phenomena and that the hybrid model might not provide a meaningful framework for understanding which PTSD symptoms relate to associated features. Limitations include a non-clinical sample and reliance on retrospective self-report assessment measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of an Educational Intervention Based on Construal Level Theory on Decision Making in Adolescents with Premenstrual Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazllollah Ghofranipour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this study, the existing challenge about the association of construal level and temporal distance was examined. Doing so, the effect of two types of educational intervention on progress of decision making stages in students with premenstrual syndrome (PMS was studied, based on theoretical concepts of construal level. Materials and Methods: The present study is a randomized field trial research conducted on 1578 high school students. A total of 255 students in the second stage of the precaution adoption process model were chosen randomly. They then went through educational intervention based on either low or high construal levels of relaxation method. Results: Subjects in the intervention group showed a higher decision-making stage progression than in control group (p<0.001. The two-stage progression was significantly salient in low construal level-based intervention group (p=0.012. None of the demographic, premenstrual, and premenstrual syndrome severity characteristics were related to this progression. Conclusion: Inducing low construal level causes an individual shift toward desired action more rapidly. That is, there is a correlation between construal level and temporal distance. To accelerate the adoption of any health behavior, temporal distance can be taken as a basic and essential topic.

  7. Distinctions of bipolar disorder symptoms in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiene, Devika; Leskauskas, Darius; Markeviciūte, Aurelija; Klimavicius, Dalius; Adomaitiene, Virginija

    2008-01-01

    Bipolar disorder in adolescents is a serious mental illness with problematic diagnosis that adversely affects social, academic, emotional, and family functioning. The objective of this study was to analyze features of premorbid and clinical symptoms, comorbidity, and course of bipolar disorder in adolescence. Data for analysis were collected from all case histories (N=6) of 14-18-year-old patients, hospitalized with diagnosis of bipolar disorder in the Unit of Children's and Adolescents' Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Hospital of Kaunas University of Medicine, during the period from 2000 to 2005. Analysis of bipolar disorder course showed that five patients previously had been diagnosed with an episode of depression. The most frequent symptoms typical to bipolar disorder were disobedience and impulsive behavior, rapid changes of mood. The most common premorbid features were frequent changes of mood, being active in communication, hyperactive behavior. Adolescence-onset bipolar disorder was frequently comorbid with emotionally instable personality disorder, borderline type. Findings of the study confirm the notion that oppositional or impulsive behavior, rapid changes of mood without any reason, dysphoric mood and euphoric mood episodes with increased energy were cardinal symptoms of bipolar disorder with mania in adolescents. Most frequent premorbid features of these patients were quite similar to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder making differential diagnosis problematic.

  8. Premenstrual syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enough to prevent you from functioning normally. The suicide rate in women with depression is much higher during the second half of the menstrual cycle. Mood disorders need to be diagnosed and treated. When to ...

  9. Glaucoma Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up You can help find a cure for glaucoma Give now Signs & Symptoms The most common types ... have completely different symptoms. Symptoms of Open-Angle Glaucoma Most people who develop open-angle glaucoma don’ ...

  10. Assessing posttraumatic stress disorder's latent structure in elderly bereaved European trauma survivors: evidence for a five-factor dysphoric and anxious arousal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; O'Connor, Maja; Elklit, Ask; Elhai, Jon D

    2013-10-01

    The three-factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) specified by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, is not supported in the empirical literature. Two alternative four-factor models have received a wealth of empirical support. However, a consensus regarding which is superior has not been reached. A recent five-factor model has been shown to provide superior fit over the existing four-factor models. The present study investigated the fit of the five-factor model against the existing four-factor models and assessed the resultant factors' association with depression in a bereaved European trauma sample (N = 325). The participants were assessed for PTSD via the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and depression via the Beck Depression Inventory. The five-factor model provided superior fit to the data compared with the existing four-factor models. In the dysphoric arousal model, depression was equally related to both dysphoric arousal and emotional numbing, whereas depression was more related to dysphoric arousal than to anxious arousal.

  11. The Effects of Melatonin on Menstrual Characteristics, Prolactin, and Premenstrual Syndrome-Like Symptoms during a Simulated Eastward Deployment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Comperatore, Carlos

    1997-01-01

    ... (desynchronization of physiological and behavioral rhythms) and assist in obtaining quality sleep. Desynchronosis often results from rapid shifts in work schedules from day to night, or from shifts in the light- dark cycle due to time zone crossing...

  12. The Effects of Melatonin on Menstrual Characteristics, Prolactin and Premenstrual Syndrome-Like Symptoms During a Simulated Eastward Deployment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kirby, Albert

    1998-01-01

    In a previous study, we investigated the effect of exogenous melatonin (10 mg) given at bedtime (2300) for 7 consecutive days during the late follicular and early luteal phase of the monthly cycle, on menstrual characteristics...

  13. Menstruation: symptoms, management and attitude of female nursing students in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moronkola, O A; Uzuegbu, V U

    2006-12-01

    This study surveyed 120 student nurses from two schools of nursing in Ibadan, Nigeria to assess the symptoms experienced during menstruation, attitude towards and management of menstruation. The student nurses overall mean age at menarche was 14 years, average duration of menstrual period was five days and mean of menstrual cycle was 28 days. Out of the 120 study participants, 93% were having menstruation regularly. More participants experienced symptoms during premenstrual periods than menstrual periods. Majority (70%) used sanitary pad to manage their menstruation, 93% had positive attitude towards menstruation while only 20% consulted medical doctors whenever they experienced menstrual symptoms. Paracetamol was the drug of choice for many of the participants whenever they experienced menstrual symptoms It was recommended that authorities in schools of nursing should not overlook reproductive health needs of students. Also teaching of reproductive health education early in primary and secondary schools should be encouraged.

  14. Essential fatty acids for premenstrual syndrome and their effect on prolactin and total cholesterol levels: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinho Neto João S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of polyunsaturated fatty acids for the treatment of the premenstrual syndrome (PMS using a graded symptom scale and to assess the effect of this treatment on basal plasma levels of prolactin and total cholesterol. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted with 120 women with PMS divided into three groups and treated with 1 or 2 grams of the medication or placebo. Symptoms were recorded over a 6-month period using the Prospective Record of the Impact and Severity of Menstruation (PRISM calendar. Total cholesterol and prolactin levels were measured. Analysis of variance (ANOVA, Pearson's chi-square test, Wilcoxon's nonparametric signed-rank test for paired samples and the Mann-Whitney nonparametric test for independent samples were used in the statistical analysis. Results There were no differences in age, marital status, schooling or ethnicity between the groups. In the group treated with 1 gram of the medication, a significant reduction was found when the median PRISM score recorded in the luteal phase at baseline (99 was compared with the median score recorded in the 3rd month (58 and in the 6th month of evaluation (35. In the 2-gram group, these differences were even more significant (baseline score: 98; 3rd month: 48; 6th month: 28. In the placebo group, there was a significant reduction at the 3rd but not at the 6th month (baseline: 96.5; 3rd month: 63.5; 6th month: 62. The difference between the phases of the menstrual cycle was greater in the 2-gram group compared to the group treated with 1 gram of the medication. There were no statistically significant differences in prolactin or total cholesterol levels between baseline values and those recorded after six months of treatment. Conclusion The difference between the groups using the medication and the placebo group with respect to the improvement in symptomatology appears to indicate the

  15. Mastalgia cíclica pré-menstrual: placebo versus outras drogas Pre-menstrual cyclic mastalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurival A. De Luca

    2006-08-01

    compound of retinol, pyridoxine chlorhydrate and tocopherol acetate. METHODS: The study is a prospective, controlled, triple blinded, randomized trial. From 259 patients, 81 were selected in order to follow rigid criteria of inclusion. They were divided into three groups of 27 patients, taking aspirin, vitamins or placebo respectively. The number of patients in each group was considered satisfactory for statistical analysis. Pain was scored as Grade 1 (without pain, Grade II (moderate pain and Grade III (severe pain. The Tukey test was applied for comparison of results (statistical significance 5%. RESULTS: Clinical parameters, age, weight, BMI, parity and lactation period were similar for each group. There was a decrease of pain intensity in all groups, that was even more pronounced for the placebo group. DISCUSSION: Emphasis was given to symptomatic treatment of cyclic premenstrual mastalgia with symptoms considered to be the expression of a physiological process that can be treated with simple drugs or placebo. Usual therapeutic approaches with several drugs are criticized, including results and contraindications. CONCLUSION: This study based upon acceptable trial methodology (randomized, triple blinded, placebo controlled, prospective did not show significant differences in the treatment of cyclic mastalgia.

  16. The structure of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in war veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecky, Brian; Meyer, Eric C; Kimbrel, Nathan A; Morissette, Sandra B

    2016-09-01

    The present research examined the underlying factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as conceptualized in the recently published fifth edition of the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5). Participants were 258 trauma-exposed Iraq/Afghanistan war veterans. A self-report measure of PTSD symptoms was administered to all participants and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to compare several different models of PTSD. CFA revealed that the best-fitting model was a six-factor model in which symptoms loaded onto the factors of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, dysphoric arousal, and anxious arousal. These findings have important implications for ongoing conceptualization of PTSD and suggest that additional modifications to the diagnostic criteria for PTSD may still be warranted to more accurately reflect the underlying structure of PTSD symptoms.

  17. Treatment of premenstrual tension syndrome with Vitex agnus castus controlled, double-blind study versus pyridoxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, C; Reuter, H D; Repges, R; Böhnert, K J; Schmidt, U

    1997-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the efficacy and tolerability of a new solid formulation (capsules) of Agnolyt®(*)) in a randomized, controlled trial versus pyridoxine in women with PMTS over a period of three treatment cycles (Vitex agnus castus (VAC): 1 capsule + 1 placebo capsule/day, n = 90; pyridoxine (B6): 2 capsules day, n = 85). The therapeutic response was assessed using the premenstrual tension syndrome scale (PMTS scale), the recording of six characteristic complaints of the syndrome, and the clinical global impression scale (CGI scale). Upon completion of the trial, efficacy of the treatment was assessed by the physician as well as by the patient. On the PMTS scale, treatment with VAC and B6 produced a reduction in score points from 15.2 to 5.1 (-47,4%) and from 11.9 to 5.1 (-48%)(*), respectively. In comparison with pyridoxine, VAC caused a considerably more marked alleviation of typical PMTS complaints, such as breast tenderness, edema, inner tension, headache, constipation, and depression. Analogous results were obtained with the CGI scale. In both treatment groups, efficacy was rated as at least adequate by more than 80% of the investigators; however, VAC treatment was rated as excellent by 24.5% and pyridoxine treatment by 12.1% of the investigators. According to the patients' assessment, 36.1% of the cases in the VAC group and 21.3% in the pyridoxine group were free from complaints. Adverse events (gastrointestinal and lower abdominal complaints, skin manifestations and transitory headache) occurred in 5 patients under B6 and in 12 patients under VAC. Serious adverse events were not observed. The results of the present study confirm the efficacy and safety of Agnolyt® capsules in the treatment of PMTS. Copyright © 1997 Gustav Fischer Verlag. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  18. Premenstrual syndrome and dysmenorrhea: urban-rural and multiethnic differences in perception, impacts, and treatment seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Li Ping

    2011-10-01

    Attitudes toward menarche and menstruation are largely influenced by sociological, cultural, and family environmental factors. Recognizing the influential effects that these factors might have on shaping adolescents' attitudes is crucial in designing a more effective means of transmitting health information. This study aimed to gather an in-depth understanding of perceptions, impacts, and treatment seeking on menstruation-related issues from an ethnically mixed group of rural and urban girls. In total, 27 focus group discussions (172 participants) were conducted between November 2008 and April 2009. Participants were adolescent girls aged 13-19 years, recruited from 7 public secondary schools in the Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur and 4 public secondary schools from the rural districts of Kelantan, in Malaysia. Many participants revealed that they were not given or had not received detailed information about the mechanism or physiology of menstruation prior to its onset. Thus, many described the onset of menarche as shocking, an event for which they were unprepared, and which has had a tremendous impact on their emotions. More positive acceptance of menarche was reported in the urban than with the rural groups. Despite the high prevalence of premenstrual syndrome and dysmenorrhea, participants across urban-rural and ethnic groups perceived the problems as completely normal, hence they relied on self-care methods and did not want to seek professional treatment. More rural girls compared to urban girls were embarrassed to talk to their mothers or consult their physicians regarding menstruation-related problems. Menstruation-related education would have a positive impact in improving adolescent girls' knowledge and in nurturing a positive attitude toward menstruation-related matters at home, at school, and in the community. Copyright © 2011 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Low Proportion of Dietary Plant Protein among Athletes with Premenstrual Syndrome-Related Performance Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Keiko; Takeda, Takashi

    2018-02-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is psychosomatic disorder that are limited to the late luteal phase in the menstrual cycle. PMS could impair athletic performance. To investigate associations between proportions of dietary plant and animal protein and PMS-related impairment of athletic performance, we surveyed 135 female athletes aged 18-23 years attending Kindai University. Participants belonged to authorized university clubs, all of which have high rankings in Japanese university sports. Participants completed self-administered questionnaires on diet history, demographics, and PMS-related impairment of athletic performance. Total protein, animal protein, and plant protein intake were examined, and the proportion of dietary plant protein was calculated for each participant. We divided athletes into two groups: those without PMS-related impairment of athletic performance (n = 117) and those with PMS-related performance impairment (n = 18). A t-test was used to compare mean values and multivariable adjusted mean values between groups; adjustment variables were energy intake, body mass index, and daily training duration. Total protein intake was not significantly different between the groups. However, athletes whose performance was affected by PMS reported higher intake of animal protein (mean 50.6 g) than athletes whose performance was unaffected by PMS (mean 34.9 g). Plant protein intake was lower among athletes with PMS-related impairment (mean 25.4 g) than among athletes without impairment (mean 26.9 g). The proportion of dietary plant protein was lower among athletes with PMS-related impairment (39.3%) than those without impairment (45.9%). A low proportion of dietary plant protein may cause PMS-related athletic impairment among athletes.

  20. Prevalence of premenstrual syndrome in Iran: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ranjbaran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS is a common disorder characterized by physical, mental and behavioral changes in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle in the reproductive age women. Objective: The present study aimed to determine the overall prevalence of PMS in Iran by a systematic review and meta-analysis study. Materials and Methods: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched international databases included ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed/Medline, Scopus, Google Scholar, and also local databases including Iranmedex, Scientific Information Database, and Magiran for articles in English and Persian language published up to September 2016. We carried out data analysis with Stata version 11. We examined heterogeneity in the results of studies through I2 statistics and Chi-square based Q test. Also, we investigated the effects of potential heterogeneity factors in the prevalence of PMS by meta-regression. Results: We studied a total of 9147 reproductive-age women from 24 articles which entered to meta-analysis. Based on the result of random effect model, we estimated the overall prevalence of PMS 70.8% [95% CI: 63.8-77.7]. The results of subgroup analysis revealed that prevalence of PMS was 80.4% (95% CI; 66.9-93.9 among high school students, 68.9% (95% CI; 59.2-78.6 among university students, and 54.9% (95% CI; 51.6-58.2 in general population. Univariate meta-regression model showed that prevalence of PMS was decreased by increasing the age of subjects but this was not statistically significant (p=0.155. Conclusion: Our finding showed that PMS was prevalent in Iranian reproductive age women especially among high school students. More epidemiological research for determining factors that affect PMS prevalence seems essential.

  1. Prevalence, impacts and medical managements of premenstrual syndrome among female students: cross-sectional study in College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, northern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolossa, Fikru Wakjira; Bekele, Mebratu Legesse

    2014-03-29

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is used to describe physical, cognitive, affective, and behavioral symptoms that occur cyclically during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and resolve quickly at or within a few days of the onset of menstruation. The primary aim of the study was to assess the prevalence, impacts and medical managements of PMS on female medical students of Mekelle University College of Health Sciences. A cross-sectional study was conducted among systematically selected female students of Mekelle University College of Health Sciences, Mekelle town, northern Ethiopia from March to April 2013. A structured and pretested self-administered questionnaire was employed for data collection. The collected data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL (SPSS version 16). The criteria proposed by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, text revision (DSM-IV TR) were used to diagnose PMS. From the total population size of 608; a sample size of 258 was drawn. Age of the study participants ranged from 18 to 25 years, with mean age of 20.86 ± 1.913 years. Among the participants, 144(83.2%) have had at least one PM symptoms with their menstrual period. The prevalence of PMS according to DSM-IV was 37.0%. About 49(28.3%) reported frequent class missing, 17(9.8%) exam missing, 14(8.1%) low grade scoring and 3(1.7%) of them reported withdrawal from their learning associated with their PMS. Only 83(48.0%) participants sought medical treatment for their PMS. The treatment modalities used were pain killers, 63(36.4%), hot drinks like coffee and tea, 13(7.5%), and massage therapy and exercise, 7(4.0%). Binary logistic regression analysis revealed average length of one cycle of menstruation (COR = 0.20(0.070-0.569) and academic performance impairment (AOR = 0.345(0.183-0.653) were significantly associated with the diagnosis of PMS and use of PMS treatments respectively. Our

  2. Exposure to phthalates among premenstrual girls from rural and urban Gharbiah, Egypt: A pilot exposure assessment study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hablas Ahmed

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phthalates have been identified as endocrine active compounds associated with developmental and reproductive toxicity. The exposure to phthalates in premenstrual Egyptian females remains unknown. The objective of this study was to characterize phthalate exposure of a potentially vulnerable population of premenstrual girls from urban and rural Egypt. Materials and methods We collected one spot urine sample from 60 10-13 year old females, 30 from rural Egypt, and 30 from urban Egypt from July to October 2009. Samples were analyzed for 11 phthalate metabolites. Additionally, we collected anthropometrics as well as questionnaire data concerning food storage behaviors, cooking practices, and cosmetic use. Phthalate metabolite concentrations were compared between urban and rural Egyptians as well as to age and gender matched Americans. Results Monoethyl phthalate (MEP, was detected at the highest concentration in urine of Egyptian girls (median: 43.2 ng/mL in rural, 98.8 ng/mL in urban. Concentrations of urinary metabolites of di-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate and dibutyl phthalate were comparable between Egyptians and age matched US girls. Storage of food in plastic containers was a statistically significant predictor of urinary mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP concentrations when comparing covariate adjusted means. Conclusions Urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites were similar in Egyptian and US populations, suggesting that phthalate exposure also occurs in developing nations. Dietary intake is likely an important route of exposure to phthalates in both urban and rural populations.

  3. The 7-factor hybrid model of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms and alcohol consumption and consequences in a national sample of trauma-exposed veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb Erwin, Meredith; Charak, Ruby; Durham, Tory A; Armour, Cherie; Lv, Xin; Southwick, Steven M; Elhai, Jon D; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate associations between the 7-factor hybrid model of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, which includes intrusions, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behaviors, anxious arousal, and dysphoric arousal symptoms, and alcohol consumption and consequences. A nationally representative sample of 916 trauma-exposed U.S. military veterans were administered the Trauma History Screen, PTSD Checklist-5, and Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to determine associations between the 7-factor hybrid model of PTSD symptoms, and alcohol consumption and consequences. Results revealed that lifetime dysphoric arousal (r=0.31), negative affect (r=0.30), and anhedonia (r=0.29) symptom clusters were most strongly associated with past-year alcohol consequences. No significant associations were observed for alcohol consumption. While the cross-sectional study design does not allow one to ascertain causative associations between PTSD factors and alcohol consumption and consequences, results generally align with the self-medication hypothesis, as PTSD factors reflecting internalizing were most strongly related to alcohol-related consequences. These results underscore the importance of assessing for alcohol use problems in veterans who score highly on PTSD symptoms reflecting internalizing symptomatology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical and sociodemographic variables associated with interictal dysphoric disorder and interictal personality in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy: A controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo Filho, Gerardo Maria; Tarifa, Bruna; Santos, Raquel Espagnolla; de Oliveira Dias, Ana Laura; Ulliano, Júlia Rodrigues Leandro; Marques, Lucia Helena Neves

    2017-04-01

    Psychiatric disorders (PD) have an elevated prevalence and an important negative impact on patients with epilepsy (PWE) since they are associated with lower quality of life and clinical refractoriness. However, it is also necessary to identify behavioral conditions possibly associated with epilepsy that are not part of the standard psychiatric classifications, such as Interictal Dysphoric Disorder (IDD) and Interictal Personality (IP). The frequency of IDD and IP in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS) was assessed. The Brazilian versions of the Neurobehavioral Inventory (NBI) and Interictal Dysphoric Disorder Inventory (IDDI) were applied to patients and to a control group. Psychiatric standard assessment was conducted through the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Psychiatric Disorders - 5th edition (DSM-5). The value of p considered significant was Disorder was observed in 18 patients (18.4%) and IP in 36 (37.9%). Interictal Dysphoric Disorder was associated with left-sided MTS (OR=3.22; p=0.008), previous psychiatric treatment (OR=4.29; p=0.007), and more than one AED used (OR=2.73; p=0.02) while presence of bilateral MTS (OR=3.27; p=0.008), longer disease duration (OR=3.39; p=0.006), and presence of Major Depressive Disorder (OR=4.73; p=0.004) were associated with IP. In the present study, there was a high prevalence of IDD and IP in patients with drug-resistant TLE-MTS; studies should be conducted to identify the presence of behavioral conditions that are not present in the conventional psychiatric classifications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Examining the dimensional structure models of secondary traumatic stress based on DSM-5 symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordeno, Imelu G; Go, Geraldine P; Yangson-Serondo, April

    2017-02-01

    Latent factor structure of Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) has been examined using Diagnostic Statistic Manual-IV (DSM-IV)'s Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) nomenclature. With the advent of Diagnostic Statistic Manual-5 (DSM-5), there is an impending need to reexamine STS using DSM-5 symptoms in light of the most updated PTSD models in the literature. The study investigated and determined the best fitted PTSD models using DSM-5 PTSD criteria symptoms. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to examine model fit using the Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale in 241 registered and practicing Filipino nurses (166 females and 75 males) who worked in the Philippines and gave direct nursing services to patients. Based on multiple fit indices, the results showed the 7-factor hybrid model, comprising of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behavior, anxious arousal, and dysphoric arousal factors has excellent fit to STS. This model asserts that: (1) hyperarousal criterion needs to be divided into anxious and dysphoric arousal factors; (2) symptoms characterizing negative and positive affect need to be separated to two separate factors, and; (3) a new factor would categorize externalized, self-initiated impulse and control-deficit behaviors. Comparison of nested and non-nested models showed Hybrid model to have superior fit over other models. The specificity of the symptom structure of STS based on DSM-5 PTSD criteria suggests having more specific interventions addressing the more elaborate symptom-groupings that would alleviate the condition of nurses exposed to STS on a daily basis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalance of premenstrual syndrome and knowledge assessment regarding it's prevention among medical students of a private medical college of Islamabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsoom, U.; Sultana, A.; Bairam, S.

    2018-01-01

    To assess prevalence of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) in medical students and to determine their knowledge regarding its prevention. Study Design: A cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted at Foundation University Medical College, Islamabad,from Jun to Aug 2017. Material and Methods: A purposive sample of 359 female medical students was taken after applying selection criteria. After ethical approval and consent of respondents, data was collected through self-administered structured questionnaire on demographic variables, prevalence of PMS, physical, psychological and behavioral changes, knowledge regarding its prevention etc. Data was analyzed by SPSS version 20. Frequencies were computed and descriptive statistics applied. Cross tabulation between knowledge regarding prevalence of premenstrual syndrome and prevention of premenstrual syndrome was done. Pearson Chi Square test was applied to see the association between these two variables. Cochran test of conditional independence was applied to see conditional association between these variables at p-value <0.05. Result: PMS was found in 280 (80%) students. Out of them, 266 (95%) experienced physical changes and breast tenderness was the most common 159 (60%). While 210 (75%) had psychological changes and depression was found in 76 (36%). Behavioral changes were present in 120 (43%) and most prevalent was effect on academic performance which was 88 (76%). About 250 (71.5%) were ignorant about its prevention while only 100 (28.5%) knew about its prevention. Statistically significant association was found between knowledge regarding prevention of premenstrual syndrome and presence of premenstrual syndrome, as p-value 0.00 of Pearson Chi- Square 35 at df1 was less than 0.05. On application of Cochran test of conditional independence, significant conditional association was found between these variables as p-value of 0.00 was <0.05. Conclusion: Premenstrual Syndrome was found in

  7. Plague Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Plague Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Home Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics ...

  8. Recognizing Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helpful, please consider supporting IFFGD with a small tax- deductible donation. Make Donation Signs and Symptoms Overview ... arises requiring an expert’s care. © Copyright 1998-2018 International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, Inc. (IFFGD). All ...

  9. Rotavirus Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rotavirus Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rotavirus Home About Rotavirus Symptoms Transmission Treatment Photos Vaccination ...

  10. Associação entre Transtorno Disfórico Pré-menstrual e Transtornos Depressivos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura Nogueira Pires

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available O Transtorno Disfórico Pré-menstrual (TDPM é caracterizado por uma constelação de sintomas emocionais e alterações comportamentais, que se manifesta com um padrão temporal cíclico em associação com o período pré-menstrual. A validade de uma categoria diagnóstica psiquiátrica distinta para TDPM ainda é uma questão controversa. Entretanto, inúmeros estudos têm documentado uma associação específica entre mudanças pré-menstruais e transtornos depressivos. A presente revisão tem como objetivo sintetizar os resultados a respeito da semelhança dos sintomas depressivos no TDPM e nos transtornos depressivos, co-morbidade, história familiar e variáveis biológicas. Evidências de que os sintomas pré-menstruais seriam expressão de vulnerabilidade ao desenvolvimento de estados disfóricos (depressão e ansiedade, assim como as implicações diagnósticas dessa proposta são comentados.Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD is characterised by a myriad of emotional symptoms and behavioural alterations, which occur with a cyclic temporal pattern associated with the pre-menstrual period. The validity of an isolated psychiatric diagnostic category for PMDD remains controversial. However, research results have been showing a specific association between pre-menstrual changes and depressive disorder. The present review has as objective to sintethise the results on similarity between depressive symptoms in PMDD and in the depressive disorders, comorbidity, family history and biological variables. Evidences suggesting that the pre-menstrual symptoms would be expression of a vulnerability to the development of dysphoric states (depression and anxiety as well as diagnostic implications of such proposals are discussed.

  11. The Effect of Three Months Regular Aerobic Exercise on Premenstrual Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinat Ghanbari

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effects of three-month regular aerobic exercise on the PMS symptoms. Also correlations with age, education, marital status and severity of PMS symptoms were studied.Materials and Methods: A Quasi- Experimental study was conducted on 91 volunteer women with regular menstrual cycle and no history of gynecological, endocrinological and psychological disorders. The study was done during March 2005- March 2007, in Tehran University of Medical Sciences. A Modified Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MMDQ was used in this study. Participants were divided into two groups: Non-exercised, they also didn't have any past experience of regular exercise (n= 48 and Exercised (n= 43. The exercise time duration was one hour and was carried out three times per week for three months.  Emotional, behavioral, electrolyte, autonomic, neurovegatative and skin symptoms of PMS were compared between two groups. P value was considered significant at < 0.05.Results: A significant difference was observed for electrolytic, neurovegetative and cognitive symptoms before and after the exercise. Also the severity of skin and neurovegetative symptoms were different in experimental groups with and without past history of doing regular exercise. There was no correlation between age, education, marital status and severity of PMS symptoms.Conclusion: Three months of regular aerobic exercise effectively reduces the severity of PMS symptoms.

  12. An exploratory pilot of factors associated with premenstrual syndrome in minority women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallory Perry

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: This pilot evidence of improved PMS symptoms in minority and non-minority groups related to fish oil supplementation supports a universal treatment approach and highlights need for a larger-scale investigation.

  13. Norovirus Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... many times a day. This can lead to dehydration, especially in young children, older adults, and people with other illnesses. Symptoms of dehydration— decrease in urination dry mouth and throat feeling dizzy when standing up Children who are dehydrated may cry with few or ...

  14. Parental dysphoria and children's internalizing symptoms: marital conflict styles as mediators of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Rocher Schudlich, Tina D; Cummings, E Mark

    2003-01-01

    Parents' marital conflict styles were investigated as mediators in the associations between parental dysphoria and children's internalizing symptoms. A community sample of 267 children, ages 8 to 16, participated with their parents. Behavioral observations were made of parents' interactions during marital conflict resolution tasks. Questionnaires assessed parents' dysphoria and children's internalizing problems. Structural equation modeling indicated that marital discord, in particular, depressive conflict styles, mediated the relationship between parental dysphoria and children's internalizing problems. Furthermore, whereas for dysphoric mothers, depressive conflict styles partially mediated the links with children's internalizing, for fathers, depressive conflict styles fully mediated the links. Destructive and constructive marital conflict were associated with parental dysphoria (positively and negatively, respectively) but did not mediate the relations with children's internalizing.

  15. Factor structure of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms in trauma-exposed adolescents: Examining stability across time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Cao, Xing; Cao, Chengqi; Fang, Ruojiao; Yang, Haibo; Elhai, Jon D

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the latent structure of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms using two-wave longitudinal data collected from a sample of adolescents exposed to an explosion accident. Two waves of surveys were conducted approximately 3 and 8 months after the accident, respectively. A total of 836 students completed the baseline survey, and 762 students completed the follow-up survey. The results of confirmatory factor analyses(CFA) indicated that a seven-factor hybrid model composed of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behaviors, anxious arousal and dysphoric arousal factors yielded significantly better data fit at both waves than the other models including the DSM-5 four-factor model, the six-factor anhedonia and externalizing behaviors models. Furthermore, the results of CFA invariance tests supported the longitudinal invariance of the model. Implications and limitations in terms of these results are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment for premenstrual syndrome with Vitex agnus castus: A prospective, randomized, multi-center placebo controlled study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhong; Chen, Rong; Zhou, Yingfang; Geng, Li; Zhang, Zhenyu; Chen, Shuling; Yao, Yanjun; Lu, Junli; Lin, Shouqing

    2009-05-20

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of VAC BNO 1095 extract in Chinese women suffering from moderate to severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Prospective, double-blind, placebo controlled, parallel-group, multi-center clinical trial design was employed. After screening and preparation phase lasting three cycles, Eligible patients were randomly assigned into treatment or placebo groups and had treatment with VAC extract or placebo for up to three cycles. Efficacy was assessed using the Chinese version PMS-diary (PMSD) and PMTS. Two hundred and seventeen women were eligible to enter the treatment phase (TP) and were randomly assigned into the treatment group (108) or the placebo group (109), 208 provided the efficacy data (treatment 104, placebo 104), and 202 completed the treatment phase (treatment 101, placebo 101). The mean total PMSD score decreased from 29.23 at baseline (0 cycle) to 6.41 at the termination (3rd cycle) for the treatment group and from 28.14 at baseline (0 cycle) to 12.64 at the termination (3rd cycle) for the placebo group. The total PMSD score of 3rd cycle was significantly lower than the baseline in both groups (pVitex agnus castus (VAC BNO 1095 corresponding to 40mg herbal drug) is a safe, well tolerated and effective drug of the treatment for Chinese women with the moderate to severe PMS.

  17. Comparison of Metabolic and Hormonal Profiles of Women With and Without Premenstrual Syndrome: A Community Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Somayeh; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Mohammadi, Nader; Rostami Dovom, Marzieh; Torkestani, Farahnaz; Simbar, Masumeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2016-04-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is reported by up to 85% of women of reproductive age. Although several studies have focused on the hormone and lipid profiles of females with PMS, the results are controversial. This study was designed to investigate the association of hormonal and metabolic factors with PMS among Iranian women of reproductive age. This study was a community based cross-sectional study. Anthropometric measurements, biochemical parameters, and metabolic disorders were compared between 354 women with PMS and 302 healthy controls selected from among 1126 women of reproductive age who participated in the Iranian PCOS prevalence study. P values high density lipoprotein (HDL) and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) levels were significantly less than they were in women without the syndrome (P rise in the probability of having metabolic syndrome (P = 0.033). There was a significant association between PMS scores and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Further studies are needed to confirm and validate the relationships between lipid profile abnormalities and metabolic disorders with PMS.

  18. [The effect of self-foot reflexology on the relief of premenstrual syndrome and dysmenorrhea in high school girls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yi-Soon; Kim, Min-Za; Jeong, Ihn-Sook

    2004-08-01

    This study was aimed to identify the effect of self-foot reflexology on the relief of premenstrual syndrome and dysmenorrhea in high school girls. Study subjects was 236 women residing in the community, teachers and nurses who were older than 45 were recruited. Data was collected with self administered questionnaires from July 1st to August 31st, 2003 and analysed using SPSS/WIN 10.0 with Xtest, t-test, and stepwise multiple logistic regression at a significant level of =.05. The breast cancer screening rate was 57.2%, and repeat screening rate was 15.3%. With the multiple logistic regression analysis, factors associated with mammography screening were age and perceived barriers of action, and factors related to the repeat mammography screening were education level and other cancer screening experience. Based on the results, we recommend the development of an intervention program to decrease the perceived barrier of action, to regard mammography as an essential test in regular check-up, and to give active advertisement and education to the public to improve the rates of breast cancer screening and repeat screening.

  19. Sertraline (Zoloft) and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a medication that has been used to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (a severe form of premenstrual syndrome), and social phobia. A brand name for sertraline is Zoloft®. Sertraline ...

  20. DSM-5 posttraumatic stress symptom dimensions and health-related quality of life among Chinese earthquake survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gen; Wang, Li; Cao, Chengqi; Fang, Ruojiao; Liu, Ping; Luo, Shu; Zhang, Jianxin; Hall, Brain J; Elhai, Jon D

    2018-01-01

    It has been well-documented that posttraumatic stress symptoms cause impairments in health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Until now we have little data on how DSM-5 PTSD symptom dimensions relate to different aspects of HRQoL. Clarifying this question would be informative to improve the quality of life of PTSD patients. This study aimed to investigate the effects of dimensions of a well-supported seven-factor model of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms on physical and psychosocial HRQoL. A total of 1063 adult survivors of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake took part in this study nine years after the disaster. PTSD symptoms were measured by the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). HRQoL was measured by the Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-36 (SF-36). The associations between PTSD symptom dimensions and HRQoL were examined using structural equation models. Dysphoric arousal symptoms were found to significantly relate to physical HRQoL. Other symptom dimensions were not associated with HRQoL. Our findings contribute to the relationship between DSM-5 PTSD and HRQoL, and carry implications for further clinical practice and research on trauma-exposed individuals.

  1. Double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study of adjunctive quetiapine SR in the treatment of PMS/PMDD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Christine; Pearson, Brenda; Girdler, Susan; Johnson, Jacqueline; Hamer, Robert M; Killenberg, Susan; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha

    2015-11-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), a more severe form of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), afflicts 5-8% of reproductive age women and results in significant functional impairment. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of adjunctive quetiapine in patients with PMS/PMDD who had inadequate response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor/serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor therapy for their symptoms. A PMS/PMDD diagnosis was confirmed by 2-month prospective diagnostic assessment of PMS/PMDD using the Prospective Record of the Impact and Severity of Premenstrual Symptoms (PRISM) calendar. Women were randomized equally to receive quetiapine sustained-release (SR) or placebo (25-mg starting dose) during the luteal phase for 3 months. Outcome variables included the Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Scales, Clinical Global Impression Scale, and PRISM. Twenty women were enrolled in the treatment phase. Although the study was underpowered, greater reductions in luteal phase mood ratings were observed in the quetiapine group on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Clinical Global Impression improvement rating, and PRISM daily score. The quetiapine group showed most improvement in symptoms of mood lability, anxiety, and irritability. This small double-blind study suggests that adjunctive treatment with quetiapine SR may be a useful addition to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy in women with PMS/PMDD by reducing symptoms and improving quality of life. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Depressive Symptoms and Deliberate Self-Harm in a Community Sample of Adolescents: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars-Gunnar Lundh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The associations between depressive symptoms and deliberate self-harm were studied by means of a 2-wave longitudinal design in a community sample of 1052 young adolescents, with longitudinal data for 83.6% of the sample. Evidence was found for a bidirectional relationship in girls, with depressive symptoms being a risk factor for increased self-harm one year later and self-harm a risk factor for increased depressive symptoms. Cluster analysis of profiles of depressive symptoms led to the identification of two clusters with clear depressive profiles (one severe, the other mild/moderate which were both characterized by an overrepresentation of girls and elevated levels of self-harm. Clusters with more circumscribed problems were also identified; of these, significantly increased levels of self-harm were found in a cluster characterized by negative self-image and in a cluster characterized by dysphoric relations to parents. It is suggested that self-harm serves more to regulate negative self-related feelings than sadness.

  3. Assessing the underlying dimensionality of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms in Chinese adolescents surviving the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Lingmin; Armour, Cherie; Cao, Chengqi; Qing, Yulan; Zhang, Jianxin; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Biao; Wu, Qi; Zhao, Zhihong; Fan, Gaolin

    2015-04-01

    By analyzing data yielded from a sample of Chinese adolescents surviving a high-intensity earthquake, this study investigated the underlying dimensionality of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms. The sample included 743 traumatized middle school students (396 females and 332 males) aged 11-17 years (mean=13.6, SD=1.0). Results of confirmatory factor analysis showed that an intercorrelated seven-factor model comprised of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behaviors, anxious arousal, and dysphoric arousal factors provided a significant better representation of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms than other alternative models. Further analyses indicated that external measures of major depression disorder and panic disorder symptoms displayed unique associations with four PTSD factors. The findings provide further support for the newly proposed seven-factor model of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms, add to very limited empirical knowledge on the latent structure of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms among adolescents, and carry implications for further refinement of the current classifications of PTSD symptoms and further clinical practice and research on posttraumatic stress symptomatology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of headaches in the premenstrual tension syndrome Caracterização das cefaléias na síndrome da tensão pré-menstrual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Characterization of headaches in premenstrual syndrome (PMS. Although headache is one of the symptoms for PMS, no details on this headache are given by the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG criteria. METHOD: A group of 45 fertile age women presenting PMS were invited to complete a registration diary for headache and PMS symptoms for three consecutive months. The diary included details of each headache attack, allowing for classification according to the International Headache Society criteria (IHS-2004. RESULTS: Migraine without aura was the most common type of headache in PMS (n=27, 60%, followed by tension type headache (n=15, 30%. Only in two cases the type of headache varied among the observed months, and only in one case the diagnosis could not be concluded by the IHS-2004 criteria. CONCLUSION: Better clinical and therapeutic approach to headache in PMS can be achieved if the patient's type of headache could be properly characterized.OBJETIVO: Caracterização das cefaléias na síndrome da tensão pré-menstrual (TPM. Embora cefaléia seja um dos sintomas associados à TPM, não são fornecidos detalhes sobre esta dor pelos critérios do American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG. MÉTODO: Um grupo de 45 mulheres em idade fértil apresentando TPM foi convidado a preencher um diário de registro de cefaléia e dos sintomas de TPM por três meses consecutivos. O diário incluía detalhes de cada crise de cefaléia, permitindo classificação de acordo com os critérios da International Headache Society (IHS-2004. RESULTADOS: Enxaqueca sem aura foi a forma mais freqüente de cefaléia na TPM (n=27, 60%, seguida de cefaléia tipo tensional (n=15, 30%. Em apenas dois casos a cefaléia variou entre os meses observados e em apenas um caso o diagnóstico não pôde ser conclusivo pelos critérios da IHS-2004. CONCLUSÃO: Melhor manejo clínico e terapêutico pode ser obtido na cefaléia da TPM se o tipo de

  5. Expert opinion and review article: The timing of comedone extraction in the treatment of premenstrual acne--a proposed therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steventon, K

    2011-04-01

    The face is the most exposed part of our body, and deterioration of facial appearance, through disease or ageing, causes psychological distress. Acne lesions and subsequent pigmentation changes contribute to the unevenness of skin colour that is detrimental to facial attractiveness and leads to rejection and stigmatization in our society. The purpose of this review is to look at the root causes of premenstrual acne and, for the first time ever, propose that the specific timing of treatment can, at least in part, resolve the acne lesions. We postulate that it is the timing of the manual extraction that matters in resolving premenstrual acne and that the effectiveness of this therapy could be improved. Based on the reviewed evidence, we propose that it is important to remove the comedones at the time of ovulation, prior to the reduction of the size of the sebaceous orifice and epidermal barrier function, to counteract the onset of increased sebum production, prevent blockage of the pores and subsequent bacterial colonization and inflammation. If performed successfully, the extraction may contribute to a reduction in inflamed acne lesions and thus benefit women by increasing their facial attractiveness, well-being, social function and thereby decrease psychological stress. © 2010 The Author. ICS © 2010 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  6. Autobiographical memory specificity and the persistence of depressive symptoms in HIV-positive patients: rumination and social problem-solving skills as mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanes, Paula K; Morse, Gene; Hsiao, Chiu-Bin; Simms, Leonard; Roberts, John E

    2012-01-01

    Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are at elevated risk for depressive conditions, which in turn can negatively impact health-related behaviours and the course of illness. The present study tested the role of autobiographical memory specificity and its interaction with perceived stress in the persistence of depressive symptoms among dysphoric HIV-positive individuals. Additionally, we examined whether rumination and social problem solving mediated these effects. Results indicated that memory specificity moderated the impact of perceived stress, such that perceived stress was more strongly associated with follow-up depressive symptoms among those with greater memory specificity. Rumination, but not social problem solving, mediated this effect. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  7. Who has the worst attitudes toward sexual minorities? Comparison of transphobia and homophobia levels in gender dysphoric individuals, the general population and health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, A D; Castellini, G; Ristori, J; Casale, H; Giovanardi, G; Carone, N; Fanni, E; Mosconi, M; Ciocca, G; Jannini, E A; Ricca, V; Lingiardi, V; Maggi, M

    2017-03-01

    To date, few studies have addressed attitudes toward transgender individuals. In addition, little is known about health care providers' (HCP) attitudes toward sexual minorities. The aim of the present study is to compare attitudes toward homosexual and transgender individuals between gender dysphoric individuals (GDs), general population controls (C) and HCP. A total of 310 subjects were considered, including 122 GDs (63 transwomen and 59 transmen), 53 heterosexual HCP (26 males and 27 females) and 135 C. Participants completed the Modern Homophobia Scale (MHS) and the Attitudes Toward Transgendered Individuals Scale (ATTI) in order to assess attitudes toward gay men and lesbian women and toward transgender individuals, respectively. In addition, GDs completed the Gender Identity/Gender Dysphoria Questionnaire (GIDYQ-AA) and ATTI to measure, respectively, gender dysphoria levels and internalized transphobia. Religious attitudes were evaluated by means of the Religious Fundamentalism Scale (RFS), and Discrimination and Stigma Scale (DISC-12) was used to measure perceived discrimination. (1) Men showed significantly higher levels of homophobia and transphobia when compared to women (p attitudes, which are strongly dependent on religious precepts and dogma.

  8. Evaluating the stability of DSM-5 PTSD symptom network structure in a national sample of U.S. military veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stockert, Sophia H H; Fried, Eiko I; Armour, Cherie; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2018-03-15

    Previous studies have used network models to investigate how PTSD symptoms associate with each other. However, analyses examining the degree to which these networks are stable over time, which are critical to identifying symptoms that may contribute to the chronicity of this disorder, are scarce. In the current study, we evaluated the temporal stability of DSM-5 PTSD symptom networks over a three-year period in a nationally representative sample of trauma-exposed U.S. military veterans. Data were analyzed from 611 trauma-exposed U.S. military veterans who participated in the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study (NHRVS). We estimated regularized partial correlation networks of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms at baseline (Time 1) and at three-year follow-up (Time 2), and examined their temporal stability. Evaluation of the network structure of PTSD symptoms at Time 1 and Time 2 using a formal network comparison indicated that the Time 1 network did not differ significantly from the Time 2 network with regard to network structure (p = 0.12) or global strength (sum of all absolute associations, i.e. connectivity; p = 0.25). Centrality estimates of both networks (r = 0.86) and adjacency matrices (r = 0.69) were highly correlated. In both networks, avoidance, intrusive, and negative cognition and mood symptoms were among the more central nodes. This study is limited by the use of a self-report instrument to assess PTSD symptoms and recruitment of a relatively homogeneous sample of predominantly older, Caucasian veterans. Results of this study demonstrate the three-year stability of DSM-5 PTSD symptom network structure in a nationally representative sample of trauma-exposed U.S. military veterans. They further suggest that trauma-related avoidance, intrusive, and dysphoric symptoms may contribute to the chronicity of PTSD symptoms in this population. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Ambivalent sexism, attitudes towards menstruation and menstrual cycle-related symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marván, Ma Luisa; Vázquez-Toboada, Rocío; Chrisler, Joan C

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between ambivalent sexism and beliefs and attitudes towards menstruation, and, in turn, to study the influence of these variables on menstrual cycle-related symptoms. One hundred and six Mexican women completed the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory, the Beliefs about and Attitudes toward Menstruation Questionnaire and the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire. The higher scores on benevolent sexism were associated with the most positive attitudes towards menstruation and also with the belief that a menstruating woman should or should not do some activities and that menstruation keeps women from their daily activities. The higher scores on hostile sexism were associated with rejection of menstruation as well as with feelings of embarrassment about it. Beliefs about and attitudes towards menstruation predicted menstrual cycle-related symptoms related to negative affect, impaired concentration and behavioural changes, but did not predict somatic symptoms. These results will be useful to health professionals and advocates who want to change the negative expectations and stereotypes of premenstrual and menstrual women and reduce the sexism and negative attitudes towards women that are evident in Mexican culture. © 2013 International Union of Psychological Science.

  10. Funcionamiento psicofisiológico y susceptibilidad a la sintomatología premenstrual en mujeres Tipo A y Tipo B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Palmero

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo se centra en explorar el papel que juega el componente emocional del Patrón de Conducta Tipo A (PCTA en diversas áreas relacionadas con la salud. En este contexto nuestra investigación desarrolla dos objetivos diferenciados. El primero trata de constatar la relación entre determinadas características del PCTA y el mecanismo psicofisiológico en una tarea experimental de estrés real (situación de examen, considerando si existen diferencias entre los dos grupos de personas, Tipo A y Tipo B, tanto en la dimensión tónica como en la dimensión fásica de la tasa cardiaca. El segundo de nuestros objetivos trata de establecer la relación existente entre determinadas características del PCTA y la experiencia de sintomatología relacionada con el ciclo menstrual, considerando tanto la sintomatología premenstrual global, como la sintomatología premenstrual específica, diferenciando tres grandes grupos de síntomas: fisiológicos, psicológicos y conductuales. La muestra final estuvo conformada por 28 mujeres Tipo A y 29 mujeres Tipo B. Los instrumentos utilizados fueron el inventario de Actividad de Jenkins (JAS, el calendario menstrual de síntomas de registro diario (CMSRD y un polígrafo que permitió registrar la tasa cardiaca. En cuanto a nuestro primer objetivo, los datos hacen pensar en la existencia de distintos perfiles psicofisiológicos en ambos grupos de mujeres; en el segundo objetivo, parece que las mujeres Tipo A experimentan de forma clara más síntomas psicológicos que las mujeres Tipo B.

  11. The treatment of severe premenstrual syndrome with goserelin with and without 'add-back' estrogen therapy: a placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leather, A T; Studd, J W; Watson, N R; Holland, E F

    1999-02-01

    The study aimed to determine if the addition of daily low-dose oral estrogen with a cyclical progestogen given to young women using a depot gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog implant for the treatment of their premenstrual syndrome (PMS) would affect the clinical outcome. In a double-blind placebo-controlled study in a specialist premenstrual syndrome clinic setting, 60 women aged between 20 and 45 years were randomized to one of three treatment groups: Group A (placebo implant four weekly + placebo tablets daily), Group B (goserelin 3.6 mg implant four weekly + estradiol valerate 2 mg daily with norethisterone 5 mg from days 21-28 of a 28-day cycle) or Group C (goserelin 3.6 mg implant four weekly + placebo tablets daily). Differences between PMS scores at 2, 4 and 6 months were compared with pretreatment values. There was a significant improvement in PMS scores in Group C (Zoladex + placebo) after 2, 4 and 6 months of treatment when compared to pretreatment values and Group A (placebo + placebo). The addition of a low-dose oral estrogen with a cyclical progestogen to GnRH analog treatment (Group B) resulted in a less dramatic response when compared to pretreatment values and no significant improvement when compared to Group A (placebo + placebo) at 2, 4 and 6 months of treatment. The addition of a low-dose oral estrogen with a cyclical progestogen to depot GnRH analog therapy in the treatment of PMS reduces the clinical response.

  12. Specificity in autobiographical memory narratives correlates with performance on the Autobiographical Memory Test and prospectively predicts depressive symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Jennifer A.; Mineka, Susan; McAdams, Dan P.

    2012-01-01

    Reduced autobiographical memory specificity (AMS) is an important cognitive marker in depression that is typically measured with the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT; Williams & Broadbent, 1986). The AMT is widely used, but the overreliance on a single methodology for assessing AMS is a limitation in the field. The current study investigated memory narratives as an alternative measure of AMS in an undergraduate student sample selected for being high or low on a measure of depressive symptoms (N = 55). We employed a multi-method design to compare narrative- and AMT-based measures of AMS. Participants generated personally significant self-defining memory narratives, and also completed two versions of the AMT (with and without instructions to retrieve specific memories). Greater AMS in self-defining memory narratives correlated with greater AMS in performance on both versions of the AMT in the full sample, and the patterns of relationships between the different AMS measures were generally similar in low and high dysphoric participants. Furthermore, AMS in self-defining memory narratives was prospectively associated with depressive symptom levels. Specifically, greater AMS in self-defining memory narratives predicted fewer depressive symptoms at a 10-week follow-up over and above baseline symptom levels. Implications for future research and clinical applications are discussed. PMID:23240988

  13. The Dissociative Subtype of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Among Adolescents: Co-Occurring PTSD, Depersonalization/Derealization, and Other Dissociation Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kristen R; Seng, Julia S; Briggs, Ernestine C; Munro-Kramer, Michelle L; Graham-Bermann, Sandra A; Lee, Robert C; Ford, Julian D

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the co-occurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dissociation in a clinical sample of trauma-exposed adolescents by evaluating evidence for the depersonalization/derealization dissociative subtype of PTSD as defined by the DSM-5 and then examining a broader set of dissociation symptoms. A sample of treatment-seeking, trauma-exposed adolescents 12 to 16 years old (N = 3,081) from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network Core Data Set was used to meet the study objectives. Two models of PTSD/dissociation co-occurrence were estimated using latent class analysis, one with 2 dissociation symptoms and the other with 10 dissociation symptoms. After model selection, groups within each model were compared on demographics, trauma characteristics, and psychopathology. Model A, the depersonalization/derealization model, had 5 classes: dissociative subtype/high PTSD; high PTSD; anxious arousal; dysphoric arousal; and a low symptom/reference class. Model B, the expanded dissociation model, identified an additional class characterized by dissociative amnesia and detached arousal. These 2 models provide new information about the specific ways PTSD and dissociation co-occur and illuminate some differences between adult and adolescent trauma symptom expression. A dissociative subtype of PTSD can be distinguished from PTSD alone in adolescents, but assessing a wider range of dissociative symptoms is needed to fully characterize adolescent traumatic stress responses. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dimensional structure of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms: results from the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Harpaz-Rotem, Ilan; Armour, Cherie; Southwick, Steven M; Krystal, John H; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and factor structure of PTSD symptomatology in a nationally representative sample of US veterans and examine how PTSD symptom clusters are related to depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, hostility, physical and mental health-related functioning, and quality of life. Data were analyzed from the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study, a nationally representative survey of 1,484 US veterans conducted from September through October 2013. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to evaluate the factor structure of PTSD symptoms, and structural equation models were constructed to examine the association between PTSD symptom clusters and external correlates. 12.0% of veterans screened positive for lifetime PTSD and 5.2% for past-month PTSD. A 5-factor dysphoric arousal model and a newly proposed 6-factor model both fit the data significantly better than the 4-factor model of DSM-5. The 6-factor model fit the data best in the full sample, as well as in subsamples of female veterans and veterans with lifetime PTSD. The emotional numbing symptom cluster was more strongly related to depression (P < .001) and worse mental health-related functioning (P < .001) than other symptom clusters, while the externalizing behavior symptom cluster was more strongly related to hostility (P < .001). A total of 5.2% of US veterans screened positive for past-month DSM-5 PTSD. A 6-factor model of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms, which builds on extant models and includes a sixth externalizing behavior factor, provides the best dimensional representation of DSM-5 PTSD symptom clusters and demonstrates validity in assessing health outcomes of interest in this population. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  15. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with Alzheimer’s disease with a vascular component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola Bidzan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available objective. Vascular changes are observed in most cases of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Observations of AD and vascular disease (VD allow us to surmise that vascular changes may not only affect cognitive impairment in AD but may also have a negative influence on the neuropsychiatric symptoms which often occur in the course of the disease. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of vascular factors on the neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer’s Disease. material and methods. The study included 48 people with a preliminary diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease on the basis of NINCDS/ADRDA criteria. The evaluation of impairments in cognitive functioning was carried out by means of the Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale – the cognitive part (ADAS – cog, whereas the behavioural and psychological symptoms were evaluated by means of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory – the version adapted for residents of nursing homes for the elderly (Neuropsychiatric Inventory – Nursing Home Version (NPI – NH. The score on the Hachinski scale was the basis for dividing the study participants into two groups – those with a mild vascular component (0–1 points on the Hachinski scale and those with a severe vascular component (2–4 points. results. The analyzed groups did not differ with respect to the intensity of cognitive impairments (ADAS-cog or age of the participants. Scores obtained on the NPI – NH scale as well as some of its elements (depression/dysphoria and anxiety had a discriminating value. Studies show that vascular factors are a serious risk factor for neuropsychiatric symptoms in AD. conclusions. Vascular factors in Alzheimer’s Disease influence the presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. In the course of angiogenic dementia a greater frequency in depressive disorders was shown. The most visible differences between individuals with a greater and lesser burden of vascular factors was in the realm of depressive and dysphoric disorders.

  16. Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women's Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201 1-800-994- ...

  17. Implicit negative affect predicts attention to sad faces beyond self-reported depressive symptoms in healthy individuals: An eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenschatz, Charlott Maria; Skopinceva, Marija; Kersting, Anette; Quirin, Markus; Suslow, Thomas

    2018-04-04

    Cognitive theories of depression assume biased attention towards mood-congruent information as a central vulnerability and maintaining factor. Among other symptoms, depression is characterized by excessive negative affect (NA). Yet, little is known about the impact of naturally occurring NA on the allocation of attention to emotional information. The study investigates how implicit and explicit NA as well as self-reported depressive symptoms predict attentional biases in a sample of healthy individuals (N = 104). Attentional biases were assessed using eye-tracking during a free viewing task in which images of sad, angry, happy and neutral faces were shown simultaneously. Participants' implicit affectivity was measured indirectly using the Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test. Questionnaires were administered to assess actual and habitual explicit NA and presence of depressive symptoms. Higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with sustained attention to sad faces and reduced attention to happy faces. Implicit but not explicit NA significantly predicted gaze behavior towards sad faces independently from depressive symptoms. The present study supports the idea that naturally occurring implicit NA is associated with attention allocation to dysphoric facial expression. The findings demonstrate the utility of implicit affectivity measures in studying individual differences in depression-relevant attentional biases and cognitive vulnerability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Glaucoma Symptoms, Treatment and Research Past Issues / Spring 2015 ... vision, without any pain. Photo courtesy of NEI Glaucoma Symptoms At first, open-angle glaucoma has no ...

  19. Dimensional structure of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress symptoms in Spanish trauma victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soberón, Carmen; Crespo, María; Del Mar Gómez-Gutiérrez, María; Fernández-Lansac, Violeta; Armour, Cherie

    2016-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analytic studies have shown that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms included in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Disorders (DSM-5) may be better explained by two 6-factor models (the Externalizing Behaviours model and the Anhedonia model) and a 7-factor Hybrid model. The latter model comprises the symptom clusters of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behaviours, and anxious and dysphoric arousal. This model has received empirical support mainly in American samples. Of note, there have been a limited number of studies conducted on samples from other countries. This study aimed to examine the underlying dimensionality of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms in a Spanish clinical sample exposed to a range of traumatic events. Participants included 165 adults (78.8% females) seeking treatment in trauma services in the Madrid area (Spain). PTSD was assessed using the Global Assessment of Posttraumatic Stress Scale 5, a Spanish self-report instrument assessing posttraumatic symptoms according to the DSM-5 criteria. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted in Mplus. Both the 7-factor Hybrid model and the 6-factor Anhedonia model demonstrated good and equivalent fit to the data. The findings of this study replicate and extend previous research by providing support for both the 7-factor Hybrid model and the 6-factor Anhedonia model in a clinical sample of Spanish trauma survivors. Given equivalent fit for these two models and the fewer number of latent factors in the Anhedonia model, it was selected as optimal in a traumatized Spanish sample. Implications and future research directions are discussed.

  20. Acute deviations from long-term trait depressive symptoms predict systemic inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohleder, Nicolas; Miller, Gregory E

    2008-07-01

    Depressive symptoms increase morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease and systemic inflammation has been proposed as the underlying mechanism. While higher levels of inflammatory mediators have been found in dysphoric individuals, it is not known whether long-term or short-term mood changes are responsible for this phenomenon. A sample of 65 young women provided weekly web-based self-ratings of depressive mood over a period of 20 weeks using the CES-D, and systemic inflammation was assessed by measuring plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) before and after the observation period. CES-D ratings were used to develop state and trait indicators of depressed mood and evaluate their relationship with inflammatory mediators. Hierarchical linear regressions controlling for baseline inflammation, age, and BMI revealed that trait levels of depressive symptoms were not associated with IL-6 (beta=0.09; n.s.) and CRP (beta=0.01; n.s.) concentrations after the observation period. In contrast, state levels of depressive symptoms were associated with changes in IL-6, but not CRP, particularly when they were indexed as the disparity between a person's trait level of symptoms and her CES-D score just prior to IL-6 assessment (beta=0.35; p=0.03). These results lead us to conclude that in young women, state, rather than trait depressed mood stimulates peripheral inflammation as measured by IL-6. This pattern suggests that in this age group, fast-reacting inflammatory mediators such as IL-6 probably respond to short-term changes, for example, in stress hormones or stress hormone sensitivity, rather than long-term dysregulations of allostatic mechanisms.

  1. Dimensional structure of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress symptoms in Spanish trauma victims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Soberón

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Confirmatory factor analytic studies have shown that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms included in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Disorders (DSM-5 may be better explained by two 6-factor models (the Externalizing Behaviours model and the Anhedonia model and a 7-factor Hybrid model. The latter model comprises the symptom clusters of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behaviours, and anxious and dysphoric arousal. This model has received empirical support mainly in American samples. Of note, there have been a limited number of studies conducted on samples from other countries. Objective: This study aimed to examine the underlying dimensionality of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms in a Spanish clinical sample exposed to a range of traumatic events. Method: Participants included 165 adults (78.8% females seeking treatment in trauma services in the Madrid area (Spain. PTSD was assessed using the Global Assessment of Posttraumatic Stress Scale 5, a Spanish self-report instrument assessing posttraumatic symptoms according to the DSM-5 criteria. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted in Mplus. Results: Both the 7-factor Hybrid model and the 6-factor Anhedonia model demonstrated good and equivalent fit to the data. Conclusions: The findings of this study replicate and extend previous research by providing support for both the 7-factor Hybrid model and the 6-factor Anhedonia model in a clinical sample of Spanish trauma survivors. Given equivalent fit for these two models and the fewer number of latent factors in the Anhedonia model, it was selected as optimal in a traumatized Spanish sample. Implications and future research directions are discussed. Highlights of the article:

  2. Management of somatic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Andreas; Dimsdale, Joel

    2014-01-01

    on the recognition and effective management of patients with excessive and disabling somatic symptoms. The clinical presentation of somatic symptoms is categorized into three groups of patients: those with multiple somatic symptoms, those with health anxiety, and those with conversion disorder. The chapter provides...

  3. Measuring bothersome menopausal symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Kamma Sundgaard; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The experience of menopausal symptoms is common and an adequate patient-reported outcome measure is crucial in studies where women are treated for these symptoms. The aims of this study were to identify a patient-reported outcome measure for bothersome menopausal symptoms and, in the ...

  4. Comportamento masculino diante da mulher com Síndrome Pré-Menstrual: narrativas de mulheres Comportamiento masculino delante de la mujer con Síndrome Premenstrual: narrativas de mujeres Male behavior in front of women with Premenstrual Syndrome: narratives of women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Akiko Komura Hoga

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever as percepções de mulheres com Síndrome Pré-Menstrual a respeito do comportamento de seus parceiros diante delas. MÉTODOS: Pesquisa de abordagem qualitativa com desenvolvimento das cinco etapas do método de análise da narrativa para conhecer as representações a respeito dessa experiência. RESULTADOS: As experiências das 20 mulheres entrevistadas estão representadas nas categorias: Dificuldades para identificar a síndrome e adotar práticas de cuidado; Falta de conhecimento e sensibilidade dos homens e suas consequências sobre a relação entre o casal. CONCLUSÃO: Orientações sistematizadas sobre a Síndrome Pré-Menstrual devem ser fornecidas a todas as pessoas, em momento anterior à menarca, para evitar o surgimento de problemas decorrentes do desconhecimento da síndrome e suas consequências nas esferas pessoal, familiar e social das mulheres.OBJETIVO: Describir las percepciones de las mujeres con Síndrome Premenstrual a respecto del comportamiento de sus compañeros delante de ellas. MÉTODOS: Investigación de abordaje cualitativo con desarrollo de las cinco etapas, del método análisis de narrativa, para conocer las representaciones a respecto de esa experiencia. RESULTADOS: Las experiencias de las 20 mujeres entrevistadas están representadas en las categorías: Dificultades para identificar el síndrome y adoptar prácticas de cuidado; falta de conocimiento y de sensibilidad de los hombres y, sus consecuencias sobre la relación de la pareja. CONCLUSIÓN: Es necesario ofrecer orientaciones sistematizadas sobre el Síndrome Premenstrual a todas las personas, en un momento anterior a la menarca, para evitar el surgimiento de problemas provenientes del desconocimiento del síndrome y de sus consecuencias en las esferas personal, familiar y social de las mujeres.OBJECTIVE: To describe the perceptions of women with premenstrual syndrome regarding the behavior of their spouses in face of this event

  5. Understanding medical symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti; Guassora, Ann Dorrit Kristiane; Graungaard, Anette Hauskov

    2015-01-01

    is a social and relational phenomenon of containment, and regulating the situation where the symptoms originate implies adjusting containment. Discourse analysis, as presented by Jonathan Potter and Margaret Wetherell, provides a tool to notice the subtle ways in which language orders perceptions and how...... to the bodily messages. Symptom management is then determined by the meaning of a symptom. Dorte E. Gannik’s concept “situational disease” explains how situations can be reviewed not just in terms of their potential to produce signs or symptoms, but also in terms of their capacity to contain symptoms. Disease...

  6. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Association With Subsequent Risky and Problem Drinking Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensley, Kara M; Seelig, Amber D; Armenta, Richard F; Rivera, Anna C; Peterson, Arthur V; Jacobson, Isabel G; Littman, Alyson J; Maynard, Charles; Bricker, Jonathan B; Boyko, Edward J; Rull, Rudolph P; Williams, Emily C

    2018-06-04

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and unhealthy alcohol use are commonly associated conditions. It is unknown whether specific symptoms of PTSD are associated with subsequent initiation of unhealthy alcohol use. Data from the first 3 enrollment panels (n = 151,567) of the longitudinal Millennium Cohort Study of military personnel were analyzed (2001-2012). Complementary log-log models were fit to estimate whether specific PTSD symptoms and symptom clusters were associated with subsequent initiation of 2 domains of unhealthy alcohol use: risky and problem drinking (experience of 1 or more alcohol-related consequences). Models were adjusted for other PTSD symptoms and demographic, service, and health-related characteristics. Eligible study populations included those without risky (n = 31,026) and problem drinking (n = 67,087) at baseline. In adjusted analyses, only 1 PTSD symptom-irritability/anger-was associated with subsequent increased initiation of risky drinking (relative risk [RR] 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.09) at least 3 years later. Two symptom clusters (dysphoric arousal [RR 1.17, 95% CI 1.11-1.23] and emotional numbing [RR 1.30, 95% CI 1.22-1.40]) and 5 symptoms (restricted affect [RR 1.13, 95% CI 1.08-1.19], sense of foreshortened future [RR 1.12, 95% CI 1.06-1.18], exaggerated startle response [RR 1.07, 95% CI 1.01-1.13], sleep disturbance [RR 1.11, 95% CI 1.07-1.15], and irritability/anger [RR 1.12, 95% CI 1.07-1.17]) were associated with subsequent initiation of problem drinking. Findings suggest that specific PTSD symptoms and symptom clusters are associated with subsequent initiation of unhealthy alcohol use.Written work prepared by employees of the Federal Government as part of their official duties is, under the U.S. Copyright Act, a "work of the United States Government" for which copyright protection under Title 17 of the United States Code is not available. As such, copyright does not extend to the contributions of

  7. Study of Knowledge and Practice of Men with Wives who Suffer From Premenstrual Syndrome about the Syndrome in Yazd City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Morowatisharifabad

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions:For achieving this important issuepresenting high quality education programs which may causes sustainable behavior change with an emphasize on issues such as symptoms of PMS including suicide tendency, self harm, increased appetite and strategies for loose weight and snack consumption is recommended.

  8. Early psychosis symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, H.A.; Hussain, S.; Islam, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prodromal symptoms of schizophrenia in the pathways to help-seeking. Study Design: A cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The Department of Psychiatry, the Aga Khan University, Karachi, from 2008 to 2009. Methodology: A total of 93 patients were interviewed in the pathways to care of schizophrenia. The diagnosis was based on ICD-10 criteria. The pathways to care were assessed through a semi-structured questionnaire. The onset, course and symptoms of psychosis were assessed through Interview for Retrospective Assessment at Age at Onset of Psychosis (IROAS). Results: Fifty five (59%) participants were male while 41% (n=38%) were female. Using IROAS, 108 symptoms were identified as concerning behaviour. Alternatively, 60 (55%) concerning behaviours were reported in the open-ended inquiry of the reasons for help seeking as assessed by the pathways to care questionnaire with a statistically significant difference between most symptoms category. The difference was most pronounced (p < 0.001) for depressed mood (66%), worries (65%), tension (63%), withdrawal/mistrust (54%) and loss of self-confidence (53%). Thought withdrawal (22%) and passivity (15%) were elicited only through structured interview (IROAS). When symptoms were categorized together, about 83% of the subjects presented with affective and non-specific prodromal symptoms. Roughly, 10% of the subjects presented with positive symptoms and 3% presented with the negative symptoms of psychosis. The non-specific, affective symptoms appear to predominate the prodromal phase of the illness. Conclusion: Prodromal symptoms of schizophrenia include non-specific, affective symptoms. Attention needs to be paid on identifying the prodromal symptoms and change in social functioning in order to identify those who are at risk of long term psychosis. (author)

  9. Somatic symptom disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related disorders; Somatization disorder; Somatiform disorders; Briquet syndrome; Illness anxiety disorder References American Psychiatric Association. Somatic symptom disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . ...

  10. Functional significance of a novel 7-factor model of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms: results from the National Health and Resilience in Veterans study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Robert H; Tsai, Jack; Armour, Cherie; Mota, Natalie; Harpaz-Rotem, Ilan; Southwick, Steven M

    2015-03-15

    While posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in the recently published Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) are clustered into four factors, emerging confirmatory factor analytic studies suggest that this disorder is best characterized by seven symptom clusters, including re-experiencing, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behaviors, and anxious and dysphoric arousal symptoms. To date, however, data are lacking regarding the relation between this novel model of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms and measures of clinical significance in this population (e.g., functioning). Using data from the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study (NHRVS), a contemporary, nationally representative sample of 1484 U.S. veterans, we evaluated clinical and functional correlates of a novel 7-factor model of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms. Differential patterns of associations were observed between DSM-5 PTSD symptom clusters, and psychiatric comorbidities, suicidal ideation, hostility, and functioning and quality of life. Anhedonia symptoms, in particular, were strongly related to current depression, as well as reduced mental functioning and quality of life. Externalizing behaviors were most strongly related to hostility, supporting the convergent validity of this construct. Cross-sectional design and employment of self-report measures. These results suggest that a more refined 7-factor model of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms may provide greater specificity in understanding associations with comorbid psychopathology, suicidal ideation, and functioning and quality of life in U.S. veterans. They further suggest that prevention and treatment efforts that target distinct aspects of the PTSD phenotype may be more effective in mitigating key clinical and functional outcomes in this population. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Bell's Palsy Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bell's Palsy Sections What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's Palsy Symptoms Bell's Palsy Treatment Bell's Palsy Symptoms Leer en Español: Síntomas de la parálisis ...

  12. Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story: Leukemia/Lymphoma Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table of Contents For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia Symptoms Frequent infections Fever and chills Anemia Easy ...

  13. Symptom profiles of subsyndromal depression in disease clusters of diabetes, excess weight, and progressive cerebrovascular conditions: a promising new type of finding from a reliable innovation to estimate exhaustively specified multiple indicators–multiple causes (MIMIC models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francoeur RB

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Richard B Francoeur School of Social Work, Adelphi University, Garden City, NY, USA Abstract: Addressing subsyndromal depression in cerebrovascular conditions, diabetes, and obesity reduces morbidity and risk of major depression. However, depression may be masked because self-reported symptoms may not reveal dysphoric (sad mood. In this study, the first wave (2,812 elders from the New Haven Epidemiological Study of the Elderly (EPESE was used. These population-weighted data combined a stratified, systematic, clustered random sample from independent residences and a census of senior housing. Physical conditions included progressive cerebrovascular disease (CVD; hypertension, silent CVD, stroke, and vascular cognitive impairment [VCI] and co-occurring excess weight and/or diabetes. These conditions and interactions (clusters simultaneously predicted 20 depression items and a latent trait of depression in participants with subsyndromal (including subthreshold depression (11≤ Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale [CES-D] score ≤27. The option for maximum likelihood estimation with standard errors that are robust to non-normality and non-independence in complex random samples (MLR in Mplus and an innovation created by the author were used for estimating unbiased effects from latent trait models with exhaustive specification. Symptom profiles reveal masked depression in 1 older males, related to the metabolic syndrome (hypertension–overweight–diabetes; silent CVD–overweight; and silent CVD–diabetes and 2 older females or the full sample, related to several diabetes and/or overweight clusters that involve stroke or VCI. Several other disease clusters are equivocal regarding masked depression; a couple do emphasize dysphoric mood. Replicating findings could identify subgroups for cost-effective screening of subsyndromal depression. Keywords: depression, diabetes, overweight, cerebrovascular disease, hypertension, metabolic

  14. Effects of a combination of Hypericum perforatum and Vitex agnus-castus on PMS-like symptoms in late-perimenopausal women: findings from a subpopulation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Die, Margaret Diana; Bone, Kerry M; Burger, Henry G; Reece, John E; Teede, Helena J

    2009-09-01

    It has been suggested that some of the symptoms typically attributed to menopause may be more related to premenstrual syndrome (PMS) than menopause, as perimenopausal women appear to be more prone to PMS-like symptoms, or at least to tolerate them less well. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a phytotherapeutic intervention comprising a combination of Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort) and Vitex agnus-castus (chaste tree/berry) in the management of PMS-like symptoms in perimenopausal women. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled parallel trial was conducted over 16 weeks on menopause-related symptoms. Data on PMS-like symptoms were collected at 4-weekly intervals from a small subgroup of late-perimenopausal women (n = 14) participating in this study. The primary endpoint was PMS scores measured on the Abrahams Menstrual Symptoms Questionnaire, comprising the subclusters of PMS-A (anxiety), PMS-D (depression), PMS-H (hydration), and PMS-C (cravings). Herbal combination therapy or placebo tablets were administered twice daily. At the end of the 16-week treatment phase, analyses of covariance showed the herbal combination to be superior to placebo for total PMS-like scores (p = 0.02), PMS-D (p = 0.006), and PMS-C clusters (p = 0.027). The active treatment group also showed significant reductions in the anxiety (p = 0.003) and hydration (p = 0.002) clusters, using paired-samples t tests. Results of trend analyses showed significant treatment group effects across the five phases for total PMS and all subscales, all in the clinically expected direction. No significant trends were evident in the placebo group. These results suggest a potentially significant clinical application for this phytotherapeutic combination in PMS-like symptoms among perimenopausal women. Further research is warranted through a randomized, controlled trial dedicated to investigation of these symptoms.

  15. The underlying dimensions of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms and their relations with anxiety and depression in a sample of adolescents exposed to an explosion accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haibo; Wang, Li; Cao, Chengqi; Cao, Xing; Fang, Ruojiao; Zhang, Jianxin; Elhai, Jon D

    2017-01-01

    Background: A large number of empirical studies pertaining to the latent dimensions of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms have accumulated. However, there is still a lack of studies specific to youths. Objective: This study sought to investigate the latent dimensions of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms in a sample of adolescents exposed to an explosion accident. Method: Participants were 836 students (407 females and 428 males). Self-reported measures including the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 and the anxiety and depression subscales of the 21-item Depression Anxiety Stress Scale were administered to participants. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was implemented to test competing factor models. Results: A seven-factor model composed of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behaviours, anxious arousal and dysphoric arousal factors emerged as the best fitting model, and PTSD's factors displayed distinguishable correlations with external measures of anxiety and depression. Conclusions: The findings provide and extend empirical evidence supporting the newly refined seven-factor hybrid model of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms, and have implications for further trauma-related clinical practice and research.

  16. Social Sensations of Symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert, Lotte; Whyte, Susan Reynolds

    2017-01-01

    The interpretation of sensations and the recognition of symptoms of a sickness, as well as the movement to seek treatment, have long been recognized in medical anthropology as inherently social processes. Based on cases of HIV and trauma (PTSD) in Uganda, we show that even the first signs....../symptoms; differential recognition of symptoms; and the embodied sociality of treatment....... and sensations of sickness can be radically social. The sensing body can be a ‘social body’ – a family, a couple, a network – a unit that transcends the individual body. In this article we focus on four aspects of the sociality of sensations and symptoms: mode of transmission; the shared experience of sensations...

  17. Flu Symptoms & Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Flu Symptoms & Complications Language: English (US) Español Recommend on ... not everyone with flu will have a fever. Flu Complications Most people who get influenza will recover ...

  18. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms and Signs Prostate Cancer Basics Risk Factors ... earlier. So what are the warning signs of prostate cancer? Unfortunately, there usually aren’t any early warning ...

  19. Medically Unexplained Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overview of three specific MUS’s: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome and discusses things you can do to minimize the symptoms and improve your quality of life. It is possible that these syndromes can all ...

  20. Cholera Illness and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Compartir Cholera is an acute, diarrheal illness caused by infection of the intestine with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae and is spread by ingestion of contaminated food or water. The infection is often mild or without symptoms, ...

  1. Premonitory symptoms in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, Katarina; Artto, Ville; Bendtsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe the frequency and number of premonitory symptoms (PS) in migraine, the co-occurrence of different PS, and their association with migraine-related factors. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, a validated questionnaire was sent to Finnish migraine families between 2002 and 2013...... to obtain data on 14 predefined PS, migraine diagnoses, demographic factors, and migraine characteristics. The estimated response rate was 80%. RESULTS: Out of 2714 persons, 2223 were diagnosed with migraine. Among these, 77% reported PS, with a mean number of 3.0 symptoms compared to 30% (p ....5 symptoms (p migraine headaches. Yawning was the most commonly reported symptom (34%) among migraineurs. Females reported PS more frequently than males (81 versus 64%, p 

  2. Gynecological cancer alarm symptoms:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasubramaniam, Kirubakaran; Ravn, Pernille; dePont Christensen, René

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To determine the proportion of patients who were referred to specialist care after reporting gynecological cancer alarm symptoms to their general practitioner. To investigate whether contact with specialist care was associated with lifestyle factors or socioeconomic status. MATERIAL...... and odds ratios (ORs) for associations between specialist care contact, lifestyle factors and socioeconomic status. RESULTS: The study included 25 866 non-pregnant women; 2957 reported the onset of at least one gynecological cancer alarm symptom, and 683 of these (23.1%) reported symptoms to their general......: Educational level influence contact with specialist care among patients with gynecological cancer alarm symptoms. Future studies should investigate inequalities in access to the secondary healthcare system. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  3. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Utah Research News Make a Difference Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy Print This Page Peripheral Neuropathy symptoms usually start ... more slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: A sensation of wearing an invisible “ ...

  4. Consequências da síndrome da tensão pré-menstrual na vida da mulher Consequencias de la sindrome de la tension pre-menstrual en la vida de la mujer The consequences of the syndrome of the pre-menstrual tension in the woman's life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice H. Muramatsu

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo tem como objetivo identificar as possíveis conseqüências da Síndrome da Tensão Pré-Menstrual na vida da mulher. Através do questionário, identificamos distúrbios relacionados a alterações físicas, emocionais e, como consequências às alterações nos relacionamentos envolvendo filho, marido/ namorado e familiar, assim como no ambiente de trabalho.Este estudio tuvo como objetivo identificar las posibles consequencias de la sindrome de la tensión pre-menstrual en la vida de la mujer. Atraves de un questionário, identificamos disturbios relacionados con alteraciones físicas y emocionales que por vez danãn los relacionamentos envolviendo hijo, marido, enamorado y familiares, asi como en el ambiente de trabajo.This study has as objective to identify the possible consequences of the Syndrome of the Pré-menstrual Tension in the woman's life. Through the questionnaire, we identified disturb related to physical and emotional discomfort and as consequences the alterations in the relationships involving son, husband / boyfriend and family, as well as in the work atmosphere.

  5. Testing the dimensional structure of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in a nonclinical trauma-exposed adolescent sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liyong; Wang, Li; Cao, Chengqi; Qing, Yulan; Armour, Cherie

    2016-02-01

    The current study investigated the underlying dimensionality of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a trauma-exposed Chinese adolescent sample using a confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) alternative model approach. The sample consisted of 559 students (242 females and 314 males) ranging in age from 12 to 18 years (M = 15.8, SD = 1.3). Participants completed the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5, the Major Depression Disorder and Panic Disorder subscales of the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Aggressive Behavior subscale of the Youth Self-Report. Confirmatory factor analytic results indicated that a seven-factor model comprised of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behavior, anxious arousal, and dysphoric arousal factors emerged as the best-fitting model. Further analyses showed that the external measures of psychopathological variables including major depressive disorder, panic disorder, and aggressive behavior were differentially associated with the resultant factors. These findings support and extend previous findings for the newly refined seven-factor hybrid model, and carry clinical and research implications for trauma-related psychopathology. © 2015 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  6. Symptom Management of Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes a treatment approach for the symptom management of bulimia that is a synthesis of various techniques, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, response prevention, relapse training, and psychodynamic therapy. The model has been a useful teaching tool for staff and patients in both group and individual formats. Addresses the challenges of…

  7. Respiratory Symptoms in Firefighters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, Frans E.; Rooyackers, Jos M.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Heederik, Dick J.

    Background The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with respiratory symptoms in common firefighters in the Netherlands. Methods A total of 1,330 firefighters from the municipal fire brigades of three provinces of the Netherlands were included in the

  8. Bullying and PTSD Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idsoe, Thormod; Dyregrov, Atle; Idsoe, Ella Cosmovici

    2012-01-01

    PTSD symptoms related to school bullying have rarely been investigated, and never in national samples. We used data from a national survey to investigate this among students from grades 8 and 9 (n = 963). The prevalence estimates of exposure to bullying were within the range of earlier research findings. Multinomial logistic regression showed that…

  9. DSM-5: proposed changes to depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Jerome C

    2012-03-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is currently undergoing a revision that will lead to a fifth edition in 2013. Proposed changes for DSM-5 include the creation of several new categories of depressive disorder. Some nosologists have expressed concern that the proposed changes could yield many 'false-positive diagnoses' in which normal distress is mislabeled as a mental disorder. Such confusion of normal distress and mental disorder undermines the interpretability of clinical trials and etiological research, causes inefficient allocation of resources, and incurs risks of unnecessary treatment. To evaluate these concerns, I critically examine five proposed DSM-5 expansions in the scope of depressive and grief disorders: (1) a new mixed anxiety/depression category; (2) a new premenstrual dysphoric disorder category; (3) elimination of the major depression bereavement exclusion; (4) elimination of the adjustment disorder bereavement exclusion, thus allowing the diagnosis of subsyndromal depressive symptoms during bereavement as adjustment disorders; and (5) a new category of adjustment disorder related to bereavement for diagnosing pathological non-depressive grief. I examine each proposal's face validity and conceptual coherence as well as empirical support where relevant, with special attention to potential implications for false-positive diagnoses. I conclude that mixed anxiety/depression and premenstrual dysphoric disorder are needed categories, but are too broadly drawn and will yield substantial false positives; that the elimination of the bereavement exclusion is not supported by the evidence; and that the proposed elimination of the adjustment-disorder bereavement exclusion, as well as the new category of grief-related adjustment disorder, are inconsistent with recent grief research, which suggests that these proposals would massively pathologize normal grief responses.

  10. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Life events and life satisfaction in Nigerian patients with undifferentiated somatoform disorder and a non clinical population. Abstract · Vol 48, No 2 (2007) - Articles Personality Disorders in a Non-Patient Population in Nigeria: Screening and Diagnosis Abstract · Vol 46, No 4 (2005) - Articles Premenstrual dysphoric disorder ...

  11. Emotional symptoms among adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meilstrup, Charlotte; Ersbøll, Annette K; Nielsen, Line

    2015-01-01

    level. RESULTS: Schoolchildren from low (odds ratio (OR) 1.70, 95% CI: 1.33-2.17) and medium (OR 1.50, 95% CI: 1.22-1.85) occupational social class (OSC), girls (OR 1.32, 95% CI: 1.13-1.56) and schoolchildren exposed to bullying (OR 3.82, 95% CI: 2.71-5.40), had increased odds for emotional symptoms....... A negative classroom climate was associated with emotional symptoms (OR 1.29, 95% CI: 0.99-1.69) and so was being part of classrooms with a high prevalence of bullying (OR 1.28, 95% CI: 1.0-1.60). CONCLUSION: Female sex, low OSC, single parent family, exposure to bullying and a high prevalence of bullying...

  12. Hearing symptoms personal stereos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Tiara Santos; Borja, Ana Lúcia Vieira de Freitas

    2012-04-01

     Practical and portable the personal stereos if had become almost indispensable accessories in the day the day. Studies disclose that the portable players of music can cause auditory damages in the long run for who hear music in high volume for a drawn out time.  to verify the prevalence of auditory symptoms in users of amplified players and to know its habits of use  Observational prospective study of transversal cut carried through in three institutions of education of the city of Salvador BA, being two of public net and one of the private net. 400 students had answered to the questionnaire, of both the sex, between 14 and 30 years that had related the habit to use personal stereos.  The symptoms most prevalent had been hyperacusis (43.5%), auricular fullness (30.5%) and humming (27.5), being that the humming is the symptom most present in the population youngest. How much to the daily habits: 62.3% frequent use, 57% in raised intensities, 34% in drawn out periods. An inverse relation between exposition time was verified and the band of age (p = 0,000) and direct with the prevalence of the humming.  Although to admit to have knowledge on the damages that the exposition the sound of high intensity can cause the hearing, the daily habits of the young evidence the inadequate use of the portable stereos characterized by long periods of exposition, raised intensities, frequent use and preference for the insertion phones. The high prevalence of symptoms after the use suggests a bigger risk for the hearing of these young.

  13. Hearing symptoms personal stereos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiara Santos da Luz1

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Practical and portable the personal stereos if had become almost indispensable accessories in the day the day. Studies disclose that the portable players of music can cause auditory damages in the long run for who hear music in high volume for a drawn out time. Objective: to verify the prevalence of auditory symptoms in users of amplified players and to know its habits of use. Method: Observational prospective study of transversal cut carried through in three institutions of education of the city of Salvador BA, being two of public net and one of the private net. 400 students had answered to the questionnaire, of both the sex, between 14 and 30 years that had related the habit to use personal stereos. Results: The symptoms most prevalent had been hyperacusis (43.5%, auricular fullness (30.5% and humming (27.5, being that the humming is the symptom most present in the population youngest. How much to the daily habits: 62.3% frequent use, 57% in raised intensities, 34% in drawn out periods. An inverse relation between exposition time was verified and the band of age (p=0,000 and direct with the prevalence of the humming. Conclusion: Although to admit to have knowledge on the damages that the exposition the sound of high intensity can cause the hearing, the daily habits of the young evidence the inadequate use of the portable stereos characterized by long periods of exposition, raised intensities, frequent use and preference for the insertion phones. The high prevalence of symptoms after the use suggests a bigger risk for the hearing of these young.

  14. Respiratory symptoms of megaesophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Di Stefano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Megaesophagus as the end result of achalasia is the consequence of disordered peristalsis and the slow decompensation of the esophageal muscular layer. The main symptoms of achalasia are dysphagia, regurgitation, chest pain and weight loss, but respiratory symptoms, such as coughing, particularly when patients lie in a horizontal position, may also be common due to microaspiration. A 70-year old woman suffered from a nocturnal cough and shortness of breath with stridor. She reported difficulty in swallowing food over the past ten years, but had adapted by eating a semi-liquid diet. Chest X-ray showed right hemithorax patchy opacities projecting from the posterior mediastinum. Chest computed tomography scan showed a marked dilatation of the esophagus with abundant food residues. Endoscopy confirmed the diagnosis of megaesophagus due to esophageal achalasia, excluding other causes of obstruction, such as secondary esophagitis, polyps, leiomyoma or leiomyosarcoma. In the elderly population, swallowing difficulties due to esophageal achalasia are often underestimated and less troublesome than the respiratory symptoms that are caused by microaspiration. The diagnosis of esophageal achalasia, although uncommon, should be considered in patients with nocturnal chronic coughs and shortness of breath with stridor when concomitant swallowing difficulties are present.

  15. Neurobiology Underlying Fibromyalgia Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Ceko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread pain, clinical symptoms that include cognitive and sleep disturbances, and other abnormalities such as increased sensitivity to painful stimuli, increased sensitivity to multiple sensory modalities, and altered pain modulatory mechanisms. Here we relate experimental findings of fibromyalgia symptoms to anatomical and functional brain changes. Neuroimaging studies show augmented sensory processing in pain-related areas, which, together with gray matter decreases and neurochemical abnormalities in areas related to pain modulation, supports the psychophysical evidence of altered pain perception and inhibition. Gray matter decreases in areas related to emotional decision making and working memory suggest that cognitive disturbances could be related to brain alterations. Altered levels of neurotransmitters involved in sleep regulation link disordered sleep to neurochemical abnormalities. Thus, current evidence supports the view that at least some fibromyalgia symptoms are associated with brain dysfunctions or alterations, giving the long-held “it is all in your head” view of the disorder a new meaning.

  16. Tratamento da disforia pré-menstrual com antidepressivos: revisão dos ensaios clínicos controlados Treatment of premenstrual dysphoria with antidepressants: review of controlled clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Cheniaux

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A disforia pré-menstrual (DPM, que acomete entre 3% e 8% das mulheres em idade fértil, representa uma forma mais grave de síndrome pré-menstrual, na qual predominam as alterações do humor e do comportamento. Acredita-se que haja algum tipo de ligação entre a DPM e os transtornos do humor. OBJETIVO: Estudar a eficácia dos antidepressivos na DPM. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada uma revisão dos ensaios clínicos controlados com antidepressivos no tratamento da DPM, utilizando-se as seguintes bases de dados: Medline, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS, psycINFO e Biblioteca Cochrane. RESULTADOS: A clomipramina, a fluoxetina, a sertralina, a paroxetina e a venlafaxina se mostraram superiores ao placebo em diversos estudos. DISCUSSÃO: As mulheres que sofrem de DPM possivelmente apresentam uma disfunção serotoninérgica. CONCLUSÃO: Alguns antidepressivos, especialmente os inibidores seletivos da recaptação da serotonina (ISRS, parecem ser eficazes no tratamento da DPM.INTODUCTION: Premenstrual dysphoria (PMD, which affects between 3% and 8% of women during reproductive years, represents a more severe type of premenstrual syndrome. Mood and behavior changes are predominant in PMD. It is believed that there is some kind of link between PMS and mood disorders. OBJECTIVE: Studying the efficacy of antidepressants in PMD. METHODS: We elaborated a review of controlled clinical trials with antidepressants in the treatment of PMD, using the following databases: Medline, LILACS, psycINFO and Cochrane Library. RESULTS: Clomipramine, fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine and venlafaxine were superior to placebo in various studies. DISCUSSION: Women with PMD possibly present a serotonergic dysfunction. CONCLUSION: Some antidepressants, specialy SSRIs, seem to be effective in the treatment of PMD.

  17. 2-Heptanone Produces Sensorial-Emotional Changes, Depending on Length of Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana G. Gutiérrez-García

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available 2-Heptanone is an alarm pheromone contained in some human fluids, but its role is unknown in chemical communication. In part one of this study, a sample of 24 women provided urine specimens taken around their supposed ovulation days, and a second sample 12 days later. As exclusion criteria, women with anxiety (based on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Spielberger, mood disorders (based on the Clinical Diagnosis of Depression Questionnaire, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (based on the Daily Symptoms Report were not included in the study. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry indicated that urinary 2-heptanone content was increased approximately two-fold during pre-menstruation compared with the days around ovulation. In part two of this study, 141 male and female volunteers, sniffed this ketone and with a simple questionnaire it was determined that the longest tested duration (180 s of sniffing 2-heptanone lowered the acceptance of sniffing this ketone again, compared with the shorter sniffing durations (5 and 60 s, with no differences between sexes. The increased concentration of 2-heptanone during the day before menstruation may be considered as part of the functional changes preceding menstruation and sniffing this ketone may produce sensorial-emotional changes depending on time of sniffing, the significance of this deserves further study.

  18. Symptoms and Causes of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptoms & Causes of Celiac Disease What are the symptoms of celiac disease? Most people with celiac disease have one or ... the rash and no other symptoms. Why are celiac disease symptoms so varied? Symptoms of celiac disease vary from ...

  19. Celiac Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Table of Contents What are some of the symptoms of celiac disease? Some people with celiac disease may not feel ... skin rash with blisters slowed growth Why are celiac disease symptoms so varied? Researchers are studying the reasons celiac ...

  20. Symptom management in Behcets disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Filiz; Tureyen, Aynur Esen; Aykar, Fisun Senuzun

    2018-01-01

    To determine the symptoms experienced by patients diagnosed with Behcet's Disease and how they cope with them. The qualitative study was conducted from September 2013 to March 2014 at Ege University Medical Faculty Hospital, Turkey, comprising patients having all symptoms of Behcet's Disease. Data was collected through semi-structured focus-group interview form. The findings were assessed using Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms and Symptom Management Theory. SPSS 20 and Nvivo 10 were used for data analysis. Of the 35 patients, 16(45.8%) were female and 19(54.2%) were male. The symptoms affected patients' lives, and the patients used either positive or negative symptom management strategies, leading to either positive or negative results during symptom management. Behcet's Disease patients needed effective symptom management.

  1. Premenstrual syndrome - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... example, do quiet activities or listen to soothing music before going to sleep. To relieve anxiety and ... www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. ...

  2. What Are the Symptoms of Endometriosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pinterest Email Print What are the symptoms of endometriosis? The primary symptoms of endometriosis are pain and ... symptoms, may cause these endometriosis symptoms to continue. Endometriosis-Related Pain Researchers know that pain is a ...

  3. Betahistine for symptoms of vertigo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murdin, Louisa; Hussain, Kiran; Schilder, Anne G M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vertigo is a symptom in which individuals experience a false sensation of movement. This type of dizziness is thought to originate in the inner ear labyrinth or its neural connections. It is a commonly experienced symptom and can cause significant problems with carrying out normal

  4. Menopause. How Exercise Mitigates Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargarten, Kathleen M.

    1994-01-01

    During menopause and the climacteric, women experience many changes that can affect nearly every organ system and cause psychological symptoms. This article reviews the specific changes and explains how exercise can address each symptom; outlines a practical approach physicians can use to help menopausal patients improve their quality of life. (SM)

  5. Impact of ADHD symptoms on autism spectrum disorder symptom severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Linda; Bühler, Eva; Poustka, Luise; Bach, Christiane; Heinzel-Gutenbrunner, Monika; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Bachmann, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Despite the official exclusion criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the DSM-IV and ICD-10, patients with ASD often show ADHD symptoms. We aimed to examine the potential influence of ADHD symptoms on autistic psychopathology in a large sample of patients with ASD. We tested the hypothesis that patients with ASD and an additional ADHD (ASD+) would show a higher severity of autistic symptoms than those with ASD only (ASD-). We measured autistic symptoms using the autism diagnostic observation schedule (ADOS-G), the autism diagnostic interview (ADI-R), and the social responsiveness scale (SRS). To measure overall psychopathology and ADHD symptoms, we used the child behavior checklist (CBCL) and the ADHD rating scale (FBB-ADHS), respectively. Group differences between the ASD+ and the ASD- group (group division was conducted according to the results of the FBB-ADHS) were calculated using a univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA). The ASD+ group showed a greater severity of autistic symptoms than the ASD- group, measured by the SRS and the ADI-R. Especially in the social interaction subscale (ADI-R), a significantly higher symptom severity was found in the ASD+ group. No significant group differences were found regarding autistic symptoms measured by the ADOS-G. Patients with ASD and an additional ADHD expressed a stronger severity of autistic symptoms than patients with ASD only. According to our results, the possibility of a co-diagnosis of ADS and ADHD, as is being planned in the DSM-5, is in line with earlier studies, is highly reasonable, will simplify research, and have therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. ''Medically unexplained" symptoms and symptom disorders in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Marianne; Hartman, Tim C. Olde; Aamland, Aase

    2017-01-01

    that better supports clinical decision-making, creates clearer communication and provides scientific underpinning of research to ensure effective interventions. Discussion: We propose a classification of symptoms that places greater emphasis on prognostic factors. Prognosis-based classification aims...

  7. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information Health Information Home Mental Health Information Statistics Consumer Health Publications Help for Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials ... Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People with depression discuss how they got help. & ...

  8. Heart Attack Symptoms in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fat, cholesterol and other substances (plaque). Watch an animation of a heart attack . Many women think the ... Support Network Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  9. Understanding ADHD: Symptoms in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding ADHD Symptoms In Children Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table ... hyperactivity, and impulsivity are the key behaviors of ADHD. It is normal for all children to be ...

  10. Neuropsychiatric symptoms and celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; OEmigielski, Janusz; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms may represent an atypical manifestation of celiac disease that occur before a gastroenterological diagnosis is made. Some studies suggest that a gluten-free diet is effective in treating the depression, anxiety, and neurological complications associated with celiac disease. The article describes the case of a patient suffering from chronic, treatment-resistant symptoms of depression and anxiety. The diagnosis of celiac disease and introduction of an elimination diet caused a significant improvement in mental state and everyday functioning in the presenting patient. The presence of persistent anxiety and depressive symptoms, with a poor reaction to pharmacological treatment, indicates a need to identify somatic reasons for the underlying condition. It is important to remember that celiac disease can occur at any age, not only in childhood. The presence of this somatic cause of persistent depressive and anxiety symptoms should be considered in the diagnostic process in adults.

  11. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... give up. Read more about depression on this Web page. If the symptoms fit, get help now. ... Contact Us U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health USA.gov The National ...

  12. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People with depression discuss how they got help. & ... I felt like I was such an awful person that there was no real reason for me ...

  13. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Outreach Home Stakeholder Engagement Outreach Partnership Program Alliance for Research Progress ... Symptoms can vary, but many depressed people lose interest in activities they normally enjoyed, have feelings of ...

  14. Symptoms of Lewy Body Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the fight against LBD! Donate Symptoms Lewy body dementia (LBD) has variable presentations that include cognitive difficulties ... wake cycle alterations. Cognitive impairment in Lewy body dementia (LBD) is often misdiagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). ...

  15. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a serious illness that affects many people. Symptoms can vary, but many depressed people lose interest in ... lot of weight. NARRATOR : A person with depression can feel irritable and restless, and have sleep problems. ...

  16. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... items) Training (1 item) Other Treatments (15 items) Alzheimer’s Disease (2 items) Coping with Traumatic Events (3 items) Institute Announcements (24 items) Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People with depression discuss how ...

  17. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... give up. Read more about depression on this Web page. If the symptoms fit, get help now. Share ... Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tool Expenditures and Results Recommendations for Reporting on Suicide ...

  18. Hearing Loss: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Hearing Loss Symptoms, Devices, Prevention & Research Past Issues / Spring ... a disease. It can accompany any type of hearing loss. It can be a side effect of ...

  19. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a minute really to do anything that took deep concentration. I tried a journal and I tried ... give up. Read more about depression on this Web page. If the symptoms fit, get help now. ...

  20. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... few days. It is a serious illness that affects many people. Symptoms can vary, but many depressed ... suffer from depression trying to learn why it affects some people but not others. Treatments for depression ...

  1. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 3 items) Institute Announcements (24 items) Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People with depression ... why it affects some people but not others. Treatments for depression do work. One type of effective ...

  2. Hope, Symptoms, and Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mellar P; Lagman, Ruth; Parala, Armida; Patel, Chirag; Sanford, Tanya; Fielding, Flannery; Brumbaugh, Anita; Gross, James; Rao, Archana; Majeed, Sumreen; Shinde, Shivani; Rybicki, Lisa A

    2017-04-01

    Hope is important to patients with cancer. Identifying factors that influence hope is important. Anxiety, depression, fatigue, and pain are reported to impair hope. The objective of this study was to determine whether age, gender, marital status, duration of cancer, symptoms, or symptom burden measured by the sum of severity scores on the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) correlated with hope measured by the Herth Hope Index (HHI). Patients with advanced cancer in a palliative care unit participated. Demographics including age, gender, marital status, cancer site, and duration of cancer were collected. Individuals completed the ESAS and HHI. Spearman correlation and linear regression were used to assess associations adjusting for gender (male vs female), age ( 12 months). One hundred and ninety-seven were participated in the study, of which 55% were female with a mean age of 61 years (standard deviation 11). Hope was not associated with gender, age, marital status, or duration of cancer. In univariable analysis, hope inversely correlated with ESAS score (-0.28), lack of appetite (-0.22), shortness of breath (-0.17), depression (-0.39), anxiety (-0.32), and lack of well-being (-0.33); only depression was clinically relevant. In multivariable analysis, total symptom burden weakly correlated with hope; only depression remained clinically significant. This study found correlation between symptom burden and hope was not clinically relevant but was so for depression. Among 9 ESAS symptoms, only depression had a clinically relevant correlation with hope.

  3. Adenomyosis and urinary system symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Gultekin Adanas; Yavuz, Arzu

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the presence and incidence of overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome in patients diagnosed with adenomyosis and to evaluate the impacts of urinary symptoms on the quality of life of the patients. A total of 108 individuals including 50 patients with adenomyosis and 58 controls who were admitted to the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of Bursa, Cekirge State Hospital and Derince Training and Research Hospital between April 2015 and December 2015 were included. The Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) were used to evaluate symptoms. Irritative urinary symptoms such as nocturia and frequency were seen more frequently in the adenomyosis group (p = 0.001 and p = 0.035). Overactive bladder symptoms were more common in the adenomyosis group (p = 0.0001). Our study showed that symptoms of urinary tract symptoms are common in patients with adenomyosis, which adversely affect the quality of life. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Trauma & the reproductive lifecycle in women Trauma e o ciclo reprodutivo feminino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Born

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Women are at significantly higher risk for developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD than men, resulting in increased psychosocial burden and healthcare related costs. Recent research has shown complex interactions between the impact of traumatic experiences, and the reproductive lifecycle in women. For example, women suffering from premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD who also report a history of sexual or physical abuse are more likely to present with different neuroendocrine reactivity to stressors, when compared to premenstrual dysphoric disorder subjects without prior history of trauma or abuse or non-premenstrual dysphoric disorder subjects. In addition, women with a history of abuse or trauma may experience re-emergence of symptoms during pregnancy. Lastly, females who experience miscarriage may present with even higher prevalence rates of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. In this manuscript we examine the existing data on gender differences in post-traumatic stress disorder, with particular focus on psychological and physiological factors that might be relevant to the development of symptoms after exposure to traumatic events associated with the reproductive life cycle. Current options available for the treatment of such symptoms, including group and counselling therapies and debriefing are critically reviewed.Mulheres estão sujeitas a um maior risco para o desenvolvimento de transtorno de estresse pós-traumático (TEPT do que os homens, o que acarreta prejuízos e custos significativos do ponto de vista psicossocial e de saúde pública. Estudos recentes mostram interações complexas entre o impacto de experiências traumáticas e o ciclo reprodutivo feminino. Por exemplo, mulheres com transtorno disfórico pré-menstrual (TDPM, que também relatam histórico de trauma ou abuso físico, estão mais sujeitas a apresentar uma resposta neuroendócrina diferenciada após exposição a um fator ou evento estressante, quando

  5. Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment of Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Pneumonia Pneumonia Symptoms, Causes, and Risk Factors Anyone can get ... risk for pneumonia. What Are the Symptoms of Pneumonia? Pneumonia symptoms can vary from mild to severe, ...

  6. What Are the Symptoms of Turner Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pinterest Email Print What are the symptoms of Turner syndrome? Turner syndrome causes a variety of symptoms in girls and ... some people, symptoms are mild, but for others, Turner syndrome can cause serious health problems. In general, women ...

  7. Psychiatric comorbidity in gender dysphoric adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A.L.C.; Doreleijers, T.A.H.; Steensma, T.D.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study examined psychiatric comorbidity in adolescents with a gender identity disorder (GID). We focused on its relation to gender, type of GID diagnosis and eligibility for medical interventions (puberty suppression and cross-sex hormones). Methods: To ascertain DSM-IV diagnoses,

  8. Vitex agnus-castus extracts for female reproductive disorders: a systematic review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Die, M Diana; Burger, Henry G; Teede, Helena J; Bone, Kerry M

    2013-05-01

    Vitex agnus-castus L. (chaste tree; chasteberry) is a popular herbal treatment, predominantly used for a range of female reproductive conditions in Anglo-American and European practice. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence for the efficacy and safety of Vitex extracts from randomised, controlled trials investigating women's health.Eight databases were searched using Latin and common names for Vitex and phytotherapeutic preparations of the herb as a sole agent, together with filters for randomised, controlled trials or clinical trials. Methodological quality was assessed according to the Cochrane risk of bias and Jadad scales, as well as the proposed elaboration of CONSORT for reporting trials on herbal interventions.Thirteen randomised, controlled trials were identified and twelve are included in this review, of which eight investigated premenstrual syndrome, two premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and two latent hyperprolactinaemia. For premenstrual syndrome, seven of eight trials found Vitex extracts to be superior to placebo (5 of 6 studies), pyridoxine (1), and magnesium oxide (1). In premenstrual dysphoric disorder, one study reported Vitex to be equivalent to fluoxetine, while in the other, fluoxetine outperformed Vitex. In latent hyperprolactinaemia, one trial reported it to be superior to placebo for reducing TRH-stimulated prolactin secretion, normalising a shortened luteal phase, increasing mid-luteal progesterone and 17β-oestradiol levels, while the other found Vitex comparable to bromocriptine for reducing serum prolactin levels and ameliorating cyclic mastalgia. Adverse events with Vitex were mild and generally infrequent. The methodological quality of the included studies varied, but was generally moderate-to-high. Limitations include small sample sizes in some studies, heterogeneity of conditions being treated, and a range of reference treatments.Despite some methodological limitations, the results from randomised

  9. Wind turbines and idiopathic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Whether or not wind turbines pose a risk to human health is a matter of heated debate. Personal reactions to other environmental exposures occurring in the same settings as wind turbines may be responsible of the reported symptoms. However, these have not been accounted for in previous studies. We...... investigated whether there is an association between residential proximity to wind turbines and idiopathic symptoms, after controlling for personal reactions to other environmental co-exposures. We assessed wind turbine exposures in 454 residences as the distance to the closest wind turbine (Dw) and number...... of wind turbines

  10. Betahistine for symptoms of vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, Louisa; Hussain, Kiran; Schilder, Anne G M

    2016-06-21

    Vertigo is a symptom in which individuals experience a false sensation of movement. This type of dizziness is thought to originate in the inner ear labyrinth or its neural connections. It is a commonly experienced symptom and can cause significant problems with carrying out normal activities. Betahistine is a drug that may work by improving blood flow to the inner ear. This review examines whether betahistine is more effective than a placebo at treating symptoms of vertigo from different causes. To assess the effects of betahistine in patients with symptoms of vertigo from different causes. The Cochrane ENT Information Specialist searched the Cochrane ENT Trials Register; Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2015, Issue 8); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; ClinicalTrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. We also contacted manufacturers and researchers in the field. The date of the search was 21 September 2015. We included randomised controlled trials of betahistine versus placebo in patients of any age with vertigo from any neurotological diagnosis in any settings. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Our primary outcome was the proportion of patients with reduction in vertigo symptoms (considering together the intensity, frequency and duration those symptoms). We included 17 studies, with a total of 1025 participants; 12 studies were published (567 patients) and five were unpublished (458 patients). Sixteen studies including 953 people compared betahistine with placebo. All studies with analysable data lasted three months or less. The majority were at high risk of bias, but in some the risk of bias was unclear. One study, at high risk of bias, included 72 people with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and compared betahistine with placebo; all patients also had particle repositioning manoeuvres. The studies varied considerably in terms of types of participants, their

  11. Symptoms and Symptom Clusters Identified by Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer Using a Symptom Heuristics App.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameringer, Suzanne; Erickson, Jeanne M; Macpherson, Catherine Fiona; Stegenga, Kristin; Linder, Lauri A

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer experience multiple distressing symptoms during treatment. Because the typical approach to symptom assessment does not easily reflect the symptom experience of individuals, alternative approaches to enhancing communication between the patient and provider are needed. We developed an iPad-based application that uses a heuristic approach to explore AYAs' cancer symptom experiences. In this mixed-methods descriptive study, 72 AYAs (13-29 years old) with cancer receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy used the Computerized Symptom Capture Tool (C-SCAT) to create images of the symptoms and symptom clusters they experienced from a list of 30 symptoms. They answered open-ended questions within the C-SCAT about the causes of their symptoms and symptom clusters. The images generated through the C-SCAT and accompanying free-text data were analyzed using descriptive, content, and visual analyses. Most participants (n = 70) reported multiple symptoms (M = 8.14). The most frequently reported symptoms were nausea (65.3%), feeling drowsy (55.6%), lack of appetite (55.6%), and lack of energy (55.6%). Forty-six grouped their symptoms into one or more clusters. The most common symptom cluster was nausea/eating problems/appetite problems. Nausea was most frequently named as the priority symptom in a cluster and as a cause of other symptoms. Although common threads were present in the symptoms experienced by AYAs, the graphic images revealed unique perspectives and a range of complexity of symptom relationships, clusters, and causes. Results highlight the need for a tailored approach to symptom management based on how the AYA with cancer perceives his or her symptom experience. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to recovery. Depression treatment can take time to work, so don't give up. Read more about depression on this Web page. If the symptoms fit, get help ... Mental Health Information Summaries of Scientific Meetings Information about NIMH ...

  13. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... few days. It is a serious illness that affects many people. Symptoms can vary, but many depressed people lose interest in ... I did have depression. NARRATOR : Medications called antidepressants can ... to figuring out exactly how these medications work, who benefits from them the ...

  14. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to recovery. Depression treatment can take time to work, so don't give up. Read more about depression on this Web page. If the symptoms fit, get help now. ... of Scientific Meetings Information about NIMH RePORTER : Research Portfolio Online ...

  15. Symptoms as the main problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Marianne; Carlsen, Anders Helles; Rask, Mette Troellund

    2016-01-01

    Dette studie undersøger tilfredsheden hos patienter, der blev afsluttet i almen praksis uden specifik diagnose, dvs. hvor lægen efter afsluttet konsultation kun kunne anføre "symptom" eller "problem" som slutdiagnose. Det drejer sig om ca. 1/3 af alle helbredsrelaterede konsultationer i almen...

  16. Stroke Risk Factors and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... » [ pdf, 433 kb ] Order Materials » Stroke Risk Factors and Symptoms Risk Factors for a Stroke Stroke prevention is still ... it. Treatment can delay complications that increase the risk of stroke. Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). Seek help. ...

  17. Prodromal symptoms in hidradenitis suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ring, H C; Theut Riis, P; Zarchi, K

    2017-01-01

    %), paraesthesia (63%) and itching (20%). the majority of the patients stated that the prodromes usually occurred > 24 h (45%) or 12-24 h (20%) before the eruption. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that the majority of patients with HS experience prodromal symptoms, heralding a flare of their HS. The findings may give...

  18. Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License For Lawyers Food & Fitness Home Food MyFoodAdvisor ... Fit Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In My Community Home ...

  19. Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for an epinephrine auto-injector? Take this survey. Food Allergy Research & Education Toggle navigation Menu Donate Search Search Life with Food Allergies Life with Food Allergies If you or someone ...

  20. Using the symptom monitor in a randomized controlled trial: the effect on symptom prevalence and severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Johanna; de Vos, Rien; van Duijn, Nico P.; Schadé, Egbert; Bindels, Patrick J. E.

    2006-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial investigated the effect of reporting physical symptoms by using a systematic symptom monitoring instrument, the Symptom Monitor, on symptom prevalence and severity among patients with cancer in the palliative phase. The overall objective was to achieve symptom relief

  1. [Pain, from symptom to syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Virginie

    2017-05-01

    Acute pain is a symptom enabling us to implement a response when faced with an attack. Chronic pain is complex and multifactorial. The care of the patient by a multidisciplinary team comprises the diagnosis of the pain and the putting in place of a treatment for each of its components. This includes physical reconditioning, adaptation strategies and work on the psychological elements relating to the representation of the pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Respiratory symptoms in insect breeders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Roberts, J; Fishwick, D; Tate, P; Rawbone, R; Stagg, S; Barber, C M; Adisesh, A

    2011-08-01

    A number of specialist food suppliers in the UK breed and distribute insects and insect larvae as food for exotic pets, such as reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates. To investigate the extent of work-related (WR) symptoms and workplace-specific serum IgE in workers potentially exposed to a variety of biological contaminants, including insect and insect larvae allergens, endotoxin and cereal allergens at a UK specialist insect breeding facility. We undertook a study of respiratory symptoms and exposures at the facility, with subsequent detailed clinical assessment of one worker. All 32 workers were assessed clinically using a respiratory questionnaire and lung function. Eighteen workers consented to provide serum for determination of specific IgE to workplace allergens. Thirty-four per cent (11/32) of insect workers reported WR respiratory symptoms. Sensitization, as judged by specific IgE, was found in 29% (4/14) of currently exposed workers. Total inhalable dust levels ranged from 1.2 to 17.9 mg/m(3) [mean 4.3 mg/m(3) (SD 4.4 mg/m(3)), median 2.0 mg/m(3)] and endotoxin levels of up to 29435 EU/m(3) were recorded. Exposure to organic dusts below the levels for which there are UK workplace exposure limits can result in respiratory symptoms and sensitization. The results should alert those responsible for the health of similarly exposed workers to the potential for respiratory ill-health and the need to provide a suitable health surveillance programme.

  3. Cholecystic fistula with atypical symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, U.C.; Hasbak, P.; From, G.

    2008-01-01

    We report a patient with spontaneous cholecystocolonis fistula secondary to cholelithiasis. A 93 year-old woman was admitted because of weight loss, diarrhoea and upper abdominal pain. Ultrasound examination revealed air in the biliary tract and cholescientigraphy revealed a fistula between the g...... the gallbladder and right colon. Using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography a calculus was extracted from the bile duct and the symptoms disappeared Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1/14...

  4. Aromatherapy for managing menopausal symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiae; Lee, Hye Won; Lee, Ju Ah; Lim, Hyun-Ja; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: Aromatherapy is often used as a complementary therapy for women's health. This systematic review aims to evaluate the therapeutic effects of aromatherapy as a management for menopausal symptoms. Methods: Eleven electronic databases will be searched from inception to February 2018. Randomized controlled trials that evaluated any type of aromatherapy against any type of control in individuals with menopausal symptoms will be eligible. The methodological quality will be assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Two authors will independently assess each study for eligibility and risk of bias and to extract data. Results: This study will provide a high quality synthesis of current evidence of aromatherapy for menopausal symptoms measured with Menopause Rating Scale, the Kupperman Index, the Greene Climacteric Scale, or other validated questionnaires. Conclusions: The conclusion of our systematic review will provide evidence to judge whether aromatherapy is an effective intervention for patient with menopausal women. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval will not be required, given that this protocol is for a systematic review. The systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. The review will also be disseminated electronically and in print. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42017079191. PMID:29419673

  5. International Active Surveillance Study of Women Taking Oral Contraceptives (INAS-OC Study)

    OpenAIRE

    Dinger, Juergen C; Bardenheuer, Kristina; Assmann, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background A 24-day regimen of contraceptive doses of drospirenone and ethinylestradiol (DRSP/EE 24d) was recently launched. This regimen has properties which may be beneficial for certain user populations (e.g., women suffering from premenstrual dysphoric disorder or acne). However, it is unknown whether this extended regimen has an impact on the cardiovascular risk associated with the use of oral contraceptives (OCs). The INternational Active Surveillance study of women taking Oral...

  6. A Review of the US Army Experience Using Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Aircrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    post - partum depression , dysmenorrhea, and pre-menstrual dysphoric disorder, conditions unique to female reproductive health. A surprising number of...Martin.quattlebaum@amedd.army.mil ABSTRACT As many as 300,000 soldiers may suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression , or anxiety...soldiers may suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression , or anxiety and less than half of them seek care, citing adverse career

  7. Trauma e o ciclo reprodutivo feminino

    OpenAIRE

    Born, Leslie; Phillips, Shauna Dae; Steiner, Meir; Soares, Claudio N

    2005-01-01

    Women are at significantly higher risk for developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than men, resulting in increased psychosocial burden and healthcare related costs. Recent research has shown complex interactions between the impact of traumatic experiences, and the reproductive lifecycle in women. For example, women suffering from premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) who also report a history of sexual or physical abuse are more likely to present with different neuroendocrine react...

  8. HIV / AIDS: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: Symptoms , Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment Past Issues / ... Most people who have become recently infected with HIV will not have any symptoms. They may, however, ...

  9. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter ... most common heart attack symptom in men and women is chest pain or discomfort. However, women also ...

  10. Modified Protein Improves Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice Spotlight on Research Modified Protein Improves Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice By Colleen Labbe, ... D., Ph.D., Rush University. Altering a key protein involved in the development of vitiligo may protect ...

  11. Spinal cord injury - Symptoms and causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breathing, coughing or clearing secretions from your lungs Emergency signs and symptoms Emergency signs and symptoms of ... tackle using the top of your helmet in football. Use a spotter for new moves in gymnastics. ...

  12. Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Glaucoma Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest Research Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Symptoms and Diagnosis Glaucoma can develop in one or both eyes. Often ...

  13. Glucosamine: Can It Worsen Gout Symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms? My husband takes glucosamine supplements to treat gout. But I'm wondering if glucosamine, which contains shellfish, may actually worsen gout symptoms? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. ...

  14. What Are the Symptoms of Menopause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pinterest Email Print What are the symptoms of menopause? Perimenopause begins with a change in a woman's ... longer than a week. A common symptom of menopause is the appearance of hot flashes (sometimes called ...

  15. Restless Legs Syndrome -- Causes and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... miles): 10 25 50 Share: Essentials in Sleep Insomnia Overview & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis & Self Tests Treatment Sleep Apnea Overview & Facts ... Self Test & Diagnosis Treatment Snoring Overview and Facts Causes and Symptoms Self Tests & ... Insomnia Short Sleeper Hypersomnias Narcolepsy Insufficient ...

  16. Musculoskeletal System Symptoms in Goiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevim Akin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal manifestations in patients with thyroid dysfunction. Methods: One hundred and twenty-three patients (100 female, 23 male who visited the nuclear medicine department for thyroid gland scintigraphy were included in our study. According to thyroid hormone levels, patients were allocated into five categories: hyperthyroidism, subclinical hyperthyroidism, euthyroid, subclinical hypothyroidism, and hypothyroidism. Before neurological and musculoskeletal examinations, a standardized symptom questionnaire was completed including questions about sensory symptoms, muscle weakness, restricted joint mobility, musculoskeletal pain. Neurological examination, range of motion of joints, effusion or swelling of joints was assessed. Diagnosis of osteoarthritis was done by the clinical and radiological characteristics. The diagnosis of FMS was made according to criteria of American College of Rheumatology. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, a T-score ≤ -2.5 was classified as osteoporosis, whereas a T-score between -2.5 and -1.0 was classified as osteopenia. Thyroid status was determined by serum TSH levels. Results: Eighty-one percent of the patients were female (100 and 19% were male (23. Mean age of female patients was 49.99±15.27 years (range 20-87 and mean age of male patients was 61.8±12.33 years (range 34-88. When divided according to thyroid status, 21.1% (n=26 had hyperthyroidism, 21.1% (n=26 had subclinical hyperthyroidism, 49.6% (n=61 were euthyroid, 4.9% (n=6 had subclinical hypothyroidism and 3.3% (n=4 were hypothyroid. None of 59% of patients had any musculoskeletal diagnosis. Osteoporosis was the most common problem, affecting 23.7% of patients Conclusion: The presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in patients with goiter should be considered and investigated. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 261-269

  17. Trauma Symptoms in Abused Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Mohammadkhani

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There are many traumatic events (including natural disasters, physical, psychological and sexual abuse that may befall children and there is clear evidence that such experiences can produce a plethora of negative psychological effects. Children’s exposure to such traumas has been associated with a wide variety of negative mental health outcomes, including anxiety and depression, post-traumatic stress and dissociation and anger and aggression. It seems that the impacts of traumatic events are significantly related to type and intensity of trauma. Materials & Method: Through a systematized clustral sampling 3042 male and female students from junior high school who were participated in a survey study for investigating point prevalence of child abuse, completed Trauma Symptoms Checklist for Children-Alternate Version (TSCC-A and Child Abuse Self-report Scale (CASRS. After recognition of abused children, they were compared based on trauma symptoms. TSCC-A is a self-report measure of post-traumatic distress and related psychological symptomatology in male and female children aged 8-16 years. It is useful in the evaluation of children who have experienced traumatic events, including physical and sexual assault, victimization by peers, major losses, the witnessing of violence done to others and natural disasters. TSCC-A makes no reference to sexual issues. CASRS is a self-report scale to assess child abuse and neglect with 38 items and four subscales (psychological abuse, neglect, physical and sexual abuse. Results: Considering the type of traumatic experiences, the results showed that abused children significantly received higher scores in scales and subscales of TSCC-A than nonabused group. They specially reported more symptoms (depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, anger and dissociation comparing normal children. Conclusion: It is concluded that the type and rate of traumatic event is related to intensity of symptomatology.

  18. Neuropsychiatric symptoms and celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Urban-Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; Œmigielski, Janusz; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Małgorzata Urban-Kowalczyk,1 Janusz Śmigielski,2 Agnieszka Gmitrowicz3 1Affective and Psychotic Disorders Department, Medical University of Łódź, Åódź, Poland; 2Department of Geriatric Medicine Medical University of Åódź, Åódź, Poland; 3Department of Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Åódź, Åódź, Poland Background: Neuropsychiatric symptoms may represent an ...

  19. Predicting depressive symptoms in unemployed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Zorica

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we review recent research literature focused on relationship between unemployment and depression, and theories emphasizing the mechanisms by which unemployment may contribute to increased levels of depression. Our research investigated depressive symptomatology and its predictors among unemployed people (N = 453 varying in length of unemployment. Results showed that self - mastery, self - esteem, financial strain, gender, intensity of job - seek behavior and length on unemployment were significant predictors of depressive symptoms. Results are discussed in light of current theories of unemployment and mental health and recommendations are made for practice.

  20. Somatic symptom profiles in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Marie; Jørgensen, Torben; Schröder, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to identify and describe somatic symptom profiles in the general adult population in order to enable further epidemiological research within multiple somatic symptoms. METHODS: Information on 19 self-reported common somatic symptoms was achieved from a population...

  1. Prediction of withdrawal symptoms during opioid detoxification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Boukje A G; Krabbe, Paul F M; De Jong, Cor A J; van der Staak, Cees P F

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The severity of self-reported withdrawal symptoms varies during detoxification of opioid-dependent patients. The aim of this study is to identify subgroups of withdrawal symptoms within the detoxification trajectory and to predict the severity of withdrawal symptoms on the basis of

  2. Symptom attributions in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Line Flytkjær; Hvidberg, Line; Pedersen, Anette Fischer

    2015-01-01

    Størstedelen af kolorektal cancere opdages gennem patienters symptomatiske henvendelse i almen praksis. Man ved dog ikke meget om, hvordan patienter selv oplever deres symptomer. Formålet med studiet var, at undersøge om symptom attributioner er associeret med hvilket symptom man oplevede før...

  3. Psychological Symptoms in Sexually Abused Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.

    1988-01-01

    The report examined psychological symptoms exhibited by 24 girls (ages 6-12) evaluated within six months of being sexually abused. Results showed a marked discrepancy between child and parent reports of symptoms with children not reporting as many symptoms of depression, anxiety, or low self-esteem as parents. (Author/DB)

  4. [Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerkamp, N.J.; Nijhof, A.; Tissingh, G.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease has traditionally been viewed as a disease with only motor features. Nowadays, a wide variety of non-motor symptoms and signs are also recognised as being characteristic of the disease. Non-motor symptoms, most importantly autonomic dysfunction, neuropsychiatric symptoms and

  5. Prediction of withdrawal symptoms during opioid detoxification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, B.A.G.; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Staak, C.P.F. van der

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The severity of self-reported withdrawal symptoms varies during detoxification of opioid-dependent patients. The aim of this study is to identify subgroups of withdrawal symptoms within the detoxification trajectory and to predict the severity of withdrawal symptoms on the basis of

  6. Assessment of lower urinary tract symptoms in men by international prostate symptom score and core lower urinary tract symptom score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Tetsuya; Kume, Haruki; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Sugihara, Toru; Nomiya, Akira; Tsurumaki, Yuzuri; Miyazaki, Hideyo; Suzuki, Motofumi; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Yutaka; Homma, Yukio

    2012-05-01

    Study Type - Therapy (symptom prevalence). Level of Evidence 2a. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) has been most commonly used for the symptom assessment of men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). However, LUTS in men are so variable that they may not be fully captured by the IPSS questionnaire alone. This study has demonstrated that the Core Lower Urinary Tract Symptom Score (CLSS) questionnaire, which addresses 10 important symptoms, is an appropriate initial assessment tool for LUTS in men with various diseases/conditions. International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) has been commonly used to assess lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). We have recently developed Core Lower Urinary Tract Symptom Score (CLSS). The aim of this study is to compare IPSS and CLSS for assessing LUTS in men.  Consecutive 515 men fulfilled IPSS and CLSS questionnaires. IPSS QOL Index was used as the QOL surrogate. The clinical diagnoses were BPH (n = 116), BPH with OAB wet (n =80), prostate cancer (n = 128), prostatitis (n = 68), underactive bladder (n = 8), others (n = 72), and controls (e.g., occult blood) (n = 42). Simple statistics and predictability of poor QOL (QOL Index 4 or greater) were examined. All symptom scores were significantly increased in symptomatic men compared with controls. Scores of corresponding symptoms of two questionnaires were significantly correlated (r = 0.58-0.85, all P incontinence, slow stream, straining, incomplete emptying, bladder pain and urethral pain) as independent factors. The hazard ratios for bladder pain (2.2) and urgency incontinence (2.0) were among the highest. All the nine symptoms are addressed in CLSS, while three symptoms (urgency incontinence, bladder, and urethral pain) are dismissed in IPSS. CLSS questionnaire is more comprehensive than IPSS questionnaire for symptom assessment of men with various diseases/conditions, although both questionnaires can capture

  7. Vegan diet alleviates fibromyalgia symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaartinen, K; Lammi, K; Hypen, M; Nenonen, M; Hanninen, O; Rauma, A L

    2000-01-01

    The effect of a strict, low-salt, uncooked vegan diet rich in lactobacteria on symptoms in 18 fibromyalgia patients during and after a 3-month intervention period in an open, non-randomized controlled study was evaluated. As control 15 patients continued their omnivorous diet. The groups did not differ significantly from each other in the beginning of the study in any other parameters except in pain and urine sodium. The results revealed significant improvements in Visual analogue scale of pain (VAS) (p=0.005), joint stiffness (p=0.001), quality of sleep (p=0.0001), Health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) (p=0.031), General health questionnaire (GHQ) (p=0.021), and a rheumatologist's own questionnaire (p=0.038). The majority of patients were overweight to some extent at the beginning of the study and shifting to a vegan food caused a significant reduction in body mass index (BMI) (p=0.0001). Total serum cholesterol showed a statistically significant lowering (p=0.003). Urine sodium dropped to 1/3 of the beginning values (p=0.0001) indicating good diet compliance. It can be concluded that vegan diet had beneficial effects on fibromyalgia symptoms at least in the short run.

  8. Eating disorder symptoms and parenting styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haycraft, Emma; Blissett, Jackie

    2010-02-01

    This study aimed to examine associations between symptoms of eating disorders and parenting style, in a non-clinical sample. One hundred and five mothers completed self-report measures of eating disorder symptoms and parenting style. Higher levels of eating disorder symptoms were associated with more authoritarian and permissive parenting styles. Authoritative parenting was not significantly related to eating disorder symptoms. The findings demonstrate that eating disorder symptoms in non-clinical individuals are related to less adaptive parenting styles. These findings have potential implications for clinicians working with mothers with eating disorders. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Symptom monitoring in treatment of cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Wanxia; Lin Miao; Lü Ye; Yang Biao; Yao Cong; Liu Juan; Wang Wenru

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine self-reported symptoms by the patients receiving cancer therapy, and find out the symptoms that should be coped with and managed during the treatment. Methods A pilot study was conducted on self-reported symptoms on 185 patients receiving chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for different cancers. The Therapy-Related Symptoms Checklist (TRSC) was used. Results Severe symptoms on the TRSC subscales: loss of appetite,feeling sluggish, weight loss, nausea and hair loss, were reported by the patients. The frequently reported symptoms by those on chemotherapy were nausea, feeling sluggish, weight loss, vomiting, and taste change. The frequently reported symptoms by those on radiotherapy were feeling sluggish, weight loss, loss of appetite, difficult sleeping, and changing taste. The symptoms of loss of appetite, feeling sluggish, weight loss, hair loss, and nausea were both frequently reported by those on radiotherapy and those on chemotherapy. Conclusion Symptom monitoring may be facilitated by TRSC, based on the severity and frequency of reported symptoms, more patients and caregivers could know which symptoms should be preferential interventions.

  10. Symptom structure of PTSD following breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, M J; Studts, J L; Hann, D M; Jacobsen, P B; Andrykowski, M A

    2000-04-01

    Identification of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and diagnoses in survivors of cancer is a growing area of research, but no published data exist regarding the symptom structure of PTSD in survivors of malignant disease. Findings from investigations of the PTSD symptom structure in other trauma populations have been inconsistent and have not been concordant with the re-experiencing, avoidance/numbing, and arousal symptom clusters specified in DSM-IV. The present study employed confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate the extent to which the implied second-order factor structure of PTSD was replicated in a sample of 142 breast cancer survivors. PTSD symptoms were measured using the PTSD Checklist--Civilian Version (PCL-C). Fit indices reflected a moderate fit of the symptom structure implied by the DSM-IV. These findings provide some tentative support for the DSM-IV clustering of PTSD symptoms and for the validity of cancer-related PTSD.

  11. Asthma symptoms in obese adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2016-01-01

    The association between asthma and obesity is well-described, but not straightforward, and according to current guidelines asthma control is more difficult to achieve in obese patients. The currently available studies evaluating response to pharmacological asthma therapy in obese patients show...... that these patients have an altered, in general less favorable, response to both reliever and controller medication compared to normal weight patients. However, at present, the limited available evidence precludes evidence-based recommendations. The 'obesity-related asthma' phenotype has different characteristics......, including association with atopy and type of airway inflammation, compared to 'classic' asthma. Furthermore, weight loss in patients with this phenotype leads to an improvement in symptoms, lung function, and airway responsiveness, as well as a reduction in medication utilization and hospital admissions...

  12. First rank symptoms for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Weiser, Karla; Maayan, Nicola; Bergman, Hanna; Davenport, Clare; Kirkham, Amanda J; Grabowski, Sarah; Adams, Clive E

    2015-01-25

    Early and accurate diagnosis and treatment of schizophrenia may have long-term advantages for the patient; the longer psychosis goes untreated the more severe the repercussions for relapse and recovery. If the correct diagnosis is not schizophrenia, but another psychotic disorder with some symptoms similar to schizophrenia, appropriate treatment might be delayed, with possible severe repercussions for the person involved and their family. There is widespread uncertainty about the diagnostic accuracy of First Rank Symptoms (FRS); we examined whether they are a useful diagnostic tool to differentiate schizophrenia from other psychotic disorders. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of one or multiple FRS for diagnosing schizophrenia, verified by clinical history and examination by a qualified professional (e.g. psychiatrists, nurses, social workers), with or without the use of operational criteria and checklists, in people thought to have non-organic psychotic symptoms. We conducted searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycInfo using OvidSP in April, June, July 2011 and December 2012. We also searched MEDION in December 2013. We selected studies that consecutively enrolled or randomly selected adults and adolescents with symptoms of psychosis, and assessed the diagnostic accuracy of FRS for schizophrenia compared to history and clinical examination performed by a qualified professional, which may or may not involve the use of symptom checklists or based on operational criteria such as ICD and DSM. Two review authors independently screened all references for inclusion. Risk of bias in included studies were assessed using the QUADAS-2 instrument. We recorded the number of true positives (TP), true negatives (TN), false positives (FP), and false negatives (FN) for constructing a 2 x 2 table for each study or derived 2 x 2 data from reported summary statistics such as sensitivity, specificity, and/or likelihood ratios. We included 21 studies with a total of 6253 participants

  13. Parents' Reports of Children's Internalizing Symptoms: Associations with Parents' Mental Health Symptoms and Substance Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michelle L; Bravo, Adrian J; Hamrick, Hannah C; Braitman, Abby L; White, Tyler D; Jenkins, Jennika

    2017-06-01

    This brief report examined the unique associations between parents' ratings of child internalizing symptoms and their own depression and anxiety in families with parental substance use disorder (SUD). Further, we examined whether parental SUD (father only, mother only, both parents) was related to discrepancy in mothers' and fathers' reports of children's internalizing symptoms. Participants were 97 triads (fathers, mothers) in which one or both parents met criteria for SUD. Polynomial regression analyses were conducted to examine whether father-mother reports of child internalizing symptoms had unique associations with parents' own symptoms of depression and anxiety while controlling for child gender, child age, and SUD diagnoses. Controlling for fathers' symptoms and other covariates, mothers experiencing more depression and anxiety symptoms reported more symptoms of child internalizing symptoms than did fathers. Mothers' and fathers' SUD was associated with higher anxiety symptoms among mothers after controlling for other variables. A second set of polynomial regressions examined whether father-mother reports of child internalizing symptoms had unique associations with parents' SUD diagnoses while controlling for child gender and child age. After controlling for mothers' symptoms and other covariates, parents' reports of children's internalizing symptoms were not significantly associated with either parent's SUD or parental SUD interactions (i.e., both parents have SUD diagnoses). Taken together, mothers' ratings of children's internalizing symptoms may be accounted for, in part, by her reports of depression and anxiety symptoms.

  14. [Family functioning of elderly with depressive symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Rosely Almeida; Desani da Costa, Gislaine; Yamashita, Cintia Hitomi; Amendola, Fernanda; Gaspar, Jaqueline Correa; Alvarenga, Márcia Regina Martins; Faccenda, Odival; Oliveira, Maria Amélia de Campos

    2014-06-01

    To classify families of elderly with depressive symptoms regarding their functioning and to ascertain the presence of an association between these symptoms, family functioning and the characteristics of the elderly. This was an observational, analytical, cross-sectional study performed with 33 teams of the Family Health Strategy in Dourados, MS. The sample consisted of 374 elderly divided into two groups (with and without depressive symptoms). The instruments for data collection were a sociodemographic instrument, the GeriatricDepression Scale (15 items) and the Family Apgar. An association was observed between depressive symptoms and family dysfunction, female gender, four or more people living together, and physical inactivity. The functional family may represent effective support for the elderly with depressive symptoms, because it offers a comfortable environment that ensures the well-being of its members. The dysfunctional family can barely provide necessary care for the elderly, which can exacerbate depressive symptoms.

  15. Symptoms and biomarkers associated with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kårhus, Line L; Thuesen, Betina H; Rumessen, Juri J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify possible early predictors (symptoms and biomarkers) of celiac disease, compare symptoms before and after screening, and evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of serologic screening for celiac disease in an adult Danish population. METHODS: This cross-sectional population......-positive individuals 19 months after the clinical evaluation to obtain information on their symptoms and their experience with participation in the screening. RESULTS: Before screening, participants subsequently diagnosed with celiac disease did not differ from the rest of the population with respect to symptoms...... with having been diagnosed and 71% felt better on a gluten-free diet. CONCLUSION: There were no differences in the prevalence of symptoms between participants with and without screening-detected celiac disease, confirming that risk stratification in a general population by symptoms is difficult. The majority...

  16. Gene-environment interplay in depressive symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petkus, A. J.; Beam, C. R.; Johnson, W.

    2017-01-01

    that genetic factors play a larger part in the association between depressive symptoms and physical illness for men than for women. For both sexes, across all ages, physical illness may similarly trigger social and health limitations that contribute to depressive symptoms.......Background Numerous factors influence late-life depressive symptoms in adults, many not thoroughly characterized. We addressed whether genetic and environmental influences on depressive symptoms differed by age, sex, and physical illness. Method The analysis sample included 24 436 twins aged 40......-90 years drawn from the Interplay of Genes and Environment across Multiple Studies (IGEMS) Consortium. Biometric analyses tested age, sex, and physical illness moderation of genetic and environmental variance in depressive symptoms. Results Women reported greater depressive symptoms than men. After age 60...

  17. Levothyroxine Poisoning - Symptoms and Clinical Outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Birgitte; Saedder, Eva A; Dalhoff, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Levothyroxine (LT), T4, poisoning is rarely associated with a severe outcome. However, cases with significant complications have been reported. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with symptoms of poisoning including late-onset symptoms. All enquiries to the Danish Poison...... Information Centre (DPIC) concerning LT poisoning between March 2007 and September 2012 were reviewed and the following parameters were recorded: age, dose, time from ingestion, multiple drug intake and symptoms. To evaluate the frequency of late-onset symptoms, a subgroup of patients without initial symptoms...... patients, neither in children nor in adults (age 16-92 years) (p poisoning at the time of enquiry; however, in 9 of 21 (43%) patients, we were able to contact, late-onset symptoms existed. In none of the cases...

  18. Family functioning of elderly with depressive symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosely Almeida Souza

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To classify families of elderly with depressive symptoms regarding their functioning and to ascertain the presence of an association between these symptoms, family functioning and the characteristics of the elderly. Method: This was an observational, analytical, cross-sectional study performed with 33 teams of the Family Health Strategy in Dourados, MS. The sample consisted of 374 elderly divided into two groups (with and without depressive symptoms. The instruments for data collection were a sociodemographic instrument, the GeriatricDepression Scale (15 items and the Family Apgar. Results: An association was observed between depressive symptoms and family dysfunction, female gender, four or more people living together, and physical inactivity. Conclusion: The functional family may represent effective support for the elderly with depressive symptoms, because it offers a comfortable environment that ensures the well-being of its members. The dysfunctional family can barely provide necessary care for the elderly, which can exacerbate depressive symptoms.

  19. "Negative symptoms"secondary to intracranial tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Kate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial tumors are increasingly common in the elderly population. They may present with varied symptoms, some of which may be psychiatric in nature. In patients with known psychiatric disorders, these symptoms may be misattributed resulting in a delay in diagnosis and management. We present a case of an elderly female with paranoid schizophrenia and new onset symptoms secondary to intracranial tumor, which were initially misdiagnosed.

  20. Children's perception of physical symptoms: The example of asthma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, S.; Prins, P.J.M.; Lahey, B.B.; Kazdin, A.E.

    1998-01-01

    Introduces symptom perception as a concept to explain and understand the discordance between objective and subjective symptoms of disease. Contemporary models describing symptom perception and factors that influence these symptom perceptual processes are evaluated in light of recent empirical