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Sample records for prelingual deafness group

  1. Functional Reorganizations of Brain Network in Prelingually Deaf Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Wenjing Li; Jianhong Li; Jieqiong Wang; Peng Zhou; Zhenchang Wang; Junfang Xian; Huiguang He

    2016-01-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies suggested structural or functional brain reorganizations occurred in prelingually deaf subjects. However, little is known about the reorganizations of brain network architectures in prelingually deaf adolescents. The present study aims to investigate alterations of whole-brain functional network using resting-state fMRI and graph theory analysis. We recruited 16 prelingually deaf adolescents (10~18 years) and 16 normal controls matched in age and gender. Brain ne...

  2. [Societal cost of pre-lingual deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubbico, L; Bartolucci, M A; Broglio, D; Boner, A

    2007-01-01

    Congenital hearing loss still remain an important medical and social problem for the delayed language development. Object of this study is to provide an updated and close estimate of the economic burden involved in pre-lingual hearing loss. Data were provided by the Ministry of Health data bank, the Ministry of Education national data bank, the National Institute of Social Insurance national data bank and the Italian Central Statistics Institute. The information was collected by means of a specially provided Societal Cost Questionnaire (SCQ). Direct medical costs, direct non-medical costs and indirect welfare costs involved in deafness were included in the cost estimate. Was enrolled in the study a sample of subjects with pre-lingual deafness, with a mean bilateral neuro-sensorial hearing impairment equal to 60 dB or more for 500, 1,000 and 2,000 Hz frequency tones in the better ear detected in neonatal age, had prevented speech from developing. The statistical assessment was performed according to an actuarial approach, considering the estimated life expectancy at birth, based on updated population data from census 2001. Based on life expectancy, the lifetime mean cost assessed for a subject affected by profound pre-lingual deafness turned out to be equal to Euro 737,994.76 for a male and Euro 755,404.02 for a female. Unlike other disabling affections, deafness weighs significantly more on the social system than on the health system. As a matter of fact, the direct medical costs, such as audiological diagnosis, hearing aids, etc., only account for 3.8% of the societal cost, whereas education, rehabilitation and welfare costs reach 96.2% of the total. Finally, our results suggest that societal costs can only be reduced by zeroing in on promotion and broadening of effective prevention strategies. The appropriate public health measures (such as the universal newborn hearing screening) set up and implemented in several European and non-European countries proved

  3. Do Profoundly Prelingually Deaf Patients with Psychosis Really Hear Voices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paijmans, R.; Cromwell, J.; Austen, S.

    2006-01-01

    The psychiatric literature has described profoundly prelingually deaf people with psychosis who report hearing voices. The present study proposes that such reports in fact reflect the beliefs of professionals in mental health and deafness and not the hallucinatory experience of psychotic deaf people. The study demonstrates that it is functionally…

  4. Aphasia in a prelingually deaf woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, C; Knight, R; Mandel, M

    1982-03-01

    A left parietal infarct in a prelingually deaf person resulted in an aphasia for both American Sign Language (ASL) and written and finger-spelled English. Originally the patient had a nearly global aphasia affecting all language systems. By five to seven weeks post-onset her symptoms resembled those of hearing aphasics with posterior lesions: fluent but paraphasic signing, anomia, impaired comprehension and repetition, alexia, and agraphia with elements of neologistic jargon. In addition, there was a pronounced sequential movement copying disorder, reduced short-term verbal memory and acalculia. In general, the patient's sign errors showed a consistent disruption in the structure of ASL signs which parallels the speech errors of oral aphasic patients. We conclude that most aphasic symptoms are not modality-dependent, but rather reflect a disruption of linguistic processes common to all human languages. This case confirms the importance of the left hemisphere in the processing of sign language. Furthermore, the results indicate that the left supramarginal and angular gyri are necessary substrates for the comprehension of visual/gestural languages.

  5. Behavioral Assessment of Prelingually Deaf Children Before Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, David L.; Pisoni, David B.; Sanders, Mary; Miyamoto, Richard T.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis To determine whether scores from a behavioral assessment of prelingually deafened children who present for cochlear implant surgery are predictive of audiological outcomes Study Design Retrospective review of longitudinal data collected from 42 children with prelingual hearing loss who presented for a cochlear implant before age 5 years. Methods The Vineland Adaptive Behavioral Scales (VABS) was administered during the preimplant workup. Standardized scores reflect daily living skills, socialization, and motor development compared with a normative sample. Regression analyses were conducted to determine whether any subject variables were related to VABS scores. Mixed-model analyses were computed to determine whether preimplant VABS scores were predictive of longitudinal spoken-language data obtained after cochlear implant surgery. Results Motor scores tended to be higher than nonmotor scores. Nonmotor scores were significantly lower than the normative mean and decreased with testing age. Children with acquired deafness demonstrated lower motor scores than children with congenital causes. Children with higher motor scores demonstrated significantly higher performance on language, vocabulary, and word recognition tests than children with lower motor scores. Nonmotor domains were not as robustly related to spoken-language measures, although similar trends were observed Conclusion Profound deafness and language delay may confound the assessment of daily living skills and socialization in the population studied. Motor development appears to proceed normally in prelingually deafened children and is a preimplant predictor of spoken-language outcome in young infants and children with cochlear implants, a finding consistent with the large body of work establishing links between perceptual-motor and language development. PMID:16148703

  6. Prelingual deafness: Benefits from cochlear implants versus conventional hearing aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Torre, Ana Adelina Giantomassi Della; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Brito, Rubens de

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The majority of patients with hearing loss, including those with severe hearing loss, benefits from the use of hearing aids. The cochlear implant is believed to achieve better results in a child with hearing loss in cases where the severity of disability renders hearing aids incapable of providing adequate sound information, as they require sufficient cochlear reserve so that acoustic detention occurs. Objective: To assess if cochlear implants provide more benefit than conventional hearing aids in prelingually deaf patients. Summary of the findings: The study was a systematic review of scientific papers selected by a search of the SciELO, Cochrane, MEDLINE, and LILACS-BIREME databases. Among the 2169 articles found, 12 studies proved relevant to the issue and presented an evidence strength rating of B. No publications rated evidence strength A. Seven of the studies analyzed were prospective cohorts and 5 were cross-sectional studies. Conclusion: Based on several studies, cochlear implants were demonstrated to be the best current alternative for bilateral severe or profound hearing loss, achieving better results in speech perception and development in prelingual children when compared to conventional hearing aids. PMID:25991962

  7. Vowel acquisition by prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Marie-Eve; Le Normand, Marie-Thérèse; Ménard, Lucie; Goud, Marilyne; Cohen, Henri

    2004-05-01

    Phonetic transcriptions (study 1) and acoustic analysis (study 2) were used to clarify the nature and rhythm of vowel acquisition following the cochlear implantation of prelingually deaf children. In the first study, seven children were divided according to their degree of hearing loss (DHL): DHL I: 90-100 dB of hearing loss, 1 children; DHL II: 100-110 dB, 3 children; and DHL III: over 110 dB, 3 children. Spontaneous speech productions were recorded and videotaped 6 and 12 months postsurgery and vowel inventories were obtained by listing all vowels that occurred at least twice in the child's repertoire at the time of recording. Results showed that degree of hearing loss and age at implantation have a significant impact on vowel acquisition. Indeed, DHL I and II children demonstrated more diversified as well as more typical pattern of acquisition. In the second study, the values of the first and second formants were extracted. The results suggest evolving use of the acoustic space, reflecting the use of auditory feedback to produce the three phonological features exploited to contrast French vowels (height, place of articulation, and rounding). The possible influence of visual feedback before cochlear implant is discussed.

  8. Preoperative cerebral metabolic difference related to the outcome of cochlear implantation in prelingually deaf children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Lim, G. C.; Ahn, J. H.; Lee, K. S.; Jeong, J. W.; Kim, J. S. [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The outcome of cochlear implantation (CI) has known to be variable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the preoperative regional glucose metabolism difference related to the speech perception outcome after CI in prelingually deaf children. Forty-one prelingually deaf children who underwent CI at age 2{approx}10 years were included. All patients underwent F-18 FDG brain PET within one month before CI and measured speech perception using the institute version of the CID at 2 years after CI. Patients were classified into younger (2{approx}6 years) and older (7{approx}10 years) groups. Each group was also divided into a GOOD (CID scores>80) and a BAD (CID scores<60) subgroup. We assessed regional metabolic difference according to CID scores and age by voxel based analysis (SPM2) comparing normal controls (n =8, 20{approx}30 years). Speech perception was good in 19 (68%) of 28 younger patients and 5 (38%) of 13 older patients after CI. Regional metabolism of both younger and older GOOD subgroup was significantly decreased in right temporal, left cerebellar and right frontal regions compared to normal controls (uncorrected p<0.001). In younger GOOD subgroup, left frontotemporal and both parietal regions showed decreased metabolism and right frontal, left temporal and anterior cingulate regions showed increased metabolism compared to BAD subgroup (uncorrected p<0.005). In younger group, regional metabolism in left superior frontal, right temporal and right occipital regions showed a significant negative correlation with CID scores (uncorrected p<0.005). In older group, the pattern of regional metabolic difference correlated with CID score was not similar to that of younger group. Preoperative regional cerebral metabolism is decreased in several brain regions related to the language in preligually deaf patients and the neuralplasty of younger patients are different according to the outcome of speech perception after CI.

  9. Auditory pathway functioning in prelingual deafness : The clinical consequences for cochlear implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, M.J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implantation has proven itself as a very successful treatment for both children and adults with severe to profound hearing loss. Although most patients obtain a high level of speech perception, performance is more variable in prelingually deaf patients, i.e., patients with an onset of sever

  10. Similarities and Differences in the Processing of Written Text by Skilled and Less Skilled Readers with Prelingual Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on similarities and differences in the processing of written text by individuals with prelingual deafness from different reading levels that used Hebrew as their first spoken language and Israeli Sign Language as their primary manual communication mode. Data were gathered from three sources, including (a) a sentence…

  11. Enhancing Parent-Child Communication and Parental Self-Esteem with a Video-Feedback Intervention: Outcomes with Prelingual Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam-Cassettari, Christa; Wadnerkar-Kamble, Meghana B.; James, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence on best practice for optimizing communication with prelingual deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children is lacking. This study examined the effect of a family-focused psychosocial video intervention program on parent-child communication in the context of childhood hearing loss. Fourteen hearing parents with a prelingual DHH child…

  12. Enhancing Parent-Child Communication and Parental Self-Esteem with a Video-Feedback Intervention: Outcomes with Prelingual Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam-Cassettari, Christa; Wadnerkar-Kamble, Meghana B.; James, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence on best practice for optimizing communication with prelingual deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children is lacking. This study examined the effect of a family-focused psychosocial video intervention program on parent-child communication in the context of childhood hearing loss. Fourteen hearing parents with a prelingual DHH child…

  13. The Music Experiences and Attitudes Of A First Cohort of Prelingually-Deaf Adolescents and Young Adults CI Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfeller, Kate; Driscoll, Virginia; Smith, Rachel See; Scheperle, Christina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the musical engagement (participation and attitude) of pediatric CI recipients who were implanted during early childhood and who have reached age 15 or older. A questionnaire was administered to a group of 31 prelingually deaf CI users who receive annual follow up services and assessment in a clinical research center. The questionnaire was used to examine involvement in and attitudes toward music in school, the community, and in the home; social affiliation (hearing, Deaf, both) and mode of communication (oral, manual, both) were also examined. Despite the technical limitations of cochlear implants in transmitting pitch, melody, and tone quality, over two thirds of this sample described music as being important or very important in their lives. A high level of past and present familial involvement in music was associated with higher levels of current involvement and importance of music in the lives of adolescent and young adult CI users. Comparisons were noted with data from prior studies of persons with hearing loss who were non-CI users. PMID:23565029

  14. [Development of early auditory and speech perception skills within one year after cochlear implantion in prelingual deaf children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ying; Chen, Yuan; Xi, Xin; Hong, Mengdi; Chen, Aiting; Wang, Qian; Wong, Lena

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the development of early auditory capability and speech perception in the prelingual deaf children after cochlear implantation, and to study the feasibility of currently available Chinese assessment instruments for the evaluation of early auditory skill and speech perception in hearing-impaired children. A total of 83 children with severe-to-profound prelingual hearing impairment participated in this study. Participants were divided into four groups according to the age for surgery: A (1-2 years), B (2-3 years), C (3-4 years) and D (4-5 years). The auditory skill and speech perception ability of CI children were evaluated by trained audiologists using the infant-toddler/meaningful auditory integration scale (IT-MAIS/MAIS) questionnaire, the Mandarin Early Speech Perception (MESP) test and the Mandarin Pediatric Speech Intelligibility (MPSI) test. The questionnaires were used in face to face interviews with the parents or guardians. Each child was assessed before the operation and 3 months, 6 months, 12 months after switch-on. After cochlear implantation, early postoperative auditory development and speech perception gradually improved. All MAIS/IT-MAIS scores showed a similar increasing trend with the rehabilitation duration (F=5.743, P=0.007). Preoperative and post operative MAIS/IT-MAIS scores of children in age group C (3-4 years) was higher than that of other groups. Children who had longer hearing aid experience before operation demonstrated higher MAIS/IT-MAIS scores than those with little or no hearing aid experience (F=4.947, P=0.000). The MESP test showed that, children were not able to perceive speech as well as detecting speech signals. However as the duration of CI use increased, speech perception ability also improved substantially. However, only about 40% of the subjects could be evaluated using the most difficult subtest on the MPSI in quiet at 12 months after switch-on. As MCR decreased, the proportion of children who could be tested

  15. Prelingual auditory-perceptual skills as indicators of initial oral language development in deaf children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianesi, Federica; Scorpecci, Alessandro; Giannantonio, Sara; Micardi, Mariella; Resca, Alessandra; Marsella, Pasquale

    2016-03-01

    To assess when prelingually deaf children with a cochlear implant (CI) achieve the First Milestone of Oral Language, to study the progression of their prelingual auditory skills in the first year after CI and to investigate a possible correlation between such skills and the timing of initial oral language development. The sample included 44 prelingually deaf children (23 M and 21 F) from the same tertiary care institution, who received unilateral or bilateral cochlear implants. Achievement of the First Milestone of Oral Language (FMOL) was defined as speech comprehension of at least 50 words and speech production of a minimum of 10 words, as established by administration of a validated Italian test for the assessment of initial language competence in infants. Prelingual auditory-perceptual skills were assessed over time by means of a test battery consisting of: the Infant Toddler Meaningful Integration Scale (IT-MAIS); the Infant Listening Progress Profile (ILiP) and the Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP). On average, the 44 children received their CI at 24±9 months and experienced FMOL after 8±4 months of continuous CI use. The IT-MAIS, ILiP and CAP scores increased significantly over time, the greatest improvement occurring between baseline and six months of CI use. On multivariate regression analysis, age at diagnosis and age at CI did not appear to bear correlation with FMOL timing; instead, the only variables contributing to its variance were IT-MAIS and ILiP scores after six months of CI use, accounting for 43% and 55%, respectively. Prelingual auditory skills of implanted children assessed via a test battery six months after CI treatment, can act as indicators of the timing of initial oral language development. Accordingly, the period from CI switch-on to six months can be considered as a window of opportunity for appropriate intervention in children failing to show the expected progression of their auditory skills and who would have higher risk of

  16. Non-syndromic sensorineural prelingual deafness: the importance of genetic counseling in demystifying parents' beliefs about the cause of their children's deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Fidjy; Paneque, Milena; Reis, Cláudia; Venâncio, Margarida; Sequeiros, Jorge; Saraiva, Jorge

    2013-08-01

    Recent advances in molecular genetics have allowed the determination of the genetic cause of some childhood non-syndromic deafness. In Portugal only a small proportion of families are referred to a clinical genetics service in order to clarify the etiology of the deafness and to provide genetic counseling. Consequently, there are no published studies of the prior beliefs of parents about the causes of hereditary deafness of their children and their genetic knowledge after receipt of genetic counseling. In order to evaluate the impact of genetic counseling, 44 parents of 24 children with the diagnosis of non-syndromic sensorineural prelingual deafness due to mutations in the GJB2 (connexin 26), completed surveys before and after genetic counseling. Before counseling 13.6 % of the parents knew the cause of deafness; at a post-counseling setting this percentage was significantly higher, with 84.1 % of the parents accurately identifying the etiology. No significant differences were found between the answers of mothers and fathers either before or after genetic counseling. Parents' level of education was a significant factor in pre-test knowledge. After genetic counseling 95.5 % of the parents stated that the consultation had met their expectations, 70.5 % remembered correctly the inheritance pattern, and 93.2 % correctly recalled the chance of risk of deafness. These results underline the importance of genetic counseling in demystifying parents' beliefs about the etiology of their children's deafness.

  17. Intelligence development of pre-lingual deaf children with unilateral cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo; Wang, Zhaoyan; Zhang, Zhiwen; Li, Xun; Wu, Weijing; Xie, Dinghua; Xiao, Zi-An

    2016-11-01

    The present study aims to test whether deaf children with unilateral cochlear implantation (CI) have higher intelligence quotients (IQ). We also try to find out the predictive factors of intelligence development in deaf children with CI. Totally, 186 children were enrolled into this study. They were divided into 3 groups: CI group (N = 66), hearing loss group (N = 54) and normal hearing group (N = 66). All children took the Hiskey-Nebraska Test of Learning Aptitude to assess the IQ. After that, we used Deafness gene chip, Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) and Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) methods to evaluate the genotype, auditory and speech performance, respectively. At baseline, the average IQ of hearing loss group (HL), CI group, normal hearing (NH) group were 98.3 ± 9.23, 100.03 ± 12.13 and 109.89 ± 10.56, while NH group scored higher significantly than HL and CI groups (p  0.05). The growth of SIR was positive correlated with the growth of IQ (r = 0.247, p = 0.046), while no significant correlation were found between IQ growth and other possible factors, i.e. gender, age of CI, use of hearing aid, genotype, implant device type, inner ear malformation and CAP growth (p > 0.05). Our study suggests that CI potentially improves the intelligence development in deaf children. Speech performance growth is significantly correlated with IQ growth of CI children. Deaf children accepted CI before 6 years can achieve a satisfying and undifferentiated short-term (12 months) development of intelligence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Background and educational characteristics of prelingually deaf children implanted by five years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geers, Ann; Brenner, Chris

    2003-02-01

    This study documents child, family and educational characteristics of a large representative sample of 8- to 9-yr-old prelingually deaf children who received a cochlear implant by 5 yr of age. Because pre-existing factors such as the child's gender, family characteristics, additional handicaps, age at onset of deafness and at implant, may affect postimplant outcomes, these variables must be accounted for before the impact of educational factors on performance with an implant can be adequately determined. Classroom variables that may affect postimplant outcomes include placement in public or private, mainstream or special education, oral or total communication environments. Other intervention variables include type and amount of individual therapy, experience of the therapist and parent participation in therapy. Documenting these characteristics for a large representative sample of implanted children can provide clinicians and researchers with insight regarding the types of families who sought early cochlear implantation for their children and the types of educational programs in which they placed their children after implantation. It is important to undertake studies that control for as many of these factors as possible so that the relative benefits of specific educational approaches for helping children to get the most benefit from their cochlear implant can be identified. Over a 4-yr period, 181 children from across the US and Canada, accompanied by a parent, attended a cochlear implant research camp. Parents completed questionnaires in which they reported the child's medical and educational history, characteristics of the family, and their participation in the child's therapy. The parent listed names and addresses of clinicians who had provided individual speech/language therapy to the child and signed permission for these clinicians to complete questionnaires describing this therapy. To the extent that this sample is representative of those families seeking a

  19. Sarcasm and Advanced Theory of Mind Understanding in Children and Adults with Prelingual Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Karin; Peterson, Candida C.; Wellman, Henry M.

    2014-01-01

    Two studies addressed key theoretical debates in theory of mind (ToM) development by comparing (a) deaf native signers (n = 18), (b) deaf late signers (n = 59), and (c) age-matched hearing persons (n = 74) in childhood (Study 1: n = 81) and adulthood (Study 2: n = 70) on tests of first- and second-order false belief and conversational sarcasm.…

  20. Enhancing Parent–Child Communication and Parental Self-Esteem With a Video-Feedback Intervention: Outcomes With Prelingual Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadnerkar-Kamble, Meghana B.; James, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence on best practice for optimizing communication with prelingual deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children is lacking. This study examined the effect of a family-focused psychosocial video intervention program on parent–child communication in the context of childhood hearing loss. Fourteen hearing parents with a prelingual DHH child (Mage = 2 years 8 months) completed three sessions of video interaction guidance intervention. Families were assessed in spontaneous free play interactions at pre and postintervention using the Emotional Availability (EA) Scales. The Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale was also used to assess parental report of self-esteem. Compared with nontreatment baselines, increases were shown in the EA subscales: parental sensitivity, parental structuring, parental nonhostility, child responsiveness, and child involvement, and in reported self-esteem at postintervention. Video-feedback enhances communication in families with prelingual DHH children and encourages more connected parent–child interaction. The results raise implications regarding the focus of early intervention strategies for prelingual DHH children. PMID:25819293

  1. Benefits of simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation on verbal reasoning skills in prelingually deaf children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Evi; Langereis, Margreet C.; Frijns, Johan H. M.; Free, Rolien H.; Goedegebure, Andre; Smits, Cas; Stokroos, Robert J.; Ariens-Meijer, Saskia A. M.; Mylanus, Emmanuel A. M.; Vermeulen, Anneke M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Impaired auditory speech perception abilities in deaf children with hearing aids compromised their verbal intelligence enormously. The availability of unilateral cochlear implantation (Cl) auditory speech perception and spoken vocabulary enabled them to reach near ageappropriate levels.

  2. Benefits of simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation on verbal reasoning skills in prelingually deaf children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, E.; Langereis, M.C.; Frijns, J.H.; Free, R.H.; Goedegebure, A.; Smits, C.; Stokroos, R.J.; Ariens-Meijer, S.A.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Vermeulen, A.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Impaired auditory speech perception abilities in deaf children with hearing aids compromised their verbal intelligence enormously. The availability of unilateral cochlear implantation (CI) auditory speech perception and spoken vocabulary enabled them to reach near ageappropriate levels.

  3. Benefits of simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation on verbal reasoning skills in prelingually deaf children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Evi; Langereis, Margreet C.; Frijns, Johan H. M.; Free, Rolien H.; Goedegebure, Andre; Smits, Cas; Stokroos, Robert J.; Ariens-Meijer, Saskia A. M.; Mylanus, Emmanuel A. M.; Vermeulen, Anneke M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Impaired auditory speech perception abilities in deaf children with hearing aids compromised their verbal intelligence enormously. The availability of unilateral cochlear implantation (Cl) auditory speech perception and spoken vocabulary enabled them to reach near ageappropriate levels.

  4. Speech Experience Shapes the Speechreading Network and Subsequent Deafness Facilitates It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Myung-Whan; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, June Sic; Chung, Chun Kee; Oh, Seung-Ha

    2009-01-01

    Speechreading is a visual communicative skill for perceiving speech. In this study, we tested the effects of speech experience and deafness on the speechreading neural network in normal hearing controls and in two groups of deaf patients who became deaf either before (prelingual deafness) or after (postlingual deafness) auditory language…

  5. Sentence Production after Listener and Echoic Training by Prelingual Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golfeto, Raquel M.; de Souza, Deisy G.

    2015-01-01

    Three children with neurosensory deafness who used cochlear implants were taught to match video clips to dictated sentences. We used matrix training with overlapping components and tested for recombinative generalization. Two 3?×?3 matrices generated 18 sentences. For each matrix, we taught 6 sentences and evaluated generalization with the…

  6. Pediatric cochlear implants in prelingual deafness: medium and long-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel M; Puterman, Moshe

    2010-02-01

    Unfortunately, no large-scale, well-designed, comprehensive studies on medium and long-term effect of cochlear implants in prelingual children exist. Furthermore, the few studies listed have addressed different aspects of this issue, in a non-standardized manner. With the question of outcomes becoming so important in modern medicine, standardized reporting methods are essential. This would enable a fair comparison between the different commercial devices and between rehabilitation-education methods. The studies presented above were published between 1999 and 2008. Due to the long follow-up period required for reporting medium and long-term outcomes, they actually represent patients implanted one and two decades ago. At present and in the near future, we may expect better results from patients who were implanted in the last few years for several reasons: a) superior cochlear implants with better coding strategies; b) developments in rehabilitation and higher awareness among parents and staff; c) better health care and universal screening programs, leading to implants being performed in an earlier age; and d) a high rate of performing bilateral cochlear implants (either simultaneously or sequentially) in the last decade, which accomplishes even better results compared to unilateral implants. From the studies reviewed above, mainstreaming the child who has auditory-verbal and oral communication is the preferred educational setting for maximizing the medium and long-term benefit from a cochlear implant. Hearing and speech skills continue to improve many years after the implant. Non-use and failure rates (as reported by the authors from the medical centers and not solely by the cochlear implant manufacturers) are low, ranging from 1% to 2.7% per year. Overall, patients have a high rate of employment, close to that of the general population. However, they may be less satisfied, as the individual and the parents may feel compromised by their communication skills.

  7. Benefits of simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation on verbal reasoning skills in prelingually deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Evi; Langereis, Margreet C; Frijns, Johan H M; Free, Rolien H; Goedegebure, Andre; Smits, Cas; Stokroos, Robert J; Ariens-Meijer, Saskia A M; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Vermeulen, Anneke M

    2016-11-01

    Impaired auditory speech perception abilities in deaf children with hearing aids compromised their verbal intelligence enormously. The availability of unilateral cochlear implantation (CI) auditory speech perception and spoken vocabulary enabled them to reach near ageappropriate levels. This holds especially for children in spoken language environments. However, speech perception in complex listening situations and the acquisition of complex verbal skills remains difficult. Bilateral CI was expected to enhance the acquisition of verbal intelligence by improved understanding of speech in noise. This study examined the effect of bilateral CI on verbal intelligence of 49 deaf children (3;5-8;0 years). Relations between speech perception in noise, auditory short-term memory and verbal intelligence were analysed with multiple linear regressions. In addition, the interaction of educational setting, mainstream or special, on these relations was analysed. Children with bilateral CI obtained higher scores on verbal intelligence. Significant associations were present between speech perception in noise, auditory short-term memory and verbal intelligence. Children with simultaneous bilateral CIs showed better speech perception in noise than children with unilateral CIs, which mediated by the auditory short-term memory capacity, enhanced the ability to acquire more complex verbal skills for BICI children in mainstream education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Long-term language levels and reading skills in mandarin-speaking prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Che-Ming; Chen, Yen-An; Chan, Kai-Chieh; Lee, Li-Ang; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Lin, Bao-Guey; Liu, Tien-Chen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to document receptive and expressive language levels and reading skills achieved by Mandarin-speaking children who had received cochlear implants (CIs) and used them for 4.75-7.42 years. The effects of possible associated factors were also analyzed. Standardized Mandarin language and reading tests were administered to 39 prelingually deaf children with Nucleus 24 devices. The Mandarin Chinese version of the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test was used to assess their receptive vocabulary knowledge and the Revised Primary School Language Assessment Test for their receptive and expressive language skills. The Graded Chinese Character Recognition Test was used to test their written word recognition ability and the Reading Comprehension Test for their reading comprehension ability. Raw scores from both language and reading measurements were compared to normative data of nor- mal-hearing children to obtain standard scores. The results showed that the mean standard score for receptive vocabulary measurement and the mean T scores for the receptive language, expressive language and total language measurement were all in the low-average range in comparison to the normative sample. In contrast, the mean T scores for word and text reading comprehension were almost the same as for their age-matched hearing counterparts. Among all children with CIs, 75.7% scored within or above the normal range of their age-matched hearing peers on receptive vocabulary measurement. For total language, Chinese word recognition and reading scores, 71.8, 77 and 82% of children with CIs were age appropriate, respectively. A strong correlation was found between language and reading skills. Age at implantation and sentence perception scores account for 37% of variance for total language outcome. Sentence perception scores and preimplantation residual hearing were revealed to be associated with the outcome of reading comprehension. We concluded that by using standard tests, the

  9. 语前聋儿童康复训练后听觉能力的动态评估%The Dynamic Assessment of Hearing of Prelingually Deaf Children after Rehabilitation Training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李郁明; 梁勇; 谭少珍

    2013-01-01

    目的 分析和总结语前聋患儿佩戴助听器并经康复训练后听觉能力提高的规律和效果以及评估方法.方法语前聋且双耳佩戴助听器的儿童135例(女57例,男78例)为研究对象,根据初次接受康复训练时的年龄分为三组:>5岁组(42例),4~5岁组(44例)和中的听觉能力评估方法,分别在训练前、训练后6个月和12个月对各组儿童进行听觉能力评估,对结果进行比较分析.10项评估内容总计100分,总分70分以上为有效,得分越高,听觉能力越好.结果 135例患儿经过康复训练6、12个月后,听觉能力均明显提高,训练前、训练后6、12个月评估得分的均值分别为51.33±9.44、70.19±9.43及87.55±6.15分,训练后评估得分明显高于训练前的评估得分(P<0.01);不同性别、年龄、听力损失程度组聋儿康复训练12个月后听觉能力评估得分均较训练前明显提高,差异有极显著统计学意义(P<0.01),有效率达100%.结论规范的康复训练对提高语前聋儿童听觉能力可取得良好的效果,定期评估其听觉能力,有利于为针对性个性化康复训练提供参考.%Objective To dynamically assess the effects of the hearing under rehabilitation training in 135 prelingually deaf children. To analyze and summarize the methods of hearing assessment, regularity and experience of prelingually deaf children under rehabilitation training. Methods 135 prelingually deaf children (57 girls and 78 boys) were included, classified into three groups according to the ages when receiving the first training(grcatcr than 5 years old, 4- 5 years old and less than 4 years old). According to the hearing loss they were classified into two groups of severe and profound hearing loss. The hearing of the prelingually deaf children before training, after six months and after twelve months was evaluated by using the Hearing and Language assessment of hearing - impaired children. The results were analyzed by SPSS 16. 0

  10. Effect of rehabilitation for prelingual deaf children who use cochlear implants in conjunction with hearing aids in the opposite ears%语前聋患儿一侧人工耳蜗对侧助听器效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田彦静; 周慧芳; 张静; 杨东; 许轶; 郭玉玺

    2012-01-01

    目的:通过对人工耳蜗植入对侧耳不同听力损失的患儿联合使用助听器与人工耳蜗语前聋患儿的听觉、语言及学习能力进行评估和比较,探索对患儿更为有效的助听方法,帮助患儿获得最大限度的言语交流。方法:将30例3~6岁语前聋患儿按照植入人工耳蜗对侧耳听力损失程度及是否佩戴助听器,分为一侧人工耳蜗+对侧重度听力损失助听器组(CI+SHA组)、一侧人工耳蜗+对侧极重度听力损失助听器组(CI+PHA组)、单耳人工耳蜗组(CI组).评估各组在康复3、6、9、12、15、18个月时听觉、语言及学习能力,并记录结果。结果:随着术后康复时间的延长,聋儿听觉、语言及学习能力逐渐提高(P<0.05),CI+SHA组听觉能力优于CI+PHA组及CI组(均P<0.05),语言能力及学习能力无明显差异(P>0.05)。结论:语前聋患儿单耳人工耳蜗植入后,若对侧耳尚有残余听力,佩戴助听器后听觉能力效果显著,长期佩戴有助于患儿的康复。%Objective; To compare the effect of rehabilitation of prelingual deaf children who used a cochlear implant(CI) in one ear and a hearing aids in the opposite ear while the hearing level of the opposite ears are different. Hearing ability,language ability and learning ability was included in the content. The aim of this research is to investigate better style of rehabilitation,and to offer the best help to the prelingual deaf children. Method: According to the hearing level of the ear opposite to the one wearing a cochlear implant and whether the opposite ear wear a hearing aid or not,30 prelingual deaf children were divided into three groups, including cochlear implant with opposite severe hearing loss and hearing aid ear(CH-SHA), cochlear implant with opposite profound hearing loss and hearing aid ear(CI+PHA) ,cochlear implant only(CI). The effect of rehabilitation was assessed in six different times(3,6, 9,12,15 and 18 months after the cochlear

  11. Effect Analysis of Inner Ear Malformations Pre-lingual Deaf Children after Cochlear Implantation*%内耳畸形语前聋患儿人工耳蜗植入术后效果分析*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟润兰; 冯永; 管志伟

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the feasibility of cochlear implantation for inner ear malformations pre-lingual deaf children, and evaluates the rehabilitation effect on hearing and speech after the surgery. Methods:Used cochlear implantation to inner ear mal-formations pre-lingual deaf children, compared with pre-lingual deaf children of normal inner ear structure, recorded the transfer ma-chine T value after the surgery in 1 year, then evaluated and analyzed the rehabilitation effect of hearing and speech, and investigated the satisfaction about the effect of surgery of the patents. Results:There was no significant differences on the test results of hearing and speech and T value between the inner ear in pre-lingual deaf children and those of normal inner ear structure (P>0.05), and most of parents were satisfied with the effect of surgery. Conclusion:After the cochlear implantation, the rehabilitation effect on the hear-ing of inner ear malformation pre-lingual deaf children is great, and no differences from that of pre-lingual deaf children of normal inner ear structure, which is worth promotion.%  目的:探讨内耳畸形语前聋患儿人工耳蜗植入术的可行性,并对其术后听觉言语康复效果进行评估。方法:对内耳畸形的语前聋患儿进行人工耳蜗植入术,并与内耳结构正常的语前聋患儿比较,记录术后1年的调机T值,评估和分析其术后听觉言语康复效果,并调查患儿家长对术后效果的满意度。结果:内耳畸形的语前聋患儿的术后听力及言语测试结果、调机T值等与内耳结构正常的患儿比较无显著性差异(P>0.05),且多数患儿家长对手术效果感到满意。结论:内耳畸形语前聋患儿行人工耳蜗植入术后,听觉康复效果显著,与内耳结构正常的语前聋患儿无明显差别,值得临床推广。

  12. Individual Differences in Effectiveness of Cochlear Implants in Children Who Are Prelingually Deaf: New Process Measures of Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisoni, David B; Cleary, Miranda; Geers, Ann E; Tobey, Emily A

    1999-01-01

    The efficacy of cochlear implants in children who are deaf has been firmly established in the literature. However, the effectiveness of cochlear implants varies widely and is influenced by demographic and experiential factors. Several key findings suggest new directions for research on central auditory factors that underlie the effectiveness of cochlear implants. First, enormous individual differences have been observed in both adults and children on a wide range of audiological outcome measures. Some patients show large increases in speech perception scores after implantation, whereas others display only modest gains on standardized tests. Second, age of implantation and length of deafness affect all outcome measures. Children implanted at younger ages do better than children implanted at older ages, and children who have been deaf for shorter periods do better than children who have been deaf for longer periods. Third, communication mode affects outcome measures. Children from "oral-only" environments do much better on standardized tests that assess phonological processing skills than children who use Total Communication. Fourth, at the present time there are no preimplant predictors of outcome performance in young children. The underlying perceptual, cognitive, and linguistic abilities and skills emerge after implantation and improve over time. Finally, there are no significant differences in audiological outcome measures among current implant devices or processing strategies. This finding suggests that the major source of variance in outcome measures lies in the neural and cognitive information processing operations that the user applies to the signal provided by the implant. Taken together, this overall pattern of results suggests that higher-level central processes such as perception, attention, learning, and memory may play important roles in explaining the large individual differences observed among users of cochlear implants. Investigations of the content

  13. A comparison of vowel productions in prelingually deaf children using cochlear implants, severe hearing-impaired children using conventional hearing aids and normal-hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudonck, Nele; Van Lierde, K; Dhooge, I; Corthals, P

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare vowel productions by deaf cochlear implant (CI) children, hearing-impaired hearing aid (HA) children and normal-hearing (NH) children. 73 children [mean age: 9;14 years (years;months)] participated: 40 deaf CI children, 34 moderately to profoundly hearing-impaired HA children and 42 NH children. For the 3 corner vowels [a], [i] and [u], F(1), F(2) and the intrasubject SD were measured using the Praat software. Spectral separation between these vowel formants and vowel space were calculated. The significant effects in the CI group all pertain to a higher intrasubject variability in formant values, whereas the significant effects in the HA group all pertain to lower formant values. Both hearing-impaired subgroups showed a tendency toward greater intervowel distances and vowel space. Several subtle deviations in the vowel production of deaf CI children and hearing-impaired HA children could be established, using a well-defined acoustic analysis. CI children as well as HA children in this study tended to overarticulate, which hypothetically can be explained by a lack of auditory feedback and an attempt to compensate it by proprioceptive feedback during articulatory maneuvers. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Respiratory behavior in groups of deaf and non-deaf GFF male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupfel, M; Busnel, M C; Molin, D; Thierry, H; Gourlet, V

    1984-05-01

    Carbon dioxide emission (VCO2) of groups of 10 GFF mice, genetically deaf and non-deaf, were compared, in controlled conditions of temperature 20-21 degrees C, humidity 50-80% and light (LD12:12; L = 108 lux). A circadian rhythm of VCO2 was evidenced in both genotypes, with levels in D and in L significantly (0.001 less than p less than 0.01) greater in deaf than in non-deaf mice. Photic VCO2 variations were significantly (0.001 less than p less than 0.05) smaller at L----D and D----L in the deaf than in non-deaf genotype. Ultradian (tau greater than 20 minutes) rhythms were evidenced in both genotypes; Fourier periodic analysis showed several significant (0.001 less than p less than 0.05) differences between these 2 genotypes concerning mainly amplitudes, whilst spectral analysis showed slight frequency differences between them. Survival to an acute nitrogen hypoxia or to an acute carbon monoxide intoxication which was significantly (p less than 0.001 and p less than 0.05) lower in deaf than in non-deaf individuals confirms the differences in respiratory behavior of groups of these two strains of mice.

  15. First Language Acquisition Differs from Second Language Acquisition in Prelingually Deaf Signers: Evidence from Sensitivity to Grammaticality Judgement in British Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Kearsy; Schembri, Adam; Vinson, David; Orfanidou, Eleni

    2012-01-01

    Age of acquisition (AoA) effects have been used to support the notion of a critical period for first language acquisition. In this study, we examine AoA effects in deaf British Sign Language (BSL) users via a grammaticality judgment task. When English reading performance and nonverbal IQ are factored out, results show that accuracy of…

  16. First Language Acquisition Differs from Second Language Acquisition in Prelingually Deaf Signers: Evidence from Sensitivity to Grammaticality Judgement in British Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Kearsy; Schembri, Adam; Vinson, David; Orfanidou, Eleni

    2012-01-01

    Age of acquisition (AoA) effects have been used to support the notion of a critical period for first language acquisition. In this study, we examine AoA effects in deaf British Sign Language (BSL) users via a grammaticality judgment task. When English reading performance and nonverbal IQ are factored out, results show that accuracy of…

  17. Reading Comprehension of an Inferential Text by Deaf Students with Cochlear Implants Using Cued Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Santiago; Rodriguez, Jose-Miguel; Garcia-Orza, Javier; Calleja, Marina

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the ability of children who are profoundly deaf to reach high levels of reading proficiency on an inferential reading task. In an experimental narrative reading task, four children with prelingual hearing loss who used cued speech (MOC group) were compared with 58 students with typical hearing: 30 peers at the…

  18. Cochlear implantation (CI) for prelingual deafness: the relevance of studies of brain organization and the role of first language acquisition in considering outcome success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ruth; MacSweeney, Mairéad; Woll, Bencie

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implantation (CI) for profound congenital hearing impairment, while often successful in restoring hearing to the deaf child, does not always result in effective speech processing. Exposure to non-auditory signals during the pre-implantation period is widely held to be responsible for such failures. Here, we question the inference that such exposure irreparably distorts the function of auditory cortex, negatively impacting the efficacy of CI. Animal studies suggest that in congenital early deafness there is a disconnection between (disordered) activation in primary auditory cortex (A1) and activation in secondary auditory cortex (A2). In humans, one factor contributing to this functional decoupling is assumed to be abnormal activation of A1 by visual projections-including exposure to sign language. In this paper we show that that this abnormal activation of A1 does not routinely occur, while A2 functions effectively supramodally and multimodally to deliver spoken language irrespective of hearing status. What, then, is responsible for poor outcomes for some individuals with CI and for apparent abnormalities in cortical organization in these people? Since infancy is a critical period for the acquisition of language, deaf children born to hearing parents are at risk of developing inefficient neural structures to support skilled language processing. A sign language, acquired by a deaf child as a first language in a signing environment, is cortically organized like a heard spoken language in terms of specialization of the dominant perisylvian system. However, very few deaf children are exposed to sign language in early infancy. Moreover, no studies to date have examined sign language proficiency in relation to cortical organization in individuals with CI. Given the paucity of such relevant findings, we suggest that the best guarantee of good language outcome after CI is the establishment of a secure first language pre-implant-however that may be achieved, and

  19. Cochlear Implantation (CI for prelingual deafness: the relevance of studies of brain organization and the role of first language acquisition in considering outcome success.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth eCampbell

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implantation (CI for profound congenital hearing impairment, while often successful in restoring hearing to the deaf child, does not always result in effective speech processing. Exposure to non-auditory signals during the pre-implantation period is widely held to be responsible for such failures. Here, we question the inference that such exposure irreparably distorts the function of auditory cortex, negatively impacting the efficacy of cochlear implantation. Animal studies suggest that in congenital early deafness there is a disconnection between (disordered activation in primary auditory cortex (A1 and activation in secondary auditory cortex (A2. In humans, one factor contributing to this functional decoupling is assumed to be abnormal activation of A1 by visual projections – including exposure to sign language. In this paper we show that that this abnormal activation of A1 does not routinely occur, while A2 functions effectively supramodally and multimodally to deliver spoken language irrespective of hearing status. What, then, is responsible for poor outcomes for some individuals with CI and for apparent abnormalities in cortical organization in these people? Since infancy is a critical period for the acquisition of language, deaf children born to hearing parents are at risk of developing inefficient neural structures to support skilled language processing. A sign language, acquired by a deaf child as a first language in a signing environment, is cortically organized like a heard spoken language in terms of specialization of the dominant perisylvian system. However, very few deaf children are exposed to sign language in early infancy. Moreover, no studies to date have examined sign language proficiency in relation to cortical organization in individuals with CI. Given the paucity of such relevant findings, we suggest that the best guarantee of good language outcome after CI is the establishment of a secure first language pre

  20. First language acquisition differs from second language acquisition in prelingually deaf signers: Evidence from sensitivity to grammaticality judgement in British Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Kearsy; Schembri, Adam; Vinson, David; Orfanidou, Eleni

    2012-01-01

    Age of acquisition (AoA) effects have been used to support the notion of a critical period for first language acquisition. In this study, we examine AoA effects in deaf British Sign Language (BSL) users via a grammaticality judgment task. When English reading performance and nonverbal IQ are factored out, results show that accuracy of grammaticality judgement decreases as AoA increases, until around age 8, thus showing the unique effect of AoA on grammatical judgement in early learners. No such effects were found in those who acquired BSL after age 8. These late learners appear to have first language proficiency in English instead, which may have been used to scaffold learning of BSL as a second language later in life. PMID:22578601

  1. First language acquisition differs from second language acquisition in prelingually deaf signers: evidence from sensitivity to grammaticality judgement in British Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Kearsy; Schembri, Adam; Vinson, David; Orfanidou, Eleni

    2012-07-01

    Age of acquisition (AoA) effects have been used to support the notion of a critical period for first language acquisition. In this study, we examine AoA effects in deaf British Sign Language (BSL) users via a grammaticality judgment task. When English reading performance and nonverbal IQ are factored out, results show that accuracy of grammaticality judgement decreases as AoA increases, until around age 8, thus showing the unique effect of AoA on grammatical judgement in early learners. No such effects were found in those who acquired BSL after age 8. These late learners appear to have first language proficiency in English instead, which may have been used to scaffold learning of BSL as a second language later in life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 语前聋患儿人工耳蜗植入术后听觉言语功能发育的观察%Development of Auditory and Speech Ability in Prelingual Deafness Children after Cochlear Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宏征; 钱宇虹; 郭梦和

    2013-01-01

    目的研究语前聋患儿植入人工耳蜗后听觉言语能力的发育情况及相关因素。方法34例接受人工耳蜗植入的极重度语前聋儿童手术时年龄为1岁2个月~5岁10个月,平均3岁2.15个月,按照植入手术时年龄分为幼龄组(A组,<3岁,17例)、大龄组(B组,≥3岁,17例),在植入手术前和开机后3、6、12个月四个时间点采用有意义听觉整合量表(meaningful auditory integration scale ,MAIS)和婴幼儿有意义听觉整合量表(the infant-toddler meaningful auditory integration scale ,IT -MAIS)对患儿进行听觉能力评估。结果全体患儿植入人工耳蜗后量表总分及三组问题的得分均明显高于植入前,并且随着开机时间的延长其得分逐步上升(P<0.05),其中评价患儿对声音感知能力的Q3~6在开机后的3个月内进展最为迅速。B组植入术前与听觉辅具有关的问题Q1~2和开机后3个月Q3~6得分高于A组(P<0.05),其余各项得分两组间差异无统计学意义。总体上男性和女性患儿各项得分无差异(P>0.05),A组女性患者术前Q1~2得分高于男性(P<0.05),其余各时间点男女间得分差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论随着使用人工耳蜗时间的延长,人工耳蜗植入患儿总体听觉能力呈逐步上升的趋势,进步最快的时间为开机后的3个月内,这个阶段较大龄的患儿对声音的察觉能力优于婴幼儿患者,但随着植入时间的延长两组听觉能力的发育无差异;不同性别患儿植入人工耳蜗后的听觉发育无差异。%Objective To evaluate auditory and speech development longitudinally over the first year after co-chlear implantation in prelingual deaf pediatric cochlear implant (CI) recipients .Methods Meaningful auditory inte-gration scale (MAIS) and infant-toddler meaningful auditory integration scale (ITMAIS) were used to evaluate 34

  3. GROUP OF HEARING MOTHERS OF DEAF CHILDREN: INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Fava de Quevedo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This experience report describes a group phenomenon, based upon a case study of a group of hearing mothers of deaf children. The weekly group, in operation for over three years, provides support for families with deaf children. At first, observations were made in the group for a subsequent analysis of the data and act on interventions. Categories containing the main features that emerged in the group were created in order to discuss the content found. The categories addressed by mothers included: independence/autonomy of the child; adolescence and sexuality; discovery of deafness and reorganization of family dynamics; and matters beyond the group goal. As for the categories related to the group process there are: resistance; containing function of the coordinator; transfer; interventions in the group field. The results lead to understanding the group as a facilitator and as a necessary support for the participants. Before that, interventions were carried out to expand the space for reflection offered by the group, which provides adaptations to the different situations experienced by the participants.

  4. A Phenomenological Study of Online Learning for Deaf Students in Postsecondary Education: A Deaf Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Patricia Michelle

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study investigated the effects of online learning for deaf college students as opposed to the mainstream classroom setting. This study specifically analyzed the writing and reading skills of deaf students in general and the development of English literacy of prelingually deaf students and those from non-English…

  5. Effectiveness of Group Training of Assertiveness on Social Anxiety among Deaf and Hard of Hearing Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Hamed; Daramadi, Parviz Sharifi; Asadi-Samani, Majid; Givtaj, Hamed; Sani, Mohammad Reza Mahmoudian

    2017-06-01

    The present study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of assertiveness group training on social anxiety (SAD) between deaf and hearing impaired adolescents. Forty eight (24 deaf and 24 hearing impaired) people participated in this study. First, participants with SAD, i.e. attaining the scores above 40 for Connor's Social Inventory Scale 2000 (SPIN), were selected according to convenience sampling and randomly assigned to two groups, i.e. intervention and control. Then, assertiveness group training was conducted for intervention group within 10 sessions, and immediately after completion of the training sessions, SPIN was re-administered to the two groups. ANCOVA showed that the effectiveness of assertiveness group training on SAD is different between deaf and hearing impaired participants, i.e. assertiveness group training was effective on improvement of SAD in hearing impaired participants but not deaf ones. Therefore, it is recommended to incorporate assertiveness group training in the educational programs developed for adolescents with ear disorders especially hearing impairment.

  6. 语前聋儿童人工耳蜗植入术后一年内的听觉发展和言语识别%Development of early auditory and speech perception skills within one year after cochlear implantion in prelingual deaf children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅莹; 陈源; 郗昕; 洪梦迪; 陈艾婷; 王倩; 黄丽娜

    2015-01-01

    后儿童早期听觉、言语识别的可用工具.%Objective To investigate the development of early auditory capability and speech perception in the prelingual deaf children after cochlear implantation,and to study the feasibility of currently available Chinese assessment instruments for the evaluation of early auditory skill and speech perception in hearing-impaired children.Methods A total of 83 children with severe-to-profound prelingual hearing impairment participated in this study.Participants were divided into four groups according to the age for surgery:A (1-2 years),B (2-3 years),C (3-4 years) and D (4-5years).The auditory skill and speech perception ability of CI children were evaluated by trained audiologists using the infant-toddler/ meaningful auditory integration scale (IT-MAIS/MAIS) questionnaire,the Mandarin Early Speech Perception (MESP)test and the Mandarin Pediatric Speech Intelligibility (MPSI) test.The questionnaires were used in face to face interviews with the parents or guardians.Each child was assessed before the operation and 3 months,6 months,12 months after switch-on.Results After cochlear implantation,early postoperative auditory development and speech perception gradually improved.All MAIS/IT-MAIS scores showed a similar increasing trend with the rehabilitation duration (F =5.743,P =0.007).Preoperative and post operative MAIS/IT-MAIS scores of children in age group C (3-4 years) was higher than that of other groups.Children who had longer hearing aid experience before operation demonstrated higher MAIS/IT-MAIS scores than those with little or no hearing aid experience(F =4.947,P =0.000).The MESP test showed that,children were not able to perceive speech as well as detecting speech signals.However as the duration of CI use increased,speech perception ability also improved substantially.However,only about 40% of the subjects could be evaluated using the most difficult subtest on the MPSI in quiet at 12 months after switch-on.As MCR

  7. Text Composition by Deaf and Hearing Middle-School Students: The Role of Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamargot, Denis; Lambert, Eric; Thebault, Claire; Dansac, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the compositional performances of deaf and hearing students and to investigate the relationships between these performances and working memory capacities. Fifteen prelingually deaf, sign-using students and 15 hearing students composed a descriptive text and performed working memory tasks. The deaf students had…

  8. Deaf signers who know Japanese remember words and numbers more effectively than deaf signers who know English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Mary; Moran, Aidan

    2004-01-01

    Deaf people have difficulty reading and remembering English script because of its sound-based orthography. Logographs (e.g., kanji, Arabic numerals) should not pose the same challenge because they are based on meaning, not sound. Little research has been conducted to test this theory's validity cross-culturally. The present study was an attempt to do just that. The first of two experiments tested immediate memory spans for word sequences of 20 hearing Irish, 20 prelingually deaf Americans, 20 hearing Japanese, and 20 prelingually deaf Japanese. For English words, deaf participants showed shorter memory spans than hearing participants, but memory spans were similar for deaf and hearing participants for words in kanji, the logographic system for Japanese writing. The second experiment tested memory span for Arabic numerals, with the same participants. Deaf English-readers showed shorter memory spans than their hearing counterparts, but deaf and hearing Japanese performed similarly.

  9. Marital Quality in Deaf-Deaf and Deaf-Hearing Marriages

    OpenAIRE

    Mosier, Anthony G.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess similarities and differences in marital adjustment between Deaf-Deaf and Deaf-hearing married couples. In examining marital adjustment, Spanier's Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale (RDAS) was translated from English to American Sign Language (ASL) and administered to 30 Deaf-Deaf and 22 Deaf-hearing couple respondents. Although there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Deaf-Deaf couples tended to have higher marital adj...

  10. Effectiveness of communication strategies for deaf or hard of hearing workers in group settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Scott

    2014-01-01

    In group settings, background noise and an obstructed view of the speaker are just a few of the issues that can make workplace communication difficult for an individual who is deaf or hard of hearing. Accommodation strategies such as amplification of the speaker's voice or the use of text-based alternatives exist to address these issues. However, recent studies have shown that there are still unmet needs related to workplace communication in group settings for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. Identify the most common strategies used by individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to improve communication in group settings and gauge the perceived effectiveness of those strategies. An online survey was conducted with individuals who self-identified as deaf or hard of hearing. The survey presented specific communication strategies based on three functional approaches (aural/oral, text, visual). The strategies applied to both receptive and expressive communication in five different meeting types ranging in size and purpose. 161 adults (age 22-90 yrs.) with limited hearing ability completed the survey. Text-based strategies were typically the least frequently used strategies in group settings, yet they ranked high in perceived effectiveness for receptive and expressive communication. Those who used an interpreter demonstrated a strong preference for having a qualified interpreter present in the meeting rather than an interpreter acting remotely. For expressive communication, participants in general preferred to use their own voice or signing abilities and ranked those strategies as highly effective. A more accessible workplace for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing would incorporate more ubiquitous text-based strategy options. Also, qualified interpreters, when used, should be present in the meeting for maximum effectiveness.

  11. Cochlear implantation in late-implanted prelingually deafened adults: changes in quality of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straatman, L.V.; Huinck, W.J.; Langereis, M.C.; Snik, A.F.M.; Mulder, J.J.S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With expanding inclusion criteria for cochlear implantation, the number of prelingually deafened persons who are implanted as adults increases. Compared with postlingually deafened adults, this group shows limited improvement in speech recognition. In this study, the changes in health-re

  12. The peculiar needs of deaf people: a study of selected members of the Lincolnshire deaf social group

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, K.

    1989-01-01

    In spite of the fact that services for deaf people have been provided since Victorian times, there is no "philosophy of deafness" and services are based upon the subjective observation of deaf people by "hearing" people. This study seeks to formulate such a philosophy, for those unable to hear spoken communication from birth or early childhood, based upon acceptance of the social limitations of being unable to hear in a society where the ready use of that sense is taken for granted. In or...

  13. Seeing the Deaf in "Deafness"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obasi, Chijioke

    2008-01-01

    This article draws on some of the existing literature on the politics of identity and representation as related to minority group formation. It applies this to constructions of Deaf identity from a cultural and linguistic perspective and contrasts this with dominant constructions of Deaf people as disabled. It highlights a number of ways in which…

  14. Language skills and nonverbal cognitive processes associated with reading comprehension in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, María Teresa; Phillips-Silver, Jessica; Ruiz-Cuadra, María del Mar; López-López, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the relationship between language skills (vocabulary knowledge and phonological awareness), nonverbal cognitive processes (attention, memory and executive functions) and reading comprehension in deaf children. Participants were thirty prelingually deaf children (10.7 ± 1.6 years old; 18 boys, 12 girls), who were classified as either good readers or poor readers by their scores on two reading comprehension tasks. The children were administered a rhyme judgment task and seven computerized neuropsychological tasks specifically designed and adapted for deaf children to evaluate vocabulary knowledge, attention, memory and executive functions in deaf children. A correlational approach was also used to assess the association between variables. Although the two groups did not show differences in phonological awareness, good readers showed better vocabulary and performed significantly better than poor readers on attention, memory and executive functions measures. Significant correlations were found between better scores in reading comprehension and better scores on tasks of vocabulary and non-verbal cognitive processes. The results suggest that in deaf children, vocabulary knowledge and nonverbal cognitive processes such as selective attention, visuo-spatial memory, abstract reasoning and sequential processing may be especially relevant for the development of reading comprehension.

  15. Exploring consequences of short- and long-term deafness on speech production: a lip-tube perturbation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Christine; Prémont, Amélie; Trudeau-Fisette, Paméla; Ménard, Lucie

    2015-05-01

    Studies have reported strong links between speech production and perception. We aimed to evaluate the role of long- and short-term auditory feedback alteration on speech production. Eleven adults with normal hearing (controls) and 17 cochlear implant (CI) users (7 pre-lingually deaf and 10 post-lingually deaf adults) were recruited. Short-term auditory feedback deprivation was induced by turning off the CI or by providing masking noise. Acoustic and articulatory measures were obtained during the production of /u/, with and without a tube inserted between the lips (perturbation), and with and without auditory feedback. F1 values were significantly different between the implant OFF and ON conditions for the pre-lingually deaf participants. In the absence of auditory feedback, the pre-lingually deaf participants moved the tongue more forward. Thus, a lack of normal auditory experience of speech may affect the internal representation of a vowel.

  16. Deafness: Cross-modal plasticity and cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Jeung-Whoon; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Chong Sun

    2001-01-01

    Hearing in profoundly deaf people can be helped by inserting an implant into the inner ear to stimulate the cochlear nerve. This also boosts the low metabolic activity of the auditory cortex, the region of the brain normally used for hearing. Other sensory modalities, such as sign language, can also activate the auditory cortex, a phenomenon known as cross-modal plasticity. Here we show that when metabolism in the auditory cortex of prelingually deaf children (whose hearing was lost before they learned to talk) has been restored by cross-modal plasticity, the auditory cortex can no longer respond to signals from a cochlear implant installed afterwards. Neural substrates in the auditory cortex might therefore be routed permanently to other cognitive processes in prelingually deaf patients.

  17. Beginnings of Song in Young Deaf Children Using Cochlear Implants: The Song They Move, the Song They Feel, the Song They Share

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yennari, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the singing activity of prelingually deaf children under four years of age who are using cochlear implants (CIs) and presents a strand of a larger study that aimed to observe, record and analyse the musical activity of seven profoundly deaf children using CIs in the UK, for a period of one calendar year. The singing activity…

  18. Epidemiology of prelingual sensorineural hearing impairment at a children’s center in Bogotá, Colombia between 1997 and 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Talero-Gutiérrez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing loss is a frequent problem in childhood with an incidence of about one case per 1000 births. Control of deafness should be aimed at prevention and early diagnosis in efforts to provide appropriate treatment and stimulate adequate communication in children affected. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of different etiologies among deaf children with a diagnosis of prelingual sensorineural hearing loss referred to the Fundación CINDA in Bogotá, Colombia, between 1997 and 2008.Materials and methods: The medical records were selected from those with prelingual hearing loss. Information was gathered in a format containing variables related to the risk factors suggested by the Joint Committee of Infant Hearing.Results: We studied 254 children; boys and girls were equally distributed. The most common etiological diagnosis was «unknown cause», followed by genetic causes (31 cases, and 38 cases from TORCH infections (toxoplasmosis, others – syphilis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes, with rubella as the most common cause.Conclusions: Review of prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal history often reveals the cause of the deafness in children; therefore, appropriate evaluation of pregnant mothers could result in decreased frequency of deafness in children in our country.

  19. Sudden Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Sudden Deafness On this page: What is sudden deafness? What ... I find additional information about SSHL? What is sudden deafness? Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL), commonly known as ...

  20. [Suprasegmental speech in prelingual hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants, hearing-impaired children without implants and normal hearing children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligthelm, A; Groenewald, E

    1999-01-01

    A review of the relevant literature indicates a lack of knowledge regarding suprasegmental speech characteristics in prelingual hearing impaired children with cochlear implants. This study is aimed at examining certain suprasegmental features in the speech of prelingual hearing impaired children with cochlear implants by perceptual ratings and acoustic analyses, comparing these results to that of prelingual hearing impaired children without implants, and normal hearing children of the same age. Twelve Afrikaansspeaking children between the ages of six and ten years were included in three groups. An integrated view of the perceptual and acoustic results shows that the cochlear implanted children's suprasegmental speech characteristics bear closer resemblance to those of the normal hearing group than those of the hearing impaired group.

  1. 语前聋患者人工耳蜗植入术后听觉言语康复相关影响因素的研究%Research on the Influencing Factors of Auditory and Speech Rehabilitation Outcomes of Prelingually Deaf Patients with Cochlear Implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张斯斯; 林有辉; 张榕; 叶胜难

    2013-01-01

    目的探讨语前聋人工耳蜗植入患者的听觉言语康复效果及其相关影响因素。方法对159例人工耳蜗植入患者家长和康复教师进行调查随访。根据听觉行为分级标准(Categories of Auditory Performance,CAP)和言语可懂度分级标准(Speech Intelligibility Rating,SIR),对患者的听觉能力和言语能力进行分级评估。用组内单因素秩和检验和多因素Logistic回归分析CAP和SIR分级结果与性别、惯用手、内耳发育、颅脑影像学情况、术前助听器使用、术前语训、植入耳侧、植入电极类型、植入年龄、植入后时间、术后语言环境、术后康复模式、家庭经济状况等13个因素的关系。结果单因素分析结果显示,不同的术前助听器使用情况、术前语训、植入后时间、家庭经济状况组间CAP分级结果有显著性差异(P值均<0.05);不同的植入耳侧、植入后时间、家庭经济状况组间SIR分级结果有显著性差异(P值均<0.05)。多因素Logistic回归分析结果显示,植入后时间、家庭经济状况与CAP、SIR分级结果均有显著相关。结论植入后时间、家庭经济状况对人工耳蜗植入术后患者的听觉言语康复效果起决定性的作用。%Objective To explore the auditory and speech rehabilitation outcomes of prelingually hearing-impaired patients with cochlear implants and the related influencing factors. Methods One hundred fifty-nine cochlear implantees were recruited in this study.The parents or teachers were interviewed to assess the auditory and speech abilities of the subjects using Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) and Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR). The relationships were investigated between auditory and speech rehabilitation outcomes represented by CAP/SIR results and 13 possible influencing factors including gender, handedness, inner ear malformations, brain abnormalities, hearing aid use, language training before

  2. Phenotype and genotype analysis of a Chinese family with prelingual X-linked hereditary hearing impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Bing; CHENG Jing; YANG Shu-zhi; CAO Ju-yang; SHEN Wei-dong; JI Fei; KANG Dong-yang; ZHANG Xin; DAI Pu; YUAN Hui-jun

    2009-01-01

    Background X-linked hearing impairment is clinically and genetically a heterogeneous disease.Although many disorders manifest with hearing loss,a limited number of sex-linked loci and only one gene (POU3F4) have been shown to be implicated in X-linked non-syndromic hearing impairment.In the present study,we have performed a clinical and genetic analysis of a Chinese family with X-linked non-syndromic hearing loss,with emphasis on audiological findings and genomic mapping.Methods The clinical features of Family JX01 were evaluated by physical and audiometric examination in eighteen family members.Mutation screening of POU3F4 was identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing.Molecular evaluation consisted of X-chromosome wide genotyping by microsatellite makers (STR),followed by analyzing using MLINK computer program.Results Five affected males demonstrated bilateral,symmetrical sensorineural and profound hearing loss.The hearing impairment started prelingual.The female carriers did not have any complain of hearing loss,however,two of them were tested with milder loss with high frequency.No causative mutations in POU3F4 gene were detected by DNA sequencing.Linkage analysis indicated that the responsible gene was linked to locus DXS1227 (maximum lod score=2.04 at θ=0).Conclusions The affected males in Family JX01 have profound prelingual sensorineural hearing impairment,In addition,two female carriers showed mild to moderate hearing losses.However,none of females complained of any hearing loss.Analysis of hereditary deafness in this family mapped most compatibly to the Xq27.2.

  3. Acoustic properties of vocal singing in prelingually-deafened children with cochlear implants or hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yitao; Zhang, Mengchao; Nutter, Heather; Zhang, Yijing; Zhou, Qixin; Liu, Qiaoyun; Wu, Weijing; Xie, Dinghua; Xu, Li

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate vocal singing performance of hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants (CI) and hearing aids (HA) as well as to evaluate the relationship between demographic factors of those hearing-impaired children and their singing ability. Thirty-seven prelingually-deafened children with CIs and 31 prelingually-deafened children with HAs, and 37 normal-hearing (NH) children participated in the study. The fundamental frequencies (F0) of each note in the recorded songs were extracted and the duration of each sung note was measured. Five metrics were used to evaluate the pitch-related and rhythm-based aspects of singing accuracy. Children with CIs and HAs showed significantly poorer performance in either the pitch-based assessments or the rhythm-based measure than the NH children. No significant differences were seen between the CI and HA groups in all of these measures except for the mean deviation of the pitch intervals. For both hearing-impaired groups, length of device use was significantly correlated with singing accuracy. There is a marked deficit in vocal singing ability either in pitch or rhythm accuracy in a majority of prelingually-deafened children who have received CIs or fitted with HAs. Although an increased length of device use might facilitate singing performance to some extent, the chance for the hearing-impaired children fitted with either HAs or CIs to reach high proficiency in singing is quite slim. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Test Equity for People Who Are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing: Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification Steps for Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladin, Shawn P.; Reid, Christine; Shiels, John

    2011-01-01

    The Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) has taken a proactive stance on perceived test inequities of the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) exam as it relates to people who are prelingually deaf and hard of hearing. This article describes the process developed and implemented by the CRCC to help maximize test equity…

  5. Test Equity for People Who Are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing: Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification Steps for Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladin, Shawn P.; Reid, Christine; Shiels, John

    2011-01-01

    The Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) has taken a proactive stance on perceived test inequities of the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) exam as it relates to people who are prelingually deaf and hard of hearing. This article describes the process developed and implemented by the CRCC to help maximize test equity…

  6. It's All a Matter of Timing: Sign Visibility and Sign Reference in Deaf and Hearing Mothers of 18-Month-Old Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M

    2001-01-01

    The signed and spoken language produced by 14 mothers to their 18-month-old children during free play was analyzed. All the children had profound prelingual deafness. Seven of the mothers were profoundly deaf and fluent users of British Sign Language (BSL) or Auslan. The other seven were hearing and had enrolled in a signing program. Maternal signed utterances were classified according to whether they were made in the child's line of sight and whether they had a salient context; that is, they referred to an object or event at the child's current focus of attention. Spoken utterances were coded by word length. Comparisons between the two groups showed that both deaf and hearing mothers produced a majority of single-sign utterances (rather than utterances containing two or more signs). Deaf mothers also produced a majority of single-word spoken utterances, whereas the hearing mothers produced a significantly greater proportion of multiword utterances. As predicted, deaf mothers were more successful than hearing mothers in presenting signed utterances with a salient context that were visible to their children. Across the group as a whole, the total number of visible and salient signed utterances produced in 10 minutes was positively correlated with the total number of occasions on which mothers successfully redirected their child's attention or the child spontaneously turned to look at the mother. This suggests that deaf children who are visually attentive to their mothers receive a greater number of visible signed utterances with a salient context. I argue that this provides a more secure context for early language development.

  7. Epidemiología de la pérdida auditiva neurosensorial pre-lingual en un centro de atención a niños de Bogotá, Colombia entre 1997 y 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Talero-Gutiérrez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing loss is a frequent problem in childhood with an incidence of about one case per 1000 births. Control of deafness should be aimed at prevention and early diagnosis in efforts to provide appropriate treatment and stimulate adequate communication in children affected. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of different etiologies among deaf children with a diagnosis of prelingual sensorineural hearing loss referred to the Fundación CINDA in Bogotá, Colombia, between 1997 and 2008. Materials and methods: The medical records were selected from those with prelingual hearing loss. Information was gathered in a format containing variables related to the risk factors suggested by the Joint Committee of Infant Hearing. Results: We studied 254 children; boys and girls were equally distributed. The most common etiological diagnosis was «unknown cause», followed by genetic causes (31 cases, and 38 cases from TORCH infections (toxoplasmosis, others – syphilis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes, with rubella as the most common cause. Conclusions: Review of prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal history often reveals the cause of the deafness in children; therefore, appropriate evaluation of pregnant mothers could result in decreased frequency of deafness in children in our country.

  8. Evaluative expression in deaf children's written narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijsterveldt, E.M. van; Hell, J.G. van

    2009-01-01

    Background: Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Aims: Adopting a

  9. Evaluative expression in deaf children's written narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijsterveldt, E.M. van; Hell, J.G. van

    2009-01-01

    Background: Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Aims: Adopting a

  10. Evaluation of glucose metabolic abnormality in postlingually deaf patients using F-18-FDG positron emission tomography and statistical parametric mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Dong Soo; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Chong Sun; Park, Kwang Suk; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    We have previously reported the prognostic relevance of cross-modal cortical plasticity in prelingual deaf patients revealed by F-18-FDG PET and SPM analysis. In this study, we investigated metabolic abnormality in postlingual deaf patients, whose clinical features are different from prelingual deafness. Nine postlingual deaf patients (age: 30.5 {+-}14.0) were performed on F-18-FDG brain PET. We compared their PET images with those of age-matched 20 normal controls (age: 27.1 {+-}8.6), and performed correlation analysis to investigate the relationship between glucose metabolism and deaf duration using SPM99. Glucose metabolism of deaf patients was significantly (p<0.05, corrected) decreased in both anterior cingulate, inferior frontal cortices, and superior temporal cortices, and left hippocampus. Metabolism in both superior temporal cortices and association area in inferior parietal cortices showed significant (p<0.01, uncorrected) positive correlation with deaf duration. Decreased metabolism in hippocampus accompanied with hypometabolism in auditory related areas can be explained by recent finding of anatomical connectivity between them, and may be the evidence indicating their functional connectivity. Metabolism recovery in auditory cortex after long deaf duration suggests that cortical plasticity takes place also in postlingual deafness.

  11. Canine deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, George M

    2012-11-01

    Conductive deafness, caused by outer or middle ear obstruction, may be corrected, whereas sensorineural deafness cannot. Most deafness in dogs is congenital sensorineural hereditary deafness, associated with the genes for white pigment: piebald or merle. The genetic cause has not yet been identified. Dogs with blue eyes have a greater likelihood of hereditary deafness than brown-eyed dogs. Other common forms of sensorineural deafness include presbycusis, ototoxicity, noise-induced hearing loss, otitis interna, and anesthesia. Definitive diagnosis of deafness requires brainstem auditory evoked response testing.

  12. Children, Deaf, of Deaf Parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, A.E.; van den Bogaerde, B.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    Deaf children with Deaf parents usually grow up in the Deaf community, that is if their parents offer them a sign language and are active members of the community. These Deaf children are similar to other children of linguistic and cultural minorities in many ways. They are also different in that

  13. Deaf Epistemology: Deafhood and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Peter C.; O'Hearn, Amanda; McKee, Michael; Steider, Anne; Thew, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Deaf epistemology constitutes the nature and extent of the knowledge that deaf individuals acquire growing up in a society that relies primarily on audition to navigate life. Deafness creates beings who are more visually oriented compared to their auditorily oriented peers. How hearing individuals interact with deaf individuals shapes how deaf…

  14. Children, Deaf, of Deaf Parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Baker; B. van den Bogaerde

    2016-01-01

    Deaf children with Deaf parents usually grow up in the Deaf community, that is if their parents offer them a sign language and are active members of the community. These Deaf children are similar to other children of linguistic and cultural minorities in many ways. They are also different in that th

  15. Black Deaf Individuals' Reading Skills: Influence of ASL, Culture, Family Characteristics, Reading Experience, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Candace; Clark, M. Diane; Musyoka, Millicent M.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Gilbert, Gizelle L.; Agyen, Selina; Hauser, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the reading abilities of Deaf individuals from various cultural groups suggests that Black Deaf and Hispanic Deaf individuals lag behind their White Deaf peers. The present study compared the reading skills of Black Deaf and White Deaf individuals, investigating the influence of American Sign Language (ASL), culture, family…

  16. Sensorineural deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve deafness; Hearing loss - sensorineural; Acquired hearing loss; SNHL; Noise-induced hearing loss; NIHL; Presbycusis ... that carries the signals to the brain. Sensorineural deafness that is present at birth (congenital) is most ...

  17. [Hypoacusis-deafness related to perinatal adverse conditions. According to the register available in a specialized unit of Ciudad de Mexico. Analysis according to birth weight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñazola-López, Y R; Castillo-Maya, G; García-Pedroza, F; Sánchez-López, H

    2004-01-01

    To analyse perinatal adverse conditions related with birth weight in 160 children with hearing impairment-deafness (prelingual sensorineural hearing loss) according to medical data of a specialized medical unit in Mexico City. The average age of children was 4 years old +/- 1.7; 61% were male. 47.5% of the cases had a birthweight between 1,500 and 2,900 g. 90 cases (56%) had an abnormal delivery and 68 (42.5%) were first pregnancy cases. A high number of cases had delayed breathing, cyanosis, jaundice or respiratory failure. 104 cases (65%) had deafness and 56 (35%) presented. hearing loss. Only 11% of the children had a birth-weight under 1,500 g. 58% of all cases had a birth weight lower than 3,000 g. The quality of medical assistance provided during the perinatal period has a very important role in origin of hearing impairment--deafness in this group of children. It is important to increase our knowledge about the perinatal adverse conditions in order to establish preventive programs.

  18. Deaf epistemology: Deafhood and Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Peter C; O'Hearn, Amanda; McKee, Michael; Steider, Anne; Thew, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Deaf epistemology constitutes the nature and extent of the knowledge that deaf individuals acquire growing up in a society that relies primarily on audition to navigate life. Deafness creates beings who are more visually oriented compared to their auditorily oriented peers. How hearing individuals interact with deaf individuals shapes how deaf individuals acquire knowledge and how they learn. Aspects of the Deaf episteme, not caused by deafness but by Deafhood, have a positive impact on how deaf individuals learn, resist audism, stay healthy, and navigate the world. Research on psychology, health, and education are reviewed to illustrate how visually oriented beings think and view the world differently from the majority. The article provides support to the theory of multiple epistemologies,and has implications for families, teachers, and researchers.

  19. Sudden hearing loss in a family with GJB2 related progressive deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotas, Haris; Theodosiou, Maria; Korres, George; Grigoriadou, Maria; Ferekidou, Elisabeth; Giannoulia-Karantana, Aglaia; Petersen, Michael B; Korres, Stavros

    2008-11-01

    Mutations of GJB2, the gene encoding connexin 26, have been associated with prelingual, sensorineural hearing loss of mild to profound severity. One specific mutation, the 35delG, has accounted for the majority of mutations detected in the GJB2 gene in Caucasian populations. Recent studies have described progression of hearing loss in a proportion of cases with GJB2 deafness. We report an unusual family with four 35delG homozygous members, in which the parents were deaf-mute whilst both children had a postlingual progressive hearing loss. Furthermore, the son suffered from sudden hearing loss.

  20. Ira Hirsh and oral deaf education: The role of audition in language development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geers, Ann

    2002-05-01

    Prior to the 1960s, the teaching of speech to deaf children consisted primarily of instruction in lip reading and tactile perception accompanied by imitative exercises in speech sound production. Hirsh came to Central Institute for the Deaf with an interest in discovering the auditory capabilities of normal-hearing listeners. This interest led him to speculate that more normal speech development could be encouraged in deaf children by maximizing use of their limited residual hearing. Following the tradition of Max Goldstein, Edith Whetnall, and Dennis Fry, Hirsh gave scientific validity to the use of amplified speech as the primary avenue to oral language development in prelingually deaf children. This ``auditory approach,'' combined with an emphasis on early intervention, formed the basis for auditory-oral education as we know it today. This presentation will examine how the speech perception, language, and reading skills of prelingually deaf children have changed as a result of improvements in auditory technology that have occurred over the past 30 years. Current data from children using cochlear implants will be compared with data collected earlier from children with profound hearing loss who used hearing aids. [Work supported by NIH.

  1. Inattentional deafness in music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koreimann, Sabrina; Gula, Bartosz; Vitouch, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    While inattentional blindness is a modern classic in attention and perception research, analogous phenomena of inattentional deafness have been widely neglected. We here present the first investigation of inattentional deafness in and with music under controlled experimental conditions. Inattentional deafness in music is defined as the inability to consciously perceive an unexpected musical stimulus when attention is focused on a certain facet of the piece. Participants listened to a modification of the first 1'50″ of Richard Strauss' Thus Spake Zarathustra; while the control group just listened, the experimental group had to count the number of timpani beats. An e-guitar solo served as the unexpected event. In Study 1, experimental data from n = 115 participants were analyzed. Non-musicians were compared with musicians to investigate the impact of expertise. In Study 2 (n = 47), the scope of the inattentional deafness effect was investigated with a more salient unexpected stimulus. Results demonstrate an inattentional deafness effect under dynamic musical conditions. Quite unexpectedly, the effect was structurally equivalent even for musicians. Our findings clearly show that sustained inattentional deafness exists in the musical realm, in close correspondence to inattentional blindness with dynamic visual stimuli.

  2. 小组工作介入聋儿社会资本的重构%Group Work in Deaf Children's Social Capital Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵淑兰; 罗远良; 邓小玲

    2012-01-01

      Social capital plays a very important role in deaf children's development. Reconstructing deaf children's social capital has become equally important to medical rehabilitation and education rehabilitation. Owing to the lack of children's games group, the par-ents' awareness of bias and the shortage of their social capital, deaf children's social capital deficiency become a very serious problem in the process of hearing rehabilitation and language acquisition. This article, from the perspective of social group work, suggests recon-structing deaf children's social capital by helping them form chil-dren's game group and enhancing their parents' social capital.%  社会资本在聋儿成长中具有非常重要的作用。重构聋儿社会资本成为社会康复的核心内容。在聋儿听力康复过程中,由于聋儿游戏群体的缺失、家长的认识偏误以及家长社会资本的不足等原因,导致聋儿社会资本不足的问题非常突出。文章从小组工作视角出发,提出通过组建聋儿游戏群体,增进聋儿家长社会资本,重构聋儿社会资本的建议。

  3. Deafness(3)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    10.For many years,American Sign Language wasbanned in schools for the deaf in the United States.Educators feared that sign language would keep deafpeople from communicating with hearing people.Today,schools for the deaf have begun to acceptAmerican Sign Language.Few classes are taught

  4. Effects of a Wearable, Tactile Aid on Language Comprehension of Prelingual Profoundly Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Adele

    Factors influencing the use of nonacoustic aids (such as visual displays and tactile devices) with the hearing impaired are reviewed. The benefits of tactile devices in improving speech reading/lipreading and speech are pointed out. Tactile aids which provide information on rhythm, rate, intensity, and duration of speech increase lipreading and…

  5. Psychodramatic Treatment for Deaf People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swink, David F.

    1985-01-01

    The article describes how psychodrama is used in group psychotherapy and in social skills groups with deaf persons. In addition, videotape replay is described as an adjunct to psychodramatic treatment. (Author/CL)

  6. Crossing the Communication Barrier: Facilitating Communication in Mixed Groups of Deaf and Hearing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Carol; Foster, Susan; Long, Gary; Stinson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Teachers of introductory technical courses such as statistics face numerous challenges in the classroom, including student motivation and mathematical background, and difficulties in interpreting numerical results in context. Cooperative learning through small groups addresses many such challenges, but students for whom spoken English is not their…

  7. Reading process and Language education Linguistic, educational and political aspects regarding two groups in Uruguay: Deaf students and University students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Andrés Larrinaga

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present some current issues in linguistic education within the public system of education in Uruguay. First I will review the situation of two groups that can be considered excluded: the mass of entering students at the Universidad de la República (UdelaR that drop out in large percentages in the different schools and the Deaf, who only recently have increased their participation in higher levels of formal education. Then, more specifically, I will relate the exclusion to some aspects of their linguistic education, focusing on their reading practices. Finally, some thought will be given to possible ways of improving or increasing the interventions of the formal system with regard to linguistic education. // Este trabajo tiene como objetivo presentar algunos asuntos relevantes sobre la formación lingüística de nuestros estudiantes en el sistema público de educación en Uruguay. Primero se presentarán dos grupos que se pueden considerar excluidos: el grupo de estudiantes que ingresa cada año a la Universidad de la República (UdelaR, de los que egresa un bajo porcentaje dado que muchos abandonan sus estudios en el primer año, y los Sordos, que tradicionalmente han tenido poca participación en el sistema educativo formal y sólo recientemente se los encuentra participando más en los niveles intermedio y superior del sistema educativo. Luego, más específicamente, relacionaremos la mencionada exclusión con la educación lingüística, enfocándonos en las prácticas de lectura. Finalmente, reflexionaremos sobre posibles formas de mejorar o incrementar las intervenciones del sistema educativo en la formación lingüística.

  8. Diversity of deaf identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bat-Chava, Y

    2000-12-01

    Social Identity Theory (Tajfel, 1981) posits that members of minority groups achieve positive social identity by (a) attempting to gain access to the mainstream through individual mobility or (b) working with other group members to bring about social change. Some people may use a combination of both strategies. Through the use of cluster analysis, the existence of three identities associated with these strategies was discerned in a sample of 267 deaf adults: culturally hearing identity, culturally deaf identity, and bicultural identity, each comprising about a third of the sample. A subset of 56 people were interviewed in depth; excerpts are presented to illustrate the identity types. Qualified support was found for the prediction that people with culturally deaf and bicultural identities would have higher self-esteem.

  9. Goya's deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P E M; Chitty, C N; Williams, G; Stephens, D

    2008-12-01

    Francisco Goya (1746-1828), a major Spanish artist, became profoundly deaf aged 46 years, following an acute illness. Despite this, his success continued and he eventually died aged 82 years. His illness is sketchily documented in letters written during his convalescence, describing headache, deafness, tinnitus, unsteadiness and visual disturbance with recovery (apart from deafness) over three months. There was a milder similar illness two years before, suggesting a relapsing condition. Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, although previously accepted as Goya's diagnosis, is not supported by the limited evidence. Susac's syndrome or Cogan's syndrome, although both rare, are more likely explanations.

  10. Epistemology and people who are deaf: deaf worldviews, views of the deaf world, or my parents are hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Margery S

    2010-01-01

    Epistemology is examined from two different perspectives within the framework of a broader evolutionary epistemology. Within this framework, reality is not absolute, and truth is a relative concept. People construct individual or personal epistemologies through their experiences, and develop or receive group or socially constructed epistemologies through their interactions with others with shared or similar experiences. There is a common perception that Deaf culture and Deaf epistemologies have been transmitted primarily by Deaf children and Deaf adults who have Deaf parents and who have grown up in a linguistically rich signing environment. The author posits that the far more numerous deaf children of hearing parents may be an even greater force in transmitting some of the strongest views of Deaf epistemology.

  11. [Clinical analysis of short-term efficacy in senile sudden deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jianyong; Tan, Guopeng; Jieyu, L V; Yan, Feipeng

    2013-11-01

    To analysis the short-term medicinal treating effects in senile sudden deafness. According the age. The sudden deafness patients were divided into to groups, older age-group (age > or = 60, a total of 70 cases), control group (age sudden deafness patients (disease time 7 days) was 38.89%. There was statistical difference (P sudden deafness patients was 49.9%; the senile sudden deafness patients which following moderate deafness (hearing threshold sudden deafness patients. As soon as possible to improve peripheral vascular microcirculation, the prognosis could be improve conspicuously the prognosis of the senile sudden deafness patients were worse than the young patients.

  12. Connexin 26 (GJB2) mutation in an Argentinean patient with keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalamón, Viviana Karina; Buonfiglio, Paula; Larralde, Margarita; Craig, Patricio; Lotersztein, Vanesa; Choate, Keith; Pallares, Norma; Diamante, Vicente; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén

    2016-05-04

    Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness (KID) syndrome is a rare condition characterized by pre-lingual sensorineural deafness with skin hyperkeratinization. The primary cause of the disease is a loss-of-function mutation in the GJB2 gene. Mutations in Argentinean patients have not been described. We studied a 2 year-old boy with bilateral congenital sensorineural deafness with dry skin over the entire body, hypotrichosis of the scalp, thin and light-blond hair. Analysis of the GJB2 gene nucleotide sequence revealed the substitution of guanine-148 by adenine predicted to result in an Asp50Asn amino acid substitution. This is the first KID report in a patient from Argentina. This de novo mutation proved to be the cause of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome (KID-syndrome) in the patient, and has implications in medical genetic practice.

  13. Captioned Films for the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatner, Edmund Burke

    1981-01-01

    The history of Captioned Films for the Deaf, an agency now called Media for the Handicapped, is traced along with the contributions of individuals and groups which led to the eventual passage of legislation in 1959. (CL)

  14. Toward ethical research practice with deaf participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Jenny L; Jones, Gabrielle; Hanumantha, Shilpa

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, scholars have been critical of what they consider unethical conduct by researchers whose studies focus on members of the Deaf or signing communities. This is the first empirical study that investigates ethical concerns and recommendations from the perspective of three stakeholder groups (Deaf research participants, researchers, and Deaf studies experts). We analyzed focus group discussions using strategies from grounded theory and community-based participatory research. The themes we identified highlight the need for the broader scientific research community to include linguistically and culturally sensitive research procedures that more adequately protect the rights of Deaf research participants, as well as other marginalized groups. We address the need to increase the number of Deaf scientists and reconsider collaboration practices between Deaf and hearing researchers.

  15. Deaf Epistemology: The Deaf Way of Knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Thomas K.

    2010-01-01

    The standard epistemology requires the use of hard science to gain knowledge and discover the truth. In contrast, Deaf epistemology relies heavily on personal testimonies, personal experiences, and personal accounts to document knowledge. In recent years, a number of deaf schools have adopted deaf-centric policies shaped by Deaf epistemology in an…

  16. [Language performance of deaf children and adolescents in verbal and written retelling of a picture story].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, R; Schildhammer, A; Ruoss, M

    1994-01-01

    Evaluation of the spoken and written language skills of prelingually deaf pupils is necessary to improve existing language curricula. Research on written language shows notable delays and substantial differences in the development of written language in comparison to hearing peers. It is difficult to investigate the spontaneous speech because of methodological problems (no control of speech parameters, language becomes a confounding variable). The written language is therefore a good indicator of language development. Nevertheless, oral communication ability can only be studied through spoken utterances. The present study deals with oral and writing performance of 23 prelingually deaf pupils from 9 to 15 years of age whose hearing losses range from 85 to 117 dB. Tape-recorded short picture sequences described by the children and adolescents were examined by experienced listeners. Furthermore, the written narratives of these picture sequences were also analyzed. Parameters included frequency of occurrence of content and function words, type-token ratio, mean length of sentence, and speech fluency. Speech intelligibility was rated by a panel of naive listeners. The results demonstrate the enormous retardation of oral and written language development and specific qualitative differences compared to hearing children. Language skills improve with age, especially in writing. However, oral and written narrative abilities are positively correlated. The loss of sound requires substitutional media for the acquisition of a formal language system. This should be taken into account in the teaching of language to the deaf in order to build up a language competence which is adequate for their age.

  17. Large deletion of the GJB6 gene in deaf patients heterozygous for the GJB2 gene mutation: genotypic and phenotypic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Delphine; Denoyelle, Françoise; Chauvin, Pierre; Garabédian, Eréa-Noël; Couderc, Rémy; Odent, Sylvie; Joannard, Alain; Schmerber, Sébastien; Delobel, Bruno; Leman, Jacques; Journel, Hubert; Catros, Hélène; Le Maréchal, Cédric; Dollfus, Hélène; Eliot, Marie-Madeleine; Delaunoy, Jean-Pierre; David, Albert; Calais, Catherine; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Obstoy, Marie-Françoise; Bouccara, Didier; Sterkers, Olivier; Huy, Patrice Tran Ba; Goizet, Cyril; Duriez, Françoise; Fellmann, Florence; Hélias, Jocelyne; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Montaut, Bétina; Lewin, Patricia; Petit, Christine; Marlin, Sandrine

    2004-06-15

    Recent investigations identified a large deletion of the GJB6 gene in trans to a mutation of GJB2 in deaf patients. We looked for GJB2 mutations and GJB6 deletions in 255 French patients presenting with a phenotype compatible with DFNB1. 32% of the patients had biallelic GJB2 mutations and 6% were a heterozygous for a GJB2 mutation and a GJB6 deletion. Biallelic GJB2 mutations and combined GJB2/GJB6 anomalies were more frequent in profoundly deaf children. Based on these results, we are now assessing GJB6 deletion status in cases of prelingual hearing loss. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. A Hearer's Insight into Deaf Sign Language Folklore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liina Paales

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses Estonian deaf lore, which comprises all folklore genres including specific language creation or sign lore characteristic of the deaf. Estonian sign language lore contains material of local as well as of international origin. The latter group includes several humorous tales that have spread mostly through the cultural contacts of the younger generation of the deaf. Hearers’ lore has also exerted its influence on deaf lore. Local deaf lore includes memories of school years and family lore of members of the Estonian deaf community, sign lore based on Estonian sign language, etc. The main features of Estonian deaf lore are (i the specific communicative form, i.e. sign language performance; (ii the minority group of lore transmitters, i.e. the Estonian deaf community; (iii group-centred interpretation of hearing loss.

  19. Investigation of the A1555G mutation in mitochondrial DNA (MT-RNR1 in groups of Brazilian individuals with nonsyndromic deafness and normal-hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Bezerra Salomão

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: We can affirm that A1555G mutation is not prevalent, or it must be very rare in normal-hearing subjects in the State of Paranα, the south region of Brazil. The A1555G mutation frequency (1.3% found in individual with nonsyndromic deafness is similar to those found in other populations, with nonsyndromic deafness. Consequently, it should be examined in deafness diagnosis. The investigation of the A1555G mutation can contribute towards the determination of the nonsyndromic deafness etiology, hence, contributing to the correct genetic counseling process.

  20. Reduced procedural motor learning in deaf individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine eLévesque

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies in the deaf suggest that cross-modal neuroplastic changes may vary across modalities. Only a handful of studies have examined motor capacities in the profoundly deaf. These studies suggest the presence of deficits in manual dexterity and delays in movement production. As of yet, the ability to learn complex sequential motor patterns has not been explored in deaf populations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the procedural learning skills of deaf adults. A serial reaction-time task (SRTT was performed by 18 deaf subjects and 18 matched controls to investigate possible motor alteration subsequent to auditory deprivation. Deaf participants had various degrees of hearing loss. Half of the experimental group were early-deaf adults mostly using hearing aids, the remaining half were late-deaf adults using a cochlear implant. Participants carried out a repeating 12-item sequence of key presses along with random blocks containing no repeating sequence. Non-specific and sequence-specific learning was analyzed in relation to individual features related to the hearing loss. The results revealed significant differences between groups in sequence-specific learning, with deaf subjects being less efficient than controls in acquiring sequence-specific knowledge. We interpret the results in light of cross-modal plasticity and the auditory scaffolding hypothesis.

  1. Rehabilitation of deaf persons with cochlear implants; Rehabilitation Hoergeschaedigter mit Cochlearimplantaten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gstoettner, W.; Hamzavi, J. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohrenheilkunde, Wien (Austria); Czerny, C. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie, Wien (Austria)

    1997-12-01

    In the last decade, the rehabilitation of postlingually deaf adults and prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants has been established as a treatment of deafness. The technological development of the implant devices and improvement of the surgical technique have led to a considerable increase of hearing performance during the last years. The postlingually deaf adults are able to use the telephone and may be integrated in their original job. Prelingually deaf children can even visit normal schools after cochlear implantation and hearing rehabilitation training. In order to preoperatively establish the state of the cochlear, radiological diagnosis of the temporal bone is necessary. High resolution computerized tomography imaging of the temporal bone with coronar and axial 1 mm slices and MRI with thin slice technique (three dimensional, T2 weighted turbo-spinecho sequence with 0.7 mm slices) have proved to be valuable according to our experience. Furthermore a postoperative synoptical X-ray, in a modified Chausse III projection, offers good information about the position of the implant and insertion of the stimulating electrode into the cochlea. (orig.) [Deutsch] In der letzten Dekade hat sich der operative Einsatz von Cochlearimplantaten fuer die Rehabilitation taubgeborener Kinder und ertaubter Erwachsenen als erfolgreiche Therapie etabliert. Durch technische Weiterentwicklung der Implantatsysteme und Verbesserung der Operationstechnik konnten in den letzten Jahren die Hoerleistungen der Patienten deutlich verbessert werden. Postlingual ertaubte Erwachsene koennen nun oftmals wieder ins Berufsleben eingegliedert werden und praelingual ertaubte Kinder koennen regulaere Schulen besuchen. Im Rahmen der Voruntersuchung fuer die Cochlearimplantation ist die radiologische Felsenbeindiagnostik von besonderer Bedeutung. Hochaufloesendes CT des Felsenbeins in koronaren und axialen Ebenen mit 1 mm Schichtdicke und MRT in Duennschichttechnik (dreidimensionale, T2

  2. The effect of cochlear implant use in postlingually deaf adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, P F; Hinderink, J B; van den Broek, P

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the use of cochlear implants (CI) on the health status of postlingually deaf adults. METHODS: Participants comprised 45 postlingually deaf adult multichannel CI users and 46 deaf candidates on the waiting list for a CI. The latter group acted as control subjects to

  3. The effect of cochlear implant use in postlingually deaf adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, P F; Hinderink, J B; van den Broek, P

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the use of cochlear implants (CI) on the health status of postlingually deaf adults. METHODS: Participants comprised 45 postlingually deaf adult multichannel CI users and 46 deaf candidates on the waiting list for a CI. The latter group acted as control subjects to

  4. The Importance of Early Sign Language Acquisition for Deaf Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M. Diane; Hauser, Peter C.; Miller, Paul; Kargin, Tevhide; Rathmann, Christian; Guldenoglu, Birkan; Kubus, Okan; Spurgeon, Erin; Israel, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have used various theories to explain deaf individuals' reading skills, including the dual route reading theory, the orthographic depth theory, and the early language access theory. This study tested 4 groups of children--hearing with dyslexia, hearing without dyslexia, deaf early signers, and deaf late signers (N = 857)--from 4…

  5. The Importance of Early Sign Language Acquisition for Deaf Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M. Diane; Hauser, Peter C.; Miller, Paul; Kargin, Tevhide; Rathmann, Christian; Guldenoglu, Birkan; Kubus, Okan; Spurgeon, Erin; Israel, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have used various theories to explain deaf individuals' reading skills, including the dual route reading theory, the orthographic depth theory, and the early language access theory. This study tested 4 groups of children--hearing with dyslexia, hearing without dyslexia, deaf early signers, and deaf late signers (N = 857)--from 4…

  6. Concurrent and Longitudinal Predictors of Reading for Deaf and Hearing Children in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Margaret; Terlektsi, Emmanouela; Kyle, Fiona Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Forty-one children with severe-profound prelingual hearing loss were assessed on single word reading, reading comprehension, English vocabulary, phonological awareness and speechreading at three time points, 1 year apart (T1-T3). Their progress was compared with that of a group of hearing children of similar nonverbal IQ, initially reading at the…

  7. Comprehension of Written Grammar Test: Reliability and Known-Groups Validity Study With Hearing and Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Joanna E; Hubley, Anita M; Millhoff, Courtney; Mazlouman, Shahla

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to gather validation evidence for the Comprehension of Written Grammar (CWG; Easterbrooks, 2010) receptive test of 26 grammatical structures of English print for use with children who are deaf and hard of hearing (DHH). Reliability and validity data were collected for 98 participants (49 DHH and 49 hearing) in Grades 2-6. The objectives were to: (a) examine 4-week test-retest reliability data; and (b) provide evidence of known-groups validity by examining expected differences between the groups on the CWG vocabulary pretest and main test, as well as selected structures. Results indicated excellent test-retest reliability estimates for CWG test scores. DHH participants performed statistically significantly lower on the CWG vocabulary pretest and main test than the hearing participants. Significantly lower performance by DHH participants on most expected grammatical structures (e.g., basic sentence patterns, auxiliary "be" singular/plural forms, tense, comparatives, and complementation) also provided known groups evidence. Overall, the findings of this study showed strong evidence of the reliability of scores and known group-based validity of inferences made from the CWG.

  8. Whose Deaf Genes Are They Anyway?: The Deaf Community's Challenge to Legislation on Embryo Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Steven D.; Middleton, Anna; Turner, Graham H.

    2010-01-01

    This article centers on the implications of genetic developments (as a scientific and technological discipline) for those Deaf people who identify as a cultural and linguistic minority group and are concerned with the preservation and development of sign language and Deaf culture. We explore the impact of one particular legislative initiative that…

  9. Deafness among the Negev Bedouin: an interdisciplinary dialogue on deafness, marginality and context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kisch

    2012-01-01

    Shifra Kisch analyses the social consequences of deafness and the sociolinguistic context of signing among the Negev Bedouin, the native Arab inhabitants of the southern arid region of present-day Israel. The consequences of deafness vary considerably between different Bedouin groups as well as alon

  10. Hearing Disorders and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impossible, to hear. They can often be helped. Deafness can keep you from hearing sound at all. ... certain medicines, and surgery. NIH: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  11. Postural responses applied in a control model in cochlear implant users with pre-lingual hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Hamlet; Ferreira, Enrique; Alonso, Rafael; Arocena, Sofia; San Roman, Cecilia; Herrera, Tamara; Lapilover, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions The assessment of postural responses (PR) based in a feedback control system model shows selective gains in different bands of frequencies adaptable with child development. Objective PR characterization of pre-lingual cochlear implant users (CIU) in different sensory conditions. Methods Total energy consumption of the body's center of pressure signal (ECCOP) and its distribution in three bands of frequencies: band 1 (0-0.1 Hz), band 2 (0.1-0.7 Hz), and band 3 (0.7-20 Hz) was measured in a sample of 18 CIU (8-16 years old) and in a control group (CG) (8-15 years old). They were assessed in a standing position on a force platform in two sensory conditions: 1 = Eyes open. 2 = Eyes closed and standing on foam. Results In condition 1, total ECCOP of PR and its proportion of energy consumption in the three bands of frequencies were similar between CIU and CG (p > 0.05). In condition 2, CIU have significantly higher ECCOP, mainly in high frequencies (bands 2 and 3) (p < 0.05). ECCOP values decreased with age also, mainly in bands 2 and 3. This behavior is interpreted in the control system model proposed as an adaptation process related with child development.

  12. The history of sign language and deaf education in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemaloğlu, Yusuf Kemal; Kemaloğlu, Pınar Yaprak

    2012-01-01

    Sign language is the natural language of the prelingually deaf people particularly without hearing-speech rehabilitation. Otorhinolaryngologists, regarding health as complete physical, mental and psychosocial well-being, aim hearing by diagnosing deafness as deviance from normality. However, it's obvious that the perception conflicted with the behavior which does not meet the mental and social well-being of the individual also contradicts with the definition mentioned above. This article aims to investigate the effects of hearing-speech target ignoring the sign language in Turkish population and its consistency with the history through statistical data, scientific publications and historical documents and to support critical perspective on this issue. The study results showed that maximum 50% of the deaf benefited from hearing-speech program for last 60 years before hearing screening programs; however, systems including sign language in education were not generated. In the light of these data, it is clear that the approach ignoring sign language particularly before the development of screening programs is not reasonable. In addition, considering sign language being part of the Anatolian history from Hittites to Ottomans, it is a question to be answered that why evaluation, habilitation and education systems excluding sign language are still the only choice for deaf individuals in Turkey. Despite legislative amendments in the last 6-7 years, the primary cause of failure to come into force is probably because of inadequate conception of the issue content and importance, as well as limited effort to offer solutions by academicians and authorized politicians. Within this context, this paper aims to make a positive effect on this issue offering a review for the medical staff, particularly otorhinolaryngologists and audiologists.

  13. Secondary endolymphatic hydrops after sudden deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Tsung-Yi; Cheng, Po-Wen; Young, Yi-Ho

    2013-10-01

    Patients with sudden deafness who had abnormal ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP)/cervical VEMP (cVEMP) responses but retained caloric function may subsequently develop secondary hydrops with a mean interval of 8 years. This study applied the inner ear test battery in patients who had sudden deafness previously to elucidate how secondary endolymphatic hydrops occurs years after sudden deafness. Twenty patients who had experienced recent vertiginous attacks several years after sudden deafness (group A) and 20 patients without rotational vertiginous episode for at least 5 years following sudden deafness (group B) were enrolled. All patients underwent an inner ear test battery comprising audiometry, caloric test, and oVEMP and cVEMP tests. The mean interval from initial sudden deafness to vertiginous attack in group A was 8 years, with a mean hearing level of 66 ± 20 dB, which did not significantly differ from 61 ± 20 dB in group B. For the vestibular test results, the percentages of abnormal cVEMP, oVEMP, and caloric tests in group A were 65%, 70%, and 25%, respectively. Compared to the respective 70%, 60%, and 75% abnormalities in group B, only the caloric test differed significantly.

  14. Acoustic properties of vowel production in prelingually deafened Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants

    OpenAIRE

    YANG, Jing; Brown, Emily; Fox, Robert A.; Xu, Li

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the acoustic features of vowel production in Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants (CIs). The subjects included 14 native Mandarin-speaking, prelingually deafened children with CIs (2.9–8.3 yr old) and 60 age-matched, normal-hearing (NH) children (3.1–9.0 years old). Each subject produced a list of monosyllables containing seven Mandarin vowels: [i, a, u, y, ɤ, ʅ, ɿ]. Midpoint F1 and F2 of each vowel token were extracted and normalized to eliminate the e...

  15. Sudden deafness and right-to-left shunts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Kazumi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Tachi, Toshihiro; Aihara, Teruhito; Harada, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    One of the etiologies for idiopathic sudden deafness is considered to be ischemia of the inner ear. Cryptogenic stroke is caused by a right-to-left shunt (RLS). The present study investigated whether RLS is associated with the occurrence of sudden deafness. Contrast saline transcranial Doppler ultrasonography was performed to detect RLS. Subjects comprised 23 consecutive sudden deafness patients and 46 age- and gender-matched controls. Clinical characteristics, including vascular risk factors, were compared between sudden deafness and control groups. RLS was more frequent in the sudden deafness group than in controls (48 vs. 17%, p = 0.011). No significant differences in other clinical characteristics were seen between groups. RLS may be a potential cause of sudden deafness. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. The deaf athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Trish; Weber, Kathleen M

    2006-12-01

    Deaf and hard of hearing athletes have few documented related medical problems. Hearing loss has multiple causes. A portion of those with a hearing loss consider themselves part of the Deaf community, a community with a unique language and culture. Athletes may have assistive devices to enhance their ability to perceive auditory cues, whereas in deaf sport competitions, common auditory cues may be made visible. There are athletic organizations whose missions are to provide a sport and social venue specific to the deaf population. Having a better understanding and appreciation of the Deaf community will help sports medicine physicians to work more effectively with this population.

  17. The Importance of Vowel Diacritics for Reading in Hebrew: What Can Be Learned from Readers with Prelingual Deafness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the importance of vowel diacritics for the reading of Hebrew in individuals with different levels of phonological control. A paradigm calling for written ordered-recall of 12 lists of 8 consecutively displayed Hebrew nouns was used as a test tool. Item presentation and between-item interval were computer-controlled. Half of…

  18. Deaf genetic testing and psychological well-being in deaf adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Christina G S; Boudreault, Patrick; Baldwin, Erin E; Fox, Michelle; Deignan, Joshua L; Kobayashi, Yoko; Sininger, Yvonne; Grody, Wayne; Sinsheimer, Janet S

    2013-08-01

    Limited data suggest that enhanced self-knowledge from genetic information related to non-medical traits can have a positive impact on psychological well-being. Deaf individuals undertake genetic testing for deaf genes to increase self-knowledge. Because deafness is considered a non-medical trait by many individuals, we hypothesized that deaf individuals receiving a genetic explanation for why they are deaf will experience increased psychological well-being. We report results from a prospective, longitudinal study to determine the impact of genetic testing (GJB2, Cx26; GJB6, Cx30) on perceived personal control (PPC), anxiety, and depression in deaf adults (N = 209) assessed following pre-test genetic counseling as well as 1-month and 6-months following test result disclosure. Participants were classified as Cx positive (n = 82) or Cx negative/inconclusive (n = 127). There was significant evidence for Cx group differences in PPC and anxiety over time (PPC: Cx group*time interaction p = 0.0007; anxiety: Cx group*time interaction p = 0.002), where PPC scores were significantly higher, and anxiety scores were significantly lower for the Cx positive group relative to the negative/inconclusive group following test result disclosure. Compared to pre-test, PPC scores increased at 1-month (p = 0.07) and anxiety scores decreased at 6-months (p = 0.03) for the Cx positive group. In contrast, PPC scores decreased (p = 0.009, p test result disclosure. Genetic testing for deaf genes affects the psychological well-being of deaf individuals. Increasing deaf adults' access to genetic testing may potentially enhance self-knowledge and increase psychological well-being for those who receive a genetic explanation, which could offer downstream health benefits.

  19. Neural networks mediating sentence reading in the deaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ann Hirshorn

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work addresses the neural bases of sentence reading in deaf populations. To better understand the relative role of deafness and English knowledge in shaping the neural networks that mediate sentence reading, three populations with different degrees of English knowledge and depth of hearing loss were included – deaf signers, oral deaf and hearing individuals. The three groups were matched for reading comprehension and scanned while reading sentences. A similar neural network of left perisylvian areas was observed, supporting the view of a shared network of areas for reading despite differences in hearing and English knowledge. However, differences were observed, in particular in the auditory cortex, with deaf signers and oral deaf showing greatest bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG recruitment as compared to hearing individuals. Importantly, within deaf individuals, the same STG area in the left hemisphere showed greater recruitment as hearing loss increased. To further understand the functional role of such auditory cortex re-organization after deafness, connectivity analyses were performed from the STG regions identified above. Connectivity from the left STG toward areas typically associated with semantic processing (BA45 and thalami was greater in deaf signers and in oral deaf as compared to hearing. In contrast, connectivity from left STG toward areas identified with speech-based processing was greater in hearing and in oral deaf as compared to deaf signers. These results support the growing literature indicating recruitment of auditory areas after congenital deafness for visually-mediated language functions, and establish that both auditory deprivation and language experience shape its functional reorganization. Implications for differential reliance on semantic vs. phonological pathways during reading in the three groups is discussed.

  20. [Sudden deafness as a presentation of acoustic neuroma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoszewicz, Robert; Niemczyk, Kazimierz; Marchel, Andrzej; Kowalska, Małgorzata

    2005-09-01

    Sudden deafness (SD) is thought to be a heterogenic group of disorders as to etiopathogenesis. Acoustic neuroma should always be considered in the differential diagnosis. The authors analysed symptoms occurring in the group of 89 patients, diagnosed with acoustic neuroma. A special attention was paid to the role of sudden deafness as a clinical manifestation of the VIIIth nerve pathology. Progressive hearing loss, tinnitus, headache and sudden deafness were the most common complaints. Sudden deafness was developed by approximately 1 of the investigated patients (24.7%). Progressive hearing loss, tinnitus and sudden deafness were also dominating initial signs. The sudden deafness onset was preceded by the period of progressive hearing loss in 3 patients. In one case episode of SD occurred twice.

  1. Maximal vowel space method in analysis of vowels in prelingual speech phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojnović Milan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main problems in the analysis of vowels which occur in prelingual speech phase are centralization of utterance and unknown dimension of vocal tract. Most researches in this field are based on the analysis of maximal vowel space (MVS because discrimination of vowels is very difficult in this early period. MVS analysis includes the estimation of vocal tract (VT physical dimensions. The aim of this research was to estimate and define changes in vowel pronunciation during prelingual speech phase. The analysis and voice recording were performed in a two month old child until he turned one. The recording was performed in 42 sessions, on average 4 sessions every month. Sound segments that look like vowel pronunciation were extracted from the recordings and were used for the formant frequencies estimation by PRAAT software. The Burg method was used for formant frequency estimation. Research results showed that MVS can be used in diagnostic procedure from a child's earliest age. MVS analysis is appropriate for a child's earliest age as a child needs to pronounce individual phonemes, and does not need to respond to speech stimuli. These results need to be confirmed on a larger sample when extended analysis should define criteria for discrimination of typical and atypical formant frequencies.

  2. Deafness, Teacher-of-the-Deaf Support and Self-Concept in Australian Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remine, Maria D.; Care, Esther; Grbic, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    This study examines whether self-concept scores of deaf students vary according to age at diagnosis of deafness, the degree of deafness and the number of visits students receive from a teacher of the deaf. Thirty-seven deaf students between the ages of 12 and 18 attending inclusive educational settings in Western Australia participated in the…

  3. Being a Deaf Role Model: Deaf People's Experiences of Working with Families and Deaf Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Katherine D.; Young, Alys M.

    2011-01-01

    The experiences of being a deaf role model have been little explored in the literature. This paper explores the role of the deaf role model as perceived by d/Deaf adults who carried out this role, when working with deaf young people, parents of deaf children, and professionals who work with them. The data were collected from part of the evaluation…

  4. Negotiating Deaf Bodies and Corporeal Experiences: The Cybernetic Deaf Subject

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas P. Horejes; Christopher J. Heuer

    2013-01-01

    Deaf people negotiate their embodiment through corporeal experiences to provide a perception of what it means to be human. Some deaf people search for a framework where being deaf is human, not a disability. Other deaf people experience their deafness as a disability and use technology as a means to negotiate their embodiment and experiences. The role of technology or cybernetics, particularly cochlear implants, for the deaf will be examined as a way to understand cultural identities and dive...

  5. Postural Control in Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir-Abbas Ebrahimi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the reliability of static control evaluation with Synapsys Posturography System (SPS, Marseille, France and to compare the static postural control of deaf children with typically developing children. This study was conducted in 2 phases on 81 children of 7 to 12 years old in Tehran schools. The first phase examined the reliability of static balance evaluation with SPS. In this phase, a total of 12 children with typical development were evaluated and then do a re-test 1 week later. In the second phase, 30 children with profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL and high risk in their balance (selected from Baghcheban Schools for the Deaf as the experimental group, and 37 children with typical development (selected randomly from 2 primary schools for girls and boys in District 12 of Tehran Department of Education as control group were enrolled in the study. They were all placed under sensory organization test evaluation. Based on the results of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC, the unilateral random effects model, test-retest reliability in different sensory conditions, the moderate to excellent results were obtained (ICC between 0.68 and 0.94. Also, the mean displacement of pressure center in all sensory conditions, the limits of stability (LOS area, the overall balance scores, and scores for balance sensory ratio (except the somatosensory ratio of children with typical development were better than the deaf peers (P˂0.05. The SPS has acceptable reliability to evaluate static posture in children between the ages of 7 and 12 years. Furthermore, deaf children as compared to children with typical development had a lower static postural control in all sensory conditions. This finding confirms the need to examine the postural control for identifying the extent of sensory deficit that has caused poor balance function, and also the need for early intervention to address the balance deficit in deaf

  6. An Examination of Health Information Management by the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how Deaf people perceive, access, and utilize interpersonal and media sources for health information. In light of the scarcity of research on health information management among this group, a two-phase study was conducted that included eight focus groups (N=39) and survey data (N=366) with Deaf participants to determine the…

  7. An Examination of Health Information Management by the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how Deaf people perceive, access, and utilize interpersonal and media sources for health information. In light of the scarcity of research on health information management among this group, a two-phase study was conducted that included eight focus groups (N=39) and survey data (N=366) with Deaf participants to determine the…

  8. Deafness, culture, and choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, N

    2002-10-01

    The recent controversy surrounding the choice, by a deaf lesbian couple, to have children who were themselves deaf, has focused attention on the ethics of choosing (apparent) disabilities for children. Deaf activists argue that deafness is not a disability, but instead the constitutive condition of access to a rich culture. Being deaf carries disadvantages with it, but these are a product of discrimination, not of the condition itself. It is, however, implausible to think that all the disadvantages which stem from deafness are social in origin. Moreover, though it may be true that being deaf carries with it the important compensation of access to a rich culture, no physical condition is required for such access. Cultures are simply the kind of things to which we are born, and therefore to which the children of deaf parents, hearing or deaf, normally belong. Thus these parents are making a mistake in choosing deafness for their children. Given their own experience of isolation as children, however, it is a mistake which is understandable, and our reaction to them ought to be compassion, not condemnation.

  9. Acoustics outreach program for the deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsawad, Cameron T.; Berardi, Mark L.; Whiting, Jennifer K.; Lawler, M. Jeannette; Gee, Kent L.; Neilsen, Tracianne B.

    2016-03-01

    The Hear and See methodology has often been used as a means of enhancing pedagogy by focusing on the two strongest learning senses, but this naturally does not apply to deaf or hard of hearing students. Because deaf students' prior nonaural experiences with sound will vary significantly from those of students with typical hearing, different methods must be used to build understanding. However, the sensory-focused pedagogical principle can be applied in a different way for the Deaf by utilizing the senses of touch and sight, called here the ``See and Feel'' method. This presentation will provide several examples of how acoustics demonstrations have been adapted to create an outreach program for a group of junior high students from a school for the Deaf and discuss challenges encountered.

  10. Empathy and Theory of Mind in Deaf and Hearing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Candida C

    2016-04-01

    Empathy (or sharing another's emotion) and theory of mind (ToM: the understanding that behavior is guided by true and false beliefs) are cornerstones of human social life and relationships. In contrast to ToM, there has been little study of empathy's development, especially in deaf children. Two studies of a total of 117 children (52 hearing; 65 deaf children of hearing parents) aged 4-13 years were therefore designed to (a) compare levels of empathy in deaf and hearing children, and (b) explore correlations of ToM with empathy in deaf and hearing groups. Results showed that (a) deaf children scored lower in empathy than their hearing peers and (b) empathy and ToM were significantly correlated for deaf children but not for the hearing. Possible reasons for these divergent developmental patterns were considered, along with implications for future research.

  11. Suicide in deaf populations: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapur Navneet

    2007-10-01

    %. Little evidence was found to suggest that risk factors for suicide in deaf people differed systematically from those in the general population. However, studies did report higher levels of depression and higher levels of perceived risk among deaf individuals than hearing control groups. No firm evidence was found regarding the effectiveness of suicide prevention strategies in deaf people, but suggested strategies include developing specific screening tools, training clinical staff, promoting deaf awareness, increasing the availability of specialist mental health services for deaf people. Conclusion There is a significant gap in our understanding of suicide in deaf populations. Clinicians should be aware of the possible association between suicide and deafness. Specialist mental health services should be readily accessible to deaf individuals and specific preventative strategies may be of benefit. However, further research using a variety of study designs is needed to increase our understanding of this issue.

  12. Cochear implantion for prelingually deafened children with leukoencephalopathy%脑白质病语前聋儿童人工耳蜗植入疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴莎; 华清泉; 曹永茂; 杨琨; 张志敏

    2014-01-01

    目的:通过对脑白质病语前聋儿童人工耳蜗植入术疗效的观察,探讨人工耳蜗植入术在脑白质病语前聋儿童中的临床应用。方法经术前常规听力学、影像学、智力、心理等评估,筛选30例脑白质病语前聋儿童(脑白质病组)实施人工耳蜗植入术,并与同期30例接受人工耳蜗植入未伴脑白质病等中枢神经系统疾病的语前聋儿童(对照组)进行术后听觉语言康复情况疗效比较。结果(1)术后半年行声场测试,脑白质病组声场听阈为39.67±5.28dBHL,对照组为37.67±3.84dBHL,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);(2)术后1年行听觉语言能力评估,听觉能力评估显示脑白质病组言语识别率为83.48±7.63%,对照组为85.03±9.43%;语言能力评估显示脑白质病组语言年龄为2.63±0.69岁,对照组语言年龄为2.71±0.74岁,两组患儿听觉能力及语言能力均无统计学差异(P>0.05)。结论脑白质病语前聋儿童在经过术前充分评估及观察筛选后实施人工耳蜗植入术与单纯语前聋儿童疗效相当,说明脑白质病聋儿实施人工耳蜗植入术是可行的。%Objective To observe the effects of cochear implantion for prelingually deafened children with leukoence-phalopathy. Methods 30 prelingually deafend children with leukoencephalopathy were screened in this study as leukoencephalopathy group by preoperative audiology, imaging data, intelligence and psychology assessment , and another 30 prelingually deafend children without central nervous diseases and accepted cochlear implantation at the same period were chosen as control group. The postoperative outcomes of the two groups were compared. Results (1)Half a year after cochlear implication, the field hearing threshold of leukoencephalopathy group was 39.67±5.28dBHL, the control group was 37.67±3.84dBHL, there was no significant difference in the two groups(P>0.05);(2)All children were

  13. Deaf Sociality and the Deaf Lutheran Church in Adamorobe, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an ethnographic analysis of "deaf sociality" in Adamorobe, a village in Ghana, where the relatively high prevalence of hereditary deafness has led to dense social and spatial connections. Deaf people are part of their hearing environment particularly through family networks, and produce deaf sociality through many…

  14. South African Deaf Education and the Deaf Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storbeck, Claudine, Ed.; Martin, David, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    In a special section of the "American Annals of the Deaf", Deaf education and the Deaf community in South Africa are discussed. The special section is organized into 7 segments: a historical overview to establish context, the educational context, educators and learners, postgraduate education and employment, perspectives of Deaf children and their…

  15. Deaf Sociality and the Deaf Lutheran Church in Adamorobe, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an ethnographic analysis of "deaf sociality" in Adamorobe, a village in Ghana, where the relatively high prevalence of hereditary deafness has led to dense social and spatial connections. Deaf people are part of their hearing environment particularly through family networks, and produce deaf sociality through many…

  16. What We Can Learn from Hearing Parents of Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Hearing parents of deaf children face stresses and demands related to parenting a deaf child, including difficult choices about language, technologies, education and identity for their children (Marschark, 1997). To date, few researchers have discussed the unique challenges faced by this group. Through a series of semistructured, in-depth…

  17. Phonological Awareness and Decoding Skills in Deaf Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravenstede, L.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the phonological awareness skills of a group of deaf adolescents and how these skills correlated with decoding skills (single word and non-word reading) and receptive vocabulary. Twenty, congenitally profoundly deaf adolescents with at least average nonverbal cognitive skills were tested on a range of phonological awareness…

  18. Negotiating Deaf Bodies and Corporeal Experiences: The Cybernetic Deaf Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P. Horejes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deaf people negotiate their embodiment through corporeal experiences to provide a perception of what it means to be human. Some deaf people search for a framework where being deaf is human, not a disability. Other deaf people experience their deafness as a disability and use technology as a means to negotiate their embodiment and experiences. The role of technology or cybernetics, particularly cochlear implants, for the deaf will be examined as a way to understand cultural identities and diverse ideological perspectives concerning what it means to be deaf and normal. Then, this paper focuses on social constructed ‘bodies’ for the deaf using embodied theory and action as a part of a theoretical framework to showcase theoretical ideas and actualities of some deaf people’s lives and experiences. These discussions are ways to open dialogues and collaborative inquiries on larger important issues such as what it means to be deaf and, in essence, human.

  19. Deaf mobile application accessibility requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Shelena Soosay; Hussain, Azham; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-08-01

    Requirement for deaf mobile applications need to be analysed to ensure the disabilities need are instilled into the mobile applications developed for them. Universal design is understandable to comply every user needs, however specific disability is argued by the authors to have different need and requirements. These differences are among the reasons for these applications being developed to target for a specific group of people, however they are less usable and later abandoned. This study focuses on deriving requirements that are needed by the deaf in their mobile applications that are meant specifically for them. Studies on previous literature was conducted it can be concluded that graphic, text, multimedia and sign language interpreter are among mostly required features to be included in their mobile application to ensure the applications are usable for this community.

  20. DFNB79: reincarnation of a nonsyndromic deafness locus on chromosome 9q34.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahid Yar; Riazuddin, Saima; Shahzad, Mohsin; Ahmed, Nazir; Zafar, Ahmad Usman; Rehman, Atteeq Ur; Morell, Robert J; Griffith, Andrew J; Ahmed, Zubair M; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B

    2010-01-01

    Genetic analysis of an inbred Pakistani family PKDF280, segregating prelingual severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss, provided evidence for a DFNB locus on human chromosome 9q34.3. Co-segregation of the deafness trait with marker D9SH159 was determined by a two-point linkage analysis (LOD score 9.43 at theta=0). Two additional large families, PKDF517 and PKDF741, co-segregate recessive deafness with markers linked to the same interval. Haplotype analyses of these three families refined the interval to 3.84 Mb defined by D9S1818 (centromeric) and D9SH6 (telomeric). This interval overlaps with the previously reported DFNB33 locus whose chromosomal map position has been recently revised and assigned to a new position on chromosome 10p11.23-q21.1. The nonsyndromic deafness locus on chromosome 9q segregating in family PKDF280 was designated DFNB79. We are currently screening the 113 candidate DFNB79 genes for mutations and have excluded CACNA1B, EDF1, PTGDS, EHMT1, QSOX2, NOTCH1, MIR126 and MIR602.

  1. Cochlear implant: Speech and language development in deaf and hard of hearing children following implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Almost 200 cochlear implantations were done in the four centers (two in Belgrade, per one in Novi Sad and Niš in Serbia from 2002 to 2009. Less than 10% of implantees were postlingually deaf adults. The vast majority, i.e. 90% were pre- and perilingually profoundly deaf children. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of improved auditory perception due to cochlear implantation on comprehension of abstract words in children as compared with hearing impaired children with conventional hearing aids and normal hearing children. Methods. Thirty children were enrolled in this study: 20 hearing impaired and 10 normal hearing. The vocabulary test was used. Results. The overall results for the whole test (100 words showed a significant difference in favor of the normal hearing as compared with hearing impaired children. The normal hearing children successfully described or defined 77.93% of a total of 100 words. Success rate for the cochlear implanted children was 26.87% and for the hearing impaired children with conventional hearing aids 20.32%. Conclusion. Testing for abstract words showed a statistically significant difference between the cochlear implanted and the hearing impaired children with hearing aids (Mann- Whitney U-test, p = 0.019 implying considerable advantage of cochlear implants over hearing aids regarding successful speech development in prelingually deaf children.

  2. Comparing Motor Development of Deaf Children of Deaf Parents and Deaf Children of Hearing Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Lauren J.; Volding, Lori; Winnick, Joseph P.

    2004-01-01

    Deaf children of Deaf parents perform better academically (Ritter-Brinton & Stewart, 1992), linguistically (Courtin, 2000; M. Harris, 2001; Vaccari & Marschark, 1997), and socially (Hadadian & Rose, 1991; M. Harris, 2001) than Deaf children of hearing parents. Twenty-nine Deaf children in residential schools were assessed to determine if a…

  3. Neonatal detection of the 35delG mutation of the GJB2 gene in families at risk for deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathelier, C; François, M; Lucotte, G

    2004-01-01

    About half of congenitally deaf children that have a recessively inherited sensorineural deafness are born from normal-hearing parents and have no risk factor for hearing loss. Mutation 35delG in the connexin-26 gene is in European populations the basis for around half of all recessively inherited prelingual sensorineural deafness. The aim of our study was to assess the efficacy and utility of the 35delG mutation of the connexin-26 gene analysis for neonates at familial risk, from DNA isolated from Guthrie newborn screening cards. Newborns who had consanguineous parent and/or a familial history of deafness underwent connexin-26 gene analysis from DNA isolated from Guthrie cards and two hearing screening tests (transient evoked otoacoustic emissions, and auditory brainstem recordings). 24 newborns were includes in this pilot study; one of them is homozygous for the 35delG mutation and had abnormal hearing screening tests; all the others newborns had normal connexin gene and at least one normal hearing screening test. Detection on connexin-26 gene mutation is feasible in selected at-risk newborns on one additional blood spot on Guthrie card.

  4. PERSONAL IDENTITY IN DEAF ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna KOSSEWSKA

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors influencing the identity deaf adolescents. The study involved 67 deaf adolescents (38 boys and 29 girls aged 16 to 19 students of secondary school. Ninety-three hearing children constituted a comparison group. The structure of identity was explored on the basis of identification references given by the subjects who were to reply in writing, 20 times running, to the question: „Who Am I?” the test, adapted from M. H. Kuhn and T. S. McPartland by Martines and Silvestre (1995 given in written and signed mode.Results showed that the hearing status as well as mode of communication influence the description of personal identity. It was found that deaf adoles­cents used more descriptions especially in the fol­lowing categories: Civil Status, Body and Physical Appearance, Tastes and Activities, Friendship and Relationships, Personal and Social Situation, Negative Personal Traits, and Neutral Personality Traits. Although this study could demonstrate im­pact independent variables on identity, the data raise the need for further, preferably longitudinal, research. This complex phenomenon has to be examined more closely.Combined self-descriptive processes lead to the development of an organized, learned and dynamic identity, and subjective description of an individ­ual has strong emotional consequences for the in­dividual in question.

  5. Deaf Individuals Show a Leftward Bias in Numerical Bisection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Cecchetto, Carlo; Papagno, Costanza

    2016-01-01

    Consistent evidence suggests that deaf individuals conceive of numerical magnitude as a left-to-right-oriented mental number line, as typically observed in hearing individuals. When accessing this spatial representation of numbers, normally hearing individuals typically show an attentional bias to the left (pseudoneglect), resembling the attentional bias they show in physical space. Deaf individuals do not show pseudoneglect in representing external space, as assessed by a visual line bisection task. However, whether deaf individuals show attentional biases in representing numerical space has never been investigated before. Here we instructed groups of deaf and hearing individuals to quickly estimate (without calculating) the midpoint of a series of numerical intervals presented in ascending and descending order. Both hearing and deaf individuals were significantly biased toward lower numbers (i.e., the leftward side of the mental number line) in their estimations. Nonetheless, the underestimation bias was smaller in deaf individuals than in the hearing when bisecting pairs of numbers given in descending order. This result may depend on the use of different strategies by deaf and hearing participants or a less pronounced lateralization of deaf individuals in the control of spatial attention.

  6. APPLICATION OF GENETIC DEAFNESS GENE CHIP FOR DETECTION OF GENE MUTATION OF DEAFNESS IN PREGNANT WOMEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Liang; ZHONG Su; ZHAO Nan; LIU Ping; ZHAO Yangyu; QIAO Jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study is to identify the carrier rate of common deafness mutation in Chinese pregnant women via detecting deafness gene mutations with gene chip. Methods The pregnant women in obstetric clinic without hearing impairment and hearing disorders family history were selected. The informed consent was signed. Peripheral blood was taken to extract genom-ic DNA. Application of genetic deafness gene chip for detecting 9 mutational hot spot of the most common 4 Chinese deafness genes, namely GJB2 (35delG,176del16bp, 235delC, 299delAT), GJB3 (C538T) ,SLC26A4 ( IVS72A>G, A2168G) and mito-chondrial DNA 12S rRNA (A1555G, C1494T) . Further genetic testing were provided to the spouses and newborns of the screened carriers. Results Peripheral blood of 430 pregnant women were detected,detection of deafness gene mutation carri-ers in 24 cases(4.2%), including 13 cases of the GJB2 heterozygous mutation, 3 cases of SLC26A4 heterozygous mutation, 1 cases of GJB3 heterozygous mutation, and 1 case of mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation. 18 spouses and 17 newborns took fur-ther genetic tests, and 6 newborns inherited the mutation from their mother. Conclusion The common deafness genes muta-tion has a high carrier rate in pregnant women group,235delC and IVS7-2A>G heterozygous mutations are common.

  7. Metabolic disorders prevalence in sudden deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiticica, Jeanne; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish the frequency of metabolic disorders among patients with sudden deafness and to compare this frequency with data from population surveys. No consensus has been reached regarding the prevalence of metabolic disorders among sudden deafness patients or their influence as associated risk factors. This cross-sectional study enrolled all sudden deafness patients treated in the Otolaryngology Department of the University of São Paulo between January 1996 and December 2006. Patients were subjected to laboratory exams including glucose and cholesterol levels, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction, triglycerides, free T4 and TSH. The sample comprised 166 patients. We observed normal glucose levels in 101 (81.5%) patients and hyperglycemia in 23 (18.5%) patients, which is significantly different (p sudden hearing loss patients and the Brazilian population. Normal levels of thyroid hormones were observed in 116 patients (78.4%), and abnormal levels were observed in 32 (21.6%) patients. Compared with the prevalence of thyroid disorders in the general population (10%), statistical analysis revealed a significant difference (p = 0.0132) between these two groups. Among sudden deafness patients, we observed frequencies of hyperglycemia and thyroid disorders that were more than twice those of the general population. Hyperglycemia and thyroid disorders are much more frequent in patients with sudden deafness than in the general population and should be considered as important associated risk factors.

  8. Deaf identities in a multicultural setting: The Ugandan context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony B. Mugeere

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Often located far apart from each other, deaf and hearing impaired persons face a multiplicity of challenges that evolve around isolation, neglect and the deprivation of essential social services that affect their welfare and survival. Although it is evident that the number of persons born with or acquire hearing impairments in later stages of their lives is increasing in many developing countries, there is limited research on this population. The main objective of this article is to explore the identities and experiences of living as a person who is deaf in Uganda. Using data from semi-structured interviews with 42 deaf persons (aged 19–41 and three focus group discussions, the study findings show that beneath the more pragmatic identities documented in the United States and European discourses there is a matrix of ambiguous, often competing and manifold forms in Uganda that are not necessarily based on the deaf and deaf constructions. The results further show that the country’s cultural, religious and ethnic diversity is more of a restraint than an enabler to the aspirations of the deaf community. The study concludes that researchers and policy makers need to be cognisant of the unique issues underlying deaf epistemologies whilst implementing policy and programme initiatives that directly affect them. The upper case ‘D’ in the term deaf is a convention that has been used since the early 1970s to connote a ‘socially constructed visual culture’ or a linguistic, social and cultural minority group who use sign language as primary means of communication and identify with the deaf community, whereas the lower case ‘d’ in deaf refers to ‘the audio logical condition of hearing impairment’. However, in this article the lower case has been used consistently.

  9. Slow change deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhoff, John G; Wayand, Joseph; Ndiaye, Mamoudou C; Berkow, Ann B; Bertacchi, Breanna R; Benton, Catherine A

    2015-05-01

    In four experiments, we demonstrated a new phenomenon called "slow-change deafness." In Experiment 1 we presented listeners with continuous speech that changed three semitones in pitch over time, and we found that nearly 50 % failed to notice the change. Experiments 2 and 3 replicated the finding, demonstrated that the changes in the stimuli were well above threshold, and showed that when listeners were alerted to the possibility of a change, detection rates improved dramatically. Experiment 4 showed that increasing the magnitude of the change that occurred in the stimulus decreased the rate of change deafness. Our results are consistent with previous work that had shown that cueing listeners to potential auditory changes can significantly reduce change deafness. These findings support an account of change deafness that is dependent on both the magnitude of a stimulus change and listener expectations.

  10. Widespread auditory deficits in tune deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer L; Zalewski, Christopher; Brewer, Carmen; Lucker, Jay; Drayna, Dennis

    2009-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate auditory function in individuals with deficits in musical pitch perception. We hypothesized that such individuals have deficits in nonspeech areas of auditory processing. We screened 865 randomly selected individuals to identify those who scored poorly on the Distorted Tunes test (DTT), a measure of musical pitch recognition ability. Those who scored poorly were given a comprehensive audiologic examination, and those with hearing loss or other confounding audiologic factors were excluded from further testing. Thirty-five individuals with tune deafness constituted the experimental group. Thirty-four individuals with normal hearing and normal DTT scores, matched for age, gender, handedness, and education, and without overt or reported psychiatric disorders made up the normal control group. Individual and group performance for pure-tone frequency discrimination at 1000 Hz was determined by measuring the difference limen for frequency (DLF). Auditory processing abilities were assessed using tests of pitch pattern recognition, duration pattern recognition, and auditory gap detection. In addition, we evaluated both attention and short- and long-term memory as variables that might influence performance on our experimental measures. Differences between groups were evaluated statistically using Wilcoxon nonparametric tests and t-tests as appropriate. The DLF at 1000 Hz in the group with tune deafness was significantly larger than that of the normal control group. However, approximately one-third of participants with tune deafness had DLFs within the range of performance observed in the control group. Many individuals with tune deafness also displayed a high degree of variability in their intertrial frequency discrimination performance that could not be explained by deficits in memory or attention. Pitch and duration pattern discrimination and auditory gap-detection ability were significantly poorer in the group with tune deafness

  11. Speech feature discrimination in deaf children following cochlear implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeson, Tonya R.; Pisoni, David B.; Kirk, Karen Iler

    2002-05-01

    Speech feature discrimination is a fundamental perceptual skill that is often assumed to underlie word recognition and sentence comprehension performance. To investigate the development of speech feature discrimination in deaf children with cochlear implants, we conducted a retrospective analysis of results from the Minimal Pairs Test (Robbins et al., 1988) selected from patients enrolled in a longitudinal study of speech perception and language development. The MP test uses a 2AFC procedure in which children hear a word and select one of two pictures (bat-pat). All 43 children were prelingually deafened, received a cochlear implant before 6 years of age or between ages 6 and 9, and used either oral or total communication. Children were tested once every 6 months to 1 year for 7 years; not all children were tested at each interval. By 2 years postimplant, the majority of these children achieved near-ceiling levels of discrimination performance for vowel height, vowel place, and consonant manner. Most of the children also achieved plateaus but did not reach ceiling performance for consonant place and voicing. The relationship between speech feature discrimination, spoken word recognition, and sentence comprehension will be discussed. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD Research Grant No. R01DC00064 and NIH/NIDCD Training Grant No. T32DC00012.

  12. An Analysis of the Reading Strategies Used by Deaf and Hearing Adults: Similarities and Differences in Phonological Processing and Metacognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    This study is a mixed methods analysis of reading processes and language experiences of deaf and hearing readers. The sample includes four groups each with fifteen adults--identified as: deaf/high-achieving readers, deaf/struggling/non-academic readers, hearing/high-achieving readers, and hearing/non-academic readers. The purpose of this study is…

  13. Acoustic properties of vowel production in prelingually deafened Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Brown, Emily; Fox, Robert A; Xu, Li

    2015-11-01

    The present study examined the acoustic features of vowel production in Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants (CIs). The subjects included 14 native Mandarin-speaking, prelingually deafened children with CIs (2.9-8.3 yr old) and 60 age-matched, normal-hearing (NH) children (3.1-9.0 years old). Each subject produced a list of monosyllables containing seven Mandarin vowels: [i, a, u, y, ɤ, ʅ, ɿ]. Midpoint F1 and F2 of each vowel token were extracted and normalized to eliminate the effects of different vocal tract sizes. Results showed that the CI children produced significantly longer vowels and less compact vowel categories than the NH children did. The CI children's acoustic vowel space was reduced due to a retracted production of the vowel [i]. The vowel space area showed a strong negative correlation with age at implantation (r = -0.80). The analysis of acoustic distance showed that the CI children produced corner vowels [a, u] similarly to the NH children, but other vowels (e.g., [ʅ, ɿ]) differently from the NH children, which suggests that CI children generally follow a similar developmental path of vowel acquisition as NH children. These findings highlight the importance of early implantation and have implications in clinical aural habilitation in young children with CIs.

  14. Effect of Peer Éducation on Deaf Secondary School

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sepamte teaching of deaf students using ... Prepost group differential scores for knowledge of the causes, modes of transmission and methods of prevention ..... three months preeeding data collection was exam» ..... AIDS and I don't want to hear.

  15. Constructions of Deafness and Deaf Education: Exploring Normalcy and Deviance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horejes, Thomas P., V

    2009-01-01

    Ideas and definitions of deafness are complicated and deeply contested, including the constraints over what ought to be normal, especially for a child. This research examines what it means to be deaf and disabled under the guise of normalcy and deviance. Social control institutions, such as schools, provide deaf children with a unique opportunity…

  16. Deaf/Hearing Research Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolsey, Ju-Lee A; Dunn, Kim Misener; Gentzke, Scott W; Joharchi, Hannah A; Clark, M Diane

    2017-01-01

    Deaf individuals typically are seen through the lens of the dominant hearing society's perception, i.e., that being deaf is an impairment. Today, a small but growing number of Deaf and hearing researchers are challenging this perception. The authors examined perceptions of what components are necessary for a successful Deaf/hearing research partnership, and propose that it is essential for Deaf and hearing researchers to embrace a Deaf epistemology. The authors found that a core category of equity is the key to effective teams. This equity is based in part on the mutual understanding that American Sign Language is the lingua franca of the team, as it provides full and easy access between Deaf and hearing team members. Additionally, a transformative paradigm, as a research frame, was found to be necessary to focus on leveling the playing field for Deaf researchers.

  17. Deaf children attending different school environments: sign language abilities and theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasuolo, Elena; Valeri, Giovanni; Di Renzo, Alessio; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Volterra, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined whether full access to sign language as a medium for instruction could influence performance in Theory of Mind (ToM) tasks. Three groups of Italian participants (age range: 6-14 years) participated in the study: Two groups of deaf signing children and one group of hearing-speaking children. The two groups of deaf children differed only in their school environment: One group attended a school with a teaching assistant (TA; Sign Language is offered only by the TA to a single deaf child), and the other group attended a bilingual program (Italian Sign Language and Italian). Linguistic abilities and understanding of false belief were assessed using similar materials and procedures in spoken Italian with hearing children and in Italian Sign Language with deaf children. Deaf children attending the bilingual school performed significantly better than deaf children attending school with the TA in tasks assessing lexical comprehension and ToM, whereas the performance of hearing children was in between that of the two deaf groups. As for lexical production, deaf children attending the bilingual school performed significantly better than the two other groups. No significant differences were found between early and late signers or between children with deaf and hearing parents.

  18. Detection of Deafness-Causing Mutations in the Greek Mitochondrial Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haris Kokotas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrion harbors its own DNA, known as mtDNA, encoding certain essential components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and protein synthesis apparatus. mtDNA mutations have an impact on cellular ATP production and many of them are undoubtedly a factor that contributes to sensorineural deafness, including both syndromic and non-syndromic forms. Hot spot regions for deafness mutations are the MTRNR1 gene, encoding the 12S rRNA, the MTTS1 gene, encoding the tRNA for Ser(UCN, and the MTTL1 gene, encoding the tRNA for Leu(UUR. We investigated the impact of mtDNA mutations in the Greek hearing impaired population, by testing a cohort of 513 patients suffering from childhood onset prelingual or postlingual, bilateral, sensorineural, syndromic or non-syndromic hearing loss of any degree for six mitochondrial variants previously associated with deafness. Screening involved the MTRNR1 961delT/insC and A1555G mutations, the MTTL1 A3243G mutation, and the MTTS1 A7445G, 7472insC and T7510C mutations. Although two patients were tested positive for the A1555G mutation, we failed to identify any subject carrying the 961delT/insC, A3243G, A7445G, 7472insC, or T7510C mutations. Our findings strongly support our previously raised conclusion that mtDNA mutations are not a major risk factor for sensorineural deafness in the Greek population.

  19. How Speechreading Contributes to Reading in a Transparent Ortography: The Case of Spanish Deaf People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ortiz, Isabel R.; Saldaña, David; Moreno-Perez, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to describe the performance of deaf and hearing people while speechreading Spanish, a language with transparent orthography, and to relate this skill to reading efficiency. Three groups of 27 participants each were recruited: a group of deaf participants, a chronological age-matched hearing group and a reading age-matched…

  20. Learning with a missing sense: what can we learn from the interaction of a deaf child with a turtle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This case study reports on the progress of Navon, a 13-year-old boy with prelingual deafness, over a 3-month period following exposure to Logo, a computer programming language that visualizes specific programming commands by means of a virtual drawing tool called the Turtle. Despite an almost complete lack of skills in spoken and sign language, Navon made impressive progress in his programming skills, including acquisition of a notable active written vocabulary, which he learned to apply in a purposeful, rule-based manner. His achievements are discussed with reference to commonly held assumptions about the relationship between language and thought, in general, and the prerequisite of proper spoken language skills for the acquisition of reading and writing, in particular. Highlighted are the central principles responsible for Navon's unexpected cognitive and linguistic development, including the way it affected his social relations with peers and teachers.

  1. Coesão textual na escrita de um grupo de adultos surdos usuários da língua de sinais Brasileira Text cohesion in writing of a group of deaf adults users of Brazilian sign language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Oliveira Crepaldi de Almeida

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: investigar a coesão textual em produções escritas por quatro adultos surdos usuários da Língua de Sinais Brasileira alfabetizados, integrantes de um grupo de discussão nessa língua, sobre o tema violência, coordenado por uma intérprete fluente. Verificar a possível interferência da Libras na escrita em português. MÉTODOS: após terem participado de sessões de discussão sobre o tema violência, cada participante produziu um texto relacionado a algum tipo de violência. Seus textos foram analisados qualitativamente em termos de sua coesão. RESULTADOS: os textos produzidos faziam referência a situações de violência simbólica. O estudo dos textos evidenciou presença de coesão textual sequencial e referencial em todos os textos, embora comprometida. Houve interferência da Libras nas redações. Observou-se que os textos, por si sós, são difíceis de serem compreendidos sem a interação direta com o participante. Apesar da dificuldade na compreensão da língua escrita, que é diferente da estrutura da língua de sinais, o estudo evidenciou que esses surdos podem construir textos com sentido e coesão. CONCLUSÃO: a produção escrita dos surdos pesquisados apresenta coesão, porém com interferência da Libras, o que prejudica, em alguns casos, a compreensão por parte do leitor. Quanto menor a coesão textual, maior a necessidade de explicações do autor sobre o que quis dizer com seu texto.PURPOSE: to investigate text cohesion in written productions of four deaf male adults using Brazilian Sign Language (Libras and write in Portuguese. Participants integrate a discussion group on violence using that language coordinated by a fluent interpreter. The study also verifies possible interference of Libras on writing in Portuguese. METHODS: after a few sessions, a discussing the theme violence, each deaf participant wrote a text on a violence situation. These texts were analyzed qualitatively as for their cohesion

  2. Visuo-tactile interactions in the congenitally deaf: A behavioral and event-related potential study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine eHauthal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory deprivation is known to be accompanied by alterations in visual processing. Yet not much is known about tactile processing and the interplay of the intact sensory modalities in the deaf. We presented visual, tactile, and visuo-tactile stimuli to congenitally deaf and hearing individuals in a speeded detection task. Analyses of multisensory responses showed a redundant signals effect that was attributable to a coactivation mechanism in both groups, although the redundancy gain was less in the deaf. In hearing but not deaf participants, N200 latencies of somatosensory event-related potentials were modulated by simultaneous visual stimulation. In deaf but not hearing participants, however, there was a modulation of N200 latencies of visual event-related potentials due to simultaneous tactile stimulation. A comparison of unisensory responses between groups revealed larger N200 amplitudes for visual and shorter N200 latencies for tactile stimuli in the deaf. P300 amplitudes in response to both stimuli were larger in deaf participants. The differences in visual and tactile processing between deaf and hearing participants, however, were not reflected in behavior. The electroencephalography (EEG results suggest an asymmetry in visuo-tactile interactions between deaf and hearing individuals. Visuo-tactile enhancements could neither be fully explained by perceptual deficiency nor by inverse effectiveness. Instead, we suggest that results might be explained by a shift in the relative importance of touch and vision in deaf individuals.

  3. Dissociating neural correlates of meaningful emblems from meaningless gestures in deaf signers and hearing non-signers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Fatima T; Patkin, Debra J; Kim, Jieun; Braun, Allen R; Horwitz, Barry

    2012-10-10

    Emblems are meaningful, culturally-specific hand gestures that are analogous to words. In this fMRI study, we contrasted the processing of emblematic gestures with meaningless gestures by pre-lingually Deaf and hearing participants. Deaf participants, who used American Sign Language, activated bilateral auditory processing and associative areas in the temporal cortex to a greater extent than the hearing participants while processing both types of gestures relative to rest. The hearing non-signers activated a diverse set of regions, including those implicated in the mirror neuron system, such as premotor cortex (BA 6) and inferior parietal lobule (BA 40) for the same contrast. Further, when contrasting the processing of meaningful to meaningless gestures (both relative to rest), the Deaf participants, but not the hearing, showed greater response in the left angular and supramarginal gyri, regions that play important roles in linguistic processing. These results suggest that whereas the signers interpreted emblems to be comparable to words, the non-signers treated emblems as similar to pictorial descriptions of the world and engaged the mirror neuron system.

  4. [To investigate the relation of sudden deafness with hearing loss level and auditory threshold].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yikun; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Ya; Chen, Xiaoling; Yu, Xiaosong

    2007-05-01

    To investigate the relation of sudden deafness with hearing loss level and auditory threshold. A retrospective analysis was performed in 92 cases(97 years) of sudden deafness patients. In this group,the best hearing loss prognosis was the ascend type and the back type the total effective rate was both 100.0%. The second was the slow descend type. The total effective rate of this type was 70.0% (7/10). the total effective rate of full deaf is 66.7% (14/21), the sudden descend type is poor, the effective rate was 50% (4/8). although the full deaf groups total effective rate was high than sudden descend type, without one ear completely recovering, and only one ear from sudden descend type was completely cured. After treatment, there were 6 ears of fall deaf in full deaf group. There was one case rised 65 dBHL and one case rised 50 dBHL from the 21 cases full deaf sufferer. In this deaf level group, the light level and the middle level was one ear respectively. Although the total effective rate of this group was the highest, all the cases were not completely recovered. After treatment, the hearing rise 17 dBHL and 19 dBHL respectively. After chi2 text (chi2 = 1.459, P > 0.05), the total effective rate of the more heavier, heavy, and the heaviest to full deaf was no significant difference but after chi2 text (chi2 = 10.09, P deaf group was the lowest: 6.0% (2/33). It was considered that the deafness level was no obvious relation to the total effective rate, but there was significant difference in fully recover rate. The different auditory threshold figure of the sudden deafness was closely related to the hearings prognosis.

  5. Calendar systems and communication of deaf-blind children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jablan Branka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explain the calendar systems and their role in teaching deaf-blind children. Deaf-blind persons belong to a group of multiple disabled persons. This disability should not be observed as a simple composite of visual and hearing impairments, but as a combination of sensory impairments that require special assistance in the development, communication and training for independent living. In our environment, deaf-blind children are being educated in schools for children with visual impairments or in schools for children with hearing impairments (in accordance with the primary impairment. However, deaf-blind children cannot be trained by means of special programs for children with hearing impairment, visual impairment or other programs for students with developmental disabilities without specific attention required by such a combination of sensory impairments. Deaf-blindness must be observed as a multiple impairment that requires special work methods, especially in the field of communication, whose development is severely compromised. Communication skills in deaf-blind people can be developed by using the calendar systems. They are designed in such a manner that they can be easily attainable to children with various sensory impairments. Calendars can be used to encourage and develop communication between adult persons and a deaf-blind child.

  6. Impaired learning of event frequencies in tone deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Psyche; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2012-04-01

    Musical knowledge is ubiquitous, effortless, and implicitly acquired all over the world via exposure to musical materials in one's culture. In contrast, one group of individuals who show insensitivity to music, specifically the inability to discriminate pitches and melodies, is the tone-deaf. In this study, we asked whether difficulties in pitch and melody discrimination among the tone-deaf could be related to learning difficulties, and, if so, what processes of learning might be affected in the tone-deaf. We investigated the learning of frequency information in a new musical system in tone-deaf individuals and matched controls. Results showed significantly impaired learning abilities in frequency matching in the tone-deaf. This impairment was positively correlated with the severity of tone deafness as assessed by the Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusia. Taken together, the results suggest that tone deafness is characterized by an impaired ability to acquire frequency information from pitched materials in the sound environment. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. Supporting Deaf Students--and All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuknis, Christina; Santini, Joseph; Appanah, Thangi

    2017-01-01

    Two faculty members and a Ph.D. student at Gallaudet University, the world's only university for the deaf, explain the concept of Deaf-Gain, which reframes the idea of hearing loss into one of gaining deafness and recognizes the contributions that deaf people make to society. This narrative assumes that deaf students and all students bring…

  8. Creating the "History through Deaf Eyes" Documentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hott, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author outlines how a documentary film about the history of deafness in the United States, inspired by the exhibition "History through Deaf Eyes," is going to be created. "History through Deaf Eyes" will have a dual focus. Part of its subject is deafness from the inside: the personal experiences of deaf people (and hearing…

  9. Inclusive Deaf Studies: Barriers and Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Jane K.; Myers, Shirley Shultz

    2010-01-01

    Joining scholars signaling the need for new directions in Deaf Studies, the authors recommend a more expansive, nuanced, and interdisciplinary approach that encompasses the many ways deaf people live today. Rather than destroy Deaf culture, this approach is the only realistic way to allow it and Deaf Studies to survive. Deaf Studies today…

  10. Sensitivity to conversational maxims in deaf and hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surian, Luca; Tedoldi, Mariantonia; Siegal, Michael

    2010-09-01

    We investigated whether access to a sign language affects the development of pragmatic competence in three groups of deaf children aged 6 to 11 years: native signers from deaf families receiving bimodal/bilingual instruction, native signers from deaf families receiving oralist instruction and late signers from hearing families receiving oralist instruction. The performance of these children was compared to a group of hearing children aged 6 to 7 years on a test designed to assess sensitivity to violations of conversational maxims. Native signers with bimodal/bilingual instruction were as able as the hearing children to detect violations that concern truthfulness (Maxim of Quality) and relevance (Maxim of Relation). On items involving these maxims, they outperformed both the late signers and native signers attending oralist schools. These results dovetail with previous findings on mindreading in deaf children and underscore the role of early conversational experience and instructional setting in the development of pragmatics.

  11. %191200 TUNE DEAFNESS [OMIM

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TONE DEAFNESS FIELD TX DESCRIPTION Tune deafness, or congenital amusia, is a lifelong deficient in music per...retz et al., 2009). See 159300 for an opposite situation, that of musical perfect pitch. CLINICAL FEATURES P...icits, brain lesions, hearing loss, or socioaffective disturbances, and was exposed to music as a child. She... did not like to listen to music because it sounded to her like noise and induced stress. Detailed tests sho...hat fine-grained pitch perception is an essential component around which the musical system develops in a no

  12. Congenital Unilateral Deafness Affects Cerebral Organization of Reading

    OpenAIRE

    Alice Mado Proverbio; Mirella Manfredi; Roberta Adorni

    2013-01-01

    It is known that early sensory deprivation modifies brain functional structure and connectivity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuro-functional organization of reading in a patient with profound congenital unilateral deafness. Using event-related potentials (ERPs), we compared cortical networks supporting the processing of written words in patient RA (completely deaf in the right ear since birth) and in a group of control volunteers. We found that congenital unilateral h...

  13. N-acetylcysteine as a single therapy for sudden deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Hsien; Young, Yi-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Like NAC ameliorates hearing loss from acoustic trauma in the inner ear, NAC may also rescue hearing loss from sudden deafness confined to the inner ear. This study assesses the effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) as a single therapy for sudden deafness. Thirty-five sudden deafness patients with neither systemic disorders nor central signs in electronystagmography were treated with NAC alone and assigned to Group A. For comparison, another 35 sudden deafness patients treated by corticosteroids and plasma expander were assigned to Group B. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of age, sex, laterality, and pre-treatment mean hearing level. All patients underwent an inner ear test battery comprising audiometry, and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP), cervical VEMP (cVEMP), and caloric tests. Groups A and B did not significantly differ in the pre-treatment mean hearing level, and percentages of abnormal oVEMP, cVEMP, and caloric tests, indicating that the involvement severity of sudden deafness between the two groups was similar. However, Group A (43 ± 27 dB) showed significantly greater mean hearing gain than Group B (21 ± 28 dB), and Group A (91%) revealed better improved rate of hearing than Group B (57%).

  14. Allocation of attention, reading skills, and deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasnis, I

    1992-11-01

    Brannan and Williams (1987) found that poor readers cannot successfully utilize parafoveal cues to identify letter targets. Whether a similar deficit in the use of cue information occurs in deaf poor readers and whether it is only specific to processes that capture attention automatically were investigated in congenitally deaf young adults classified as poor or good readers and hearing controls classified as good readers. Subjects were presented with central or parafoveal cues that varied in cue validity probability, followed by letter targets presented to the left or right of fixation. The reaction time data analyses showed significant main effects for cue type and cue location and significant interactions among cue type, cue location, cue validity probability, and visual field. No significant main effect or interactions involving groups were found. These results raise the possibility that reading difficulties associated with deafness do no involve a deficit in the visual attentional system of deaf people. They also confirm that parafoveal cues are more effective than central cues in capturing attention.

  15. Confronting the language barrier: Theory of mind in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anna C; Gutierrez, Roberto; Ludlow, Amanda K

    2015-01-01

    The current study addressed deaf children's Theory of Mind (ToM) development as measured by a battery of first- and second-order belief tasks. Both a chronological age-matched control group and a younger group of pre-school aged hearing children were compared to a group of deaf children born to hearing parents. A hearing native signer enacted each of the tasks, which were pre-recorded in video clips in English (SSE), British Sign Language (BSL) and spoken English, in order to consider all communication preferences of the deaf children. Results revealed no differences in performance between the deaf and the young hearing children. However, despite the inclusion of ToM tasks based on their preferred mode of communication, the deaf children performed significantly worse at the unexpected-content and second-order belief task compared with their age-matched controls. These findings imply a delay rather than a deficit in ToM in deaf children that could be attributed to limited opportunities to converse and overhear conversations about mental states. None. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Is Semantics Affected by Missing a Critical Period? Evidence from the Persian Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubsaz, Yassaman; Gheitury, Amer

    2017-01-01

    The present study aims to explore the semantic knowledge of a group of Iranian deaf individuals who, due mainly to auditory deprivation did not acquire language normally in early years of their life. The participants were ten deaf and a matched number of hearing individuals as control group. A test of five tasks was administrated to assess their…

  17. Pedophilia and Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay; Rich, Steve

    1997-01-01

    Data from 22 cases of individuals with deafness suffering from pedophilia indicate a number of factors that distinguish them from hearing pedophiles. Differences include a prevalence of Primitive Personality Disorder, a high rate of brain damage, illiteracy, poorer communication skills, and psychiatric illnesses. Legal issues, prevention, and…

  18. Children of Deaf Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaerde, B.; Baker, A.E.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    The hearing children of Deaf parents grow up in two cultures with two languages. They are similar to other bilingual, bicultural children in many ways but are special also. They can be in conflict between two worlds and often carry an extra burden of responsibility in functioning as a bridge between

  19. [Genetics of congenital deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faundes, Víctor; Pardo, Rosa Andrea; Castillo Taucher, Silvia

    2012-10-20

    Congenital deafness is defined as the hearing loss which is present at birth and, consequently, before speech development. It is the most prevalent sensor neural disorder in developed countries, and its incidence is estimated between 1-3 children per 1,000 newborns, of which more than 50% are attributable to genetics causes. Deafness can be classified as syndromic or non-syndromic. In the first case, it is associated with outer ear malformations and/or systemic findings. More than 400 syndromes accompanied of deafness have been described, which represent about 30% of cases of congenital hearing loss. The remaining percentage corresponds to non-syndromic cases: 75-85% are autosomal recessive, 15-24% are autosomal dominant, and 1-2% are X-linked. The evaluation of a child with deafness requires a multidisciplinary collaboration among specialists, who must coordinate themselves and give information to the affected family. The aims of establishing a diagnosis are to predict other manifestations that may suggest some syndrome and to anticipate their management, as well as to perform genetic counseling to parents and affected individuals.

  20. Bilingualism, Biculturalism, and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosjean, Francois

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains three parts. In the first part, what it means to be bilingual in sign language and the spoken (majority) language is explained, and similarities as well as differences with hearing bilinguals are discussed. The second part examines the biculturalism of deaf people. Like hearing biculturals, they take part, to varying degrees,…

  1. Psychodrama with Deaf People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Lynette; Robinson, Luther D.

    1971-01-01

    Observations based on psychodrama with deaf people, relating to interaction between people and the communication process, are made. How role training skills, which involve some of the skills of psychodrama, can be applied by professionals in vocational and social learning situations is illustrated. (KW)

  2. The genetics of deafness in domestic animals

    OpenAIRE

    Strain, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Although deafness can be acquired throughout an animal’s life from a variety of causes, hereditary deafness, especially congenital hereditary deafness, is a significant problem in several species. Extensive reviews exist of the genetics of deafness in humans and mice, but not for deafness in domestic animals. Hereditary deafness in many species and breeds is associated with loci for white pigmentation, where the cochlear pathology is cochleo-sacular. In other cases there is no pigmentation as...

  3. The Genetics of Deafness in Domestic Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Strain, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Although deafness can be acquired throughout an animal’s life from a variety of causes, hereditary deafness, especially congenital hereditary deafness, is a significant problem in several species. Extensive reviews exist of the genetics of deafness in humans and mice, but not for deafness in domestic animals. Hereditary deafness in many species and breeds is associated with loci for white pigmentation, where the cochlear pathology is cochleo-saccular. In other cases, there is no pigmentation ...

  4. Pathophysiology of reversible sudden deafness--epidemiological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohsaki,Katsuichiro

    1983-04-01

    Full Text Available Many aspects of the etiology and pathophysiology of reversible sudden deafness remain obscure. In order to better understand the pathophysiology of reversible sudden deafness we compared the results of two therapies which have different mechanisms of action. The results of therapy with tranexamic acid alone in 49 cases (57 ears of sudden deafness were compared with the results of treatment with so-called antisludging agents in 65 cases (69 ears using the chi square contingency test. The same therapeutic effect was observed in both groups despite the different modes of chemical action of the two therapeutics. A series of processes involving an increase in permeability of vascular walls and related edema, and extravascular red cell oozing due to hypoxia or anoxia leading to tissue damage in the inner ear seem to be important factors in the etiology and pathophysiology of reversible sudden deafness.

  5. Metabolic disorders prevalence in sudden deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Oiticica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to establish the frequency of metabolic disorders among patients with sudden deafness and to compare this frequency with data from population surveys. INTRODUCTION: No consensus has been reached regarding the prevalence of metabolic disorders among sudden deafness patients or their influence as associated risk factors. METHODS: This cross-sectional study enrolled all sudden deafness patients treated in the Otolaryngology Department of the University of São Paulo between January 1996 and December 2006. Patients were subjected to laboratory exams including glucose and cholesterol levels, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction, triglycerides, free T4 and TSH. RESULTS: The sample comprised 166 patients. We observed normal glucose levels in 101 (81.5% patients and hyperglycemia in 23 (18.5% patients, which is significantly different (p < 0.0001 compared to the diabetes mellitus prevalence (7.6% in the Brazilian population. Cholesterol levels were normal in 78 patients (49.7% and abnormal in 79 (50.3% patients, which is significantly different compared to the Brazilian population (p = 0.0093. However, no differences were observed in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction (p = 0.1087 or triglyceride levels (p = 0.1474 between sudden hearing loss patients and the Brazilian population. Normal levels of thyroid hormones were observed in 116 patients (78.4%, and abnormal levels were observed in 32 (21.6% patients. Compared with the prevalence of thyroid disorders in the general population (10%, statistical analysis revealed a significant difference (p = 0.0132 between these two groups. DISCUSSION: Among sudden deafness patients, we observed frequencies of hyperglycemia and thyroid disorders that were more than twice those of the general population. CONCLUSIONS: Hyperglycemia and thyroid disorders are much more frequent in patients with sudden deafness than in the general population and should be

  6. Gold award: mental health services for the deaf--St. Elizabeths Hospital, Washington, D.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-01

    The mental health program for the deaf at St. Elizabeths Hospital offers comprehensive services to adolescents and adults who were born deaf or who became deaf early in life. A staff of 49, six of whom have impaired hearing, provide services to about 33 inpatients and about 71 outpatients. Activity therapies that do not require oral communication, such as occupational therapy, art therapy, dance therapy, and psychodrama, play an important role in the program, as does group psychotherapy. The program provides training, field experience, and consultation for workers throughout the U.S. and from foreign countries. Some guidelines for communicating with the deaf are given.

  7. The Impact of Visual Communication on the Intersubjective Development of Early Parent?Child Interaction with 18- to 24-Month-Old Deaf Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loots, Gerrit; Devise, Isabel; Jacquet, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a study that examined the impact of visual communication on the quality of the early interaction between deaf and hearing mothers and fathers and their deaf children aged between 18 and 24 months. Three communication mode groups of parent?deaf child dyads that differed by the use of signing and visual?tactile communication…

  8. [Identity of the deaf and interventions in health from the perspective of a community of sign language users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Juliana Donato; Andrade, Andréa Batista de; Pontes, Ricardo José Soares; Bosi, Maria Lúcia Magalhães; Machado, Márcia Maria Tavares

    2012-03-01

    The biomedical view sees deafness as a physiological loss of audition and the deaf as individuals with an organic abnormality to be corrected; healthcare interventions support this perception. This study sought to understand deafness from the standpoint of the deaf, in order to identify elements for public policies addressed to them in the context of the ethical dimension of care. The research adopted the qualitative approach (focus groups) and 9 members of a deaf community in Fortaleza (Ceará-Brazil), all fluent in Brazilian Sign Language-LIBRAS, took part. The results show deafness is perceived as a way of being based on day-to-day experiences of visual interaction with nature and society, giving the deaf a different identity in terms of culture (being deaf) and linguistics (LIBRAS). Some public policies for oral training and technological interventions, like cochlear implants, are seen as a setback by the deaf, as it negates their status in the world and involves a loss of identity for the deaf. It is necessary to consider the deaf from a socio-historic, symbolic and cultural standpoint where different discourses co-exist, over and above the physiological dimension.

  9. Understanding dementia: effective information access from the Deaf community's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Alys; Ferguson-Coleman, Emma; Keady, John

    2016-01-01

    This study concerns older Deaf sign language users in the UK. Its aim was to explore how to enable effective information access and promote awareness and understanding of dementia from a culturally Deaf perspective. A purposive sample of 26 Deaf people without dementia participated in one of three focus groups facilitated directly in British Sign Language (BSL) without an intermediate interpreter. The sample was differentiated by age, role in the Deaf community, and diversity of educational attainment and professional experience. A phenomenological approach underpinned the thematic analysis of data. The findings demonstrate: (i) translation into (BSL) is a necessary but not sufficient condition to support understanding. Attention to culturally preferred means of engagement with information is vital; (ii) the content of information is best presented utilising structures and formats which cohere with Deaf people's visual cognitive strengths; and (iii) the importance of cultural values and cultural practices in raising awareness and building understanding of dementia. These include collective rather than individual responsibility for knowledge transfer and the pan-national nature of knowledge transfer among Deaf people(s). The discussion demonstrates how these specific features of effective information access and awareness building have universal implications relevant to public engagement and the promotion of general knowledge consistent with the National Dementia Strategy (England).

  10. Enhancement of visual motion detection thresholds in early deaf people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiell, Martha M; Champoux, François; Zatorre, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    In deaf people, the auditory cortex can reorganize to support visual motion processing. Although this cross-modal reorganization has long been thought to subserve enhanced visual abilities, previous research has been unsuccessful at identifying behavioural enhancements specific to motion processing. Recently, research with congenitally deaf cats has uncovered an enhancement for visual motion detection. Our goal was to test for a similar difference between deaf and hearing people. We tested 16 early and profoundly deaf participants and 20 hearing controls. Participants completed a visual motion detection task, in which they were asked to determine which of two sinusoidal gratings was moving. The speed of the moving grating varied according to an adaptive staircase procedure, allowing us to determine the lowest speed necessary for participants to detect motion. Consistent with previous research in deaf cats, the deaf group had lower motion detection thresholds than the hearing. This finding supports the proposal that cross-modal reorganization after sensory deprivation will occur for supramodal sensory features and preserve the output functions.

  11. Enhancement of visual motion detection thresholds in early deaf people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M Shiell

    Full Text Available In deaf people, the auditory cortex can reorganize to support visual motion processing. Although this cross-modal reorganization has long been thought to subserve enhanced visual abilities, previous research has been unsuccessful at identifying behavioural enhancements specific to motion processing. Recently, research with congenitally deaf cats has uncovered an enhancement for visual motion detection. Our goal was to test for a similar difference between deaf and hearing people. We tested 16 early and profoundly deaf participants and 20 hearing controls. Participants completed a visual motion detection task, in which they were asked to determine which of two sinusoidal gratings was moving. The speed of the moving grating varied according to an adaptive staircase procedure, allowing us to determine the lowest speed necessary for participants to detect motion. Consistent with previous research in deaf cats, the deaf group had lower motion detection thresholds than the hearing. This finding supports the proposal that cross-modal reorganization after sensory deprivation will occur for supramodal sensory features and preserve the output functions.

  12. Meeting Global Deaf Peers, Visiting Ideal Deaf Places: Deaf Ways of Education Leading to Empowerment, an Exploratory Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clerck, Goedele A. M.

    2007-01-01

    In a Flemish case study, deaf role models revealed a moment of awakening, indicated by the Flemish sign WAKE-UP. Contact with deaf cultural rhetoric made them "wake up," and deconstruct and reconstruct their lives, a process represented by a "circle of deaf empowerment." Flemish deaf leaders mentioned acquiring this rhetoric during visits to deaf…

  13. Deaf, blind or deaf-blind: Is touch enhanced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagno, Costanza; Cecchetto, Carlo; Pisoni, Alberto; Bolognini, Nadia

    2016-02-01

    When someone looses one type of sensory input, s/he may compensate by using the sensory information conveyed by other senses. To verify whether loosing a sense or two has consequences on a spared sensory modality, namely touch, and whether these consequences depend on the type of sensory loss, we investigated the effects of deafness and blindness on temporal and spatial tactile tasks in deaf, blind and deaf-blind people. Deaf and deaf-blind people performed the spatial tactile task better than the temporal one, while blind and controls showed the opposite pattern. Deaf and deaf-blind participants were impaired in temporal discrimination as compared to controls, while deaf-blind individuals outperformed blind participants in the spatial tactile task. Overall, sensory-deprived participants did not show an enhanced tactile performance. We speculate that discriminative touch is not so relevant in humans, while social touch is. Probably, more complex tactile tasks would have revealed an increased performance in sensory-deprived people.

  14. [Synergic effect of alprostadil injection and ginaton in treating sudden deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiping; Wang, Shuyun; Tong, Kang

    2011-07-01

    To explore synergic effect of Alprostadil injection and ginaton in treating sudden deafness. ninety one patients with sudden deafness were divided into group A, group B and group C at random; 33 ears of group A were treated with 70 mg ginaton by vein, 30 ears of group B were treated with 10 microg Alprostadil injection by vein, 31 ears of group C were treated with 10 microg Alprostadil injection and ginaton by vein,once a day, the time of treatment is 14 days. the effective rate of group A is 60.61%, the effective rate of group B is 60.00%, the effective rate of group C is 87.09% the treating effect was significantly different in the group A and C (P sudden deafness, and it has significantly Synergic effect in treating sudden deafness with Alprostadil injection and ginaton.

  15. The Deaf Mentoring Survey: A Community Cultural Wealth Framework for Measuring Mentoring Effectiveness with Underrepresented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Derek C.; Gormally, Cara; Clark, M. Diane

    2017-01-01

    Disabled individuals, women, and individuals from cultural/ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Research has shown that mentoring improves retention for underrepresented individuals. However, existing mentoring surveys were developed to assess the majority population, not underrepresented individuals. We describe the development of a next-generation mentoring survey built upon capital theory and critical race theory. It emphasizes community cultural wealth, thought to be instrumental to the success of individuals from minority communities. Our survey targets relationships between deaf mentees and their research mentors and includes Deaf community cultural wealth. From our results, we identified four segregating factors: Being a Scientist, which incorporated the traditional capitals; Deaf Community Capital; Asking for Accommodations; and Communication Access. Being a Scientist scores did not vary among the mentor and mentee variables that we tested. However, Deaf Community Capital, Asking for Accommodations, and Communication Access were highest when a deaf mentee was paired with a mentor who was either deaf or familiar with the Deaf community, indicating that cultural competency training should improve these aspects of mentoring for deaf mentees. This theoretical framework and survey will be useful for assessing mentoring relationships with deaf students and could be adapted for other underrepresented groups. PMID:28188283

  16. Verbal and Spatial Analogical Reasoning in Deaf and Hearing Children: The Role of Grammar and Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lindsey; Figueras, Berta; Mellanby, Jane; Langdon, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which cognitive development and abilities are dependent on language remains controversial. In this study, the analogical reasoning skills of deaf and hard of hearing children are explored. Two groups of children (deaf and hard of hearing children with either cochlear implants or hearing aids and hearing children) completed tests of…

  17. Phonological Awareness, Vocabulary, and Reading in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carol; Goswami, Usha

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the phonological awareness skills of deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) and relationships with vocabulary and reading development. Method: Forty-three deaf children with implants who were between 5 and 15 years of age were tested; 21 had been implanted at around 2.5 years of age (Early CI group), and 22 had been…

  18. Teacher-Assigned Literacy Events in a Bimodal, Bilingual Preschool with Deaf and Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Ann Elise; Simonsen, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study of literacy practices in a Norwegian preschool where deaf and hearing children are enrolled in the same group and where communication is based on both sign language and spoken language. The aim of the study was to explore pathways to literacy for young deaf children within this setting. Our implicit assumption is…

  19. Neurofilament heavy chain expression and neuroplasticity in rat auditory cortex after unilateral and bilateral deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min-Hyun; Jang, Jeong Hun; Song, Jae-Jin; Lee, Ho Sun; Oh, Seung Ha

    2016-09-01

    Deafness induces many plastic changes in the auditory neural system. For instance, dendritic changes cause synaptic changes in neural cells. SMI-32, a monoclonal antibody reveals auditory areas and recognizes non-phosphorylated epitopes on medium- and high-molecular-weight subunits of neurofilament proteins in cortical pyramidal neuron dendrites. We investigated SMI-32-immunoreactive (-ir) protein levels in the auditory cortices of rats with induced unilateral and bilateral deafness. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into unilateral deafness (UD), bilateral deafness (BD), and control groups. Deafness was induced by cochlear ablation. All rats were sacrificed, and the auditory cortices were harvested for real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analyses at 2, 4, 6, and 12 weeks after deafness was induced. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to evaluate the location of SMI-32-ir neurons. Neurofilament heavy chain (NEFH) mRNA expression and SMI-32-ir protein levels were increased in the BD group. In particular, SMI-32-ir protein levels increased significantly 6 and 12 weeks after deafness was induced. In contrast, no significant changes in protein level were detected in the right or left auditory cortices at any time point in the UD group. NEFH mRNA level decreased at 4 weeks after deafness was induced in the UD group, but recovered thereafter. Taken together, BD induced plastic changes in the auditory cortex, whereas UD did not affect the auditory neural system sufficiently to show plastic changes, as measured by neurofilament protein level.

  20. Effectiveness of psychodrama with pantomime on the social adjustment of deaf female students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salar Faramarzi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Deaf children face several compatibility issues because of their hearing impairment. The present study aims to investigate the effectiveness of psychodrama using pantomime on the social adjustment of 12-15-year-old deaf female students in Isfahan.Methods: For this study, an experimental design was used with a pre-test and post-test and a control group. Thirty deaf subjects (12-15-year-olds in Isfahan were selected randomly and allocated to experimental and control groups. To gather information, Rao’s Social Maturity Scale was used. The data were analyzed by the multivariate analysis of covariance s tatistical method (SPSS version 21.Results: Our findings revealed that there was a significant difference between the performances of deaf students of both the groups in the post-test on social adjustment (p=0.0001.Conclusion: The use of psychodrama increased the rate of social adjustment in deaf students.

  1. Deaf Education as Intercultural Communication: Different Discourses About Deaf Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Skedsmo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The traditions, the development, and the objectives of deaf education in Norway and Russia are different. One of the main differences is whether deaf education is in itself seen as intercultural communication, meaning to what degrees the sign language communities are treated as linguistic and cultural minorities or simply as disabled. Neither the Russian nor the Norwegian practice is internationally unique, but the two become recognizable in light of each other, and internationally, they represent two common ways of dealing with education for the deaf today. This article will discuss what are some of the differences and similarities in deaf education between Norway and Russia related to the status of the two countries’ signed languages and whether the deaf populations are viewed either as disabled or as a linguistic minority. The discussion is based on some historical occurrences leading to the current situations in the two countries. Two different discourses, a disability discourse and a minority discourse, will be presented. The disability discourse generally seems to be the most intuitive one among adult newcomers to this field, while the minority discourse more often needs a fair bit of elaboration. Therefore, more space will be devoted to the minority discourse in this article. Furthermore, the description of the differences and similarities in deaf education will draw on the writings of the Russian scholar Lev Vygotsky on (Russian deaf education and look at what Joseph Stalin wrote about deaf people and language. I shall argue that Vygotsky’s suggestions seem to have had more impact in Norway than in Russia, while Stalin’s writings seemingly had a great impact on the view on Russian Sign Language (RSL1 and the practice and objectives of the Russian schools for the deaf. I will argue that a hundred years of experience of attempting to make the spoken majority language the first language of deaf children should lead to a change in

  2. Retrocochlear mass lesion in mid-frequency sudden deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Tsen; Young, Yi-Ho

    2008-01-01

    This study retrospectively reviewed all cases of mid-frequency sudden deafness to understand the clinical significance of this hallmark finding. Retrospective study. From 1992 to 2006, a total of 556 patients with sudden deafness were experienced. Based on the audiographic configuration, these patients were classified into: flat-type group, 272 cases; high-frequency group, 146 cases; low-frequency group, 70 cases; mid-frequency group, 30 cases; and unclassified group, 38 cases. All patients underwent a battery of audiovestibular function testing. Among 556 sudden deafness patients, 17 patients (3%) were proved to have a retrocochlear tumor, including mid-frequency group (10), high-frequency group (4), flat-type group (2), and low-frequency group (1). Thus, the mid-frequency group had significantly higher (33%) association with a retrocochlear tumor than other groups. One-third of the patients with mid-frequency sudden deafness harbor a true retrocochlear mass lesion; hence, MR imaging is mandatory in such cases.

  3. Identity Development in Deaf Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnen, E. Saskia

    2014-01-01

    We studied identity development during 5 years in seven deaf adolescents who attended a school for deaf children in the highest level of regular secondary education (age between 14 and 18 years), administering identity interviews every year. Identity development is conceptualized as the processes of exploration and commitment formation (Bosma,…

  4. Communicating effectively with deaf patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAleer, Monica

    This article explores the communication needs of deaf patients who use British Sign Language as their first or preferred language. It would appear that these needs are not being met, particularly in acute hospital settings. Practical advice is provided for nurses to improve the quality of care that deaf patients receive.

  5. The Last American Deaf School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, Constance M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to uncover the beliefs regarding the purpose and future of residential deaf schools among State Directors of Special Education and Superintendents of residential schools for the deaf. In order to achieve the objective of the study, a positioned subjects approach within a qualitative methods design was used. Six…

  6. Identity development in deaf adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, E. Saskia

    2014-01-01

    We studied identity development during 5 years in 11 deaf adolescents who attend a school for deaf children in the highest level of regular secondary education (age between 14 and 19 years). Identity development is conceptualized by the processes of exploration and commitment formation, as

  7. Sports and the Deaf Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.; Ellis, M. Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    The increasingly sedentary American lifestyle has resulted in a growing number of overweight and out-of-shape school-age children. Deaf children are not exempt from this trend, yet there is little evidence that public school programs for these children are doing anything to counter it. Much can be done to assist deaf students, not only in becoming…

  8. Identity development in deaf adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, E. Saskia

    2014-01-01

    We studied identity development during 5 years in 11 deaf adolescents who attend a school for deaf children in the highest level of regular secondary education (age between 14 and 19 years). Identity development is conceptualized by the processes of exploration and commitment formation, as formulate

  9. Are Deaf Students Visual Learners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Morrison, Carolyn; Lukomski, Jennifer; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol

    2013-01-01

    It is frequently assumed that by virtue of their hearing losses, deaf students are visual learners. Deaf individuals have some visual-spatial advantages relative to hearing individuals, but most have been linked to use of sign language rather than auditory deprivation. How such cognitive differences might affect academic performance has been…

  10. Epistemologies, Deafness, Learning, and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, Donald F.

    2010-01-01

    The study of Deaf epistemologies is in a nascent stage relative to, e.g., the study of feminist or African American epistemologies. It has only recently begun attracting the widespread attention it deserves. The present article addresses Deaf epistemologies as they relate to the sometimes conflicting trends in American society and education. In a…

  11. Are Deaf Students Visual Learners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Morrison, Carolyn; Lukomski, Jennifer; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol

    2013-01-01

    It is frequently assumed that by virtue of their hearing losses, deaf students are visual learners. Deaf individuals have some visual-spatial advantages relative to hearing individuals, but most have been linked to use of sign language rather than auditory deprivation. How such cognitive differences might affect academic performance has been…

  12. Overview on Deaf-Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... build relationships and become the eventual basis for language learning. As the child who is deaf-blind becomes ... those near them, deaf-blindness fosters opportunities for learning and mutual ... M. (Eds.), (1993). Second edition. A model service delivery system for persons ...

  13. Apartheid in deaf education: examining workforce diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Laurene; Rusher, Melissa; Andrews, Jean F; Coryell, Judy

    2008-01-01

    A survey of 3,227 professionals in 313 deaf education programs found that 22.0% of teachers and 14.5% of administrators were deaf--a less than 10% increase in deaf professionals since 1993. Additionally, 21.7% of teachers and 6.1% of administrators were professionals of color. Of these minority teachers, only 2.5% were deaf persons of color. Only 3 deaf administrators of color were identified. The study describes how "apartheid" or "intellectual oppression" may result from unchanged hiring practices in K-12 programs for the deaf and in postsecondary institutions. Using a bottle metaphor, the researchers describe how deaf persons of color are often stuck in "a bottleneck on the highway to opportunity." Relevant data underscore that the field of deaf education must diversify its professional force in order to utilize the intellectual, linguistic, and multicultural proficiencies of hearing teachers of color, deaf teachers, and deaf teachers of color.

  14. The deaf utilize phonological representations in visually presented verbal memory tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Rieko; Nakagawa, Jun; Takahashi, Muneyoshi; Kanaka, Noriko; Fukamauchi, Fumihiko; Watanabe, Katsumi; Namatame, Miki; Matsuda, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    The phonological abilities of congenitally deaf individuals are inferior to those of people who can hear. However, deaf individuals can acquire spoken languages by utilizing orthography and lip-reading. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to show that deaf individuals utilize phonological representations via a mnemonic process. We compared the brain activation of deaf and hearing participants while they memorized serially visually presented Japanese kana letters (Kana), finger alphabets (Finger), and Arabic letters (Arabic). Hearing participants did not know which finger alphabets corresponded to which language sounds, whereas deaf participants did. All of the participants understood the correspondence between Kana and their language sounds. None of the participants knew the correspondence between Arabic and their language sounds, so this condition was used as a baseline. We found that the left superior temporal gyrus (STG) was activated by phonological representations in the deaf group when memorizing both Kana and Finger. Additionally, the brain areas associated with phonological representations for Finger in the deaf group were the same as the areas for Kana in the hearing group. Overall, despite the fact that they are superior in visual information processing, deaf individuals utilize phonological rather than visual representations in visually presented verbal memory.

  15. Studies on deaf mobile application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Shelena Soosay; Hussain, Azham; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-08-01

    The deaf normally considered to be disabled that do not need any mobile technology due to the inabilities of hearing and talking. However, many deaf are using mobile phone in their daily life for various purposes such as communication and learning. Many studies have attempted to identify the need of deaf people in mobile application and level of usage of the applications. This study aims in studying the recent research conducted on deaf mobile application to understand the level of importance of mobile technology for this disabled community. This paper enable identification of studies conducted are limited and the need of more research done of this disabled people to ensure their privilege of using mobile technology and its application, which leads to the identification of deaf user requirement for mobile application as future study.

  16. Sexual and reproductive health needs assessment with deaf people in Ghana: Methodological challenges and ethical concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisdom K. Mprah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deafness is a complex and multifaceted phenomenon. The different ways of perceiving and understanding deafness have practical implications for research with deaf people. Whilst the deaf community is not homogenous, it is generally distinct from the hearing population. Consequently, the appropriateness of applying research methods and informed concern processes designed for the hearing population in research with deaf people has been questioned.Objectives: This article reflected on some methodological challenges and ethical concerns arising from conducting a sexual and reproductive health needs assessment with deaf people in Ghana. The aim was to provide some perspectives on some of the challenges associated with doing research with deaf people.Method: The study was a two phase, sequential, mixed methods design, consisting of three focus groups to assist in the development of a survey and then the implementation of the survey for needs assessment data collection. The number of participants in the study was 179, consisting of 26 focus group participants: 7 executives of the Ghana National Association of the Deaf (GNAD, 10 male adults, and 9 female adults. There were 152 survey respondents (students, women and men and one key informant. All participants, except the key informant, were deaf people.Results: The application of traditional research methods to studies involving deaf participants presents numerous methodological and ethical dilemmas associated mainly with deaf people’s unique cultural and linguistic characteristics.Conclusion: Research methods should not be taken as universal guidelines for conducting research in all settings because of differences in settings.

  17. Eye gaze during observation of static faces in deaf people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsumi Watanabe

    Full Text Available Knowing where people look when viewing faces provides an objective measure into the part of information entering the visual system as well as into the cognitive strategy involved in facial perception. In the present study, we recorded the eye movements of 20 congenitally deaf (10 male and 10 female and 23 (11 male and 12 female normal-hearing Japanese participants while they evaluated the emotional valence of static face stimuli. While no difference was found in the evaluation scores, the eye movements during facial observations differed among participant groups. The deaf group looked at the eyes more frequently and for longer duration than the nose whereas the hearing group focused on the nose (or the central region of face more than the eyes. These results suggest that the strategy employed to extract visual information when viewing static faces may differ between deaf and hearing people.

  18. Auditory and speech performance in deaf children with deaf parents after cochlear implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ga Young; Moon, Il Joon; Kim, Eun Yeon; Chung, Eun-Wook; Cho, Yang-Sun; Chung, Won-Ho; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the auditory and speech outcome in deaf children with deaf parents (CDP) after cochlear implantation (CI), emphasizing both the presence of additional caregiver and patients' main communication mode. Retrospective case review. Cochlear implant center at a tertiary referral hospital. Fourteen CDP and 14 age- and sex-matched deaf children with normal-hearing parents (CNH). The Korean version of Ling's stage (K-Ling) and Category of Auditory Perception (CAP) were administered to the children to assess the speech production and auditory perception abilities, preoperatively and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after CI. To elucidate the effects of the additional caregiver and main communication mode of the implanted child, the patients were divided into the following groups: with additional caregiver(s) who have normal hearing (n = 11) versus without additional caregiver (n = 3); sign language plus oral communication (S+O) group (n = 9) versus oral communication only (O) group (n = 5). CAP scores and K-Ling stages improved remarkably in both CDP and CNH, and no significant differences were found between the 2 groups. Within the CDP group, CAP scores and K-Ling stages improved significantly in CDP with an additional caregiver than those without. Auditory perception and speech production performances in the S+O group were similar to those in the O group. CDP can develop similarly to CNH in auditory perception and speech production, if an additional caregiver with normal hearing provides sufficient support and speech input. In addition, using sign language in addition to oral language might not be harmful, and these children can be a communication bridge between their deaf parents and society.

  19. Everyday activities and social contacts among older deaf sign language users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werngren-Elgström, Monica; Brandt, Ase; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the everyday activities and social contacts among older deaf sign language users, and to investigate relationships between these phenomena and the health and well-being within this group. The study population comprised deaf sign language users, 65 years...... or older, in Sweden. Data collection was based on interviews in sign language, including open-ended questions covering everyday activities and social contacts as well as self-rated instruments measuring aspects of health and subjective well-being. The results demonstrated that the group of participants...... aspects of health and subjective well-being and the frequency of social contacts with family/relatives or visiting the deaf club and meeting friends. It is concluded that the variety of activities at the deaf clubs are important for the subjective well-being of older deaf sign language users. Further...

  20. Sign vocabulary in deaf toddlers exposed to sign language since birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Pasquale; Caselli, Maria Cristina; Di Renzo, Alessio; Gulli, Tiziana; Volterra, Virginia

    2014-07-01

    Lexical comprehension and production is directly evaluated for the first time in deaf signing children below the age of 3 years. A Picture Naming Task was administered to 8 deaf signing toddlers (aged 2-3 years) who were exposed to Sign Language since birth. Results were compared with data of hearing speaking controls. In both deaf and hearing children, comprehension was significantly higher than production. The deaf group provided a significantly lower number of correct responses in production than did the hearing controls, whereas in comprehension, the 2 groups did not differ. Difficulty and ease of items in comprehension and production was similar for signing deaf children and hearing speaking children, showing that, despite size differences, semantic development followed similar paths. For signing children, predicates production appears easier than nominals production compared with hearing children acquiring spoken language. Findings take into account differences in input modalities and language structures.

  1. Effect of vinpocetine on hemorheology of patients with sudden deafness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong Ma; Wen-Qiang Xu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To discuss and investigate the effect of vinpocetine on hemorheology of patients with sudden deafness.Methods:A total of 68 patients with sudden deafness treated in our hospital during March 2011 to March 2014 were select for the clinical contrast. After the informed consent of patients themselves and their families, the patients were randomly divided into control group (salvia miltiorrhiza injection group) and observation group (vinpocetine group) with 34 cases of each group. After the treatments conducted in two groups, the blood viscosity and other hemorheology indexes of patients with sudden deafness between two groups before and after treatment were tested, and the obtained results were analyzed and compared.Results:The blood viscosity and other hemorheology indexes of patients in observation group at 3rd, 7th and 14th Day after treatment were significantly lower than those before treatment and those in control group. There were significant differences between above indexes (P<0.05).Conclusions:The effect of vinpocetine on hemorheology of patients with sudden deafness is relatively positive and has the positive clinical effect on the improvement of ear local microcirculation.

  2. Comparison of diadochokinetic rate between deaf children and normal children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Wang; Zhihong Yao

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diadochokinetic rate reflects the motion state and synergic level of oral, lingual and speech muscle group, and it is an important index to judge the speech articulation, it is also very significant in the training and evaluation of vocal ability and the correction and treatment of speech.OBJECTIVE: To compare the diadochokinetic rate between deaf children and normal children.DESIGN: A comparative observation.SETTING: College of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Zhejiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.PARTICIPANTS: Twenty deaf children and 20 normal children of 6-7 years old, half boys and half girls, were selected from Hangzhou Rehabilitation Center for Deaf Children and Hangzhou Fuxing Kindergarten between January and March, 2006. The influences of organic dysarthria on our study had been eliminated, including intellectual and oral diseases, etc. Informed consents were obtained from the guardians of all the enrolled children.METHODS: ① The deaf children all cooperated with the study after proper communication with them. They practiced to pronounce/pa/,/ta/,/ka/clearly in order, then pronounced them together, that was/pataka/. They should slow down at first in order to pronounce clearly and cohere them together, then speeded up to practice,so that the results could not be affected by the unfamiliar pronunciation. After practice, the deaf children were tested by pronouncing /pataka/ for five time continuously, and they were asked to pronounce clearly and correctly with uniform intensity, loudness, speed, etc. They were tested for three times by the same methods,and the durations of the three times were recorded to obtain the average value, then the velocity was calculated. The tests for the normal children were the same as those mentioned above. ② The differences of the measurement data were compared by the ttest.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Results of diadochokinetic rate compared between deaf children and normal children.RESULTS: All the 20

  3. Exploring the use of seclusion and restraint with deaf psychiatric patients: comparisons with hearing patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, David R; Landsberger, Sarah A

    2010-12-01

    Archival data of seclusion and restraint events in a group of deaf adults (n = 30) was compared with a random sample of hearing adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) (n = 30) and a random sample of hearing adults without ID (n = 51) admitted to a state hospital from 1998 to 2008. Only 12% of the hearing non-ID group experienced a seclusion or restraint versus 43% of the deaf group. The ID group also showed significantly higher rates of seclusion and restraint than the hearing non-ID group (30 vs. 12%). Patients in the deaf and ID group were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with impulse control disorders (23 and 23%, respectively), which may have contributed to the higher utilization of seclusion and restraint procedures in these groups. Deafness-related cultural and linguistic variables that impact the use of seclusion and restraint are reviewed.

  4. The impact of visual communication on the intersubjective development of early parent-child interaction with 18- to 24-month-old deaf toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loots, Gerrit; Devisé, Isabel; Jacquet, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a study that examined the impact of visual communication on the quality of the early interaction between deaf and hearing mothers and fathers and their deaf children aged between 18 and 24 months. Three communication mode groups of parent-deaf child dyads that differed by the use of signing and visual-tactile communication strategies were involved: (a) hearing parents communicating with their deaf child in an auditory/oral way, (b) hearing parents using total communication, and (c) deaf parents using sign language. Based on Loots and colleagues' intersubjective developmental theory, parent-deaf child interaction was analyzed according to the occurrence of intersubjectivity during free play with a standard set of toys. The data analyses indicated that the use of sign language in a sequential visual way of communication enabled the deaf parents to involve their 18- to 24-month-old deaf infants in symbolic intersubjectivity, whereas hearing parents who hold on to oral-only communication were excluded from involvement in symbolic intersubjectivity with their deaf infants. Hearing parents using total communication were more similar to deaf parents, but they still differed from deaf parents in exchanging and sharing symbolic and linguistic meaning with their deaf child.

  5. Spelling of Deaf Children Who Use Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Heather; Kessler, Brett; Treiman, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The spellings of 39 profoundly deaf users of cochlear implants, aged 6 to 12 years, were compared with those of 39 hearing peers. When controlled for age and reading ability, the error rates of the 2 groups were not significantly different. Both groups evinced phonological spelling strategies, performing better on words with more typical…

  6. Effect of retreatment on the end-stage sudden deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suoqiang, Zhai; Ning, Yu; Guiliang, Zheng; Yuhua, Zhu; He, Qin

    2012-03-01

    Microcirculatory disturbance of inner ear is probably one of the important etiological factors of sudden deafness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of retreatment on the end-stage sudden deafness. For this purpose, the patients who met with the criteria for sudden deafness and showed poor response to conventional therapy over 2 months were assigned randomly to the retreatment group. Pure tone audiometry was conducted before and after retreatment among the 103 patients (112 ears). Sodium bicarbonate and dexamethasone were injected by intravenous drip for 2 days and batroxobin 5BU for 6 days. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and t test to determine the efficacy of retreatment. These data show that the efficacy rate in retreatment group was 46.43% and the difference between before and after retreatment was significant (P sudden deafness could improve the audition of the patients and should be valuable in clinics. In this regard, the combination of sodium bicarbonate and dexamethasone proved a rational therapeutic regimen for the end-stage sudden deafness. However, further large-size multicenter studies will be required for independent validation of these findings.

  7. Phonological awareness and short-term memory in hearing and deaf individuals of different communication backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Daniel; Crain, Kelly; LaSasso, Carol; Eden, Guinevere F

    2008-12-01

    Previous work in deaf populations on phonological coding and working memory, two skills thought to play an important role in the acquisition of written language skills, have focused primarily on signers or did not clearly identify the subjects' native language and communication mode. In the present study, we examined the effect of sensory experience, early language experience, and communication mode on the phonological awareness skills and serial recall of linguistic items in deaf and hearing individuals of different communicative and linguistic backgrounds: hearing nonsigning controls, hearing users of ASL, deaf users of ASL, deaf oral users of English, and deaf users of cued speech. Since many current measures of phonological awareness skills are inappropriate for deaf populations on account of the verbal demands in the stimuli or response, we devised a nonverbal phonological measure that addresses this limitation. The Phoneme Detection Test revealed that deaf cuers and oral users, but not deaf signers, performed as well as their hearing peers when detecting phonemes not transparent in the orthography. The second focus of the study examined short-term memory skills and found that in response to the traditional digit span as well as an experimental visual version, digit-span performance was similar across the three deaf groups, yet deaf subjects' retrieval was lower than that of hearing subjects. Our results support the claim (Bavelier et al., 2006) that lexical items processed in the visual-spatial modality are not as well retained as information processed in the auditory channel. Together these findings show that the relationship between working memory, phonological coding, and reading may not be as tightly interwoven in deaf students as would have been predicted from work conducted in hearing students.

  8. [Traumatic and occupational deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncet, J L; Kossowski, M; Verdaille, P

    2000-01-15

    The frequency of accidental, traumatic hearing loss is increasing due to a sometimes violently noisy environment and to the development of sports as leisure activities. The diagnosis is based on knowledge of the circumstances of the trauma and on otoscopic examination. Total audiometry localises the damage. Occupational hearing loss forms a special subset of traumatic deafness. This trauma is usually due to intense noise occurring at the work-place. It is of insidious onset, irreversibly progressive and without treatment once under way; Prevention is based on knowledge of the deleterious effects of noise and on the individual factors of the subject at risk.

  9. The syndrome of deafness-dystonia: clinical and genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojovic, Maja; Pareés, Isabel; Lampreia, Tania; Pienczk-Reclawowicz, Karolina; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Kramberger, Milica; Carecchio, Miryam; Alazami, Anas M; Brancati, Francesco; Slawek, Jaroslaw; Pirtosek, Zvezdan; Valente, Enza Maria; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Edwards, Mark J; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2013-06-01

    The syndrome of deafness-dystonia is rare and refers to the association of hearing impairment and dystonia when these are dominant features of a disease. Known genetic causes include Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome, Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome, and mitochondrial disorders, but the cause frequently remains unidentified. The aim of the current study was to better characterize etiological and clinical aspects of deafness-dystonia syndrome. We evaluated 20 patients with deafness-dystonia syndrome who were seen during the period between 1994 and 2011. The cause was identified in only 7 patients and included methylmalonic aciduria, meningoencephalitis, perinatal hypoxic-ischemic injury, large genomic deletion on chromosome 7q21, translocase of inner mitochondrial membrane 8 homolog A (TIMM8A) mutation (Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome), and chromosome 2 open reading frame 37 (C2orf37) mutation (Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome). The age of onset and clinical characteristics in these patients varied, depending on the etiology. In 13 patients, the cause remained unexplained despite extensive work-up. In the group of patients who had unknown etiology, a family history for deafness and/or dystonia was present the majority of patients, suggesting a strong genetic component. Sensory-neural deafness always preceded dystonia. Two clinical patterns of deafness-dystonia syndrome were observed: patients who had an onset in childhood had generalized dystonia (10 of 13 patients) with frequent bulbar involvement, whereas patients who had a dystonia onset in adulthood had segmental dystonia (3 of 13 patients) with the invariable presence of laryngeal dystonia. Deafness-dystonia syndrome is etiologically and clinically heterogeneous, and most patients have an unknown cause. The different age at onset and variable family history suggest a heterogeneous genetic background, possibly including currently unidentified genetic conditions.

  10. PET evidence of neuroplasticity in adult auditory cortex of postlingual deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Dong Soo; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Chong Sun; Kim, Jeong-Whun; Hwang, Chan Ho; Koo, Jawon; Kang, Eunjoo; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2003-09-01

    Controversy regarding functional reorganization in the adult brain remains. To investigate whether neuroplasticity is present in adults with postlingual deafness, we examined the pattern of cerebral glucose metabolism on (18)F-FDG brain PET images of postlingually deaf patients by comparing the auditory cortical activation pattern with those of age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. We also correlated the cerebral glucose metabolism in deaf patients with the duration of deafness using statistical parametric mapping. In the resting state (eye closed, ears unoccluded in a dark and quiet environment), (18)F-FDG brain PET scans were performed on 9 postlingually deaf patients and 9 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Significant increases and decreases of regional cerebral metabolism in the patient group were estimated by comparing their PET images with those of the healthy volunteers using t statistics at every voxel. To reveal regions in which metabolism was significantly correlated with the duration of deafness, the general linear model with the duration of deafness as a covariate was tested at each voxel. When we compared (18)F-FDG brain PET images of postlingually deaf patients with those of age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects by performing a t test at every voxel, the glucose metabolism of deaf patients was significantly (P deaf patients with the same threshold. When we correlated glucose metabolism of deaf patients with the duration of deafness after total deprivation of hearing capability using a general linear model with the duration of deafness as a covariate at every voxel, metabolism in both anterior cingulate gyri (BA24) and superior temporal cortices (BA41, BA42) showed a significant (P deafness. This study suggests that plasticity is present in adult brains of postlingually deaf patients. In the mature brain, auditory deprivation decreased neuronal activity transiently in primary auditory and auditory-related cortices, and, over

  11. Ambiguity--A Tool or Obstacle for Joint Productive Dialogue Activity in Deaf and Hearing Students' Reasoning about Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molander, Bengt-Olov; Hallden, Ola; Lindahl, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    The ambiguity of words and signs as a resource or obstacle in group discussions is studied. How deaf and hearing students aged 13-15 years elaborate on ecological concepts through dialogue is described. Group interviews were conducted with 14 hearing and 18 deaf students. Probes were used to initiate discussion about the different meanings of…

  12. [Sound therapy in sudden deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-González, Miguel A; Cambil, Esther; Abrante, Antonio; López-Fernández, Rocío; Esteban, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a hearing disorder of unknown cause. The spontaneous recovery rate ranges from 50 to 75% of the patients. Scientific experiments on animals support the present study in patients with sudden deafness treated with sounds. During the period 2003-2009, patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss were administered steroids, piracetam and antioxidants, together with the addition of sounds by means of music and words. Comparing the results of patients treated with medication (n=65) and those treated with medication and sounds (n=67), it was observed that patients treated with medication and sounds had higher recovery. Within the group of patients treated with medication and sounds, 25 (37%) experienced complete recovery, 28 (42%) good recovery, 11 (16%) slight recovery and 3 (5%) poor or no recovery. The patients who recovered more than half of their audition accounted for 54% in the group treated with medication and for 79% in the group of patients receiving medication and sounds. Auditory recuperation showed no alterations, at least up to 12 months after therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Voxel-based statistical analysis of cerebral glucose metabolism in the rat cortical deafness model by 3D reconstruction of brain from autoradiographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Park, Kwang Suk [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 28 Yungun-Dong, Chongno-Ku, Seoul (Korea); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul (Korea); Ahn, Soon-Hyun; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Chong Sun; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Dong Soo; Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 28 Yungun-Dong, Chongno-Ku, Seoul (Korea)

    2005-06-01

    Animal models of cortical deafness are essential for investigation of the cerebral glucose metabolism in congenital or prelingual deafness. Autoradiographic imaging is mainly used to assess the cerebral glucose metabolism in rodents. In this study, procedures for the 3D voxel-based statistical analysis of autoradiographic data were established to enable investigations of the within-modal and cross-modal plasticity through entire areas of the brain of sensory-deprived animals without lumping together heterogeneous subregions within each brain structure into a large region of interest. Thirteen 2-[1-{sup 14}C]-deoxy-D-glucose autoradiographic images were acquired from six deaf and seven age-matched normal rats (age 6-10 weeks). The deafness was induced by surgical ablation. For the 3D voxel-based statistical analysis, brain slices were extracted semiautomatically from the autoradiographic images, which contained the coronal sections of the brain, and were stacked into 3D volume data. Using principal axes matching and mutual information maximization algorithms, the adjacent coronal sections were co-registered using a rigid body transformation, and all sections were realigned to the first section. A study-specific template was composed and the realigned images were spatially normalized onto the template. Following count normalization, voxel-wise t tests were performed to reveal the areas with significant differences in cerebral glucose metabolism between the deaf and the control rats. Continuous and clear edges were detected in each image after registration between the coronal sections, and the internal and external landmarks extracted from the spatially normalized images were well matched, demonstrating the reliability of the spatial processing procedures. Voxel-wise t tests showed that the glucose metabolism in the bilateral auditory cortices of the deaf rats was significantly (P<0.001) lower than that in the controls. There was no significantly reduced metabolism in

  14. Health-related quality of life and mental distress in patients with partial deafness: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieśla, Katarzyna; Lewandowska, Monika; Skarżyński, Henryk

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate mental distress and health-related quality of life in patients with bilateral partial deafness (high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss) before cochlear implantation, with respect to their audiological performance and time of onset of the hearing impairment. Thirty-one patients and 31 normal-hearing individuals were administered the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the State-Trait-Anxiety-Inventory (STAI) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF). Patients also completed the Nijmegen-Cochlear-Implant-Questionnaire (NCIQ), a tool for evaluation of quality of life related to hearing loss. Patients revealed increased depressive and anxiety symptoms, as well as decreased health-related quality of life (psychological health, physical health), in comparison with their healthy counterparts (t tests, p patients with a prelingual onset of hearing loss enhanced self-evaluated social interactions and activity (NCIQ), when their outcomes were contrasted with those obtained in individuals with postlingual partial deafness (p Patients not using hearing aids had better audiological performance and, therefore, better sound perception and speech production, as measured with NCIQ. There was no effect of hearing aid use with respect to mental distress. Additional statistically significant correlations seen in patients included those between a steeper slope hearing loss configuration (averaged pure-tone thresholds at 1 and 2 kHz with subtracted threshold at 0.5 kHz) and better audiometric speech detection, between audiometric thresholds and the subjectively rated sound perception (NCIQ), as well as left-ear audiometric word recognition scores and the subjectively perceived ability to recognize advanced sounds (NCIQ). In addition, a longer duration of postlingual deafness, as well as a younger age at the onset were both related to worse speech detection thresholds. The results of the study provide evidence

  15. [The role of music therapy in impaired hearing recovery. A survey among professionals working with deaf children and between users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comincini, Valeria; Del Piccolo, Lidia

    2013-02-01

    In this study, two groups are interviewed: the first study includes a sample of 60 physicians and health providers in the field of deafness, whose opinion on music therapy is collected by a specific questionnaire; the second involves 8 parents of deaf children attending music therapy lessons, who are asked to give an evaluation on the effect of music therapy, based on the experience of their children. Results show that health professionals know very little about the rehabilitative effectiveness of music therapy, whereas the parents of deaf children give a positive evaluation on the psychological, behavioral and linguistic benefits that music therapy gives to their deaf children.

  16. Administrators' ratings of competencies needed to prepare preservice teachers for oral deaf education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartz, Maribeth N; Litchfield, Sharon K

    Deaf education teacher preparation programs must prepare teachers to staff an increasing number of oral programs. A survey was conducted to determine which competencies administrators of deaf education programs rate as important for teachers in oral programs and to compare ratings of these competencies by oral school administrators to ratings made by administrators of comprehensive deaf and hard of hearing programs. Between the two groups of administrators, six areas of agreement about competencies were found. There were notable differences in the range of ratings between the two groups. These differences were attributed to the roles teachers assume in the two types of programs and the focus of instruction in each type of program.

  17. Joining the Diaspora of Deaf Memoirists: A Personal Account of Writing Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Donna

    2014-01-01

    In this essay, the author describes how, and why, she tackled a lifetime of questions about her deafness and experiences of being deaf by writing a memoir called The Art of Being Deaf. While researching her memoir, the author discovered that the questions about her deafness that she most needed to answer were her own. Having first read many…

  18. Examining a Sample of Black Deaf Individuals on the Deaf Acculturation Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson Schmitt, Shawn S.; Leigh, Irene W.

    2015-01-01

    The current study sought to identify and analyze how Black deaf and hard-of-hearing people conceptualize their deaf and hard-of-hearing identities. That is, what cultural and linguistic factors are involved and how do they interact? An existing measure of Deaf cultural identity, the Deaf Acculturation Scale (DAS), was used to evaluate these…

  19. Comprehension of texts by deaf elementary school students: The role of grammatical understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas, Carmen; González-Cuenca, Antonia M; Carrero, Francisco

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze how the reading process of deaf Spanish elementary school students is affected both by those components that explain reading comprehension according to the Simple View of Reading model: decoding and linguistic comprehension (both lexical and grammatical) and by other variables that are external to the reading process: the type of assistive technology used, the age at which it is implanted or fitted, the participant's socioeconomic status and school stage. Forty-seven students aged between 6 and 13 years participated in the study; all presented with profound or severe prelingual bilateral deafness, and all used digital hearing aids or cochlear implants. Students' text comprehension skills, decoding skills and oral comprehension skills (both lexical and grammatical) were evaluated. Logistic regression analysis indicated that neither the type of assistive technology, age at time of fitting or activation, socioeconomic status, nor school stage could predict the presence or absence of difficulties in text comprehension. Furthermore, logistic regression analysis indicated that neither decoding skills, nor lexical age could predict competency in text comprehension; however, grammatical age could explain 41% of the variance. Probing deeper into the effect of grammatical understanding, logistic regression analysis indicated that a participant's understanding of reversible passive object-verb-subject sentences and reversible predicative subject-verb-object sentences accounted for 38% of the variance in text comprehension. Based on these results, we suggest that it might be beneficial to devise and evaluate interventions that focus specifically on grammatical comprehension. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Low empathy in deaf and hard of hearing (preadolescents compared to normal hearing controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk P Netten

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the level of empathy in deaf and hard of hearing (preadolescents compared to normal hearing controls and to define the influence of language and various hearing loss characteristics on the development of empathy.The study group (mean age 11.9 years consisted of 122 deaf and hard of hearing children (52 children with cochlear implants and 70 children with conventional hearing aids and 162 normal hearing children. The two groups were compared using self-reports, a parent-report and observation tasks to rate the children's level of empathy, their attendance to others' emotions, emotion recognition, and supportive behavior.Deaf and hard of hearing children reported lower levels of cognitive empathy and prosocial motivation than normal hearing children, regardless of their type of hearing device. The level of emotion recognition was equal in both groups. During observations, deaf and hard of hearing children showed more attention to the emotion evoking events but less supportive behavior compared to their normal hearing peers. Deaf and hard of hearing children attending mainstream education or using oral language show higher levels of cognitive empathy and prosocial motivation than deaf and hard of hearing children who use sign (supported language or attend special education. However, they are still outperformed by normal hearing children.Deaf and hard of hearing children, especially those in special education, show lower levels of empathy than normal hearing children, which can have consequences for initiating and maintaining relationships.

  1. Joining the diaspora of deaf memoirists: a personal account of writing deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDONALD, Donna

    2014-01-01

    In this essay, the author describes how, and why, she tackled a lifetime of questions about her deafness and experiences of being deaf by writing a memoir called The Art of Being Deaf. While researching her memoir, the author discovered that the questions about her deafness that she most needed to answer were her own. Having first read many memoirs by other deaf writers and novels with deaf characters, the author set about composing her own narrative of deafness in a fresh way. She not only came to an improved understanding of her deaf self, but grew into a more authentic understanding of her whole self, reconciling her memories of the deaf girl she once was with the adult deaf woman she is now. The author illustrates how the act of writing a memoir can be an important tool in resolving questions of identity.

  2. Believing... Achieving: Hispanic Latino & Deaf = Creer... Conseguir: Hispano Latino y Sordo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cate, Tammy, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This booklet tells the success stories of a group of diverse individuals who are Hispanic/Latino and deaf or hard of hearing. Parallel translation is provided in English and Spanish. [This paper was translated by Coral Getino.

  3. Deaf children’s non-verbal working memory is impacted by their language experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe eMarshall

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that deaf children perform more poorly on working memory tasks compared to hearing children, but do not say whether this poorer performance arises directly from deafness itself or from deaf children’s reduced language exposure. The issue remains unresolved because findings come from (1 tasks that are verbal as opposed to non-verbal, and (2 involve deaf children who use spoken communication and therefore may have experienced impoverished input and delayed language acquisition. This is in contrast to deaf children who have been exposed to a sign language since birth from Deaf parents (and who therefore have native language-learning opportunities. A more direct test of how the type and quality of language exposure impacts working memory is to use measures of non-verbal working memory (NVWM and to compare hearing children with two groups of deaf signing children: those who have had native exposure to a sign language, and those who have experienced delayed acquisition compared to their native-signing peers. In this study we investigated the relationship between NVWM and language in three groups aged 6-11 years: hearing children (n=27, deaf native users of British Sign Language (BSL; n=7, and deaf children non native signers (n=19. We administered a battery of non-verbal reasoning, NVWM, and language tasks. We examined whether the groups differed on NVWM scores, and if language tasks predicted scores on NVWM tasks. For the two NVWM tasks, the non-native signers performed less accurately than the native signer and hearing groups (who did not differ from one another. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the vocabulary measure predicted scores on NVWM tasks. Our results suggest that whatever the language modality – spoken or signed – rich language experience from birth, and the good language skills that result from this early age of aacquisition, play a critical role in the development of NVWM and in performance on NVWM

  4. Understanding Deaf Bilingual Education from the inside: A SWOT Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Baell, Irma M.; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos; Ruiz-Cantero, M.; Ferreiro-Lago, Emilio; Aroca-Fernandez, Eva

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) analysis using a nominal group process undertaken to identify and tackle significant factors, both internal and external, affecting those current Deaf bilingual practices in Spain which promote or prevent the processes through which more inclusive (barrier-free)…

  5. Understanding Deaf Bilingual Education from the inside: A SWOT Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Baell, Irma M.; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos; Ruiz-Cantero, M.; Ferreiro-Lago, Emilio; Aroca-Fernandez, Eva

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) analysis using a nominal group process undertaken to identify and tackle significant factors, both internal and external, affecting those current Deaf bilingual practices in Spain which promote or prevent the processes through which more inclusive (barrier-free)…

  6. Reading and Writing Skills of Deaf Pupils with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Connie; Watson, Linda; Archbold, Sue; Ng, Zheng Yen; Mulla, Imran

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-three young people with cochlear implants, aged between 9 and 16 years, were assessed for use of their implant system, cognitive abilities, vocabulary, reading, and writing skills. The group came from throughout England and included 26 born deaf, six deafened by meningitis, one with auditory neuropathy, and five with additional needs.…

  7. A Social Skills Training Program for Deaf Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, Richard Risser; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A social skills training program for deaf adolescents was developed which stresses (1) observable positive social behaviors and (2) social problem-solving thinking skills. Pilot evaluation of the eight-week program with 35 male adolescents revealed that the experimental group scored significantly higher than controls on a test of social skills and…

  8. INSTITUTIONALIZATION AND PSYCHO-EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF DEAF CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FRISINA, D. ROBERT; QUIGLEY, STEPHEN

    THE OBJECTIVE WAS TO DETERMINE IF RESIDENTIAL STUDENTS IN INSTITUTIONS FOR THE DEAF PERFORM AT A LOWER LEVEL ON MEASURES OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT, SOCIAL MATURITY, AND COMMUNICATION ABILITY THAN A SIMILAR GROUP OF STUDENTS WHO ARE DAY STUDENTS AT THE SAME INSTITUTIONS. SAMPLES OF RESIDENTIAL AND DAY STUDENTS AT 15 INSTITUTIONS EDUCATING DEAF…

  9. Visual spatial representation in mathematical problem solving by deaf and hearing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatto-Vallee, Gary; Kelly, Ronald R; Gaustad, Martha G; Porter, Jeffrey; Fonzi, Judith

    2007-01-01

    This research examined the use of visual-spatial representation by deaf and hearing students while solving mathematical problems. The connection between spatial skills and success in mathematics performance has long been established in the literature. This study examined the distinction between visual-spatial "schematic" representations that encode the spatial relations described in a problem versus visual-spatial "pictorial" representations that encode only the visual appearance of the objects described in a problem. A total of 305 hearing (n = 156) and deaf (n = 149) participants from middle school, high school, and college participated in this study. At all educational levels, the hearing students performed significantly better in solving the mathematical problems compared to their deaf peers. Although the deaf baccalaureate students exhibited the highest performance of all the deaf participants, they only performed as well as the hearing middle school students who were the lowest scoring hearing group. Deaf students remained flat in their performance on the mathematical problem-solving task from middle school through the college associate degree level. The analysis of the students' problem representations showed that the hearing participants utilized visual-spatial schematic representation to a greater extent than did the deaf participants. However, the use of visual-spatial schematic representations was a stronger positive predictor of mathematical problem-solving performance for the deaf students. When deaf students' problem representation focused simply on the visual-spatial pictorial or iconic aspects of the mathematical problems, there was a negative predictive relationship with their problem-solving performance. On two measures of visual-spatial abilities, the hearing students in high school and college performed significantly better than their deaf peers.

  10. [Permanent hearing loss in the prelingual phase in children with a non-aberrant neonatal hearing screening result].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korver, A M H; Meuwese-Jongejeugd, J; Briaire, J J; Frijns, J H M; Oudesluys-Murphy, A M

    2008-02-23

    --Neonatal hearing screening is fully implemented in the Netherlands since June 2006 using otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) technology. --A normal neonatal hearing screening result unfortunately does not guarantee childhood normal hearing. Hearing loss may not become manifest until after the neonatal period. --Hearing loss at a later stage may be classified in three categories: (a) delayed onset hearing loss which occurs when the cause of the hearing loss is present at birth but the hearing loss itself becomes detectable at a later stage; (b) progressive hearing loss in which a very slight hearing loss may be present at birth but is not yet detectable and the hearing loss becomes progressively more severe; and (c) acquired hearing loss that results from a number of external factors, such as meningitis, ototoxic drugs, neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia necessitating an exchange transfusion, and trauma. --Neonatal hearing screening can result in detection of moderate to profound permanent hearing loss at an early age when therapeutic options may have maximum effect. However, even after this period, constant vigilance is necessary to detect permanent hearing loss in young children, especially during the prelingual period.

  11. Ethics of mitochondrial therapy for deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legge, Michael; Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    2014-11-07

    Mitochondrial therapy may provide the relief to many families with inherited mitochondrial diseases. However, it also has the potential for use in non-fatal disorders such as inherited mitochondrial deafness, providing an option for correction of the deafness using assisted reproductive technology. In this paper we discuss the potential for use in correcting mitochondrial deafness and consider some of the issues for the deaf community.

  12. Apartheid in Deaf Education: Examining Workforce Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Laurene; Rusher, Melissa; Andrews, Jean F.; Coryell, Judy

    2008-01-01

    A survey of 3,227 professionals in 313 deaf education programs found that 22.0% of teachers and 14.5% of administrators were deaf--a less than 10% increase in deaf professionals since 1993. Additionally, 21.7% of teachers and 6.1% of administrators were professionals of color. Of these minority teachers, only 2.5% were deaf persons of color. Only…

  13. Narrative skills in deaf children who use spoken English: Dissociations between macro and microstructural devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A C; Toscano, E; Botting, N; Marshall, C R; Atkinson, J R; Denmark, T; Herman, R; Morgan, G

    2016-12-01

    Previous research has highlighted that deaf children acquiring spoken English have difficulties in narrative development relative to their hearing peers both in terms of macro-structure and with micro-structural devices. The majority of previous research focused on narrative tasks designed for hearing children that depend on good receptive language skills. The current study compared narratives of 6 to 11-year-old deaf children who use spoken English (N=59) with matched for age and non-verbal intelligence hearing peers. To examine the role of general language abilities, single word vocabulary was also assessed. Narratives were elicited by the retelling of a story presented non-verbally in video format. Results showed that deaf and hearing children had equivalent macro-structure skills, but the deaf group showed poorer performance on micro-structural components. Furthermore, the deaf group gave less detailed responses to inferencing probe questions indicating poorer understanding of the story's underlying message. For deaf children, micro-level devices most strongly correlated with the vocabulary measure. These findings suggest that deaf children, despite spoken language delays, are able to convey the main elements of content and structure in narrative but have greater difficulty in using grammatical devices more dependent on finer linguistic and pragmatic skills.

  14. Comparing the effect of auditory-only and auditory-visual modes in two groups of Persian children using cochlear implants: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryadi Zanjani, Mohammad Majid; Hasanzadeh, Saeid; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Shemshadi, Hashem; Purdy, Suzanne C; Mahmudi Bakhtiari, Behrooz; Vahab, Maryam

    2013-09-01

    Since the introduction of cochlear implantation, researchers have considered children's communication and educational success before and after implantation. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare auditory, speech, and language development scores following one-sided cochlear implantation between two groups of prelingual deaf children educated through either auditory-only (unisensory) or auditory-visual (bisensory) modes. A randomized controlled trial with a single-factor experimental design was used. The study was conducted in the Instruction and Rehabilitation Private Centre of Hearing Impaired Children and their Family, called Soroosh in Shiraz, Iran. We assessed 30 Persian deaf children for eligibility and 22 children qualified to enter the study. They were aged between 27 and 66 months old and had been implanted between the ages of 15 and 63 months. The sample of 22 children was randomly assigned to two groups: auditory-only mode and auditory-visual mode; 11 participants in each group were analyzed. In both groups, the development of auditory perception, receptive language, expressive language, speech, and speech intelligibility was assessed pre- and post-intervention by means of instruments which were validated and standardized in the Persian population. No significant differences were found between the two groups. The children with cochlear implants who had been instructed using either the auditory-only or auditory-visual modes acquired auditory, receptive language, expressive language, and speech skills at the same rate. Overall, spoken language significantly developed in both the unisensory group and the bisensory group. Thus, both the auditory-only mode and the auditory-visual mode were effective. Therefore, it is not essential to limit access to the visual modality and to rely solely on the auditory modality when instructing hearing, language, and speech in children with cochlear implants who are exposed to spoken language both at home and at school

  15. Deafness and the Riddle of Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lennard J.

    2007-01-01

    In the past, much discrimination against deaf people was based on the assumption that they were in fact people without language--that is, dumb. "Dumb" carried the sense of being not only mute but also stupid, as in a "dumb" animal. The status of deaf people has changed in important ways, as deaf activists and scholars have reshaped the idea of…

  16. Representations of Sound in American Deaf Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Russell S.

    2007-01-01

    Sound plays a prominent role in narrative description of characters and environs in mainstream American literature. A review of American Deaf literature shows that the representations of sound held for deaf writers are in extensional and oppositional terms. American deaf writers, in their descriptions of entities, characters, functions, and…

  17. Episodes of repeated sudden deafness following pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak-Osinska, Katarzyna; Burduk, Pawel K; Kopczynski, Andrzej

    2009-04-01

    Sex hormones influence and provoke changes in hearing levels. Sudden deafness is rarely observed in pregnant women. The effective treatment of sudden deafness in pregnant women is a challenging problem. We present a case of repeatable, completely regressed sudden deafness in a woman during her first and second pregnancies.

  18. Nativization, Linguistic Theory, and Deaf Language Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, James Paul; Goodhart, Wendy

    1985-01-01

    Considers the acquisition of language by deaf children of deaf parents and by deaf children of hearing parents in the light of such linguistic theories as Andersen's "nativization-denativization" and Bickerton's "bioprograms." Findings both support the theories and bring to light complexities that the theories do not exactly explain. (SED)

  19. Deafness as Conflict and Conflict Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Christopher Jon

    2007-01-01

    Writers of D/deaf autobiographies or biographies face something of a dilemma when incorporating deafness into the stories they tell. This includes writers of D/deaf fiction because many such works are based on the same personal experiences from which autobiographies and biographies are derived. At heart, autobiographies and biographies are merely…

  20. No Dummies: Deafness, Baseball, and American Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R. A. R.

    2012-01-01

    This article begins by examining the historical and social factors that led to 1901 being the "deafest" year in major league baseball history with four deaf players. In particular, the author discusses the career of William Ellsworth "Dummy" Hoy, a deaf man from Ohio who became the most celebrated deaf player in history and explores the reasons…

  1. Understanding Deaf Readers: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelstone, Aaron Weir

    2013-01-01

    The development of reading skills, beyond a functional level, is difficult for most deaf readers. Standardized testing demonstrates a median 4th grade reading level that remains consistent even after national norming of the Stanford Achievement test on the population of deaf school children. Deaf education continues to generate various educational…

  2. Development of Deaf Identity: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Guy; Storbeck, Claudine

    2011-01-01

    This ethnographic study explores the identity development of 9 deaf participants through the narratives of their educational experiences in either mainstream or special schools for the Deaf. This exploration goes beyond a binary conceptualization of deaf identity that allows for only the medical and social models and proposes a bicultural…

  3. Deaf in the Time of the Cochlea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Tom; Humphries, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    The American Deaf community for several decades has been involved in sometimes complicated and often contested ways of defining what it means to be Deaf. It is our thesis that the processes of identity construction and the recent discourse of Deaf identity are not unique phenomena at all but echo the experience of other embedded cultural groups…

  4. Deafness as Conflict and Conflict Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Christopher Jon

    2007-01-01

    Writers of D/deaf autobiographies or biographies face something of a dilemma when incorporating deafness into the stories they tell. This includes writers of D/deaf fiction because many such works are based on the same personal experiences from which autobiographies and biographies are derived. At heart, autobiographies and biographies are merely…

  5. No Dummies: Deafness, Baseball, and American Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R. A. R.

    2012-01-01

    This article begins by examining the historical and social factors that led to 1901 being the "deafest" year in major league baseball history with four deaf players. In particular, the author discusses the career of William Ellsworth "Dummy" Hoy, a deaf man from Ohio who became the most celebrated deaf player in history and…

  6. No Dummies: Deafness, Baseball, and American Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R. A. R.

    2012-01-01

    This article begins by examining the historical and social factors that led to 1901 being the "deafest" year in major league baseball history with four deaf players. In particular, the author discusses the career of William Ellsworth "Dummy" Hoy, a deaf man from Ohio who became the most celebrated deaf player in history and…

  7. Violent Offenders in a Deaf Prison Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Katrina R.; Vernon, McCay; Capella, Michele E.

    2005-01-01

    Previous research suggested an unexplained difference in the patterns of offending behaviors among deaf people when compared to hearing people. This study, conducted in Texas, compares the incidence and types of violent offenses of a deaf prison population in comparison to the hearing prison population. Sixty-four percent of deaf prisoners were…

  8. Psychomotor Development for the Deaf-Blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Claudine

    The stages of psychomotor development in deaf blind children and youth are reviewed, and educational principles to guide psychomotor development programs for the deaf blind are outlined. Etiological factors which contribute to the psychomotor development of deaf blind persons are discussed including nonambulation and sensory deprivation, heart…

  9. The Central Asylum for the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb, Canajoharie, New York, 1823-1835.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Colin D.

    1999-01-01

    This case study describes the Central Asylum for the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb in Canajoharie, NY, a public school that existed from 1823 to 1835. The study illustrates how a small group of communities with limited funds met a need for the education of persons who were deaf. (Contains references.) (CR)

  10. Prevalence of sensorineural deafness in habitual mobile phone users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G C Sahoo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Mobile phone usage is widespread and concerns have been raised on the safety of its long-term usage. The electromagnetic fields emitted from mobile can penetrate skull and deposit energy 4-6 cm into the brain resulting in heating of the tissue. In this study, we explore a possible relationship between prolonged mobile phone usage and sensorineural deafness. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a medical college situated in rural India. A total of 100 persons between the age group of 20-45years using mobile phone for at least 5 years are selected and screened for sensorineural deafness. Use of cellular phones was assessed by a questionnaire. Mean number of daily calls and minutes were asked for to calculate the cumulative use in hours for all years. The most frequently used ear during cellular phone calls was noted, or whether both ears were used equally. Otoscopic examinations were performed by an otolaryngologist before testing in order to rule out any external or middle ear pathology that could affect audiometric measurements. The hearing levels of subjects were tested using pure tone audiometry. Results : One hundred subjects who are habitual mobile phone users were screened by pure tone audiometry. It is found that the prevalence of sensorineural deafness was 3% and there is a linear relationship between the duration of mobile phone use and the degree of the severity of deafness. Conclusion : The prevalence of sensorineural deafness in our study in habitual mobile users is 3%. It is not clearly known whether mobile phone use is the direct cause of deafness in these subjects but the absence of other causes might point towards its etiological role.

  11. Implantes cocleares em crianças portadoras de deficiência auditiva decorrente de meningite Cochlear implant in deaf children due to meningites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Bevilacqua

    2003-12-01

    and attention deficits as well as inability for learning. Characteristically the hearing loss due to meningitis is bilateral profound sensorineural symmetric and descendent and it is more common in males and in children under 5 years old and it brings severe implications in the emotional, social and development. AIM: To compare the performance of two groups of pre-lingually deaf implanted children, with age varying from 1 year and 10 months to 6 years, with hearing loss due to meningitis and other varied causes. STUDY DESIGN: Transversal cohorte. MATERIAL AND METHOD: 63 profoundly deaf implanted children were evaluated, 25 (40% were male and 38 (60% were females. In 12 cases (19% the hearing loss was caused by meningitis and in 51 cases (81% hearing loss was due to a variety of causes. All participants were submitted to ear nose throat examination and clinical and objective audiological evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: the occurrence of partial insertion was higher in the meningitis group. There were no statically significant differences on word and phoneme recognition as well as in the questionnaire for evaluation of the hearing (MAIS and language (MUSS skills between the groups.

  12. Prevalence of congenital hereditary sensorineural deafness in Australian Cattle Dogs and associations with coat characteristics and sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sommerlad Susan F

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital hereditary sensorineural deafness (CHSD occurs in many dog breeds, including Australian Cattle Dogs. In some breeds, CHSD is associated with a lack of cochlear melanocytes in the stria vascularis, certain coat characteristics, and potentially, abnormalities in neuroepithelial pigment production. This study investigates phenotypic markers for CHSD in 899 Australian Cattle Dogs. Results Auditory function was tested in 899 Australian Cattle Dogs in family groups using brainstem auditory evoked response testing. Coat colour and patterns, facial and body markings, gender and parental hearing status were recorded. Deafness prevalence among all 899 dogs was 10.8% with 7.5% unilaterally deaf, and 3.3% bilaterally deaf, and amongst pups from completely tested litters (n = 696 was 11.1%, with 7.5% unilaterally deaf, and 3.6% bilaterally deaf. Univariable and multivariable analyses revealed a negative association between deafness and bilateral facial masks (odds ratio 0.2; P ≤ 0.001. Using multivariable logistic animal modelling, the risk of deafness was lower in dogs with pigmented body spots (odds ratio 0.4; P = 0.050. No significant associations were found between deafness and coat colour. Within unilaterally deaf dogs with unilateral facial masks, no association was observed between the side of deafness and side of mask. The side of unilateral deafness was not significantly clustered amongst unilaterally deaf dogs from the same litter. Females were at increased risk of deafness (odds ratio from a logistic animal model 1.9; P = 0.034 after adjusting for any confounding by mask type and pigmented body spots. Conclusions Australian Cattle Dogs suffer from CHSD, and this disease is more common in dogs with mask-free faces, and in those without pigmented body patches. In unilaterally deaf dogs with unilateral masks, the lack of observed association between side of deafness and side of mask suggests that if CHSD is due to

  13. [The effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to different degree of hearing loss and types of threshold curve in sudden deafness patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyun; Sun, Dajiang; Shao, Shan; Jiang, Wen; Sun, Zhengliang; Li, Zhengxian

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to different degrees of hearing loss and different types of threshold curve in sudden deafness patients, and establish a personalized therapy, so as to promote clinical effect to sudden deafness. One hundred and twenty cases were divided into two groups respectively (each group 60 cases). Drug treatment had been used in group A for two weeks. The patients in group B received drug treatment combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy for two weeks. According to the different degrees of hearing loss and the types of audiogram in two groups, the statistical analysis to the difference of hyperbaric oxygen therapeutic effect was done. The effective rates was statistically different (chi2 = 8.044, P deafness patients. The statistical difference could been found between moderate and the severe deafness, the value of chi2 and p were 4.969, 5.560 and 0.040, 0.035, respectively. In group A, the statistical difference could only been found between mild and the profound deafness patients (chi2 = 6.739, P deafness, the moderate and the profound deafness, the severe and the profound deafness patients. The value of chi2 were 11.500, 15.058,10.221 and P deafness. The statistical difference could been found between the downsloping and the flat audiogram, with the value of chi2 and p were 5.144 and 5.969, P deafness. The value of chi2 were 6.188, 7.247, 8.082 and P deafness and severe deafness, the descending and flat type of audiogram.

  14. An analysis of the reading strategies used by adult and student deaf readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banner, Alyssa; Wang, Ye

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and examine effective reading strategies used by adult deaf readers compared with student deaf readers. There were a total of 11 participants: 5 deaf adults ranging from 27 to 36 years and 6 deaf students ranging from 16 to 20 years. Assessment methods included interview and think-aloud procedures in which individuals were interrupted 3 times during the reading of a text to answer questions about their internal cognitive processes. It was found that both student and adult groups had highly skilled readers who demonstrated higher level reading strategies and less skilled readers who demonstrated lower level strategies, and only the highest skilled reader demonstrated both breadth and depth of strategies in all three categories: "constructing meaning," "monitoring and improving comprehension," and "evaluating comprehension." The study contributes evidence toward two identified gaps in the existing body of research: (a) the lack of investigation into the reading strategies utilized by deaf readers in text comprehension and (b) the overemphasis of most research on studying less skilled deaf readers while overlooking highly proficient deaf readers.

  15. Practitioner Talk on Deaf Children's Reading Comprehension: Analysing Multiple Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanwick, Ruth A.; Kitchen, Ruth; Clarke, Paula J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined different perspectives of deaf education practitioners on deafness and reading comprehension. This involved a full deaf education support team comprising teachers of the deaf, communication support workers, and deaf instructors from a UK citywide service covering early years, primary and secondary settings. Using a focus group…

  16. Deaf Education in a Planetarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Muxue; Hintz, E. G.; Jones, M.; Lawler, J.; Fisler, A.; Mumford, H.

    2013-01-01

    Over the years we have struggled with the difficulty of giving a planetarium show to a deaf audience. This is especially true for a younger audience with limited reading abilities. You must illuminate the ASL signer which causes light splash onto the dome. You must slow the presentation down to allow for time to interpret and then point. A slower presentation can have an adverse impact on the learning of the hearing students if the presentation is made to a mixed audience. To address these issues, we are currently working on methods to improve deaf education in a planetarium environment. We will present an overview of the current project along with efforts to establish baselines comprehension levels for both deaf and hearing children. This work is partially funded by an NSF IIS-1124548 grant and funding from the Sorenson Foundation.

  17. Spelling in oral deaf and hearing dyslexic children: A comparison of phonologically plausible errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, P; Shergold, Z; Kyle, F E; Herman, R

    2014-11-01

    A written single word spelling to dictation test and a single word reading test were given to 68 severe-profoundly oral deaf 10-11-year-old children and 20 hearing children with a diagnosis of dyslexia. The literacy scores of the deaf children and the hearing children with dyslexia were lower than expected for children of their age and did not differ from each other. Three quarters of the spelling errors of hearing children with dyslexia compared with just over half the errors of the oral deaf group were phonologically plausible. Expressive vocabulary and speech intelligibility predicted the percentage of phonologically plausible errors in the deaf group only. Implications of findings for the phonological decoding self-teaching model and for supporting literacy development are discussed.

  18. Short-Term Effects of Screening for Cardiovascular Risk in the Deaf Community: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is limited information on the risk of cardiovascular disease amongst the Deaf community. Given that the access of Deaf people to mainstream health promotion is likely to be hindered by language barriers, we were interested to assess the short-term impact of cardiovascular health promotion within this group. Using a pilot study we investigated changes in cardiovascular risk factors amongst Deaf people identified to be at high cardiovascular risk, who received standard health promotion by a medical team specializing in cardiovascular health promotion. The short-term impact of cardiovascular health promotion in this group did not reduce estimates of cardiovascular risk. The reasons for this are likely to relate to the design and delivery of health promotion to Deaf people, which deserves further study.

  19. Genetics of hearing and deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Simon; Lin, Xi; Liu, Xue Zhong

    2012-11-01

    This article is a review of the genes and genetic disorders that affect hearing in humans and a few selected mouse models of deafness. Genetics is playing an increasingly critical role in the practice of medicine. This is not only in part to the importance that genetic knowledge has on traditional genetic diseases but also in part to the fact that genetic knowledge provides an understanding of the fundamental biological process of most diseases. The proteins coded by the genes related to hearing loss (HL) are involved in many functions in the ear, such as cochlear fluid homeostasis, ionic channels, stereocilia morphology and function, synaptic transmission, gene regulation, and others. Mouse models play a crucial role in understanding of the pathogenesis associated with these genes. Different types of familial HL have been recognized for years; however, in the last two decades, there has been tremendous progress in the discovery of gene mutations that cause deafness. Most of the cases of genetic deafness recognized today are monogenic disorders that can be broadly classified by the mode of inheritance (i.e., autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and mitochondrial inheritance) and by the presence of associated phenotypic features (i.e., syndromic; and nonsyndromic). In terms of nonsyndromic HL, the chromosomal locations are currently known for ∼ 125 loci (54 for dominant and 71 for recessive deafness), 64 genes have been identified (24 for dominant and 40 for recessive deafness), and there are many more loci for syndromic deafness and X-linked and mitochondrial DNA disorders (http://hereditaryhearingloss.org). Thus, today's clinician must understand the science of medical genetics as this knowledge can lead to more effective disease diagnosis, counseling, treatment, and prevention.

  20. [Analysis of trace elements in the deaf-muted children among ethnic minorities in Urumchi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youledusi, Abudurusuli; Jian-ping, Liu

    2010-04-01

    To explore the relationship between trace elements and auditory function in the deafness children among ethnic minorities in Urumchi. There were 27 deaf-muted children in this study and 30 children with normal hearing as control. Sample of serum and hair from two groups were collected, and we tested 17 kinds of trace elements by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer. The content of trace elements in serum including Zn, Cu, Fe, Cd, Se, V and Pb from deaf-muted group was more higher than that of control group (P elements including Mn, Sr, Sn, and Bi was much lower than that of control group (P content of those trace elements including Ba, Cr, Ag, Co, Ti, and Ni in serum from both testing and control groups was found no significant difference with each other (P > 0.05). On the other hand, the content of the trace elements including Sn and Se in hairs from deaf-muted group was more higher than that of control group (P content of the trace elements including Zn, Fe, Co, Mn, Sr, V, Pb, Ni, Cr, Ti and Ba in hairs from deaf-muted group was much lower than that of control group (P content of the trace element including Cu, Ag, Cd, and Bi in hairs from deaf-muted group was found no significant difference between each other (P > 0.05). The content of some trace elements in serum and hairs of deaf-muted children is found a significant difference compared with children with normal hearing. This study indicates that some trace elements may relate to auditory function among ethnic minorities in Urumchi.

  1. Cochlear implants in genetic deafness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuezhong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Genetic defects are one of the most important etiologies of severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss and play an important role in determining cochlear implantation outcomes. While the pathogenic mutation types of a number of deafness genes have been cloned, the pathogenesis mechanisms and their relationship to the outcomes of cochlear implantation remain a hot research area. The auditory performance is considered to be affected by the etiology of hearing loss and the number of surviving spiral ganglion cells, as well as others. Current research advances in cochlear implantation for hereditary deafness, especially the relationship among clinic-types, genotypes and outcomes of cochlear implantation, will be discussed in this review.

  2. Hearing Mothers and Oral Deaf Children: An Atypical Relational Context for Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecciso, Flavia; Petrocchi, Serena; Marchetti, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    The study assessed Theory of Mind (ToM) abilities in a group of oral deaf children and in their hearing mothers using a battery of ToM tasks. It also investigated the connection between mother and child in ToM performance. Participants were: 17 oral deaf children (aged 5 to 14 years) were paired by gender, age, and mental age with 17 hearing…

  3. Cochlear implantation in children with single-sided deafness: does aetiology and duration of deafness matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Susan; Prosse, Susanne; Laszig, Roland; Wesarg, Thomas; Aschendorff, Antje; Hassepass, Frederike

    2015-01-01

    For adult patients with single-sided deafness (SSD), treatment with a cochlear implant (CI) is well established as an acceptable and beneficial hearing rehabilitation method administered routinely in clinical practice. In contrast, for children with SSD, CI has been applied less often to date, with the rationale to decide either on a case-by-case basis or under the realm of clinical research. The aim of our clinical study was to evaluate the longitudinal benefits of CI for a group of children diagnosed with SSD and to compare their outcomes with respect to patient characteristics. Evaluating a pool of paediatric SSD patients presenting for possible CI surgery revealed that the primary aetiology of deafness was congenital cochlear nerve deficiency. A subgroup of children meeting the CI candidacy criteria for the affected ear (the majority with acquired hearing loss) were enrolled in the study. Preliminary group results suggest substantial improvements in speech comprehension in noise and in the ability to localise sound, which was demonstrated through objective and subjective assessments after CI treatment for the group, with results varying from patient to patient. Our study shows a trend towards superior outcomes for children with acquired hearing loss and a shorter duration of hearing loss compared to congenitally deafened children who had a longer duration of SSD. This indicates an interactive influence of the age at onset, aetiology and duration of deafness upon the restoration of binaural integration and the overall benefits of sound stimulation to two ears after CI treatment. Continued longitudinal investigation of these children and further studies in larger groups may provide more guidance on the optimal timing of treatment for paediatric patients with acquired and congenital SSD.

  4. Reflections on Deaf Education: Perspectives of Deaf Senior Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Len; Shaw, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Parents with deaf children face many challenges in making educational choices, developing language and a sense of belonging. Other key aspects of life including concept development and social competency are also critical decision points faced by parents. Developing language, whether it is through spoken or signed modalities, is of utmost…

  5. Writing in Young Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cheri; Mayer, Connie

    2015-01-01

    The authors conducted an integrative review of the research literature on the writing development, writing instruction, and writing assessment of young deaf children ages 3 to 8 years (or preschool through third grade) published between 1990 and 2012. A total of 17 studies were identified that met inclusion criteria. The analysis examined research…

  6. [Etiology of deafness in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvaux de Fenffe, J; Deggouj, N; Dutilleux, D; Gersdorff, M

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective etiological study of 112 files of deaf children is presented. A prenatal etiology is found in 42.8%, a perinatal in 19.6% and a postnatal in 13.4% of the cases. No cause was suspected in 30.3% of the cases. These results emphasise existing literature.

  7. A Compelling Desire for Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David

    2006-01-01

    A case is described of a patient who has a compelling and persistent desire to become deaf. She often kept cotton wool moistened with oil in her ears and was learning sign language. Living without sound appeared to be a severe form of avoidance behavior from hyperacusis and misophonia. She had a borderline personality disorder that was associated…

  8. Deaf Community Mobilization in Uruguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    There are more than 50 million (or approximately 15%) persons with disabilities living in Latin America and the Caribbean: 80 percent live in impoverished conditions, lack employment, and encounter social exclusion. Deaf and hard of hearing persons are particularly impacted as they are frequently denied access to most sectors of society. This…

  9. Writing in Young Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cheri; Mayer, Connie

    2015-01-01

    The authors conducted an integrative review of the research literature on the writing development, writing instruction, and writing assessment of young deaf children ages 3 to 8 years (or preschool through third grade) published between 1990 and 2012. A total of 17 studies were identified that met inclusion criteria. The analysis examined research…

  10. Considerations on Deafness and Homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaneuf, Jean

    1987-01-01

    The article reviews the literature and discusses emotions, attitudes, and general reactions toward homosexuality in deaf individuals. The "coming out" process is discussed, with related social, familial, and personal implications, as well as the role of professional counseling and intervention. (Author/DB)

  11. 语前聋儿童人工耳蜗植入术后元音声调发声状况分析%Characteristics of Tones in Vowels in Prelingual Hearing-impaired Children after Cochlear Implant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈晓丽; 管燕平; 蒋功达; 俞鲁婷; 周静

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the pronunciation characteristics of vowels' tone in prelingual hearing-impaired children accepted co-chlear implant (CI). Methods 8 prelingual hearing-impaired children accepted CI aged 3~4 years (group CI) and 8 normal-hearing children (group NH) with the same age were asked to pronounce the vowels of/a/,/o/,/e/,/i/,/u/, and/ü/ in four tones with the direction of speech training teacher. The sounds were recorded and analyzed with Praat software extract Formants (F1, F2) and duration of the sounds. Results The error of vowels in four tones was more in group CI than in group NH, but difficult level was almost the same between groups. There was significant difference in the F1 of/e/, F2 of/i/and/u/in tone 2, F2 of/e/and duration of/o/,/e/, and/ü/in tone 3 between groups (P<0.05). Conclusion Pronouncing the four tones of vowels is more difficult for the hearing-impaired children. For vowels articulation training, it is important to focus on the mouth and breath training.%  目的探讨语前聋儿童人工耳蜗植入术后元音声调的发声特点。方法8例语前聋人工耳蜗植入儿童(聋儿组)和8例同年龄组(3~4岁)听力正常儿童(正常组),在语训教师(音量控制在60~70 dBSPL)带领下朗读四声状态下的元音/a/、/o/、/e/、/i/、/u/、/ü/。对语音录音采样,采用Praat语音分析软件提取共振峰(F1、F2)及音长。结果聋儿组元音四声错误率高于正常组,但两组儿童四声发音的难易程度一致。与正常组比较,聋儿组阳平/e/的F1,/i/和/u/的F2存在显著性差异(P<0.05);上声/e/的F2存在显著性差异(P<0.05);上声/o/、/e/和/ü/的音长存在显著性差异(P<0.05)。结论人工耳蜗植入儿童声调习得难度更大。共振峰、音长测试可为口型和舌位的训练提供参考。

  12. Using online glossing lessons for accelerated instruction in ASL for preservice deaf education majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisson, Gerald J

    2007-01-01

    Teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students must serve as language models for their students. However, preservice deaf education teachers typically have at most only four semesters of American Sign Language (ASL) training. How can their limited ASL instructional time be used to increase their proficiency? Studies involving deaf and hard of hearing students have revealed that glosses (written equivalents of ASL sentences) can serve as "bridges" between ASL and English. The study investigated whether glossing instruction can facilitate hearing students' learning of ASL. A Web site was developed in which ASL glossing rules were explained and glossing exercises provided. Posttest scores showed the experimental group improving from 39% to 71% on ASL grammar knowledge. These findings indicate that online glossing lessons may provide the means to obtain ASL skills more readily, thus preparing deaf education teachers to serve as ASL language models.

  13. Haptic spatial configuration learning in deaf and hearing individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick van Dijk

    Full Text Available The present study investigated haptic spatial configuration learning in deaf individuals, hearing sign language interpreters and hearing controls. In three trials, participants had to match ten shapes haptically to the cut-outs in a board as fast as possible. Deaf and hearing sign language users outperformed the hearing controls. A similar difference was observed for a rotated version of the board. The groups did not differ, however, on a free relocation trial. Though a significant sign language experience advantage was observed, comparison to results from a previous study testing the same task in a group of blind individuals showed it to be smaller than the advantage observed for the blind group. These results are discussed in terms of how sign language experience and sensory deprivation benefit haptic spatial configuration processing.

  14. Effect of Exogenous Cues on Covert Spatial Orienting in Deaf and Normal Hearing Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Seema Gorur; Patil, Gouri Shanker; Mishra, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Deaf individuals have been known to process visual stimuli better at the periphery compared to the normal hearing population. However, very few studies have examined attention orienting in the oculomotor domain in the deaf, particularly when targets appear at variable eccentricity. In this study, we examined if the visual perceptual processing advantage reported in the deaf people also modulates spatial attentional orienting with eye movement responses. We used a spatial cueing task with cued and uncued targets that appeared at two different eccentricities and explored attentional facilitation and inhibition. We elicited both a saccadic and a manual response. The deaf showed a higher cueing effect for the ocular responses than the normal hearing participants. However, there was no group difference for the manual responses. There was also higher facilitation at the periphery for both saccadic and manual responses, irrespective of groups. These results suggest that, owing to their superior visual processing ability, the deaf may orient attention faster to targets. We discuss the results in terms of previous studies on cueing and attentional orienting in deaf.

  15. Deaf and hearing children's development of theory of mind, peer popularity, and leadership during middle childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Candida C; O'Reilly, Karin; Wellman, Henry M

    2016-09-01

    This study had two primary aims. First, we compared deaf and hearing children during middle and late childhood on (a) cognitive understanding of basic and advanced theory of mind (ToM) and (b) social dimensions of peer group relations, including popularity, isolation, leadership, and the disposition to interact positively with peers. Second, using correlational analyses, we examined ToM's connections with these social variables to see whether and how ToM impacts children's social lives. A total of 57 children (36 deaf children of hearing parents and 21 hearing children) 6 to 14years of age completed a 6-step developmental ToM Scale, and their teachers reported on the social variables. Hearing children outperformed deaf children on ToM and all teacher-rated variables. For deaf children, popularity correlated positively, and social isolation correlated negatively, with ToM even after controlling for age, gender, and language ability. For hearing children, the only ToM link was a weak correlation with leadership. Possible reasons for the differences between deaf and hearing groups are discussed, together with the likelihood of bidirectional causal links and implications for deaf children's social development in school.

  16. Congenital and prolonged adult-onset deafness cause distinct degradations in neural ITD coding with bilateral cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Kenneth E; Chung, Yoojin; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2013-06-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (CI) users perform poorly on tasks involving interaural time differences (ITD), which are critical for sound localization and speech reception in noise by normal-hearing listeners. ITD perception with bilateral CI is influenced by age at onset of deafness and duration of deafness. We previously showed that ITD coding in the auditory midbrain is degraded in congenitally deaf white cats (DWC) compared to acutely deafened cats (ADC) with normal auditory development (Hancock et al., J. Neurosci, 30:14068). To determine the relative importance of early onset of deafness and prolonged duration of deafness for abnormal ITD coding in DWC, we recorded from single units in the inferior colliculus of cats deafened as adults 6 months prior to experimentation (long-term deafened cats, LTDC) and compared neural ITD coding between the three deafness models. The incidence of ITD-sensitive neurons was similar in both groups with normal auditory development (LTDC and ADC), but significantly diminished in DWC. In contrast, both groups that experienced prolonged deafness (LTDC and DWC) had broad distributions of best ITDs around the midline, unlike the more focused distributions biased toward contralateral-leading ITDs present in both ADC and normal-hearing animals. The lack of contralateral bias in LTDC and DWC results in reduced sensitivity to changes in ITD within the natural range. The finding that early onset of deafness more severely degrades neural ITD coding than prolonged duration of deafness argues for the importance of fitting deaf children with sound processors that provide reliable ITD cues at an early age.

  17. [Study of relationship between the onset time of sudden deafness and blood rheology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiu-Mei; Zhang, Qing-Quan; Xie, Guang

    2007-03-01

    To investigate the correlation of the onset time of sudden deafness and blood rheology using a large-scale retrospective study. One hundred and ninety-eight patients of sudden deafness were examined with blood rheology and compared with 60 healthy people. Thirty patients were as subjects to study the circadian of blood rheology in order to search whether the blood rheology of morning was the highest. By divided 24 hours into twelve groups, each group contained two hours. Then the 198 patients were separated into twelve groups according to the time of onset. The blood rheology of each group was analyzed and compared with each other to observe which group was the highest. Most blood rheology index of the patients were higher than that of the healthy people. The onset time in most of the patients was during 4 am-8 am, but 45 patients during 4 am-6 am and 40 patients during 6 am-8 am. By analyzing and comparing the blood rheology of each group, the results showed that the blood rheology index in the group of 4 am-8 am was highest. And the blood rheology index of sudden deafness was highest in the morning. There was a close relation between blood rheology and sudden deafness. The peak time of onset was 4 am-8 am, and the patients whose blood rheology were the highest should be more predisposed to sudden deafness than the other patients.

  18. The Church of Deaf Sociality: Deaf Churchgoing Practices and "Sign Bread and Butter" in Bangalore, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedner, Michele

    2014-01-01

    This article ethnographically analyzes the practices of deaf young adults in Bangalore, India. As sign language is not used by families, schools, or other institutions, the church is a crucial educational space. Churchgoing provides deaf young adults with opportunities to orient themselves toward other deaf young adults, to develop new ideas of…

  19. The Church of Deaf Sociality: Deaf Churchgoing Practices and "Sign Bread and Butter" in Bangalore, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedner, Michele

    2014-01-01

    This article ethnographically analyzes the practices of deaf young adults in Bangalore, India. As sign language is not used by families, schools, or other institutions, the church is a crucial educational space. Churchgoing provides deaf young adults with opportunities to orient themselves toward other deaf young adults, to develop new ideas of…

  20. The Impact of Maternal Deafness on Cradling Laterality with Deaf and Hearing Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieratzki, Jechil S.; Woll, Bencie

    2004-01-01

    A recent article in the "Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education" (Leigh, Brice, & Meadow-Orlans, 2004) explored attachment between deaf mothers and their 18-month-old children and reported relationship patterns similar to those for hearing dyads. The study reported here explores a marker of early mother-child relationships: cradling…

  1. Genetic Testing for Deafness--GJB2 and SLC26A4 as Causes of Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard J. H.; Robin, Nathaniel H.

    2002-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of genetic testing for deafness. Two genes that make appreciable contributions to the autosomal recessive non-syndromic deafness (ARNSD) genetic load are reviewed, GJB2 and SLC26A4. In addition, the unique aspects of genetic counseling for deafness and recurrence chance estimates are explained. (Contains…

  2. Attitudes of Deaf Adults Regarding Preferred Sign Language Systems Used in the Classroom with Deaf Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautzky-Bowden, Sally M.; Gonzales, B. Robert

    1987-01-01

    A questionnaire survey assessing attitudes of 50 deaf adults toward sign language systems used in schools found the majority supported American Sign Language and Manually Coded English-Pidgin with some reservations. Respondents were also concerned about needs of individual deaf children and deaf adult involvement in educational decision making for…

  3. Deaf Children Attending Different School Environments: Sign Language Abilities and Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasuolo, Elena; Valeri, Giovanni; Di Renzo, Alessio; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Volterra, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined whether full access to sign language as a medium for instruction could influence performance in Theory of Mind (ToM) tasks. Three groups of Italian participants (age range: 6-14 years) participated in the study: Two groups of deaf signing children and one group of hearing-speaking children. The two groups of deaf…

  4. Hopwood, affirmative action, and deaf education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J F; Martin, G

    1998-10-01

    Minority-deaf students constitute 43.5% of the deaf school-age population, yet only 11.7% of teachers and administrators in programs serving deaf students are persons of color. The ruling in Hopwood v. State of Texas (1996) banned the use of race as a major determinant in admissions to colleges and universities in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. This ruling, along with the current backlash against affirmative action policies, has hindered college administrators' efforts to recruit minorities in deaf education. We discuss Hopwood, affirmative action policies, and how both affect deaf education teacher training today. We also present an eight-step action plan for teacher-training colleges and universities to meet the need to increase the number of minority teachers and leaders and encourage state educational agencies and schools for the Deaf to do likewise.

  5. The Genetic Deafness in Chinese Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xuezhong; Ouyang Xiaomei; Denise Yan

    2006-01-01

    Deafness is an etiologically heterogeneous trait with many known genetic, environmental causes or a combination thereof. The identification of more than 120 independent genes for deafness has provided profound new insights into the pathophysiology of hearing. However, recent findings indicate that a large proportion of both syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of deafness in Chinese population are caused by a small number of mutations.This review is focused on syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness as well as on the latest information linking inherited mitochondrial pathologies to a variety of etiologies of sensorineural deafness in Chinese population. Better understanding of the genetic causes of deafness in Chinese population is important for accurate genetics counseling and early diagnosis for timely intervention and treatment options.

  6. Vibrotactile Discrimination Training Affects Brain Connectivity in Profoundly Deaf Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Garrido, Andrés A.; Ruiz-Stovel, Vanessa D.; Gómez-Velázquez, Fabiola R.; Vélez-Pérez, Hugo; Romo-Vázquez, Rebeca; Salido-Ruiz, Ricardo A.; Espinoza-Valdez, Aurora; Campos, Luis R.

    2017-01-01

    Early auditory deprivation has serious neurodevelopmental and cognitive repercussions largely derived from impoverished and delayed language acquisition. These conditions may be associated with early changes in brain connectivity. Vibrotactile stimulation is a sensory substitution method that allows perception and discrimination of sound, and even speech. To clarify the efficacy of this approach, a vibrotactile oddball task with 700 and 900 Hz pure-tones as stimuli [counterbalanced as target (T: 20% of the total) and non-target (NT: 80%)] with simultaneous EEG recording was performed by 14 profoundly deaf and 14 normal-hearing (NH) subjects, before and after a short training period (five 1-h sessions; in 2.5–3 weeks). A small device worn on the right index finger delivered sound-wave stimuli. The training included discrimination of pure tone frequency and duration, and more complex natural sounds. A significant P300 amplitude increase and behavioral improvement was observed in both deaf and normal subjects, with no between group differences. However, a P3 with larger scalp distribution over parietal cortical areas and lateralized to the right was observed in the profoundly deaf. A graph theory analysis showed that brief training significantly increased fronto-central brain connectivity in deaf subjects, but not in NH subjects. Together, ERP tools and graph methods depicted the different functional brain dynamic in deaf and NH individuals, underlying the temporary engagement of the cognitive resources demanded by the task. Our findings showed that the index-fingertip somatosensory mechanoreceptors can discriminate sounds. Further studies are necessary to clarify brain connectivity dynamics associated with the performance of vibrotactile language-related discrimination tasks and the effect of lengthier training programs. PMID:28220063

  7. Numerical Estimation in Deaf and Hearing Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Bull, Rebecca; Marschark, Marc; Sapere, Patty; Davidson, Wendy A.; Murphy, Derek; Nordmann, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Deaf students often lag behind hearing peers in numerical and mathematical abilities. Studies of hearing children with mathematical difficulties highlight the importance of estimation skills as the foundation for formal mathematical abilities, but research with adults is limited. Deaf and hearing college students were assessed on the Number-to-Position task as a measure of estimation, and completed standardised assessments of arithmetical and mathematical reasoning. Deaf students performed si...

  8. Deaf and hearing children's plural noun spelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breadmore, Helen L; Olson, Andrew C; Krott, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines deaf and hearing children's spelling of plural nouns. Severe literacy impairments are well documented in the deaf, which are believed to be a consequence of phonological awareness limitations. Fifty deaf (mean chronological age 13;10 years, mean reading age 7;5 years) and 50 reading-age-matched hearing children produced spellings of regular, semiregular, and irregular plural nouns in Experiment 1 and nonword plurals in Experiment 2. Deaf children performed reading-age appropriately on rule-based (regular and semiregular) plurals but were significantly less accurate at spelling irregular plurals. Spelling of plural nonwords and spelling error analyses revealed clear evidence for use of morphology. Deaf children used morphological generalization to a greater degree than their reading-age-matched hearing counterparts. Also, hearing children combined use of phonology and morphology to guide spelling, whereas deaf children appeared to use morphology without phonological mediation. Therefore, use of morphology in spelling can be independent of phonology and is available to the deaf despite limited experience with spoken language. Indeed, deaf children appear to be learning about morphology from the orthography. Education on more complex morphological generalization and exceptions may be highly beneficial not only for the deaf but also for other populations with phonological awareness limitations.

  9. [Comparative observation on acupuncture-moxibustion and western medication for treatment of sudden deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xin-hua; Ding, Ya-nan; Chang, Xiang-hui; Ouyang, Yu-lu; Xie, Qiang

    2010-08-01

    To compare the therapeutic effect on sudden deafness between acupuncture and moxibustion therapy of excitation-focus transfer and routine medication. Eighty cases of sudden deafness were randomly divided into two groups, 40 cases in each one. Acupuncture and moxibustion therapy of excitation-focus transfer was adopted in observation group on Yongquan (KI 1) (with reducing and slightly heavy manipulation), Tinggong (SI 19), Tinghui (GB 2) and Ermen (TE 21), and associated with suspending moxibustion for thermal sensitization on Yongquan (KI 1). In control group, the routine medications were given. The therapeutic effects of two groups were compared with each other. After three sessions of treatment, dB value of hearing loss in two groups decreased (Psudden deafness as compared with the routine western therapy.

  10. Demographic characteristics and rates of progress of deaf and hard of hearing persons receiving substance abuse treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Dennis; McAweeney, Mary

    A lack of demographic information and data related to the achievement of short-term goals during substance abuse treatment among persons who are deaf or hard of hearing dictated the need for the study. New York State maintains a database on all individuals who participate in treatment. Within this database, 1.8% of persons in treatment for substance use disorder (SUD) were also deaf or hard of hearing. As hypothesized, members of the deaf and hard of hearing sample were older, likelier to be white, and likelier to be female, relative to the SUD-only group. For both groups, alcohol, heroin, and cocaine had the highest rates of reported use. Achievement of short-term goals in the areas of alcohol use, drug use, vocational/educational goals, and overall goals indicated no differences between the deaf and hard of hearing group and the SUD-only group. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  11. Knowledge and use of contraceptive methods amongst deaf people in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisdom K. Mprah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Persons with disabilities in general face serious barriers to sexual and reproductive health (SRH information and services due to institutional and attitudinal barriers. However, because deaf people have unique communication and linguistic needs, which are often misunderstood or ignored, they face greater barriers than other persons with disabilities. Whilst available data indicated that there is a wide gap between knowledge and usage of contraceptive amongst Ghanaians, little is known about the level of contraceptive knowledge and usage amongst deaf people.Objectives: The objective of the study was to investigate the level of knowledge and use of contraceptive methods amongst deaf people in Ghana with the aim of understanding their contraceptive behaviour and to improve access.Method: The study was a participatory SRH needs assessment utilising a two-phase, sequential, mixed methods design. The study included 179 participants, consisting of focus groups with seven executives of Ghana National Association of the Deaf (GNAD, 10 male deaf adults, and 9 deaf female adults. A total of 152 deaf people, made up of students, women, and men participated in a survey, whilst one hearing person served as a key informant.Results: The findings of the study indicated that of the 13 methods shown in the survey, only three were known to about 70% of the adults and 60% of the students. Level of knowledge of the remaining nine methods was low.Conclusion: Clear and effective policies are needed to guide the provision of SRH information and services for deaf people in Ghana.

  12. The Effectiveness of Emotional Intelligence Training on the Mental Health of Male Deaf Students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoume Pourmohamadreza-Tajrishi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Deafness is a common neural-sensory impairment which leads to lower life quality, withdrawal, social activities reduction, and rejection feeling. So, it is important to plan suitable training programs for mental health promotion of deaf children. Emotional intelligence training is one of these programs. The present study was aimed to determine the effectiveness of emotional intelligence training on the mental health of deaf students.In this semi-experimental study with pretest and posttest design, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ was completed in 40 randomly selected boy deaf students with mean age of (12.48 years old before and after the intervention. The aim of the questionnaire was obtaining information of somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction, and depression as well as general health. The students were assigned in experimental and control group randomly and in equal. Experimental group participated in 12 sessions (each session lasts for 50 minutes; twice a week and were trained by emotional intelligence program, but control group did not. Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA was used for analyzing the data.There was a significant difference (P<0.001 between experimental and control group according to somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction, depression and general health as a whole after participation in intervention sessions.There was a significant decrease in somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction, depression and increase in general health of experimental group. Our findings showed that emotional intelligence training program led to promote of general health of boy deaf students.

  13. Films about the deaf: the representations of deaf and sign languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Hessel Silveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes two films about deafness which have not been investigated in the Brazilian academic context. They are Mandy (directed by Alexander Mackendrick, 1952, England and After the Silence (by Fred Gerber, 1996, USA. The analysis is supported by Cultural Studies and Deaf Studies, especially on the concepts of cultural pedagogies, deaf culture, deaf identities, sign language, as well as on the analysis of other films about deaf people conducted by Thoma (2004. Both films are classified as drama, and particular attention was given to how deaf characters are represented, highlighting scenes showing the difficulties deaf people face in a hearing society. It is worth noting that in the end of both films the deaf characters manage to speak and hear. The pedagogical impact of these films is questioned as they show that the deaf may be able to speak and hear after using Sign Language. Deaf representations, deaf education and sign language are present in both films, although there is a difference in approach between them.

  14. Bringing Hearing to the Deaf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipsey, Ian (Purdue)

    2006-06-12

    In his talk, Shipsey will discuss the cochlear implant, the first device to successfully allow the profoundly deaf to regain some sense of hearing. A cochlear implant is a small electronic apparatus. Unlike a normal hearing aid, which amplifies sound, a cochlear implant is surgically implanted behind the ear where it converts sound waves into electrical impulses. These implants have instigated a popular but controversial revolution in the treatment of deafness, and they serve as a model for research in neuroscience and biomedical engineering. Shipsey will discuss the physiology of natural hearing from the perspective of a physicist. He will also touch on the function of cochlear implants in the context of historical treatments, electrical engineering, psychophysics, clinical evaluation of efficacy and personal experience. Finally, Shipsey will address the social implications of cochlear implantation and the future outlook for auditory prostheses.

  15. Reading vocabulary knowledge and deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, P

    1996-01-01

    With respect to reading vocabulary knowledge and deafness, this article addresses two broad questions: (1) Why is vocabulary knowledge related to reading comprehension ability? (2) How is reading vocabulary (i.e., word meanings) acquired? The article argues that the answers to these questions are best addressed by a vocabulary acquisition model labeled the knowledge model. In essence, this model asserts that both breadth and depth of vocabulary knowledge are critical. It is necessary to teach vocabulary, especially to poor readers, who are not likely to derive many word meanings from the use of context during natural or deliberate reading situations. On the basis of theoretical and research syntheses, the article offers implications for vocabulary instruction for deaf children and adolescents.

  16. Deaf education in China: history, current issues, and emerging deaf voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, Richard R; Johnson, Kathryn E; Hui, Yang Jun

    An overview is provided of (a) deaf education in China, (b) views of deaf Chinese, and (c) recent empowering international collaborations. China's national policy focuses on oral/aural education and hearing rehabilitation. However, everyday practice in schools for deaf children includes various forms of Chinese Sign Language. Early childhood education focuses on speech and hearing. Elementary and secondary school curricula reflect low expectations for deaf students and lack the same academic content provided to hearing students. There are limited higher education opportunities. There are no support services such as note takers or interpreters for mainstreamed students. There are no deaf teacher preparation or interpreter training programs. Jobs are few; the vast majority of deaf adults are unemployed. Deaf people interviewed for the article describe their needs, their dreams, and the changes they are witnessing, which result in part from recent empowering international collaborations.

  17. Screening of GJB2 mutations in Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The GJB2 gene (connexin 26) has been shown to be responsible for DFNB1 and DFNA3. We screened the GJB2 gene in 488 patients with prelingual deafness (Group 1 ), 124 with postlingual deafness(Group 2), and 117 normal hearing subjects (Group 3). We found that, in Group 1, 65 patients (13.32%) were homozygotes or compound heterozygotes and 51 patients (10.45%) carried a single pathogenic mutation. The 235delC mutation was the most frequent mutation, accounting for 73.22% of the known pathogenic alleles in Group 1. No homozygotes or compound heterozygotes were detected in Group 2 or Group 3. Some postlingual deaf patients (2.42%) and normal hearing subjects (4.27%) were 235delC carriers. Our preliminary data indicate that 235delC, the most frequent mutation identified in this study, is a major cause for prelingual deafness.

  18. The effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on rehabilitation of paroxysmal deafness%高压氧对突发性耳聋的康复效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙春焕; 王庆霞; 刘怀芹; 秦军

    2001-01-01

    @@Background: The cause of paroxysmal deafness is unknown.It is a nerve deafness that has mostly hearing handicap and harried onset.At present,the disease is usually deemed incurable if it continues for three months.Many scholars consider that handicap of blood circulation in inner ear is an important factor leading to paroxysmal deafness.Hyperbaric oxygenation improves oxygenic content and press in blood. Objective: The effects of hyperbaric oxygenation on rehabilitation of paroxysmal deafness were investigated. Design: 105 patients with paroxysmal deafness were randomly divided into treatment group(n=41)and control group(n=43).Treatment group included 30 patients single ear with deafness of unilateral ear.Control group included 28 patients with deafness of unilateral ear. Unit: Liaocheng People's Hospital. Subject: We collected 105 patients with paroxysmal deafness from May 1999 to Dec 2000.84 patients were male,21 patients were female,aged 7~ 60 years(average 31.9 years).

  19. Factors Contributing to Successful Employment Outcomes for Hispanic Women Who Are Deaf: Utilization of Chi-Squared Automatic Interaction Detector and Logistic Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Amber M.

    2013-01-01

    Hispanic women who are deaf constitute a heterogeneous group of individuals with varying vocational needs. To understand the unique needs of this population, it is important to analyze how consumer characteristics, presence of public supports, and type of services provided influence employment outcomes for Hispanic women who are deaf. The purpose…

  20. The effect of deafness duration on neurotrophin gene therapy for spiral ganglion neuron protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Andrew K; Tu, Tian; Atkinson, Patrick J; Flynn, Brianna O; Sgro, Beatrice E; Hume, Cliff; O'Leary, Stephen J; Shepherd, Robert K; Richardson, Rachael T

    2011-08-01

    level of transfection was remarkably lower following longer durations of deafness. There was a significant increase in SGN survival in the entire basal turn for cochleae that received NT gene therapy compared to the untreated contralateral control cochleae for the one week deaf group. In the four week deaf group significant SGN survival was observed in the lower basal turn only. There was no increase in SGN survival for the eight week deaf group in any cochlear region. These findings indicated that the efficacy of NT gene therapy diminished with increasing durations of deafness leading to reduced benefits in terms of SGN protection. Clinically, there remains a window of opportunity in which NT gene therapy can provide ongoing trophic support for SGNs.

  1. Temporary deafness can impair multisensory integration: a study of cochlear-implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Simon P; Guillemot, Jean-Paul; Champoux, François

    2013-07-01

    Previous investigations suggest that temporary deafness can have a dramatic impact on audiovisual speech processing. The aim of this study was to test whether temporary deafness disturbs other multisensory processes in adults. A nonspeech task involving an audiotactile illusion was administered to a group of normally hearing individuals and a group of individuals who had been temporarily auditorily deprived. Members of this latter group had their auditory detection thresholds restored to normal levels through the use of a cochlear implant. Control conditions revealed that auditory and tactile discrimination capabilities were identical in the two groups. However, whereas normally hearing individuals integrated auditory and tactile information, so that they experienced the audiotactile illusion, individuals who had been temporarily deprived did not. Given the basic nature of the task, failure to integrate multisensory information could not be explained by the use of the cochlear implant. Thus, the results suggest that normally anticipated audiotactile interactions are disturbed following temporary deafness.

  2. The Influence of Phonological Mechanisms in Written Spelling of Profoundly Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Lucia; Arfe, Barbara; Bronte, Tiziana

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of phonological and working memory mechanisms involved in spelling Italian single words was explored in two groups of children matched for grade level: a group of normally hearing children and a group of pre-verbally deaf children, with severe-to-profound hearing loss. Three-syllable and four-syllable familiar…

  3. The Influence of Computer Games on Visual-Motor Integration in Profoundly Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanovic, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the influence of specialised software on the visual-motor integration of profoundly deaf children. The research sample was made up of 70 students aged from seven to 10, 43 of whom formed the experimental group and 27 the control group. The students in the experimental group used computers once a week…

  4. Auditory, Visual, and Auditory-Visual Speech Perception by Individuals with Cochlear Implants versus Individuals with Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Rothem, Hilla; Luntz, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The researchers evaluated the contribution of cochlear implants (CIs) to speech perception by a sample of prelingually deaf individuals implanted after age 8 years. This group was compared with a group with profound hearing impairment (HA-P), and with a group with severe hearing impairment (HA-S), both of which used hearing aids. Words and…

  5. Auditory, Visual, and Auditory-Visual Speech Perception by Individuals with Cochlear Implants versus Individuals with Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Rothem, Hilla; Luntz, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The researchers evaluated the contribution of cochlear implants (CIs) to speech perception by a sample of prelingually deaf individuals implanted after age 8 years. This group was compared with a group with profound hearing impairment (HA-P), and with a group with severe hearing impairment (HA-S), both of which used hearing aids. Words and…

  6. Violence against Deaf Women: Effect of Partner Hearing Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa L.; Kobek Pezzarossi, Caroline M.

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of Deaf female undergraduate students, the current study sought to investigate the prevalence, correlates, and characteristics of intimate partner violence victimization in hearing-Deaf and Deaf-Deaf relationships. Initial results suggest that similarities in hearing status and communication preference are associated with increased…

  7. Surveys of the American Deaf Population: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Russell S.

    2009-01-01

    This is a critical review of surveys conducted on the American deaf population since 1990. There is no agreement among the surveys on the number of deaf and hard of hearing individuals in the US. This behooves us to study the question: Why the lack of agreement in estimates and prevalence rates of the American general deaf and the deaf child…

  8. Without Boundaries: An Inquiry into Deaf Epistemologies through a Metaparadigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing debate on Deaf epistemologies reflects two major paradigms in deaf education: positivism and constructivism. The present article investigates Deaf epistemologies through a metaparadigm, which should blur the boundaries among different paradigms and connect the epistemological inquiry to instructional practice for d/Deaf students. The…

  9. Violence against Deaf Women: Effect of Partner Hearing Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa L.; Kobek Pezzarossi, Caroline M.

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of Deaf female undergraduate students, the current study sought to investigate the prevalence, correlates, and characteristics of intimate partner violence victimization in hearing-Deaf and Deaf-Deaf relationships. Initial results suggest that similarities in hearing status and communication preference are associated with increased…

  10. Lesbian couple create a child who is deaf like them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriggs, M

    2002-10-01

    A deaf lesbian couple who sought a sperm donor with a family history of deafness in order to have a child they hoped would be deaf have attracted a lot of criticism. They have been criticised for deliberately creating a deaf child, for denying their child a hearing aid, and for raising the child in a homosexual household.

  11. Social Maturity and Executive Function among Deaf Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Kronenberger, William G.; Rosica, Mark; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol; Durkin, Andreana; Machmer, Elizabeth; Schmitz, Kathryn L.

    2017-01-01

    Two experiments examined relations among social maturity, executive function, language, and cochlear implant (CI) use among deaf high school and college students. Experiment 1 revealed no differences between deaf CI users, deaf nonusers, and hearing college students in measures of social maturity. However, deaf students (both CI users and…

  12. Perceptions of "Maori" Deaf Identity in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiler, Kirsten; McKee, Rachel Locker

    2007-01-01

    Following the reframing of "Deaf" as a cultural and linguistic identity, ethnic minority members of Deaf communities are increasingly exploring their plural identities in relation to Deaf and hearing communities of affiliation. This article examines "Maori" Deaf people's perceptions of identity, during a coinciding period of "Tino Rangatiratanga"…

  13. Low Empathy in Deaf and Hard of Hearing (Pre)Adolescents Compared to Normal Hearing Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netten, Anouk P.; Rieffe, Carolien; Theunissen, Stephanie C. P. M.; Soede, Wim; Dirks, Evelien; Briaire, Jeroen J.; Frijns, Johan H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the level of empathy in deaf and hard of hearing (pre)adolescents compared to normal hearing controls and to define the influence of language and various hearing loss characteristics on the development of empathy. Methods The study group (mean age 11.9 years) consisted of 122 deaf and hard of hearing children (52 children with cochlear implants and 70 children with conventional hearing aids) and 162 normal hearing children. The two groups were compared using self-reports, a parent-report and observation tasks to rate the children’s level of empathy, their attendance to others’ emotions, emotion recognition, and supportive behavior. Results Deaf and hard of hearing children reported lower levels of cognitive empathy and prosocial motivation than normal hearing children, regardless of their type of hearing device. The level of emotion recognition was equal in both groups. During observations, deaf and hard of hearing children showed more attention to the emotion evoking events but less supportive behavior compared to their normal hearing peers. Deaf and hard of hearing children attending mainstream education or using oral language show higher levels of cognitive empathy and prosocial motivation than deaf and hard of hearing children who use sign (supported) language or attend special education. However, they are still outperformed by normal hearing children. Conclusions Deaf and hard of hearing children, especially those in special education, show lower levels of empathy than normal hearing children, which can have consequences for initiating and maintaining relationships. PMID:25906365

  14. Bilingual Education for Deaf Children in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svartholm, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    In 1981, Swedish Sign Language gained recognition by the Swedish Parliament as the language of deaf people, a decision that made Sweden the first country in the world to give a sign language the status of a language. Swedish was designated as a second language for deaf people, and the need for bilingualism among them was officially asserted. This…

  15. Critical Literacy: Deaf Adults Speak Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a variety of teaching and learning strategies that were used within a classroom of Deaf adults participating in a high school English course as part of an upgrading program. The class was conducted in a bilingual manner; that is, being Deaf and communicating with American Sign Language (ASL) was not…

  16. Critical Literacy: Deaf Adults Speak Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a variety of teaching and learning strategies that were used within a classroom of Deaf adults participating in a high school English course as part of an upgrading program. The class was conducted in a bilingual manner; that is, being Deaf and communicating with American Sign Language (ASL) was not…

  17. Social Information Processing in Deaf Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Jesús; Saldaña, David; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Isabel R.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the processing of social information in deaf and hearing adolescents. A task was developed to assess social information processing (SIP) skills of deaf adolescents based on Crick and Dodge's (1994; A review and reformulation of social information-processing mechanisms in children's social adjustment.…

  18. Communities of Practice: Literacy and Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Ann-Elise; Simonsen, Eva

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to discuss young deaf children's access to literacy within a sociocultural perspective. We introduce the concept of communities of practice as an aspect in early literacy development for young deaf children. Preschools are learning communities and thus constitute communities of practice. Our discussion on the use of communities…

  19. Morphological sensitivity in deaf readers of Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, A.H. van; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Schreuder, R.; Knoors, H.E.T.

    2011-01-01

    Deaf children experience difficulties with reading comprehension. These difficulties are not completely explained by their difficulties with the reading of single short words. Whether deaf children and adults lag behind in the morphological processing of longer words is therefore examined in two

  20. Morphological Sensitivity in Deaf Readers of Dutch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoogmoed, Anne H.; Verhoeven, Ludo; Schreuder, Robert; Knoors, Harry

    2011-01-01

    Deaf children experience difficulties with reading comprehension. These difficulties are not completely explained by their difficulties with the reading of single short words. Whether deaf children and adults lag behind in the morphological processing of longer words is therefore examined in two experiments in which the processing of prefixes by…

  1. Deafness in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyaga, Nassozi B.; Moores, Donald F.

    2003-01-01

    A review of deaf education in sub-Saharan Africa notes the role of missionaries, especially Andrew Foster who established 31 schools and introduced total communication; deaf education in Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda, and South Africa; the growing acceptance of sign language; and the role of international disability organizations, especially the World…

  2. Deaf-Hearing Interchange in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Claire; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Discusses factors that have delayed the development of basic research on both sign language and the deaf community in South Africa and presents findings of a study conducted to determine effective sign language communication between deaf and hearing signers in South Africa, the SimCom project. (14 references) (GLR)

  3. Deaf Teenagers and Family Alcohol Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Raymond P.

    1987-01-01

    Deaf teenagers have more trouble coping with the effects of parental alcohol abuse than do hearing teenagers. Suggestions are made for helping the deaf teenager and other family members deal with these problems, especially in potentially violent situations. Two short case studies are provided to illustrate intervention methods and outcomes.…

  4. Development of Implanted Deaf Children's Conversational Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maner-Idrissi, Gaid; Dardier, Virginie; Pajon, Cecile; Tan-Bescond, Geraldine; David, Kristell; Deleau, Michel; Godey, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of preverbal development have highlighted the recurrent difficulties experienced by deaf children in acquiring knowledge of the social rules and social skills pertaining to discourse. We expected cochlear implants in children with bilateral profound deafness to improve their use of verbal language, so that their communication…

  5. Brain Damage in Deaf Vocational Rehabilitation Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Marc; Vernon, McCay

    1986-01-01

    Screening of 54 deaf vocational clients by the Bender-Gestalt and other tests indicated the likely presence of significantly more brain damage than among the hearing population with a particularly high correlation between low IQ and brain damage in the deaf population. (DB)

  6. Prevalence of Overweight among Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dair, Jessica; Ellis, M. Kathleen; Lieberman, Lauren J.

    2006-01-01

    The study examined the prevalence of overweight cases in a sample of 151 deaf children aged 6-11 years. Participants were deaf students attending six elementary schools, both regular and special, in four states. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated using height and weight, plotted on the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) U.S.…

  7. Congenital unilateral deafness affects cerebral organization of reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorni, Roberta; Manfredi, Mirella; Proverbio, Alice Mado

    2013-06-05

    It is known that early sensory deprivation modifies brain functional structure and connectivity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuro-functional organization of reading in a patient with profound congenital unilateral deafness. Using event-related potentials (ERPs), we compared cortical networks supporting the processing of written words in patient RA (completely deaf in the right ear since birth) and in a group of control volunteers. We found that congenital unilateral hearing deprivation modifies neural mechanisms of word reading. Indeed, while written word processing was left-lateralized in controls, we found a strong right lateralization of the fusiform and inferior occipital gyri activation in RA. This finding goes in the same direction of recent proposals that the ventral occipito-temporal activity in word reading seem to lateralize to the same hemisphere as the one involved in spoken language processing.

  8. Congenital Unilateral Deafness Affects Cerebral Organization of Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Mado Proverbio

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that early sensory deprivation modifies brain functional structure and connectivity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuro-functional organization of reading in a patient with profound congenital unilateral deafness. Using event-related potentials (ERPs, we compared cortical networks supporting the processing of written words in patient RA (completely deaf in the right ear since birth and in a group of control volunteers. We found that congenital unilateral hearing deprivation modifies neural mechanisms of word reading. Indeed, while written word processing was left-lateralized in controls, we found a strong right lateralization of the fusiform and inferior occipital gyri activation in RA. This finding goes in the same direction of recent proposals that the ventral occipito-temporal activity in word reading seem to lateralize to the same hemisphere as the one involved in spoken language processing.

  9. Beethoven's deafness, the defiance of a genius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ludwig van Beethoven, one of the greatest composers in History, was tormented for his whole life by a progressive deafness without definitive diagnosis. Many authors published studies about the etiologic possibilities of the deafness of the music genius with different explanations about his auditory loss. In this work, the author discusses the implications of Beethoven's progressive deafness to the creation of his word, as well as etiologic assumptions of his disease. Would Beethoven have had the same ingeniousness he showed in his symphonies if he did not have hypacusis and tinnitus? What is the influence of his deafness on his work and life? Could he have had a more precise diagnosis and specially a treatment nowadays? Would we have the brilliant composer if he had deafness today? We surely could not have!

  10. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

  11. The relationship of theory of mind and executive functions in normal, deaf and cochlear-implanted children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Nazarzadeh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim : Theory of mind refers to the ability to understand the others have mental states that can be different from one's own mental states or facts. This study aimed to investigate the relationship of theory of mind and executive functions in normal hearing, deaf, and cochlear-implanted children.Methods: The study population consisted of normal, deaf and cochlear-implanted girl students in Mashhad city, Iran. Using random sampling, 30 children (10 normal, 10 deaf and 10 cochlear-implanted in age groups of 8-12 years old were selected. To measure the theoty of mind, theory of mind 38-item scale and to assess executive function, Coolidge neuropsychological and personality test was used. Research data were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient, analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis tests.Results: There was a significant difference between the groups in the theory of mind and executive function subscales, organization, planning-decision-making, and inhibition. Between normal and deaf groups (p=0.01, as well as cochlear-implanted and deaf groups (p=0.01, there was significant difference in planning decision-making subscale. There was not any significant relationship between the theory of mind and executive functions generally or the theory of mind and executive function subscales in these three groups independently.Conclusion: Based on our findings, cochlear-implanted and deaf children have lower performance in theory of mind and executive function compared with normal hearing children.

  12. BILINGUALISM: MULTICULTURALISM HOLOPRAXIOLOGY OF THE VENEZUELAN DEAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Florencio Martínez Pérez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the child has been made regularly and without many prejudices or tbacks,  until this had some physical characteristic or perceptual, who twisted his attention.  To those who were born with the inability to listen or hear properly, excluded in all respects. At the end of the 20th century, the deaf began to defend their identity and differed between Deafness (lack of hearing of deafness, with "S", which is a socio-anthropological perspective, which includes the use of sign language and the learning of reading and writing of the Spanish (bilingualism in their training. This research had as general objective to unveil bilingualism from an intercultural intersubjectivity of the deaf in Venezuela by applying a qualitative related paradigm with methodology fenomenologica-hermeneutica of Max Van Manen. The information collected observing and interviewing in depth (12 deaf students, parents or representatives (6, (3 researchers and educational specialists deaf and listeners (12. To analyze and triangulate information, obtained the following conclusions about the bilingual deaf: their physical and intellectual abilities are exactly the same to the listeners;  they can achieve the necessary qualification for any job; is required the language of signs so that you can put into practice the language; those who have the organizational capacity to develop oral language, it should not hinder him this opportunity, without detriment to the learning of the language of signs and the systematic training of the deaf teachers and deaf family, educational managers, political and employer of the deaf is essentially required.

  13. Computational solution for the auxiliary in the literacy of deaf

    OpenAIRE

    João Carlos Lopes Fernandes; Silvia Cristina Martini Rodrigues; Ovidio Lopes da Cruz Netto

    2016-01-01

    The learning of the deaf is a great challenge for educators, especially in Portuguese-speaking course. Brazilian schools are not prepared for suits with deaf, because they lack trained professionals. Current Brazilian educational policies, seeking socialize all deaf and not deaf students. The Brazilian deaf community uses LIBRAS, Brazilian sign language as their main form of communication between them. Integrating LBS and Portuguese is one of the main current challenges and the use of compute...

  14. Computational solution for the auxiliary in the literacy of deaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Lopes Fernandes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The learning of the deaf is a great challenge for educators, especially in Portuguese-speaking course. Brazilian schools are not prepared for suits with deaf, because they lack trained professionals. Current Brazilian educational policies, seeking socialize all deaf and not deaf students. The Brazilian deaf community uses LIBRAS, Brazilian sign language as their main form of communication between them. Integrating LBS and Portuguese is one of the main current challenges and the use of computers has helped a lot.

  15. How do profoundly deaf children learn to read?

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 泰子

    2013-01-01

    We know that children who were born profoundly deaf have much difficulty to learn to speak English or Japanese. But is it possible that profoundly deaf children learn to read written English or Japanese? Some researchers mention that early exposure to fingerspelling actually helps deaf children become better readers. Then I tried to find the reason why fingerspelling helps deaf children develop their reading ability and examined how to develop deaf children’s reading ability with fingerspelli...

  16. Deaf children's non-verbal working memory is impacted by their language experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Chloë; Jones, Anna; Denmark, Tanya; Mason, Kathryn; Atkinson, Joanna; Botting, Nicola; Morgan, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Several recent studies have suggested that deaf children perform more poorly on working memory tasks compared to hearing children, but these studies have not been able to determine whether this poorer performance arises directly from deafness itself or from deaf children's reduced language exposure. The issue remains unresolved because findings come mostly from (1) tasks that are verbal as opposed to non-verbal, and (2) involve deaf children who use spoken communication and therefore may have experienced impoverished input and delayed language acquisition. This is in contrast to deaf children who have been exposed to a sign language since birth from Deaf parents (and who therefore have native language-learning opportunities within a normal developmental timeframe for language acquisition). A more direct, and therefore stronger, test of the hypothesis that the type and quality of language exposure impact working memory is to use measures of non-verbal working memory (NVWM) and to compare hearing children with two groups of deaf signing children: those who have had native exposure to a sign language, and those who have experienced delayed acquisition and reduced quality of language input compared to their native-signing peers. In this study we investigated the relationship between NVWM and language in three groups aged 6-11 years: hearing children (n = 28), deaf children who were native users of British Sign Language (BSL; n = 8), and deaf children who used BSL but who were not native signers (n = 19). We administered a battery of non-verbal reasoning, NVWM, and language tasks. We examined whether the groups differed on NVWM scores, and whether scores on language tasks predicted scores on NVWM tasks. For the two executive-loaded NVWM tasks included in our battery, the non-native signers performed less accurately than the native signer and hearing groups (who did not differ from one another). Multiple regression analysis revealed that scores on the vocabulary measure

  17. When Hearing Is Tricky: Speech Processing Strategies in Prelingually Deafened Children and Adolescents with Cochlear Implants Having Good and Poor Speech Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmann, Magdalene; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Knief, Arne; Baare, Johanna; Brinkheetker, Stephanie; am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antoinette; Dobel, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Cochlear implants provide individuals who are deaf with access to speech. Although substantial advancements have been made by novel technologies, there still is high variability in language development during childhood, depending on adaptation and neural plasticity. These factors have often been investigated in the auditory domain, with the mismatch negativity as an index for sensory and phonological processing. Several studies have demonstrated that the MMN is an electrophysiological correlate for hearing improvement with cochlear implants. In this study, two groups of cochlear implant users, both with very good basic hearing abilities but with non-overlapping speech performance (very good or very poor speech performance), were matched according to device experience and age at implantation. We tested the perception of phonemes in the context of specific other phonemes from which they were very hard to discriminate (e.g., the vowels in /bu/ vs. /bo/). The most difficult pair was individually determined for each participant. Using behavioral measures, both cochlear implants groups performed worse than matched controls, and the good performers performed better than the poor performers. Cochlear implant groups and controls did not differ during time intervals typically used for the mismatch negativity, but earlier: source analyses revealed increased activity in the region of the right supramarginal gyrus (220–260 ms) in good performers. Poor performers showed increased activity in the left occipital cortex (220–290 ms), which may be an index for cross-modal perception. The time course and the neural generators differ from data from our earlier studies, in which the same phonemes were assessed in an easy-to-discriminate context. The results demonstrate that the groups used different language processing strategies, depending on the success of language development and the particular language context. Overall, our data emphasize the role of neural plasticity and use

  18. Peer Social Skills and Theory of Mind in Children with Autism, Deafness, or Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Candida; Slaughter, Virginia; Moore, Chris; Wellman, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    Consequences of theory of mind (ToM) development for daily social lives of children are uncertain. Five to 13-year-olds (N = 195) with typical development, autism, or deafness (both native and late signers) took ToM tests and their teachers reported on their social skills for peer interaction (e.g., leadership, group entry). Groups differed in…

  19. On tune deafness (dysmelodia): frequency, development, genetics and musical background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmus, H; Fry, D B

    1980-05-01

    With the aid of the Distorted Tunes Test a group of British adults could be established whose melodic aptitude was below a certain level and whom we called tune deaf. They are only a fraction of those popularly called tone deaf. The Distorted Tunes Test is only slightly correlated with pitch discrimination, short term tonal memory or number memory. In children ability to pass the Distorted Tunes Test develops at greatly varying speeds and to a varying degree, reaching stability in adolescence. Tune deafness has a familial distribution and segregates in a way suggesting an autosomal dominant trait with imperfect penetrance. Some degree of positive assortative mating has been established. Some people, unfamiliar with the British melodies which form the basis of the test, pass it. This indicates the existence of a partly innate and partly acquired competence to judge what is acceptable and what is not, within the tradition of Western popular or classical music. This seems to indicate the existence of some deep structure of tonality, comparable with Chomsky's deep language structure. Asians who have not been much exposed to this kind of music find the task very difficult.

  20. Personal factors that influence deaf college students' academic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, John A; Kelly, Ronald R; Matchett, Mary Karol

    2012-01-01

    Research tells us that academic preparation is key to deaf students' success at college. Yet, that is not the whole story. Many academically prepared students drop out during their first year. This study identified entering deaf college students' personal factors as assessed by their individual responses to both the Noel-Levitz College Student Inventory Form B and the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory, second edition (LASSI). Entering students in 3 successive cohorts (total n =437) participated in this study. Results show that in addition to entry measurements of reading and mathematic skills, personal factors contributed to the academic performance of students in their first quarter in college. The Noel-Levitz provided the comparatively better predictive value of academic performance: Motivation for Academic Study Scale (e.g., desire to finish college). The LASSI also showed statistically significant predictors, the Self-Regulation Component (e.g., time management) and Will Component (e.g., self-discipline), but accounted for relatively less variability in the students' initial grade point averages. For this group of underprepared students, results show that personal factors can play a significant role in academic success. Deaf students' personal factors are discussed as they relate to other first-year college students and to their subsequent academic performance and persistence.

  1. Microstructural differences in the thalamus and thalamic radiations in the congenitally deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyness, Rebecca C; Alvarez, I; Sereno, Martin I; MacSweeney, Mairéad

    2014-10-15

    There is evidence of both crossmodal and intermodal plasticity in the deaf brain. Here, we investigated whether sub-cortical plasticity, specifically of the thalamus, contributed to this reorganisation. We contrasted diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging data from 13 congenitally deaf and 13 hearing participants, all of whom had learnt British Sign Language after 10 years of age. Connectivity based segmentation of the thalamus revealed changes to mean and radial diffusivity in occipital and frontal regions, which may be linked to enhanced peripheral visual acuity, and differences in how visual attention is deployed in the deaf group. Using probabilistic tractography, tracts were traced between the thalamus and its cortical targets, and microstructural measurements were extracted from these tracts. Group differences were found in microstructural measurements of occipital, frontal, somatosensory, motor and parietal thalamo-cortical tracts. Our findings suggest that there is sub-cortical plasticity in the deaf brain, and that white matter alterations can be found throughout the deaf brain, rather than being restricted to, or focussed in the auditory cortex.

  2. Effects of deafness and cochlear implant use on temporal response characteristics in cat primary auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, James B; Shepherd, Robert K; Nayagam, David A X; Wise, Andrew K; Heffer, Leon F; Landry, Thomas G; Irvine, Dexter R F

    2014-09-01

    We have previously shown that neonatal deafness of 7-13 months duration leads to loss of cochleotopy in the primary auditory cortex (AI) that can be reversed by cochlear implant use. Here we describe the effects of a similar duration of deafness and cochlear implant use on temporal processing. Specifically, we compared the temporal resolution of neurons in AI of young adult normal-hearing cats that were acutely deafened and implanted immediately prior to recording with that in three groups of neonatally deafened cats. One group of neonatally deafened cats received no chronic stimulation. The other two groups received up to 8 months of either low- or high-rate (50 or 500 pulses per second per electrode, respectively) stimulation from a clinical cochlear implant, initiated at 10 weeks of age. Deafness of 7-13 months duration had no effect on the duration of post-onset response suppression, latency, latency jitter, or the stimulus repetition rate at which units responded maximally (best repetition rate), but resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the ability of units to respond to every stimulus in a train (maximum following rate). None of the temporal response characteristics of the low-rate group differed from those in acutely deafened controls. In contrast, high-rate stimulation had diverse effects: it resulted in decreased suppression duration, longer latency and greater jitter relative to all other groups, and an increase in best repetition rate and cut-off rate relative to acutely deafened controls. The minimal effects of moderate-duration deafness on temporal processing in the present study are in contrast to its previously-reported pronounced effects on cochleotopy. Much longer periods of deafness have been reported to result in significant changes in temporal processing, in accord with the fact that duration of deafness is a major factor influencing outcome in human cochlear implantees.

  3. Literatura Surda/Deaf Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lodenir Becker Karnopp

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente artigo é proceder a uma análise dos livros de literatura infantil Cinderela Surda e Rapunzel Surda, focalizando os sentidos produzidos sobre identidades e diferenças. As análises desses livros pretendem contribuir para a discussão da produção de uma literatura surda, que está vinculada às discussões sobre cultura e identidade. Na investigação desses materiais, os textos e as imagens produzidas evidenciam que os autores buscam o caminho da auto-representação do grupo de surdos, através da luta pelo estabelecimento do que reconhecem como suas identidades e suas diferenças. Tais evidências estão no uso da língua de sinais, em suas formas de narrar as histórias e/ou de adaptar histórias clássicas, tendo como base suas formas de existência, suas formas de ler, traduzir, conceber e julgar os produtos culturais que consomem e que produzem. This article aims to present an analysis of the fairy tales, Deaf Cinderella and Deaf Rapunzel, focusing on the meanings produced from identities and differences. The analyses of these two books intend to give a contribution to the discussion on the production of deaf literature, which is linked to the discussions on culture and identity. In the investigation of these books, the texts and the images produced show that the authors seek the path to self- representation of the deaf community, through the struggle for the establishment of what they recognize as their identities and differences. Such evidences are in the use of sign language, in their ways of narrating their stories and/or of adapting classic fairy tales, having as a basis their existential ways of being, their ways of reading, translating, conceiving and judging the cultural products which they consume and produce.

  4. Central auditory function of deafness genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willaredt, Marc A; Ebbers, Lena; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2014-06-01

    The highly variable benefit of hearing devices is a serious challenge in auditory rehabilitation. Various factors contribute to this phenomenon such as the diversity in ear defects, the different extent of auditory nerve hypoplasia, the age of intervention, and cognitive abilities. Recent analyses indicate that, in addition, central auditory functions of deafness genes have to be considered in this context. Since reduced neuronal activity acts as the common denominator in deafness, it is widely assumed that peripheral deafness influences development and function of the central auditory system in a stereotypical manner. However, functional characterization of transgenic mice with mutated deafness genes demonstrated gene-specific abnormalities in the central auditory system as well. A frequent function of deafness genes in the central auditory system is supported by a genome-wide expression study that revealed significant enrichment of these genes in the transcriptome of the auditory brainstem compared to the entire brain. Here, we will summarize current knowledge of the diverse central auditory functions of deafness genes. We furthermore propose the intimately interwoven gene regulatory networks governing development of the otic placode and the hindbrain as a mechanistic explanation for the widespread expression of these genes beyond the cochlea. We conclude that better knowledge of central auditory dysfunction caused by genetic alterations in deafness genes is required. In combination with improved genetic diagnostics becoming currently available through novel sequencing technologies, this information will likely contribute to better outcome prediction of hearing devices.

  5. Peer to peer deaf literacy:working with young deaf people and peer tutors in India

    OpenAIRE

    Gillen, Julia; Panda, Sibaji; Papen, Uta; Zeshan, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    This report of research in progress introduces the project: Literacy development with deaf communities using sign language, peer tuition, and learner-generated online content: Sustainable educational innovation. The rationale, aims, and participatory approach to learning and teaching English literacy to deaf learners in India are described. Deaf learners are particularly marginalised in the mainstream educational systems of developing countries. This project responds through designing a parti...

  6. [The deaf patient--information for a barrier-free conversation with patients in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binggeli, Tatjana; Lussi, Adrian; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    There are about 650,000 people with hearing problems in Switzerland, 10,000 of whom use sign language. About 100,000 people are hard of hearing. Deaf patients require special treatment in the dental office as they have specific communication needs. This community, like many other minority groups, has a sign language and a culture of its own. To prevent misunderstandings it is therefore very important to provide solutions for an enhanced communication. However, guidelines for the communication with deaf dental patients are still missing. Successful communication between deaf patients and dentist is essential for effective care. This paper is concerned with providing background information and introducing recommendations for unrestricted dentist-patient communication. The aim of this article is to improve dentists' knowledge of the appropriate communication with this patient group.

  7. An exploration of deaf women's access to mental health nurse education in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharples, Naomi

    2013-09-01

    Historically deaf people have been denied access to professional nurse education due to a range of language, communication and ideological barriers. The following study was set in the North of England and draws upon the Western experience and knowledge base of deaf people's experience of access to professional education. The aim of this study was to understand the experiences of the first British Sign Language using deaf qualified nurses before they entered the Pre-registration Diploma in Nursing Programme, during the programme and after the programme as they progressed into professional nursing roles. The purpose of the study was to gather the nurses' thoughts and feelings about their experiences and to analyse these using thematic analysis within a narrative interpretive tradition against a backdrop of Jurgen Habermas' critical theory and Paulo Freire's critical pedagogy. By drawing out significant themes to structure a deeper understanding of the nurses' unique positions, they offer a model for inclusive education practice that would support deaf people and people from minority groups into nursing and other health care professions. The signed narratives were video recorded and interpreted into written English transcripts which were then analysed to discover the underlying themes using Boyatzis' (1998) thematic analysis. The findings are set against an historical and contemporary setting of deaf people in Western society, their experiences of education, health and employment. These unique findings illustrate the significance of an accessible language environment for the nurses, the role of the organisation in ensuring access for the nurses and the impact of barriers to education and the clinical environment. The implications for education and practice supports the need to analyse the workforce required in deaf services, to scrutinize the access provided, to develop cultural competence skills, enhance the use of additional support mechanisms, generate accessible

  8. Availability of Mental Health Services for Individuals Who Are Deaf or Deaf-Blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnall, Michele C; Crudden, Adele; LeJeune, B J; Steverson, Anne Carter

    2017-01-01

    A survey of state mental health agencies found that a majority have no specific policy or procedure regarding how to provide mental health services to persons who are deaf or who are deaf-blind. Agency representatives report that staff lack knowledge of how to provide mental health services to persons who are deaf-blind and the agencies lack qualified interpreters. They recommend training for social workers and counselors to address best practices in working with people who are deaf-blind concerning communication methods and strategies, physical interaction, cultural issues, everyday life, sensory deprivation, ethics, use of an interpreter, and other general issues.

  9. Sign Language Benefits Tibetan Deaf-mutes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUO QIONG; SUN WENZHEN

    2007-01-01

    @@ There are in Tibet Autonomous Region 190,000 disabled persons,including more than 30,000 who are deaf-mutes or are hearing impaired.In the Tibetan language,a word is often expressed with different signs.This poses a serious handicap for communication and exchanges among Tibetan deaf-mutes and their effort to participate in social activities.The ongoing research and development of a Tibetan sign language is expected to get rid of that handicap and allow Tibetan deaf-mutes to lead a normal life.

  10. Stigma in Mothers of Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2015-03-01

     Results: Results showed that most mothers suffer from stigma due to having a deaf child. The mean stigma score was 96.48 ±27.72. In total, 24.4% of mothers reported that they had received strange and mocking looks; 72.2% regarded child deafness as a sign of divine retribution; and 33.3% felt ashamed of their child’s deafness. There was an inverse relationship between the mother’s level of education and mean stigma scores (P

  11. [Ludwig van Beethoven: an autoimmune deafness?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P J

    1995-01-01

    The author reminds us of the great moments of Beethoven's life and of the different stages of his deafness onset, until to last instants. The post-mortem examination, performed by doctor Wagner, and the scientific studies of the remains, during the exhumations, are reported. Beethoven's deafness was clearly a sensorineural impairment and the previously suggested prevalent hypotheses are discussed. A new theory is emphasized, based on modern studies about autoimmune sensorineural hearing losses in relation with chronic inflammatory bowel ailment. Conclusion is that Beethoven's deafness was probably owing to a primary autoimmune degeneration of the organ of Corti, giving rise to atrophy of the auditory nerve.

  12. Should All Deaf Children Learn Sign Language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Donna Jo; Mellon, Nancy K; Niparko, John K; Rathmann, Christian; Mathur, Gaurav; Humphries, Tom; Handley, Theresa; Scambler, Sasha; Lantos, John D

    2015-07-01

    Every year, 10,000 infants are born in the United States with sensorineural deafness. Deaf children of hearing (and nonsigning) parents are unique among all children in the world in that they cannot easily or naturally learn the language that their parents speak. These parents face tough choices. Should they seek a cochlear implant for their child? If so, should they also learn to sign? As pediatricians, we need to help parents understand the risks and benefits of different approaches to parent-child communication when the child is deaf [corrected].

  13. Silencing Deafness: Displacing Disability in the Nineteenth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esme Cleall

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the way in which the language of displacement and silence were used in nineteenth-century discussions of deafness and connects this tendency to the marginalised place deaf experience occupies historically. Throughout the nineteenth century, a period which saw the consolidation of ‘the deaf and dumb’ as a social category, the word ‘forgetting’ crept into numerous discussions of deafness by both deaf and hearing commentators. Some, such as the educationalist Alexander Graeme Bell, were overt in their desire to forget deafness, demanding disability was ‘bred out’ and deaf culture condemned to the forgotten past. Others used the term ambivalently and sometimes metaphorically discussing the deaf as ‘forgotten’ by society, and ‘children of silence’. Some even pleaded that people who were deaf were not forgotten. But, though varied, the use of the imagery of forgetting and silence to evoke deafness is recurrent, and may, therefore, be seen to reveal something about how deaf experience can be approached as a displacement where deafness was spatially and imaginatively marginalised. I argue that one of the consequences of the conceptual framing of deafness through the language of forgetting was actively to silence deafness and to neutralise the idea that disability should be marginal and could be forgotten.

  14. Clinical comparison of ears sudden deafness and sudden deafness in one ear%双耳与单耳突发性聋的临床对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海霞

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features and therapeutic efficacy of ears sudden deafness and sudden deafness in one ear.Methods Two hundred and twenty cases of sudden deafness in the first people's hospital of Shangqiu from December 2012 to December 2013 were selected.They were divided into control group (24 cases with ears sudden deafness) and observation group (196 cases with sudden deafness in one ear),and all were given comprehensive treatment.The clinical data of the two groups were retrospectively analyzed in order to investigate the clinical features and therapeutic efficacy.Results Observation group (sudden deafness in one ear) with age above 45 years old accounted for 53.06%,obviously lower than the control group(ears sudden deafness) which accounted for 79.17%.The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05).The incidence of hypertension,hyperlipidemia and diabetes of observation group was 17.35%,14.80% and 10.71%,which was obviously lower than that of the control group,the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05).Total efficiency of observation group was 88.78%,which were obviously higher than that of the control group(58.33%,P <0.05).Conclusions Advanced age,high blood pressure,high cholesterol,diabetes and other complications are main factors of poor prognosis in patients with sudden deafness.Clinical features and therapeutic efficacy of ears sudden deafness and sudden deafness in one ear are different,so it should be given high attention.%目的 探讨双耳突发性聋与单耳突发性聋的临床特点及治疗效果.方法 选择商丘市第一人民医院2012年12月至2013年12月收治的220例突发性耳聋患者为研究对象,其中双耳突聋患者24例为对照组,单耳突聋患者196例为观察组,均采取综合治疗,且对两组患者的临床资料进行回顾性分析,以探讨其临床特点和治疗效果.结果 观察组(单耳突聋)年龄≥45岁者占53.06%,显著

  15. Better Visuospatial Working Memory in Adults Who Report Profound Deafness Compared to Those With Normal or Poor Hearing: Data From the UK Biobank Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudner, Mary; Keidser, Gitte; Hygge, Staffan; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2016-01-01

    Experimental work has shown better visuospatial working memory (VSWM) in profoundly deaf individuals compared to those with normal hearing. Other data, including the UK Biobank resource shows poorer VSWM in individuals with poorer hearing. Using the same database, the authors investigated VSWM in individuals who reported profound deafness. Included in this study were 112 participants who were profoundly deaf, 1310 with poor hearing and 74,635 with normal hearing. All participants performed a card-pair matching task as a test of VSWM. Although variance in VSWM performance was large among profoundly deaf participants, at group level it was superior to that of participants with both normal and poor hearing. VSWM in adults is related to hearing status but the association is not linear. Future study should investigate the mechanism behind enhanced VSWM in profoundly deaf adults.

  16. Gaze patterns during identity and emotion judgments in hearing adults and deaf users of American Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneau, Susan M; Mitchell, Teresa V

    2011-01-01

    Deaf individuals rely on facial expressions for emotional, social, and linguistic cues. In order to test the hypothesis that specialized experience with faces can alter typically observed gaze patterns, twelve hearing adults and twelve deaf, early-users of American Sign Language judged the emotion and identity of expressive faces (including whole faces, and isolated top and bottom halves), while accuracy and fixations were recorded. Both groups recognized individuals more accurately from top than bottom halves, and emotional expressions from bottom than top halves. Hearing adults directed the majority of fixations to the top halves of faces in both tasks, but fixated the bottom half slightly more often when judging emotion than identity. In contrast, deaf adults often split fixations evenly between the top and bottom halves regardless of task demands. These results suggest that deaf adults have habitual fixation patterns that may maximize their ability to gather information from expressive faces.

  17. "We communicated that way for a reason": language practices and language ideologies among hearing adults whose parents are deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizer, Ginger; Walters, Keith; Meier, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    Families with deaf parents and hearing children are often bilingual and bimodal, with both a spoken language and a signed one in regular use among family members. When interviewed, 13 American hearing adults with deaf parents reported widely varying language practices, sign language abilities, and social affiliations with Deaf and Hearing communities. Despite this variation, the interviewees' moral judgments of their own and others' communicative behavior suggest that these adults share a language ideology concerning the obligation of all family members to expend effort to overcome potential communication barriers. To our knowledge, such a language ideology is not similarly pervasive among spoken-language bilingual families, raising the question of whether there is something unique about family bimodal bilingualism that imposes different rights and responsibilities on family members than spoken-language family bilingualism does. This ideology unites an otherwise diverse group of interviewees, where each one preemptively denied being a "typical CODA [children of deaf adult]."

  18. Intimate partner violence reported by two samples of deaf adults via a computerized American sign language survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Robert Q; Sutter, Erika; Cerulli, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    A computerized sign language survey was administered to two large samples of deaf adults. Six questions regarding intimate partner violence (IPV) were included, querying lifetime and past-year experiences of emotional abuse, physical abuse, and forced sex. Comparison data were available from a telephone survey of local households. Deaf respondents reported high rates of emotional abuse and much higher rates of forced sex than general population respondents. Physical abuse rates were comparable between groups. More men than women in both deaf samples reported past-year physical and sexual abuse. Past-year IPV was associated with higher utilization of hospital emergency services. Implications for IPV research, education, and intervention in the Deaf community are discussed.

  19. Addressing special populations. Forgotten: a view of the social and political obstacles to the prevention and treatment of AIDS in Kenyan deaf people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyang'aya, D

    1998-05-01

    There are an estimated 87,000 deaf people in Kenya; yet campaigns against HIV/AIDS have failed to address the communication needs of this special segment of the population. This paper examines the communication environment of deaf Kenyans. Though a minor group, the deaf community exists as a distinct cultural entity in the country. The Kenyan deaf culture has evolved from within the deaf communities, mainly in the 38 academic institutions and associations of the deaf. The isolation of these communities helped them to cultivate a unique way of life complete with a language--the Kenya Sign Language (KSL). Greatly bypassed by the information on AIDS, there is danger that the deaf Kenyan community will be wiped out by the epidemic because of the many obstacles. Among these obstacles are the use of the English language in literatures on HIV/AIDS, the lack of KSL interpretation on the television and on many AIDS related programs as well as in local public meetings. In addition, deaf people cannot benefit from the services that are offered by some organizations such as telephone hotline for counseling purposes, as well as for medical counseling services unless there is an interpreter. However, the presence of an interpreter beats the main purpose of these services, which is to offer anonymity and confidentiality. Providing relevant HIV/AIDS information to this forgotten segment of the population is a challenge to the health care community. In this regard, a number of recommendations are discussed.

  20. When Being Deaf Is Centered: d/Deaf Women of Color's Experiences with Racial/Ethnic and d/Deaf Identities in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Lissa

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 30% of d/Deaf students are successfully completing college; the reasons for such a low graduation rate is unknown (Destler & Buckly, 2011). Most research on d/Deaf college students lack racial/ethnic diversity within the study; thus, it is unclear how d/Deaf Students of Color are faring in higher education or what experiences…

  1. Assessment of Early Prelingual Auditory Development for 0-9-month-old Infants after Early Hearing Aid Fitting%9月龄内听力损失婴儿助听器干预后的早期语前听能发育规律初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张圆; 郑芸; 李刚; Sigfrid D. Soli

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the early prelingual auditory development of 0-9-month-old infants after early hearing aid fitting.Methods The design of this study was longitudinal and prospective. The infant-toddler meaningful auditory integration scale (IT-MAIS) was used to evaluate 43 infants diagnosed with moderate, severe, and profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and fitted with hearing aids bilaterally before 9 months old. The early prelingual auditory development of all subjects was evaluated with IT-MAIS before hearing aid fitting, and 1, 3, 6, 12 months after fitting.Results The mean IT-MAIS scores showed significant improvements as time of hearing aid use increased for all three groups (P0.05). The multiple comparisons indicated that there was no significant difference between the moderate and severe group before and 1,3 and 6 months after fitting(P>0.05),but were significant differences between the moderate and profound group at each assessment interval(P0.05), but were significant differences before fitting and 3 and 6 months after fitting(P0.05)。对配戴前及配戴后1、3、6个月的IT-MAIS得分分别进行两两比较显示,中度组与重度组在6个月前均无显著性差异(P>0.05);中度组与极重度组在6个月前均具有显著性差异(P0.05)外,其余均有显著性差异(P<0.05)。结论听力损失婴儿助听后的早期语前听觉能力随助听器配戴时间延长而提高,早期语前听能发育主要受助听器配戴时间的影响。IT-MAIS可提供常规测听方法不能反映的重要听能发育信息,应作为听力损失患儿康复效果评估的常规测试方法在临床上应用。

  2. Congenital vs acquired deafness: differences in reading and mathematics levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeon, B; Berg, R A; Battin, R R

    1979-04-01

    Measures of reading ability and math skills were taken in 22 adults who were either congenitally deaf or had acquired deafness in the second or third year of life. Both groups were equivalent with respect to I.Q., education level and degree of loss. The following tests were administered: (1) the performance scale of the Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale, (2) the math section of the Wide Range Achievement Test, (3) the Reading Comprehension subtest of the Peabody Individual Achievement Test, and (4) the Raven Test of Progressive Matrices. There were no significant differences between the two groups on reading level, but a significantly higher math level was found in the congenital group. It was suggested that the pathology in the acquired group may have affected other neural centers in addition to the auditory, or that the acquired group may have been handicapped by the possibility of switching from one coding system (auditory) to another (visual), while in the congenital group the coding remained confined to the visual mode.

  3. Evaluation of vestibular and dynamic visual acuity in adults with congenital deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yukinori; Kaga, Kimitaka; Takekoshi, Hideki; Sakuraba, Keisyoku

    2012-10-01

    This study compared vestibular and dynamic visual acuity in 19 adult athletes with deafness participating in Deaflympics to those of 25 young adults with normal hearing. Balance capability was evaluated using a one-leg standing test with eyes open and stabilometry. Caloric tests and vestibular evoked myogenic potential tests were conducted to test vestibular function. Visual function was evaluated using a dynamic visual acuity test. No significant difference was found between results of the one-leg standing test with eyes open and stabilometry with eyes open. Athletes with deafness performed better than normal hearing young adults with eyes closed. The caloric test indicated hypofunction of the lateral semicircular canal function in 5 of the 19 athletes with deafness. Balance-function tests showed normal results for both groups. The results for athletes with deafness on visual acuity were better than those of controls. Young Deaflympics athletes with deafness can adjust their balance function as well as or better than normal hearing young adults using dynamic visual acuity.

  4. Glucose metabolism in the primary auditory cortex of postlingually deaf patients: an FDG-PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Takumi; Nagamachi, Shigeki; Ushisako, Yasuaki; Tono, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    Previous FDG-PET studies have indicated neuroplasticity in the adult auditory cortex in cases of postlingual deafness. In the mature brain, auditory deprivation decreased neuronal activity in primary auditory and auditory-related cortices. In order to reevaluate these issues, we used statistical analytic software, namely a three-dimensional stereotaxic region of interest template (3DSRT), in addition to statistical parametric mapping (SPM; Institute of Neurology, University College of London, UK). (18)F-FDG brain PET scans were performed on 7 postlingually deaf patients and 10 healthy volunteers. Significant increases and decreases of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in the patient group were estimated by comparing their PET images with those of healthy volunteers using SPM analysis and 3DSRT. SPM revealed that the glucose metabolism of the deaf patients was lower in the right superior temporal gyrus, both middle temporal gyri, left inferior temporal gyrus, right inferior lobulus parietalis, right posterior cingulate gyrus, and left insular cortex than that of the control subjects. 3DSRT data also revealed significantly decreased glucose metabolism in both primary auditory cortices of the postlingually deaf patients. SPM and 3DSRT analyses indicated that glucose metabolism decreased in the primary auditory cortex of the postlingually deaf patients. The previous results of PET studies were confirmed, and our method involving 3DSRT has proved to be useful. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Differential activity in Heschl's gyrus between deaf and hearing individuals is due to auditory deprivation rather than language modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardin, Velia; Smittenaar, Rebecca C; Orfanidou, Eleni; Rönnberg, Jerker; Capek, Cheryl M; Rudner, Mary; Woll, Bencie

    2016-01-01

    Sensory cortices undergo crossmodal reorganisation as a consequence of sensory deprivation. Congenital deafness in humans represents a particular case with respect to other types of sensory deprivation, because cortical reorganisation is not only a consequence of auditory deprivation, but also of language-driven mechanisms. Visual crossmodal plasticity has been found in secondary auditory cortices of deaf individuals, but it is still unclear if reorganisation also takes place in primary auditory areas, and how this relates to language modality and auditory deprivation. Here, we dissociated the effects of language modality and auditory deprivation on crossmodal plasticity in Heschl's gyrus as a whole, and in cytoarchitectonic region Te1.0 (likely to contain the core auditory cortex). Using fMRI, we measured the BOLD response to viewing sign language in congenitally or early deaf individuals with and without sign language knowledge, and in hearing controls. Results show that differences between hearing and deaf individuals are due to a reduction in activation caused by visual stimulation in the hearing group, which is more significant in Te1.0 than in Heschl's gyrus as a whole. Furthermore, differences between deaf and hearing groups are due to auditory deprivation, and there is no evidence that the modality of language used by deaf individuals contributes to crossmodal plasticity in Heschl's gyrus.

  6. Dental care for the deaf pediatric patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat K Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Great strides have been accomplished recently in providing better medical services for handicapped children. As the dentist begins to understand the complexity of each particular form of handicap and its characteristics, he is able to plan more efficiently for satisfactory treatment. Because many dentists do not understand deafness and the unique problems that deaf children exhibit, inadequate dental care for deaf children still ensues. Handicapped persons are at a greater risk for dental disease, for the most part, because of greater neglect or poor oral hygiene and access to routine dental care. Deaf patients in particular often fail to obtain needed care because of communication difficulties experienced in the treatment situation.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: deafness and myopia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Test: Hearing Loss EyeSmart: Eyeglasses for Vision Correction GeneReview: Deafness and Myopia Syndrome Harvard Medical School ... Genes and Hearing Loss Center for Hearing and Speech: Types of Hearing Loss Centers for Disease Control ...

  8. Health Care Access Among Deaf People

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    .... The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in global health...

  9. Mainstreaming from a School for the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne Conway, Sister

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-four students who had been in a school for the deaf (in grades 5-12), but were now mainstreamed, were interviewed to ascertain their academic and communication skills, and their psycho-social adjustment. (PHR)

  10. Education of the deaf in nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polich, L

    2001-01-01

    Nicaragua now ranks as the third poorest country in the Western Hemisphere (Interamerican Development Bank [IDB], 1995). Occasionally educational improvement has been a national priority (Arrien & Matus, 1989). Usually, however, education rests at the lower end of a long list of national needs. The history of education in Nicaragua is marked by low teacher salaries, deteriorated physical plants, and scarcities of teaching materials (Arnove, 1994). Deaf education has been no exception. Teachers have been expected to learn empirically what deafness is and how to teach deaf children, to teach pupils who have had little or no language exposure before entering school, and to manage with the barest physical resources, all the while receiving only meager compensation. This article places education of the deaf in Nicaragua in a historical perspective, reports the results of a teacher survey, and discusses national policies that, so far, have had only indirect effects, but are likely to gain importance in the future.

  11. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: palmoplantar keratoderma with deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... novel missense mutation in GJB2 disturbs gap junction protein transport and causes focal palmoplantar keratoderma with deafness. J ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  13. Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs. (MHB)

  14. Neuroplasticity as a double-edged sword: deaf enhancements and dyslexic deficits in motion processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Courtney; Neville, Helen

    2006-05-01

    We examined the hypothesis that aspects of processing that are most modifiable by experience (i.e., "plastic") display the most vulnerability in developmental disorders and the most compensatory enhancement after sensory deprivation. A large literature reports that motion processing and magnocellular visual function is selectively deficient in dyslexia. A smaller literature reports enhancements in such functions in deaf individuals. However, studies with dyslexic and deaf individuals have used different experimental paradigms to assess visual function, and no research has yet examined both sides of modifiability (i.e., enhancements and deficits) using the same experimental paradigm. In the present research, visual function was compared in dyslexic (n=15), deaf (n=17), and control adults by using automated peripheral kinetic and foveal static perimetry. In the kinetic perimetry task, the dyslexic group showed deficits ( pdeaf group showed enhancements ( pdeaf ( p=.632) group differed significantly from controls in foveal contrast sensitivity thresholds, and no group or individual approached ceiling performance on this task. Taken together, the present data bridge previous literatures and suggest that motion processing tasks are selectively modifiable, either to decrement or enhancement, whereas foveal contrast sensitivity does not differ in dyslexic or deaf groups.

  15. Action video game players and deaf observers have larger Goldmann visual fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, David; Codina, Charlotte; Bhardwaj, Palvi; Pascalis, Olivier

    2010-03-05

    We used Goldmann kinetic perimetry to compare how training and congenital auditory deprivation may affect the size of the visual field. We measured the ability of action video game players and deaf observers to detect small moving lights at various locations in the central (around 30 degrees from fixation) and peripheral (around 60 degrees ) visual fields. Experiment 1 found that 10 habitual video game players showed significantly larger central and peripheral field areas than 10 controls. In Experiment 2 we found that 13 congenitally deaf observers had significantly larger visual fields than 13 hearing controls for both the peripheral and central fields. Here the greatest differences were found in the lower parts of the fields. Comparison of the two groups showed that whereas VGP players have a more uniform increase in field size in both central and peripheral fields deaf observers show non-uniform increases with greatest increases in lower parts of the visual field.

  16. Routes to short term memory indexing: Lessons from deaf native users of American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshorn, Elizabeth A.; Fernandez, Nina M.; Bavelier, Daphne

    2012-01-01

    Models of working memory (WM) have been instrumental in understanding foundational cognitive processes and sources of individual differences. However, current models cannot conclusively explain the consistent group differences between deaf signers and hearing speakers on a number of short-term memory (STM) tasks. Here we take the perspective that these results are not due to a temporal order-processing deficit in deaf individuals, but rather reflect different biases in how different types of memory cues are used to do a given task. We further argue that the main driving force behind the shifts in relative biasing is a consequence of language modality (sign vs. speech) and the processing they afford, and not deafness, per se. PMID:22871205

  17. 34 CFR 396.1 - What is the Training of Interpreters for Individuals Who Are Deaf and Individuals Who Are Deaf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Who Are Deaf and Individuals Who Are Deaf-Blind program? 396.1 Section 396.1 Education Regulations of... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TRAINING OF INTERPRETERS FOR INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE DEAF AND INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE DEAF-BLIND General § 396.1 What is the Training of Interpreters for Individuals Who Are Deaf...

  18. Stigma in Mothers of Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A deaf child creates a feeling of stigma in many hearing parents. Stigma in mothers can have a negative impact on a child’s treatment and rehabilitation process. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the extent of stigma in mothers with deaf children.  Materials and Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 among 90 mothers with deaf children. The data-collection instrument included the stigma scale in the mothers of children with disabilities. The reliability and validity of the instrument were confirmed through content validity and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient (α=86%, respectively. Data were analyzed using SPSS-15 software.   Results: Results showed that most mothers suffer from stigma due to having a deaf child. The mean stigma score was 96.48 ±27.72. In total, 24.4% of mothers reported that they had received strange and mocking looks; 72.2% regarded child deafness as a sign of divine retribution; and 33.3% felt ashamed of their child’s deafness. There was an inverse relationship between the mother’s level of education and mean stigma scores (P

  19. [The efficacy of intratympanic dexamethasone injection for the moderate and severe sudden deafness with BPPV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Yu, Youjun; Zhao, Yuanxin; Wang, Yuejian; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Qiuling

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of intratympanic dexamethasone injection for the moderate and severe sudden deafness with BPPV. A total of 63 patients diagnosed with sudden sensorineural hearing loss with BPPV were treated through OPD. Patients were divided into three groups: 20 cases in intratympanic dexamethasone injection as initial treatment (group A); 18 cases in systemic hormone therapy group (group B); 25 cases in intratympanic dexamethasone injection as salvage treatment (group C). In addition, routine drugs were used to all patients. The overall effective rate of group A, B and C in hearing recovery was 60.0%, 38.9% and 48.0%, respectively: (1) No significant difference of hearing recovery was observed among three groups (P > 0.05); (2) A significant difference of hearing recovery was evidenced between group A and C (P 0.05). Our data showed that intratympanic dexamethasone should be used as initial therapy for treating the moderate and severe sudden deafness with BPPV.

  20. Access to English Language Acquisition in Ghana Schools for the Deaf: Are the Deaf Students Handicapped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obosu, Gideon Kwesi; Opoku-Asare, Nana Afia; Deku, Prosper

    2016-01-01

    This paper primarily discusses the challenges deaf students in Ghana are likely to grapple with as they access education provided for them in English language. The arguments discussed in this paper are supported by findings from a multiple site case study of five Schools for the Deaf purposively sampled from four regions of Ghana. Observations…

  1. Genetics and Deafness: Implications for Education and Life Care of Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Jerome D.; Miller, Maurice H.

    2008-01-01

    The severity of deafness can obscure the presence of other disabilities that may accompany genetic anomalies, such as occur in Alport and Usher syndromes. Recent advances in genetics have heightened attention to various disabilities and dysfunctions that may coexist with deafness. Failure to recognize these additional disabilities when they occur…

  2. Deaf culture and community: intersections and emergence of the deaf pedagogical subject in the school environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liane Camatti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The work that goes on is from a research proposal that aims at examining the ways in which the deaf community can relate to the school environment and how, in this context, the deaf culture subject emerges from capture his difference. Therefore, it starts out a review of the way the school for the deaf is being produced and the place it is occupying when the deaf community meets, relates or even is allocated within the school environment. Accordingly, the analytical tools used for the development of this text are taken from the field of Deaf Studies and Cultural Studies in Education, focusing especially on discussions concerning the educational institution, culture, community and deaf pedagogical subject. Thus, trace a discussion about the ways in which the school is becoming a place of discipline, of culture circle, institutions of meanings. The school for the deaf is often the only place of communication. It can be inferred that it has some roles that differ from regular schools. A picture emerges in which the school’s disciplinary practices are reviewed, modified and conditioned by the approach to the deaf community. This, in turn, also has very peculiar forms, breaking into a space that is the reluctance of discourses about culture, its main weapon of resistance.

  3. Intersubjective Interaction between Deaf Parents/Deaf Infants during the Infant's First 18 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Carin; Cramér-Wolrath, Emelie; Falkman, Kerstin W.

    2016-01-01

    This study is part of a larger longitudinal project with the aim of focusing early social interaction and development of mentalizing ability in 12 deaf infants, including the interaction between the infants and their deaf parents. The aim of the present paper is to describe early social interaction and moments of intersubjectivity between the deaf…

  4. Objectification Theory and Deaf Cultural Identity Attitudes: Roles in Deaf Women's Eating Disorder Symptomatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Bonnie; Rottenstein, Adena

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the generalizability of direct and mediated links posited in objectification theory among internalization of sociocultural standards of beauty, body surveillance, body shame, and eating disorder symptoms with a sample of Deaf women. The study also examined the role of marginal Deaf cultural identity attitudes within this…

  5. "Deaf discourse": the social construction of deafness in a Bedouin community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kisch

    2008-01-01

    Among the Al-Sayyid Arab-Bedouin, the use of an indigenous sign language is widespread and provides the foundation of a signing community shared by hearing and deaf people. Cases with comparable high incidences of deafness have in recent years stimulated debates in diverse academic disciplines. Lack

  6. The Language and Culture of Deaf People: Implications for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Categories of deafness are defined not in terms of degree of hearing loss but of consequences for the deaf person. The culture and language, British Sign Language, of a largely hidden population are discussed. (40 references) (LB)

  7. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Home Health Info Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Balance Taste and Smell Voice, Speech, and Language ... NIH… Turning Discovery Into Health ® National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 31 Center Drive, MSC ...

  8. Role of p63 and the Notch pathway in cochlea development and sensorineural deafness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terrinoni, A.; Serra, V.; Bruno, E.; Strasser, A.; Valente, E.; Flores, E.R.; Bokhoven, H. van; Lu, X.; Knight, R.A.; Melino, G.

    2013-01-01

    The ectodermal dysplasias are a group of inherited autosomal dominant syndromes associated with heterozygous mutations in the Tumor Protein p63 (TRP63) gene. Here we show that, in addition to their epidermal pathology, a proportion of these patients have distinct levels of deafness. Accordingly, p63

  9. Magic Finger Teaching Method in Learning Multiplication Facts among Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Liong; Yasin, Mohd. Hanafi Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Deaf students face problems in mastering multiplication facts. This study aims to identify the effectiveness of Magic Finger Teaching Method (MFTM) and students' perception towards MFTM. The research employs a quasi experimental with non-equivalent pre-test and post-test control group design. Pre-test, post-test and questionnaires were used. As…

  10. Bullying and Cyberbullying among Deaf Students and Their Hearing Peers: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Sheri; Pero, Heather

    2011-01-01

    A questionnaire on bullying and cyberbullying was administered to 30 secondary students (Grades 7-12) in a charter school for the Deaf and hard of hearing and a matched group of 22 hearing students in a charter secondary school on the same campus. Because the sample size was small and distributions non-normal, results are primarily descriptive and…

  11. Survey and Analysis of Dental Caries in Students at a Deaf-Mute High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hong; Wang, Yan-Ling; Cong, Xiao-Na; Tang, Wan-Qin; Wei, Ping-Min

    2012-01-01

    The present cross-sectional study was conducted to assess and compare the prevalence of dental caries of 229 deaf adolescents in a special senior high school and to identify factors related to dental caries, with a match group of 196 healthy adolescents in a normal senior high school, in Jiangsu province of East China. In this study the prevalence…

  12. Survey and Analysis of Dental Caries in Students at a Deaf-Mute High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hong; Wang, Yan-Ling; Cong, Xiao-Na; Tang, Wan-Qin; Wei, Ping-Min

    2012-01-01

    The present cross-sectional study was conducted to assess and compare the prevalence of dental caries of 229 deaf adolescents in a special senior high school and to identify factors related to dental caries, with a match group of 196 healthy adolescents in a normal senior high school, in Jiangsu province of East China. In this study the prevalence…

  13. Barriers and Facilitators to Deaf Trauma Survivors' Help-Seeking Behavior: Lessons for Behavioral Clinical Trials Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa L; Wolf Craig, Kelly S; Ziedonis, Douglas M

    2017-01-01

    Deaf individuals experience significant obstacles to participating in behavioral health research when careful consideration is not given to accessibility during the design of study methodology. To inform such considerations, we conducted an exploratory secondary analysis of a mixed-methods study that originally explored 16 Deaf trauma survivors' help-seeking experiences. Our objective was to identify key findings and qualitative themes from consumers' own words that could be applied to the design of behavioral clinical trials methodology. In many ways, the themes that emerged were not wholly dissimilar from the general preferences of members of other sociolinguistic minority groups-a need for communication access, empathy, respect, strict confidentiality procedures, trust, and transparency of the research process. Yet, how these themes are applied to the inclusion of Deaf research participants is distinct from any other sociolinguistic minority population, given Deaf people's unique sensory and linguistic characteristics. We summarize our findings in a preliminary "Checklist for Designing Deaf Behavioral Clinical Trials" to operationalize the steps researchers can take to apply Deaf-friendly approaches in their empirical work.

  14. Analysis of reading strategies in deaf adults as a function of their language and meta-phonological skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Ana-Belén; Carrillo, María-Soledad; Pérez, Maria Del Mar; Alegría, Jesus

    2014-07-01

    The first aim of this study was to examine the mechanisms used in reading sentences by deaf adults who had completed secondary or higher education. Previous data allowed us to hypothesize that they used the key word strategy, consisting of identifying (some of) the frequent content words, and deriving an overall representation of the sentence's meaning ignoring the function words. The results supported the hypothesis. The second aim was to establish the relationships between this strategy and the linguistic and phonological abilities of deaf participants. The results show that vocabulary increased with reading level, but syntax, evaluated with the use of function words, did not. This suggests that using the key word strategy during long periods of time increases knowledge of content words but not syntax, probably because function words are neglected by this strategy. The results also showed that the deaf participants had a fairly large orthographical lexicon. This implies that the extensive use of the key word strategy allows them to store lexical information. The next question was whether the written word representations of the deaf participants were memorized as mere logograms, or if they had been stored in connection with the phonological representations of the corresponding words. The metaphonological tasks conducted produced evidence indicating that deaf participants used both orthographic and phonological representations. A factor analysis of the metaphonological tasks together with reading and spelling confirmed that both factors were necessary to explain the whole variance in the deaf group.

  15. Examining the Relationship Between Genetic Counselors’ Attitudes Toward Deaf People and the Genetic Counseling Session

    OpenAIRE

    Enns, Emily E.; Boudreault, Patrick; Palmer, Christina G.

    2009-01-01

    Given the medical and cultural perspectives on deafness it is important to determine if genetic counselors’ attitudes toward deaf people can affect counseling sessions for deafness genes. One hundred fifty-eight genetic counselors recruited through the National Society of Genetic Counselors Listserv completed an online survey assessing attitudes toward deaf people and scenario-specific comfort levels discussing and offering genetic testing for deafness. Respondents with deaf/Deaf friends or w...

  16. Effects on Deaf Patients of Medication Education by Pharmacists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyoguchi, Naomi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kubota, Toshio; Shimazoe, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Deaf people often experience difficulty in understanding medication information provided by pharmacists due to communication barriers. We held medication education lectures for deaf and hard of hearing (HH) individuals and examined the extent to which deaf participants understood medication-related information as well as their attitude about…

  17. Reaching the Summit: Deaf Adults as Essential Partners in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne-Firl, Bridgetta

    2016-01-01

    How do we reach the summit in terms of supporting the best transition possible for each young deaf or hard of hearing individual in the United States? Should professionals who are hearing work alone to succeed with deaf and hard of hearing students? No matter how good the intention, if we want deaf and hard of hearing students to transition from…

  18. Language Facility and Theory of Mind Development in Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A. Lyn

    2001-01-01

    Deaf children with signing parents, nonnative signing deaf children, children from a hearing impaired unit, oral deaf children, and hearing controls were tested on theory of Mind (ToM) tasks and a British sign language receptive language test. Language ability correlated positively and significantly with ToM ability. Age underpinned the…

  19. Social Factors Influencing Participation in Sport for the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.

    1987-01-01

    The article looks at social factors influencing participation in sport by the deaf including communication mode and value orientations of community, family, school, and peers of both the hearing and deaf world. A model for integration of the deaf into sports is offered. (DB)

  20. Examination of Bias in Mental Health Evaluation of Deaf Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickert, Jeffery

    1988-01-01

    Examined mental health service providers' (N=80) evaluation of deaf patients in various programs. Found staff at specialized inpatient mental health programs for the deaf had more positive attitudes than staff serving the general population. Found mental health staff evaluated some deaf patients differently from hearing patients with respect to…

  1. Influences on Facial Emotion Recognition in Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidera, Francesc; Amadó, Anna; Martínez, Laura

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory research is aimed at studying facial emotion recognition abilities in deaf children and how they relate to linguistic skills and the characteristics of deafness. A total of 166 participants (75 deaf) aged 3-8 years were administered the following tasks: facial emotion recognition, naming vocabulary and cognitive ability. The…

  2. 77 FR 42187 - Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 64 Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010, Section 105, Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals, Order... Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals, CG Docket No. 10-210. Form Number: N/A. Type of Review: Revision of...

  3. 76 FR 31261 - Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 64 Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... to establish the National Deaf-Blind Equipment Distribution Program (NDBEDP) pilot program in... environments shall be considered when determining whether the individual is deaf-blind under clauses...

  4. Reading Efficiency of Deaf and Hearing People in Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Pérez, Francisco J.; Saldaña, David; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Isabel R.

    2015-01-01

    Different studies have showed poor reading performance in the deaf compared to the hearing population. This has overshadowed the fact that a minority of deaf children learns to read successfully and reaches levels similar to their hearing peers. We analyze whether deaf people deploy the same cognitive and learning processes in reading as their…

  5. Issues in the Sexual Molestation of Deaf Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay; Miller, Katrina R.

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of issues involved in sexual abuse of deaf youth in schools considers characteristics of pedophiles and hebephiles and how sexual offenders are dealt with in the criminal justice system. It suggests ways to prevent sexual abuse of children who are deaf and what to look for in identifying deaf children who are being victimized. (Contains…

  6. Reading Efficiency of Deaf and Hearing People in Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Pérez, Francisco J.; Saldaña, David; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Isabel R.

    2015-01-01

    Different studies have showed poor reading performance in the deaf compared to the hearing population. This has overshadowed the fact that a minority of deaf children learns to read successfully and reaches levels similar to their hearing peers. We analyze whether deaf people deploy the same cognitive and learning processes in reading as their…

  7. Self-Concept among Hearing Chinese Children of Deaf Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lik Man; Lui, Brian

    1990-01-01

    A questionnaire was administered to 42 Hong Kong Chinese deaf couples, their 70 hearing children, 41 hearing couples, and their 82 hearing children. No differences were found in the self-concepts of children of deaf parents compared to children of hearing parents, but deaf parents reported lower self-concepts than hearing parents. (Author/JDD)

  8. The Early Years: Parents and Young Deaf Children Reading Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Research is just beginning to describe the role of reading in the lives of families with deaf children. While the time that deaf children spend reading or being read to represents only a small part of their lives at home, research highlights its importance for young children--hearing as well as deaf. Children whose parents read to them at home…

  9. Deaf Children with Disabilities: Rights under the IDEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Parents of children who are deaf and who have disabilities often face barriers in ensuring that their children receive the services they need. Some of these barriers include lack of awareness about deafness-disability constellations, shortages of professionals knowledgeable about how deaf children learn or the impact of the disability on deaf…

  10. Narrative Structure and Narrative Development in Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathmann, Christian; Mann, Wolfgang; Morgan, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Researchers, the Deaf community, teachers of deaf children and speech and language therapists all share a concern about how to improve deaf children's written language skills. One part of literacy is story writing or narrative. A finding from a small number of studies is that children exposed to sign language from early childhood onwards achieve…

  11. Deafness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周浅

    1999-01-01

    本文是Blindness一文的姊妹篇,专谈耳疾。失聪者在美国的人数之巨,也让我们吃惊。失聪一般可分三类,但是与眼疾所不同的是:…many cases canbe prevented.在对导致失聪的原因作分析时,有一点给读者留下深刻印象:…old men in quiet African villages have much better hearing than young people inAmerica.由此可窥见噪声对听力所造成的危害。文章对American Sign Language(美国手势语)/the hearing aid(助听器)的演变详有说明,信息丰富。】

  12. Inclusion and Deaf Education: The Perceptions and Experiences of Young Deaf People in Northern Ireland and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Marie Therese

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to examine what the concept of inclusion means and how it relates to children who are deaf. The paper begins with a background to deaf education, followed by specific reference to how inclusion is perceived in Northern Ireland and in Sweden. It investigates the experiences and opinions of deaf pupils in Schools…

  13. Deaf Culture and Competing Discourses in a Residential School for the Deaf: "Can Do" versus "Can't Do"

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Catherine A.; Placier, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    From an ethnographic case study of a state-funded residential school for the Deaf, the authors employed Critical Discourse Analysis to identify competing discourses in the talk of educators. These discourses are embedded in the historical oppression and labeling of deaf people as disabled and the development of Deaf culture as a counter-discourse.…

  14. Gênero e surdez / Gender and deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalena Klein

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo propõe-se discutir a temática da surdez, articulando-a com discussões referentes a gênero e sexualidade, tomando por referência autores da perspectiva dosEstudos Culturais em Educação e dos Estudos Surdos. A surdez e os surdos, assim como o gênero, são entendidos a partir da diferença cultural. No mercado de trabalho em geral, as surdas são discriminadas, porém são a maioria no professorado, o que é uma conseqüência da feminização do trabalho docente. A crescente presença feminina na liderança dos movimentos surdos pode estar relacionada a essa maioria de professoras, que carregam para os movimentos características da organização escolar. Analisamos dois artigos sobre o tema, além de um encontro sobre mulheres surdas ocorrido em Pelotas – RS, onde as participantes destacaram seu papel na luta política da associação dos surdos, enquanto aos homens cabe o papel de organizar as atividades de lazer e esportes. A luta pelos direitos das mulheres surdas vem crescendo no Brasil e há necessidade de haver mais estudos sobre essa temática.Abstract This paper discusses the topic of deafness, articulating it with discussions referring to gender and sexuality, based on authors from the perspectives of Cultural Studies in Education and Deaf Studies. Deafness and deaf people, as the gender issue, are understood through a cultural difference perspective. Deaf women are discriminated inthe workplace in general, but they are the majority in the teaching profession, a consequence of the feminization of the teaching work. The increasing female presence as leaders of deaf movements may be related to this greater rate of women as teachers, who carry the features of the school organization onto the movements. Two papers onthe topic were examined, as well as a meeting on deaf women occurring in Pelotas – RS, whose participants highlighted their role in the political struggle by the deaf people’s association, while men take

  15. [Analyses of clinical features and efficacy of sudden deafness with vertigo and dizziness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Han, Demin; Zhang, Yi; Li, Yongxin; Gong, Shusheng; Chen, Xiuwu; Meng, Xixi; Tang, Junxiang; Xiang, Jie; Jiang, Xuejun; Yang, Ning; Tian, Ying; Hui, Lian; Feng, Shuai

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics and the effect of drug treatment for sudden hearing loss with vertigo or dizziness. In a prospective, randomized, single blinded randomized multicenter clinical study, patients with sudden deafness, ranging in age from 18 to 65 years old, with a duration less than 2 weeks, and with no any medical treatments were collected. In accordance with the hearing curve, those patients were divided into four types, i.e., low and intermediate frequency descent type; high frequency descent type; fall flat type; and total deafness type. Each type was treated by four different treatment options, according to the unified design of the random table, and randomly selected one of the options for treatment. The efficacy of the patients with sudden deafness with vertigo and dizziness was analyzed statistically after the follow-up for 4 weeks. SPSS 13.0 software was used to analyze the data. In August 2007 to October 2011, 33 hospitals in the country included 1 024 patients with sudden deafness in line with the inclusion criteria, of whom 296 (28.91%) were accompanied by vertigo/dizziness symptoms, 126 were males and 170 were females, with an average age of (41.2 ± 13.5) years old. types of the different audiometric curves of sudden deafness, the occurrence of complete deafness with vertigo/dizziness was the highest (44.93%), followed by flat down type (25.87%), high frequency descent type (21.28%) and low intermediate frequency descent type (18.54%). After the standard treatment, the vertigo and dizziness symptoms of the sudden deafness patients could disappear, and the hearing in each group was obviously improved. The hearing curative effect on patients accompanied by vertigo/dizziness of low frequency and intermediate frequency descent type was the best, and the total efficiency can reach up to 94.74%, with the cure rate of 68.42%; followed by flat type, in which the total effective rate was 80.76%, with the recovery rate of 22.12%; and

  16. Health promotion of families of deaf children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Albuquerque Frota

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the impact of hearing loss in the family dynamics of the deaf child; identify the family’s knowledge about deafness, understand how parents experience the diagnosis and treatment of child with hearing impairment. Methods: The study has aqualitative approach developed at the Center for Integrated Medical Care - NAMI, attached to the University of Fortaleza - UNIFOR located in Fortaleza - CE, Brazil. The participants were six mothers of children with hearing impairment. Data collection was carried outthrough participant observation and semi-structured interview. The Thematic Analysis of Bardin was used for processing the data. Results: After coding, some categories emerged from the discourse: Misinformation of Hearing Loss; impact of the discovery of hearingloss, caregivers and facilitators of the development of the deaf children. Conclusion: The birth of a deaf child alters the previous family balance, causing specific problems, such as the communication barrier, whose solution is related to how to handle the situation. Itis necessary to promote changes, emphasizing the involvement of caregivers and loved as facilitators of deaf child’s development. In Phonoaudiology, this attitude represents discovering new ways to identify the need for the subject, which requires strategies thatvalue their opinion, allowing the expression of expectations, perceptions, representations and feelings.

  17. Deaf murderers: clinical and forensic issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, M; Steinberg, A G; Montoya, L A

    1999-01-01

    Data are reported on 28 deaf individuals who were convicted, pled guilty, or have been charged and awaiting trial for murder. The unique forensic issues raised by these cases are discussed, and their clinical picture presented. A significant percentage of these deaf murderers and defendants had such severely limited communication skills in both English and American Sign Language that they lacked the linguistic ability to understand the charges against them and/or to participate in their own defense. As such, they were incompetent to stand trial, due not to mental illness or mental retardation, but to linguistic deficits. This form of incompetence poses a dilemma to the courts that remains unresolved. This same linguistic disability makes it impossible for some deaf suspects to be administered Miranda Warnings in a way comprehensible to them. This paper identifies the reasons for the communication problems many deaf persons face in court and offers remedial steps to help assure fair trials and police interrogations for deaf defendants. The roles and responsibilities of psychiatric and psychological experts in these cases are discussed. Data are provided on the etiology of the 28 individuals' hearing losses, psychiatric/psychological histories, IQs, communication characteristics, educational levels, and victim characteristics.

  18. [Analysis of personality characteristics of sudden deafness patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Huiqin; Guo, Mingli; Han, Xiaoli; Bu, Guiqing

    2014-04-01

    To Study the personality characteristics in patients with sudden deafness. Thirty-eight sudden deafness patients and 45 healthy volunteers were assessed by Eysenck personality questionnaire (EPQ). The standard scores of P, E, N dimensions of patients with sudden deafness were greater than healthy volunteers. The standard score in L dimensions of patients with sudden deafness was less than healthy volunteers. The difference of the standard score of P dimension revealed statistical significance (P 0.05). Sudden deafness patients have emotional instability and psychoticism personality characteristics.

  19. Listener judges and the speech intelligibility of deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencke, E O; Ochsner, G J; Testut, E W

    1983-05-01

    Two listener groups, one experienced and the other inexperienced in listening to deaf speakers, were asked to recognize speech sounds in word contexts presented in two modes: auditory only and auditory-visual. In contrast to previous studies, the experienced and inexperienced listener groups performed similarly. The one exception occurred for speech sounds in the final position presented auditory visually where the experienced listeners' performance surpassed that of inexperienced listeners. For both groups, performance in correct phoneme identification was better in the auditory-visual mode of presentation. Furthermore, and interaction between the position-in-word and the mode of stimulus presentation was present in both groups. In the auditory-only task, listeners correctly identified more target phonemes when they were initial rather than final position in a word. With supplemental visual information, listener performance increased our phonemes in both positions within a word, although the increase was greater for final position phonemes.

  20. Health promotion via SMS improves hypertension knowledge for deaf South Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haricharan, Hanne Jensen; Heap, Marion; Hacking, Damian; Lau, Yan Kwan

    2017-08-18

    Signing Deaf South Africans have limited access to health information. As a result, their knowledge about health is limited. Cell phone usage in South Africa is high. This study aimed to assess whether a short message service (SMS)-based health promotion campaign could improve Deaf people's knowledge of hypertension and healthy living. Additionally, the study aimed to assess the acceptability of using SMSs for health promotion targeting Deaf people. A baseline questionnaire assessed participants' knowledge about hypertension before an SMS-based information campaign was conducted. After the campaign, an exit questionnaire was conducted, containing the same questions as the baseline questionnaire with additional questions about general acceptability and communication preferences. Results were compared between baseline and exit, using McNemar's test, paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Focus groups aimed to get further information on the impact and acceptability of SMSs. The focus groups were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. The campaign recruited 82 participants for the baseline survey, but due to significant loss-to-follow-up and exclusions only 41 participants were included in the analysis of the survey. The majority (60%) were men. Eighty percent were employed, while 98% had not finished high school. The campaign showed a statistically significant improvement in overall knowledge about hypertension and healthy living amongst participants. Six individual questions out of 19 also showed a statistically significant improvement. Despite this, participants in focus groups found the medical terminology difficult to understand. Several ways of improving SMS campaigns for the Deaf were identified. These included using using pictures, using 'signed' SMSs, combining SMSs with signed drama and linking SMS-campaigns to an interactive communication service that would enable the Deaf to pose questions for clarification. Focus groups suggested that

  1. A Review of Selected Program Activities in the Education of the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Patria G.; Fein, Judith G.

    Program activities sponsored by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare in the education of the deaf reviewed include Gallaudet College, National Technical Institute for the Deaf, National Advisory Committee on Education of the Deaf, Model Secondary School for the Deaf, and Captioned Films for the Deaf. Also summarized are centers and…

  2. Symptom and Surface: Disruptive Deafness and Medieval Medical Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsy, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    This essay examines constructions of deafness in medieval culture, exploring how deaf experience disrupts authoritative discourses in three textual genres: medical treatise, literary fiction, and autobiographical writing. Medical manuals often present deafness as a physical defect, yet they also suggest how social conditions for deaf people can be transformed in lieu of treatment protocols. Fictional narratives tend to associate deafness with sin or social stigma, but they can also imagine deaf experience with a remarkable degree of sympathy and nuance. Autobiographical writing by deaf authors most vividly challenges diagnostic models of disability, exploring generative forms of perception that deafness can foster. In tracing the disruptive force that deaf experience exerts on perceived notions of textual authority, this essay reveals how medieval culture critiqued the diagnostic power of medical practitioners. Deafness does not simply function as a symptom of an individual problem or a metaphor for a spiritual or social condition; rather, deafness is a transformative capacity affording new modes of knowing self and other.

  3. Deafness and Diversity: Reflections and Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardino, Caroline; Cannon, Joanna E

    2016-01-01

    Concluding a two-part American Annals of the Deaf special issue on deafness and diversity (DAD), the editors provide reflections and guidance to the field regarding d/Deaf and hard of hearing (d/Dhh) children with a disability (DWD; e.g., learning or intellectual disability, autism) and d/Dhh children from homes where parents use a language other than English or American Sign Language (d/Dhh Multilingual Learners; DMLs). Contributing authors addressed the application of theory, research, and practice to five topics: (a) early intervention, (b) communication/language, (c) assessment, (d) transition, (e) teacher preparation. An overview of the main recommendations of the contributors and editors is presented in an effort to advance research and pedagogy with these learners. In conclusion, the editors discuss the "Radical Middle" approach (Easterbrooks & Maiorana-Basas, 2015) to working with students who are DAD: providing learners with all options for academic, social, and emotional success.

  4. Rare cause of bilateral sudden deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, F I; Merkus, P; van Nieuwkerk, E B J; Hensen, E F

    2016-10-08

    In this paper, we describe the case of a 62-year-old female with recurring episodes of sudden deafness with vertigo and facial paresis. Within a month's time, this resulted in bilateral deafness and vestibular areflexia. Erroneously, the patient was diagnosed with sudden deafness of unknown origin and subsequently with neuroborreliosis (Lyme disease). The true diagnosis of relapsing polychondritis (RP) was revealed 9 months after initial presentation. The diagnostic delay is in part explained by the fact that, by definition, the disease has to relapse before the diagnosis can be made, but also by its pluriform clinical presentation. Timely identification of RP as the cause of this profound sensorineural hearing loss proved to be important. It was key in instigating adequate follow-up, and allowed for cochlear implantation before total cochlear obliteration, which might have hampered optimal hearing rehabilitation.

  5. RELATION OF DEAF PERSONS TOWARDS BILINGUALISM AS COMMUNICATION MODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Salkić

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bilingualism of a deaf child implies concurrent cognition and usage of sign language, as community language and oral-voice language as language of greater community in which deaf persons live. Today, most authors consider that deaf persons should know both of these languages and that deaf persons need to be educated in both languages, because of their general communication and complete psycho-social development. Through research on sample of 80 deaf examinees, we affirmed the kind of relation that deaf persons have towards bilingualism, bilingual way of education and communication. The research results have shown that bilingualism and bilingual way of education and communication is acceptable to deaf persons and that there is no statistically significant difference between the sub-samples of examinees.

  6. Deafness, a Social Stigma: Physician Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, M K

    2014-12-01

    Hearing is an essential sensory sense of an individual for development of speech which is crucial for verbal communication and personality development. It is the second most common form of disability after loco motor disability in India. Disabling hearing loss is more than 40 dB hearing loss in better ear in a person more than 15 years of age and greater than 30 dB hearing loss in better hearing ear below 14 years of age. WHO estimated 360 million individuals in the world with disabling hearing loss, out of which 91 % are adults and only 9 % are children. Early and accurate identification of birth asphyxia, hyperbilirubinemia, auditory neuropathy Presbyacusis and avoiding noise pollution and discouraging use of mobile phone, tobacco chewing/smoking, in those who are prone to deafness, an intervention is a must to decrease deafness from our society. Deafness prevention can only be possible with mutual cooperation with dedication of different medical and non-medical personnel and also by helping the persons with deafness. We have to focus not only on the children but also on senior citizens as most alarming, up to 40 %, incidence of deafness is in senior citizens above the age of 75 years. Timely cure and preventive measures are essential for better socio-economic state of the country. By helping the persons with deafness, we will not only be doing a great service to the Nation but also to the society at large.

  7. Deaf college students' perspectives on literacy portfolios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Jane Freiburg

    2003-01-01

    The study examined how literacy portfolios were used as tools in a college developmental English class in which deaf students assessed their reading comprehension as well as their writing processes and products. The students' reading and writing assignments involved reflective thinking and were grounded in authentic tasks. Immediate feedback was provided. The study was multidimensional, longitudinal, and ongoing. A variety of field research techniques were used to ascertain the uses and influences of portfolios in regard to students' reading, writing, and reflective thinking. The results support the idea that the use of literacy portfolios can positively influence students who are deaf when they assess their reading and writing abilities.

  8. Speechreading in Deaf Adults with Cochlear Implants: Evidence for Perceptual Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimperton, Hannah; Ralph-Lewis, Amelia; MacSweeney, Mairéad

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has provided evidence for a speechreading advantage in congenitally deaf adults compared to hearing adults. A ‘perceptual compensation’ account of this finding proposes that prolonged early onset deafness leads to a greater reliance on visual, as opposed to auditory, information when perceiving speech which in turn results in superior visual speech perception skills in deaf adults. In the current study we tested whether previous demonstrations of a speechreading advantage for profoundly congenitally deaf adults with hearing aids, or no amplificiation, were also apparent in adults with the same deafness profile but who have experienced greater access to the auditory elements of speech via a cochlear implant (CI). We also tested the prediction that, in line with the perceptual compensation account, receiving a CI at a later age is associated with superior speechreading skills due to later implanted individuals having experienced greater dependence on visual speech information. We designed a speechreading task in which participants viewed silent videos of 123 single words spoken by a model and were required to indicate which word they thought had been said via a free text response. We compared congenitally deaf adults who had received CIs in childhood or adolescence (N = 15) with a comparison group of hearing adults (N = 15) matched on age and education level. The adults with CI showed significantly better scores on the speechreading task than the hearing comparison group. Furthermore, within the group of adults with CI, there was a significant positive correlation between age at implantation and speechreading performance; earlier implantation was associated with lower speechreading scores. These results are both consistent with the hypothesis of perceptual compensation in the domain of speech perception, indicating that more prolonged dependence on visual speech information in speech perception may lead to improvements in the perception of

  9. A Case of Sudden Deafness with Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage and Sudden Deafness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Jeong Jin; Jeong, Se Won; Lee, Jae Wook; Han, Su-Jin

    2015-01-01

    .... The prognosis SSNHL by intralabyrintine hemorrhage is generally known to be poor. We report a case of sudden deafness with intralabyrintine hemorrhage who has a history of anticoagulant administration, with a review of literature.

  10. Cutaneous sensory nerve as a substitute for auditory nerve in solving deaf-mutes’ hearing problem: an innovation in multi-channel-array skin-hearing technology

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jianwen; Li, Yan; Ming ZHANG; Ma, Weifang; Ma, Xuezong

    2014-01-01

    The current use of hearing aids and artificial cochleas for deaf-mute individuals depends on their auditory nerve. Skin-hearing technology, a patented system developed by our group, uses a cutaneous sensory nerve to substitute for the auditory nerve to help deaf-mutes to hear sound. This paper introduces a new solution, multi-channel-array skin-hearing technology, to solve the problem of speech discrimination. Based on the filtering principle of hair cells, external voice signals at different...

  11. Ambiguity as a Motor for Communication--Differences between Hearing and Deaf Students' Ways of Reasoning about Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molander, Bengt-Olov; Hallden, Ola; Lindahl, Camilla

    2007-01-01

    Ambiguity in group discussions as a resource for communication is studied. How students, aged 13-15 years, elaborate on the concept energy through dialogue is described. Group interviews were conducted with 15 hearing and 20 deaf students. Three probes were used to initiate discussions on different meanings of energy. The results show that the…

  12. Understanding communication among deaf students who sign and speak: a trivial pursuit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Convertino, Carol M; Macias, Gayle; Monikowski, Christine M; Sapere, Patricia; Seewagen, Rosemarie

    2007-01-01

    Classroom communication between deaf students was modeled using a question-and-answer game. Participants consisted of student pairs that relied on spoken language, pairs that relied on American Sign Language (ASL), and mixed pairs in which one student used spoken language and one signed. Although the task encouraged students to request clarification of messages they did not understand, such requests were rare, and did not vary across groups. Face-to-face communication was relatively poor in all groups. Students in the ASL group understood questions more readily than students who relied on oral communication. Although comprehension was low for all groups, those using oral communication provided more correct free responses, although the numbers were low; no significant differences existed for multiple-choice responses. Results are discussed in terms of the possibility that many deaf students have developed lower criteria for comprehension, and related challenges for classroom communication access.

  13. Teacher quality: a comparison of National Board-certified and non-Board-certified teachers of deaf students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheetz, Nanci A; Martin, David S

    2006-01-01

    THE STUDY was designed to identify specific components of teacher excellence, focusing initially on the characteristics of the small number of teachers of the deaf who are certified by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS), then comparing those with the characteristics of other teachers identified as master teachers by university faculty in teacher preparation in deafness. Classroom observation, written lesson plans, teacher questionnaires on beliefs, and content analysis of interactive electronic focus groups were used to compare the two groups of teachers. Results indicated similarities between Board-certified and non-Board-certified master teachers in regard to teacher behaviors and commitment to well-founded pedagogical principles. Differences were found in classroom priorities and in the greater level of interconnectivity expressed by Board-certified teachers as the result of becoming Board certified. Recommendations are made for preparing teachers of deaf students.

  14. The role of music in deaf culture: deaf students' perception of emotion in music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2006-01-01

    Although emotional interpretation of music is an individual and variable experience, researchers have found that typical listeners are quite consistent in associating basic or primary emotions such as happiness, sadness, fear, and anger to musical compositions. It has been suggested that an individual with a sensorineural hearing loss, or any lesion in auditory perceptors in the brain may have trouble perceiving music emotionally. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether students with a hearing loss who associate with the deaf culture, assign the same emotions to music as students without a hearing loss. Sixty-two elementary and junior high students at a Midwestern state school for the deaf and students at neighboring elementary and junior high schools served as participants. Participants at the state school for the deaf had hearing losses ranging from moderate to severe. Twelve film score excerpts, composed to depict the primary emotions-happiness, sadness, and fear, were used as the musical stimuli. Participants were asked to assign an emotion to each excerpt. Results indicated a significant difference between the Deaf and typical hearing participants' responses, with hearing participants' responses more in agreement with the composers' intent. No significant differences were found for age or gender. Analyses of the Deaf participants' responses indicate that timbre, texture, and rhythm are perhaps the musical elements most influential in transmitting emotion to persons with a hearing loss. Adaptive strategies are suggested for assisting children who are deaf in accessing the elements of music intended to portray emotion.

  15. Cellular and deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss – A common hereditary deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Wingard

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family which encodes gap junctional proteins is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2 mutations are responsible for ~50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential (EP reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K+-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Additionally, there is no clear relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Cx30, Cx29, Cx31, and Cx43 mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes and pathogeneses of specific-mutation induced hearing loss remain unclear. Finally, little information is available for humans. Further studies to address these deficiencies are urgently required.

  16. CNS activation and regional connectivity during pantomime observation: no engagement of the mirror neuron system for deaf signers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmorey, Karen; Xu, Jiang; Gannon, Patrick; Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Braun, Allen

    2010-01-01

    Deaf signers have extensive experience using their hands to communicate. Using fMRI, we examined the neural systems engaged during the perception of manual communication in 14 deaf signers and 14 hearing non-signers. Participants passively viewed blocked video clips of pantomimes (e.g., peeling an imaginary banana) and action verbs in American Sign Language (ASL) that were rated as meaningless by non-signers (e.g., TO-DANCE). In contrast to visual fixation, pantomimes strongly activated fronto-parietal regions (the mirror neuron system, MNS) in hearing non-signers, but only bilateral middle temporal regions in deaf signers. When contrasted with ASL verbs, pantomimes selectively engaged inferior and superior parietal regions in hearing non-signers, but right superior temporal cortex in deaf signers. The perception of ASL verbs recruited similar regions as pantomimes for deaf signers, with some evidence of greater involvement of left inferior frontal gyrus for ASL verbs. Functional connectivity analyses with left hemisphere seed voxels (ventral premotor, inferior parietal lobule, fusiform gyrus) revealed robust connectivity with the MNS for the hearing non-signers. Deaf signers exhibited functional connectivity with the right hemisphere that was not observed for the hearing group for the fusiform gyrus seed voxel. We suggest that life-long experience with manual communication, and/or auditory deprivation, may alter regional connectivity and brain activation when viewing pantomimes. We conclude that the lack of activation within the MNS for deaf signers does not support an account of human communication that depends upon automatic sensorimotor resonance between perception and action.

  17. Reading skills in Persian deaf children with cochlear implants and hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohammad; Rashedi, Vahid; Morasae, Esmaeil Khedmati

    2016-10-01

    Reading skills are necessary for educational development in children. Many studies have shown that children with hearing loss often experience delays in reading. This study aimed to examine reading skills of Persian deaf children with cochlear implant and hearing aid and compare them with normal hearing counterparts. The sample consisted of 72 s and third grade Persian-speaking children aged 8-12 years. They were divided into three equal groups including 24 children with cochlear implant (CI), 24 children with hearing aid (HA), and 24 children with normal hearing (NH). Reading performance of participants was evaluated by the "Nama" reading test. "Nama" provides normative data for hearing and deaf children and consists of 10 subtests and the sum of the scores is regarded as reading performance score. Results of ANOVA on reading test showed that NH children had significantly better reading performance than deaf children with CI and HA in both grades (P reading, word reading, and word comprehension skills (respectively, P = 0.976, P = 0.988, P = 0.998). Considering the findings, cochlear implantation is not significantly more effective than hearing aid for improvement of reading abilities. It is clear that even with considerable advances in hearing aid technology, many deaf children continue to find literacy a challenging struggle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Intelligence, parental depression, and behavior adaptability in deaf children being considered for cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushalnagar, Poorna; Krull, Kevin; Hannay, Julia; Mehta, Paras; Caudle, Susan; Oghalai, John

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive ability and behavioral adaptability are distinct, yet related, constructs that can impact childhood development. Both are often reduced in deaf children of hearing parents who do not provide sufficient language and communication access. Additionally, parental depression is commonly observed due to parent-child communication difficulties that can lead to parents' feelings of inadequacy and frustration. We sought to assess whether adaptive behavior in deaf children was associated with nonverbal intelligence and parental depression. Parents of precochlear implant patients seen for neuropsychological assessment were administered the Parenting Stress Index and Vineland Behavior Adaptive Scales to obtain measures of parental distress and child's behavioral adaptability. Precochlear implant patients' cognitive functioning was assessed via the Mullen Scales of Early Learning or the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised, depending on the child's age at the time of testing. Regardless of age or neurological status, the deaf child's adaptive behavior consistently showed a strong relationship with intelligence. Moderate correlation between parental depression and the child's adaptive behavior was observed only in the younger group. The relationship between parental depression and communication subscale was moderated by intelligence for deaf children without neurological complications. The findings provide important implications for promoting family-centered interventions with early communication and language development.

  19. Child Modifiability as a Predictor of Language Abilities in Deaf Children Who Use American Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Wolfgang; Peña, Elizabeth D; Morgan, Gary

    2015-08-01

    This research explored the use of dynamic assessment (DA) for language-learning abilities in signing deaf children from deaf and hearing families. Thirty-seven deaf children, aged 6 to 11 years, were identified as either stronger (n = 26) or weaker (n = 11) language learners according to teacher or speech-language pathologist report. All children received 2 scripted, mediated learning experience sessions targeting vocabulary knowledge—specifically, the use of semantic categories that were carried out in American Sign Language. Participant responses to learning were measured in terms of an index of child modifiability. This index was determined separately at the end of the 2 individual sessions. It combined ratings reflecting each child's learning abilities and responses to mediation, including social-emotional behavior, cognitive arousal, and cognitive elaboration. Group results showed that modifiability ratings were significantly better for stronger language learners than for weaker language learners. The strongest predictors of language ability were cognitive arousal and cognitive elaboration. Mediator ratings of child modifiability (i.e., combined score of social-emotional factors and cognitive factors) are highly sensitive to language-learning abilities in deaf children who use sign language as their primary mode of communication. This method can be used to design targeted interventions.

  20. Semantic and syntactic reading comprehension strategies used by deaf children with early and late cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Carlos; Martín-Aragoneses, M Teresa; López-Higes, Ramón; Pisón, Guzmán

    2016-01-01

    Deaf students have traditionally exhibited reading comprehension difficulties. In recent years, these comprehension problems have been partially offset through cochlear implantation (CI), and the subsequent improvement in spoken language skills. However, the use of cochlear implants has not managed to fully bridge the gap in language and reading between normally hearing (NH) and deaf children, as its efficacy depends on variables such as the age at implant. This study compared the reading comprehension of sentences in 19 children who received a cochlear implant before 24 months of age (early-CI) and 19 who received it after 24 months (late-CI) with a control group of 19 NH children. The task involved completing sentences in which the last word had been omitted. To complete each sentence children had to choose a word from among several alternatives that included one syntactic and two semantic foils in addition to the target word. The results showed that deaf children with late-CI performed this task significantly worse than NH children, while those with early-CI exhibited no significant differences with NH children, except under more demanding processing conditions (long sentences with infrequent target words). Further, the error analysis revealed a preference of deaf students with early-CI for selecting the syntactic foil over a semantic one, which suggests that they draw upon syntactic cues during sentence processing in the same way as NH children do. In contrast, deaf children with late-CI do not appear to use a syntactic strategy, but neither a semantic strategy based on the use of key words, as the literature suggests. Rather, the numerous errors of both kinds that the late-CI group made seem to indicate an inconsistent and erratic response when faced with a lack of comprehension. These findings are discussed in relation to differences in receptive vocabulary and short-term memory and their implications for sentence reading comprehension. Copyright © 2015

  1. Communication Considerations for Parents of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Communication Considerations for Parents of Deaf and Hard-of- ... people have debated the best ways to develop communication skills and provide education for deaf and hard- ...

  2. 75 FR 10294 - National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... ON DEAFNESS AND OTHER COMMUNICATION DISORDERS, including consideration of personnel qualifications..., Division of Intramural Research, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, 5...

  3. Living with Worry: The Experience of Mothers with Deaf Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Born of a child with hearing loss is a stressful and unexpected experience for the parents. Understanding the experience of the mothers of children with hearing loss is a crucial to provide an appropriate care for this group of mothers.This study aimed to understand the concerns of the mothers who have a child with congenitally hearing loss. Materials and Methods In this qualitative content analysis, 35 mothers with child hearing loss participated in the semi-structural and deep interviews through a purposeful sampling method. Data were analyzed by using qualitative content analysis provided by Graneheim et al.   Results Concerns of mothers of children with hearing loss were categorized in three main themes: ‘the concerns of nature of hearing loss’, ‘the social concerns’ and ‘concerns about future’. Remarkably, the participants live with fear of the possibility of another deaf child birth in the next pregnancy or next generations were the most important concern of mothers. Conclusion Mothers of deaf children are experiencing the varieties of concerns. To cope with these concerns, they need a special consideration by society and health professionals. Modification of the concerns can decrease the child-related stress and consequently encourage them to involve in child care.

  4. First molecular screening of deafness in the Altai Republic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claustres Mireille

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We studied the molecular basis of NSHL in Republic of Altai (South Siberia, Russia. The Altaians are the indigenous Asian population of the Altai Mountain region considered as a melting-pot and a dispersion center for world-wide human expansions in the past. Methods A total of 76 patients of Altaian, Russian or mixed ethnicity and 130 Altaian controls were analyzed by PCR-DHPLC and sequencing in the GJB2 gene. The GJB6 deletion and the common non-syndromic deafness-causing mitochondrial mutations were also tested when appropriate. Results 8.3% of the Altaian chromosomes were carrying GJB2 mutations versus 46.9% of the Russian chromosomes. The 235delC mutation was predominant among Altaians, whereas the 35delG mutation was most prevalent among Russian patients. Conclusion We found an Asian-specific GJB2 diversity among Altaians, and different GJB2 contribution for deafness in the Altaian and Russian patients. The high carrier frequency of 235delC in Altaians (4.6% is probably defined by gene drift/founder effect in a particular group. The question whether the Altai region could be one of founder sources for the 235delC mutation widespread in Asia is open.

  5. Mutual Help Between Deaf and Blind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    IN September of 1996, Zhou Tingting, a 16-year-old deaf girl, entered Liaoning Normal University to study in the Special Education Department. There she met another freshman, Wang Zheng, whose eyesight was so poor that she could barely see anything. To cope with the various

  6. If I am Blind or Deaf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新颖

    2005-01-01

    For some time,l wished to be blind or deaf so that I could avoid the sight or the sound from having driven me mad.The majority of people must object the idea that the dark life maybe more beautiful than the life full of limitations and unhappiness.

  7. Health Care Access among Deaf People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in…

  8. Hereditary congenital unilateral deafness : A new disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, FG; Verheij, JBGM; van Mechelen, M

    2005-01-01

    Congenital unilateral deafness is a rare disorder. The prevalence rates are unknown. The prevalence of children with severe to profound hearing losses that are congenital (or acquired before the development of speech and language) is 0.5 to 3 per 1,000 live births. Evidently, congenital unilateral d

  9. Potentials of Rubella Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin F.

    Potentials of three classifications of rubella deaf blind children are discussed. Potentials for children at the middle trainable level and below are discussed for the areas of communication skills, daily living skills, mobility and orientation, vocational effort, and self-control and social interaction. For children in the upper trainable through…

  10. Mutilating keratoderma with deaf-mutism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastogi S

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A 30 year old woman presented with typical lesions of mutilating keratoderma. The patient was deaf and dumb. Hyperkeratosis of palms and soles was present since infancy. Constriction of digits started by the age of 5 years. The clinical diagnosis was supported by histopathological examination.

  11. Language Maintenance and the Deaf Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Louisa

    2012-01-01

    For all families with deaf children, choosing communication methods is a complex and evolving business. This process is particularly complex for migrant background families, who must not only negotiate the role that speaking or signing will play in their communication practices, but also which spoken language(s) will be used--that of the host…

  12. Developmental Social Cognitive Neuroscience: Insights from Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corina, David; Singleton, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    The condition of deafness presents a developmental context that provides insight into the biological, cultural, and linguistic factors underlying the development of neural systems that impact social cognition. Studies of visual attention, behavioral regulation, language development, and face and human action perception are discussed. Visually…

  13. Motor Proficiency Traits of Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Denis; Broadhead, Geoffrey D.

    1982-01-01

    Children at the Louisiana State School for the Deaf were tested for motor proficiency using the Short Form of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency. The children appeared to lack balancing skills but scored better than hearing children in visual motor control. Sex and age differences are noted. (PP)

  14. Educating Deaf Children: Language, Cognition, and Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marschark, M.; Knoors, H.E.T.

    2012-01-01

    Decades of research have demonstrated that deaf children generally lag behind hearing peers in terms of academic achievement, and that lags in some areas may never be overcome fully. Hundreds of research and intervention studies have been aimed at improving the situation, but they have resulted in o

  15. Deaf College Students' Perspectives on Literacy Portfolios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Jane Freiburg

    2003-01-01

    This study examined use of literacy portfolios in a college developmental English class in which students who are deaf assessed their reading comprehension, writing processes, and products. Assignments involved reflective thinking and were grounded in authentic tasks. Various field research techniques were used to ascertain the uses and influences…

  16. Deaf Students' Metacognitive Awareness during Language Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Carolyn; Marschark, Marc; Sarchet, Thomastine; Convertino, Carol M.; Borgna, Georgianna; Dirmyer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This study explored deaf and hearing university students' metacognitive awareness with regard to comprehension difficulties during reading and classroom instruction. Utilising the Reading Awareness Inventory (Milholic, V. 1994. "An inventory to pique students' metacognitive awareness of reading strategies." "Journal of Reading"…

  17. Grapheme-Phoneme Acquisition of Deaf Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.; Lederberg, Amy R.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    We examined acquisition of grapheme-phoneme correspondences by 4 deaf and hard-of-hearing preschoolers using instruction from a curriculum designed specifically for this population supplemented by Visual Phonics. Learning was documented through a multiple baseline across content design as well as descriptive analyses. Preschoolers who used sign…

  18. ATM: Restructing Learning for Deaf Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Barbara; Stockford, David

    Governor Baxter School for the Deaf is one of six Maine pilot sites chosen by NYNEX to showcase asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) technology. ATM is a network connection that allows high bandwidth transmission of data, voice, and video. Its high speed capability allows for high quality two-way full-motion video, which is especially beneficial to a…

  19. Deaf Children's Bimodal Bilingualism and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanwick, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the research into deaf children's bilingualism and bilingual education through a synthesis of studies published over the last 15 years. This review brings together the linguistic and pedagogical work on bimodal bilingualism to inform educational practice. The first section of the review provides a synthesis of…

  20. Directory of Organizations (Deafness and Communication Disorders)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Policies Free Publications U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health USA.gov-Government Made Easy NIH... Turning Discovery Into Health ® National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 31 Center Drive, MSC 2320, Bethesda, MD ...

  1. Toward More Effective Conversations with Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dorothy

    1987-01-01

    The classroom teachers' style of conversing with deaf children is as important as the communication mode in the students' development of linguistic competence in English. Emphasis on a conversational style with low repair and low control should lead to increased student initiative and fewer misunderstandings of teachers' comments. (VW)

  2. THE DEAF BODY AND ITS SINGULARITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article refers to a section of a master dissertation held at Univates University Center from July 2013 to July 2015. Among the theories of philosophers of difference, including Deleuze and Barthes, the following research problem was taken: How a deaf body is pierced by different means other than the representation? Such a problem unfolds on the following objectives: understanding the ways in which some deaf bodies are unique and how they empower their lives; carto(photographing the affects produced by the encounter between a deaf body and the photography. These carto(photographs were held at different times, with three deaf people in the cities of Lajeado / RS and Estrela / RS, from paths which were traveled using a camera. The encounter with the work "Walking" by Lygia Clark (1964 served to think the route as a work that takes place in the act. In some cases, an unfinished body in motion of constant refusal to fix; in many others, only one body captured by stratified lines. At the end of the survey, it’s possible to see that the body's release is always difficult, so that it is more fixed in the objectivity and brevity, rather than in what a body is capable of producing as uniqueness.

  3. Molecular pathogenefic mechanism of maternally inherited deafness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Min-Xin

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA) have been shown to be one of the important causes of deafness.In particular, mutations in mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA)have been found to be associated with both syndromic and non-syndromic forms of sensorineural hearing loss.The deafness-linked mutations often occur in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene and the tRNA genes.The mutations in the 12S rRNA gene account for a significant number of cases of aminoglycoside ototoxicity.The other hot spot for mutations associated with hearing impairment is the tRNA Ser(UCN)gene,as five deafness-linked mutations have been identified.Non-syndromic deafness-linked mtDNA mutations are often homoplasmic or at high levels of heteroplasm,indicating a high threshold for pathogenicity.Phenotypic expression of these mtDNA mutations require the contribution of other factors,such as nuclear modifier gene(s),environmental factor(s) and mitochondrial haplotype(s).

  4. Sudden Deafness during Antepartum versus Postpartum Periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bang-Yan; Young, Yi-Ho

    2017-10-06

    This study reviewed our experience in treating sudden deafness in antepartum (pregnant) and postpartum women during the past 2 decades. From 1997 to 2016, we have recorded sudden deafness in 16 antepartum (mean age, 32 years) and 3 postpartum (mean age, 31 years) women. Sudden deafness occurred during the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd trimesters in 5, 4, and 7 antepartum women, respectively. In contrast, the mean interval between giving birth and symptom onset in the 3 postpartum women was 18 days. Each patient underwent an inner ear test battery. In 8 antepartum women treated by dextran infusion, the outcome as regards hearing was improved in 7 patients (88%) and unchanged in 1 patient. In contrast, the other 8 antepartum women selected no treatment, and only 1 patient (12%) achieved hearing improvement, exhibiting a significantly better outcome when receiving dextran treatment. For the postpartum women, 2 patients had hearing improvement when treated by antioxidants, while 1 patient retained unchanged hearing without treatment. Medication is needed in sudden deafness in antepartum or postpartum women rather than waiting for a natural course. No adverse effects have been identified in any of the mothers or offspring 1 year after delivery. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Visual perceptual load induces inattentional deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, James S P; Lavie, Nilli

    2011-08-01

    In this article, we establish a new phenomenon of "inattentional deafness" and highlight the level of load on visual attention as a critical determinant of this phenomenon. In three experiments, we modified an inattentional blindness paradigm to assess inattentional deafness. Participants made either a low- or high-load visual discrimination concerning a cross shape (respectively, a discrimination of line color or of line length with a subtle length difference). A brief pure tone was presented simultaneously with the visual task display on a final trial. Failures to notice the presence of this tone (i.e., inattentional deafness) reached a rate of 79% in the high-visual-load condition, significantly more than in the low-load condition. These findings establish the phenomenon of inattentional deafness under visual load, thereby extending the load theory of attention (e.g., Lavie, Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance, 25, 596-616, 1995) to address the cross-modal effects of visual perceptual load.

  6. An Analysis of the Relationship between Identity Patterns of Turkish Deaf Adolescents and the Communication Modes Used in Special Residential Schools for the Hearing Impaired and Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Hakan

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between identity patterns and the communication modes of deaf adolescents aged between 14 and 18 years in Turkey. They were currently being educated in state residential secondary schools for the deaf. Deaf adolescents were administered the "Deaf Identity Scale" presented in Turkish using total communication…

  7. AUDIOLOGY AND EDUCATION OF THE DEAF, A RESEARCH PROJECT AND TRAINING MANUAL SPONSORED BY THE JOINT COMMITTEE ON AUDIOLOGY AND EDUCATION OF THE DEAF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VENTRY, IRA M.

    TO IMPROVE UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN AUDIOLOGISTS AND EDUCATORS OF THE DEAF, THE AMERICAN SPEECH AND HEARING ASSOCIATION AND THE CONFERENCE OF EXECUTIVES OF AMERICAN SCHOOLS FOR THE DEAF SPONSORED A TWO YEAR PROJECT. FIVE DIFFERENT QUESTIONNAIRES WERE SENT TO SPEECH AND HEARING CENTERS, SCHOOLS FOR THE DEAF, TEACHERS OF THE DEAF, AND AUDIOLOGISTS. THE…

  8. Prior knowledge and reading comprehension ability of deaf adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D; Paul, P; Smith, J

    1997-01-01

    Fifty-one severely to profoundly deaf students (mean dB hearing loss = 89) were randomly assigned to two groups that differed by the type of probes (short or long) used to elicit prior knowledge (PK). PK scores were used to predict reading comprehension (RC), which was assessed by students' responses to three types of questions: test-explicit (TE), text-implicit (TI), and script-implicit (SI). Multiple regression models with PK scores and scores from a standardized achievement test (Stanford Achievement Test - Hearing Impaired Version, reading subtest) were also used to predict RC. The regression model showed that, for the group pretested with an in-depth, or long, probe of PK, the best predictor of RC was the ability to answer TE and SI questions. We present discussions of the observed differences in comprehension as a function of long and short knowledge probes and the use of three question types, together with implications for instruction.

  9. [The preliminary research of progress on sudden deafness with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Yu, Youjin; Zhao, Yuanxin; Wang, Yuejian; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Qiuling

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the prognosis of sudden deafness patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). The clinical data of 24 sudden deafness patients with BPPV was analyzed. The outcome of 125 sudden deafness patients without BPPV at the same time was compared. Hearing improvement after three months treatment was 41.67% and 72.80% in sudden deafness patients with BPPV and sudden deafness patients without BPPV, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (Psudden deafness patients with BPPV is worse than that in sudden deafness patients without BPPV. BPPV may predict a poor hearing outcome in sudden deafness.

  10. The influence of language deprivation in early childhood on L2 processing: An ERP comparison of deaf native signers and deaf signers with a delayed language acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotara, Nils; Salden, Uta; Kügow, Monique; Hänel-Faulhaber, Barbara; Röder, Brigitte

    2012-05-03

    To examine which language function depends on early experience, the present study compared deaf native signers, deaf non-native signers and hearing German native speakers while processing German sentences. The participants watched simple written sentences while event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. At the end of each sentence they were asked to judge whether the sentence was correct or not. Two types of violations were introduced in the middle of the sentence: a semantically implausible noun or a violation of subject-verb number agreement. The results showed a similar ERP pattern after semantic violations (an N400 followed by a positivity) in all three groups. After syntactic violations, native German speakers and native signers of German sign language (DGS) with German as second language (L2) showed a left anterior negativity (LAN) followed by a P600, whereas no LAN but a negativity over the right hemisphere instead was found in deaf participants with a delayed onset of first language (L1) acquisition. The P600 of this group had a smaller amplitude and a different scalp distribution as compared to German native speakers. The results of the present study suggest that language deprivation in early childhood alters the cerebral organization of syntactic language processing mechanisms for L2. Semantic language processing instead was unaffected.

  11. The influence of language deprivation in early childhood on L2 processing: An ERP comparison of deaf native signers and deaf signers with a delayed language acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skotara Nils

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine which language function depends on early experience, the present study compared deaf native signers, deaf non-native signers and hearing German native speakers while processing German sentences. The participants watched simple written sentences while event-related potentials (ERPs were recorded. At the end of each sentence they were asked to judge whether the sentence was correct or not. Two types of violations were introduced in the middle of the sentence: a semantically implausible noun or a violation of subject-verb number agreement. Results The results showed a similar ERP pattern after semantic violations (an N400 followed by a positivity in all three groups. After syntactic violations, native German speakers and native signers of German sign language (DGS with German as second language (L2 showed a left anterior negativity (LAN followed by a P600, whereas no LAN but a negativity over the right hemisphere instead was found in deaf participants with a delayed onset of first language (L1 acquisition. The P600 of this group had a smaller amplitude and a different scalp distribution as compared to German native speakers. Conclusions The results of the present study suggest that language deprivation in early childhood alters the cerebral organization of syntactic language processing mechanisms for L2. Semantic language processing instead was unaffected.

  12. Learning via direct and mediated instruction by deaf students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Sapere, Patricia; Convertino, Carol; Pelz, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments investigated classroom learning by deaf college students receiving lectures from instructors signing for themselves or using interpreters. Deaf students' prior content knowledge, scores on postlecture assessments of content learning, and gain scores were compared to those of hearing classmates. Consistent with prior research, deaf students, on average, came into and left the classroom with less content knowledge than hearing peers, and use of simultaneous communication (sign and speech together) and American Sign Language (ASL) apparently were equally effective for deaf students' learning of the material. Students' self-rated sign language skills were not significantly related to performance. Two new findings were of particular importance. First, direct and mediated instruction (via interpreting) were equally effective for deaf college students under the several conditions employed here. Second, despite coming into the classroom with the disadvantage of having less content knowledge, deaf students' gain scores generally did not differ from those of their hearing peers. Possible explanations for these findings are considered.

  13. Representations of deaf characters in children's picture books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golos, Debbie B; Moses, Annie M

    2011-01-01

    Picture books can influence how children perceive people of different backgrounds, including people with disabilities whose cultures differ from their own. Researchers have examined the portrayal of multicultural characters with disabilities in children's literature. However, few have specifically considered the portrayal of deaf characters, despite increased inclusion of deaf characters in children's literature over the past two decades. The present study analyzed the portrayal of deaf characters in picture books for children ages 4-8 years. A content analysis of 20 children's picture books was conducted in which the books were analyzed for messages linked to pathological and cultural categories. Results indicated that these books did not portray Deaf characters from a cultural perspective but, rather, highlighted aspects of deafness as a medical condition, one that requires fixing and that perpetuates stereotypes of deafness as a disability.

  14. A Comparison of Parenting Dimensions Between Deaf and Hearing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekim, Ayfer; Ocakci, Ayse Ferda

    2016-06-01

    Effective parenting is vital for intellectual, physical, social, and emotional development of a child. This study examined the differences between the parenting dimensions of deaf children and healthy ones. The sample of the study consisted of 292 children and their parents (146 of them deaf children and 146 of them healthy ones). Dimensions of parenting (warmth, rejection, structure, chaos, autonomy, and coercion) were measured using the Parent as Social Context Questionnaire. The mean scores of the positive parenting dimensions of warmth and autonomy of deaf children were significantly lower; however, the mean scores of the negative dimensions of chaos and coercion of deaf children were significantly higher than those of healthy ones. Deaf children can become successful adults with the help of their parents. Our results regarding parenting dimensions will be a guide for future nursing interventions planned to develop the relationships between deaf children and their parents.

  15. Malay Speech Intelligibility Test (MSIT for Deaf Malaysian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkhairi Md. Yusof

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel approach to objectively measure speech intelligibility of deaf Malaysian children using nonsense syllables as test words. In this study, speech intelligibility of deaf children is measured through the ability to say simple syllables (consisting of a consonant and a vowel for all the 22 Malay consonants. The MSIT score should indicate how well these children can produce speech; the higher the score, the better their speech intelligibility. The MSIT have been tested with twenty deaf and ten normal hearning Malaysian children and has been verified by five naïve and two expert listeners. The application of the test is presented as speech intelligibility index for deaf children in a deaf school. The successful development of the MSIT system serves to assist speech pathologist, therapist, teachers and parents of deaf children to determine the level of Malay speech deficiencies and the effectiveness of corrective measures taken.

  16. Electromyographic analysis of the masseter and temporal muscles in oralized deaf individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalo, S C H; Vitti, M; Semprini, M; Rosa, L B; Martinez, F H R M; Santos, C M; Hallak, J E C

    2006-01-01

    Deaf individuals show a number of difficulties related to the functionality of the stomatognathic system, mainly by reason of the little or no use of facial musculature during speech either due to the use of sign language or to the difficulty that these individuals have in articulating words. The stomatognathic system muscles play important roles in functions such as mastication, deglutition, and phonation. This study aimed to assess, by means of computerized bilateral electromyography (EMG), masseter and temporal muscles of 12 oralized deaf individuals in clinical activities that involve part of this masticatory musculature and compare this system's functionality with that of 12 normal listening individuals, performing the same activities. An 8-channel K6-I EMG Light Channel Surface Electromyography device was used (Myo-Tronics Co.Seattle, WA, USA), in addition to disposable double electrodes covered with silver chloride (Duotrodes; Myo-tronics Co., Seattle, WA) containing a conductor gel (Myogel- Myo-tronics Co., Seatlle, WA). The averaged rectified EMG values were normalized with reference to the EMG amplitude induced by a maximum bite force. The statistical analysis confirmed that there were any significant differences between the groups, clinical activities, and muscles, and also effects of interaction among them. The analysis made use of Variance Analysis (ANOVA). Significant differences (p masseter and temporal muscular activity such as mastication, mouth opening and closing, and dental compression. Greater electromyographic values were found for both deaf individuals and healthy controls during clinical activities of mastication and dental compression. Based on the obtained data, we concluded that deaf individuals showed a lower activity of the masticatory musculature than healthy individuals; the differences were significant at the level of p < 0.01 between the performed clinical activities; and all deaf individuals and healthy controls showed greater

  17. Predicate structures, gesture, and simultaneity in the representation of action in British Sign Language: evidence from deaf children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Kearsy; Smith, Sandra; Sevcikova, Zed

    2013-01-01

    British Sign Language (BSL) signers use a variety of structures, such as constructed action (CA), depicting constructions (DCs), or lexical verbs, to represent action and other verbal meanings. This study examines the use of these verbal predicate structures and their gestural counterparts, both separately and simultaneously, in narratives by deaf children with various levels of exposure to BSL (ages 5;1 to 7;5) and deaf adult native BSL signers. Results reveal that all groups used the same types of predicative structures, including children with minimal BSL exposure. However, adults used CA, DCs, and/or lexical signs simultaneously more frequently than children. These results suggest that simultaneous use of CA with lexical and depicting predicates is more complex than the use of these predicate structures alone and thus may take deaf children more time to master.

  18. Music Therapy Interventions for Deaf Clients with Dual Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Johnson Ward

    2016-01-01

    The current music therapy literature addresses the use of music with the Deaf population, particularly those with cochlear implants. However, few studies or descriptions of music therapy with Deaf individuals who are dually diagnosed with an emotional or behavioral disorder and an intellectual disability have been conducted. Given that music therapy has been found to be an effective intervention for both Deaf individuals and individuals with emotional or behavioral needs, ideas and resources ...

  19. Understanding The Writing Conventions of Deaf Urban Latino Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Negrete, Mark Steven

    2015-01-01

    The thesis project analyzes the trajectory and components of English writing conventions of Deaf Urban Latino Youth. It is an analysis of writing features and strategies in punctuation, organization, paragraph writing, neatness and portions of English grammar. The lessons call for real world everyday experiences of communication for Deaf youth in conjunction with English writing. Deaf Latino students in particular undergo a contention of acquiring English writing skills while experiencing oth...

  20. Pathophysiology of reversible sudden deafness--epidemiological study.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohsaki, Katsuichiro; Aoyama, Hideyasu

    1983-01-01

    Many aspects of the etiology and pathophysiology of reversible sudden deafness remain obscure. In order to better understand the pathophysiology of reversible sudden deafness we compared the results of two therapies which have different mechanisms of action. The results of therapy with tranexamic acid alone in 49 cases (57 ears) of sudden deafness were compared with the results of treatment with so-called antisludging agents in 65 cases (69 ears) using the chi square contingency test. The sam...