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Sample records for preliminary nutritional requirements

  1. Burns, metabolism and nutritional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça Machado, N; Gragnani, A; Masako Ferreira, L

    2011-01-01

    To review the nutritional evaluation in burned patient, considering the literature descriptions of nutritional evaluation and energy requirements of these patients. Thermal injury is the traumatic event with the highest metabolic response in critically ill patients. Various mathematical formulas have been developed to estimate nutritional requirements in burned patient. Indirect Calorimetry is the only method considered gold standard for measuring caloric expenditure. A survey of the literature and data was collected based on official data bases, LILACS, EMBASE and PubMed. The metabolic changes involved in hypermetabolism are designed to supply energy to support immune function, brain activity, wound healing, and preservation of body tissues. Body weight is considered the easiest indicator and perhaps the best to assess the nutritional status. The most common formulas utilized in these patients are the Curreri, Pennisi, Schofield, Ireton-Jones, Harris-Benedict and the ASPEN recommendations. For children is the Mayes and World Health Organization formula. The majority of mathematical formulas overestimate the nutritional needs. The regular use of Indirect Calorimetry supplies adequate nutritional support to the burn patient. The traditional nutritional evaluation considers anthropometry, biochemical markers and estimation of nutritional requirements. The weight provides a basis for decisions that are established in the clinical context. Classic parameters can be adapted to intensive care environment. The use of Indirect Calorimetry is crucial to ensure the safety of the nutritional support of burn patients and this should be widely encouraged.

  2. Nutritional Requirements for Space Station Freedom Crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Helen W.; Rice, Barbara L.; Wogan, Christine F. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to set preliminary nutritional requirements for crewmembers flying from 90 to 180 day missions on Space Station Freedom. Specific recommendations included providing crewmembers with in flight feedback on nutritional intake, weight and strength, and incorporating issues of energy intake, body weight, body composition, strength, and protein intake in the flight medicine program. Exercise must be considered an integral part of any plan to maintain nutritional status, especially those modes that stress the skeleton and maintain body weight. Nutrient intake, amount of exercise, and drugs ingested must be recorded daily; high priority should be given to development of fully automated record systems that minimize astronauts' effort. A system of nutritional supplements should be developed to provide a method for reducing intake deficits that become apparent. Finally, post flight monitoring should include bone density, muscle mass and function, and iron status at three and six months after landing.

  3. Nutritional requirements after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnic, Gordana

    2014-06-01

    This article presents an overview of postoperative nutritional requirements and goals following bariatric surgery. It summarizes current diet progression and nutrient intake guidelines geared toward optimizing weight loss and maintaining adequate nutritional status, nutrient absorption, as well as hydration. The article further emphasizes the importance of postoperative follow-up with a bariatric multidisciplinary team for appropriate postoperative care, diet management, and nutrient deficiency screenings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tilapia: environmental and nutritional requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilapia are an important species to global aquaculture production. Their adaptability to a wide range of environmental and nutritional conditions and their ability to grow and reproduce make them a prime species for aquaculture. Nonetheless, to achieve maximum performance in culture, tilapia requir...

  5. Nutritional requirements and assessing nutritional status in camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Saun, Robert J

    2009-07-01

    It has been nearly 30 years since the first imported llamas and alpacas have been commercially raised in the United States. Nutritional requirements for these animals have not been well understood and most feeding practices were based on extrapolated and experiential information. Only recently has a National Research Council committee reviewed the available published information relative to nutrient requirements of llamas and alpacas. This article summarizes current nutrient requirement recommendations and provides some practical feeding recommendations and methods to assess nutritional status.

  6. Some Principles and Requirements in Fish Nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    J.F.N. Abowei; A.T. Ekubo

    2011-01-01

    Fish, especially when reared in high densities, require a high-quality, nutritionally complete, balanced diet to grow rapidly and remain healthy. Fish gut is a tubular structure beginning from the mouth and ending at the annus. Many fish chew their food and have the ability to secrete mucus substances from the mucus gland. In fish, the enzymes are liberated into the lumen of the gut and the products of their action absorbed (extra cellular digestion). Chromium oxide (Cr2O3) mixed with prepare...

  7. Nutrition Research: Basis for Station Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Helen W.; Rice, Barbara; Smith, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Prior to the Shuttle program, all understanding of nutritional needs in space came from Skylab metabolic research. Because Shuttle flights were short, most less than 14 days, research focused on major nutritional issues: energy (calories), protein and amino acids, water and electrotypes, with some more general physiology studies that related to iron and calcium. Using stable isotope tracer studies and diet intake records, we found that astronauts typically did not consume adequate calories to meet energy expenditure. To monitor energy and nutrient intake status and provide feedback to the flight surgeon and the astronauts, the International Space Station (ISS) program implemented a weekly food frequency questionnaire and routine body mass measurements. Other Shuttle investigations found that protein turnover was higher during flight, suggesting there was increased protein degradation and probably concurrent increase in protein synthesis, and this occurred even in cases of adequate protein and caloric intake. These results may partially explain some of the loss of leg muscle mass. Fluid and electrolyte flight studies demonstrated that water intake, like energy intake, was lower than required. However, sodium intakes were elevated during flight and likely related to other concerns such as calcium turnover and other health-related issues. NASA is making efforts to have tasty foods with much lower salt levels to reduce sodium intake and to promote fluid intake on orbit. Red blood cell studies conducted on the Shuttle found decreased erythrogenesis and increased serum ferritin levels. Given that the diet is high in iron there may be iron storage health concerns, especially related to the role of iron in oxidative damage, complicated by the stress and radiation. The Shuttle nutrition research lead to new monitoring and research on ISS. These data will be valuable for future NASA and commercial crewed missions.

  8. Oral contraceptives and changes in nutritional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmery, M; Saraceno, A; Vaiarelli, A; Carlomagno, G

    2013-07-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) are a major class of prescription drug, used by a large proportion of women starting from early adolescence. Much research has been conducted to investigate the physiological changes that occur in women who take OCs. These include changes in general health as well as in nutritional needs. In terms of nutrition, several studies investigated whether women on OCs need different amounts of some vitamins and minerals. In particular, a report from the World Health Organization (WHO) points out that the influence of OCs on nutrient requirements is a topic of high clinical relevance and should, therefore, receive great attention. It has been shown that the key nutrient depletions concern folic acid, vitamins B2, B6, B12, vitamin C and E and the minerals magnesium, selenium and zinc. Most research has focused on the levels of these vitamins and minerals in the blood of women who take OCs compared to women who do not. Since women who take OCs not always have adequate diet, may have unhealthy life style or may suffer from pathologies of malabsorption, the possibility to prevent vitamin and mineral deficiencies by taking appropriate dietary supplements should be considered a first-line approach by clinicians.

  9. Chocolate Bars Based on Human Nutritional Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, Anthony,

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Key Points * The nutritional value of chocolate bars should be based on the nutritional value of the low energy dense late Paleolithic human diet to help reduce mental ill health, obesity, and other postprandial insults. * Current chocolate bars have a high energy density (>2 kcal/g). * Cocoa can be sweetened by the addition of calorie-free Purefruit™ (Tate & Lyle) monk fruit ( Siraitia grosvenorii ) extract. PUREFRUIT™ is approximately 200 times sweeter than sugar and...

  10. Chocolate Bars Based on Human Nutritional Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, Anthony,

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Key Points * The nutritional value of chocolate bars should be based on the nutritional value of the low energy dense late Paleolithic human diet to help reduce mental ill health, obesity, and other postprandial insults. * Current chocolate bars have a high energy density (>2 kcal/g). * Cocoa can be sweetened by the addition of calorie-free Purefruit™ (Tate & Lyle) monk fruit ( Siraitia grosvenorii ) extract. PUREFRUIT™ is approximately 200 times sweeter than sugar and...

  11. Nutritional requirements and parenteral nutrition in preterm infants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    airway pressure, and artificial surfactant therapy have resulted in improvement .... 3 g/kg/day is well tolerated without adverse effects and provides the required .... Randomized trial of early diet in preterm infants and later intelligence quotient.

  12. Are functional foods redefining nutritional requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter J; Varady, Krista A

    2008-02-01

    Functional foods are increasing in popularity owing to their ability to confer health and physiological benefits. Nevertheless, the notion that functional foods improve health when providing nutrients at levels above and beyond existing recommended intakes is inconsistent with the definition of requirement. This disparity highlights the need for an alternative definition of nutrient requirement. The present objective is to examine distinctions between optimization of health, as defined by what we currently deem as required intakes, versus adding physiological benefit using bioactive agents found in functional foods. Presently, requirement is defined as the lowest amount of intake of a nutrient that will maintain a defined level of nourishment for a specific indicator of adequacy. In contrast, functional foods are described as ingredients that are not necessary for body function, yet provide added physiological benefit that confer better overall health. Plant sterols are one example of such an ingredient. Plant sterols lower plasma cholesterol concentrations, and may thus be considered essential nutrients in physiological situations where circulating cholesterol concentrations are high. Similarly, intakes of omega-3 fats beyond existing requirement may confer additional health benefits such as hypolipidemic and anti-diabetic effects. These examples underscore the inconsistencies between what is defined as a nutrient requirement versus what is identified as a health benefit of a functional food. Such discrepancies emphasize the need for a more all-encompassing definition of a nutrient requirement; that is, one that moves beyond the prevention of overt deficiency to encompass improved health and disease risk reduction.

  13. Smart gun technology requirements preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, D.R.; Brandt, D.J.; Tweet, K.D.

    1995-05-01

    Goal of the Smart Gun Technology project is to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user from firing a law enforcement officer`s firearm by implementing user-recognizing-and-authorizing surety technologies. This project is funded by the National Institute of Justice. This document reports the projects first objective: to find and document the requirements for a user-recognizing-and-authorizing firearm technology that law enforcement officers will value. This report details the problem of firearm takeaways in law enforcement, the methodology used to develop the law enforcement officers` requirements, and the requirements themselves.

  14. Amino acid nutrition of fishes: requirements and supplementation of diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketola, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is: (1) to make a concise review of the published dietary requirements of fishes for amino acids, (2) to describe recent findings at the Tunison Laboratory concerning amino acid nutrition of trout, (3) to review specific signs of deficiency of amino acids, and (4) to discuss use of the fish egg amino acid pattern as a guideline to formulating new feeds or studying amino acid requirements of fishes for which there is limited information on their quantitative requirements.

  15. Influence of exercise on nutritional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, D R; Meksawan, K; Limprasertkul, A; Fisher, N M

    2011-03-01

    There is no consensus on the best diet for exercise, as many variables influence it. We propose an approach that is based on the total energy expenditure of exercise and the specific macro- and micronutrients used. di Prampero quantified the impact of intensity and duration on the energy cost of exercise. This can be used to determine the total energy needs and the balance of fats and carbohydrates (CHO). There are metabolic differences between sedentary and trained persons, thus the total energy intake to prevent overfeeding of sedentary persons and underfeeding athletes is important. During submaximal sustained exercise, fat oxidation (FO) plays an important role. This role is diminished and CHO's role increases as exercise intensity increases. At super-maximal exercise intensities, anaerobic glycolysis dominates. In the case of protein and micronutrients, specific recommendations are required. We propose that for submaximal exercise, the balance of CHO and fat favors fat for longer exercise and CHO for shorter exercise, while always maintaining the minimal requirements of each (CHO: 40% and fat: 30%). A case for higher protein (above 15%) as well as creatine supplementation for resistance exercise has been proposed. One may also consider increasing bicarbonate intake for exercise that relies on anaerobic glycolysis, whereas there appears to be little support for antioxidant supplementation. Insuring minimal levels of substrate will prevent exercise intolerance, while increasing some components may increase exercise tolerance.

  16. Nutritional potassium requirement for laying Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Guilherme Perazzo Costa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the potassium requirement for laying Japanese quails. Two hundred and forty quails were distributed in a randomized block design, with five treatments and six replicates, with eight birds each. The treatments consisted of a basal diet deficient in potassium (K (2.50 g/kg, supplemented with potassium carbonate, to replace the inert, to reach levels of 2.50, 3.50, 4.50, 5.50 and 6.50 (g/kg of K in the diet. There was a quadratic effect of K levels on feed intake, egg production, egg mass and feed conversion per egg mass and per egg dozen, estimating the requirements of 4.26, 4.41, 4.38, 4.43 and 4.48 (g/kg of K diet, respectively. There was no significant effect on the levels of K in the diet on egg weight, albumen weight, percentage of yolk or shell and yolk color. However, yolk and shell weights reduced and the albumen percentage increased linearly with increasing levels of K in the diet. Despite the reduction of shell weight, the increased levels of K did not influence the specific gravity and shell thickness. The use of 4.41 g/kg of potassium is recommended in the diet for laying Japanese quails.

  17. Nutritional requirements of the critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Nuno André de Almeida; Marinho, Aníbal Defensor; Cançado, Luciana Ribeiro

    2012-09-01

    Given the inaccessibility of indirect calorimetry, intensive care units generally use predictive equations or recommendations that are established by international societies to determine energy expenditure. The aim of the present study was to compare the energy expenditure of critically ill patients, as determined using indirect calorimetry, to the values obtained using the Harris-Benedict equation. A retrospective observational study was conducted at the Intensive Care Unit 1 of the Centro Hospitalar do Porto. The energy requirements of hospitalized critically ill patients as determined using indirect calorimetry were assessed between January 2003 and April 2012. The accuracy (± 10% difference between the measured and estimated values), the mean differences and the limits of agreement were determined for the studied equations. Eighty-five patients were assessed using 288 indirect calorimetry measurements. The following energy requirement values were obtained for the different methods: 1,753.98±391.13 kcal/day (24.48 ± 5.95 kcal/kg/day) for indirect calorimetry and 1,504.11 ± 266.99 kcal/day (20.72±2.43 kcal/kg/day) for the Harris-Benedict equation. The equation had a precision of 31.76% with a mean difference of -259.86 kcal/day and limits of agreement between -858.84 and 339.12 kcal/day. Sex (p=0.023), temperature (p=0.009) and body mass index (p<0.001) were found to significantly affect energy expenditure. The Harris-Benedict equation is inaccurate and tends to underestimate energy expenditure. In addition, the Harris-Benedict equation is associated with significant differences between the predicted and true energy expenditure at an individual level.

  18. [Modern medico-biological nutritional requirements for pregnant women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baĭkova, D; Markov, D; Markov, P; Ivanov, S

    2007-01-01

    This review describes the basic physiological requirements, expert opinions and medico-biological recommendations for the optimal nutritional regime of pregnant women. In the first trimester of pregnancy the nutritional intake should be supplemented by about +68 kcal/24 h (the normal intake is 2000 kcal/24 h for non-pregnant women in the respective age group). In the second trimester the supplementation should be by +266 kcal/24 h, while in the III trimester--by up to +496 kcal/24 h. The requirements of folic acid and vitamin B6 during pregnancy are increased by 50%. The need for vitamin A is augmented up to 60%, while for vitamin C, niacin, vitamin B2 and B12--up to 30%. However, the requirements of iron and iodine are increased at most--100%. The weight gain in pregnant women should normally be in the range of 10-12.5 kg. During the I and II trimester it should be not substantial, while in the III trimester it should be about 350-400 g/per week. The risks associated with obesity and uncontrolled weight gain during pregnancy are discussed. Consulting physicians are provided with expert opinions about the individualization of the nutritional intake according to the specific metabolic changes during pregnancy and with definitions of an adequate in energy supply and nutritional balance diet.

  19. Nutritional and fluid requirements: high-output stomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlin, Sophie

    Based on the current available evidence, this article explores the nutritional management of those with a high-output stoma. The main alterations required to the intake of patients with a high-output stoma include the use of an oral rehydration solution to ensure optimum absorption of fluid and sodium, and a high-calorie, high-protein diet, with the aim of optimizing nutritional status. Diet advice should be delivered by a dietitian with experience in managing these complex patients. Monitoring of electrolytes and micronutrients is essential, and long-term follow up from a multidisciplinary nutrition support team is invaluable in coordinating this. Patients with high-output stomas can enjoy good quality of life and long-term health if their condition is managed effectively by a well-organized multidisciplinary team.

  20. Influence of human genetic variation on nutritional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Patrick J

    2006-02-01

    Genetic variation is known to affect food tolerances among human subpopulations and may also influence dietary requirements, giving rise to the new field of nutritional genomics and raising the possibility of individualizing nutritional intake for optimal health and disease prevention on the basis of an individual's genome. However, because gene-diet interactions are complex and poorly understood, the use of genomic knowledge to adjust population-based dietary recommendations is not without risk. Whereas current recommendations target most of the population to prevent nutritional deficiencies, inclusion of genomic criteria may indicate subpopulations that may incur differential benefit or risk from generalized recommendations and fortification policies. Current efforts to identify gene alleles that affect nutrient utilization have been enhanced by the identification of genetic variations that have expanded as a consequence of selection under extreme conditions. Identification of genetic variation that arose as a consequence of diet as a selective pressure helps to identify gene alleles that affect nutrient utilization. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying gene-nutrient interactions and their modification by genetic variation is expected to result in dietary recommendations and nutritional interventions that optimize individual health.

  1. Nutritional status and nutritional habits of men with benign prostatic hyperplasia or prostate cancer - preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goluch-Koniuszy, Zuzanna; Rygielska, Magda; Nowacka, Ilona

    2013-01-01

    The ageing in men, the most frequent pathologic lesions affecting the prostatic gland in this period are benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PC), the course of which may be influenced by the improper nutritional status of patients and their nutritional habits. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the nutritional status and eating habits of men diagnosed and treated for one of the above diseases. MATERIAL AND METODS: The nutritional status of 30 male patients with clinically confirmed and treated disease of the prostatic gland, including 15 men (aged 51-75 years) with BPH and 15 men (aged 51-73 years) with PC, was evaluated based on their BMI, WC, WHR, and WHtR parameters. In turn, the energy and nutritive value of 90 daily food rations (DFRs) was evaluated. Finally, calculations were made for the Key's index of diet atherogenicity, resultant Glycemic Index (GI) and Glycemic Load (GL). Higher values of the BMI, WC, WHR and WHtR parameters were noted in the men with PC, they were also characterized by a higher incidence of peripheral subcutaneous obesity and visceral obesity. The DFRs of the men were characterized by a low energy value and by a low intake of available carbohydrates, dietary fi ber, K, Ca, Mg, vitamins D and C, and fl uids at a simultaneously high intake of total and animal protein, cholesterol, Na, P, Fe, Cu as well as vitamins B2 and PP. The contribution of energy derived from the basic nutrients diverged from the recommended values. In addition, the DFRs were characterized by high values of Key's index and 24-h GL. Differences in meeting the RDA for selected nutrients between the analysed groups of men were statistically significant. The improper nutritional status of the men may result from their incorrect nutritional habits which fail to improve their health status, and even predispose them to the development of some diet-dependent diseases. In view of that, both correction of diets of the surveyed men, as well as

  2. Nutritional status and nutritional habits of men with benign prostatic hyperplasia or prostate cancer - preliminary investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzanna Goluch-Koniuszy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The ageing in men, the most frequent pathologic lesions affecting the prostatic gland in this period are benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate cancer (PC, the course of which may be infl uenced by the improper nutritional status of patients and their nutritional habits. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the nutritional status and eating habits of men diagnosed and treated for one of the above diseases. Material and metods. The nutritional status of 30 male patients with clinically confi rmed and treated disease of the prostatic gland, including 15 men (aged 51-75 years with BPH and 15 men (aged 51-73 years with PC, was evaluated based on their BMI, WC, WHR, and WHtR parameters. In turn, the energy and nutritive value of 90 daily food rations (DFRs was evaluated. Finally, calculations were made for the Key’s index of diet atherogenicity, resultant Glycemic Index (GI and Glycemic Load (GL. Results. Higher values of the BMI, WC, WHR and WHtR parameters were noted in the men with PC, they were also characterized by a higher incidence of peripheral subcutaneous obesity and visceral obesity. The DFRs of the men were characterized by a low energy value and by a low intake of available carbohydrates, dietary fi ber, K, Ca, Mg, vitamins D and C, and fl uids at a simultaneously high intake of total and animal protein, cholesterol, Na, P, Fe, Cu as well as vitamins B2 and PP. The contribution of energy derived from the basic nutrients diverged from the recommended values. In addition, the DFRs were characterized by high values of Key’s index and 24-h GL. Differences in meeting the RDA for selected nutrients between the analysed groups of men were statistically signifi cant. Conclusions. The improper nutritional status of the men may result from their incorrect nutritional habits which fail to improve their health status, and even predispose them to the development of some diet-dependent diseases. In view of that

  3. SPANISH MULTICENTRIC STUDY ABOUT NUTRITION-INFLAMATIONhn WITH MID DILUTION (ENIMID STUDY: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barril G

    2012-06-01

    CONCLUSIONS: 1-The preliminary results show that MidDilution provides a good removal of small and middle molecules, increases appetite by providing a proper balance of cytokines through stimulation of antiinflamatory ones and neuropeptide Y. 2-It provides an improvement of body composition. Finally MidDilution improves nutritional parameters which leads to a better quality of life, as well as physical and mental status.

  4. Nutritional preliminary characterization of some indigenous raw materials used in formulation of concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houcine Selmi,

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cereal grains and proteins are varied and numerous in Tunisia. The use of these local resources remains limited because of a shift towards relying on imports and state subsidies. This has caused disruption of the national economic strategy and the sustainability of farming systems. Thus, in recent years, research for alternative feed resources readily available within the country borders has accelerated. Among these indigenous resources, barley, triticale, white sorghum, and faba beans who have nutritional values potentially similar to those of corn and soybean meal were incorporated into the formulation of feed concentrate to supplement dairy sheep rations based on encouraging preliminary results on nutritive values (number and types of ciliates, total gas and on quantity and quality of produced milk in sheep

  5. Computer-aided hepatic tumour ablation requirements and preliminary results

    CERN Document Server

    Voirin, D; Amavizca, M; Letoublon, C; Troccaz, J; Voirin, David; Payan, Yohan; Amavizca, Miriam; Letoublon, Christian; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2002-01-01

    Surgical resection of hepatic tumours is not always possible, since it depends on different factors, among which their location inside the liver functional segments. Alternative techniques consist in local use of chemical or physical agents to destroy the tumour. Radio frequency and cryosurgical ablations are examples of such alternative techniques that may be performed percutaneously. This requires a precise localisation of the tumour placement during ablation. Computer-assisted surgery tools may be used in conjunction with these new ablation techniques to improve the therapeutic efficiency, whilst they benefit from minimal invasiveness. This paper introduces the principles of a system for computer-assisted hepatic tumour ablation and describes preliminary experiments focusing on data registration evaluation. To keep close to conventional protocols, we consider registration of pre-operative CT or MRI data to intra-operative echographic data.

  6. Sensorized pacifier to quantify the rhythmicity of non-nutritive sucking: A preliminary study on newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, A; Cecchi, F; Guzzetta, A; Laschi, C

    2015-01-01

    Non-nutritive sucking (NNS) is one of the most significant spontaneous actions of infants. The suction/expression rhythmicity of NNS remains unknown. We developed a sensorized pacifier for an objective measurement of NNS. Two miniaturized digital pressure sensors are embedded into a commercial pacifier and they acquired suction and expression pressures simultaneously. Experimental tests with nine newborns confirmed that our device is suitable for the measurement of the natural NNS behavior and for the extrapolation of parameters related to the suction/expression rhythmicity. Preliminary results encourage future studies to evaluate the possibility to use these parameters as indicators of oral feeding readiness of premature infants.

  7. Electronic Warfare M-on-N Digital Simulation Logging Requirements and HDF5: A Preliminary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-12

    E. Jarvis Electronic Warfare M-on- N Digital Simulation Logging Requirements and HDF5: A Preliminary Analysis Advanced Techniques Branch Tactical...12-04-2017 NRL Memorandum Report Electronic Warfare M-on- N Digital Simulation Logging Requirements and HDF5: A Preliminary Analysis Donald E...ELECTRONIC WARFARE M-ON- N DIGITAL SIMULATION LOGGING REQUIREMENTS AND HDF5: A PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS 1. INTRODUCTION HDF5 technology [Folk] has been

  8. Predictors of insulin requirements among hospitalized adults receiving parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehl, Kelly A; Lach, Kristen; Coltman, Anne E; Bacon, Cheryl A; Singh, Shubha; Peterson, Sarah J; Sowa, Diane C

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this quality improvement project was to determine factors predictive of parenteral nutrition (PN) insulin therapy. Patients receiving PN at a tertiary care academic medical center between January 1, 2009, and December 1, 2012, 18 years or older were included. Variables collected included demographics, medical information, and PN-specific data. χ(2) and Student t tests were used to determine differences between patients who did and did not require PN insulin. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to determine associations between characteristics. Stepwise forward logistic regression was used determine the best predictors of PN insulin. A total of 1388 patients were started on PN. After adjusting for potential confounders, strong associations existed between PN insulin requirements and diabetes mellitus (DM) diagnosis (OR, 8.90; 95% CI, 4.98-15.90, P obese status (body mass index ≥25.0 kg/m(2)) (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.04-4.30, P = .04), intensive care unit (ICU) admission (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.03-3.11, P = .04), blood glucose (BG) on day of PN start >120 mg/dL (OR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.32-4.05, P = .003), mean BG >180 mg/dL while receiving PN (OR, 6.10; 95% CI, 2.18-17.04, P = .001), and hemoglobin A1c (A1c) ≥5.7% (OR, 3.18; 95% CI, 1.84-5.50, P 120 mg/dL on PN start day (P < .001), and ICU admission (P < .001) predicted the need for PN insulin.

  9. Assistance for the Prescription of Nutritional Support Must Be Required in Nonexperienced Nutritional Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ouaïssi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the current practices of nutritional support among hospitalized patients in nonspecialized hospital departments. Materials and Methods. During an observation period of 2 months, a surgeon and a gastroenterologist designated in each of the two departments concerned, not “specialized” in nutritional assistance, have treated patients in which nutritional support seemed necessary. Assessing the degree of malnutrition of the patient, the therapeutic decision and the type of product prescribed by the doctors were secondarily compared to the proposals of a structured computer program according to the criteria and standards established by the institutions currently recognized. Results. The study included 120 patients bearing a surgical disease in 86.7% of cases and 10% of medical cases. 50% of the patients had cancer. Nutritional status was correctly evaluated in 38.3% by the initial doctors’ diagnosis—consistent with the software’s evaluation. The strategy of nutrition was concordant with the proposals of the software in 79.2% of cases. Conclusions. Despite an erroneous assessment of the nutritional status in more than two-thirds of cases the strategy of nutritional management was correct in 80% of cases. Malnutrition and its consequences can be prevented in nonexperienced nutritional teams by adequate nutritional support strategies coming from modern techniques including computerized programs.

  10. Nutritional requirements in pregnancy and use of dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Claire; Wyness, Laura

    2013-08-01

    A new British Nutrition Foundation (BNF) Task Force report has been published, which looks in detail at the impact of early life nutrition on health and the risk of diseases in later life, including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, bone health, allergic disease and cognitive function. One of the aspects that the report covers in detail is the health and nutrition of pregnant women and where improvements in the maternal diet could be made. This article focuses on the report's findings with regard to the essential nutrients folic acid and vitamin D, including current intakes and status, uptake of supplements and vulnerable groups that are falling short of dietary guidelines.

  11. Educational Requirements for Entry-Level Practice in the Profession of Nutrition and Dietetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad-Jorge, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The profession of nutrition and dietetics has experienced significant changes over the past 100 years due to advances in nutrition science and healthcare delivery. Although these advances have prompted changes in educational requirements in other healthcare professions, the requirements for entry-level registered dietitians have not changed since…

  12. Iodine: It's Important in Patients that Require Parenteral Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects on growth and development because of inadequate thyroid hormone production. Four methods are generally recommended for assessment of iodine nutrition: urinary iodine concentration, thyroid size, and blood concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone an

  13. Nutrition interventions in patients with gynecological cancers requiring surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermair, Andreas; Simunovic, Marko; Isenring, Liz; Janda, Monika

    2017-04-01

    Including developing countries, between 20 and 88% of gynecological oncology patients may present with at least mild malnutrition at diagnosis. Significant morbidity and mortality is attributed to malnutrition. Here we reviewed randomized clinical trials of nutritional interventions used to achieve early return to oral diet, enhance recovery from surgery and reduce adverse events in gynecological cancer patients undergoing surgery. Ebscohost (CINAHL+Medline+PsycINFO), Cochrane, Embase, PubMed and Scopus databases were searched for articles published from 2000 onwards. Potentially eligible articles were screened by two reviewers. Length of hospital stay (LOS), postoperative complications, recovery of intestinal function, quality of life (QOL), hematological and immunological parameters were outcome measures of the nutritional interventions. Seven randomized clinical trials were included in the review. Early clear liquid diet, semiliquid diet, regular diet or immune-enhanced enteral diets were all found to be safe as nutritional interventions. In five of the seven trials significantly better outcomes were observed in the intervention group compared to usual care for one of more of the outcomes intestinal recovery time, LOS, postoperative complications and immunological parameters. However, the nutritional interventions varied greatly between the trials, making it difficult to directly compare their findings. Trial quality was low to moderate. Recommended malnutrition screening and assessment tools and guidelines for treatment are reviewed. From the limited findings it would appear that nutritional interventions of early oral feeding and enteral feeding are safe. Receiving nutritional interventions seems to reduce LOS, intestinal recovery time and postoperative complications for some patients. Increasing use of neoadjuvant treatment may reduce the prevalence of patients presenting malnourished for surgery in the future. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier

  14. Analysis and prediction of nutritional requirements using structural properties of metabolic networks and support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takeyuki; Christian, Nils; Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Ebenhöh, Oliver; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2010-01-01

    Properties of graph representation of genome scale metabolic networks have been extensively studied. However, the relationship between these structural properties and functional properties of the networks are still very unclear. In this paper, we focus on nutritional requirements of organisms as a functional property and study the relationship with structural properties of a graph representation of metabolic networks. In order to examine the relationship, we study to what extent the nutritional requirements can be predicted by using support vector machines from structural properties, which include degree exponent, edge density, clustering coefficient, degree centrality, closeness centrality, betweenness centrality and eigenvector centrality. Furthermore, we study which properties are influential to the nutritional requirements.

  15. Nutritional Requirements Dietary Demand Research among Sports Coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhai Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study proposed the balance between heat and nutrients, the balance of the nutrients intake and acid-base balance, etc. At the same time, the relevant departments should strengthen the monitoring of sports nutrition, so as to ensure the coaches can match with the biochemical index, making use of nutritional supplements with a reasonable choice, to supply the inadequate dietary intake. The training of athletic sports has been approaching to the physical limit of the athletes, it is proved by the evidence that without the scientific guidance for training and no other means to aid the simple "hard training" cannot guarantee the athletes defeat the other opponents and achieve more good achievements in the competition.

  16. Creating convenience food based on human nutritional requirements

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Nanoscale science and technology are now enabling us to understand many natural and unnatural processes. Studying nanostructures at the cell and DNA level, gives us insight in to the working of these processes and how to manipulate, prevent and/or enhance them for the benefit of mankind. Emergent technologies can and must help correct the food system by creating modern convenience foods on a mass scale that mimic and improve on the nutritional value of the most nutriti...

  17. Nutrient intake and contribution of home enteral nutrition to meeting nutritional requirements after oesophagectomy and total gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, M L; Halliday, V; Robinson, P; Smith, K; Bowrey, D J

    2017-06-28

    This study evaluated nutrition after oesophago-gastric resection and the influence of home jejunostomy feeding in the six months after surgery. Data on nutritional intake and physiologic measures were collected as part of a randomised trial with measurements taken before and up to six months after surgery. A total of 41 participants (32 oesophagectomy, 9 total gastrectomy) received home jejunostomy feeding (n=18) or usual care without feeding (n=23). At hospital discharge, oral intakes were adequate for energy and protein in 9% and 6%, respectively. By three and six months, these values had increased to 61% and 55%, 94% and 77% respectively. Six participants (26%) who received usual care required rescue feeding. Six weeks after hospital discharge, energy intakes were met in those who received jejunal feeding because of the contribution of enteral nutrition. Jejunal feeding did not affect oral intake, being similar in both groups (fed: 77% estimated need, usual care: 79%). At three months, inadequate micronutrient intakes were seen in over one third. Compared to baseline values, six weeks after surgery, weight loss exceeding 5% was seen in 5/18 (28%) who received feeding, 14/17 (82%) who received usual care and 5/6 (83%) of those who required rescue feeding, P=0.002. Weight loss averaged 4.1% (fed), 10.4% (usual care) and 9.2% (rescue fed), P=0.004. These trends persisted out to six months. Supplementary jejunostomy feeding made an important contribution to meeting nutrition after oesophago-gastric resection. Importantly, oral nutritional intake was not compromised dispelling the assertion that jejunal feeding deincentivises patients from eating.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 28 June 2017; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2017.88.

  18. Do Dutch nutrition and dietetics students meet nutritional requirements during education?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joke J. van de Kruk; Dr Harriët Jager-Wittenaar; Roos M.B. Nieweg; Dr. C.P. van der Schans

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the dietary intakes of Dutch nutrition and dietetics students with the Dutch RDA and the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey (DNFCS), and to assess whether dietary intake changes during education. DESIGN: Cross-sectional and longitudinal research (2004-2010). SETTING:

  19. Do Dutch nutrition and dietetics students meet nutritional requirements during education?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruk, Joke J. van de; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriët; Nieweg, Roos M.B.; Schans, Cees van der

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the dietary intakes of Dutch nutrition and dietetics students with the Dutch RDA and the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey (DNFCS), and to assess whether dietary intake changes during education. DESIGN: Cross-sectional and longitudinal research (2004-2010). SETTING: Da

  20. Do Dutch nutrition and dietetics students meet nutritional requirements during education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kruk, Joke J; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriët; Nieweg, Roos M B; van der Schans, Cees P

    2014-06-01

    To compare the dietary intakes of Dutch nutrition and dietetics students with the Dutch RDA and the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey (DNFCS), and to assess whether dietary intake changes during education. Cross-sectional and longitudinal research (2004-2010). Data collection by 7 d dietary record and questionnaire. Dutch nutrition and dietetics students. Three hundred and fifty-two first-year and 216 fourth-year students were included. One hundred and thirty-three students in three cohorts were assessed twice. Of first-year students, >80 % met the RDA for all macronutrients. Of these students only 37 % met the RDA for fibre and in 43 % intake of saturated fat was too high. Fourth-year students more often met the RDA for fruits (55 %) and vegetables (74 %) compared with first-year students (32 % and 40 %, respectively). Intake of fruits and vegetables of both first- and fourth-year students was much higher than that of DNFCS participants (where 2 % and 7 %, respectively, met the corresponding RDA). Only 80 %). Intakes of dietary fibre, Ca, Mg, Se, riboflavin, niacin, fruits, vegetables and fish improved significantly during education. Dietary intake of nutrition and dietetics students is much better than that of DNFCS participants and improved during education. However, there is still a gap between actual dietary intake and the RDA, especially for Fe, Se and vitamin D.

  1. INPATIENTS NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS INDICATOR AT ARMY HOSPITAL DR. SOEPRAOEN MALANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumboyono Kumboyono

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient acceptance to diet in fl uences patient intake during the hospitalization. Patient acceptance on meals provided by the hospital can be seen from the left over. Whilst factors which in fl uences patient motivation to finish their meals including addtional food, taste, and adaptation level to the hospital, the aim of this research was to identify factors that related to patient acceptance on meals provided by the hospital in class three ward dr. Soepraoen Hospital, Malang. Method: Descriptive analitic was used as research design with cross-sectional approach. As many as 51 samples were chosen with purposive sampling. Data was analyzed with chi square with 95%signi fi cance. Results: The results showed a signi fi cant relation between additional food and the leftover (p-Value = 0,018. There is signi fi cant relation on the taste and the leftover (p-Value = 0.032 and adaptation level and leftover (p-Value = 0.026. Discussion: It can be concluded that additional food, taste, and adaptation level to the hospital have signi fi cant relation with hospitalized patient acceptance on their diet. It is suggested that nurse pay more attention on these factors to fulfi ll patient nutrition needs during hospitalization.

  2. Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for staff development or offered staff development on nutrition and dietary behavior to those who teach health education increased ... for staff development or offered staff development on nutrition and dietary behavior to those who teach health education increased ...

  3. The SDGs Will Require Integrated Agriculture, Nutrition, and Health at the Community Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavan, Chelsey R; Graybill, Lauren; Fawzi, Wafaie; Kinabo, Joyce

    2016-03-01

    Child malnutrition is an urgent and complex issue and requires integrated approaches across agriculture, nutrition, and health. This issue has gained prominence at the global level. While national-level efforts are underway in many countries, there is little information on how to integrate at the community level. Here, we offer a community-based approach using cadres of agricultural and community health workers, drawing on qualitative work we have conducted in Tanzania. Agriculture is an important driver of nutritional and health outcomes, and improving child health will require practical solutions for integration that can add to the evidence base.

  4. Callus cultures of tomato mutants: I. Nutritional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, J M; Mackinney, G

    1969-01-01

    Callus from hypocotyl, stem, and fruit tissue of tomato mutants was grown on a complex pea extract medium. The genotypes responded differently to the levels of nutrients and stimulators or inhibitors in the medium. Hypocotyl callus of yellow (r) tomato required K(2) SO(4) for quick establishment and continued steady growth for several months; callus of this mutant could also grow with 0.5 % dimethyl sulfoxide in the medium, although growth was less than the control. The red ghost (r(+) gh) mutant is sensitive to a toxic component in the pea extract, and makes its best growth with the standard minerals and vitamins, but in 1/2 concentration pea extract plus 5 % coconut water. Tangerine (t), red lutescent stem (r(+) l(2) ), and r(+) gh are mutants which respond differently to thiourea: t grows about the same at all concentrations, r(+) gh grows best at low thiourea, and r(+) l(2) grows best at the specific level of 20 mg/l thiourea. The recent active t or r(+) l(1) and r(+) l(2) isolates require supplementary auxin to which the older, slow-growing isolates do not respond. However, there is variation in growth response of different isolates of the same mutant. The several red (r(+) ) cultures are similar in their slow growth, but somewhat different in responses to specific nutrients. The recent (+) isolate is one of the most active cultures, in comparison to the slow growth of t callus isolated in 1964. It is therefore concluded that growth is affected both by the specific requirements of the mutant and by the age and vigor of isolates.

  5. Nutritional requirements and media development for Lactococcus lactis IL1403.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Kadri; Adamberg, Kaarel; Timarova, Veronica; Seiman, Andrus; Feštšenko, Darja; Vilu, Raivo

    2014-07-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are extensively used in food technology and for the production of various compounds, but they are fastidious in nutrient requirements. In order to elucidate the role of each component precisely, defined multicomponent media are required. This study focuses on determining nutrient auxotrophies and minimizing media components (amino acids, vitamins, metal ions, buffers and additional compounds) for the cultivation of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403, using microtitre plates and test tubes. It was shown that glutamine and asparagine were the most important media components for achieving higher biomass yields while the branched-chain amino acids were necessary to increase specific growth rate. The amino acid and glucose ratio was reduced to achieve minimal residual concentration of amino acids in the medium after the growth of cells, whereas the specific growth rate and biomass yield of cells were not considerably affected. As the percentage of each consumed amino acid compared to initial amount is larger than measurement error, these optimized media are important for achieving more precise data about amino acid utilization and metabolism.

  6. Comparing nutritional requirements, provision and intakes among patients prescribed therapeutic diets in hospital: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattray, Megan; Desbrow, Ben; Roberts, Shelley

    Nutrition is an important part of recovery for hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional adequacy of meals provided to and consumed by patients prescribed a therapeutic diet. Patients (N = 110) prescribed a therapeutic diet (texture-modified, low-fiber, oral fluid, or food allergy or intolerance diets) for medical or nutritional reasons were recruited from six wards of a tertiary hospital. Complete (24-h) dietary provisions and intakes were directly observed and analyzed for energy (kJ) and protein (g) content. A chart audit gathered demographic, clinical, and nutrition-related information to calculate each patient's disease-specific estimated energy and protein requirements. Provisions and intake were considered adequate if they met ≥75% of the patient's estimated requirements. Mean energy and protein provided to patients (5844 ± 2319 kJ, 53 ± 30 g) were significantly lower than their mean estimated requirements (8786 ± 1641 kJ, 86 ± 18 g). Consequently, mean nutrition intake (4088 ± 2423 kJ, 37 ± 28 g) were significantly lower than estimated requirements. Only 37% (41) of patients were provided with and 18% (20) consumed adequate nutrition to meet their estimated requirements. No therapeutic diet provided adequate food to meet the energy and protein requirements of all recipients. Patients on oral fluid diets had the highest estimated requirements (9497 ± 1455 kJ, 93 ± 16 g) and the lowest nutrient provision (3497 ± 1388 kJ, 25 ± 19 g) and intake (2156 ± 1394 kJ, 14 ± 14 g). Hospitalized patients prescribed therapeutic diets (particularly fluid-only diets) are at risk for malnutrition. Further research is required to determine the most effective strategies to improve nutritional provision and intake among patients prescribed therapeutic diets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nutritional requirements and strain heterogeneity in Ashbya gossypii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Orquídea; Domingues, Lucília; Penttilä, Merja; Wiebe, Marilyn G

    2012-10-01

    Colony radial growth rates and specific growth rates of three related Ashbya gossypii strains ATCC10895, IMI31268, MUCL29450 and an unrelated strain, CBS109.26, were measured on various carbon and nitrogen sources at pH 4.5 and pH 6.5 to elucidate physiological growth requirements and strain differences. All strains grew on yeast extract or ammonium as nitrogen sources, but not on nitrate. Substantial growth at pH 4.5 was observed only on complex medium. D-Glucose, glycerol and starch were utilised as carbon sources. Ethanol was produced during growth on glycerol. Conversion of xylose into xylitol demonstrates that the xylose reductase is active. Phenotypic differences between related strains were greater than expected. We demonstrate that A. gossypii utilizes ammonium as sole nitrogen source at pH 6.5, facilitating further physiological studies using chemically defined media in the future. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Lipid requirements in the nutrition of dairy ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Serra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review was to contribute to the knowledge of lipid requirements in dairy ewes, by reviewing experi- mental papers about lipid supplementation in dairy ewe feeding. The number of trials in ewe feeding is lower than that in dairy cow feeding and, leaving calcium soap of palm oil out of consideration, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the effects of protected and unprotected lipid sources on milk yield and quality from dairy ewes. On the basis of data reported in the literature, the optimal dose of calcium soap of palm oil resulted to be 100-120 g/d. Also, milk fatty acid composition may be improved by adding calcium soap of fatty acids to ewe diets. The general effect of calcium salt sup- plementation is an increase in milk unsaturated fatty acids and a decrease in saturated ones. However, more research is needed in order to explain the effect of different fat sources (protected and unprotected on milk yield and quality from dairy ewes.

  9. Fertiliser requirements for balanced nutrition of cassava across eight locations in West Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezui, K.S.; Franke, A.C.; Mando, A.; Ahiabor, B.D.K.; Tetteh, F.M.; Sogbedji, J.; Janssen, B.H.; Giller, K.E.

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient and unbalanced fertiliser use widens cassava yield gaps. We assessed the spatial variability of optimal fertiliser requirements of cassava for enhanced nutrient use efficiency and increased yield using the balanced nutrition approach of the QUEFTS model. Two datasets comprised of fiv

  10. Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnin, J V

    1976-07-01

    Nutrition appeared somewhat late on the scene in the I.B.P. projects in the U.K., but eventually it occupied an integral part of many of the H.A. (human adaptability) investigations. The nutritional data obtained in the studies of isolated and nearisolated communities in Tristan da Cunha and in New Guinea provided information of wide nutritional significance. There were also detailed and extensive studies in Israel which, similarly to those in New Guinea, attempted to relate nutritional factors to enviroment, working conditions, and physical fitness. Some extraordinarily low energy intakes found in Ethiopians have induced much speculation on the extent which man can adequately adapt to restricted food supplies. Interesting nutritional observations, of general importance, have also arisen from results obtained on such disparate groups as Glasgow adolescents, Tanzanian and Sudanese students, children in Malawi and vegans in the U.K.

  11. Estimation of energy requirements for mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients using nutritional status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Mee-Nin; Chang, Han-Hsin; Sheu, Woei-Fen; Cheng, Chien-Hsiang; Lee, Bor-Jen; Huang, Yi-Chia

    2003-01-01

    Background There is very little information on what is considered an adequate energy intake for mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients. The purpose of the present study was to determine this energy requirement by making use of patients' nutritional status. Methods The study was conducted in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit of Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan. Patients were hemodynamically stable and not comatose, and were requiring at least 7 days of mechanical ventilation. Fifty-four patients successfully completed this study. The resting energy expenditure was measured using indirect calorimetry. The total energy requirement was considered 120% of the measured energy expenditure. The daily nutrient intake was recorded. Nutritional status was assessed using single and multiple parameters, nitrogen balance, and medical records, and was performed within 24 hours of admission and after 7 days in the intensive care unit. Results Fifteen patients were being underfed (requirement), 20 patients were in the appropriate feeding (AF) group (within ± 10% of total energy requirement), and 19 patients received overfeeding (>110% of total energy requirement). Patients in the underfeeding group received only 68.3% of their energy requirement, while the overfeeding group patients received up to 136.5% of their required calories. Only patients in the AF group had a positive nitrogen balance (0.04 ± 5.1) on day 7. AF group patients had a significantly higher Nutritional Risk Index value at day 7 than at day 1. Conclusion AF patients had more improvement in nutritional status than patients in the other feeding groups. To provide at least 120% of the resting energy expenditure seemed adequate to meet the caloric energy needs of hemodynamically stable, mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients. PMID:12974978

  12. A preliminary study on nutritional status and intake in Chinese children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei; Zhou, Yanjuan; Sun, Caihong; Wang, Jia; Wu, Lijie

    2010-10-01

    Parents of children with autism often report gastrointestinal problems as well as picky eating and selective eating in their children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nutritional status and the nutrient intake in 111 Chinese children with autism, aged between 2 and 9 years. Anthropometric data were expressed as Z scores. A 3-day dietary recall was provided by the parents, and the data were compared with the national Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) standards for Chinese children. The results showed that only nine of the autistic children (8.1%) were acute or chronically malnourished. From the remaining 102 patients, 67 (60.4%) were eutrophic and 35 (31.5%) had either overweight or obesity. Intakes of both calories and proteins were adequate in the vast majority of these children, but the calories from fat was lower than DRI in the same age group. The average intake of vitamin E and niacin exceeded 100% of DRI, and the intakes of vitamin B1 and B2, magnesium, and iron were between 80% and 90% of DRI range. However, the following nutrients did not meet the DRI requirements at all: vitamins A, B6 and C, folic acid, calcium, and zinc. Although growth was satisfactory in the vast majority of these children with autistic disorder, this study revealed serious deficiencies in the intakes of several vitamins and essential nutrients.

  13. Preliminary data on nutritional value of abundant species in supraforestal Pyrenean pastures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinas, A.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The alpine pastures of the Pyrenees have been used as summer ranges for centuries and continue to be an important forage resource for livestock husbandry to this day. Some studies attribute high nutritional values to alpine pastures, but recent surveys have revealed weight-loss in animals summering in Pyrenean pastures. There is virtually no information available with regard to the nutritional value of the species which constitute Pyrenean summer pastures. Twenty-three of the most common species were analysed chemically to determine their nutritional value and their capacity to meet livestock requirements. Monthly samplings of uneaten plants were performed from June to September in plots where species were abundant. These samples were analysed to determine neutral detergent fiber (NDF, lignin (ADL, crude protein (CP, P, K and Mg content. In vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD was calculated using the pepsin-cellulase method and metabolizable energy (ME was estimated from it. On average, graminoids presented higher levels of NDF and lower levels of the other nutrients when compared with forbs. Month effect was significant for ADL, CP, P and K. In these cases June was the month which differed significantly from other months. Crude protein, P and K contents diminished with maturity, whereas ADL and Ca levels increased. NDF, IVDMD and Mg values remained fairly constant throughout the summer in both botanical groups. This fact is noteworthy because it may provide a constant supply of ME for herbivores during the grazing period (July to September. Dicotyledoneous forbs meet livestock requirements of all the nutrients analysed except P during the grazing period. Graminoids are deficient in ME (mainly for sheep, P and Mg, and their CP content is slightly low for the requirements of sheep. When cattle and sheep diets

  14. Preliminary data on nutritional value of abundant species in supraforestal Pyrenean pastures

    OpenAIRE

    Marinas, A.; García-González, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    The alpine pastures of the Pyrenees have been used as summer ranges for centuries and continue to be an important forage resource for livestock husbandry to this day. Some studies attribute high nutritional values to alpine pastures, but recent surveys have revealed weight-loss in animals summering in Pyrenean pastures. There is virtually no information available with regard to the nutritional value of the species which constitute Pyrenean summer pastures. Twenty-three of the most common s...

  15. NUTRITION REQUIREMENT OF CULTURED ABALONE POST LARVAE AND JUVENILES: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wa Iba

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abalone aquaculture attracts wide attention nowadays because of its high market value and depleted of wild stocks. China and Japan are the main producer of abalone from aquaculture followed by other countries such as New Zealand, Australia and US. Most of cultured abalone are temperate species but considerable research efforts have been made to culture tropical abalone in the Philippines, Thailand, and Indonesia. Most of abalone culture still depends on natural food but recent studies have been conducted to develop artificial diet for abalone. This will not only reduce wild harvest of macrolagae but also develop high nutrition diet at low cost. Successful abalone aquaculture is determined by correct nutrition supplement in the diet. As other cultured animal, abalone requires balanced nutrition of carbohydrate, protein, lipid, vitamins, and minerals. As herbivores, abalone can utilize carbohydrate efficiently as energy source and thus only requires low level of protein (range from 27%—40%. Lipid requirements range from 3%—5% while some minerals such as calcium and phosphorus in artificial feed are only needed in small amount, 0.5% of calcium in diets and 0.7% of phosphorus in the diet can improve the growth rate of abalone. There is not available information of vitamin upplementation in the diet but it is suggested that natural food meets the requirement.

  16. Preliminary Requirement of Hot Pool Free Surface Level from PGSFR Reactor Head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Gyeonghoi; Joo, Hyeongkook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The sensitivity study on structural integrity evaluations are carried out to make a decision of a hot pool free surface location from the reactor head for a preliminary designed reactor enclosure system. To do this, the thermal stress evaluations for a reactor vessel are carried out for a steady state normal operating condition with detailed heat transfer analyses through the reactor enclosure system. From these results, the preliminary design requirement of a hot pool free surface location from the reactor head is established to be 2.0m. From the sensitivity studies on the structural integrity evaluations for a steady state condition, the preliminary distance from the hot pool free surface to the reactor head is determined to be 2.0m same as a conceptual design. More detailed structural analyses for a reactor enclosure system will be carried out as a PGSFR structural design goes forward in detail.

  17. Estimates of nutritional requirements and use of Small Ruminant Nutrition System model for hair sheep in semiarid conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Pinto de Oliveira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to determine the efficiency of utilization of metabolizable energy for maintenance (km and weight gain (kf, the dietary requirements of total digestible nutrients (TDN and metabolizable protein (MP, as well as, evaluate the Small Ruminant Nutrition System (SRNS model to predict the dry matter intake (DMI and the average daily gain (ADG of Santa Ines lambs, fed diets containing different levels of metabolizable energy (ME. Thirty five lambs, non-castrated, with initial body weight (BW of 14.77 ± 1.26 kg at approximate two months old, were used. At the beginning of the experiment, five animals were slaughtered to serve as reference for the estimative of empty body weight (EBW and initial body composition of the 30 remaining animals, which were distributed in randomized block design with five treatments (1.13; 1.40; 1.73; 2.22 and 2.60 Mcal/kg DM, and six repetitions. The requirement of metabolizable energy for maintenance was 78.53 kcal/kg EBW0,75/day, with a utilization efficiency of 66%. The average value of efficiency of metabolizable energy utilization for weight gain was 48%. The dietary requirements of TDN and MP increased with the increase in BW and ADG of the animals. The SRNS model underestimated the DMI and ADG of the animals in 6.2% and 24.6%, respectively. Concludes that the values of km and kf are consistent with those observed in several studies with lambs created in the tropics. The dietary requirements of TDN and MP of Santa Ines lambs for different BW and ADG are, approximately, 42% and 24%, respectively, lower than those suggested by the american system of evaluation of food and nutrient requirements of small ruminants. The SRNS model was sensitive to predict the DMI in Santa Ines lambs, however, for variable ADG, more studies are needed, since the model underestimated the response of the animals of this study.

  18. Nutritional requirements and feeding recommendations for small for gestational age infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudehope, David; Vento, Maximo; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Pachi, Paulo

    2013-03-01

    We define the small for gestational age (SGA) infant as an infant born ≥ 35 weeks' gestation and nutritional requirements and provides short- and long-term benefits. Several distinct patterns of intrauterine growth restriction are identified among the heterogeneous grouping of SGA infants; each varies with regard to neonatal morbidities, requirements for neonatal management, postnatal growth velocities, neurodevelopmental progress, and adult health outcomes. There is much we do not know about nutritional management of the SGA infant. We need to identify and define: infants who have "true" growth restriction and are at high risk for adverse metabolic outcomes in later life; optimal growth velocity and "catch-up" growth rates that are conducive with life-long health and well being; global approaches to management of hypoglycemia; and an optimal model for postdischarge care. Large, rigorously conducted trials are required to determine whether aggressive feeding of SGA infants results in improved nutritional rehabilitation, growth, and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Before birth, maternal supplementation with specific nutrients reduces the rate and severity of growth restriction and may prevent nutrient deficiency states if infants are born SGA. After birth, the generally accepted goal is to provide enough nutrients to achieve postnatal growth similar to that of a normal fetus. In addition, we recommend SGA infants be allowed to "room in" with their mothers to promote breastfeeding, mother-infant attachment, and skin-to-skin contact to assist with thermoregulation. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Methods for simulating nutritional requirement and response studies with all organisms to increase research efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedenov, Dmitry; Alhotan, Rashed A; Wang, Runlian; Pesti, Gene M

    2017-02-01

    Nutritional requirements and responses of all organisms are estimated using various models representing the response to different dietary levels of the nutrient in question. To help nutritionists design experiments for estimating responses and requirements, we developed a simulation workbook using Microsoft Excel. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the influence of different numbers of nutrient levels, ranges of nutrient levels and replications per nutrient level on the estimates of requirements based on common nutritional response models. The user provides estimates of the shape of the response curve, requirements and other parameters and observation to observation variation. The Excel workbook then produces 1-1000 randomly simulated responses based on the given response curve and estimates the standard errors of the requirement (and other parameters) from different models as an indication of the expected power of the experiment. Interpretations are based on the assumption that the smaller the standard error of the requirement, the more powerful the experiment. The user can see the potential effects of using one or more subjects, different nutrient levels, etc., on the expected outcome of future experiments. From a theoretical perspective, each organism should have some enzyme-catalysed reaction whose rate is limited by the availability of some limiting nutrient. The response to the limiting nutrient should therefore be similar to enzyme kinetics. In conclusion, the workbook eliminates some of the guesswork involved in designing experiments and determining the minimum number of subjects needed to achieve desired outcomes.

  20. A comparison of methods to estimate nutritional requirements from experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesti, G M; Vedenov, D; Cason, J A; Billard, L

    2009-01-01

    1. Research papers use a variety of methods for evaluating experiments designed to determine nutritional requirements of poultry. Growth trials result in a set of ordered pairs of data. Often, point-by-point comparisons are made between treatments using analysis of variance. This approach ignores that response variables (body weight, feed efficiency, bone ash, etc.) are continuous rather than discrete. Point-by-point analyses harvest much less than the total amount of information from the data. Regression models are more effective at gleaning information from data, but the concept of "requirements" is poorly defined by many regression models. 2. Response data from a study of the lysine requirements of young broilers was used to compare methods of determining requirements. In this study, multiple range tests were compared with quadratic polynomials (QP), broken line models with linear (BLL) or quadratic (BLQ) ascending portions, the saturation kinetics model (SK) a logistic model (LM) and a compartmental (CM) model. 3. The sum of total residuals squared was used to compare the models. The SK and LM were the best fit models, followed by the CM, BLL, BLQ, and QP models. A plot of the residuals versus nutrient intake showed clearly that the BLQ and SK models fitted the data best in the important region where the ascending portion meets the plateau. 4. The BLQ model clearly defines the technical concept of nutritional requirements as typically defined by nutritionists. However, the SK, LM and CM models better depict the relationship typically defined by economists as the "law of diminishing marginal productivity". The SK model was used to demonstrate how the law of diminishing marginal productivity can be applied to poultry nutrition, and how the "most economical feeding level" may replace the concept of "requirements".

  1. Preliminary research on amino acid composition and nutritional value of clover proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kłyszejko-Stefanowicz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid composition and nutritional value of 5 clover varieties including 3 Polish ones ('Gloria', 'Hruszowska', 'Skrzeszowicka' and 2 of foreign origin ('Rotra' and 'Violetta' were investigated. No significant differences in the total protein content (19.2–20.0% of dry matter as well as in qualitative amino acid composition were found among the clover varieties under examination. EAA index (Essential amino acid index calculated according to Oser for 'Gloria' and 'Hruszowska' showed the highest nutritional value was – 40. The lowest value of EAA index was found for 'Violetta' cvar. – 32, intermediate values however for Rotra and Skrzeszowicka was 37 and 36.

  2. Nutritional implications of organic conversion in large scale food service preliminary results from Core Organic research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg; He, Chen

    The discussion about nutritional advantages of organic consumption has traditionally focused on the properties of the food it self. Studies have shown however that change of consumption patterns towards organic food seems to induce changed dietary patterns. The current research was a part of the i...... to be driven by different agendas but that awareness raising on nutrition and sustainability issues seems to be an important feature of many change processes. Findings also suggest that the two agendas although separated in the scientific literature is more integrated in the everyday life perspective of school...

  3. Nutritional requirements during lactation. Towards European alignment of reference values: the EURRECA network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall Moran, Victoria; Lowe, Nicola; Crossland, Nicola; Berti, Cristiana; Cetin, Irene; Hermoso, Maria; Koletzko, Berthold; Dykes, Fiona

    2010-10-01

    There is considerable variation in reference values for micronutrient intake during lactation across Europe. The European Micronutrients Recommendations Aligned project aims to harmonize dietary recommendations throughout Europe. Recommended nutrient intakes during lactation are based on limited data and are often extrapolated from known secretion of the nutrient in milk with adjustments for bioavailability, so that differences between values can be partly ascribed to differences in methodological approaches and how these approaches were applied. Few studies have considered the impact of lactation on the mother's nutritional status. Rather, focus has been placed on the influence of maternal nutritional status on the composition of her breast milk. Most common nutritional deficits in breast milk are the result of maternal deficiencies of the water-soluble vitamins, thiamine, riboflavin and vitamins B6 and B12. Other than maternal vitamin A status, which to some extent is reflected in breast milk, concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins and most minerals in breast milk are less affected by maternal status. Factors relating to suboptimal maternal nutritional status during lactation include maternal age, diet and lifestyle factors and spacing of consecutive births. Recent research is providing new knowledge on the micronutrient requirements of lactating women. Identifying needs for research and improving understanding of the differences in values that have been derived by various committees and groups across Europe will enhance transparency and facilitate the application of dietary recommendations in policy-making decision and their translation into recommendations for lactating women. Given the wide variation in breastfeeding practices across Europe, making nutritional recommendations for lactating women is complex and challenging. Thus, it is crucial to first examine the cultural practices within and across European populations and to assess its relevance before

  4. Canadian Home Total Parenteral Nutrition Registry: Preliminary Data on the Patient Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitreyi Raman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-term administration of home total parenteral nutrition (HTPN has permitted patients with chronic intestinal failure to survive for prolonged periods of time. However, HTPN is associated with numerous complications, all of which increase morbidity and mortality. In Canada, a comprehensive review of the HTPN population has never been performed.

  5. Advantages of enteral nutrition over parenteral nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Seres, David S.; Valcarcel, Monika; Guillaume, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    It is a strong and commonly held belief among nutrition clinicians that enteral nutrition is preferable to parenteral nutrition. We provide a narrative review of more recent studies and technical reviews comparing enteral nutrition with parenteral nutrition. Despite significant weaknesses in the existing data, current literature continues to support the use of enteral nutrition in patients requiring nutrition support, over parenteral nutrition.

  6. The Impact of Neonatal Illness on Nutritional Requirements-One Size Does Not Fit All.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramel, Sara E; Brown, Laura D; Georgieff, Michael K

    2014-12-01

    Sick neonates are at high risk for growth failure and poorer neurodevelopment than their healthy counterparts. The etiology of postnatal growth failure in sick infants is likely multi-factorial and includes undernutrition due to the difficulty of feeding them during their illness and instability. Illness also itself induces fundamental changes in cellular metabolism that appear to significantly alter nutritional demand and nutrient handling. Inflammation and physiologic stress play a large role in inducing the catabolic state characteristic of the critically ill newborn infant. Inflammatory and stress responses are critical short-term adaptations to promote survival, but are not conducive to promoting long-term growth and development. Conditions such as sepsis, surgery, necrotizing enterocolitis, chronic lung disease and intrauterine growth restriction and their treatments are characterized by altered energy, protein and micronutrient metabolism that result in nutritional requirements that are different from those of the healthy, growing term or preterm infant.

  7. Nutritional requirements of surgical and critically-ill patients: do we really know what they need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Clare L

    2004-08-01

    Malnutrition remains a problem in surgical and critically-ill patients. In surgical patients the incidence of malnutrition ranges from 9 to 44%. Despite this variability there is a consensus that malnutrition worsens during hospital stay. In the intensive care unit (ICU), 43% of the patients are malnourished. Although poor nutrition during hospitalisation may be attributable to many factors, not least inadequacies in hospital catering services, there must also be the question of whether those patients who receive nutritional support are being fed appropriately. Indirect calorimetry is the 'gold standard' for determining an individual's energy requirements, but limited time and financial resources preclude the use of this method in everyday clinical practice. Studies in surgical and ICU patient populations have been reviewed to determine the 'optimal' energy and protein requirements of these patients. There are only a small number of studies that have attempted to measure energy requirements in the various surgical patient groups. Uncomplicated surgery has been associated with energy requirements of 1.0-1.15 x BMR whilst complicated surgery requires 1.25-1.4 x BMR in order to meet the patient's needs. Identifying the optimal requirements of ICU patients is far more difficult because of the heterogeneous nature of this population. In general, 5.6 kJ (25 kcal)/kg per d is an acceptable and achievable target intake, but patients with sepsis or trauma may require almost twice as much energy during the acute phase of their illness. The implications of failing to meet and exceeding the requirements of critically-ill patients are also reviewed.

  8. NUTRITIONAL PRELIMINARY CHARACTERIZATION OF SOME VARIETIES OF DATES AND PALM DOWNGRADED AS RUMINANT FEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. SELMI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In Saharan regions, the date palm which forms the backbone of agriculture, offers a wide range of agricultural by-products, traditionally used for domestic purposes. The determination of chemical composition and nutritional value of these byproducts for rational use in feeding livestock is needed. The analysis showed that the byproducts of palm have total nitrogen content (CP, lipid (FAT and (CB, NDF, ADF and ADL also with a higher nutritional value close to that of straw and hay. The scrap value of dates offers a relatively high energy (0.87 UFL / kg DM which is comparable to the concentrate feed but with relatively low levels of nitrogen or the need for supplementation or nitrogen treatment.

  9. [Nutritional status and Alzheimer's disease: preliminary results of the REAL.FR study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocker, P; Benhamidat, T; Benoit, M; Staccini, P; Bertogliati, C; Guérin, O; Lechowski, L; Robert, P H

    2003-10-01

    Weight loss is common in elderly people with dementia, particularly those with Alzheimer' disease (AD), and feeding difficulties are major issues in their care in the later stages of the disease. In this study (REAL FR for Réseau sur la maladie d'Alzheimer Français) we prospectively used the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) to examine the nutritional status of 479 subjects. Three groups of patients were studied: group 1 = 22 patients with undernutrition (MNA = 17), group 2 = 166 patients with risk of undernutrition (17 < MNA < 24), and group 3 = 291 patients without undernutrition (MNA = 24). Correlations with behavioral and psychological signs and symptoms of dementia (Neuropsychiatric Inventory NPI), with caregiver distress (Zarit), and with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) were studied. Undernutrition is more frequently associated with low MMSE (p < 0.001), high behavioural disturbances (p < 0.001) and high distress of caregivers (p < 0.001). Risk of undernutrition is also associated with NPI (p < 0.001) and Zarit (p < 0.001). These first results in a French cohort of patients with AD underline the importance of the evaluation of nutritional status and finally the follow-up of eating behavior, cognitive status and the quality of life of the caregivers.

  10. The determination of nutritional requirements for Safe Haven Food Supply System (emergency/survival foods)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Selina

    1987-01-01

    The Space Station Safe Haven Food System must sustain 8 crew members under emergency conditions for 45 days. Emergency Survival Foods are defined as a nutritionally balanced collection of high density food and beverages selected to provide for the survival of Space Station flight crews in contingency situations. Since storage volume is limited, the foods should be highly concentrated. A careful study of different research findings regarding starvation and calorie restricted diets indicates that a minimum nutritional need close to RDA is an important factor for sustaining an individual's life in a stressful environment. Fat, protein, and carbohydrates are 3 energy producing nutrients which play a vital role in the growth and maintenance process of human life. A lower intake of protein can minimize the water intake, but it causes a negative nitrogen balance and a lower performance level. Other macro and micro nutrients are also required for nutritional interrelationships to metabolize the other 3 nutrients to their optimum level. The various options for longer duration than 45 days are under investigation.

  11. Balancing functional and nutritional quality of oils and fats: Current requirements and future trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van den Bremt Karen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oils and fats play an important role in the structure, aroma and stability of a wide variety of food products, as well as in their nutritional properties. For Puratos, a producer of ingredients for bakery, patisserie and chocolate sector, functionality and taste are of utmost importance, but the company also wants to contribute to the balanced diet of consumers. Vegetable oils and fats are used in margarines and releasing agents, vegetable creams, compound chocolate, fillings and emulsifiers. Each application requires an oil or fat with specific physicochemical properties in order to ensure the optimal structure, stability and taste of the end product. Traditionally, (partially hydrogenated vegetable oils deliver important functional characteristics concerning crystallization behaviour, directly linked with the workability, melting properties, stability and mouth feel of the food product. However, due to negative nutritional implications, trans fats are to be replaced by healthier alternatives, preferably not by saturated fats. Consumers – and in some regions, legal instances – demand transfree or hydro-free products while not compromising on taste. Alternative fats and oils will be discussed concerning their functional and nutritional properties.

  12. Refugee issues. Summary of WFP / UNHCR guidelines for estimating food and nutritional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    In line with recent recommendations by WHO and the Committee on International Nutrition, WFP and UNHCR will now use 2100 kcal/person/day as the initial energy requirement for designing food aid rations in emergencies. In an emergency situation, it is essential to establish such a value to allow for rapid planning and response to the food and nutrition requirements of an affected population. An in-depth assessment is often not possible in the early days of an emergency, and an estimated value is needed to make decisions about the immediate procurement and shipment of food. The initial level is applicable only in the early stages of an emergency. As soon as demographic, health, nutritional and food security information is available, the estimated per capita energy requirements should be adjusted accordingly. Food rations should complement any food that the affected population is able to obtain on its own through activities such as agricultural production, trade, labor, and small business. An understanding of the various mechanisms used by the population to gain access to food is essential to give an accurate estimate of food needs. Therefore, a prerequisite for the design of a longer-term ration is a thorough assessment of the degree of self-reliance and level of household food security. Frequent assessments are necessary to adequately determine food aid needs on an ongoing basis. The importance of ensuring a culturally acceptable, adequate basic ration for the affected population at the onset of an emergency is considered to be one of the basic principles in ration design. The quality of the ration provided, particularly in terms of micronutrients, is stressed in the guidelines, and levels provided will aim to conform with standards set by other technical agencies.

  13. Iron oxide nanoparticles for plant nutrition? A preliminary Mössbauer study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homonnay, Z., E-mail: homonnay@caesar.elte.hu [EötvösLoránd University, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary); Tolnai, Gy. [Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (Hungary); Fodor, F.; Solti, Á. [EötvösLoránd University, Institute of Biology (Hungary); Kovács, K.; Kuzmann, E.; Ábrahám, A. [EötvösLoránd University, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary); Szabó, E. Gy.; Németh, P.; Szabó, L.; Klencsár, Z. [Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (Hungary)

    2016-12-15

    One of the most important micronutrients for plants is iron. We have prepared iron(III) oxyhydroxide and magnetite nanoparticles with the aim to use them as possible nutrition source for plants. The iron(III)-oxide/oxyhydroxide nanoparticles prepared under our experimental conditions as colloidal suspensions proved to be 6-line ferrihydrite nanoparticles as verified by XRD, TEM/SAED and Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra of magnetite nanoparticles prepared under different preparation conditions could be analyzed on the basis of a common model based on the superposition of four sextet components displaying Gaussian-shaped hyperfine magnetic field distributions.

  14. Iron oxide nanoparticles for plant nutrition? A preliminary Mössbauer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homonnay, Z.; Tolnai, Gy.; Fodor, F.; Solti, Á.; Kovács, K.; Kuzmann, E.; Ábrahám, A.; Szabó, E. Gy.; Németh, P.; Szabó, L.; Klencsár, Z.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important micronutrients for plants is iron. We have prepared iron(III) oxyhydroxide and magnetite nanoparticles with the aim to use them as possible nutrition source for plants. The iron(III)-oxide/oxyhydroxide nanoparticles prepared under our experimental conditions as colloidal suspensions proved to be 6-line ferrihydrite nanoparticles as verified by XRD, TEM/SAED and Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements. 57Fe Mössbauer spectra of magnetite nanoparticles prepared under different preparation conditions could be analyzed on the basis of a common model based on the superposition of four sextet components displaying Gaussian-shaped hyperfine magnetic field distributions.

  15. Basic requirements for a preliminary conceptual design of the Korea advanced pyroprocess facility (KAPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Hee; Ko, Won Il; Chang, Hong Lae; Song, Dae Yong; Kwon, Eun Ha; Lee, Jung Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing technologies for pyroprocessing for spent PWR fuels. This study is part of a long term R and D program in Korea to develop an advanced recycle system that has the potential to meet and exceed the proliferation resistance, waste minimization, resource minimization, safety and economic goals of approved Korean Government energy policy, as well as the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) program. To support this R and D program, KAERI requires that an independent estimate be made of the conceptual design and cost for construction and operation of a 'Korea Advanced Pyroprocessing Facility', This document describes the basic requirements for preliminary conceptual design of the Korea Advanced Pyroprocess Facility (KAPF). The presented requirements will be modified to be more effective and feasible on an engineering basis during the subsequent design process.

  16. Software requirements flow-down and preliminary software design for the G-CLEF spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ian N.; Budynkiewicz, Jamie A.; DePonte Evans, Janet; Miller, Joseph B.; Onyuksel, Cem; Paxson, Charles; Plummer, David A.

    2016-08-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT)-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) is a fiber-fed, precision radial velocity (PRV) optical echelle spectrograph that will be the first light instrument on the GMT. The G-CLEF instrument device control subsystem (IDCS) provides software control of the instrument hardware, including the active feedback loops that are required to meet the G-CLEF PRV stability requirements. The IDCS is also tasked with providing operational support packages that include data reduction pipelines and proposal preparation tools. A formal, but ultimately pragmatic approach is being used to establish a complete and correct set of requirements for both the G-CLEF device control and operational support packages. The device control packages must integrate tightly with the state-machine driven software and controls reference architecture designed by the GMT Organization. A model-based systems engineering methodology is being used to develop a preliminary design that meets these requirements. Through this process we have identified some lessons that have general applicability to the development of software for ground-based instrumentation. For example, tasking an individual with overall responsibility for science/software/hardware integration is a key step to ensuring effective integration between these elements. An operational concept document that includes detailed routine and non- routine operational sequences should be prepared in parallel with the hardware design process to tie together these elements and identify any gaps. Appropriate time-phasing of the hardware and software design phases is important, but revisions to driving requirements that impact software requirements and preliminary design are inevitable. Such revisions must be carefully managed to ensure efficient use of resources.

  17. Nutrition and Osteoporosis: Preliminary data of Campania Region of European PERsonalised ICT Supported Service for Independent Living and Active Ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuolo, L.; Barrea, L.; Savanelli, MC; Savastano, S.; Rubino, M.; Scarano, E.; Soprano, M.; Illario, M.; Colao, A.; Di Somma, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bone impairment and malnutrition are associated with significant disability and mortality. PERSSILAA is an European project developing health services to detect and prevent frailty in older adults by addressing cognitive, physical and nutritional. Methods: Subjects underwent anthropometric measurements, calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) scan and PREDIMED (PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea) questionnaire. Aim: To investigate the association between adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (MD) and bone health. Results: 87 subjects (4 males and 83 females) 70.1±4.9 aged, were examined. Mean Body Mass Index (BMI) was 28.7±4.7(kg/m2): in particular 28 subjects (32.2%) resulted obese, 42 (48.3%) overweight, and only 17 (19.5%) with normal weight. Mean T score was −1.2±1.2: in particular 13 subjects (14.9%) resulted osteoporotic; 43 (49.5%) osteopenic; and 31 (35.6%) with normal bone mineral density. Regarding adherence to MD, 9 subjects (10.3%) were poorly adherent; 41 (47.2%) average adherent; 37 (42.5%) highly adherent. T-score was associated with PREDIMED score and osteoporotic subjects presented the lowest PREDIMED score (5.8±2.2). Conclusions: These preliminary data show a significant correlation between the adherence to the MD and bone health parameters. The association between MD and bone health highlights the potential beneficial effects of nutritional interventions promoting a Mediterranean food pattern, as safe adjuvant treatment in ageing. PMID:27042428

  18. Physicochemical and Nutritional Requirements for Axenic Replication Suggest Physiological Basis for Coxiella burnetii Niche Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo Esquerra, Eduardo; Yang, Hong; Sanchez, Savannah E; Omsland, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial obligate intracellular parasites are clinically significant animal and human pathogens. Central to the biology of these organisms is their level of adaptation to intracellular replication niches associated with physicochemical and nutritional constraints. While most bacterial pathogens can adapt to a wide range of environments, severe niche restriction-an inability to thrive in diverse environments-is a hallmark of bacterial obligate intracellular parasites. Herein the physicochemical and nutritional factors underlying the physiological basis for niche restriction in the zoonotic bacterial obligate intracellular parasite and Q fever agent Coxiella burnetii are characterized. Additionally, these factors are reviewed in the context of C. burnetii evolution and continued (patho) adaptation. C. burnetii replication was strictly dependent on a combination of moderately acidic pH, reduced oxygen tension, and presence of carbon dioxide. Of macronutrients, amino acids alone support replication under physicochemically favorable conditions. In addition to utilizing gluconeogenic substrates for replication, C. burnetii can also utilize glucose to generate biomass. A mutant with a disruption in the gene pckA, encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), the first committed step in gluconeogenesis, could be complemented chemically by the addition of glucose. Disruption of pckA resulted in a moderate glucose-dependent growth defect during infection of cultured host cells. Although, C. burnetii has the theoretical capacity to synthesize essential core metabolites via glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, amino acid auxotrophy essentially restricts C. burnetii replication to a niche providing ample access to amino acids. Overall, the described combination of physiochemical and nutritional growth requirements are strong indicators for why C. burnetii favors an acidified phagolysosome-derived vacuole in respiring tissue for replication.

  19. Drug/Nutrients Interaction in Neoplastic Patients Requiring Nutritional Support. Practical Advice with Special Focusing on Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ilaria Uomo; Adele Savoia

    2008-01-01

    Malnutrition and cachexia are frequent complaints in neoplastic disease [1, 2]. Nutritional support and pain treatment still remain the main treatment option for the majority of patients with cancer, particularly for those affected by pancreatic cancer who very often present an advanced stage of the disease at moment of first diagnosis [3, 4, 5]. Therefore, in their clinical practice, physicians are faced with the need for parenteral or enteral nutrition and with the contemporary requirement ...

  20. Sources of variation in dietary requirements in an obligate nutritional symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Kevin J; Moran, Nancy A

    2011-01-07

    The nutritional symbiosis between aphids and their obligate symbiont, Buchnera aphidicola, is often characterized as a highly functional partnership in which the symbiont provides the host with essential nutrients. Despite this, some aphid lineages exhibit dietary requirements for nutrients typically synthesized by Buchnera, suggesting that some aspect of the symbiosis is disrupted. To examine this phenomenon in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, populations were assayed using defined artificial diet to determine dietary requirements for essential amino acids (EAAs). Six clones exhibiting dependence on EAAs in their diet were investigated further. In one aphid clone, a mutation in a Buchnera amino acid biosynthesis gene could account for the clone's requirement for dietary arginine. Analysis of aphid F1 hybrids allowed separation of effects of the host and symbiont genomes, and revealed that both affect the requirement for dietary EAAs in the clones tested. Amino acid requirements were minimally affected by secondary symbiont infection. Our results indicate that variation among pea aphids in dependence on dietary amino acids can result from Buchnera mutation as well as variation in the host genotype.

  1. Burns, metabolism and nutritional requirements Quemaduras, el metabolismo y los requerimientos nutricionales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mendonça Machado

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To review the nutritional evaluation in burned patient, considering the literature descriptions of nutritional evaluation and energy requirements of these patients. Introduction: Thermal injury is the traumatic event with the highest metabolic response in critically ill patients. Various mathematical formulas have been developed to estimate nutritional requirements in burned patient. Indirect Calorimetry is the only method considered gold standard for measuring caloric expenditure. Methods: A survey of the literature and data was collected based on official data bases, LILACS, EMBASE and PubMed. Results: The metabolic changes involved in hypermetabolism are designed to supply energy to support immune function, brain activity, wound healing, and preservation of body tissues. Body weight is considered the easiest indicator and perhaps the best to assess the nutritional status. The most common formulas utilized in these patients are the Curreri, Pennisi, Schofield, Ireton-Jones, Harris-Benedict and the ASPEN recommendations. For children is the Mayes and World Health Organization formula. The majority of mathematical formulas overestimate the nutritional needs. The regular use of Indirect Calorimetry supplies adequate nutritional support to the burn patient. Discussion: The traditional nutritional evaluation considers anthropometry, biochemical markers and estimation of nutritional requirements. The weight provides a basis for decisions that are established in the clinical context. Classic parameters can be adapted to intensive care environment. Conclusions: The use of Indirect Calorimetry is crucial to ensure the safety of the nutritional support of burn patients and this should be widely encouraged.Objetivos: Revisar la evaluación nutricional del paciente quemado, considerando las descripciones bibliográficas de la evaluación nutricional y de los requerimientos energéticos de estos pacientes. Introducción: la lesión térmica es

  2. Energy and protein allowances and requirements in stallions during the breeding season, comparing different nutritional systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, R; Bailoni, L

    2011-07-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the nutritional value of diets given to stallions of different breeds during the reproductive season, and comparing allowances with requirements. The systems compared were the French INRA, the 1989 NRC, and the 2007 NRC. Data on reproductive activity, daily exercise, BW, BCS, feed intake, and feed composition during 4 mo (from March to June) were recorded on 12 stallions used for commercial AI programs. Stallions belonged to 3 different breeds: Italian Haflinger (IH, n=4), Holstein (HOL, n=4), and Italian Heavy Draft horse (IHDH, n=4). Data recorded were used to estimate the actual energy and protein intakes and theoretical requirements of the stallions using the aforementioned systems. A deviation index [DI = (intake - requirement)/intake × -1] was calculated to allow a comparison among methods as a proportion of under- or overestimates of theoretical requirements. All data were statistically analyzed with a mixed model for repeated measurements. The reproductive activity of the stallions was affected by month (less in March and greater in subsequent months; Prequirements considering all 3 nutritional systems. Energy and protein INRA recommendations showed, on average, +0.90 and +0.27 greater DI than actual intakes, respectively, for IH and HOL stallions, whereas the theoretical requirements were much closer to allowances for the IHDH stallions (DI close to 0). The 1989 NRC energy and protein recommendations, respectively, were +0.67 and +0.87 greater than intake for IH, +0.28 and +0.43 greater for HOL, and only +0.06 and +0.17 greater for IHDH stallions. The 2007 NRC energy and protein recommendations, respectively, were +0.70 and +0.52 greater for IH, +0.33 and +0.17 greater for HOL, and +0.52 and +0.49 greater for IHDH than actual intakes. Therefore, all systems overestimated the requirements of the stallion, particularly in lighter breeds. Further studies to validate requirements for breeding stallions of different sizes

  3. Development and preliminary validation of a Family Nutrition and Physical Activity (FNPA screening tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenmann Joey C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parents directly influence children's physical activity and nutrition behaviors and also dictate the physical and social environments that are available to their children. This paper summarizes the development of an easy to use screening tool (The Family Nutrition and Physical Activity (FNPA Screening Tool designed to assess family environmental and behavioral factors that may predispose a child to becoming overweight. Methods The FNPA instrument was developed using constructs identified in a comprehensive evidence analysis conducted in collaboration with the American Dietetics Association. Two or three items were created for each of the ten constructs with evidence grades of II or higher. Parents of first grade students from a large urban school district (39 schools were recruited to complete the FNPA screening tool and provide permission to link results to BMI data obtained from trained nurses in each school. A total of 1085 surveys were completed out of the available sample of 2189 children in the district. Factor analysis was conducted to examine the factor structure of the scale. Mixed model analyses were conducted on the composite FNPA score to determine if patterns in home environments and behaviors matched some of the expected socio-economic (SES and ethnic patterns in BMI. Correlations among FNPA constructs and other main variables were computed to examine possible associations among the various factors. Finally, logistic regression was used to evaluate the construct validity of the FNPA scale. Results Factor analyses revealed the presence of a single factor and this unidimensional structure was supported by the correlation analyses. The correlations among constructs were consistently positive but the total score had higher correlations with child BMI than the other individual constructs. The FNPA scores followed expected demographic patterns with low income families reporting lower (less favorable scores than

  4. Health, nutrition and hydration status of Indonesian workers: a preliminary study in two different environmental settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saptawati Bardosono

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydration status in the working environment of hot and conveniently cool may influence the health status of workers, including their hydration status. This study aimed to determine the health, nutrition and hydration status of workers in two different working environment, i.e. hot and conveniently cool environment.Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study was done on apparently healthy male subjects, age 25-45 years. Two groups of factory workers consisted of  39 subjects working in environment exposed directly to heat and the other doing administrative work in cool environment. Data on their health status (physical examination, weight, height, waist circumference, fat body composition, laboratory result, were collected. The data was presented as average value and  proportion; statistical analysis with unpaired-t (Mann-Whitney test and chi-square test was used.Results: Subjects working in a hot environment were more prone to dehydration  in comparison to their counterparts, as was shown by significantly higher values of several hydration status biomarkers: hemoglobin (15.6 vs 14.8 g/dL, p = 0.017, hematocrit (46 vs 44.5%, p = 0.040, blood viscosity (23 vs 12 mEq/L, p < 0.001, and blood sodium concentration (140 vs 138 mEq/L, p < 0.001. In contrast, subjects working in a conveniently cool environment who did more administrative tasks were physically less active, had significantly lower HDL-cholesterol level (43 vs 52.1 mg/dL, p = 0.005, higher body and visceral fat compositions (21.6 vs 17.6%, p = 0.008, and 10 vs 8%, p = 0.015, respectively compared to their counterparts.Conclusion: Workers in hot and cool working environment are prone to nutrition- and health problems as well as dehydration, suggesting special attention to the provision of timely drinking water, and physical activity during working time.

  5. Clinical Aspects of Trace Elements: Zinc in Human Nutrition – Zinc Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Pluhator

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The body requires certain levels of essential nutrients, such as zinc, to maintain life. Intake less than the required levels can cause impaired function, disease and death. Every essential nutrient has a unique range of tissue concentration and intake necessary for proper physiological and biochemical functioning. Many criteria have been used to set dietary intake levels for nutrients. For trace elements, however, a limited number of investigative approaches are currently employed by researchers due to inadequate information on individual requirements and intake levels. Further, a clear lack of satisfactory biochemical methods to measure zinc nutritional status continues to hinder formulation of dietary guidelines. Thus, many assumptions have to be made, and large safety margins have to be added to assumed daily requirements in order to compensate for this absence of information. Numerous barriers to a full understanding of what constitutes an adequate dietary recommendation for zinc still exist. Zinc is incompletely absorbed, and this absorption can be greatly influenced by the chemical form in which zinc is bound; interactions with other nutrients also affect absorption. Part three of this five-part review presents the current Canadian recommended nutrient intakes for zinc for various sex and age categories and provides a rationale for the suggested values. The important nutrient interactions that affect the bioavailability of zinc, including those with phytates, copper, cadmium, tin and iron, are discussed.

  6. Drug/Nutrients Interaction in Neoplastic Patients Requiring Nutritional Support. Practical Advice with Special Focusing on Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Uomo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition and cachexia are frequent complaints in neoplastic disease [1, 2]. Nutritional support and pain treatment still remain the main treatment option for the majority of patients with cancer, particularly for those affected by pancreatic cancer who very often present an advanced stage of the disease at moment of first diagnosis [3, 4, 5]. Therefore, in their clinical practice, physicians are faced with the need for parenteral or enteral nutrition and with the contemporary requirement of several drugs capable of interfering with the components of the nutritional admixture. Different drawbacks may arise from these drug/nutrient interactions, nullifying the pharmacological effect and/or the nutritional value [6]. The aim of this review is to summarize possible drug/nutrient interaction in neoplastic patients, particularly in those with pancreatic cancer, during external food supplementation.

  7. Designing lifestyle-specific food policies based on nutritional requirements and ecological footprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Csutora

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Expanded understanding of the trends and determinants of food consumption is needed to reduce the ecological impacts of the contemporary agro-food system while also being attentive to broader issues pertaining to health and the environment. Incorporating these additional aspects and formulating meaningful dietary recommendations is a major challenge. This article seeks to highlight differences in ecological footprint (EF by activity level for various social groups to meet suggested physiological requirements by nutritionists versus actual food consumption. The study is based on a combination of healthy diet requirements (as expressed by national guidelines and a survey of a representative sample of 1,013 Hungarian adults using a bottom-up approach for calculating EFs. Students and women with small children have a higher than average food-related EF due to their higher nutritional needs. At the same time, the elderly are characterized by lower footprints. Perhaps most interesting is our finding that people with sedentary forms of employment have higher food footprints than those with jobs that require physical labor. We offer recommendations for food-policy planning based on encouraging dietary changes for individuals, differentiated by the nature of their work. The research suggests that dietary policy that improves health often has environmental benefits.

  8. Thirty Meter Telescope: observatory software requirements, architecture, and preliminary implementation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, David R.; Angeli, George; Boyer, Corinne; Sirota, Mark; Trinh, Thang

    2008-07-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) will be a ground-based, 30-m optical-IR alt-az telescope with a highly segmented primary mirror located in a remote location. Efficient science operations require the asynchronous coordination of many different sub-systems including telescope mount, three independent active optics sub-systems, adaptive optics, laser guide stars, and user-configured science instrument. An important high-level requirement is target acquisition and observatory system configuration must be completed in less than 5 minutes (or 10 minutes if moving to a new instrument). To meet this coordination challenge and target acquisition time requirement, a distributed software architecture is envisioned consisting of software components linked by a service-based software communications backbone. A master sequencer coordinates the activities of mid-layer sequencers for the telescope, adaptive optics, and selected instrument. In turn, these mid-layer sequencers coordinate the activities of groups of sub-systems. In this paper, TMT observatory requirements are presented in more detail, followed by a description of the design reference software architecture and a discussion of preliminary implementation strategies.

  9. Nutritional requirements of sheep, goats and cattle in warm climates: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, N; Sauvant, D; Archimède, H

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to update energy and protein requirements of growing sheep, goats and cattle in warm areas through a meta-analysis study of 590 publications. Requirements were expressed on metabolic live weight (MLW=LW0.75) and LW1 basis. The maintenance requirements for energy were 542.64 and 631.26 kJ ME/kg LW0.75 for small ruminants and cattle, respectively, and the difference was significant (Prequirement for 1 g gain was 24.3 kJ ME without any significant effect of species. Relative to LW0.75, there was no difference among genotypes intra-species in terms of ME requirement for maintenance and gain. However, small ruminants of warm and tropical climate appeared to have higher ME requirements for maintenance relative to live weight (LW) compared with temperate climate ones and cattle. Maintenance requirements for protein were estimated via two approaches. For these two methods, the data in which retained nitrogen (RN) was used cover the same range of variability of observations. The regression of digestible CP intake (DCPI, g/kg LW0.75) against RN (g/kg LW0.75) indicated that DCP requirements are significantly higher in sheep (3.36 g/kg LW0.75) than in goats (2.38 g/kg LW0.75), with cattle intermediate (2.81 g/kg LW0.75), without any significant difference in the quantity of DCPI/g retained CP (RCP) (40.43). Regressing metabolisable protein (MP) or minimal digestible protein in the intestine (PDImin) against RCP showed that there was no difference between species and genotypes, neither for the intercept (maintenance=3.51 g/kg LW0.75 for sheep and goat v. 4.35 for cattle) nor for the slope (growth=0.60 g MP/g RCP). The regression of DCP against ADG showed that DCP requirements did not differ among species or genotypes. These new feeding standards are derived from a wider range of nutritional conditions compared with existing feeding standards as they are based on a larger database. The standards seem to be more appropriate for ruminants in warm and

  10. Dietary restriction of Caenorhabditis elegans by axenic culture reflects nutritional requirement for constituents provided by metabolically active microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, Isabelle; Walker, Glenda A; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Gems, David; Vanfleteren, Jacques R

    2008-03-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, several manipulations that affect nutrition slow development, reduce fecundity, and increase life span. These are viewed as dietary restriction (DR) and include culture in semidefined, nutrient-rich liquid medium that is axenic (i.e., there is no microbial food source). Here we describe convenient ways to exert DR by culture on agar plates containing axenic medium. We used these to explore whether effects of axenic culture really reflect DR. Our results imply that major nutrient components of axenic medium, and overall caloric content, are not limiting for life span. However, adding growth-arrested Escherichia coli as an additional food source rescued the effects of axenic culture. We then sought to identify the component of E. coli that is critical for normal C. elegans nutrition using add-back experiments. Our results suggest that C. elegans has a nutritional requirement for live, metabolically active microbes or, possibly, an unidentified, heat-labile, nonsoluble component present in live microbes.

  11. Considerations regarding neuropsychiatric nutritional requirements for intakes of omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbeln, Joseph R; Davis, John M

    2009-01-01

    Adverse neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric outcomes have been established as signs of nutrient deficiencies and may be applicable to insufficient dietary intakes of omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (n-3 HUFAs). Consider if statistical definitions for Daily Reference Intakes can be applied to n-3 HUFAs intakes during pregnancy for maternal and neurodevelopmental deficiencies. Data were prospectively collected from women during pregnancy and children up to age 8 years participating in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Statistical analyses took social and lifestyle factors into account. During pregnancy, n-3 HUFA intakes from seafood that putatively meet statistical definitions of an estimated average requirement ranged from 0.05 to 0.06 en% (111-139 mg/d/2000 Cal) for suboptimal fine motor control at 42 m and 0.065-0.08 en% (114-181 mg/d/2000 Cal) for suboptimal verbal IQ at age 8 years and 0.18-0.22 en% (389-486 mg/d/2000 Cal) for maternal depression at 32 weeks. Intakes of n-3 ranging from 0.2 to 0.41 en% (445-917 mg/d/2000 Cal) prevented both increased risk of maternal depression and adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes for children among 97.5% of the population. No upper limit for safety was found. During pregnancy, a n-3 HUFA intake of 0.40 en% (900 mg/d/2000 Cal) from seafood is likely to meet the nutritional requirements for 97.5% of the mothers and children of this population. These considerations do not constitute DRI's for docosahexaenoic acid and n-3 HUFAs, but may contribute to their formulation.

  12. C2 Link Security for UAS: Technical Literature Study and Preliminary Functional Requirements. Version 0.9 (Working Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This document provides a study of the technical literature related to Command and Control (C2) link security for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) for operation in the National Airspace System (NAS). Included is a preliminary set of functional requirements for C2 link security.

  13. The Habitable Exoplanet (HabEx) Imaging Mission: preliminary science drivers and technical requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennesson, Bertrand; Gaudi, Scott; Seager, Sara; Cahoy, Kerri; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Feinberg, Lee; Guyon, Olivier; Kasdin, Jeremy; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Tamura, Motohide; Mouillet, David; Prusti, Timo; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Robinson, Tyler; Rogers, Leslie; Scowen, Paul; Somerville, Rachel; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Stern, Daniel; Still, Martin; Turnbull, Margaret; Booth, Jeffrey; Kiessling, Alina; Kuan, Gary; Warfield, Keith

    2016-07-01

    HabEx is one of four candidate flagship missions being studied in detail by NASA, to be submitted for consideration to the 2020 Decadal Survey in Astronomy and Astrophysics for possible launch in the 2030s. It will be optimized for direct imaging and spectroscopy of potentially habitable exoplanets, and will also enable a wide range of general astrophysics science. HabEx aims to fully characterize planetary systems around nearby solar-type stars for the first time, including rocky planets, possible water worlds, gas giants, ice giants, and faint circumstellar debris disks. In particular, it will explore our nearest neighbors and search for signs of habitability and biosignatures in the atmospheres of rocky planets in the habitable zones of their parent stars. Such high spatial resolution, high contrast observations require a large (roughly greater than 3.5m), stable, and diffraction-limited optical space telescope. Such a telescope also opens up unique capabilities for studying the formation and evolution of stars and galaxies. We present some preliminary science objectives identified for HabEx by our Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT), together with a first look at the key challenges and design trades ahead.

  14. The Habitable Exoplanet (HabEx) Imaging Mission: Preliminary Science Drivers and Technical Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudi, B. Scott; Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission Science and Technology Definition Team

    2017-01-01

    HabEx is one of four candidate flagship missions being studied in detail by NASA, to be submitted for consideration to the 2020 Decadal Survey in Astronomy and Astrophysics for possible launch in the 2030s. It will be optimized for direct imaging and spectroscopy of potentially habitable exoplanets, and will also enable a wide range of general astrophysics science. HabEx aims to fully characterize planetary systems around nearby solar-type stars for the first time, including rocky planets, possible water worlds, gas giants, ice giants, and faint circumstellar debris disks. In particular, it will explore our nearest neighbors and search for signs of habitability and biosignatures in the atmospheres of rocky planets in the habitable zones of their parent stars. Such high spatial resolution, high contrast observations require a large (roughly greater than 3.5m), stable, and diffraction-limited optical space telescope. Such a telescope also opens up unique capabilities for studying the formation and evolution of stars and galaxies. We present some preliminary science objectives identified for HabEx by our Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT), together with a first look at the key challenges and design trades ahead.

  15. Nutritional Requirements for Growth of Agaricus brasiliensis = Requerimentos nutricionais para o crescimento micelial de Agaricus brasiliensis

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    Pascoal José Gaspar Júnior

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional requirements of A. brasiliensis in culture media were assessed by supplementing a basal medium (g L-1: (glucose, 10, KH2PO4, 1, MgSO4.7H2O, 0.5, [NH4]2SO4, 1, pH 5.5 with CaCl2, trace elements (FeSO4.7H2O; MnCl2.4H2O; ZnSO4.7H2O; CuSO4.5H2O, casein, yeast extract, peptone, B-vitamins or amino acids. Evaluations were based on the mycelial growth in solid or liquid culture (mm day-1 or mg day-1 and visual analysis of the colony. The addition of CaCl2 and trace elements was very important for the major mycelial growth of the fungi. The addition of casein and inositol to the medium did not have a significant effect on growth. The best growth result in solid medium was obtained with the basal medium plus the addition of yeast extract and peptone. In relation to the other nutrient sources, the mycelial growth in the presence of amino acids darkened the medium after two weeks. The addition of B-vitamins to the basal medium lead to slower mycelial growth; however, growth was more visually dense when compared to other nutritional sources. B-vitamins added separately did not have the same result, suggesting that the fungus requires two or more vitamins at the same time for better mycelial growth.Os requerimentos nutricionais de A. brasiliensis foram avaliados, com a suplementação de um meio basal (g L-1: (glicose, 10, KH2PO4, 1, MgSO4.7H2O, 0.5, [NH4]2SO4, 1, pH 5.5 com CaCl2, micronutrientes (FeSO4.7H2O; MnCl2.4H2O; ZnSO4.7H2O; CuSO4.5H2O, caseína, extrato de levedura, peptona, vitaminas do complexo B ou aminoácidos. O crescimento micelial foi avaliado em meio sólido e líquido, considerando velocidade de crescimento e produção de massa micelial (mm dia-1 ou mg dia-1 e análise visual da colônia. A adição de CaCl2 e micronutrientes foi muito importante para o melhor crescimentomicelial do fungo, enquanto que a adição de caseina e inositol não apresentou efeito significativo sobre o crescimento. O melhor crescimento em meio s

  16. Nutritional Requirements for the Mycelial Biomass and Exopolymer Production by Hericium erinaceus CZ-2

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    Daming Huang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of medium composition and fermentation parameters on the simultaneous production of mycelial biomass and exopolymer by medicinal mushroom Hericium erinaceus CZ-2 were investigated in shake flask cultures using one-factor-at-a-time method and orthogonal array design. Results showed that the most suitable carbon, nitrogen, mineral sources, and cofactors for the mycelial biomass and exopolymer production were: corn flour combined with 1 % glucose, yeast extract, KH2PO4 and corn steep liquor. The intuitive analysis of orthogonal array design results indicated that the effects of nutritional requirement on the mycelial growth of Hericium erinaceus CZ-2 were in regular sequence of corn flour combined with 1 % glucose > yeast extract > corn steep liquor > KH2PO4, and those on exopolymer production were in the order of corn flour combined with glucose > KH2PO4 > yeast extract > corn steep liquor. The maximal yield of mycelial biomass (16.07 g/L was obtained when the composition of the culture medium was (in g/L: corn flour 30, glucose 10, yeast extract 3, KH2PO4 1, CaCO3 0.5, and 15 mL/L of corn steep liquor; while the maximal exopolymer yield (1.314 g/L was achieved when the composition of medium was (in g/L: corn flour 30, glucose 10, yeast extract 5, KH2PO4 3, CaCO3 0.5, and 15 mL/L of corn steep liquor. In the 15-litre scale-up fermentation, the maximum mycelial biomass yield of 20.50 g/L was achieved using the optimized medium.

  17. Attributes of Seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L. to Meet Nutritional Requirements in High Altitude.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsering Stobdan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The diet of humans living in different geographical and climatic regions of the earth varies greatly in both quantity and composition of foods. Evidence is accumulating that indicates that there is a high risk of malnutrition at high altitude because of the usual lack of fresh food and environmental factors. Lack of nutritious diet in the difficult terrain is a potential stressor that elicits oxidative stress. The excretion of minerals from the body is higher in high altitude condition. The altered nutritional requirement can be met to a large extend by regular consumption of locally grown fruits and vegetables. Results of analysis of Seabuckthorn growing in Leh valley of Trans-Himalaya showed the presence of high content of multivitamins including vitamin C (275 mg/100g, vitamin A (432.4 IU/100g, vitamin E (3.54 mg/100g, Riboflavin (1.45 mg/100g, Niacin (68.4 mg/100g, Pantothenic acid (0.85 mcg/100g, vitamin B-6 (1.12 mg/100g, and vitamin B-2 (5.4 mcg/100g. Similarly, mineral elements composition revealed high amount of minerals including potassium (647.2 mg/l, calcium (176.6 mg/l, iron (30.9 mg/l, magnesium (22.5 mg/l, phosphorous (84.2 mg/l, sodium (414.2 mg/l, zinc (1.4 mg/l, copper (0.7 mg/l, manganese (1.06 mg/l and selenium (0.53 mg/l.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(2, pp.226-230, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.344

  18. A qualitative analysis of the nutritional requirements of palliative care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, C I; Linklater, G T

    2011-10-01

    The National Health Servive (NHS) Quality Improvement Scotland developed nutritional Clinical Standards to address the problem of malnutrition in hospitals. NHS palliative care units are obliged to incorporate these standards into nutritional aspects of care. The nutritional needs of this patient population are under-researched. The present study aimed to explore patients' views of nutrition, to begin to understand their concerns and to determine whether such standards meet the needs of patients in the palliative care setting. A qualitative study was conducted in 2009 in an NHS Palliative Care Unit. Six inpatients were involved in one-to-one interviews, which were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were subject to qualitative data analysis in accordance with a previous framework. A recurring theme that emerged was that of change and uncertainty. Four main areas subject to change were: disease state, symptoms, oral dietary intake and weight. Each change could exert control over, or be controlled by, the patient. When patients were eventually unable to exert control, they accepted the change, either willingly or enforced, thereby unintentionally setting their own targets. The present study enables a deeper understanding of the concerns that palliative care patients have regarding their oral dietary intake and weight. Their 'malnutrition' not only refers to physical malnutrition alone, but also incorporates psychological and social 'malnutrition'. When applying standards or protocols regarding nutritional care, these wider issues must be taken into account to meet patients' nutritional needs. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2011 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  19. [Analysis of the nutritional parameters and adjustment of the requirements of the initial parenteral nutrition in post surgical critically ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero Domínguez-Berrueta, M Carmen; Martín de Rosales Cabrera, Ana María; Pérez Encinas, Montserrat

    2014-02-01

    To analyze nutritional parameters in critical post-surgical patients under stressful conditions, their evolution, and to assess the degree of adjustment of initial parenteral nutrition (PN) to the requirements set for in the recently published recommendations. Observational, retrospective study including post-surgical critically ill patients admitted to the post-surgical reanimation unit (RU) in whom PN was prescribed, in 2011. Demographical, anthropometric, diagnosis, nutritional parameters, mortality, total duration of hospitalization and duration of hospitalization at the RU, and complications were gathered. The type of PN prescribed was compared, with individualization of the requirements by Kg of body weight, according to the latest recommendations published on nutrition of critically ill patients (ASPEN, ESPEN, SENPE): 18-30 kcal/kg, 0.8-1.5 g/kg/proteins, 4 mg/kg/min/glucose and 2-3 mg/kg/min/glucose in patients with stress-related hyperglycemia, and 0.5-1 g/kg/day of lipids. The variables analyzed were caloric, protein, and glucose adjustments in the initial PN, recovering of albumin > 3 g/dL at day 10, and likely association with the number of complications, mortality and hospital stay. 60 patients were analyzed. 23.3% (14/60) presented hyponutrition at admission, with significant weight loss before the intervention. Albumin, a negative acute phase reactant, was significantly low at baseline, on average 1.9 g/dL (95%CI 1.83-2.12), which indicates a high level of metabolic stress in post-surgical patients. Prescribed PNs were adjusted to the recommendations for kcal, proteins and lipids in 68.3%, 71.7%, and 80.4%, respectively. 57.1% were adjusted for glucose, although the intake from fluid therapy was not taken into account. In patients with a BMI 3 g/dL at day 10, and the mortality, the duration of hospitalization at the RU, and the number of complications were significantly lower in these patients than in those not recuperating their albumin levels (p

  20. The challenges of meeting nutritional requirements in children and adults with epidermolysis bullosa: proceedings of a multidisciplinary team study day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, L; Haynes, L; Sklar, M; Martinez, A E; Mellerio, J E

    2011-08-01

    This is a report of a study day held in London on 3 March 2010 to discuss measures with which to meet the nutritional requirements of patients with epidermolysis bullosa (EB). Members of national and international multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) caring for patients with EB attended this event. The study day focused on four challenging aspects of management intimately associated with nutritional status in EB, necessitating close cooperation between MDT members: iron-deficiency anaemia, gastrostomy placement and feeding, muscle mass and mobility, and dental health. The study day provided a unique forum for dietitians, doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, psychologists, psychotherapists, dentists, dental hygienists and occupational therapists to share knowledge and debate problems common to all who strive to promote best practice in this rare and complex group of conditions. © The Author(s). CED © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  1. Required Preliminary Administrative Service Credential Program Culminating Activities in California NCATE Accredited Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildman, Louis

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this effort is to share information about the variety of culminating activities used in the acquisition of the California Preliminary Administrative Services Credential. Knowledge of these varying culminating activities and related practices has not previously been readily available. The culminating activities among California's…

  2. Direct and indirect effects of nutritional status, physical function and cognitive function on activities of daily living in Japanese older adults requiring long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Tomohiko; Nishida, Yuusuke

    2014-10-01

    To identify the direct and indirect effects of nutritional status, physical function, and cognitive function on activities of daily living in Japanese older adults requiring long-term care. In total, 179 participants aged ≥ 65 years who were eligible for long-term care insurance (mean age 85.5 ± 7.8 years) were recruited for this study. Nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment, Short Form) and physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery) were examined. Activities of daily living, cognitive function and frailty were assessed using the Barthel Index, Mini-Mental State Examination and Clinical Frailty Scale, respectively. Path analysis was used to determine relationships between these factors and the activities of daily living. For Japanese older adults requiring long-term care, pathways were modeled for nutritional status, physical function and the activities of daily living. The total effect of nutritional status was 0.516 (Pnutritional status through physical function on the activities of daily living was 0.458 (Pnutritional status on activities of daily living was observed (b=0.058, P=0.258). The present study identified the complex pathway from nutritional status to the activities of daily living through physical function in aged Japanese people requiring long-term care. These findings suggest that maintaining good nutritional status and nutritional support might delay physical function decline, and prolong the activities of daily living. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  3. Relation of nutritional status to physiological outcomes after cardiac surgery in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Watanabe, Satoshi

    2016-12-01

    To determine differences in physiological outcome (PO) based on the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI) and cut-off values for PO according to the GNRI in elderly post-cardiac surgery patients complicated by diabetes mellitus (DM). Thirty-five patients (72.9 years) were enrolled and divided by GNRI. Patient characteristics and PO of handgrip strength (HG), knee extensor muscle strength (KEMS), maximum gait speed (GS), and one-leg standing time (OLST) were compared between the groups, and cut-off values for PO were determined. These POs were significantly lower in the low-GNRI group (Nutritional status might influence PO following cardiac surgery. The cut-off values of PO reported here might be indicative of the need to improve patient nutritional status.

  4. Nutritional status, assessment, requirements and adequacy of traumatic brain injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daradkeh, Ghazi; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Al-Adawi, S Samir; Subash, Selvaraju; Mahmood, Lubna; Kumar, Parvathy R

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) has been considered as a serious public health problem. Each year, traumatic brain injuries are contributing to a substantial number of cases of permanent disability and deaths and it can be classified according to the severity into penetrating and closed head injury. Symptoms, beside to be unconscious can be defined as vomiting, nausea, headache, dizziness, lack of motor coordination, difficulty in balancing, blurred vision and lightheadedness, bad taste in the mouth, ringing in the ears, fatigue and lethargy as well as changes in sleep patterns. The brain is known to be the functional regulator for all the metabolic activities inside the body and TBI patients mostly have a complex metabolic alterations including aberrant cellular metabolism, abnormal metabolic processes, changes in hormones functions and inflammatory cascade. The TBI patient's status needed to be assessed medically and nutritionally since the medical status of the patients can affect the nutrition part. Data from the four assessment tools are needed to be correctly used and interpreted in order to make a proper nutritional diagnosis, clinical assessment, biochemistry as well as anthropometric measurements. Regardless the methods used for assessing TBI patients, having adequate intake and medical care can lead to a reduction in hospital costs, numbers of day hospitalized, numbers of hours of mechanical ventilation and in the overall infection rates.

  5. Discrepancy between the composition of some commercial cat foods and their package labelling and suitability for meeting nutritional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosper, E C; Raubenheimer, D; Machovsky-Capuska, G E; Chaves, A V

    2016-01-01

    To investigate if the label information and nutrient composition of commercial cat foods are accurate and compliant with the Australian Standard (AS 5812-2011) and if they meet the nutritional requirements of an adult cat. A chemical analysis of 10 wet and 10 dry commercial cat foods labelled as 'nutritionally complete' for the adult cat was performed. The results were compared with the package composition values, the Australian Standard and the unique dietary requirements of the cat. In addition, the results of the chemical analysis were compared with the nutrient requirements published by the Association of the American Feed Control Officials and the National Research Council. When compared with the Australian Standard, 9 of the 20 cat foods did not adhere to their 'guaranteed analysis' and 8 did not adhere to the standards for nutrient composition. Also, various deficiencies and excesses of crude protein, crude fat, fatty acid and amino acid were observed in the majority of the cat foods. The results of this study highlight a need for an improved method of ensuring that label information and nutrient composition are accurate and comply with the Australian Standard (AS 5812-2011) to ensure the adult cat's unique dietary requirements are being met by commercial adult cat food. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  6. Exigências nutricionais de bezerros nelores lactentes Nutritional requirements of nursing Nellore calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozart Alves Fonseca

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi conduzido com o objetivo de avaliar as exigências de proteína, energia e macrominerais de bezerros nelores do nascimento aos 180 dias. Foram utilizados 20 bezerros (10 machos e 10 fêmeas com peso corporal médio de 30±3 kg. Imediatamente após o nascimento, quatro bezerros, dois machos e duas fêmeas, foram abatidos para estimar a composição corporal inicial dos animais restantes no experimento. Aos 90 dias, foram abatidos oito bezerros (quatro machos e quatro fêmeas, o restante dos animais abatidos aos 180 dias. Além do leite, os bezerros foram alimentados com silagem de milho à vontade e concentrado comercial fixado em no máximo 0,5 kg/animal/dia. Foram conduzidos dois ensaios de digestibilidade, aos 30 e 90 dias para estimar os consumos de energia dos bezerros. Após o abate, todos os bezerros tiveram suas meias-carcaças direitas dissecadas. Os conteúdos corporais de proteína, energia e minerais foram estimados pela equação Y = a . PCVZb, sendo PCVZ o peso de corpo vazio. A relação PCVZ/PC dos bezerros foi de 0,9622 e a de ganho (G de PCVZ/GPC foi de 0,958. As exigências líquidas de proteína e energia aumentaram com o aumento do peso corporal, enquanto as de cálcio diminuíram. As exigências de proteína metabolizável para ganho de 1 kg de PC foram de 216,96 e 261,98 g para bezerros de 100 e 200 kg, respectivamente. Recomenda-se utilizar as seguintes equações para estimar os conteúdos corporais de bezerros Nelore lactentes: proteína (g/dia = 0,135 × PCVZ1,0351; energia (Mcal/dia = 1,1798 × PCVZ1,1805; cálcio (g/dia = 0,091 × PCVZ0,6019; fósforo (g/dia = 0,00894 × PCVZ0,9629; sódio (g/dia = 0,00126 × PCVZ0,9791; magnésio (g/dia = 0,000405 × PCVZ0,9827; potássio (g/dia = 0,00165 × PCVZ0,9364.This experiment was carried out to evaluate the nutritional requirements of protein, energy and macro minerals for Nellore calves from birth to 180 days. A total of 20 calves, 10 males (M and 10

  7. Genome-health nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics: nutritional requirements or 'nutriomes' for chromosomal stability and telomere maintenance at the individual level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Caroline; Fenech, Michael

    2008-05-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that (a) risk for developmental and degenerative disease increases with more DNA damage, which in turn is dependent on nutritional status, and (b) the optimal concentration of micronutrients for prevention of genome damage is also dependent on genetic polymorphisms that alter the function of genes involved directly or indirectly in the uptake and metabolism of micronutrients required for DNA repair and DNA replication. The development of dietary patterns, functional foods and supplements that are designed to improve genome-health maintenance in individuals with specific genetic backgrounds may provide an important contribution to an optimum health strategy based on the diagnosis and individualised nutritional prevention of genome damage, i.e. genome health clinics. The present review summarises some of the recent knowledge relating to micronutrients that are associated with chromosomal stability and provides some initial insights into the likely nutritional factors that may be expected to have an impact on the maintenance of telomeres. It is evident that developing effective strategies for defining nutrient doses and combinations or 'nutriomes' for genome-health maintenance at the individual level is essential for further progress in this research field.

  8. A multi-factorial approach to the nutritional requirements of sports horses: critical analysis and some practical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Valle

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives for the correct feeding of the horses is to provide them all the nutrients required to satisfy the organism’s needs and all the substances that can help to avoid metabolic problems and to use energy substrates and different nutrients sources in proper way. Many factors can influence the success of a feeding plan such as owner expectations, metabolic and digestive differences among horses, and stable conditions. Moreover the estimation in field conditions of nutritional requirements is usually performed by empirical way and not always estimated with care. It is generally based on the observation of the work performed as judged by rider and the Body Condition Score of the horse. As a result the nutritional requirements of the horse are frequently misjudged. In particular energy expenditure for exercise is often correlated to the riders perception or horse work attitude. To try to assess the workload in proper way, it is then important to try using new tools to better understand the real needs of sport horses. For this reason, new areas are nowadays explored and new techniques applied to sport horses.

  9. The development, testing, and preliminary feasibility of an adaptable pediatric oncology nutrition algorithm for low-middle income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAK Fleming

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Survivors of childhood cancer are at increased risk for several cardiometabolic complications. Obesity/overweight and metabolic syndrome have been widely reported in Western literature, but data from India are lacking. Aims: To perform an objective assessment of nutritional status in a cohort of childhood cancer survivors (CCSs and to find risk factors for extremes in nutritional status. Settings And Design: The study was a retrospective chart review of CCSs who attended the late effects clinic of a referral pediatric oncology center over the period of 1 year. Materials And Methods: An objective assessment of nutritional status was done, and results were analyzed in two groups: Adult survivors (present age 20 years or current age >30 years in adult survivors. Conclusions: The prevalence of obesity/overweight is lower in our cohort when compared to Western literature. It remains to be clarified whether this reflects the underlying undernutrition in our country, or whether our cohort of survivors is indeed distinct from their Western counterparts. Comparison with age/sex-matched normal controls and baseline parameters would yield more meaningful results.

  10. The development, testing, and preliminary feasibility of an adaptable pediatric oncology nutrition algorithm for low-middle income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, C A K; Viani, K; Murphy, A J; Mosby, T T; Arora, B; Schoeman, J; Ladas, E J

    2015-01-01

    Survivors of childhood cancer are at increased risk for several cardiometabolic complications. Obesity/overweight and metabolic syndrome have been widely reported in Western literature, but data from India are lacking. To perform an objective assessment of nutritional status in a cohort of childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) and to find risk factors for extremes in nutritional status. The study was a retrospective chart review of CCSs who attended the late effects clinic of a referral pediatric oncology center over the period of 1 year. An objective assessment of nutritional status was done, and results were analyzed in two groups: Adult survivors (present age obesity, overweight, normal, and undernutrition was 2.6%, 10.8%, 62.7%, and 28.8% (CASs) and 0%, 8.5%, 62.7%, and 28.8% (adult survivors), respectively. Factors predictive of overweight/obesity were an initial diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or brain tumor and follow-up duration of >20 years or current age >30 years in adult survivors. The prevalence of obesity/overweight is lower in our cohort when compared to Western literature. It remains to be clarified whether this reflects the underlying undernutrition in our country, or whether our cohort of survivors is indeed distinct from their Western counterparts. Comparison with age/sex-matched normal controls and baseline parameters would yield more meaningful results.

  11. Estimating energy requirements in hospitalised underweight and obese patients requiring nutritional support: a survey of dietetic practice in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judges, D; Knight, A; Graham, E; Goff, L M

    2012-03-01

    Many methods are available to determine energy requirements, however, all have limitations, particularly when used for the obese. The aim of this survey was to investigate current practice in the estimation of energy requirements in an underweight and obese hospitalised patient in a large cohort of UK dietitians. A cross-sectional anonymous online survey of UK registered dietitians was performed. A total of 672 responses were received. Underweight patient: prediction equations with adjustment for metabolic stress and physical activity were most commonly used (90%). The median estimated energy requirement was 2079 kcals/day. The estimated energy requirement using calorie per kilogram method was significantly lower compared with equations (Prequirements was found (PNutrition support dietitians used a lower stress factor compared with non-nutrition support dietitians (P=0.016). Method used to estimate the energy requirements was associated with years in clinical practice and place of work (Prequirements was found, particularly in the obese patient group. In an age of rapidly increasing rates of obesity a professional consensus of treatment of this patient group is needed.

  12. Dietary requirements of "nutritionally non-essential amino acids" by animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoyao; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Yang, Ying; Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Chuang; Wang, Bin; Wang, Junjun; Yin, Yulong

    2013-04-01

    Amino acids are necessary for the survival, growth, development, reproduction and health of all organisms. They were traditionally classified as nutritionally essential or non-essential for mammals, birds and fish based on nitrogen balance or growth. It was assumed that all "non-essential amino acids (NEAA)" were synthesized sufficiently in the body to meet the needs for maximal growth and health. However, there has been no compelling experimental evidence to support this assumption over the past century. NEAA (e.g., glutamine, glutamate, proline, glycine and arginine) play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling, antioxidative responses, neurotransmission, and immunity. Additionally, glutamate, glutamine and aspartate are major metabolic fuels for the small intestine to maintain its digestive function and protect its mucosal integrity. Therefore, based on new research findings, NEAA should be taken into consideration in revising the classical "ideal protein" concept and formulating balanced diets to improve protein accretion, food efficiency, and health in animals and humans.

  13. Effect of a school feeding programme on nutritional status and anaemia in an urban slum: a preliminary evaluation in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neervoort, Femke; von Rosenstiel, Ines; Bongers, Karlien; Demetriades, Matthew; Shacola, Marina; Wolffers, Ivan

    2013-06-01

    To reduce malnutrition and improve child survival, school feeding programmes have been established in many parts of Africa, although prevalence of child malnutrition and anaemia remains high, especially in urban slums. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of a school feeding programme in the slums of Nairobi (Kenya) on anaemia and nutritional status, together with an investigation for socioeconomic determinants that may overrule this effect. Sixty-seven children at the St. George primary school in Kibera participated in the school feeding programme for 1 year and data concerning anaemia rate, nutritional status and socioeconomic status were collected during a medical health check. Data were compared with a control group of children attending the same school, of the same age and with the same gender distribution without participation in a feeding programme. Data were analyzed with statistical software (SPSS 17.0). Children participating in the school feeding programme were less stunted (p = 0.02) and wasted (p = 0.02) than children in the control group, and levels of anaemia were lower (p = 0.01). Having no father (p = 0.01) and living in small families (p = 0.003) overruled the effect of the feeding programme. Also, the higher the mother's education, the more wasting was seen (p = 0.04) despite participation in the programme. The programme reduced anaemia and malnutrition and has improved child growth in our study group greatly, but we found that education level of the mother, family size and absence of a father overruled the effect of the school feeding programme. Because sample size of our study is small, we encourage further large-scaled research on reviewing programmatic interventions to develop optimal feeding strategies and improve nutritional status of children.

  14. The nutritional requirements of infants. Towards EU alignment of reference values: the EURRECA network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermoso, M.; Tabacchi, G.; Iglesia-Altaba, I.; Bel-Serrat, S.; Moreno-Aznar, L.A.; Garcia-Santos, Y.; Rosario Garcia-Luzardo, Del M.; Santana-Salguero, B.; Pena-Quintana, L.; Serra-Majem, L.; Hall Moran, V.; Dykes, F.; Decsi, T.; Benetou, V.; Plada, M.; Trichopoulou, A.; Raats, M.M.; Doets, E.L.; Berti, C.; Cetin, I.; Koletzko, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the current knowledge regarding the macro- and micronutrient requirements of infants and discusses issues related to these requirements during the first year of life. The paper also reviews the current reference values used in European countries and the methodological

  15. The design of an insulin pump - preliminary requirements (a technical note)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawlas, Hubert J.; Lewenstein, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    The material presented in this paper is an attempt to lay down requirements for the planned design of an insulin pump. An insulin pump is a device for continuous dosage of insulin at a selected rate, which facilitates treatment and improves the lives of diabetic patients. This paper is a compilation of medical requirements and user suggestions of presently offered insulin pumps. It seems important to establish proper requirements for a device before starting developing any design for an insulin pump.

  16. A nutrition mathematical model to account for dietary supply and requirements of energy and nutrients for domesticated small ruminants: the development and evaluation of the Small Ruminant Nutrition System

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Orlindo Tedeschi; Antonello Cannas; Danny Gene Fox

    2008-01-01

    A mechanistic model that predicts nutrient requirements and biological values of feeds for sheep (Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System; CNCPS-S) was expanded to include goats and the name was changed to the Small Ruminant Nutrition System (SRNS). The SRNS uses animal and environmental factors to predict metabolizable energy (ME) and protein, and Ca and P requirements. Requirements for goats in the SRNS are predicted based on the equations developed for CNCPS-S, modified to account for ...

  17. [Estimates of trace elements requirements of children receiving total parenteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricour, C; Duhamel, J F; Gros, J; Mazière, B; Comar, D

    1977-01-01

    Ten children on total parenteral nutrition were studied. Plasma copper, zinc, manganese and selenium levels were determined by neutron activation and gamma spectrometry, every 10 days. With a copper intake of 20 microgram/kg/24 h, the average level 120 microgram% (94-144) was normal (N: 118 microgram +/- 11%). With a manganese intake of 40 microgram/kg/24 h, the level increased to 2.6 microgram% (1.3-4.5) (N: 1.1 microgram +/- 0.2%). With a zinc intake of 30 microgram/kg/24 h, the level decreased to 45.9 microgram % (20-63) (N: 83 microgram +/- 28%); with an intake of 50 microgram/kg/24 h the level remained under normal. With a selenium intake of 1 microgram/kg/24 h, the level decreased to 10.6 ng/ml (3.6-21.6) (N: 38.2 ng/ml +/- 11.9), but was normalized with an intake of 3 microgram/kg/24 h. From these results, with all reserves that estimation implies, the authors suggest that the disorders due to deficit or excess of trace elements could be avoided by daily intakes per kg of body weight: copper 20 microgram, zinc 100 microgram, manganese 10 microgram and selenium 3 microgram, with supplementation of iron, iodine and fluoride.

  18. Experimental and statistical analysis of nutritional requirements for the growth of the extremophile Deinococcus geothermalis DSM 11300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornot, Julie; Aceves-Lara, César-Arturo; Molina-Jouve, Carole; Uribelarrea, Jean-Louis; Gorret, Nathalie

    2014-11-01

    Few studies concerning the nutritional requirements of Deinococcus geothermalis DSM 11300 have been conducted to date. Three defined media compositions have been published for the growth of this strain but they were found to be inadequate to achieve growth without limitation. Furthermore, growth curves, biomass concentration and growth rates were generally not available. Analysis in Principal Components was used in this work to compare and consequently to highlight the main compounds which differ between published chemically defined media. When available, biomass concentration, and/or growth rate were superimposed to the PCA analysis. The formulations of the media were collected from existing literature; media compositions designed for the growth of several strains of Deinococcaceae or Micrococcaceae were included. The results showed that a defined medium adapted from Holland et al. (Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 72:1074-1082, 2006) was the best basal medium and was chosen for further studies. A growth rate of 0.03 h(-1) and a final OD600nm of 0.55 were obtained, but the growth was linear. Then, the effects of several medium components on oxygen uptake and biomass production by Deinococcus geothermalis DSM 11300 were studied using a respirometry-based method, to search for the nutritional limitation. The results revealed that the whole yeast extract in the medium with glucose is necessary to obtain a non-limiting growth of Deinococcus geothermalis DSM 11300 at a maximum growth rate of 0.64 h(-1) at 45 °C.

  19. A preliminary study of the effect of eliminating requirements on clinical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, W W; Dale, R A; Hendricson, W D

    1993-09-01

    This study determined the effect of a clinical program driven by patient needs upon students' productivity, attitudes, and academic performance. A group of eight senior students, whose academic and clinical performance profile replicated that of the rest of the class, were chosen to participate in a year-long non-requirement clinic. The students were expected to attend all clinic sessions, and treat their assigned patients. Their performance was compared to that of classmates in the regular requirement-driven curriculum. The non-requirement group had significantly higher academic achievement and significantly outproduced their classmates. Non-requirement students had no state board failures, versus 17 percent in the regular curriculum, and reported significantly lower stress. This study suggests that predoctoral clinical programs can maintain quality and productivity in the absence of unit requirements.

  20. Food and nutritional security requires adequate protein as well as energy, delivered from whole-year crop production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Graeme D; Wratten, Stephen D; Porter, John R

    2016-01-01

    Human food security requires the production of sufficient quantities of both high-quality protein and dietary energy. In a series of case-studies from New Zealand, we show that while production of food ingredients from crops on arable land can meet human dietary energy requirements effectively, requirements for high-quality protein are met more efficiently by animal production from such land. We present a model that can be used to assess dietary energy and quality-corrected protein production from various crop and crop/animal production systems, and demonstrate its utility. We extend our analysis with an accompanying economic analysis of commercially-available, pre-prepared or simply-cooked foods that can be produced from our case-study crop and animal products. We calculate the per-person, per-day cost of both quality-corrected protein and dietary energy as provided in the processed foods. We conclude that mixed dairy/cropping systems provide the greatest quantity of high-quality protein per unit price to the consumer, have the highest food energy production and can support the dietary requirements of the highest number of people, when assessed as all-year-round production systems. Global food and nutritional security will largely be an outcome of national or regional agroeconomies addressing their own food needs. We hope that our model will be used for similar analyses of food production systems in other countries, agroecological zones and economies.

  1. Sports nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomanić Milena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to higher energy consumption, physically active people have higher nutritional requirements. In addition to other important factors for sports, such as good health and physical predisposition, adequate nutrition is a fundamental component. Sports nutrition must be well planned and individually adapted based on physical characteristics, tendencies towards gaining or losing weight, frequency, duration and intensity of training sessions. Studies have shown that a well-balanced ratio of macro and micronutrients, with the support of supplements and adequate hydration, can significantly improve athletic performance and plays a key role in achieving better results. An optimally designed nutritional program, with realistic and achievable goals, which complements a well-planned training program, is the basis for success in sports. Only when nutritional requirements are met, deficits can be prevented and performance in sport pushed to the limit.

  2. The nutritional requirements of infants. Towards EU alignment of reference values: the EURRECA network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermoso, Maria; Tabacchi, Garden; Iglesia-Altaba, Iris; Bel-Serrat, Silvia; Moreno-Aznar, Luis A; García-Santos, Yurena; García-Luzardo, Ma del Rosario; Santana-Salguero, Beatriz; Peña-Quintana, Luis; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Moran, Victoria Hall; Dykes, Fiona; Decsi, Tamás; Benetou, Vassiliki; Plada, Maria; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Raats, Monique M; Doets, Esmée L; Berti, Cristiana; Cetin, Irene; Koletzko, Berthold

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a review of the current knowledge regarding the macro- and micronutrient requirements of infants and discusses issues related to these requirements during the first year of life. The paper also reviews the current reference values used in European countries and the methodological approaches used to derive them by a sample of seven European and international authoritative committees from which background scientific reports are available. Throughout the paper, the main issues contributing to disparities in micronutrient reference values for infants are highlighted. The identification of these issues in relation to the specific physiological aspects of infants is important for informing future initiatives aimed at providing standardized approaches to overcome variability of micronutrient reference values across Europe for this age group. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Nutritional anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oski, F A

    1979-10-01

    The role of the metals, iron and copper, and the vitamins E, folic acid, and B12 in the genesis of nutritional anemias in infancy have been reviewed. All are preventable. The precise requirements for each of these trace elements and vitamins in the small premature infant remain to be defined. The nonhematologic consequences of these nutritional deficiencies require further study. Anemia may prove to be the least important manifestation of the deficiency states.

  4. Australian Defence Force Nutritional Requirements in the 21st Century (Version 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    substantially above the mean energy requirement would promote either excessive intake—and therefore overweight/obesity—or wastage of food . Provision of...10d do not account for inevitable food discarding. As discussed above, 15% of total food available is considered a reasonable allowance for wastage ...the relevant variables that determine the types and quantities of foods necessary to support ADF training and operations—and the current state of

  5. ITS as a data resource: Preliminary requirements for a user service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margiotta, R.

    1998-04-01

    Contents of this report are: Executive Summary; Introduction; The Need for an Archived Data User Service; Technical and Institutional Issues for Implementation; Basic Requirements; Appendix A: Summary of Recent Data Needs Identification Efforts; Appendix B: Supplemental Information on the Long-Term Pavement Performance Traffic Data Structure.

  6. Body composition and energy and protein nutritional requirements for weight gain in Santa Ines crossbred sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrim, Darley Oliveira; Alves, Kaliandra Souza; dos Santos, Rozilda da Conceição; da Mata, Vanessa Jaqueline Veloso; Oliveira, Luis Rennan Sampaio; Gomes, Daiany Íris; Mezzomo, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the body composition and net energy and protein requirements for weight gain in Santa Ines crossbred sheep. Thirty woolless, 4-month-old, castrated male sheep with an initial body weight (BW) of 19.77 ± 1.99 kg were used. Six animals (reference group) were slaughtered after the adaptation period to estimate empty body weight (EBW) and initial body composition. The remaining 24 animals were randomly distributed among four treatments (experimental diets) and slaughtered when they reached 30.24 ± 0.78 kg BW. The body composition ranged from 162.88 to 160.4 g protein/kg EBW, from 59.49 to 164.23 g fat/kg EBW and from 1.54 to 2.46 Mcal energy/kg EBW for animals ranging between 20 and 30 kg BW. The net energy requirement for Santa Ines crossbred sheep linearly increased when BW increased from 20 to 30 kg. Within that same weight range, the net protein requirement for weight gain in sheep was constant, ranging from 12.61 to 12.42 g/day to 100 g daily weight gain.

  7. Nutritional requirements of the BY series of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for optimum growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanscho, Michael; Ruckerbauer, David E; Chauhan, Neha; Hofbauer, Harald F; Krahulec, Stefan; Nidetzky, Bernd; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Zanghellini, Juergen; Natter, Klaus

    2012-11-01

    Among the vast variety of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, the BY family is particularly important because the widely used deletion collections are based on this background. Here we demonstrate that some standard growth media recipes require substantial modifications to provide optimum growth conditions for auxotrophic BY strains and to avoid growth arrest before glucose is depleted. In addition to the essential supplements that are required to satisfy auxotrophic requirements, we found the four amino acids phenylalanine, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine to be indispensable for optimum growth, despite the fact that BY is 'prototrophic' for these amino acids. Interestingly, other widely used S. cerevisiae strains, such as strains of the CEN.PK family, are less sensitive to lack of the described supplements. Furthermore, we found that the concentration of inositol in yeast nitrogen base is too low to support fast proliferation of yeast cultures until glucose is exhausted. Depletion of inositol during exponential growth induces characteristic changes, namely a decrease in glucose uptake and maximum specific growth rate, increased cell size, reduced viability, and accumulation of lipid storage pools. Thus, several of the existing growth media recipes need to be revised to achieve optimum growth conditions for BY-derived strains. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Community Nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranceta, Javier

    2004-06-01

    In the last 20 years, Public Health Nutrition focused mainly on the qualitative aspects which may influence the onset of chronic diseases, quality of life, physical and mental performance and life expectancy. This applied knowledge organised as part of preventive and health promotion programs led to the development of Community Nutrition. The aim of Community Nutrition actions is to adequate lifestyles related to food consumption patterns in order to improve the quality of life and contribute to health promotion of the population in the community where programs and services are delivered. Key functions to develop in a Community Nutrition Unit consist in the identification and assessment of nutrition problems in the community as well as the design, implementation and evaluation of intervention programs by means of appropriate strategies. These should aim at different populations groups and settings, such as work places, schools, high risk groups or the general public. Nowadays, Community Nutrition work efforts should focus on three main aspects: nutrition education in schools and in the community; food safety and food security and the development and reinforcement of food preparation skills across all age groups. Social catering services, either in schools, the work place or at the community level, need to ensure adequate nutritional supply, provide foods contributing to healthy eating practices as well as to enhance culinary traditions and social learning. Food safety and food security have become a top priority in Public Health. The concepts referes to the availability of food safe and adequate as well as in sufficient amount in order to satisfy nutrition requirements of all individuals in the community. Social changes along new scientific developments will introduce new demands in Community Nutrition work and individual dietary counselling will become a key strategy. In order to face new challenges, community nutrition pactitioners require a high quality

  9. Nutritional requirements for methyl orange decolourisation by freely suspended cells and growing cells of Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phisit Seesuriyachan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500 possesses cytoplasmic azoreductase and can breakdown azo bonds under microaerophilic condition. It was found previously that a growing culture is more tolerant to a high initial dye concentration than freely suspended cells supplied only with sucrose. The present study is aimed at investigating the nutritive requirements for decolourisation by the growing cells and the freely suspended cells using Plackett-Burmann experimental design. In this study, the composition of the medium was found to play an important role in methyl orange decolourisation and biomass production. Sucrose, meat extract and peptone increased methyl orange decolourisation by freely suspended cells, whereas sodium acetate exerted a negative effect on decolourisation. In addition, it was observed that the yeast and meat extracts enhanced the degradation of the dye by the growing cells. Sucrose was an important factor in biomass production by freely suspended cells and growing cells. On the other hand, dipotassium hydrogen phosphate and sodium acetate decreased the biomass production. These findings promote the understanding and knowledge about the requirements of azo dye decolourisation by Lactobacillus casei.

  10. Nutritional Requirements for the Improvement of Growth and Sporulation of Several Strains of Monascus purpureus on Solid State Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ajdari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the nutritional requirements for the improvement of growth and sporulation of several strains of Monascus purpureus on solid state cultivation. The findings revealed that glucose enhanced growth of all M. purpureus strains tested but inhibited the sporulation rate. On the other hand, sucrose induced sporulation but inhibited production of cell mass. A combination of glucose and sucrose greatly enhanced sporulation and cell mass production of M. purpureus. Although growth and sporulation rate were related to the ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C/N ratio, the types and concentrations of carbon and nitrogen sources also greatly influenced the growth kinetics. Among the media tested, Hiroi-PDA medium was the most preferred medium for all M. purpureus strains tested for the enhancement of radial growth rate, sporulation, and cell production. Hence, Hiroi-PDA could be suggested as the generic basal medium for the cultivation of M. purpureus. However, individual medium optimization is required for significant enhancement in growth and sporulation of each strain of M. purpureus.

  11. Exigências nutricionais de zebuínos: energia Nutritional requirements of zebu cattle: energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Veiga Rodrigues Paulino

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de determinar as exigências de energia e as eficiências de utilização da energia metabolizável para ganho de peso e mantença de zebuínos, foi desenvolvido um experimento envolvendo 19 novilhos anelorados, com peso vivo médio inicial de 270 kg. Quatro animais foram abatidos ao início do experimento, para servirem de referência para estudos posteriores, três foram alimentados ao nível de mantença e os 12 restantes foram alocados em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com três tratamentos: 5, 35 e 65% de concentrado na base da matéria seca total. O volumoso foi constituído de pré-secado de capim-braquiária (Brachiaria brizantha e de capim-tifton 85 (Cynodon sp.. As dietas foram isonitrogenadas e os animais foram alimentados ad libitum. A exigência líquida de energia para mantença (ELm foi estimada como o anti-log do intercepto da equação obtida pela regressão linear entre o logaritmo da produção de calor (PC e o consumo de energia metabolizável (CEM, bem como pelo coeficiente "a" da equação de regressão exponencial entre a PC e o CEM dos animais do tratamento com 35% de concentrado e os do grupo mantença. As quantidades de energia e gordura no ganho elevaram-se com o aumento do peso vivo (PV dos animais. O teste de identidade dos modelos de regressão demonstrou não haver diferenças entre os tratamentos. O requisito energético diário para mantença foi de 68,60 kcal/PV0,75. A k m estimada foi de 0,66 e as k g calculadas foram de 0,26; 0,41 e 0,46, respectivamente, para concentrações de EM de 2,31; 2,47 e 2,62 Mcal/kg de MS, correspondentes aos teores de 5, 35 e 65% de concentrado na dieta. Os requisitos diários de EM e NDT para mantença de um animal de 400 kg de PV foram de 9,30 Mcal e 2,57 kg, respectivamente.A trial involving nineteen zebu steers with initial live weight of 270 kg were conducted with the objective of determining their energy requirements and the efficiency of utilization of

  12. Preliminary Assessment of Operational Hazards and Safety Requirements for Airborne Trajectory Management (ABTM) Roadmap Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, William B.; Hilb, Robert; Koczo, Stefan, Jr.; Wing, David J.

    2016-01-01

    A set of five developmental steps building from the NASA TASAR (Traffic Aware Strategic Aircrew Requests) concept are described, each providing incrementally more efficiency and capacity benefits to airspace system users and service providers, culminating in a Full Airborne Trajectory Management capability. For each of these steps, the incremental Operational Hazards and Safety Requirements are identified for later use in future formal safety assessments intended to lead to certification and operational approval of the equipment and the associated procedures. Two established safety assessment methodologies that are compliant with the FAA's Safety Management System were used leading to Failure Effects Classifications (FEC) for each of the steps. The most likely FEC for the first three steps, Basic TASAR, Digital TASAR, and 4D TASAR, is "No effect". For step four, Strategic Airborne Trajectory Management, the likely FEC is "Minor". For Full Airborne Trajectory Management (Step 5), the most likely FEC is "Major".

  13. R&D Requirements, RF Gun Mode Studies, FEL-2 Steady-StateStudies, Preliminary FEL-1 Time-Dependent Studies, and Preliminary LayoutOption Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, John; Corlett, John; Doolittle, Larry; Fawley, William; Lidia, Steven; Penn, Gregory; Ratti, Alex; Staples, John; Wilcox Russell; Wurtele, Jonathan; Zholents, Alexander

    2005-10-01

    This report constitutes the third deliverable of LBNLs contracted role in the FERMI {at} Elettra Technical Optimization study. It describes proposed R&D activities for the baseline design of the Technical Optimization Study, initial studies of the RF gun mode-coupling and potential effects on beam dynamics, steady-state studies of FEL-2 performance to 10 nm, preliminary studies of time-dependent FEL-1 performance using electron bunch distribution from the start-to-end studies, and a preliminary investigation of a configuration with FEL sinclined at a small angle from the line of the linac.

  14. Exigências nutricionais de zebuínos: minerais Nutritional requirements of zebu cattle: minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Veiga Rodrigues Paulino

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de determinar as exigências dos macroelementos minerais (Ca, P, Mg, K e Na de zebuínos, foi conduzido um experimento no Departamento de Zootecnia da Universidade Federal de Viçosa, utilizando-se 16 novilhos castrados, com peso vivo médio inicial de 270 kg, mantidos em confinamento. Quatro animais foram abatidos, após o período de adaptação, para servirem como referência, e os doze restantes foram distribuídos em três tratamentos com diferentes níveis de concentrado nas dietas (5, 35 e 65%, na base da matéria seca (MS total, em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com quatro repetições. As dietas foram formuladas de forma a serem isoprotéicas. O volumoso foi constituído de pré-secado de capim-braquiária (Brachiaria brizantha e de capim-tifton 85 (Cynodon sp.. Os conteúdos de macroelementos minerais retidos no corpo foram estimados por meio de equações de regressão do logaritmo do conteúdo corporal dos macroelementos minerais, em função do logaritmo do peso de corpo vazio (PCVZ. As exigências líquidas dos macroelementos minerais, para ganho de 1 kg de PCVZ, foram obtidas utilizando-se a equação Y' = b.10ª. Xb-1, sendo a e b o intercepto e o coeficiente de regressão, respectivamente, das equações de predição dos conteúdos corporais de cada macroelemento mineral considerado. Verificou-se diminuição nas concentrações de todos os macroelementos minerais estudados, no corpo vazio e no ganho de corpo vazio, com a elevação do peso vivo. As relações obtidas para g Ca/100g de proteína retida e g P/100 g de proteína retida foram, respectivamente, 10,92 e 5,26.With the objective to determine the macrominerals (Ca, P, Mg, Na, K requirements of zebu cattle, a trial involving sixteen zebu steers with initial live weight of 270 kg was conducted. Four steers were slaughtered after the adaptation period of the trial, performing the reference group, and the remaining were uniformly allotted to a

  15. Approach of the US food and nutrition board to daily nutrient requirements : a useful basis for the European discussion on risk assessment of nutrients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussaard, J.H.; Berg, H. van den; Hermus, R.J.J.; Walter, P.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the approach of the US Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) to daily nutrient requirements and its relevance for Europe. Setting: A workshop for experts from academia and regulatory bodies, together with members from the FNB Dietary Reference Intakes Subcommittee on Upper Reference L

  16. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allerg ies (NDA) ; Guidance on the scientific requirements for health claims related to appetite ratings, weight management, and blood glucose concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) to draft guidance on scientific requirements for health claims related to appetite ratings, weight management, and blood glucose concentrations. This guidance has been drawn from scientific...

  17. Approach of the US food and nutrition board to daily nutrient requirements : a useful basis for the European discussion on risk assessment of nutrients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussaard, J.H.; Berg, H. van den; Hermus, R.J.J.; Walter, P.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the approach of the US Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) to daily nutrient requirements and its relevance for Europe. Setting: A workshop for experts from academia and regulatory bodies, together with members from the FNB Dietary Reference Intakes Subcommittee on Upper Reference L

  18. Genomic approach to studying nutritional requirements of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and other Clostridia causing late blowing defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storari, Michelangelo; Kulli, Sandra; Wüthrich, Daniel; Bruggmann, Rémy; Berthoud, Hélène; Arias-Roth, Emmanuelle

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum is the main microorganism responsible for the late blowing defect in hard and semi-hard cheeses, causing considerable economic losses to the cheese industry. Deeper knowledge of the metabolic requirements of this microorganism can lead to the development of more effective control approaches. In this work, the amino acids and B vitamins essential for sustaining the growth of C. tyrobutyricum were investigated using a genomic approach. As the first step, the genomes of four C. tyrobutyricum strains were analyzed for the presence of genes putatively involved in the biosynthesis of amino acids and B vitamins. Metabolic pathways could be reconstructed for all amino acids and B vitamins with the exception of biotin (vitamin B7) and folate (vitamin B9). The biotin pathway was missing the enzyme amino-7-oxononanoate synthase that catalyzes the condensation of pimeloyl-ACP and l-alanine to 8-amino-7-oxononanoate. In the folate pathway, the missing genes were those coding for para-aminobenzoate synthase and aminodeoxychorismate lyase enzymes. These enzymes are responsible for the conversion of chorismate into para-aminobenzoate (PABA). Two C. tyrobutyircum strains whose genome was analyzed in silico as well as other 10 strains isolated from cheese were tested in liquid media to confirm these observations. 11 strains showed growth in a defined liquid medium containing biotin and PABA after 6-8 days of incubation. No strain showed growth when only one or none of these compounds were added, confirming the observations obtained in silico. Furthermore, the genome analysis was extended to genomes of single strains of other Clostridium species potentially causing late blowing, namely Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium sporogenes and Clostridium butyricum. Only the biotin biosynthesis pathway was incomplete for C. butyricum and C. beijerincki. In contrast, C. sporogenes showed missing enzymes in biosynthesis pathways of several amino acids as well

  19. Preliminary assessment of numerical data requirements TA-73 landfill Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-19

    A numerical model, TOUGH2, was selected for describing liquid- and gas-phase flow in the unsaturated tuff underlying the TA-73 landfill. The model was selected primarily for its ability to simulate the significant mechanisms that may affect transport of contaminants through the vadose zone at the TA-73 landfill, including non-isothermal flow through fractured media. TOUGH2 is the best documented, verified, and validated model capable of performing the required simulations. The sensitivity analyses that were performed and describes in this report identified the input parameters that the selected numerical model is most sensitive to. The input parameters analyzed were saturated hydraulic conductivity, van Genuchten {alpha} and n, residual and saturated moisture contents, infiltration rate, fracture spacing and permeability, atmospheric pressure, and temperature. The sensitivity analyses were performed using a model grid that was designed to incorporate the regions in the landfill vicinity where contaminant transport is likely to occur and where the physical processes affecting flow and transport are the most dynamic. The sensitivity analyses performed suggest that the model is quite sensitive to a number of input parameters, including saturated hydraulic conductivity, the van Genuchten parameters {alpha} and n (for both the tuff matrix and fractures), fracture density and aperture, and atmospheric pressure. The results indicate that additional site-specific hydraulic properties and fracture data should be obtained before attempting to perform predictive, numerical simulations of gas- and liquid-phase flow beneath the landfill.

  20. 7 CFR 210.10 - Nutrition standards and menu planning approaches for lunches and requirements for afterschool...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... this section, depending on the menu planning approach used); (2) Provision of the lunchtime energy... Child Nutrition Database. The nutrient analysis is based on the Child Nutrition Database. This database... systems for schools may contact FNS for more information about the database. (ii) Software evaluation....

  1. Building a transnational biosurveillance network using semantic web technologies: requirements, design, and preliminary evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, Douglas; Pasche, Emilie; Gobeill, Julien; Emonet, Stéphane; Ruch, Patrick; Lovis, Christian

    2012-05-29

    Antimicrobial resistance has reached globally alarming levels and is becoming a major public health threat. Lack of efficacious antimicrobial resistance surveillance systems was identified as one of the causes of increasing resistance, due to the lag time between new resistances and alerts to care providers. Several initiatives to track drug resistance evolution have been developed. However, no effective real-time and source-independent antimicrobial resistance monitoring system is available publicly. To design and implement an architecture that can provide real-time and source-independent antimicrobial resistance monitoring to support transnational resistance surveillance. In particular, we investigated the use of a Semantic Web-based model to foster integration and interoperability of interinstitutional and cross-border microbiology laboratory databases. Following the agile software development methodology, we derived the main requirements needed for effective antimicrobial resistance monitoring, from which we proposed a decentralized monitoring architecture based on the Semantic Web stack. The architecture uses an ontology-driven approach to promote the integration of a network of sentinel hospitals or laboratories. Local databases are wrapped into semantic data repositories that automatically expose local computing-formalized laboratory information in the Web. A central source mediator, based on local reasoning, coordinates the access to the semantic end points. On the user side, a user-friendly Web interface provides access and graphical visualization to the integrated views. We designed and implemented the online Antimicrobial Resistance Trend Monitoring System (ARTEMIS) in a pilot network of seven European health care institutions sharing 70+ million triples of information about drug resistance and consumption. Evaluation of the computing performance of the mediator demonstrated that, on average, query response time was a few seconds (mean 4.3, SD 0.1 × 10

  2. The eco-nutrition requirements for dietary protein and its rhomb characteristics in juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong; JIANG Keyong; SUN Guoxiang; GAO Tingting; ZHOU Bangwei

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the dietary protein requirements of juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.)and their effects on aquatic quality.Five experimental diets were formulated containing 450,480,500,520,and 540 g/kg.Each diet was randomly assigned to triplicate groups of juvenile turbot (mean initial body weight 34.5±5.5 g) for 88 d.Both the weight gain ratio and feed efficiency increased with increasing dietary protein up to 500 g/kg,but no further improvement was detected when dietary protein levels were >500 g/kg.Protein intake and digestion increased with protein levels,while fecal nitrogen and nitrogen content in seawater increased only when dietary protein exceeded 500 g/kg.Protein digestibility was highest at intermediate dietary protein levels.Chemical oxygen demand,nitrite-nitrogen (NO2- -N) and phosphatic-phosphor (PO43 -P) levels increased in the rearing water as dietary protein levels increased.The optimum eco-nutrition level of dietary protein for juvenile turbot was 500 g/kg under the current experimental conditions.The diets containing 540 and 500 g/kg protein had similar growth rates and feed conversion ratios,but levels of ammonia (NH4+) and nitrogen were considerably higher in the water and feces,respectively,at the higher level of dietary protein.The difference in the pattem of change between body weight gain and ammonia concentration in water with increasing dietary protein is described by rhomb characteristics.

  3. Optimisation of nutritional requirements for dopamine synthesis by calcium alginate-entrapped mutant strain of Aspergillus oryzae EMS-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sikander; Nawaz, Wajeeha

    2017-02-01

    The optimisation of nutritional requirements for dopamine (DA) synthesis by calcium alginate-entrapped mutant variant of Aspergillus oryzae EMS-6 using submerged fermentation technique was investigated. A total of 13 strains were isolated from soil. Isolate I-2 was selected as a better producer of DA and improved by exposing with ethyl methylsulphonate (EMS). EMS-6 was selected as it exhibited 43 μg/mL DA activity. The mutant variable was further treated with low levels of l-cysteine HCl to make it resistant against diversion and environmental stress. The conidiospores of mutant variant were entrapped in calcium alginate beads for stable product formation. EMS-6 gave maximum DA activity (124 μg/mL) when supplemented with 0.1% peptone and 0.2% sucrose, under optimised parameters viz. pH 3, temperature of 55 °C and incubation time of 70 min. The study involves the high profile of DA activity and is needed, as DA is capable to control numerous neurogenic disorders.

  4. Differences in larval nutritional requirements and female oviposition preference reflect the order of fruit colonization of Zaprionus indianus and Drosophila simulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matavelli, Cristiane; Carvalho, Maria João A; Martins, Nelson E; Mirth, Christen K

    2015-11-01

    Species coexist using the same nutritional resource by partitioning it either in space or time, but few studies explore how species-specific nutritional requirements allow partitioning. Zaprionus indianus and Drosophila simulans co-exist in figs by invading the fruit at different stages; Z. indianus colonizes ripe figs, whereas D. simulans oviposits in decaying fruit. Larvae feed on yeast growing on the fruit, which serves as their primary protein source. Because yeast populations increase as fruit decays, we find that ripe fruit has lower protein content than rotting fruit. Therefore, we hypothesized that Z. indianus and D. simulans larvae differ in their dietary requirements for protein. We used nutritional geometry to assess the effects of protein and carbohydrate concentration in the larval diet on life history characters in both species. Survival, development time, and ovariole number respond differently to the composition of the larval diet, with Z. indianus generally performing better across a wider range of protein concentrations. Correspondingly, we found that Z. indianus females preferred to lay eggs on low protein foods, while D. simulans females chose higher protein foods for oviposition when competing with Z. indianus. We propose the different nutritional requirements and oviposition preference of these two species allows them to temporally partition their habitat. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Rational design of medium supplementation strategy for improved influenza viruses production based on analyzing nutritional requirements of MDCK Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ding; Xia-Hou, Kang; Liu, Xu-Ping; Zhao, Liang; Fan, Li; Ye, Zhaoyang; Tan, Wen-Song; Luo, Jian; Chen, Ze

    2014-12-12

    Influenza vaccine production using cell culture technology has become popular nowadays. However, to meet the ever increasing demand of influenza vaccine, it is prerequisite to improve the yield of influenza virus in cells. To achieve this, in the present study, the nutritional requirements of MDCK cells in the virus production process were analyzed and a nutrient-feeding strategy was developed accordingly. Based on the consumption rates and corresponding concentration optimization, glucose and fast metabolized amino acids were supplemented into the maintaining medium at the time of infection. Compared with the non-supplemented culture, the average cell specific death rate during 0-48 h post-infection was 0.013 h(-1), which was 40.91% lower in the nutrient-supplemented culture. Total virus titer, HA antigen protein concentration and cell-specific virus yield were (1.88±0.23)×10(3) HA units/50μL, 11.70±0.22 μg/mL and (10.06±1.16)×10(3) virions/cell, respectively, which were 84.04±22.50%, 31.46±2.87% and 86.64±25.81% higher than those in the control, respectively. These data showed that the appropriate supplementation of nutrients during virus production process could reduce cell death, and improve cell-specific virus yield and total influenza virus output. This study laid foundation for the development of cell culture technology for influenza vaccine production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bioenergetics-based modeling of Plasmodium falciparum metabolism reveals its essential genes, nutritional requirements, and thermodynamic bottlenecks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappino-Pepe, Anush; Tymoshenko, Stepan; Ataman, Meriç; Soldati-Favre, Dominique; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2017-03-01

    Novel antimalarial therapies are urgently needed for the fight against drug-resistant parasites. The metabolism of malaria parasites in infected cells is an attractive source of drug targets but is rather complex. Computational methods can handle this complexity and allow integrative analyses of cell metabolism. In this study, we present a genome-scale metabolic model (iPfa) of the deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, and its thermodynamics-based flux analysis (TFA). Using previous absolute concentration data of the intraerythrocytic parasite, we applied TFA to iPfa and predicted up to 63 essential genes and 26 essential pairs of genes. Of the 63 genes, 35 have been experimentally validated and reported in the literature, and 28 have not been experimentally tested and include previously hypothesized or novel predictions of essential metabolic capabilities. Without metabolomics data, four of the genes would have been incorrectly predicted to be non-essential. TFA also indicated that substrate channeling should exist in two metabolic pathways to ensure the thermodynamic feasibility of the flux. Finally, analysis of the metabolic capabilities of P. falciparum led to the identification of both the minimal nutritional requirements and the genes that can become indispensable upon substrate inaccessibility. This model provides novel insight into the metabolic needs and capabilities of the malaria parasite and highlights metabolites and pathways that should be measured and characterized to identify potential thermodynamic bottlenecks and substrate channeling. The hypotheses presented seek to guide experimental studies to facilitate a better understanding of the parasite metabolism and the identification of targets for more efficient intervention.

  7. Bioenergetics-based modeling of Plasmodium falciparum metabolism reveals its essential genes, nutritional requirements, and thermodynamic bottlenecks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anush Chiappino-Pepe

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Novel antimalarial therapies are urgently needed for the fight against drug-resistant parasites. The metabolism of malaria parasites in infected cells is an attractive source of drug targets but is rather complex. Computational methods can handle this complexity and allow integrative analyses of cell metabolism. In this study, we present a genome-scale metabolic model (iPfa of the deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, and its thermodynamics-based flux analysis (TFA. Using previous absolute concentration data of the intraerythrocytic parasite, we applied TFA to iPfa and predicted up to 63 essential genes and 26 essential pairs of genes. Of the 63 genes, 35 have been experimentally validated and reported in the literature, and 28 have not been experimentally tested and include previously hypothesized or novel predictions of essential metabolic capabilities. Without metabolomics data, four of the genes would have been incorrectly predicted to be non-essential. TFA also indicated that substrate channeling should exist in two metabolic pathways to ensure the thermodynamic feasibility of the flux. Finally, analysis of the metabolic capabilities of P. falciparum led to the identification of both the minimal nutritional requirements and the genes that can become indispensable upon substrate inaccessibility. This model provides novel insight into the metabolic needs and capabilities of the malaria parasite and highlights metabolites and pathways that should be measured and characterized to identify potential thermodynamic bottlenecks and substrate channeling. The hypotheses presented seek to guide experimental studies to facilitate a better understanding of the parasite metabolism and the identification of targets for more efficient intervention.

  8. Bioenergetics-based modeling of Plasmodium falciparum metabolism reveals its essential genes, nutritional requirements, and thermodynamic bottlenecks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappino-Pepe, Anush; Ataman, Meriç

    2017-01-01

    Novel antimalarial therapies are urgently needed for the fight against drug-resistant parasites. The metabolism of malaria parasites in infected cells is an attractive source of drug targets but is rather complex. Computational methods can handle this complexity and allow integrative analyses of cell metabolism. In this study, we present a genome-scale metabolic model (iPfa) of the deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, and its thermodynamics-based flux analysis (TFA). Using previous absolute concentration data of the intraerythrocytic parasite, we applied TFA to iPfa and predicted up to 63 essential genes and 26 essential pairs of genes. Of the 63 genes, 35 have been experimentally validated and reported in the literature, and 28 have not been experimentally tested and include previously hypothesized or novel predictions of essential metabolic capabilities. Without metabolomics data, four of the genes would have been incorrectly predicted to be non-essential. TFA also indicated that substrate channeling should exist in two metabolic pathways to ensure the thermodynamic feasibility of the flux. Finally, analysis of the metabolic capabilities of P. falciparum led to the identification of both the minimal nutritional requirements and the genes that can become indispensable upon substrate inaccessibility. This model provides novel insight into the metabolic needs and capabilities of the malaria parasite and highlights metabolites and pathways that should be measured and characterized to identify potential thermodynamic bottlenecks and substrate channeling. The hypotheses presented seek to guide experimental studies to facilitate a better understanding of the parasite metabolism and the identification of targets for more efficient intervention. PMID:28333921

  9. Medical nutrition therapy planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torović Ljilja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diet has vital, preventive and therapeutic functions. Medical nutrition therapy is a part of the Standardized Nutrition Care Process integrated in health care systems. Material and methods. An overview of the Nutrition Care Process model and the application of nutrition guidelines based on literature, reports, documents and programmes of international health, food and physical activity authorities was done. Results. The Nutrition Care Process model requires registered dieticians, standardized terminology as well as nutrition diagnosis categorization. It consists of four distinct, but interrelated and connected steps: (a nutrition assessment, (b nutrition diagnosis, (c nutrition intervention, and (d nutrition monitoring and evaluation. An individual approach is essential for successful medical nutrition therapy. Nutrition guidelines facilitate the process of understanding and application of medical nutrition therapy. Conclusion. The Nutrition Care process provides dietetic professionals information on high-quality client nutrition care. The success of medical nutrition therapy rests not only upon the advice of the dietician, but also upon the client’s compliance.

  10. Application of two-stage cultivation for exploring the nutritional requirements for sporulation of three biocontrol fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li

    2015-01-01

    Fungicide was an important part in mycopesticides, which play an important role in pest management, while their mass production and commercialization faced problem. We found that the nutrition for mycelia growth and sporulation differences a lot. So, we developed "two-step method" to define the nutrition for sporulation in this paper. The results indicated that the novel method led to a great increase of spore yields for Beauveria bassiana (IBC1201), Lecanicillium lecanii (CA-1-G), and Pochonia chlamydosporia (HSY-12-14), respectively, of about 100, 2, and 16 times and, also reduced the cycle of mass production to 1/3 compared with common time for culturing.

  11. Space Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2009-01-01

    Optimal nutrition will be critical for crew members who embark on space exploration missions. Nutritional assessment provides an opportunity to ensure that crewmembers begin their missions in optimal nutritional status, to document changes during a mission and, if necessary, to provide intervention to maintain that status throughout the mission, and to assesses changes after landing in order to facilitate the return to their normal status as soon as possible after landing. We report here the findings from our nutritional assessment of astronauts who participated in the International Space Station (ISS) missions, along with flight and ground-based research findings. We also present ongoing and planned nutrition research activities. These studies provide evidence that bone loss, compromised vitamin status, and oxidative damage are the critical nutritional concerns for space travelers. Other nutrient issues exist, including concerns about the stability of nutrients in the food system, which are exposed to longterm storage and radiation during flight. Defining nutrient requirements, and being able to provide and maintain those nutrients on exploration missions, will be critical for maintaining crew member health.

  12. Nutritional counseling and nutritional supplements: a cornerstone of multidisciplinary cancer care for cachectic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenring, Elizabeth A; Teleni, Laisa

    2013-12-01

    The challenge with cancer cachexia is that it is not fully reversed by nutrition support. The purpose of this review is to provide an opinion on the nutritional management of cancer cachexia based on the most recent available evidence. There continues to be a paucity of nutrition intervention studies in patients with cancer cachexia. In patients with cancer undergoing radiotherapy, there is strong evidence that nutrition counseling increases dietary intake, body weight, nutritional status and quality of life with some suggestion that dietary counseling may improve nutrition impact symptoms, treatment response and survival. In patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, the evidence is less clear. The use of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may have some positive effects in patients with cancer; however, clinical judgment and care need to be taken in its application. Preliminary results of studies in the use of L-carnitine in improving fatigue are promising; however, the largest trial in 'healthy' cancer patients showed no benefit. Further research into the most appropriate methods for identifying and treating cancer cachexia is required. Regardless of whether patients are experiencing reduced dietary intake resulting in malnutrition or due to cachexia, nutrition remains a cornerstone of multimodal treatment.

  13. Aging and Nutrition Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzarre, Terry L.

    1978-01-01

    Reviews nutrition education programs in relation to aging. A summary of nutritional information that constitutes different components of nutrition education programs for the elderly is discussed. A brief review of physiological changes affecting nutrient utilization and food selection and changes in dietary intake and requirements are presented.…

  14. Nutrition for Sport Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrition Foundation, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This guidebook presents basic facts about nutrition, focusing upon the nutritional needs of athletes. Information is given on: (1) the importance of water, salt and other electrolytes, and treating and preventing heat disorders; (2) nutrition for training and performance, the best diet, caloric and energy requirements for various and specific…

  15. Nutritional Status Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional Status Assessment (Nutrition) is the most comprehensive inflight study done by NASA to date of human physiologic changes during long-duration space flight; this includes measures of bone metabolism, oxidative damage, nutritional assessments, and hormonal changes. This study will impact both the definition of nutritional requirements and development of food systems for future space exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. This experiment will also help to understand the impact of countermeasures (exercise and pharmaceuticals) on nutritional status and nutrient requirements for astronauts.

  16. Application of Two-Stage Cultivation for Exploring the Nutritional Requirements for Sporulation of Three Biocontrol Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungicide was an important part in mycopesticides, which play an important role in pest management, while their mass production and commercialization faced problem. We found that the nutrition for mycelia growth and sporulation differences a lot. So, we developed “two-step method” to define the nutrition for sporulation in this paper. The results indicated that the novel method led to a great increase of spore yields for Beauveria bassiana (IBC1201, Lecanicillium lecanii (CA-1-G, and Pochonia chlamydosporia (HSY-12-14, respectively, of about 100, 2, and 16 times and, also reduced the cycle of mass production to 1/3 compared with common time for culturing.

  17. Exigências nutricionais de vacas nelores primíparas lactantes Nutritional requirements of primiparous lactating Nellore cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozart Alves Fonseca

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar as exigências nutricionais de proteína e energia de vacas nelores em lactação no período de 0 a 180 dias. Foram utilizadas 20 vacas primíparas com peso corporal médio ao parto de 362±25 kg. Quatro vacas foram abatidas logo após o parto e foram consideradas grupo referência. Do parto aos 90 dias, quatro vacas receberam alimentação restrita na proporção de 1,5% do peso corporal (PC, em porcentagem da matéria seca (MS, e 12 foram alimentadas à vontade. Aos 90 dias do pós-parto, foram abatidas oito vacas (quatro de cada oferta alimentar. Dos 90 aos 180 dias, quatro vacas foram realocadas para mantença (1,8% PC em MS e quatro continuaram em consumo voluntário, sendo todas abatidas ao final do período. Os conteúdos corporais de proteína e energia foram estimados pelo equação Y = a . Xb, em que X é o peso de corpo vazio (PCVZ e a e b os parâmetros da equação. Foram obtidas relações médias de 0,894 para PCVZ/PC e de 0,936 para ganho de PCVZ (GPCVZ/ganho de PC (GPC. As exigências líquidas de energia para mantença (ELm foram de 97,84 kcal/PCVZ0,75 e as de energia metabolizável para mantença (EMm, 140,17 kcal/PCVZ0,75. As eficiências de utilização da energia para mantença e ganho de peso foram 0,70 e 0,44, respectivamente. Os conteúdos corporais de proteína diminuíram com o aumento do PC, enquanto os de energia aumentaram. No leite das vacas, foram determinados teores médios de 3,71; 3,88; e 4,74%, respectivamente, de proteína bruta, gordura e lactose. A exigência de ELm para lactação de vacas nelores é de 97,84 kcal/PCVZ0,75, enquanto a de EMm é de 140,17 kcal/PCVZ0,75 e a de proteína metabolizável, de 52,8 g. Para produzir 1 kg de leite com 4% de gordura, vacas nelores necessitam de 0,300 kg de NDT.This study was conducted to evaluate the nutritional requirements of protein and energy of primiparous lactating Nellore cows from 0 to 180 days after calving. A total of 20 lactating

  18. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) ; Guidance on the scientific requirements for health claims related to physical performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    The Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) to draft guidance on scientific requirements for health claims related to physical performance. This guidance has been drawn from scientific opinions of the NDA Panel on such health...... claims. Thus, this guidance document represents the views of the NDA Panel based on the experience gained to date with the evaluation of health claims in this area. It is not intended that the document should include an exhaustive list of beneficial effects and studies/outcome measures which...

  19. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) ; Guidance on the scientific requirements for health claims related to bone, joints, skin and oral health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    The Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) has been asked by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) to draft guidance on the scientific requirements for health claims related to bone, joints, skin, and oral health. This guidance has been drawn from scientific opinions...... of the NDA Panel on such health claims. Thus, this guidance document represents the views of the NDA Panel based on the experience gained to date with the evaluation of health claims in these areas. It is not intended that the document should include an exhaustive list of beneficial effects and studies...

  20. A preliminary study about effect of nutrition education on dietary behaviors%营养教育对饮食行为的影响初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王媛

    2012-01-01

    目的 营养教育是以改善营养状况目的的,通过传播相关营养信息,指导个人、家庭和社区人群选择健康食物,最终改变人群饮食行为的一系列有计划的活动.通过不同方式的营养教育,可以在人群中普及膳食营养知识,摒弃不健康的生活方式,指导公众建立良好的饮食行为.本文综述了营养教育对儿童、青年学生及中老年人群饮食行为的影响,以及实施营养教育中遇到的问题.为了取得更加满意的干预效果,在营养教育实践中,应注意大众传播和人际传播两种途径相结合,注意保持教育的长期性与有效性,并尽量涵盖不同年龄段和知识层次的人群.%The nutrition education whose aim is to improve the nutritional status is a series of planned activities. By spreading nutrition related information, the nutrition education can guide individual, family and community population to choose the healthy food, so as to change the dietary behaviors of population. The various ways of nutrition education can popularize the dietary and nutritional knowledge among population, change the unhealthy life style, and guide public establish good dietary behaviors. This paper reviews the effect of nutrition education on dietary behaviors of children, young students and elderly people, and the problems on implementation of nutrition education. In order to obtain more satisfactory intervention effect, it is necessary to combine the mass communication and interpersonal communication, implement the long-term and effective education methods, and cover every population with different age and education background.

  1. Nutrition in the adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, R

    1999-02-01

    This article reviews the nutritional requirements of puberty and the clinical assessment of nutritional status, and discusses the nutritional risks imposed by vegetarian diets, pregnancy, and athletic involvement. Energy (calories) and protein are essential in pubertal development. Adolescent females require approximately 2200 calories/day, whereas male adolescents require 2500-3000 calories/day. Additional intake requirements include fat, calcium, iron, zinc, vitamins, and fiber. The clinical assessment of nutritional status begins with obtaining a good diet history of the patient and this could be offered by the body mass index. Nutritional deficiencies and poor eating habits established during adolescence can have long-term consequences, including delayed sexual maturation, loss of final adult height, osteoporosis, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. As for vegetarian adolescents, nutritional risks include lack of iodine, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and some essential fatty acids. In addition, substances in some grains reduce gut absorption, thus increasing mineral deficiencies. Pregnancy may also be a risk factor for poor nutrition during adolescence. A pregnant adolescent has different nutritional needs because she is still growing. Among adolescent athletes many are turning to nutritional supplements in an attempt to improve athletic performance. A balanced, varied diet provides adequate calories and nutrition to meet the needs of most adolescents. They also have greater water needs than do adult athletes. Details on adolescent health concerns are further discussed in this article.

  2. Preliminary Data on the Ecological Requirements of the Invasive Spiny-Cheek Crayfish in the Lower Danube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pîrvu Mălina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Water quality and properties of the riverbed often shape the community structure of aquatic ecosystems, occasionally sustaining the expansion of non-native species. This study aims to provide preliminary data on the ecological preferences of the invasive species Orconectes limosus, its control, and the protection of the native stock is an European priority. In order to assess the species ability to colonize small river systems, relevant tributaries in the invaded Danube sector were monitored. Statistical test indicates a preference for deep and warm rivers, low water velocity and also high concentrations of calcium.

  3. Superfluid helium orbital resupply - The status of the SHOOT flight experiment and preliminary user requirements. [Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipirro, Michael J.; Kittel, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) flight experiment is designed to demonstrate the components and techniques necessary to resupply superfluid helium to satellites or Space Station based facilities. A top level description as well as the development status of the critical components to be used in SHOOT are discussed. Some of these components include the thermomechanical pump, the fluid acquisition system, the normal helium and superfluid helium phase separators, Venturi flow meter, cryogenic valves, burst disks, and astronaut-compatible EVA coupler and transfer line. The requirements for the control electronics and software are given. A preliminary description of the requirements that must be met by a satellite requiring superfluid helium servicing is given. In particular, minimum and optimum plumbing arrangements are shown, transfer line flow impedance and heat input impacts are assessed, instrumentation is described, and performance parameters are considered.

  4. Genetic variants in the metabolism of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids: their role in the determination of nutritional requirements and chronic disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, Artemis P

    2010-07-01

    The tissue composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids is important to health and depends on both dietary intake and metabolism controlled by genetic polymorphisms that should be taken into consideration in the determination of nutritional requirements. Therefore at the same dietary intake of linoleic acid (LA) and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), their respective health effects may differ due to genetic differences in metabolism. Delta-5 and delta-6 desaturases, FADS1 and FADS2, respectively, influence the serum, plasma and membrane phospholipid levels of LA, ALA and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids during pregnancy, lactation, and may influence an infant's IQ, atopy and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. At low intakes of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), polymorphisms at the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) level increase the risk for CHD whereas polymorphisms at cyclooxgenase-2 increase the risk for prostate cancer. At high intakes of LA the risk for breast cancer increases. EPA and DHA influence gene expression. In future, intervention studies on the biological effects of LA, ALA and LC-PUFAs, and the effects of genetic variants in FADS1 and FADS2, 5-LO and cyclooxygenase-2 should be taken into consideration both in the determination of nutritional requirements and chronic disease risk. Furthermore, genome-wide association studies need to include environmental exposures and include diet in the interaction between genetic variation and disease association.

  5. Meta-analysis and functional validation of nutritional requirements of solventogenic Clostridia growing under butanol stress conditions and coutilization of D-glucose and D-xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heluane, Humberto; Evans, Matthew R; Dagher, Sue F; Bruno-Bárcena, José M

    2011-07-01

    Recent advances in systems biology, omics, and computational studies allow us to carry out data mining for improving biofuel production bioprocesses. Of particular interest are bioprocesses that center on microbial capabilities to biotransform both the hexose and pentose fractions present in crop residues. This called for a systematic exploration of the components of the media to obtain higher-density cultures and more-productive fermentation operations than are currently found. By using a meta-analysis approach of the transcriptional responses to butanol stress, we identified the nutritional requirements of solvent-tolerant strain Clostridium beijerinckii SA-1 (ATCC 35702). The nutritional requirements identified were later validated using the chemostat pulse-and-shift technique. C. beijerinckii SA-1 was cultivated in a two-stage single-feed-stream continuous production system to test the proposed validated medium formulation, and the coutilization of D-glucose and D-xylose was evaluated by taking advantage of the well-known ability of solventogenic clostridia to utilize a large variety of carbon sources such as mono-, oligo-, and polysaccharides containing pentose and hexose sugars. Our results indicated that C. beijerinckii SA-1 was able to coferment hexose/pentose sugar mixtures in the absence of a glucose repression effect. In addition, our analysis suggests that the solvent and acid resistance mechanisms found in this strain are differentially regulated compared to strain NRRL B-527 and are outlined as the basis of the analysis toward optimizing butanol production.

  6. 7 CFR 248.9 - Nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nutrition education. 248.9 Section 248.9 Agriculture... Nutrition education. (a) Goals. Nutrition education shall emphasize the relationship of proper nutrition to.... (b) Requirement. The State agency shall integrate nutrition education into FMNP operations and may...

  7. Analysis of nutritional adequacy of local foods for meeting dietary requirements of children aged 6-23 months in rural central Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Jofrey; Agaba, Morris; Mollay, Clara; Rose, Jerman W; Kassim, Neema

    2017-01-01

    Under nutrition remains a serious problem among children in Sub-Saharan Africa. Analysing how diets composed of local foods could achieve nutritional goals for infants and young children in low-income settings is essential. The objective of this study was to analyse how local foods can be used rationally and to what extent these foods can be supplemented to achieve nutrient requirements for children aged 6 - 23 months in resource-poor settings. A cross-sectional study was carried out to estimate dietary intakes of 400 children aged 6-23 months using a 12-h weighed dietary record, 24-h dietary recalls, and 7-days food records. Anthropometric measurements on each subject were also taken. Analyses were done to establish the level of nutrient intake, and nutritional status of the study population using Microsoft Excel 2013 and ProPAN software version 2.0. The results showed that the prevalence of stunting, wasting and underweight for children aged 6-23 months was 30-41%, 1.5-3% and 4-9%, respectively. In addition, the results showed that diets that were consumed by the subjects comprised of local foods met vitamin A, vitamin C, protein and energy requirements for children aged 6-23 months. However, the extent of deficit in iron, zinc and calcium in baseline diets was large and difficult to meet under the existing feeding practices. The study shows that local foods in the study area have a potential to achieve recommended dietary intakes of some essential nutrients, and that interventions are needed to meet the required amount of iron, zinc and calcium for children aged 6-23 months. The interventions we propose here may encourage changes in traditional feeding habits and practices of the target population. Possible intervention options are (1) supplementation of local foods with nutrient-dense foods that are not normally consumed in the locality (2) providing new avenues for increasing the production and wide consumption of local nutrient-dense foods, or optimizing

  8. 鲜鸭蛋及其制品的营养成分初步分析%Preliminary Nutritional Analysis of Fresh Duck Egg and its Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周有祥; 夏虹; 彭茂民; 汪清清; 胡定金

    2009-01-01

    In order to illuminate the nutritive value and provide basic nutritive evidence of duck egg and its products,some basic nutritional indices including the contents of crude protein,crude fat,ash,moisture and amino acid profile in fresh,alkaline-preserved and salted duck eggs was analyzed in this paper. The results revealed that the contents of crude protein in duck egg and its products were similar,but the differences in crude fat,ash and moisture contents were significant (P= 0.05). No obvious difference in the profiles of 17 amino acids between fresh and salted duck egg was observed,but the significant differences (P=0.05) in alkaline-preserved duck egg compared with fresh duck egg was obtained. The basic nutritional analysis indicated that duck egg could be beneficial supplement to the hen eggs in our dietary structure for its equivalent nutritive value in protein and better value in mineral and fat compared with hen egg.%试验通过对鲜鸭蛋、皮蛋和咸蛋的粗蛋白、粗脂肪、灰分、含水量以及17种氨基酸含量的测定,分析比较了它们的基本营养指标,为阐明其营养价值提供了初步的营养依据.试验结果表明,鲜鸭蛋及鸭蛋制品中的粗蛋白含量处于同一水平,而粗脂肪、灰分以及水分含量的差异显著(P=0.05).咸蛋与鲜鸭蛋中的17种氨基酸含量大致保持一致,而皮蛋中的Cys和Arg含量显著低于鲜鸭蛋(P=0.05).营养分析表明,鲜鸭蛋及其制品的营养价值在蛋白质方面与鸡蛋相当,在脂肪和矿物质含量上优于鸡蛋,因此在饮食结构中,可作为鸡蛋的有益补充.

  9. Assessment of serum CX3CL1/fractalkine level in Han Chinese girls with anorexia nervosa and its correlation with nutritional status: a preliminary cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengkang; Tang, Hanfeng; Gong, Cai; Liu, Jiang; Chen, Jindong

    2017-02-01

    The chemokine (C-X3-C motif) ligand 1 (CX3CL1), also named fractalkine (FKN), has been implicated in psychiatric disorders and functions as a novel adipocytokine. However, no attention has been paid to the role of FKN in anorexia nervosa (AN). The current study was performed to explore FKN levels in AN to determine its role in the involvement of AN. A total of 96 girls aged 11-18 years with AN (n=34), healthy controls (HC; n=32) and simple obesity (OB, n=30) were enrolled in the cross-sectional study. Blood samples were collected during the fasting state. Serum FKN concentrations were determined using ELISA. The skinfold thickness (TSF) of the biceps and triceps as well as mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC) were used to determine the nutritional status. Our results showed that serum FKN levels were significantly lower in the AN group than in the control and OB groups. After adjusting for body mass index (BMI), FKN concentrations in the AN group were statistically higher than in the HC and OB groups. Significant correlations between serum FKN and body weight, BMI, Cole index and serum insulin were observed. In addition, serum FKN levels were positively related to TSF and MAMC in all subjects. Serum FKN concentrations are attenuated in girls with AN compared with healthy adolescents and are positively related to nutritional status. The lower FKN levels may be regulated by nutrition status and response to starvation. After adjusting for BMI, higher FKN levels may reflect that persistent inflammation is present in patients with AN. Copyright © 2016 American Federation for Medical Research.

  10. Food and nutritional security requires adequate protein as well as energy, delivered from whole-year crop production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coles, Graeme D; Wratten, Stephen D; Porter, John Roy

    2016-01-01

    Human food security requires the production of sufficient quantities of both high-quality protein and dietary energy. In a series of case-studies from New Zealand, we show that while production of food ingredients from crops on arable land can meet human dietary energy requirements effectively......, requirements for high-quality protein are met more efficiently by animal production from such land. We present a model that can be used to assess dietary energy and quality-corrected protein production from various crop and crop/animal production systems, and demonstrate its utility. We extend our analysis...... with an accompanying economic analysis of commercially-available, pre-prepared or simply-cooked foods that can be produced from our case-study crop and animal products. We calculate the per-person, per-day cost of both quality-corrected protein and dietary energy as provided in the processed foods. We conclude...

  11. Food and nutritional security requires adequate protein as well as energy, delivered from whole-year crop production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coles, Graeme D; Wratten, Stephen D; Porter, John Roy

    2016-01-01

    Human food security requires the production of sufficient quantities of both high-quality protein and dietary energy. In a series of case-studies from New Zealand, we show that while production of food ingredients from crops on arable land can meet human dietary energy requirements effectively......, requirements for high-quality protein are met more efficiently by animal production from such land. We present a model that can be used to assess dietary energy and quality-corrected protein production from various crop and crop/animal production systems, and demonstrate its utility. We extend our analysis...... with an accompanying economic analysis of commercially-available, pre-prepared or simply-cooked foods that can be produced from our case-study crop and animal products. We calculate the per-person, per-day cost of both quality-corrected protein and dietary energy as provided in the processed foods. We conclude...

  12. Diet & Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Diet & Nutrition Eating healthy to take charge of your health. Shelly Diagnosed in 2006 Diet & Nutrition Take Control of Your Weight Portion Control Low ...

  13. Nutritional status at diagnosis in children and adolescents with cancer in the Asociacion de Hemato-Oncologia Pediatrica de Centro America (AHOPCA) countries: preliminary results from Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Alessandra; Rossi, Emanuela; Antillon, Federico

    2008-02-01

    More than 50% of children with cancer in Guatemala have some degree of malnutrition at diagnosis. In particular, the proportions of patients with non-lymphoblastic leukemias and myelodysplasia (MDS) with moderate and severe malnutrition were 73% and 9% respectively; higher than that in the population with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), P = 0.0493. There was no relationship of nutritional status to gender. Children with ALL and other leukemias + MDS who had severe malnutrition were significantly younger than such malnourished children with solid tumors (P = 0.0003). The relationship of malnutrition to race was mixed, perhaps reflecting the frequent difficulty of accurately categorizing race. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Geological impacts on nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter reviews the nutritional roles of mineral elements, as part of a volume on health implications of geology. The chapter addresses the absorption and post-absorptive utilization of the nutritionally essential minerals, including their physiological functions and quantitative requirements....

  15. Nutritional and metabolic requirements for the infection of HeLa cells by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Steven D; Hopper-Chidlaw, Amanda C; Rice, Christopher J; Ramachandran, Vinoy K; Kelly, David J; Thompson, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella is the causative agent of a spectrum of human and animal diseases ranging from gastroenteritis to typhoid fever. It is a food--and water--borne pathogen and infects via ingestion followed by invasion of intestinal epithelial cells and phagocytic cells. In this study we employed a mutational approach to define the nutrients and metabolic pathways required by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium during infection of a human epithelial cell line (HeLa). We deleted the key glycolytic genes, pfkA and pfkB to show that S. Typhimurium utilizes glycolysis for replication within HeLa cells; however, glycolysis was not absolutely essential for intracellular replication. Using S. Typhimurium strains deleted for genes encoding components of the phosphotransferase system and glucose transport, we show that glucose is a major substrate required for the intracellular replication of S. Typhimurium in HeLa cells. We also deleted genes encoding enzymes involved in the utilization of gluconeogenic substrates and the glyoxylate shunt and show that neither of these pathways were required for intracellular replication of S. Typhimurium within HeLa cells.

  16. Nutritional research may be useful in treating tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Luke

    2016-06-01

    Tendon injures cause a great deal of disability and pain, and increase medical costs. However, relatively little is known about tendon biology and healing. Many tendon-related surgical procedures are not very successful and leave the patient with essentially a chronic injury. New therapeutic approaches for tendon injury are needed. Preliminary evidence suggests that various nutrients such as proteins, amino acids (leucine, arginine, glutamine), vitamins C and D, manganese, copper, zinc, and phytochemicals may be useful in improving tendon growth and healing. More research on nutrition and tendon health is needed. Because many nutrients are required for tendon health, nutritional interventions involving multiple nutrients may be more effective than single-nutrient strategies. In the future, ideal treatment regimens for tendon injuries may include a multifaceted "bundle" of nutrition, drugs, biologic products, extracellular matrix therapies, exercise/physical therapy, and possibly surgery.

  17. Pediatric Nutrition Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Corkins, Kelly; Teague, Erin E

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric patients with chronic illnesses or diseases or who require long-term nutrition support are most vulnerable to nutrition-related issues. Malnutrition in a pediatric patient may negatively affect long-term growth and development. Children also become malnourished much more quickly than adults. A comprehensive nutrition assessment that includes food and nutrition-related history, anthropometric measurements, biochemical data, medical tests and procedures, nutrition-focused physical findings, and patient history should be completed on these patients as no one parameter is a comprehensive indicator of nutrition status. Anthropometric measurements provide important information on the growth and nutrition status of a child, yet many times it is difficult to get accurate and valid measurements due to physical limitations of the child or improper technique. Inaccurate measurements may result in a missed diagnosis of malnutrition or may lead to an incorrect diagnosis of a healthy child. Knowledge of appropriate anthropometric measurements and alternatives is crucial when assessing growth in all children and essential for those who are physically handicapped or critically ill. The purpose of this review is to present key components of a pediatric nutrition assessment so proper nutrition-related diagnosis, including malnutrition, can be accomplished, a nutrition care plan established, and expected outcomes documented.

  18. [Nutrition and liver failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plauth, M

    2013-06-01

    In the critically ill liver patient, nutrition support is not very different from that given for other illnesses. In hyperacute liver failure, nutrition support is of less importance than in the other subtypes of acute liver failure that take a more protracted course. Nasoenteral tube feeding using a polymeric standard formula should be the first-line approach, while parenteral nutrition giving glucose, fat, amino acids, vitamins, and trace elements is initiated when enteral nutrition is insufficient or impracticable. In chronic liver disease, notably cirrhosis, there is frequently protein malnutrition indicating a poor prognosis and requiring immediate initiation of nutrition support. Enteral nutrition ensuring an adequate provision of energy and protein should be preferred. Particular care should be taken to avoid refeeding syndrome and to treat vitamin and trace element deficiency.

  19. A nutrition mathematical model to account for dietary supply and requirements of energy and nutrients for domesticated small ruminants: the development and evaluation of the Small Ruminant Nutrition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Orlindo Tedeschi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A mechanistic model that predicts nutrient requirements and biological values of feeds for sheep (Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System; CNCPS-S was expanded to include goats and the name was changed to the Small Ruminant Nutrition System (SRNS. The SRNS uses animal and environmental factors to predict metabolizable energy (ME and protein, and Ca and P requirements. Requirements for goats in the SRNS are predicted based on the equations developed for CNCPS-S, modified to account for specific requirements of goats, including maintenance, lactation, and pregnancy requirements, and body reserves. Feed biological values are predicted based on carbohydrate and protein fractions and their ruminal fermentation rates, forage, concentrate and liquid passage rates, and microbial growth. The evaluation of the SRNS for sheep using published papers (19 treatment means indicated no mean bias (MB; 1.1 g/100 g and low root mean square prediction error (RMSPE; 3.6 g/100g when predicting dietary organic matter digestibility for diets not deficient in ruminal nitrogen. The SRNS accurately predicted gains and losses of shrunk body weight (SBW of adult sheep (15 treatment means; MB = 5.8 g/d and RMSPE = 30 g/d when diets were not deficient in ruminal nitrogen. The SRNS for sheep had MB varying from -34 to 1 g/d and RSME varying from 37 to 56 g/d when predicting average daily gain (ADG of growing lambs (42 treatment means. The evaluation of the SRNS for goats based on literature data showed accurate predictions for ADG of kids (31 treatment means; RMSEP = 32.5 g/d; r2= 0.85; concordance correlation coefficient, CCC, = 0.91, daily ME intake (21 treatment means; RMSEP = 0.24 Mcal/d g/d; r2 = 0.99; CCC = 0.99, and energy balance (21 treatment means; RMSEP = 0.20 Mcal/d g/d; r2 = 0.87; CCC = 0.90 of goats. In conclusion, the SRNS for sheep can accurately predict dietary organic matter digestibility, ADG of growing lambs and changes in SBW of mature sheep. The SRNS

  20. Preliminary designs for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) stationkeeping subsystems (SKSS). Task I. Design requirements. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    The results of Task I, Design Requirements, are presented. Environmental conditions for the Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico site are reviewed and synthesized to provide definition of current, wind and wave severity, direction, and occurrence for service, operational, and extreme sea states. SKSS performance requirements, including design life and watch circle, are followed by interface considerations particularly for the electrical transmission riser cable, and design criteria including safety and load factors. The SKSS concepts will be analyzed to evaluate performance, reliability, and cost. Performance analysis conducted included catenary anchor leg static calculations to size components, as well as drag due to environmental loads in the operational and extreme sea states for both ship and spar platforms. Dynamic analyses and trade studies to be conducted in Task II are presented. A reliability and risk assessment analysis of the three basic SKSS types - single-, multiple-, and tension-anchor-leg moors - was completed, indicating that the multiple-anchor-leg/multiple-point rotary or turret moor has the lowest risk-criticality for the ship, while that for the spar is the multiple-anchor-leg/multiple-point moor. The catenary single-anchor-leg/single-point moor has insufficient reliability for both platforms. The life cycle cost analysis methodology, including work breakdown structure, cost estimating, and cost minimization define the approach to costing to be followed throughout the study. The results of these design trades and analyses will first be applied to concept ranking required for recommendation of a SKSS concept for each platform.

  1. A Preliminary Study of the Course Nutrition and Hygiene in Cookingat Vocational Colleges%高职烹饪营养卫生课程教学初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜密英

    2012-01-01

    烹饪营养卫生课程是一门实践性很强的课程,针对目前教学中存在的教学方法和手段单一,学生兴趣不高,教学效果差等问题,文章在加强实践性、应用性的基础上,对烹饪营养卫生课程教学谈了几点看法。%Nutrition and Hygiene in Cooking is a practical course for cuisine students in vocational colleges.In order to improve the teaching of the course,this paper emphasizes the practicability and applicability of the course and targets such problems as monotonous teaching methods,non-motivated students and ineffective teaching.

  2. Effect of Moringa (Moringa oleifera leaf powder and sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum leaf paste on sensory and nutritional qualities of beef and ham burgers – A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Teye

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Moringa leaf powder and sweet basil leaf paste are commonly used in local dishes in Ghana for purposes of flavour enhancement and nutrient supplements. This study was conducted to determine the effects of Moringa (Moringa oleifera leaf powder (MLP and Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum leaf paste (SBLP on the sensory characteristics and nutritional compositions of beef and hamburgers. MLP and SBLP were incorporated at 0g (Control, T1, 2g, 4g and 6g/kg meat (T2, T3 and T4 respectively during the production of the burgers. The burgers were vacuum-packed and frozen for sensory and laboratory analyses. The M. oleifera leaf powder had significant (P0.01 the crude protein content but no significant effect on sensory characteristics of the products.

  3. Exigências nutricionais de zebuínos: proteína Nutritional requirements of Zebu cattle: protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Veiga Rodrigues Paulino

    2004-06-01

    objective of determining their protein requirements. Four steers were slaughtered at the beginning of the trial, compounding the reference group, three were fed at maintenance level and the remaining were uniformly allotted to a complete randomized design, of three treatments, with different levels of concentrate in the diets (5, 35, 65 %, in the total dry matter basis. As roughage was used Brachiaria brizantha and Cynodon sp. haylage. The diets were isonitrogenous and the animals were fed ad libitum. The protein content retained in the body was estimated by a regression equation obtained between the logarithm of the body content of protein and the logarithm of the empty body weight (EBW. The net requirements of protein for 1 kg of empty body gain (EBG were determined as the derivative of the equation of prediction of protein body content. The protein requirements for gain decreased as the live weight increased. The protein requirement found for an animal of 400 kg of live weight was 106.84 g/kg EBW, while for an animal of 200 kg, was 129.01 g/kg EBW. Considering a steer of 400 kg of live weight, the estimated metabolizable requirements of protein for maintenance (MPm and gain (MPg were, respectively, 339.88 and 217.14 g/kg LW. For this type of animal, the daily protein requirements in terms of degradable and undegradable protein were, respectively, 830.86 and 4.46 g. The requirement of crude protein was 835.32 g/d.

  4. Larval fish nutrition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holt, J

    2011-01-01

    ... introduction to fish micronutrient history 4.2 Micronutrients in larval feeds 4.3 Requirements versus recommendations 4.4 Vitamins 4.5 Minerals 34.6 Future challenges Section 2: Nutritional Physi...

  5. Genome-wide mutant fitness profiling identifies nutritional requirements for optimal growth of Yersinia pestis in deep tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palace, Samantha G; Proulx, Megan K; Lu, Shan; Baker, Richard E; Goguen, Jon D

    2014-08-19

    Rapid growth in deep tissue is essential to the high virulence of Yersinia pestis, causative agent of plague. To better understand the mechanisms underlying this unusual ability, we used transposon mutagenesis and high-throughput sequencing (Tn-seq) to systematically probe the Y. pestis genome for elements contributing to fitness during infection. More than a million independent insertion mutants representing nearly 200,000 unique genotypes were generated in fully virulent Y. pestis. Each mutant in the library was assayed for its ability to proliferate in vitro on rich medium and in mice following intravenous injection. Virtually all genes previously established to contribute to virulence following intravenous infection showed significant fitness defects, with the exception of genes for yersiniabactin biosynthesis, which were masked by strong intercellular complementation effects. We also identified more than 30 genes with roles in nutrient acquisition and metabolism as experiencing strong selection during infection. Many of these genes had not previously been implicated in Y. pestis virulence. We further examined the fitness defects of strains carrying mutations in two such genes-encoding a branched-chain amino acid importer (brnQ) and a glucose importer (ptsG)-both in vivo and in a novel defined synthetic growth medium with nutrient concentrations matching those in serum. Our findings suggest that diverse nutrient limitations in deep tissue play a more important role in controlling bacterial infection than has heretofore been appreciated. Because much is known about Y. pestis pathogenesis, this study also serves as a test case that assesses the ability of Tn-seq to detect virulence genes. Our understanding of the functions required by bacteria to grow in deep tissues is limited, in part because most growth studies of pathogenic bacteria are conducted on laboratory media that do not reflect conditions prevailing in infected animal tissues. Improving our

  6. Exigências nutricionais e crescimento de plantas de mogno (Swietenia macrophylla King. Nutritional requirements and growth of mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King. plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cacilda Adélia Sampaio de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A necessidade de desenvolver pesquisas referentes aos requerimentos nutricionais das espécies florestais, principalmente as essências florestais nativas da Amazônia, como o mogno, é inadiável, visto que as constantes explorações de espécies de alto valor econômico são cada vez maiores. Com o objetivo de avaliar o crescimento e o requerimento nutricional de mudas de mogno, foi realizado um experimento em casa de vegetação com 14 tratamentos. O delineamento experimental foi de blocos casualisados, com 5 repetições. As características de crescimento avaliadas foram: altura da parte aérea, diâmetro de colo, matéria seca da parte aérea, da raiz e total, relação raiz e parte aérea e conteúdo de nutrientes da matéria seca da parte aérea. Os resultados obtidos permitem concluir que: é necessária a correção conjunta da acidez e da fertilidade do solo para solos ácidos e de baixa fertilidade natural, mesmo que o teor de matéria orgânica seja considerado alto; dos nutrientes, P é o que mais limita o desenvolvimento da planta, bem como a absorção dos outros nutrientes; não há necessidade de adição de K para o desenvolvimento das plantas quando se realiza calagem; na ausência de calagem a adição de K deve ser recomendada e o requerimento nutricional do mogno em macronutrientes obedece à ordem decrescente de: P>S>K>N.The need for developing research related principally to the nutritional requirements of essential native Amazonian forest species, such as mahogany, is urgent, since the exploration of highly valuable species is continually more frequent. With the objective of evaluating the growth and the nutritional requirement of mahogany plants, an experiment in a vegetation house with 14 treatments was undertaken. The experiment outline was of occasional blocks with 5 repetitions. The growth characteristics evaluated were: height of the aerial part, diameter of the bottom, dry material of the aerial part, root and

  7. Development of artificial neural network models based on experimental data of response surface methodology to establish the nutritional requirements of digestible lysine, methionine, and threonine in broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehri, M

    2012-12-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) approach was used to develop feed-forward multilayer perceptron models to estimate the nutritional requirements of digestible lysine (dLys), methionine (dMet), and threonine (dThr) in broiler chicks. Sixty data lines representing response of the broiler chicks during 3 to 16 d of age to dietary levels of dLys (0.88-1.32%), dMet (0.42-0.58%), and dThr (0.53-0.87%) were obtained from literature and used to train the networks. The prediction values of ANN were compared with those of response surface methodology to evaluate the fitness of these 2 methods. The models were tested using R(2), mean absolute deviation, mean absolute percentage error, and absolute average deviation. The random search algorithm was used to optimize the developed ANN models to estimate the optimal values of dietary dLys, dMet, and dThr. The ANN models were used to assess the relative importance of each dietary input on the bird performance using sensitivity analysis. The statistical evaluations revealed the higher accuracy of ANN to predict the bird performance compared with response surface methodology models. The optimization results showed that the maximum BW gain may be obtained with dietary levels of 1.11, 0.51, and 0.78% of dLys, dMet, and dThr, respectively. Minimum feed conversion ratio may be achieved with dietary levels of 1.13, 0.54, 0.78% of dLys, dMet, and dThr, respectively. The sensitivity analysis on the models indicated that dietary Lys is the most important variable in the growth performance of the broiler chicks, followed by dietary Thr and Met. The results of this research revealed that the experimental data of a response-surface-methodology design could be successfully used to develop the well-designed ANN for pattern recognition of bird growth and optimization of nutritional requirements. The comparison between the 2 methods also showed that the statistical methods may have little effect on the ideal ratios of dMet and dThr to dLys in

  8. FSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Guidance on the scientific requirements for health claims related to functions of the ne rvous system, including psycholog ical functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies to draft guidance on scientific requirements for health claims related to functions of the nervous system, including psychological functions. This guidance has been drawn from scientific opinions...

  9. Preliminary Efficacy of Group Medical Nutrition Therapy and Motivational Interviewing among Obese African American Women with Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stephania T.; Oates, Veronica J.; Brooks, Malinda A.; Shintani, Ayumi; Jenkins, Darlene M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the efficacy and acceptability of a group medical nutritional therapy (MNT) intervention, using motivational interviewing (MI). Research Design & Method. African American (AA) women with type 2 diabetes (T2D) participated in five, certified diabetes educator/dietitian-facilitated intervention sessions targeting carbohydrate, fat, and fruit/vegetable intake and management. Motivation-based activities centered on exploration of dietary ambivalence and the relationships between diet and personal strengths. Repeated pre- and post-intervention, psychosocial, dietary self-care, and clinical outcomes were collected and analyzed using generalized least squares regression. An acceptability assessment was administered after intervention. Results. Participants (n = 24) were mostly of middle age (mean age 50.8 ± 6.3) with an average BMI of 39 ± 6.5. Compared to a gradual pre-intervention loss of HbA1c control and confidence in choosing restaurant foods, a significant post-intervention improvement in HbA1c (P = 0.03) and a near significant (P = 0.06) increase in confidence in choosing restaurant foods were observed with both returning to pre-intervention levels. 100% reported that they would recommend the study to other AA women with type 2 diabetes. Conclusion. The results support the potential efficacy of a group MNT/MI intervention in improving glycemic control and dietary self-care-related confidence in overweight/obese AA women with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25243082

  10. Preliminary Efficacy of Group Medical Nutrition Therapy and Motivational Interviewing among Obese African American Women with Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephania T. Miller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the efficacy and acceptability of a group medical nutritional therapy (MNT intervention, using motivational interviewing (MI. Research Design & Method. African American (AA women with type 2 diabetes (T2D participated in five, certified diabetes educator/dietitian-facilitated intervention sessions targeting carbohydrate, fat, and fruit/vegetable intake and management. Motivation-based activities centered on exploration of dietary ambivalence and the relationships between diet and personal strengths. Repeated pre- and post-intervention, psychosocial, dietary self-care, and clinical outcomes were collected and analyzed using generalized least squares regression. An acceptability assessment was administered after intervention. Results. Participants (n = 24 were mostly of middle age (mean age 50.8 ± 6.3 with an average BMI of 39 ± 6.5. Compared to a gradual pre-intervention loss of HbA1c control and confidence in choosing restaurant foods, a significant post-intervention improvement in HbA1c (P = 0.03 and a near significant (P = 0.06 increase in confidence in choosing restaurant foods were observed with both returning to pre-intervention levels. 100% reported that they would recommend the study to other AA women with type 2 diabetes. Conclusion. The results support the potential efficacy of a group MNT/MI intervention in improving glycemic control and dietary self-care-related confidence in overweight/obese AA women with type 2 diabetes.

  11. [The role of nutritional factors on the structure and function of the brain: an update on dietary requirements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourre, J-M

    2004-09-01

    The brain is an organ elaborated and functioning from substances present in the diet. Dietary regulation of blood glucose level (via ingestion of food with a low glycemic index ensuring a low insulin level) improves the quality and duration of intellectual performance, if only because at rest the adult brain consumes 50 p. 100 of dietary carbohydrates, 80 p. 100 of them for energy purposes. The nature of the amino acid composition of dietary proteins contributes to good cerebral function; tryptophan plays a special role. Many indispensable amino acids present in dietary proteins help to elaborate neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. Omega-3 fatty acids provided the first coherent experimental demonstration of the effect of dietary nutrients on the structure and function of the brain. First it was shown that the differentiation and functioning of cultured brain cells requires omega-3 fatty acids. It was then demonstrated that alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) deficiency alters the course of brain development, perturbs the composition and physicochemical properties of brain cell membranes, neurones, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes (ALA). This leads to physicochemical modifications, induces biochemical and physiological perturbations, and results in neurosensory and behavioral upset. Consequently, the nature of polyunsaturated fatty acids (in particular omega-3) present in formula milks for infants (premature and term) conditions the visual and cerebral abilities, including intellectual abilities. Moreover, dietary omega-3 fatty acids are certainly involved in the prevention of some aspects of cardiovascular disease (including at the level of cerebral vascularization), and in some neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly depression, as well as in dementia, notably Alzheimer's disease. Their deficiency can prevent the satisfactory renewal of membranes and thus accelerate cerebral aging. Iron is necessary to ensure oxygenation, to produce energy in the cerebral parenchyma

  12. Is macroporosity absolutely required for preliminary in vitro bone biomaterial study? A comparison between porous materials and flat materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juliana T Y; Chow, King L; Wang, Kefeng; Tsang, Wai-Hung

    2011-11-08

    Porous materials are highly preferred for bone tissue engineering due to space for blood vessel ingrowth, but this may introduce extra experimental variations because of the difficulty in precise control of porosity. In order to decide whether it is absolutely necessary to use porous materials in in vitro comparative osteogenesis study of materials with different chemistries, we carried out osteoinductivity study using C3H/10T1/2 cells, pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), on seven material types: hydroxyapatite (HA), α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) and b-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) in both porous and dense forms and tissue culture plastic. For all materials under test, dense materials give higher alkaline phosphatase gene (Alp) expression compared with porous materials. In addition, the cell density effects on the 10T1/2 cells were assessed through alkaline phosphatase protein (ALP) enzymatic assay. The ALP expression was higher for higher initial cell plating density and this explains the greater osteoinductivity of dense materials compared with porous materials for in vitro study as porous materials would have higher surface area. On the other hand, the same trend of Alp mRNA level (HA > β-TCP > α-TCP) was observed for both porous and dense materials, validating the use of dense flat materials for comparative study of materials with different chemistries for more reliable comparison when well-defined porous materials are not available. The avoidance of porosity variation would probably facilitate more reproducible results. This study does not suggest porosity is not required for experiments related to bone regeneration application, but emphasizes that there is often a tradeoff between higher clinical relevance, and less variation in a less complex set up, which facilitates a statistically significant conclusion. Technically, we also show that the base of normalization for ALP activity may influence the conclusion and there may be ALP activity from

  13. Oral L-carnitine supplementation in low-birth-weight newborns: a study on neonates requiring combined parenteral and enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melegh, B; Kerner, J; Sándor, A; Vincellér, M; Kispál, G

    1986-01-01

    Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on plasma ketone body (KB) and triglyceride (TG) concentrations was studied in ten premature infants requiring combined enteral and parenteral nutrition. At the second week of life (9 to 14 days of age) the infants were randomly divided into two groups. Five of them (plasma carnitine value, 33.77 +/- 2.48 mumol/l; mean +/- SEM) received oral L-carnitine supplementation (60 mumol/kg daily) added to pasteurized pooled human milk for seven consecutive days; additional five (plasma carnitine value, 36.70 +/- 5.19 mumol/l) served as controls. Composition of the daily diet was nearly constant in the study period. On the seventh day, prior to an Intralipid infusion, plasma carnitine and ketone body levels were significantly increased in the supplemented group as compared to controls or to previous values of the same group. In response to lipid infusion the fat load induced ketone body production was significantly higher in the supplemented group as compared to controls, whereas the triglycerides reached higher levels in the control group. It is suggested that L-carnitine supplementation in low-weight newborns promotes ketone body formation from endogenous stores as well as from exogenous fat supply, and thus may enhance triglyceride utilization.

  14. Enteral Nutrition and Acute Pancreatitis: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanier, B.W.M.; Bruno, M.J.; Mathus-Vliegen, E.M.H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), nutritional support is required if normal food cannot be tolerated within several days. Enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition. We reviewed the literature about enteral nutrition in AP. Methods. A MEDLINE search of the English

  15. Enteral nutrition and acute pancreatitis: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.W.M. Spanier (Marcel); M.J. Bruno (Marco); E.M.H. Mathus-Vliegen (Elisabeth)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction. In patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), nutritional support is required if normal food cannot be tolerated within several days. Enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition. We reviewed the literature about enteral nutrition in AP. Methods. A MEDLINE search of

  16. Enteral Nutrition and Acute Pancreatitis: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.W.M. Spanier; M.J. Bruno; E.M.H. Mathus-Vliegen

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), nutritional support is required if normal food cannot be tolerated within several days. Enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition. We reviewed the literature about enteral nutrition in AP. Methods. A MEDLINE search of the English

  17. Fetal leptin is a signal of fat mass independent of maternal nutrition in ewes fed at or above maintenance energy requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlhäusler, B S; Roberts, C T; McFarlane, J R; Kauter, K G; McMillen, I C

    2002-08-01

    In adults, circulating leptin concentrations are dependent on body fat content and on current nutritional status. However, the relationships among maternal nutrient intake, fetal adiposity, and circulating leptin concentrations before birth are unknown. We investigated the effects of an increase in nutrient intake in the pregnant ewe on fetal adiposity and plasma leptin concentrations during late gestation. Between 115 and 139-141 days gestation (term = 147 +/- 3 days gestation), ewes were fed a diet calculated to provide either maintenance (control, n = 6) or approximately 155% of maintenance requirements (well-fed, n = 8). The fetal fat depots (perirenal and interscapular) were dissected, and the relative proportion of unilocular and multilocular adipocytes in each depot was determined. Maternal plasma glucose and leptin concentrations were significantly increased in well-fed ewes. Fetal plasma glucose concentrations were also higher in the well-fed group (115-139 days gestation: control, 1.65 +/- 0.14 mmol/L; well-fed, 2.00 +/- 0.14 mmol/L; F = 5.76, P fetal plasma leptin concentrations (115-139 days gestation: control, 5.2 +/- 0.8 ng/ml; well-fed, 4.7 +/- 0.7 ng/ml). However, in both the control and well-fed groups fetal plasma leptin concentrations (y) were positively correlated with the relative mass of unilocular fat (x): y = 1.51x + 1.70; (R = 0.76, P fetal leptin may play a role as a signal of unilocular fat mass in the fetus when maternal nutrient intake is at or above maintenance requirements.

  18. Rise of Nutrition Industry:Essential Requirement of Social and Economical Development%营养产业崛起是社会经济发展的必然要求

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于小冬

    2011-01-01

    随着中国居民生活水平不断提高,健康理念日益受到重视,中国居民不同层次的健康需求拉动了中国保健品行业的发展,中国营养健康产业蓬勃兴起.本文介绍了营养产业的概念及发展背景,分析了我国发展营养产业的特有条件和比较优势,提出发展营养产业是社会发展的必然要求,并对我国发展营养产业提出建议.%With the rising of living standards in China, the concept of health has received increasing attention, different levels of the health needs of Chinese people stimulate the development of health products industry in China and Chinese nutrition and health industry is booming.This paper introduced the concept of nutrition industry and its development backgrounds, analyzed the characteristics and comparative advantage of developing nutrition industry, pointed out that the development of nutrition industry was essential requirement of social development, and proposd suggestion for nutrition industry development.

  19. Iatrogenic nutritional deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R C; Blass, J P

    1982-01-01

    This article catalogs the nutritional deficiencies inadvertently introduced by certain treatment regimens. Specifically, the iatrogenic effects on nutrition of surgery, hemodialysis, irradiation, and drugs are reviewed. Nutritional problems are particularly frequent consequences of surgery on the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric surgery can lead to deficiencies of vitamin B12, folate, iron, and thiamine, as well as to metabolic bone disease. The benefits of small bowel bypass are limited by the potentially severe nutritional consequences of this procedure. Following bypass surgery, patients should be monitored for signs of possible nutritional probems such as weight loss, neuropathy, cardiac arrhythmias, loss of stamina, or changes in mental status. Minimal laboratory tests should include hematologic evaluation, B12, folate, iron, albumin, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, sodium, potassium, chloride, and carbon dioxide levels. Roentgenologic examination of the bone should also be obtained. Loss of bone substance is a major consequence of many forms of treatment, and dietary supplementation with calcium is warranted. Patients undergoing hemodialysis have shown carnitine and choline deficiencies, potassium depletion, and hypovitaminosis, as well as osteomalacia. Chronic drug use may alter intake, synthesis, absorption, transport, storage, metabolism, or excretion of nutrients. Patients vary markedly in the metabolic effects of drugs, and recommendations for nutrition must be related to age, sex, reproductive status, and genetic endowment. Moreover, the illness being treated can itself alter nutritional requirements and the effect of the treatment on nutrient status. The changes in nutritional levels induced by use of estrogen-containing oral contraceptives (OCs) are obscure; however, the effects on folate matabolism appear to be of less clinical import than previously suggested. Reduction in pyridoxine and serum vitamin B12 levels has been

  20. Nutritional Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritional support is therapy for people who cannot get enough nourishment by eating or drinking. You may ... absorb nutrients through your digestive system You receive nutritional support through a needle or catheter placed in ...

  1. Nutritional supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Gry Bjerg; Andersen, Jens Rikardt

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have indicated that cancer patients have significantly altered taste sensitivity without specifying the preferences. One of the related problems is low compliance to nutritional therapy with oral nutritional supplements (ONS) in patients suffering severe weight loss...

  2. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2013. Scientific Opinion on nutrient requirements and dietary intakes of infants and young children in the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver a Scientific Opinion on the nutrient requirements and dietary intakes of infants and young children in the European Union. This Opinion describes the dietary...... requirements of infants and young children, compares dietary intakes and requirements in infants and young children in Europe and, based on these findings, concludes on the potential role of young-child formulae in the diets of infants and young children, including whether they have any nutritional benefits...... when compared with other foods that may be included in the normal diet of infants and young children. The Panel concluded on the levels of nutrient and energy intakes that are considered adequate for the majority of infants and young children, and evaluated the risk of inadequate nutrient intakes...

  3. Nutrition and multifetal pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J E; Carlson, M

    2000-03-01

    Largely because of assisted reproduction, the rate of multifetal pregnancy is rising rapidly in the United States. Accordingly, dietitians are increasingly being called upon to provide nutrition services for these high-risk pregnancies. This article gives an overview of the incidence of and risks associated with multifetal pregnancy and reviews studies that contribute to our knowledge of nutrition and multifetal pregnancy. Practice guidelines for promoting healthy outcomes based on the best available scientific data are suggested. Guidelines for weight gain for twin and triplet pregnancy, dietary intake, and supplement use are included. Suggested practice guidelines for multifetal pregnancy include a positive rate of weight gain early in pregnancy, the use of prepregnancy weight status to determine total weight gain goals in twin pregnancy, a 50-lb weight gain goal for triplet pregnancy, and higher minimal number of servings of foods from several of the Food Guide Pyramid groups. The need for additional information on the effects of nutritional status on the course and outcome of multifetal pregnancy is critical. Preliminary evidence of the benefits of nutrition services suggests that both the incorporation of dietetics services into care programs and additional research on nutrition and multifetal gestation are warranted.

  4. Pediatric enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, David; Kazmerski, Kimberly; Iyer, Kishore

    2006-01-01

    Common to all pediatric patients receiving enteral nutrition is the inability to consume calories orally. This is often secondary to issues of inadequate weight gain, inadequate growth, prolonged feeding times, weight loss, a decrease in weight/age or weight/height ratios, or a persistent triceps skinfold thickness <5% for age. Enteral nutrition requires enteral access. In the neonatal period the nasoenteric route is usually used. In pediatric patients requiring long-term enteral access, surgically, endoscopically, or radiologically placed percutaneous feeding tubes are common. Jejunal feeding tubes are used in pediatric patients with gastric feeding intolerance or persistent gastroesophageal reflux. Low-profile enteral access devices are preferred by most pediatric patients because of their cosmetic appearance. For most children, a standard pediatric polypeptide enteral formula is well tolerated. There are specialized pediatric enteral formulas available for patients with decreased intestinal length, altered intestinal absorptive capacity, or altered pancreatic function. Weaning patients from tube feeding to oral nutrition is the ultimate nutrition goal. A multidisciplinary approach to patients with short bowel syndrome will maximize the use of enteral nutrition while preserving parenteral nutrition for patients with true enteral nutrition therapy failure.

  5. Nutrition Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-01-01

    because consumers will avoid products that the label shows to be nutritionally deficient, but also because food producers will try to avoid marketing products that appear, according to the label, as nutritionally problematic, for example, because of a high content of saturated fat or salt. Nutrition......Nutrition labeling refers to the provision of information on a food product’s nutritional content on the package label. It can serve both public health and commercial purposes. From a public health perspective, the aim of nutrition labeling is to provide information that can enable consumers...... to make healthier choices when choosing food products. Nutrition labeling is thus closely linked to the notion of the informed consumer, that chooses products according to their aims, on the basis of the information at their disposal. Because many consumers are assumed to be interested in making healthy...

  6. Nutrition Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-01-01

    because consumers will avoid products that the label shows to be nutritionally deficient, but also because food producers will try to avoid marketing products that appear, according to the label, as nutritionally problematic, for example, because of a high content of saturated fat or salt. Nutrition......Nutrition labeling refers to the provision of information on a food product’s nutritional content on the package label. It can serve both public health and commercial purposes. From a public health perspective, the aim of nutrition labeling is to provide information that can enable consumers...... to make healthier choices when choosing food products. Nutrition labeling is thus closely linked to the notion of the informed consumer, that chooses products according to their aims, on the basis of the information at their disposal. Because many consumers are assumed to be interested in making healthy...

  7. Nutrition in pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udipi, S A; Ghugre, P; Antony, U

    2000-09-01

    Nutrition at optimal levels is fundamental in the maintenance of positive health. Matemal nutrition is very important for the course and outcome of pregnancy. Lactation represents a stage wherein health and nutritional status of the infant are dependent on the mother. Successful pregnancy and lactation require adjustments in maternal body composition, metabolism and function of various physioogical systems. A diet that meets matemal nutritional needs is required for these adjustments, so that maternal well-being is safeguarded with birth of an healthy infant. Adequate nutrition supports the growth of both matemal and foetal tissues. Chronic undernutrition throughout pregnancy affects birth weights of newborns. Poor nutrition causes intra-uterine growth retardation. Specific nutrients like zinc, iodine and folate are also required for development of the foetus. Foetal iron deficiency exists in maternal iron deficiency anaemia. Maternal nutritional status, breast milk composition and volume are elaborated in the article. Proteins, fats, minerals and vitamins and their requirements are narrated in detail. Additional nutritional requirements during lactation have been tabulated in this article. Thus improving the nutrition and health of girls and younger women and of mothers during pregnancy and lactation will derive benefits in terms of improved health of their children throughout their lives.

  8. Nutrition, ecology and nutritional ecology: towardan integrated framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Steven J.; Mayntz, David

    2009-01-01

    1. The science of nutritional ecology spans a wide range of fields, including ecology, nutrition, behaviour, morphology, physiology, life history and evolutionary biology. But does nutritional ecology have a unique theoretical framework and research program and thus qualify as a field of research...... in its own right? 2. We suggest that the distinctive feature of nutritional ecology is its integrative nature, and that the field would benefit from more attention to formalizing a theoretical and quantitative framework for developing this. 3. Such a framework, we propose, should satisfy three minimal...... requirements: it should be nutritionally explicit, organismally explicit, and ecologically explicit. 4. We evaluate against these criteria four existing frameworks (Optimal Foraging Theory, Classical Insect Nutritional Ecology, the Geometric Framework for nutrition, and Ecological Stoichiometry), and conclude...

  9. Pregnancy Requires Major Changes in the Quality of the Diet for Nutritional Adequacy: Simulations in the French and the United States Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clélia M Bianchi

    Full Text Available Maternal nutrition is critical to the health of both mother and offspring, but there is a paucity of data on the nutritional adequacy of diets during pregnancy.Our objective was to identify to what extent pregnancy reduces the nutritional adequacy of the expecting mother's diet and if this nutritional gap can be resolved by simple quantitative or qualitative changes in the diet.We evaluated the observed overall nutritional adequacy of diets of French and American women of childbearing age participating in ENNS (n = 344 and NHANES (n = 563 using the probabilistic approach of the PANDiet system, resulting in a 100-point score. Then, we simulated the changes in the PANDiet scores of women of childbearing age who would remain on their diet during pregnancy. Finally, by either increasing the quantity of consumed foods or using eleven snacks recommended during pregnancy, we simulated the effect of a 150-kcal increase in the energy intake of French women.Observed PANDiet scores were equal to 59.3 ± 7.0 and 58.8 ± 9.3 points respectively in France and in the US. Simulation of pregnancy for women of childbearing age led to a decrease in nutritional adequacy for key nutrients during pregnancy and resulted in reducing PANDiet scores by 3.3 ± 0.1 and 3.7 ± 0.1 points in France and in the US. Simulated 150-kcal increases in energy intake proved to be only partially effective in filling the gap both when the quantity of food consumed was increased and when recommended snacks were used.The decrease in nutritional adequacy induced by pregnancy cannot be addressed by simply following generic dietary guidelines.

  10. Pregnancy Requires Major Changes in the Quality of the Diet for Nutritional Adequacy: Simulations in the French and the United States Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Clélia M.; Mariotti, François; Verger, Eric O.; Huneau, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Background Maternal nutrition is critical to the health of both mother and offspring, but there is a paucity of data on the nutritional adequacy of diets during pregnancy. Objective Our objective was to identify to what extent pregnancy reduces the nutritional adequacy of the expecting mother’s diet and if this nutritional gap can be resolved by simple quantitative or qualitative changes in the diet. Materials and Methods We evaluated the observed overall nutritional adequacy of diets of French and American women of childbearing age participating in ENNS (n = 344) and NHANES (n = 563) using the probabilistic approach of the PANDiet system, resulting in a 100-point score. Then, we simulated the changes in the PANDiet scores of women of childbearing age who would remain on their diet during pregnancy. Finally, by either increasing the quantity of consumed foods or using eleven snacks recommended during pregnancy, we simulated the effect of a 150-kcal increase in the energy intake of French women. Results Observed PANDiet scores were equal to 59.3 ± 7.0 and 58.8 ± 9.3 points respectively in France and in the US. Simulation of pregnancy for women of childbearing age led to a decrease in nutritional adequacy for key nutrients during pregnancy and resulted in reducing PANDiet scores by 3.3 ± 0.1 and 3.7 ± 0.1 points in France and in the US. Simulated 150-kcal increases in energy intake proved to be only partially effective in filling the gap both when the quantity of food consumed was increased and when recommended snacks were used. Conclusions The decrease in nutritional adequacy induced by pregnancy cannot be addressed by simply following generic dietary guidelines. PMID:26959492

  11. Oral health and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, G W

    1994-03-01

    The relationships between oral health conditions, dietary practices and nutritional status, and general health status in the older American are complex, with many interrelating factors. Just as inadequate nutrition can affect oral health, poor oral health status affects food choices and, thus, nutritional status. It is clearly essential that the primary care practitioner and/or screening health professionals always include an evaluation of oral status in assessment of an elderly person. Effective care for the elderly dental patient requires knowledge about the disease of aging and the impact of those diseases on oral health and nutrition, pharmacology and drug interactions and their impact on oral health status, the biology of aging including sensory changes, the relationship of general medicine and systemic diseases, and psychology and sociology. The attitudes of empathy and understanding, caring and compassion, respect and a positive attitude toward the older patient, and flexibility in treatment planning are also critical elements. The interdisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, nutrition professionals, dentists, and social service professionals must all work together to ensure that good oral health status and adequate nutrition are maintained in older Americans. Recognizing and treating oral health and nutrition problems are important in improving the health and quality of life for the elderly population. Research that can provide more answers to health care problems in this growing group; educating professionals with respect to the relationships between oral health and nutrition; and public policy changes with regard to provision and funding of nutrition services, especially when provided by registered and/or licensed nutrition professionals, contribute to improving the health and quality of life for elders.

  12. Nutrition: ethical issues and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Robert B; Rucker, Michael R

    2016-11-01

    For nutrition and its associated disciplines, ethical considerations related to research are often complicated by factors that range from the use of experimental research designs that are overly holistic to inextricable links between nutrition research and marketing. As a consequence, there is the need for constant vigilance to assess and deal with apparent conflicts of interest. Also, there are few scientific disciplines that are defined by cultural, religious, or political codifications as is nutrition. Accordingly, examples of historical, cultural, and political events are described that have influenced ethical approaches related to nutrition research. Furthermore, nutrition research questions are often multifaceted and require dealing with complex variables. In this regard, ethical principles and perspectives that have relevance to data acquisition, the publication and translation of nutrition research, and the marketing of nutritional products and concepts are highlighted.

  13. Nutritional considerations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touger-Decker, R

    1988-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. The severity of the disease process adversely affects nutritional status. Articular changes, such as small joint deformities and temporomandibular joint syndrome, alter the ability to self-feed. The inflammatory process may increase metabolic rate. Ingestion, digestion, absorption, and excretion may be compromised by secondary manifestations of the disease. Comprehensive nutrition assessment incorporates evaluation of disease and treatment-specific factors, along with the usual assessment parameters. Abnormal values for certain assessment parameters do not necessarily reflect nutritional status. Treatment methods, including medications, may have an impact on nutritional status, assessment tools, and self-feeding. Nutrition management goals focus on identification and implementation of feeding strategies. Evaluation of the ability to feed oneself includes consideration of functional status, secondary manifestations, and medical treatment. Multiple feeding modalities may be required. Oral supplements, tube feedings, and parenteral nutrition may be employed to meet the nutrition needs of the individual with rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. 78 FR 52899 - Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Enhancing Retail Food Store Eligibility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Enhancing Retail Food Store Eligibility--Listening Sessions AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), USDA. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... regarding Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) retailer eligibility requirements (78 FR...

  15. Nutritional support of the oncology patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzetti, Federico

    2013-08-01

    This review focuses on the nutritional support of the non-surgical cancer patient. The following topics are reviewed: cancer cachexia (definition and staging, prevalence and impact on clinical outcome); nutritional screening to identify potential candidates for nutritional support; nutritional requirements in terms of macro-and micro-nutrients of the advanced cancer patient. Finally, the indications and results of nutritional support are presented with a special focus on the following issues: routes of delivering nutritional support, the use of standard or n-3 fatty acids-enriched oral nutritional supplements during radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy, tube feeding during RT (with/without chemotherapy), parenteral nutrition during chemotherapy, nutritional support during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, (home) enteral or total and supplemental parenteral nutrition in the incurable patient. Lastly, the bioethical aspects of feeding patients with incurable disease are briefly reviewed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Exigência nutricional de lisina digestível para frangos de corte Nutritional requirement of digestible lysine for broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Amaral Barboza

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar, mediante ensaio de digestibilidade, as exigências nutricionais de lisina digestível verdadeira para frangos de corte nas quatro fases de crescimento. Quatro experimentos de desempenho, realizados previamente, permitiram estimar a exigência de lisina total para frangos de corte nas fases de 1 a 21, 15 a 40, 22 a 40 e 42 a 48 dias de idade. Foram utilizados 30 galos, adultos, Leghorn, cecectomizados com peso médio de 2316±190 g, sendo alojados, individualmente, em gaiolas com bandejas coletoras de excretas, utilizando-se o método de alimentação forçada. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, com cinco tratamentos (quatro com dietas e um em jejum e seis repetições. Foram utilizadas as dietas basais das quatro fases de crescimento, contendo 1,0; 0,825; 0,80; e 0,75% de lisina total. Com base nos coeficientes de digestibilidade determinados de 93,3; 93,58; 89,76; e 92,25% e considerando a L-lisina HCL suplementada como 100% digestível, as exigências de lisina digestível verdadeira foram 1,130; 1,075; 0,95; e 0,84% para as fases de 1 a 21, 15 a 40, 22 a 40 e 42 a 48 dias de idade, respectivamente. Ao aplicar o modelo de regressão linear, foram obtidas as equações (% lisina/Mcal = 0,4335 - 0,003284X r² 0,98 e (% lisina/Mcal = 0,41081 - 0,003213X, r² 0,96 para lisina total e digestível, respectivamente, sendo x a idade média das aves, em dias.The objective of this work was to determine, through a digestibility assay, the nutritional requirement of true digestible lysine for broiler chickens, in the four growing phases. Four performance experiments, previously performed, allowed the determination of total lysine requirement of broiler chickens in the periods from 1 to 21, 15 to 40, 22 to 40 and 42 to 48 days of age. Thirty cecectomized adults Leghorn roosters were used, with an average weight of 2316±190 g, and individually caged in batteries with excreta collecting trays

  17. Political economy challenges in nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balarajan, Yarlini; Reich, Michael R

    2016-11-05

    Historically, implementing nutrition policy has confronted persistent obstacles, with many of these obstacles arising from political economy sources. While there has been increased global policy attention to improving nutrition in recent years, the difficulty of translating this policy momentum into results remains. We present key political economy themes emanating from the political economy of nutrition literature. Together, these interrelated themes create a complex web of obstacles to moving nutrition policy forward. From these themes, we frame six political economy challenges facing the implementation of nutrition policy today. Building awareness of the broader political and economic issues that shape nutrition actions and adopting a more systematic approach to political economy analysis may help to mitigate these challenges. Improving nutrition will require managing the political economy challenges that persist in the nutrition field at global, national and subnational levels. We argue that a "mindshift" is required to build greater awareness of the broader political economy factors shaping the global nutrition landscape; and to embed systematic political economy analysis into the work of stakeholders navigating this field. This mindshift may help to improve the political feasibility of efforts to reform nutrition policy and implementation-and ensure that historical legacies do not continue to shape the future.

  18. Shopper marketing nutrition interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Collin R; Niculescu, Mihai; Just, David R; Kelly, Michael P

    2014-09-01

    Grocery stores represent a context in which a majority of people's food purchases occur. Considering the nutrition quality of the population's food intake has dramatically decreased, understanding how to improve food choice in the grocery store is paramount to healthier living. In this work, we detail the type of financial resources from which shoppers could draw (i.e., personal income and benefits from government food assistance programs to low income populations) and explain how these financial resources are allocated in the grocery store (i.e., planned, unplanned, error). Subsequently, we identify a conceptual framework for shopper marketing nutrition interventions that targets unplanned fruit and vegetable purchases (i.e., slack, or willingness to spend minus list items). Targeting slack for fresh fruit and vegetable purchases allows retailers to benefit economically (i.e., fruit and vegetables are higher margin) and allows shoppers to improve their nutrition without increasing their budgets (i.e., budget neutrality). We also provide preliminary evidence of what in-store marketing of fresh fruits and vegetables could entail by modifying grocery carts and grocery floors to provide information of what is common, normal, or appropriate fruit and vegetable purchases. In each example, fresh fruit and vegetable purchases increased and evidence suggested shopper budget neutrality. To provide context for these results, we detail measurement tools that can be used to measure shopper behaviors, purchases, and consumption patterns. Finally, we address theoretical, practical, and policy implications of shopper marketing nutrition interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation on the Athletes' Nutritional Consciousness and Requirement of Different Sports in Heilongjiang Province%黑龙江省不同项目运动员营养意识与需求调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭静璐

    2014-01-01

    为了解黑龙江省运动员的营养需求,以提供平衡膳食、科学营养的正确指导,促进其营养意识的提升,对黑龙江省冬夏季不同项目运动员进行日常饮食习惯问卷调查,发现多数运动员早餐营养摄入不足;夜宵摄入大量垃圾食品;大量饮用瓶装饮料代替喝水等一系列问题。建议运动员应多吃主食、多吃蔬果、多吃豆奶制品、少吃油炸食品、减少油脂及盐分摄入,并通过运动营养知识教育培训、健全膳食营养管理体系、配备专兼职营养师等一系列举措调整餐厅膳食配餐及营养结构,以提高运动员营养意识,保证日常饮食健康合理,为运动训练提供营养支持,为运动成绩提高夯实营养基础。%For understanding the nutritional requirement of Heilongjiang athletes to provide right guidance of scientific nutrition and balanced diet,the paper has a questionnaire about dietary habits of Heilongjiang athletes from winter and summer sports. It finds out that the most of athletes lack the nutrition in breakfast,take lots of junk food after dinner,drink lots of beverages instead of water. It suggests that the athletes should eat more staple,vegetable,fruit,bean products,milk products,and intake less fried food,oil,salt;the athletes should have the educational training of nutrition knowledge to advance the nutritional consciousness;the athlete dining room should adjust the meals and nutritional structure to ensure the healthy diet by improving the management system and manning the full-time and part-time nutritionists. The purpose is to support the training with nutrition basis.

  20. Nutritional toxicology: basic principles and actual problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathcock, J N

    1990-01-01

    Nutritional toxicology is a specialty that combines the backgrounds and research approaches of nutrition and toxicology. Many problems of substantial importance to health and food safety involve interactions of nutrition process and requirement with the effects of toxicological impact. Solution of these problems requires research that meets the procedural and design criteria of experimental nutrition and these of experimental toxicology. The relationships may be described in three basic categories: (1) influence of nutrition on toxicities; (2) influence of toxicants on nutrition; and (3) toxicities of nutrients. Trypsin inhibitor research, an example of diet impacting on toxicological response, illustrates the necessity of controlling nutritional composition aspects that can confound the results. Prolonged acetaminophen administration provides an example of the effects of toxicants on nutritional requirement and function which could be important for persons with marginal sulphur amino acid intake.

  1. Energy requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, Christian V.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.

    2007-01-01

    The determination of the appropriate energy and nutritional requirements of a newborn infant requires a clear goal of the energy and other compounds to be administered, valid methods to measure energy balance and body composition, and knowledge of the neonatal metabolic capacities. Providing an appr

  2. Energy requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, Christian V.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.

    The determination of the appropriate energy and nutritional requirements of a newborn infant requires a clear goal of the energy and other compounds to be administered, valid methods to measure energy balance and body composition, and knowledge of the neonatal metabolic capacities. Providing an

  3. Sports Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri State Dept. of Health, Jefferson City.

    This guide deals with various aspects of sports and nutrition. Twelve chapters are included: (1) "Sports and Nutrition"; (2) "Eat to Compete"; (3) "Fit Folks Need Fit Food"; (4) "The Food Guide Pyramid"; (5) "Fat Finder's Guide"; (6) "Pre- and Post-Event Meals"; (7) "Tips for the…

  4. Nutritional epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter is intended to provide a timely overview of the current state of research at the intersection of nutrition and epigenetics. I begin by describing epigenetics and molecular mechanisms of eigenetic regulation, then highlight four classes of nutritional exposures currently being investiga...

  5. Nutrition in chronic critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingleton, S K

    2001-03-01

    Nutritional management of patients with respiratory failure can be a model of nutritional management in chronically critically ill patients. This model requires recognition of the differing metabolic states of starvation and hypermetabolism. Starvation can result in malnutrition, with adverse effect on respiratory muscle strength, ventilatory drive, and immune defense mechanisms. General nutritional goals include preservation of lean body mass by providing adequate energy and positive nitrogen balance. General nutritional prescriptions for both states include a substrate mix of 20% protein, 60% to 70% carbohydrates, and 20% to 30% fat. Positive nitrogen balance is difficult to attain in hypermetabolic patients and energy requirements are increased compared with starved patients. Enteral nutrition should be the mode of initial nutrient delivery unless the gastrointestinal tract is nonfunctional. Monitoring of nutritional support is essential. Complications of nutritional support are multiple. Nutritional hypercapnia is an important complication in a chronically critically ill patient. Outcomes of selected long-term acute patients are poor, with only 8% of patients fully functional 1 year after discharge. Appropriate nutritional therapy is one aspect of management of these patients that has the possibility of optimizing function and survival.

  6. Nutrition and Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thai HbH:Vietnamese Relevant links Living with Thalassemia NUTRITIONNutrition and Diet ▶ Diet for the Non-transfused ... Nutrition with Connie Schroepfer, MS, RD: Dec 2016 Nutrition and Diet Nutritional deficiencies are common in thalassemia, ...

  7. Metodologia para determinação das necessidades nutricionais de melão e melancia Metodology for assessment of nutritional requirements of melon and watermelon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. de A. Paula

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se este trabalho visando definir a necessidade nutricional de nitrogênio, fósforo e potássio de melão e melancia, em função da produtividade esperada, a partir de dados médios citados na literatura, e validá-los com dados obtidos em experimentos com melão e melancia, realizados no Agropolo Assu/Mossoró. O experimento com melão seguiu o delineamento em blocos ao acaso, com três repetições, no esquema fatorial 3 x 3 + 3, que constou da combinação de três doses de N (N1 = 42, N2 = 84 e N3 = 126 kg ha-1 e de K (K1 = 106, K2 = 212 e K3 = 322 kg ha-1, mais três tratamentos adicionais (N0K0, N0K2 e N2K0, sendo que N0 e K0 não receberam N nem K. O experimento com melancia seguiu o mesmo delineamento experimental, modificando as doses de N (N1 = 45, N2 = 91 e N3 = 136 kg ha-1 e de K (K1 = 78, K2 = 156 e K3 = 234 kg ha-1, havendo dois tratamentos adicionais (N0K2 e N2K0. O modelo que melhor se ajustou, tanto para a melancia como para o melão, seguiu a relação produtividade (kg planta-1 x nutrientes exportados (g planta-1. Os índices de concordância observados entre os valores estimados pelo modelo de absorção total de N e K e valores obtidos experimentalmente, são considerados aceitáveis, tanto para melancia como para melão.This work was carried out aiming to determine nutritional requirements of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium for melon and watermelon, as a function of estimated yield, and validate them with experimental data obtained from melon and watermelon trials carried out in Assu-Mossoró region. Melon trial followed a randomized block design, in a 3 x 3 + 3 factorial scheme with three replications, which consisted of combination of three doses of N (N1 = 42, N2 = 84 and N3 = 126 kg ha-1 and of K (K1 = 106, K2 = 212 and K3 = 322 kg ha-1, and three additional treatments (N0K0, N0K2 e N2K0, where N0 and K0 had no application of N and K. Watermelon trial followed the same design, with modification of doses of

  8. Nutrition Standards for Child Care Programs: Meeting Children's Nutrition and Education Needs. Nutrition, Health and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley, Margaret E.; Grey, Cynthia R.

    2000-01-01

    Presents information on standards for American child care and early education programs participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Topics discussed include meal plans, nutritional requirements, food preparation and food service, cultural diversity, food safety and sanitation, nutrition education, and emotional climate at mealtimes. (KB)

  9. Nutrition Education for Family Practice Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dappen, Alan; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The American Academy of Family Practice requires that nutrition be taught to residents throughout their three-year residencies, although it does not specify a block of nutrition instruction. The nutrition knowledge of residents in eight family practice residencies in California were examined. (MLW)

  10. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  11. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  12. Diet & Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Giving d Employer Matching Gifts d Gifts of Stock or Securities d Giving Circles Golden Circle Circle ... health. Shelly Diagnosed in 2006 Diet & Nutrition Take Control of Your Weight Portion Control Low Carb Omega- ...

  13. Parenteral nutrition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Inayet, N; Neild, P

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, parenteral nutrition has been recognised as an invaluable and potentially lifesaving tool in the physician's arsenal in the management of patients with intestinal failure or inaccessibility...

  14. HEPATOBILIARY COMPLICATIONS OF PARENTERAL NUTRITION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Tepaev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition allows adequately providing children’s bodies with amino acids, carbohydrates, fats and energy required to maintain the baseline energy level and correct the preceding nutritive deficiency. Long-term parenteral nutrition is associated with hepatobiliary complications of varying severity – from transitory complications to lethal ones, caused by cholestasis. The article presents modern data on diagnostics, prevention and treatment of hepatobiliary complications of parenteral nutrition in children.

  15. Nutritional values of waterfowl foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredickson, Leigh H.; Reid, Fredric A.

    1988-01-01

    wetland habitats throughout their annual cycles. Survival, reproduction, and growth are dependent on the availability of foods that meet nutritional requirements for recurring biological events. These requirements occur among a wide variety of environmental conditions that also influence nutritional demands. Recent work on nesting waterfowl has identified the female’s general nutrient needs for egg laying and incubation. Far less is known about nutritional requirements for molt and other portions of the life cycle, particularly those during the nonbreeding season. Although information on specific requirements for amino acids and micronutrients of wild birds is meager, the available information on waterfowl requirements can be used to develop waterfowl management strategies. For example, nutrient content of foods, nutritional requirements of waterfowl, and the cues waterfowl use in locating and selecting foods are all kinds of information that managers need to encourage use of habitats by feeding waterfowl. Waterfowl nutritional needs during the annual cycle and the nutritional values of natural foods and crops will be discussed below.

  16. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: nutritional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Kathryn M; Trujillo, Elaine

    2014-02-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that nutritional genomics provides insight into how diet and genotype interactions affect phenotype. The practical application of nutritional genomics for complex chronic disease is an emerging science and the use of nutrigenetic testing to provide dietary advice is not ready for routine dietetics practice. Registered dietitian nutritionists need basic competency in genetics as a foundation for understanding nutritional genomics; proficiency requires advanced knowledge and skills. Unlike single-gene defects in which a mutation in a single gene results in a specific disorder, most chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer are multigenetic and multifactorial and therefore genetic mutations are only partially predictive of disease risk. Family history, biochemical parameters, and the presence of risk factors in individuals are relevant tools for personalizing dietary interventions. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing is not closely regulated in the United States and may not be accompanied by access to health care practitioners. Applying nutritional genomics in clinical practice through the use of genetic testing requires that registered dietitian nutritionists understand, interpret, and communicate complex test results in which the actual risk of developing a disease may not be known. The practical application of nutritional genomics in dietetics practice will require an evidence-based approach to validate that personalized recommendations result in health benefits to individuals and do not cause harm. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Nutrition and cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuramaki, T; Hirata, K; Isobe, M

    1998-03-01

    Nutritional therapy for cancer patients includes various objectives such as improvement of cachexia, elucidation of the mechanism of malnutrition, development of therapy for anorexia, nutrition support during chemotherapy or radiotherapy, and inhibition of tumor growth under controlled caloric intake. This review describes recent remarkable developments in nutritional therapy for cancer patients. Cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor which induce proteolysis and lipolysis are involved in the cause of malnutrition and cachexia in cancer patients. IL-1 also plays a significant role in the development of cancer anorexia via direct action in the brain. For anorexia therapy, progestogens have been shown to improve appetite and food intake in cancer patients. Moreover, glutamine supplementation improves the host protein metabolism without enhancement of tumor growth during chemotherapy. Among the effects of caloric intake on anticancer therapy, AO-90, a methionine-free intravenous amino acid solution, has been shown to increase the antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil in clinical studies. From these observations, recent progress in nutritional therapy for cancer patients has been remarkable. Further study of nutritional therapy is required in order to maintain or improve the quality of life of cancer patients in the future.

  18. Terapia nutricional enteral em unidade de terapia intensiva: infusão versus necessidades Nutrition support in an intensive care unit: delivery versus requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Castro Teixeira

    2006-12-01

    critically ill patients nutritional deficiency is common. Considering this fact, the diary monitoring of energy delivered is extremely important. The objective of this study is to assess the adequacy of enteral nutrition (EN in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU and identify the reasons for interruptions in feeding. METHODS: Prospective study of adult patients admitted to ICU in period of 53 days. Patients receiving continuous enteral tube feeding (22 hours/day exclusively and post-pyloric tube feeding position were followed. The feeding volume started at 25 mL/h and was increased until nutritional goal, guided by a feeding protocol. RESULTS: 33 patients between 18 and 85 years old were studied. 58% were male. The main admission diagnoses were cardiovascular diseases (27% and septic shock (21%. The mean time to feeding was 25.3 hours after the patient admission and nutritional goal was achieved in a mean time of 32 hours. The total volume prescribed per day was sufficient to guarantee a mean of 26.1 kcal/kg of body weight and 1.04 g of protein/kg of body weight. Patients received a mean of 19.5 kcal/kg of body weight and 0.8 g of protein/kg of body weight, which correspond a 74% of adequacy. Interruptions of feeding for routine procedures related to patients accounted for 40.6% of the total reasons. CONCLUSIONS: The nutritional support is adequate considering the literature for these patients, who clinical instability causes gastrointestinal intolerance. The effective participation of the Nutrition Therapy Team can contribute positively on nutritional therapy.

  19. National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in School as Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Final rule and interim final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-29

    This rule adopts as final, with some modifications, the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program regulations set forth in the interim final rule published in the Federal Register on June 28, 2013. The requirements addressed in this rule conform to the provisions in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 regarding nutrition standards for all foods sold in schools, other than food sold under the lunch and breakfast programs. Most provisions of this final rule were implemented on July 1, 2014, a full year subsequent to publication of the interim final rule. This was in compliance with section 208 of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, which required that State and local educational agencies have at least one full school year from the date of publication of the interim final rule to implement the competitive food provisions. Based on comments received on the interim final rule and implementation experience, this final rule makes a few modifications to the nutrition standards for all foods sold in schools implemented on July 1, 2014. In addition, this final rule codifies specific policy guidance issued after publication of the interim rule. Finally, this rule retains the provision related to the standard for total fat as interim and requests further comment on this single standard.

  20. 45 CFR 150.217 - Preliminary determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preliminary determination. 150.217 Section 150.217... Are Failing To Substantially Enforce HIPAA Requirements § 150.217 Preliminary determination. If, at... designees). (b) Notifies the State of CMS's preliminary determination that the State has failed to...

  1. Nutritional Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Julie

    2016-03-01

    This article provides the reader with steps needed to accurately assess patient nutrition behaviors that contribute to weight gain, inability to lose weight, or inability to sustain weight loss. Evidence-based approaches in nutrition therapy that can create the daily energy deficit needed to produce 1/2 to 2 pounds of weight loss per week, and the strategies to create the energy deficit, are presented. To optimize health, long-term weight loss maintenance is needed. The benefits of using a multidisciplinary team approach in treating obesity are highlighted.

  2. Nutritional Problems and Policy in Tanzania. Cornell International Nutrition Monograph Series, Number 7 (1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgaza, Olyvia

    This monograph discusses policies designed to deal with food and nutrition problems in Tanzania. Available information on food supplies and nutritional conditions in Tanzania clearly shows that the country faces nutritional problems; protein energy malnutrition is the most serious and requires priority action. Iron deficiency anemia, goiter, and…

  3. Medical Issues: Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... support & care > living with sma > medical issues > nutrition Nutrition Good nutrition is essential to health and growth. ... must make decisions based on their own needs. Nutrition Considerations Since we are still waiting for clinical ...

  4. Translation of Nutritional Genomics into Nutrition Practice: The Next Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Chiara; Adamski, Melissa M.

    2017-01-01

    Genetics is an important piece of every individual health puzzle. The completion of the Human Genome Project sequence has deeply changed the research of life sciences including nutrition. The analysis of the genome is already part of clinical care in oncology, pharmacology, infectious disease and, rare and undiagnosed diseases. The implications of genetic variations in shaping individual nutritional requirements have been recognised and conclusively proven, yet routine use of genetic information in nutrition and dietetics practice is still far from being implemented. This article sets out the path that needs to be taken to build a framework to translate gene–nutrient interaction studies into best-practice guidelines, providing tools that health professionals can use to understand whether genetic variation affects nutritional requirements in their daily clinical practice. PMID:28383492

  5. Pathogenesisandtreatmentofparenteral nutrition-associatedliverdisease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Wei Xu; You-Sheng Li

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) has been common in patients who require long-term parenteral nutrition. PNALD develops in 40%-60%of infants on long-term parenteral nutrition compared with 15%-40%of adults on home parenteral nutrition for intestinal failure. The pathogenesis of PNALD is multifactorial and remains unclear. There is no speciifc treatment. Management strategies for its prevention and treatment depend on an understanding of many risk factors. This review aims to provide an update on the pathogenesis and treatment of this disease. DATA SOURCES: A literature search was performed on the MEDLINE and Web of Science databases for articles published up to October 2011, using the keywords: parenteral nutrition associated liver disease, intestinal failure associated liver disease, lipid emulsions and ifsh oil. The available data reported in the relevant literatures were analyzed. RESULTS: The literature search provided a huge amount of evidence about the pathogenesis and management strategies on PNALD. Currently, lack of enteral feeding, extended duration of parenteral nutrition, recurrent sepsis, and nutrient deifciency or excess may play important roles in the pathogenesis of PNALD. Recent studies found that phytosterols, present as contaminants in soy-based lipid emulsions, are also an important factor in the pathogenesis. Moreover, the treatment of PNALD is discussed. CONCLUSIONS: The use of lipid emulsions, phytosterols in particular, is associated with PNALD. Management strategies for the prevention and treatment of PNALD include consideration of early enteral feeding, the use of specialized lipid emulsions such as ifsh oil emulsions, and isolated small bowel or combined liver and small bowel transplantation. A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of PNALD has led to promising interventions to prevent and treat this condition. Future work should aim to better understand the mechanisms of PNALD and the long

  6. Nutrition in the hospitalized patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Lisa L; Kashiwagi, Deanne T; Brantley, Susan; Scheurer, Danielle; Varkey, Prathibha

    2013-01-01

    Almost 50% of patients are malnourished on admission; many others develop malnutrition during admission. Malnutrition contributes to hospital morbidity, mortality, costs, and readmissions. The Joint Commission requires malnutrition risk screening on admission. If screening identifies malnutrition risk, a nutrition assessment is required to create a nutrition care plan. The plan should be initiated early in the hospital course, as even patients with normal nutrition become malnourished quickly when acutely ill. While the Harris-Benedict equation is the most commonly used method to estimate calories, its accuracy may not be optimal in all patients. Calculating the caloric needs of acutely ill obese patients is particularly problematic. In general, a patient's caloric intake should be slightly less than calculated needs to avoid the metabolic risks of overfeeding. However, most patients do not receive their goal calories or receive parenteral nutrition due to erroneous practices of awaiting return of bowel sounds or holding feeding for gastric residual volumes. Patients with inadequate intake over time may develop potentially fatal refeeding syndrome. The hospitalist must be able to recognize the risk factors for malnutrition, patients at risk of refeeding syndrome, and the optimal route for nutrition support. Finally, education of patients and their caregivers about nutrition support must begin before discharge, and include coordination of care with outpatient facilities. As with all other aspects of discharge, it is the hospitalist's role to assure smooth transition of the nutrition care plan to an outpatient setting.

  7. Meat-based enteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevitskay, O. K.; Dydykin, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Enteral nutrition is widely used in hospitals as a means of nutritional support and therapy for different diseases. Enteral nutrition must fulfil the energy needs of the body, be balanced by the nutrient composition and meet patient’s nutritional needs. Meat is a source of full-value animal protein, vitamins and minerals. On the basis of this research, recipes and technology for a meat-based enteral nutrition product were developed. The product is a ready-to-eat sterilised mixture in the form of a liquid homogeneous mass, which is of full value in terms of composition and enriched with vitamins and minerals, consists of particles with a size of not more than 0.3 mm and has the modified fat composition and rheological characteristics that are necessary for passage through enteral feeding tubes. The study presents experimental data on the content of the main macro- and micro-nutrients in the developed product. The new product is characterised by a balanced fatty acid composition, which plays an important role in correction of lipid metabolism disorders and protein-energy deficiency, and it is capable of satisfying patients’ daily requirements for vitamins and the main macro- and microelements when consuming 1500-2000 ml. Meat-based enteral nutrition can be used in diets as a standard mixture for effective correction of the energy and anabolic requirements of the body and support of the nutritional status of patients, including those with operated stomach syndrome.

  8. Recent Advances in Ruminant Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Rüştü Kutlu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most industrialized animal production branches of ruminant production successfully requires a blending of theoretical knowledge of nutritional principles with practical stockmanship, maintaining health and dealing with numbers. It is well known that high yielding, dairy cows, require balanced diet with adequate nutrients for yielding. This is not provided with only a few feedstuffs. Milk production in dairy cows is related to the improvements in genetic merit of farm animals and also developments in feed science, feed technology and animal nutrition. In particular, feeds and feed technology studies associated with sustainability, economical perspectives and product quality in the last decade have been in advance. In the present work, recent advances in feed sources and feed technology, minerals (macro and trace minerals , vitamins and amino acids, feed additives (antibiotics alternative growth stimulants, rumen modulator, organic acids, antioxidants, enzymes, plant extracts, nutrition-products (meat-milk-progeny quality and functional food production (milk, meat nutrition-reproduction, nutrition-animal health, nutrition-environmental temperature, nutrition-global warming were evaluated.

  9. [Enteral Nutritional Support in Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Ran

    2015-06-01

    Nutritional support is important because malnutrition is a major contributor to increased morbidity and mortality, decreased quality of life, increased length of hospital stay, and higher healthcare costs. Patients with gastrointestinal disease are at an increased risk of nutritional deterioration due to therapeutic dietary restriction, fasting for the diagnostic tests, loss of appetite due to anorexia or altered nutritional requirement caused by the disease itself. Therefore, it is important that gastroenterologists are aware of the nutritional status of patients and plan a treatment strategy considering patient's nutritional status. Enteral nutrition is preferred to parenteral nutrition as it is more physiologic, has fewer complications, help to prevent mucosal atrophy and maintain gut barrier function, which decrease intestinal bacterial translocation. Hence, enteral nutrition has been considered to be the most effective route for nutritional support. In this article, we will review enteral nutrition (oral nutritional supplements, enteral tube feeding) as a treatment for the patients with gastrointestinal, liver and pancreatic disease at risk of malnutrition.

  10. Promoting nutrition in breastfeeding women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Patty R; Pugh, Linda C

    2005-01-01

    Nurses have a vital role in providing nutritional education to breastfeeding women. In this article, the authors discuss the nutritional requirements for breast-feeding women in terms of micronutrients, macronutrients, and minerals. They provide recommendations for women with vegetarian diets and low-income women enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children program who may have dietary deficiencies, and they present a directed case study to provide an example of how to perform a dietary assessment and the educational support that may be offered by nurses to breastfeeding women.

  11. OFTIFEL PERSONALIZED NUTRITIONAL CALCULATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malte BETHKE

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A food calculator for elderly people was elaborated by Centiv GmbH, an active partner in the European FP7 OPTIFEL Project, based on the functional requirement specifications and the existing recommendations for daily allowances across Europe, data which were synthetized and used to give aims in amounts per portion. The OPTIFEL Personalised Nutritional Calculator is the only available online tool which allows to determine on a personalised level the required nutrients for elderly people (65+. It has been developed mainly to support nursing homes providing best possible (personalised nutrient enriched food to their patients. The European FP7 OPTIFEL project “Optimised Food Products for Elderly Populations” aims to develop innovative products based on vegetables and fruits for elderly populations to increase length of independence. The OPTIFEL Personalised Nutritional Calculator is recommended to be used by nursing homes.

  12. [Nutritional therapy of gout].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickolai, Beate; Kiss, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition and nutritional behaviours have been found to play a major role in the development of gout. Studies show that body mass index (BMI), as well as excessive intake of alcoholic beverages, meat, soft drinks and fruit juices increase the risk of developing gout. Similarly, dairy products and coffee have been seen to decrease the risk of hyperuricemia and gout, as they increase the excretion of uric acid. Flares of gout are often caused by large meals and high alcohol consumption. Each additional intake of meat portion per day increases the risk of gout by 21 %. Taking total alcohol consumption into account, the risk of gout increases after one to two standard drinks. In contrast to previous assumptions purine-rich plant foods like legumes and vegetables do not increase the risk of gout. The current dietary guidelines take into account nutritional factors, which not only consider purine intake, but also their endogenous production and their influence on renal excretion. A balanced diet based on the Swiss healthy eating guideline pyramid as well as the Mediterranean diet is appropriate for this patient population. The treatment of gout is multi-faceted, since this patient population presents other comorbidities such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Collectively, these risk factors are diet dependent and require a treatment strategy that is centered on modifying one's nutrition and nutritional behaviours. The aim of such therapy is to educate the patient as well as treat the accompanying comorbidities with the goal of decreasing serum uric acid values. Motivated patients require consultation and follow-up care in order to be able to actively decrease the serum uric acid.

  13. Nutrition for adventure racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchordas, Mayur K

    2012-11-01

    Adventure racing requires competitors to perform various disciplines ranging from, but not limited to, mountain biking, running, kayaking, climbing, mountaineering, flat- and white-water boating and orienteering over a rugged, often remote and wilderness terrain. Races can vary from 6 hours to expedition-length events that can last up to 10-consecutive days or more. The purpose of this article is to provide evidence-based nutritional recommendations for adventure racing competitors. Energy expenditures of 365-750 kcal/hour have been reported with total energy expenditures of 18 000-80 000 kcal required to complete adventure races, and large negative energy balances during competitions have been reported. Nutrition, therefore, plays a major role in the successful completion of such ultra-endurance events. Conducting research in these events is challenging and the limited studies investigating dietary surveys and nutritional status of adventure racers indicate that competitors do not meet nutrition recommendations for ultra-endurance exercise. Carbohydrate intakes of 7-12 g/kg are needed during periods of prolonged training to meet requirements and replenish glycogen stores. Protein intakes of 1.4-1.7 g/kg are recommended to build and repair tissue. Adequate replacement of fluid and electrolytes are crucial, particularly during extreme temperatures; however, sweat rates can vary greatly between competitors. There is considerable evidence to support the use of sports drinks, gels and bars, as they are a convenient and portable source of carbohydrate that can be consumed during exercise, in training and in competition. Similarly, protein and amino acid supplements can be useful to help meet periods of increased protein requirements. Caffeine can be used as an ergogenic aid to help competitors stay awake during prolonged periods, enhance glycogen resynthesis and enhance endurance performance.

  14. Nutritional requirements of energy, protein and macrominerals for maintenance and weight gain of young crossbred Nellore × Holstein bulls on pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlos Oliveira Porto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate requirements of energy, protein and macrominerals of young Nellore/Holstein crossbreds bulls supplemented on pastures of Brachiaria decumbens Stapf. Thirty-five young bulls, at 8.53±0.18 months of age and with initial body weight of 230.6±6.1 kg were used. Ten animals were slaughtered as reference, in different weight range, and the other animals were slaughtered at the end of the experimental period. For estimate of net energy requirements for weight, a regression equation between log of retained energy (RE and log of empty body weight gain (EBWG was constructed. Net requirements of Ca, P, Mg, Na and K were determined by the equation Y' = a.b.Xb-1, in which a and b represent the intercept and the coefficient of equation of prediction of macrominerals in body content, respectively. Requirements of metabolizable energy for maintenance (MEm were obtained from retained energy in function of metabolizable energy intake (MEI. The requirements of MEm of Nellore/Holstein crossbreds young bulls on pasture was 125 kcal/EBW0.75/day. The efficiency of ME utilization for maintenance (k of grazing Nellore/Holstein crossbred young mbulls was 0.58 and 0.24 for gain. The total metabolizable protein requirements for an animal with 400 kg and with average daily gain of 1.0 kg, were 638.36 g/day. The dietetic requirements of Ca and P for an animal with 400 kg BW were 0.49 and 0.21% of DM, respectively. Daily metabolizable energy requirement for maintenance of grazing Nellore/Holstein crossbred young bulls was 11.6% greater than the values found for cattle in feedlot in Brazil (112 kcal/kg EBW0.75.

  15. Tratamiento nutricional de la obesidad mórbida que requiere cirugía bariátrica Nutritional treatment of morbid obesity requiring bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Bolet Astoviza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available La obesidad en el mundo actual es un importante problema de salud por el riesgo aumentado de morbilidad y mortalidad, sobre todo por las enfermedades cardiovasculares que puede ocasionar. También es un factor de riesgo de diabetes mellitus, hipertensión arterial, enfermedad vesicular, osteoartritis, y ciertos tipos de cánceres, que influyen en la calidad de vida de los pacientes y finalmente limitan su esperanza de vida. En el 95 % de los casos la obesidad es exógena o nutricional, y está asociada a la ingestión de dietas hiperenergéticas y a escasa actividad física. La obesidad se considera mórbida cuando la persona alcanza 40 kg/m2 o más de índice de masa corporal. Se realiza una revisión del tema de la obesidad mórbida y su tratamiento nutricional preoperatorio y posoperatorio.In present era obesity is a significant health problem due to increased risk of morbidity and mortality, mainly by the potential cardiovascular diseases. Also, it is a risk factor of diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure, vesicular disease, osteoarthritis, and some types of cancer influencing in quality of life of patients and it is associated with ingestion of hyperenergetic diets and the lack of physical activity. Obesity is considered as morbid when a person gain 40 kg/m2 or more in the body mass rate. A review on morbid obesity is performed and its preoperative and on the postoperative nutritional treatment.

  16. Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient: update. Consensus SEMICYUC-SENPE: macronutrient and micronutrient requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet Saris, A; Márquez Vácaro, J A; Serón Arbeloa, C

    2011-11-01

    Energy requirements are altered in critically-ill patients and are influenced by the clinical situation, treatment, and phase of the process. Therefore, the most appropriate method to calculate calorie intake is indirect calorimetry. In the absence of this technique, fixed calorie intake (between 25 and 35 kcal/kg/day) or predictive equations such as the Penn State formula can be used to obtain a more accurate evaluation of metabolic rate. Carbohydrate administration should be limited to a maximum of 4 g/kg/day and a minimum of 2 g/kg/day. Plasma glycemia should be controlled to avoid hyperglycemia. Fat intake should be between 1 and 1.5 g/kg/day. The recommended protein intake is 1-1.5 g/kg/day but can vary according to the patient's clinical status. Particular attention should be paid to micronutrient intake. Consensus is lacking on micronutrient requirements. Some vitamins (A, B, C, E) are highly important in critically-ill patients, especially those undergoing continuous renal replacement techniques, patients with severe burns and alcoholics, although the specific requirements in each of these types of patient have not yet been established. Energy and protein intake in critically-ill patients is complex, since both clinical factors and the stage of the process must be taken into account. The first step is to calculate each patient's energy requirements and then proceed to distribute calorie intake among its three components: proteins, carbohydrates and fat. Micronutrient requirements must also be considered.

  17. [Nutritional assessment and perioperative nutritional support in gastric cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyung Won; Yoon, Ki Young

    2013-04-01

    Weight loss and malnutrition are common in cancer patients. Although weight loss is predominantly due to loss of fat mass, the morbidity risk is given by the decrease in muscle mass. The assessment of nutritional status is essential for a diagnosis of nutritional compromise and required for the multidisciplinary approach. Subjective global assessment (SGA) is made by the patients nutritional symptoms and weight loss. The objective assessment, a significant weight loss (>10%) for 6 months is considered an indicator of nutritional deficiency. The mean body index, body fat mass and body protein mass are decreased as cancer stage increases. The biochemical data of albumin, cholesterol, triglyceride, Zn, transferrin, total lymphocyte count are decreased in advanced cancer stage. Daily energy intake, cabohyderate and Vit B1 intake is decreased according to cancer stage. The patients are divided into three groups according to SGA. The three groups showed a significant difference in body weight, 1 month weight loss%, 6 month weight loss%, body mass index, mid arm circumference, albumin, energy intake, as well as carbohyderate intake protein and energy malnutrition. Nutritional assessment is of great importance because undernutrition has been shown to be associated with increase in stomach cancer associated morbidity and mortality. The authors concluded that nutritional assessment should be done in cancer patients preoperatively, and with adequate nutritional support, the morbidity and mortality would be decreased.

  18. Exigências nutricionais de cálcio e fósforo para codornas japonesas (Coturnix coturnix japonica em postura Calcium and phosphorus nutritional requirements of laying Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Nunes Martins

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de determinar as exigências nutricionais de cálcio (Ca e fósforo (P para codornas japonesas (Coturnix coturnix japonica em postura, utilizaram-se 512 codornas, em esquema fatorial 4x4 (níveis de P (disponível - 0,27%, 0,32%, 0,37% e 0,42% e níveis de Ca-2,5%, 3,0%, 3,5% e 4,0%, com quatro repetições e oito codornas por unidade experimental. Houve interação linear (p To determine calcium (Ca and phosphorus (P nutritional requirements, 512 laying Japanese quails were distributed in a completely randomized 4x4 factorial design (P levels available – 0.27%, 0.32%, 0.37%, 0.42%, and CA levels – 2.5%, 3.0%, 3.5%, 4.0%, with four replicates and eight quails per experimental unit. A linear interaction (p < 0.05 was observed between P and Ca levels for production percentage; the P level that maximized the interaction was 0.36% and the Ca level was 3.06%. Ca levels decreased linearly (p < 0.01 feed intake and eggs weight, but increased linearly the egg shell percentage (p < 0.01 and tibia strength (p < 0.05. P levels decreased linearly (p < 0.05 feed conversion (kg/dz and caused a quadratic effect (p < 0.05 on feed intake, feed conversion (kg/kg, shell percentage and P percentage in bone; the optimum levels were, respectively, 0.36%, 0.36%, 0.37% and 0.35%. It may be concluded that the laying Japanese guail nutritional requirements are 2.5%Ca and 0.36% P.

  19. Nutrition for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2005-01-01

    Nutrition has proven to be critical throughout the history of human exploration, on both land and water. The importance of nutrition during long-duration space exploration is no different. Maintaining optimal nutritional status is critical for all bodily systems, especially in light of the fact that that many are also affected by space flight itself. Major systems of concern are bone, muscle, the cardiovascular system, the immune system, protection against radiation damage, and others. The task ahead includes defining the nutritional requirements for space travelers, ensuring adequacy of the food system, and assessing crew nutritional status before, during, and after flight. Accomplishing these tasks will provide significant contributions to ensuring crew health on long-duration missions. In addition, development and testing of nutritional countermeasures to effects of space flight is required, and assessment of the impact of other countermeasures (such as exercise and pharmaceuticals) on nutrition is also critical for maintaining overall crew health. Vitamin D stores of crew members are routinely low after long-duration space flight. This occurs even when crew members take vitamin D supplements, suggesting that vitamin D metabolism may be altered during space flight. Vitamin D is essential for efficient absorption of calcium, and has numerous other benefits for other tissues with vitamin D receptors. Protein is a macronutrient that requires additional study to define the optimal intake for space travelers. Administration of protein to bed rest subjects can effectively mitigate muscle loss associated with disuse, but too much or too little protein can also have negative effects on bone. In another bed rest study, we found that the ratio of protein to potassium was correlated with the level of bone resorption: the higher the ratio, the more bone resorption. These relationships warrant further study to optimize the beneficial effect of protein on both bone and muscle

  20. Nutritional supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Gry Bjerg; Andersen, Jens Rikardt

    2015-01-01

    , metal, gritty, consistence and ability to drink 150 ml (one glass), and the patients arranged the drinks in order of preference. Results: The sensory qualities differed significantly concerning sweet (p...Background: Several studies have indicated that cancer patients have significantly altered taste sensitivity without specifying the preferences. One of the related problems is low compliance to nutritional therapy with oral nutritional supplements (ONS) in patients suffering severe weight loss....... Objective: We wanted to investigate taste preferences and sensoric characteristics among three usually used ONS in patients with malignant haematological disease during cytotoxic treatment. Design: Tested drinks were: Protin® (protein-enriched-milk, ARLA), Nutridrink® (NUTRICIA) and hospital-produced drink...

  1. Cultivating nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Carol E; Long, Jennifer; Simler, Kenneth R.; Johnson-Welch, Charlotte

    2003-01-01

    "Over the past decade, donor-funded policies and programs designed to address undernutrition in the Global South have shifted away from agriculture-based strategies toward nutrient supplementation and food fortification programs. Given the potential benefits resulting from agriculture-based nutrition interventions, this study uses Q methodology to explore the views of a range of stakeholders from both developed and developing countries on the value of—and constraints related to—gender-sensiti...

  2. Nutritional Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the effects that space flight has on humans nutritional biochemistry. Particular attention is devoted to the study of protein breakdown, inflammation, hypercatabolism, omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin D, calcium, urine, folate and nutrient stability of certain vitamins, the fluid shift and renal stone risk, acidosis, iron/hematology, and the effects on bone of dietary protein, potassium. inflammation, and omega-3 fatty acids

  3. Uncovering the nutritional landscape of food

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Seunghyeon; Foo, Mathias; Jin, Yong-Su; Kim, Pan-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The study of foods and nutrients is essential for designing healthy diets. This can be facilitated through quantitative, data-driven approaches that utilize massive nutritional information collected for many different foods. Using information from over 1,000 raw foods, we systematically evaluated the nutrient composition of each food in regards to satisfying daily nutritional requirements. Such nutrient balance within a food was quantified herein as nutritional fitness, using the food's frequency of occurrence in nutritionally-adequate food combinations. Nutritional fitness offers prioritization of recommendable foods within a food network, in which foods are connected based on similarities of nutrient compositions. We found a number of key nutrients, such as choline and \\alpha-linolenic acid, whose levels in foods can critically affect the foods' nutritional fitness. Analogously, pairs of nutrients can have the same effect. In fact, two nutrients can impact nutritional fitness synergistically, although the i...

  4. Climate change and nutrition: creating a climate for nutrition security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado, M C; Crahay, P; Mahy, L; Zanev, C; Neira, M; Msangi, S; Brown, R; Scaramella, C; Costa Coitinho, D; Müller, A

    2013-12-01

    ), and policies and actions formulated by the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Improved multi-sectoral coordination and political will is required to integrate nutrition-sensitive actions into climate-resilient sustainable development efforts in the UNFCCC work and in the post 2015 development agenda. Placing human rights at the center of strategies to mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change and international solidarity is essential to advance sustainable development and to create a climate for nutrition security.

  5. Phase Angle and Handgrip Strength Are Sensitive Early Markers of Energy Intake in Hypophagic, Non-Surgical Patients at Nutritional Risk, with Contraindications to Enteral Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Caccialanza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of nutritional intakes during hospitalization is crucial, as it is known that nutritional status tends to worsen during the hospital stay, and this can lead to the negative consequences of malnutrition. International guidelines recommend the use of parenteral nutrition (PN in hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk, with contraindications to enteral nutrition. However, to date, there are no published data regarding either energy intake or objective measurements associated with it in this patient population. The aim of the present exploratory methodological study was to evaluate whether phase angle (PhA and handgrip strength normalized for skeletal muscle mass (HG/SMM are sensitive early markers of energy intake in hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk, with contraindications to enteral nutrition. We evaluated 30 eligible patients, who were treated with personalized dietary modifications and supplemental PN for at least one week during hospitalization. In a liner regression model adjusted for age, gender, basal protein intake and the basal value of each variable, a trend toward improvement of PhA and preservation of HG/SMM was observed in patients satisfying the estimated calorie requirements (N = 20, while a significant deterioration of these parameters occurred in those who were not able to reach the target (N = 10. The mean adjusted difference and 95% CI were +1.4° (0.5–2.3 (p = 0.005 for PhA and +0.23 (0.20–0.43 (p = 0.033 for HG/SMM. A significant correlation between PhA and HG/SMM variations was also observed (r = 0.56 (95% CI, 0.23–0.77; p = 0.0023. PhA and HG/SMM were able to distinguish between hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk who satisfied their estimated caloric requirements and those who did not after a one-week personalized nutritional support. Clinical studies are warranted, in order to verify these preliminary observations and to validate the role of Ph

  6. Phase angle and handgrip strength are sensitive early markers of energy intake in hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk, with contraindications to enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccialanza, Riccardo; Cereda, Emanuele; Klersy, Catherine; Bonardi, Chiara; Cappello, Silvia; Quarleri, Lara; Turri, Annalisa; Montagna, Elisabetta; Iacona, Isabella; Valentino, Francesco; Pedrazzoli, Paolo

    2015-03-11

    The assessment of nutritional intakes during hospitalization is crucial, as it is known that nutritional status tends to worsen during the hospital stay, and this can lead to the negative consequences of malnutrition. International guidelines recommend the use of parenteral nutrition (PN) in hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk, with contraindications to enteral nutrition. However, to date, there are no published data regarding either energy intake or objective measurements associated with it in this patient population. The aim of the present exploratory methodological study was to evaluate whether phase angle (PhA) and handgrip strength normalized for skeletal muscle mass (HG/SMM) are sensitive early markers of energy intake in hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk, with contraindications to enteral nutrition. We evaluated 30 eligible patients, who were treated with personalized dietary modifications and supplemental PN for at least one week during hospitalization. In a liner regression model adjusted for age, gender, basal protein intake and the basal value of each variable, a trend toward improvement of PhA and preservation of HG/SMM was observed in patients satisfying the estimated calorie requirements (N = 20), while a significant deterioration of these parameters occurred in those who were not able to reach the target (N = 10). The mean adjusted difference and 95% CI were +1.4° (0.5-2.3) (p = 0.005) for PhA and +0.23 (0.20-0.43) (p = 0.033) for HG/SMM. A significant correlation between PhA and HG/SMM variations was also observed (r = 0.56 (95% CI, 0.23-0.77); p = 0.0023). PhA and HG/SMM were able to distinguish between hypophagic, non-surgical patients at nutritional risk who satisfied their estimated caloric requirements and those who did not after a one-week personalized nutritional support. Clinical studies are warranted, in order to verify these preliminary observations and to validate the role of PhA variations as early

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Nutritional Composition of African Locust ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nutritional requirement for human diet is through the investigation of their nutritional values. ... balance diet for normal growth (FAO 2004). ... west Nigeria, edible fruits from wild plants are often ... supplement important minerals and vitamins in.

  8. 门诊慢性肾脏病患者营养知识认知水平与服务需求的调查研究%The research of serving requirements and the level of nutritional knowledge for nephropathic patients in clinic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈华; 林秀蓉; 林海

    2012-01-01

    目的:调查门诊慢性肾脏病患者的营养知识认知水平和开设营养门诊的服务需求.方法:自行设计问卷调查表,对113例肾脏病患者的营养知识认识水平、营养态度及营养需求进行问卷调查.结果:营养知识及格的肾脏病患者仅达38.94%.不同文化程度的患者对营养知识认识有显著差异(P<0.05).有76.11%的肾脏病患者希望通过营养门诊来获得系统的膳食营养知识,不同肾病情况的患者对需要膳食营养服务需求有显著差异(P<0.05).在需求的服务项目顺位分别为:疾病食疗(93.02%)、营养成份指导(60.47%)、个性化饮食指导(48.84%)、食谱配餐(43.02%).结论:肾病患者营养知识严重缺乏,医务人员有责任通过营养健康教育、营养门诊等方式帮助患者提高营养知识及进行饮食指导,其中患多种慢性病或患多种并发症的患者最需求营养知识和膳食指导.在门诊营养服务中,可重点指导患者疾病食疗和讲解食物营养成份,根据患者病情及个人需求,进一步进行个性化饮食指导和食谱配餐服务.%Objective: To research the level of dietary nutrition and serving requirements for nephropathic patients in out - patient department. Methods: With designed questionnaire, the level of dietary nutrition, nutrition attitudes and nutrition requirements will be surveyed in 113 nephropathic patients. Results: The passing level of nutrition knowledge was only 38. 94% in nephropathic patients. The understanding of nutrition was significantly different with different degrees of cultural knowledge(P < 0.05 ) . 76.11 % of nephropathic patients hope to get whole knowledge of dietary nutrition through Nutrition Clinic. The serving requirements of Nutrition Clinic are significantly different in different degrees of nephropathic patients(P <0.05) . The sortorder of required services were; disease diet (93.02% ) , nutritional guidance (60.47%) , personalized dietary guidance (48

  9. [Diabetes and nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz París, A

    2000-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most frequent metabolic syndromes found in our hospitals, occurring at around 10%. There are basically two types: the most common is Type 2, associated with obesity in almost 80% of cases and family groupings, and then, far behind, comes Type 1 which requires insulin administration for life. Furthermore, there is a condition known as "stress hyperglycaemia" in which a patient without a prior history of diabetes mellitus responds to stress with a syndrome comprising hypermetabolism, hyperglycaemia, hyperlactacidaemia and protein catabolism. The desirable pre-prandial levels of glycaemia in an outpatient are between 80 and 120 mg/dl (under 100 mg/dl is normal) and between 100 and 140 mg/dl before retiring (levels of 110 mg/dl are normal). In patients with artificial nutrition, whether parenteral or enteral, the control of glycaemia is not so strict and the recommendation is for a level of around 150-200 mg/dl in the acute stress phases, falling to 100-150 mg/dl in stable patients. The ideal enteral formula for diabetic patients has been a bone of contention for years and has still not been satisfactorily resolved. The discussion centres on the replacement of saturated fatty acids by mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) or by carbohydrates. The studies of patients undergoing prolonged treatments with MUFA-rich enteral diets have shown a greater control of glycaemia with these diets than with those rich in carbohydrates, so Type 2 diabetics and in stress hyperglycaemia with enteral nutrition, there is an ever stronger proposal to use MUFA rich formulas, whereas in Type 1 diabetics and in Type 2 patients with high prior requirements of insulin, it would be more recommendable to use diets with a more intermediate composition. With regard to parenteral nutrition, there is a consensus on increasing the amount of fatty acids to the detriment of carbohydrates, but the use of carbohydrates other than glucose is not so clear. The use of fast

  10. Nutrition and HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Henrik; Olsen, Mette Frahm; Filteau, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the global human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic is most severe in sub-Saharan African countries already affected by undernutrition and food insecurity. There is a two-way relationship between HIV and undernutrition and food insecurity......, which is mainly synergistic and operating at different levels. HIV infection increases energy and nutrient requirements, yet it reduces food security. The result is nutritional deficiencies, which increase progression of HIV infection. Both undernutrition and food insecurity may also lead to increased...... risk of transmission. Nutritional intake and status may affect metabolism of antiretroviral drugs, some of which may affect body composition, and increase risk of the metabolic syndrome. In addition, HIV is transmitted through breastfeeding, causing a serious infant feeding dilemma for which...

  11. Nutrition and sports performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherhood, J R

    1984-01-01

    During the past 20 years there have been great developments in the scientific understanding of the role of nutrition in health and physical performance. Epidemiological and physiological studies have provided evidence that certain forms of dietary behaviour may be linked with an increased risk of developing disorders such as high blood pressure, coronary artery disease and some cancers. This has resulted in dietary recommendations that are intended to reduce the incidence of these disorders in the community. The science of nutrition in relation to sports performance has progressed from empirical studies investigating the effects of dietary manipulations, such as restriction and supplementation, to the direct investigation of the physiological basis of the specific nutritional demands of hard physical exercise. This review is based on the premise that it is "what comes out' rather than "what goes in', which provides the clues to ideal nutrition for athletic performance. Various aspects of the physical demands of athletic exercise are viewed as stresses that induce specific biochemical, and hence nutritional, strains in the athlete. Training is the predominant demand in the athletic lifestyle. This is characterised by acute bouts of high power output. During one hour of hard training an athlete may expend 30% of his or her total 24-hour energy output. These high power outputs have important implications for energy substrate and water requirements. Carbohydrate, specifically muscle glycogen, is an obligatory fuel for the high power outputs demanded by athletic sports. Muscle glycogen is a limiting factor in hard exercise because it is held in limited amounts, utilised rapidly by intense exercise, and fatigue occurs when it is depleted to low levels in the active muscles. Liver glycogen may also be exhausted by hard exercise and low blood glucose contributes to fatigue. High sweat rates are demanded during severe exercise and large water deficits commensurate with

  12. Nutrition in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Nutritional support has become a routine part of the care of the critically ill patient. It is an adjunctive therapy, the main goal of which is to attenuate the development of malnutrition, yet the effectiveness of nutritional support is often thwarted by an underlying hostile metabolic milieu. This requires that these metabolic changes be taken into consideration when designing nutritional regimens for such patients. There is also a need to conduct large, multi-center studies to acquire more...

  13. A Preliminary Assessment of the Initial Compression Power Requirement in CO2 Pipeline “Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS Technologies”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdussalam El-Suleiman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available CO2 captured from fossil-fueled power generation plants is said to be economically transported via pipelines over long distances. The CO2 must be compressed to pipeline specifications using compressors and pumps that are driven by gas turbine (GT or other prime movers. This paper presents the evaluation of actual work transfer or required prime power by modeling the governing equations of compression using the Peng–Robinson equation of state (PR-EOS. A computer code was developed to carry out the modeling and subsequent simulation of the compression power requirement. The simulation of prime mover power was carried out for different technology (head per stage of the compressor ranging from 10-staged compression to double stage compression. The results show that the current technology of the centrifugal compressor could require as much as 23MW of prime mover power to compress 1.5 million tonnes per year of CO2—a projected equivalent CO2 released from a 530MW combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT power generation plant.

  14. Effects of an individualised nutritional education and support programme on dietary habits, nutritional knowledge, and nutritional status of older adults living alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeong-Ah; Park, JeeWon; Kim, Chun-Ja

    2017-09-07

    The effects of an individualised nutritional education and support programme on dietary habits, nutritional knowledge, and nutritional status of 71 older adults living alone were examined. Although a regular dietary meal plan is recommended for improving nutritional status of older adults living alone, little research is done in this field in Korea. A pre- and post-test controlled quasi-experimental design was used at public health centres. The intervention group participated in an intensive nutritional education and support programme once a week for 8 weeks with dietary menus provided by home visiting nurses/dieticians; control group received usual care. Dietary habits and nutritional knowledge were assessed using structured questionnaires; nutritional intake status was analysed using Computer Aided Nutritional Analysis Program 5.0. The mean age of participants was 77.6 years, and 81.7% of the participants were women. At 8 weeks, there were significant interactions of group by time for dietary habits, nutritional knowledge, and selected nutritional status of protein, iron, and vitamins of B2 and C. Changes over time in the mean score of dietary habits and nutritional knowledge were significantly improved in the intervention group compared to the control group. The percentages of normal nutrition intake of protein, iron, and vitamins A and C in the intervention group were significantly higher than the control group at 8 weeks. Nutritional education and support programme positively impacted dietary habits, nutritional knowledge, and selected nutritional status in older adults living alone, and we highlight the need for community-based nutritional education and counselling programmes. Older adults living alone in a community have relatively poor nutritional status and thus require tailored nutritional intervention according to objective nutritional analysis. It is necessary to link visiting nurses with dieticians in the community to manage effective nutritional

  15. Nutrition Advice and Recipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sign-Up Home Patient Information Nutrition Advice & Recipes Nutrition Advice & Recipes This is a very important section ... information on all aspects of daily life, including nutrition, medical treatments, pain management, and practical tips. For ...

  16. Nutrition for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Do I Stay Healthy Share this page: Nutrition for Lung Cancer Key Points There is no ... lung cancer symptoms, making them worse or better. Nutrition Goals Each person's nutritional needs during lung cancer ...

  17. Geriatric nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, R W; Hodgkins, E M

    1989-01-01

    In recent decades, veterinary medicine has become more successful in prolonging the healthy, useful lives of pets. As a result, the practitioner spends a greater part of each practice day caring for the geriatric animal, both healthy and unhealthy. Because of their longevity, older pets are typically regular family members, with owners who seek the finest health care possible for their pets. The practice of geriatric medicine most properly should begin not when the dog or cat reaches some specific "golden" age, but rather when the wiggly, robust puppy or kitten receives its first examination. Like all parts of a sound preventive program, geriatric nutrition best follows from a well-considered juvenile and adult nutrition program. Furthermore, once it becomes senior, the "well" geriatric is as much a candidate for a diet designed especially to accommodate old age changes as is his unhealthy contemporary. In fact, evidence suggests that appropriate dietary management of the healthy, but often subclinical, patient may help postpone the signs of dysfunction and increase quality and length of life. A knowledge of the most significant nutrients and the impact of each on aging systems is now, and will become increasingly more, important to the progressive, skillful veterinarian.

  18. [Nutritional support in stroke patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos Peláez, Rosa; Segurola Gurrutxaga, Hegoi; Bretón Lesmes, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a public health problem of the first order. In developed countries is one of the leading causes of death, along with cardiovascular disease and cancer. In addition, stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in adulthood. Many of the patients who survive do so with significant sequelae that limit them in their activities of daily living. Most strokes (80-85%) are due to ischemia, while the rest are hemorrhagic. We have identified many modifiable risk factors, some with an important relationship with dietary factors or comorbidities in wich the diet has a significant impact. The incidence of malnutrition in stroke patients is not well known, but most likely impacts on patient prognosis. Furthermore, the nutritional status of patients admitted for stroke often deteriorates during hospitalization. It is necessary to perform a nutritional assessment of the patient in the early hours of admission, to determine both the nutritional status and the presence of dysphagia. Dysphagia, through alteration of the safety and efficacy of swallowing, is a complication that has an implication for nutritional support, and must be treated to prevent aspiration pneumonia, which is the leading cause of mortality in the stroke patient. Nutritional support should begin in the early hours. In patients with no or mild dysphagia that can be controlled by modifying the texture of the diet, they will start oral diet and oral nutritional supplementation will be used if the patient does not meet their nutritional requirements. There is no evidence to support the use of nutritional supplements routinely. Patients with severe dysphagia, or decreased level of consciousness will require enteral nutrition. Current evidence indicates that early nutrition should be initiated through a nasogastric tube, with any advantages of early feeding gastrostomy. Gastrostomy will be planned when the enteral nutrition support will be expected for long-term (4 weeks). Much evidence points to the

  19. The Global Nutrition Report 2014: actions and accountability to accelerate the world's progress on nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Lawrence; Achadi, Endang; Bendech, Mohamed Ag; Ahuja, Arti; Bhatia, Komal; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Blössner, Monika; Borghi, Elaine; Colecraft, Esi; de Onis, Mercedes; Eriksen, Kamilla; Fanzo, Jessica; Flores-Ayala, Rafael; Fracassi, Patrizia; Kimani-Murage, Elizabeth; Nago Koukoubou, Eunice; Krasevec, Julia; Newby, Holly; Nugent, Rachel; Oenema, Stineke; Martin-Prével, Yves; Randel, Judith; Requejo, Jennifer; Shyam, Tara; Udomkesmalee, Emorn; Reddy, K Srinath

    2015-04-01

    In 2013, the Nutrition for Growth Summit called for a Global Nutrition Report (GNR) to strengthen accountability in nutrition so that progress in reducing malnutrition could be accelerated. This article summarizes the results of the first GNR. By focusing on undernutrition and overweight, the GNR puts malnutrition in a new light. Nearly every country in the world is affected by malnutrition, and multiple malnutrition burdens are the "new normal." Unfortunately, the world is off track to meet the 2025 World Health Assembly (WHA) targets for nutrition. Many countries are, however, making good progress on WHA indicators, providing inspiration and guidance for others. Beyond the WHA goals, nutrition needs to be more strongly represented in the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) framework. At present, it is only explicitly mentioned in 1 of 169 SDG targets despite the many contributions improved nutritional status will make to their attainment. To achieve improvements in nutrition status, it is vital to scale up nutrition programs. We identify bottlenecks in the scale-up of nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive approaches and highlight actions to accelerate coverage and reach. Holding stakeholders to account for delivery on nutrition actions requires a well-functioning accountability infrastructure, which is lacking in nutrition. New accountability mechanisms need piloting and evaluation, financial resource flows to nutrition need to be made explicit, nutrition spending targets should be established, and some key data gaps need to be filled. For example, many UN member states cannot report on their WHA progress and those that can often rely on data >5 y old. The world can accelerate malnutrition reduction substantially, but this will require stronger accountability mechanisms to hold all stakeholders to account. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. Lead - nutritional considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead poisoning - nutritional considerations; Toxic metal - nutritional considerations ... Markowitz M. Lead poisoning. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, ... Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. ...

  1. [Nutritional support in oncology. The outpatient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, M E

    1994-04-01

    The process of tissue regeneration and healing requires individualized nutrition, often with dietary manipulation of regular foodstuffs and supplements to prevent or correct previous or iatrogenic deficiencies. A practical approach to problem-solving in order to provide the best possible nutritional support at home is presented.

  2. Nutrition Considerations in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jillian; Samuels, Emily; Mullins, Lucille

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a serious degenerative muscular disease affecting males. Diagnosis usually occurs in childhood and is confirmed through genetic testing and/or muscle biopsy. Accompanying the disease are several nutrition-related concerns: growth, body composition, energy and protein requirements, constipation, swallowing difficulties, bone health, and complementary medicine. This review article addresses the nutrition aspects of DMD.

  3. Chem I Supplement: Nutrition (Diet) and Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineback, David R.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various aspects related to nutrition and athletics. Examines nutritional requirements, energy use, carbohydrate loading, and myths and fallacies regarding food and athletic performance. Indicates that scientific evidence does not validate the use of any special diet by an athlete. (JN)

  4. Metabonomics in neonatal nutrition research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Rezzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Maternal obesity and early post-natal nutrition might associate with increased obesity risk in later life. We have investigated the effect of breastfeeding and infant formulas differing in protein content on the urinary and fecal metabolism of term infants born from overweight and obese mothers using a metabonomic approach. Metabolic differences were observed between breast and formula fed infants both in urine and stool samples. Metabolic profiles of formula fed infants exhibited a distinct metabolic pattern that was associated with the processing of dietary proteins from the host and the gut microbiota. Metabonomics appears as a powerful tool to measure the physiological response to infant formula versus the gold standard breastfeeding. In future, nutritional phenotyping will combine metabonomics and nutritional profiling to study specific nutritional requirements and measure the efficacy of tailored nutritional interventions on growth and development endpoints. It will then open novel opportunities to develop targeted nutritional solutions for health maintenance and disease prevention. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  5. Nutrition in adolescents: physiology, metabolism, and nutritional needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jai K; Salam, Rehana A; Thornburg, Kent L; Prentice, Andrew M; Campisi, Susan; Lassi, Zohra S; Koletzko, Berthold; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2017-04-01

    Adolescence is the period of development that begins at puberty and ends in early adulthood. Most commonly, adolescence is divided into three developmental periods: early adolescence (10-14 years of age), late adolescence (15-19 years of age), and young adulthood (20-24 years of age). Adolescence is marked by physical and sexual maturation, social and economic independence, development of identity, acquisition of skills needed to carry out adult relationships and roles, and the capacity for abstract reasoning. Adolescence is characterized by a rapid pace of growth that is second only to that of infancy. Nutrition and the adolescent transition are closely intertwined, since eating patterns and behaviors are influenced by many factors, including peer influences, parental modeling, food availability, food preferences, cost, convenience, personal and cultural beliefs, mass media, and body image. Here, we describe the physiology, metabolism, and nutritional requirements for adolescents and pregnant adolescents, as well as nutrition-related behavior and current trends in adolescent nutrition. We conclude with thoughts on the implications for nutrition interventions and priority areas that would require further investigation. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Nutritional Metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde

    and alignment algorithms, such that each has pros and cons. Thus, the use of more than one software tool and/or the use of several parameter settings during data preprocessing are likely to decrease the risk of failing to detect features (potential marker candidates) in untargeted metabolomics. On the other...... handling, this thesis also deals with biological interpretation of postprandial metabolism and trans fatty acid (TFA) intake. Two nutritional issues were objects of investigation: 1) metabolic states as a function of time since the last meal and 2) markers related to intakes of cis- and trans-fat. Plasma...... to TFA intake (16 weeks) and its depletion (12 weeks) were examined in order to identify metabolic patterns affected by this potentially toxic fat using a parallel intervention study. In addition, the impact of cis- vs. trans-fat intake on a glucose challenge was investigated (PAPER II). The postprandial...

  7. Nutrition and parasite interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coop, R L; Holmes, P H

    1996-01-01

    This overview focuses on the interaction between nutritional status and gastrointestinal nematode infection in ruminants and considers: (i) the influence of the parasite on host metabolism; and (ii) the effect of host nutrition on the establishment and survival of parasite populations, the development of the host-immune response and the pathophysiology of infection. Gastrointestinal nematodes reduce voluntary feed intake and efficiency of feed utilisation, a key feature being an increased endogenous loss of protein into the gastrointestinal tract. Overall there is movement of protein from productive processes into repair of the gastrointestinal tract, synthesis of plasma proteins and mucoprotein production. Although reduction in feed intake is a major factor contributing to the reduced performance of parasitised ruminants, the underlying mechanisms of the anorexia are poorly understood. Supplementation of the diet with additional protein does not appear to affect initial establishment of nematode infections but the pathophysiological consequences are generally more severe on lower planes of protein nutrition. The main effect of protein supplementation is to increase the rate of acquisition of immunity and increase resistance to reinfection and this has been associated with an enhanced cellular immune response in the gastrointestinal mucosa. The unresponsiveness of the young lamb can be improved by dietary protein supplementation. Recent trials have shown that growing sheep offered a free choice between a low and a high protein ration are able to modify their diet selection in order to alleviate the increase in protein requirements which result from gastrointestinal nematode infection. Studies on the influence of nutrition on the expression of genotype have shown that the benefits of a superior genotype are not lost on a low protein diet whereas a high protein diet can partially emeliorate the disadvantages of an inferior genotype. In addition to dietary protein

  8. Nutritional Status Assessment (SMO -16E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Heer, M. A.; Zwart, S. R.

    2012-01-01

    The Nutritional Status Assessment Supplemental Medical Objective was an experiment initiated to expand nominal pre- and postflight clinical nutrition testing, and to gain a better understanding of the time course of changes during flight. The primary activity of this effort was collecting blood and urine samples 5 times during flight for analysis after return to Earth. Samples were subjected to a battery of tests, including nutritional, physiological, general chemistry, and endocrinology indices. These data provide a comprehensive survey of how nutritional status and related systems are affected by 4-6 months of space flight. Analyzing the data will help us to define nutritional requirements for long-duration missions, and better understand human adaptation to microgravity. This expanded set of measurements will also aid in the identification of nutritional countermeasures to counteract, for example, the deleterious effects of microgravity on bone and muscle and the effects of space radiation.

  9. Pharmacological nutrition in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, F G; Waitzberg, D L; Teixeira, M G; Mucerino, D R; Kiss, D R; Habr-Gama, A

    2003-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases--ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease--are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with a high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission of disease in adults and promoting growth in children. Recent research has focused on the use of specific nutrients as primary treatment agents. Although some reports have indicated that glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants and immunonutrition with omega-3 fatty acids are an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, the beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these nutrients still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.

  10. Kindergarten food familiarization. An exploratory study of teachers' perspectives on food and nutrition in kindergartens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Meghan

    2015-04-01

    This exploratory study employed a netnographic approach (netnography being a research methodology that adopts the practices of ethnography in an Internet-based setting) to reveal opportunities for kindergarten food familiarization. The study analyses kindergarten teachers' discussions on seven Internet message boards regarding the various food and nutrition experiences in their classes. Semi-structured interviews were then conducted with seven kindergarten teachers to explore further the message board findings. Five opportunities for how food familiarization occurs in kindergartens emerged from the analysis. These opportunities were categorized as being either "overt": (1) nutrition lessons, (2) snack times, (3) cooking experiences, or "covert" (4) food as teaching materials, and (5) dramatic play centres. Overt refers to any opportunity centred on food, healthy eating, or nutrition, whereas covert refers to opportunities where food was involved but in a non-exclusive manner. The five opportunities are examined and discussed in terms of their implications for children's food preference development. Results should be useful for future researchers for two main reasons. First, the results demonstrate the wide variety of food and nutrition experiences kindergarten students encounter throughout the day, beyond healthy eating interventions or foods served during meals. And second, because the findings are preliminary they require further research using various methods of data collection and samples of teachers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Preliminary design of high-power wave-guide/transmission system for multimegawatt CW requirements of 100 MeV proton LINAC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Purushottam Shrivastava; Y D Wanmode; P R Hannurkar

    2002-11-01

    Development of a 100 MeV CW proton LINAC has been planned at CAT. This LINAC will be needing CW rf power in the frequency ranges of 350 MHz and 700 MHz for its RFQ and DTL/CCDTL/SFDTL structures respectively. The power to the accelerating structures will be produced by either 1 MW CW or 250 kW CW klystrons/inductive output tubes (HOM IOTs). The power needed by respective feed points in the structure is max. 250 kW which will be powered by splitting the power from 1 MW klystron/klystrode into four channels by using a wave-guide system. In case of using 250 kW tubes the power to the structures will be provided directly from each tube. Two types of wave-guide transmission system have been considered, viz, WR 2300 for 350 MHz rf needs and WR 1500 for 700 MHz rf needs. The typical wave-guide system has been designed using the 1 MW CW klystron followed by wave-guide filter, dual directional coupler, high-power circulator, three 3 dB magic TEE power dividers to split the main channel into four equal channels of 250 kW each. Each individual channel has dual directional couplers, flexible wave-guide sections and high power ceramic vacuum window. The circulator and each power divider is terminated into the isolated ports by high power CW loads. Out of the four channels three channels have phase shifters. Present paper describes the technological aspects and design specifications-considerations for these stringent requirements.

  12. Standardised Parenteral Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Deshpande

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition (PN has become an integral part of clinical management of very low birth weight premature neonates. Traditionally different components of PN are prescribed individually considering requirements of an individual neonate (IPN. More recently, standardised PN formulations (SPN for preterm neonates have been assessed and may have advantages including better provision of nutrients, less prescription and administration errors, decreased risk of infection, and cost savings. The recent introduction of triple-chamber bag that provides total nutrient admixture for neonates may have additional advantage of decreased risk of contamination and ease of administration.

  13. Nutrition in the pediatric population in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Nutrition is an essential component of patient management in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Poor nutrition status accompanies many childhood chronic illnesses. A thorough assessment of the critically ill child is required to inform the plan for nutrition support. Accurate and clinically relevant nutritional assessment, including growth measurements, provides important guidance. Indirect calorimetry provides the most accurate measurement of resting energy expenditure, but is too often unavailable in the PICU. To prevent inappropriate caloric intake, reassessment of the child's nutrition status is imperative. Enteral nutrition is the recommended route of intake. Human milk is preferred for infants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Time required for adaptation of protein metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animals that can appropriately adjust to varying environmental and nutritional conditions possess a survival advantage. Maintaining homeostasis and homeorhesis in response to changing nutritional conditions requires flexibility in nutrient partitioning and efficiencies. This is especially the case f...

  15. Uncovering the nutritional landscape of food.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seunghyeon Kim

    Full Text Available Recent progresses in data-driven analysis methods, including network-based approaches, are revolutionizing many classical disciplines. These techniques can also be applied to food and nutrition, which must be studied to design healthy diets. Using nutritional information from over 1,000 raw foods, we systematically evaluated the nutrient composition of each food in regards to satisfying daily nutritional requirements. The nutrient balance of a food was quantified and termed nutritional fitness; this measure was based on the food's frequency of occurrence in nutritionally adequate food combinations. Nutritional fitness offers a way to prioritize recommendable foods within a global network of foods, in which foods are connected based on the similarities of their nutrient compositions. We identified a number of key nutrients, such as choline and α-linolenic acid, whose levels in foods can critically affect the nutritional fitness of the foods. Analogously, pairs of nutrients can have the same effect. In fact, two nutrients can synergistically affect the nutritional fitness, although the individual nutrients alone may not have an impact. This result, involving the tendency among nutrients to exhibit correlations in their abundances across foods, implies a hidden layer of complexity when exploring for foods whose balance of nutrients within pairs holistically helps meet nutritional requirements. Interestingly, foods with high nutritional fitness successfully maintain this nutrient balance. This effect expands our scope to a diverse repertoire of nutrient-nutrient correlations, which are integrated under a common network framework that yields unexpected yet coherent associations between nutrients. Our nutrient-profiling approach combined with a network-based analysis provides a more unbiased, global view of the relationships between foods and nutrients, and can be extended towards nutritional policies, food marketing, and personalized nutrition.

  16. Inflammatory bowel diseases: principles of nutritional therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Waitzberg, Dan L; Teixeira, Magaly Gemio; Mucerino, Donato Roberto; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Kiss, Desidério R

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease- are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and to prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission in adults and promoting growth in children. Due to its low complication rate and lower costs, enteral nutrition should be preferred over total parenteral nutrition whenever possible. Both present equal effectiveness in primary therapy for remission of active Crohn's disease. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted, especially in patients presumed to need total parenteral nutrition. Recent research has focused on the use of nutrients as primary treatment agents. Immunonutrition is an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, modulating the inflammation and changing the eicosanoid synthesis profile. However, beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these and other nutrients (glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants) still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.

  17. Nutritional metabolomics: progress in addressing complexity in diet and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dean P; Park, Youngja; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2012-08-21

    Nutritional metabolomics is rapidly maturing to use small-molecule chemical profiling to support integration of diet and nutrition in complex biosystems research. These developments are critical to facilitate transition of nutritional sciences from population-based to individual-based criteria for nutritional research, assessment, and management. This review addresses progress in making these approaches manageable for nutrition research. Important concept developments concerning the exposome, predictive health, and complex pathobiology serve to emphasize the central role of diet and nutrition in integrated biosystems models of health and disease. Improved analytic tools and databases for targeted and nontargeted metabolic profiling, along with bioinformatics, pathway mapping, and computational modeling, are now used for nutrition research on diet, metabolism, microbiome, and health associations. These new developments enable metabolome-wide association studies (MWAS) and provide a foundation for nutritional metabolomics, along with genomics, epigenomics, and health phenotyping, to support the integrated models required for personalized diet and nutrition forecasting.

  18. Nutritional management of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, K L; Samson-Fang, L

    2013-12-01

    Children with severe cerebral palsy and particularly those with oropharyngeal dysfunction are at risk of poor nutritional status. Determining the need and the mode of nutritional intervention is multifactorial and requires multiple methodologies. First-line treatment typically involves oral nutritional support for those children who are safe to consume an oral diet. Enteral tube feeding may need to be considered in children with undernutrition where poor weight gain continues despite oral nutritional support, or in those with oropharyngeal dysphagia and an unsafe swallow. Estimates for energy and protein requirements provide a starting point only, and ongoing assessment and monitoring is essential to ensure nutritional needs are being met, that complications are adequately managed and to avoid over or under feeding.

  19. [Importance of artificial nutrition in the resolution and etiologic diagnosis of severe chronic diarrhea: a propos of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, F J; Gómez, F J; Aragón, C; Rueda, A; Balsa, J A; Zamarrón, I; Carrero, C; Botella Carretero, J I; Montalbán, C; Vázquez, C

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of severe chronic diarrhea requiring parenteral nutritional support to both cover the nutritional needs and allow for intestinal rest for later adaptation to enteral nutrition, altogether allowing for the etiologic diagnosis and disease healing.

  20. Innovations in nutrition education and global health: the Bangalore Boston nutrition collaborative

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: India has a wide range of nutrition and health problems which require professionals with appropriate skills, knowledge and trans-disciplinary collaborative abilities to influence policy making at the national and global level. Methods: The Bangalore Boston Nutrition Collaborative (BBNC) was established as collaboration between St. John’s Research Institute (SJRI), Harvard School of Public Health and Tufts University, with a focus on nutrition research and training. The goals of th...

  1. History of parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudrick, Stanley J

    2009-06-01

    The concept of feeding patients entirely parenterally by injecting nutrient substances or fluids intravenously was advocated and attempted long before the successful practical development of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) four decades ago. Realization of this 400 year old seemingly fanciful dream initially required centuries of fundamental investigation coupled with basic technological advances and judicious clinical applications. Most clinicians in the 1950's were aware of the negative impact of starvation on morbidity, mortality, and outcomes, but only few understood the necessity for providing adequate nutritional support to malnourished patients if optimal clinical results were to be achieved. The prevailing dogma in the 1960's was that, "Feeding entirely by vein is impossible; even if it were possible, it would be impractical; and even if it were practical, it would be unaffordable." Major challenges to the development of TPN included: (1) formulate complete parenteral nutrient solutions (did not exist), (2) concentrate substrate components to 5-6 times isotonicity without precipitation (not easily done), (3) demonstrate utility and safety of long-term central venous catheterization (not looked upon with favor by the medical hierarchy), (4) demonstrate efficacy and safety of long-term infusion of hypertonic nutrient solutions (contrary to clinical practices at the time), (5) maintain asepsis and antisepsis throughout solution preparation and delivery (required a major culture change), and (6) anticipate, avoid, and correct metabolic imbalances or derangements (a monumental challenge and undertaking). This presentation recounts approaches to, and solution of, some of the daunting problems as really occurred in a comprehensive, concise and candid history of parenteral nutrition.

  2. Nutrition and bone growth and development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prentice, Ann; Schoenmakers, Inez; Laskey, M Ann; de Bono, Stephanie; Ginty, Fiona; Goldberg, Gail R

    2006-01-01

    ... (e.g. Cu, Zn, vitamin C). In recent years there has been interest in the role nutrition may play in bone growth at intakes above those required to prevent classical deficiencies, particularly in relation to optimising peak...

  3. Nutrition and its importance to intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verity, S

    1996-04-01

    The purpose in this paper is to consider the importance of early nutrition for critically ill patients, briefly reviewing the effects of malnutrition, and the metabolic response to starvation and sepsis. Discussion includes assessment of nutritional status and nutritional requirements, with a suggested enteral feeding regime; and also the combined effect of enteral nutrition and glutamine on gut integrity and its relevance to nosocomial pneumonia, and the ability of the gut to accept food during critical illness.

  4. Avaliação do impacto do Programa Nacional do Leite em Alagoas, através de métodos isotópicos: aspectos metodológicos e resultados preliminares Isotope methods for evaluating the impact of the National Nutritional Program in Alagoas: methodological aspects and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Petrucci Gigante

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Descrever aspectos metodológicos e resultados preliminares de um estudo de intervenção planejado para medir o impacto de um programa de suplementação alimentar sobre a promoção do crescimento infantil de crianças desnutridas. MÉTODOS: Estudo longitudinal, controlado, desenvolvido no estado de Alagoas, com grupos comparados antes e depois da intervenção. Vinte municípios foram selecionados através de um indicador de cobertura do programa de suplementação alimentar. Essa cobertura foi estimada pela diferença entre a proporção de crianças desnutridas e a proporção de crianças atendidas pelo programa. Os dez municípios com indicador de alta cobertura foram selecionados para o grupo intervenção e aqueles de menor cobertura para o grupo controle. Em cada município do grupo intervenção foram selecionadas 15 crianças ingressando no Programa. Em cada município do grupo controle foram incluídas 15 crianças elegíveis, mas que não conseguiram vaga no Programa. RESULTADOS: Foram aplicados 111 e 102 questionários em crianças dos municípios do grupo intervenção e controle, respectivamente. A comparação em relação às características de base mostra que a distribuição das variáveis demográficas e nutricionais foi semelhante entre as crianças dos grupos intervenção e controle. Por outro lado, as crianças do grupo intervenção são provenientes de famílias com menor renda familiar e seus pais apresentaram menor escolaridade quando comparadas às do grupo controle. CONCLUSÕES: Os resultados preliminares mostram que os grupos são comparáveis em relação às variáveis demográficas e nutricionais e que as diferenças observadas quanto ao nível socioeconômico deverão ser consideradas na análise ajustada, na segunda fase do estudo.OBJECTIVE: To describe methodological aspects and preliminary results of an intervention designed to measure the impact on child growth of nutritional programs

  5. Nutritional approaches in cancer: relevance of individualized counseling and supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravasco, Paula

    2015-04-01

    Intensive individualized nutritional counseling requires nutrition professionals with specific experience in oncology. If the patient is unable to achieve his or her nutritional requirements via regular foods, nutritional supplements may be prescribed, the composition of which is based on detection of dietary deficits as well as a detailed intake questionnaire. Any nutritional intervention must be based on the need for an adequate intake and also must take into consideration other relevant factors such as digestive and absorptive capacity, the need for alleviation or arrest of symptoms, and any psychological issues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Diet, nutrition, and cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, S.

    1985-01-01

    Evidence pertaining to the role of dietary factors in carcinogenesis comes from both epidemiological studies and laboratory experiments. In 1982, the Committee on Diet, Nutrition, and Cancer of the National Research Council conducted a comprehensive evaluation of this evidence. That assessment as well as recent epidemiological and laboratory investigations suggest that a high fat diet is associated with increased susceptibility to cancer of different sites, particularly the breast and colon, and to a lesser extent, the prostate. Current data permit no definitive conclusions about other dietary macroconstituents including cholesterol, total caloric intake, protein, carbohydrates and total dietary fiber. Specific components of fiber, however, may have a protective effect against colon cancer. In epidemiological studies, frequent consumption of certain fruits and vegetables, especially citrus fruits and carotene-rich and cruciferous vegetables, is associated with a lower incidence of cancers at various sites. The specific components responsible for these effects are not clearly identified, although the epidemiological evidence appears to be most consistent for a protective effect of carotene on lung cancer and less so for vitamins A and C and various cancer sites. The laboratory evidence is most consistent for vitamin A deficiency and enhanced tumorigenesis, and for the ability of various nonnutritive components in cruciferous vegetables to block in-vivo carcinogenesis. The data for minerals and carcinogenesis are extremely limited, although preliminary evidence from both epidemiological and laboratory studies suggests that selenium may protect against overall cancer risk. 402 references.

  7. Prospects for better nutrition in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Rajan; van den Briel, Tina

    2014-01-01

    Being home to 31% of the world's children who are stunted and 42% of those who are underweight, and with many children and adults affected by micronutrient deficiencies, India is facing huge challenges in the field of nutrition. Even though the Indian Government is investing vast amounts of money into programs that aim to enhance food security, health and nutrition (the Integrated Child Development Services program alone costs 3 billion USD per year), overall impact has been rather disappointing. However, there are some bright spots on the horizon. The recent District Level Health Surveys (DLHS-4) do show significant progress, ie a reduction in stunting of around 15% over the past 6 years in a few states for which preliminary results are available. The reasons for this reduction are not unambiguous and appear to include state government commitment, focus on the 'window of opportunity', improved status and education of women, a lowered fertility rate, and combinations of nutrition- specific and nutrition-sensitive interventions. Apart from the government many other agencies play a role in driving improvements in nutrition. Since 2006 the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) has worked with a range of partners to improve access to nutritious foods for large parts of the population, through public and private delivery channels. This supplement presents a selection of these activities, ranging from a capacityassessment of frontline workers in the ICDS system, large scale staple food fortification, salt iodization, fortification of mid-day meals for school children and decentralized complementary food production.

  8. Nutrition for young soccer players

    OpenAIRE

    Umaña Alvarado, Mónica

    2005-01-01

    El artículo también se encuentra escrito en español. The growing participation of young people in soccer is a motivation so that the trainers, physical educators and parents know which are the special requirements to practice this sport in a safe manner, specially the nutritional requirements. The present revision includes generalities on the physiological demands of soccer, the differences between young people and adults when making prolonged exercise, the necessities ...

  9. Nutrition for winter sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Nanna L; Manore, Melinda M; Helle, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Winter sports are played in cold conditions on ice or snow and often at moderate to high altitude. The most important nutritional challenges for winter sport athletes exposed to environmental extremes include increased energy expenditure, accelerated muscle and liver glycogen utilization, exacerbated fluid loss, and increased iron turnover. Winter sports, however, vary greatly regarding their nutritional requirements due to variable physiological and physique characteristics, energy and substrate demands, and environmental training and competition conditions. What most winter sport athletes have in common is a relatively lean physique and high-intensity training periods, thus they require greater energy and nutrient intakes, along with adequate food and fluid before, during, and after training. Event fuelling is most challenging for cross-country skiers competing in long events, ski jumpers aiming to reduce their body weight, and those winter sport athletes incurring repeated qualification rounds and heats. These athletes need to ensure carbohydrate availability throughout competition. Finally, winter sport athletes may benefit from dietary and sport supplements; however, attention should be paid to safety and efficacy if supplementation is considered.

  10. Nutritional Requirements for Children with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Michael; Drucker, Richard

    2008-01-01

    In the last few decades, there has been an alarming and disturbing increase in infant and childhood behavioral and physiologic disorders. These include, but are not limited to, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dyslexia, dyspraxia, autism, cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and Down syndrome to name just a few. The society has…

  11. Optimization of nutritional requirements and ammonium feeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tounukarin

    2011-09-07

    Sep 7, 2011 ... enhanced the industrial production, resulting in a stable high vitamin B12 production .... with distilled water; the cell precipitate was dried to a constant ... then the upper aqueous phase was measured using a HPLC ..... Xmax, Maximum cell concentration (g/l); growth rate: maximum cell density divided by the ...

  12. Nutritional Requirements for Children with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Michael; Drucker, Richard

    2008-01-01

    In the last few decades, there has been an alarming and disturbing increase in infant and childhood behavioral and physiologic disorders. These include, but are not limited to, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dyslexia, dyspraxia, autism, cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and Down syndrome to name just a few. The society has…

  13. Nutritional requirements for soybean cyst nematode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybeans [Glycine max] are the second largest cash crop in US Agriculture, but the soybean yield is compromised by infections from Heterodera glycines, also known as Soybean Cyst Nematodes [SCN]. SCN are the most devastating pathogen or plant disease soybean producers confront. This obligate parasi...

  14. [Enteral nutrition in burn patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J L; Garrido, M; Gómez-Cía, T; Serrera, J L; Franco, A; Pumar, A; Relimpio, F; Astorga, R; García-Luna, P P

    1992-01-01

    Nutritional support plays an important role in the treatment of patients with burns. Due to the severe hypercatabolism that develops in these patients, oral support is insufficient in most cases, and this makes it essential to initiate artificial nutritional support (either enteral or parenteral). Enteral nutrition is more physiological than parenteral, and data exist which show that in patients with burns, enteral nutrition exercises a protective effect on the intestine and may even reduce the hypermetabolic response in these patients. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of enteral nutritional support with a hypercaloric, hyperproteic diet with a high content of branched amino acids in the nutritional support of patients suffering from burns. The study included 12 patients (8 males and 4 females), admitted to the Burns Unit. Average age was 35 +/- 17 years (range: 21-85 years). The percentage of body surface affected by the burns was 10% in two cases, between 10-30% in three cases, between 30-50% in five cases and over 50% in two cases. Initiation of the enteral nutrition was between twenty-four hours and seven days after the burn. The patients were kept in the unit until they were discharged, and the average time spent in the unit was 31.5 days (range: 17-63 days). Total energetic requirements were calculated based on Harris-Benedict, with a variable aggression factor depending on the body surface burned, which varied from 2,000 and 4,000 cal day. Nitrogenous balance was determined on a daily basis, and plasmatic levels of total proteins, albumin and prealbumin on a weekly basis. There was a significant difference between the prealbumin values at the initiation and finalization of the enteral nutrition (9.6 +/- 2.24 mg/dl compared with 19.75 +/- 5.48 mg/dl; p diet was very good, and only mild complications such as diarrhoea developed in two patients. Enteral nutrition is a suitable nutritional support method for patients with

  15. PBL教学法在食品类专业《食品营养与卫生学》课程中的应用%Preliminary Application of PBL in Food Nutrition and Hygiene of Food Major

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建芳; 周枫

    2014-01-01

    In the course teaching of Food Nutrition and Hygiene in application-oriented university, introducing PBL, it could change traditional teaching mode with teacher as the center, give full play to students'subjective initiative, improve the students'interest in learning, broaden their knowledge, train their ability of thinking and solving problems independently, embody the humanist teaching i-dea and obtain better effect.%在应用型本科食品类专业的《食品营养与卫生学》课程教学中,引入PBL教学法,改变了传统以教师为中心的教学模式,充分发挥学生的主观能动性,提高了学生的学习兴趣,拓宽了学生的知识面,培养了学生独立思考与解决问题的能力,体现了以人为本的教学理念,取得了较好的教学效果。

  16. Child Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or steam foods instead of frying them Limit fast food and junk food Offer water or milk instead of sugary fruit drinks and sodas Learn about your children's nutrient requirements. Some of them, such as the ...

  17. Nutritional therapies in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evatt, Marian L

    2007-05-01

    Advise patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) to consume a balanced diet, with special attention to adequate intake of dietary fiber, fluids, and macro- and micronutrients. Regularly reassess patients' nutritional history and anthropomorphic measures (height and weight), particularly in patients with advanced disease. PD-related psychosocial as well as physical and cognitive limitations increase susceptibility to subacute and chronic malnutrition. Nutritional requirements may change with PD progression or after surgical therapy for PD. Patients and caregivers may benefit from counseling by a dietician who is knowledgeable about the nutritional risks and needs of PD. Regularly inquire about dysphagia symptoms, and consider speech therapy consultation for clinical and modified barium-swallowing evaluations and management recommendations. Although non-oral delivery options of dopaminergic therapy are increasing, severe dysphagia may warrant percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement for nutritional support and more reliable PD medication dosing. Analyze vitamin B(12) and D concentrations at regular intervals. Both vitamins are frequently deficient in elderly persons but may not be routinely checked by primary care physicians. Record over-the-counter and nutritional supplement medications at each visit, and assist patients in periodically re-evaluating their potential benefits, side effects, drug interactions, and costs. To date, clinical trials of antioxidant vitamins and nutritional supplements have provided insufficient evidence to support routine use for PD in the clinic. Data from several clinical trials of antioxidant vitamins/nutritional supplements are expected in the near future. Consider altering medication dosing in relation to meals to help with mild to moderate motor fluctuations. Patients with severe motor fluctuations may benefit from adapting the 5:1 carbohydrate-to-protein ratio in their daily meals and snacks. Following a "protein

  18. Nutrition support to patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Nicola

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nutritional depletion has been demonstrated to be a major determinant of the development of post-operative complications. Gastrointestinal surgery patients are at risk of nutritional depletion from inadequate nutritional intake, surgical stress and the subsequent increase in metabolic rate. Fears of postoperative ileus and the integrity of the newly constructed anastomosis have led to treatment typically entailing starvation with administration of intravenous fluids until the passage of flatus. However, it has since been shown that prompt postoperative enteral feeding is both effective and well tolerated. Enteral feeding is also associated with specific clinical benefits such as reduced incidence of postoperative infectious complications and an improved wound healing response. Further research is required to determine whether enteral nutrition is also associated with modulation of gut function. Studies have indicated that significant reductions in morbidity and mortality associated with perioperative Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN are limited to severely malnourished patients with gastrointestinal malignancy. Meta-analyses have shown that enteral nutrition is associated with fewer septic complications compared with parenteral feeding, reduced costs and a shorter hospital stay, so should be the preferred option whenever possible. Evidence to support pre-operative nutrition support is limited, but suggests that if malnourished individuals are adequately fed for at least 7–10 days preoperatively then surgical outcome can be improved. Ongoing research continues to explore the potential benefits of the action of glutamine on the gut and immune system for gastrointestinal surgery patients. To date it has been demonstrated that glutamine-enriched parenteral nutrition results in reduced length of stay and reduced costs in elective abdominal surgery patients. Further research is required to determine whether the routine supplementation of

  19. Percutaneous renal puncture: requirements and preliminary results

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, A; Payan, Y; Richard, F; Chartier-Kastler, E; Troccaz, J; Leroy, Antoine; Mozer, Pierre; Payan, Yohan; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2002-01-01

    This paper introduces the principles of computer assisted percutaneous renal puncture, that would provide the surgeon with an accurate pre-operative 3D planning on CT images and, after a rigid registration with space-localized echographic data, would help him to perform the puncture through an intuitive 2D/3D interface. The whole development stage relied on both CT and US images of a healthy subject. We carried out millimetric registrations on real data, then guidance experiments on a kidney phantom showed encouraging results.

  20. Nutrition labelling, marketing techniques, nutrition claims and health claims on chip and biscuit packages from sixteen countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Alexandra J; Lock, Karen; Kelishadi, Roya; Swaminathan, Sumathi; Marcilio, Claudia S; Iqbal, Romaina; Dehghan, Mahshid; Yusuf, Salim; Chow, Clara K

    2016-04-01

    Food packages were objectively assessed to explore differences in nutrition labelling, selected promotional marketing techniques and health and nutrition claims between countries, in comparison to national regulations. Cross-sectional. Chip and sweet biscuit packages were collected from sixteen countries at different levels of economic development in the EPOCH (Environmental Profile of a Community's Health) study between 2008 and 2010. Seven hundred and thirty-seven food packages were systematically evaluated for nutrition labelling, selected promotional marketing techniques relevant to nutrition and health, and health and nutrition claims. We compared pack labelling in countries with labelling regulations, with voluntary regulations and no regulations. Overall 86 % of the packages had nutrition labels, 30 % had health or nutrition claims and 87 % displayed selected marketing techniques. On average, each package displayed two marketing techniques and one health or nutrition claim. In countries with mandatory nutrition labelling a greater proportion of packages displayed nutrition labels, had more of the seven required nutrients present, more total nutrients listed and higher readability compared with those with voluntary or no regulations. Countries with no health or nutrition claim regulations had fewer claims per package compared with countries with regulations. Nutrition label regulations were associated with increased prevalence and quality of nutrition labels. Health and nutrition claim regulations were unexpectedly associated with increased use of claims, suggesting that current regulations may not have the desired effect of protecting consumers. Of concern, lack of regulation was associated with increased promotional marketing techniques directed at children and misleadingly promoting broad concepts of health.

  1. Effectiveness of enteral and parenteral nutrition in the nutritional management of children with Wilms' tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, K A; Kirksey, A; Baehner, R L; Grosfeld, J L; Provisor, A; Weetman, R M; Boxer, L A; Ballantine, T V

    1980-12-01

    The effectiveness of enteral and parenteral feeding in supporting a satisfactory nutrition status and/or reversing protein-energy malnutrition was evaluated in nine children, ages 1 to 7 years (eight female), with Wilms' tumors. At the onset of treatment, eight patients received comprehensive enteral nutrition (CEN) which included intense nutritional counseling and oral supplements while one received total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Despite CEN, the initial, intense treatment period was associated with a decreased energy intake (64 +/- 27% Recommended Dietary Allowances), dramatic weight loss (22 +/- 7% by 26 +/- 17 days from the beginning of treatment), decreased skinfold thickness (total lymphocyte count were 3.02 +/- 0.45 g/dl, 155 +/- 40 mg/dl, and, 655 +/- 437/mm3, respectively; all children had abnormal anthropometric measurements and anergy to recall skin test antigens. TPN for 28 or more days supported weight gain (+ 2.44 kg), increased serum albumin (+ 0.58 +/- 0.47 g/dl) and transferrin (+ 76 +/- 34 mg/dl), and reversed anergy despite low total lymphocyte counts. During maintenance treatment, nutritional status was maintained or restored with CEN in the group who responded. These preliminary data document the severity of protein-energy malnutrition which accompanies initial, intense treatment of children with Wilms' tumors, the nutritional and immunological benefits of TPN during continuing intense treatment and the effectiveness of CEN in maintaining a satisfactory nutritional status during maintenance treatment.

  2. Pharmacognostic and Preliminary Phytochemical Analysis of Sauropus androgynus (L) Merr. Leaf

    OpenAIRE

    Ankad Gireesh; Hegde Harsha; Kholkute S.D; Hurkadale Pramod

    2013-01-01

    The leaves of Sauropus androgynus (L.) Merr. are used in traditional medicine to treat various disorders and also used as vegetable for its nutritive value. Such plant having medicinal and nutritive values lacks pharmacognostical and preliminary phytochemical information. Hence the present work is intended to study pharmacognostical and preliminary phytochemical studies, which will serve as quality control parameters. The pharmacognostical parameters like transverse section of midrib, epiderm...

  3. Celss nutrition system utilizing snails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Y.; Fujii, T.; Ohira, A.; Nitta, K.

    At the 40th IAF Congress in Malaga, a nutrition system for a lunar base CELSS was presented. A lunar base with a total of eight crew members was envisaged. In this paper, four species of plants—rice, soybean, lettuce and strawberry—were introduced to the system. These plants were sufficient to satisfy fundamental nutritional needs of the crew members. The supply of nutrition from plants and the human nutritional requirements could almost be balanced. Our study revealed that the necessary plant cultivation area per crew member would be nearly 40 m 3 in the lunar base. The sources of nutrition considered in the study were energy, sugar, fat, amino acids, inorganic salt and vitamins; however, calcium, vitamin B 2, vitamin A and sodium were found to be lacking. Therefore, a subsystem to supply these elements is of considerable value. In this paper, we report on a study for breeding snails and utilizing meat as food. Nutrients supplied from snails are shown to compensate for the abovementioned lacking elements. We evaluate the snail breeder and the associated food supply system as a subsystem of closed ecological life support system.

  4. Innovations in national nutrition surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Alison M; Mak, Tsz Ning; Fitt, Emily; Nicholson, Sonja; Roberts, Caireen; Sommerville, Jill

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe innovations taking place in national nutrition surveys in the UK and the challenges of undertaking innovations in such settings. National nutrition surveys must be representative of the overall population in characteristics such as socio-economic circumstances, age, sex and region. High response rates are critical. Dietary assessment innovations must therefore be suitable for all types of individuals, from the very young to the very old, for variable literacy and/or technical skills, different ethnic backgrounds and life circumstances, such as multiple carers and frequent travel. At the same time, national surveys need details on foods consumed. Current advances in dietary assessment use either technological innovations or simplified methods; neither lend themselves to national surveys. The National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) rolling programme, and the Diet and Nutrition Survey of Infants and Young Children (DNSIYC), currently use the 4-d estimated diary, a compromise for detail and respondent burden. Collection of food packaging enables identification of specific products. Providing space for location of eating, others eating, the television being on and eating at a table, adds to eating context information. Disaggregation of mixed dishes enables determination of true intakes of meat and fruit and vegetables. Measurement of nutritional status requires blood sampling and processing in DNSIYC clinics throughout the country and mobile units were used to optimise response. Hence, innovations in national surveys can and are being made but must take into account the paramount concerns of detail and response rate.

  5. Aging, Nutritional Status and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Wilma; Hankey, Catherine

    2015-07-30

    The older population is increasing worldwide and in many countries older people will outnumber younger people in the near future. This projected growth in the older population has the potential to place significant burdens on healthcare and support services. Meeting the diet and nutrition needs of older people is therefore crucial for the maintenance of health, functional independence and quality of life. While many older adults remain healthy and eat well those in poorer health may experience difficulties in meeting their nutritional needs. Malnutrition, encompassing both under and over nutrition increases health risks in the older population. More recently the increase in obesity, and in turn the incidence of chronic disease in older adults, now justifies weight management interventions in obese older adults. This growing population group is becoming increasingly diverse in their nutritional requirements. Micro-nutrient status may fluctuate and shortfalls in vitamin D, iron and a number of other nutrients are relatively common and can impact on well-being and quality of life. Aging presents a number of challenges for the maintenance of good nutritional health in older adults.

  6. Perioperative nutrition in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, J M; Redmond, H P; Gallagher, H

    1992-01-01

    Cancer patients have the highest incidence of protein-calorie malnutrition seen in hospitalized patients, with significant malnutrition occurring in more than 30% of cancer patients undergoing major upper gastrointestinal procedures. Clinically significant malnutrition occurs as a result of diminished nutrient intake, increased nutrient losses, and tumor-induced derangements in host metabolism. In the absence of adequate exogenous nutrients, the body utilizes endogenous substrates to satisfy the ongoing requirements of both host and tumor for energy and protein. In those patients with malignant obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract, the tumor itself may induce diminished nutrient intake. Present day treatment modalities including gastrointestinal resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy compound these metabolic derangements, further increasing the risk of postoperative morbidity and death. The presence of malnutrition in cancer patients has prognostic importance. In a review of more than 3000 cancer patients, DeWys and colleagues identified significantly improved survival in those patients without weight loss compared with those had lost 6% of their body weight (Am J Med 69:491-497, 1980). Other investigators have noted increased postoperative morbidity and mortality associated with malnutrition. Early hypotheses suggested that reversal of weight loss would improve survival. The development and refinements of enteral and parenteral nutrition have provided the opportunity for studying the relationship between nutritional supplementation and postoperative prognosis. Nutrition support is therefore often instituted to improve nutritional status and thereby reduce the risks of postoperative complications. This article addresses the beneficial role of preoperative nutrition therapy in cancer patients.

  7. Aging, Nutritional Status and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma Leslie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The older population is increasing worldwide and in many countries older people will outnumber younger people in the near future. This projected growth in the older population has the potential to place significant burdens on healthcare and support services. Meeting the diet and nutrition needs of older people is therefore crucial for the maintenance of health, functional independence and quality of life. While many older adults remain healthy and eat well those in poorer health may experience difficulties in meeting their nutritional needs. Malnutrition, encompassing both under and over nutrition increases health risks in the older population. More recently the increase in obesity, and in turn the incidence of chronic disease in older adults, now justifies weight management interventions in obese older adults. This growing population group is becoming increasingly diverse in their nutritional requirements. Micro-nutrient status may fluctuate and shortfalls in vitamin D, iron and a number of other nutrients are relatively common and can impact on well-being and quality of life. Aging presents a number of challenges for the maintenance of good nutritional health in older adults.

  8. Nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Gómez, María Josefa; Melián Fernández, Cristóbal; Romeo Donlo, María

    2016-07-12

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic pathology that has an outbreaks course that in recent years have seen an increase in incidence, especially at younger ages. Malnutrition is frequently associated with this condition, therefore, it is very important to ensure a right nutritional intervention, especially in pediatric patients, to ensure an optimal growth and also an improvement in the clinic. Our goal will be updated the role of nutrition in this disease and in its treatment based on the published evidence. Malnutrition in these patients is frequent and is influenced by various factors such as, decreased food intake, increased nutrient requirements, increased protein loss and malabsorption of nutrients. Therefore there should be a nutritional monitoring of all of them, in which anthropometric measurements, laboratory tests and densitometry were made to establish the needs and sufficient caloric intake tailored to each patient. The use of enteral nutrition as a treatment in Crohn’s disease with mild to moderate outbreak in child population, is amply demonstrated, has even shown to be superior to the use of corticosteroids. Therefore we can conclude by stressing that nutritional intervention is a mainstay in the management of patients with IBD, which aims to prevent and / or control disease-related malnutrition to decrease morbidity and mortality and improve quality of life.

  9. Molecular identification of green tide algae in the South Yellow Sea and preliminary study on its nutritive value%南黄海绿潮藻的分子鉴定及营养价值初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡子豪; 杜晶; 孙彬; 何培民; 马家海

    2016-01-01

    对2014年度南黄海绿潮藻进行分子鉴定和营养价值初步研究。 ITS序列分析结果显示,南黄海绿潮藻主要包括Ulva linza-procera-prolifera( LPP)以及Ulva compressa 2个类群。营养价值分析结果显示,南黄海绿潮藻中必需氨基酸与氨基酸总量的比值(EAA/TAA)为30.31%~33.83%,呈味氨基酸含量较高(42.84%~46.89%),脂肪酸组成丰富,其不饱和脂肪酸中α-亚麻酸含量占总脂肪酸的(32.36±6.58)%,蛋白质含量与浙江固着浒苔相近(独立样本t 检验, P >0.05),是一种高蛋白(26.46%~29.01%)、低脂肪(0.76%~0.91%)、富含纤维(4.87%~6.58%)且安全的海藻食品。%Based on molecular identification ,the nutritive value of green tide algae from the South Yellow Sea in 2014 was studied in this research .ITS sequence analysis showed that green tide algae in the South Yellow Sea were include in Ulva linza-procera-prolifera( LPP) and Ulva compressa.Nutritive value analysis indicated that green tide algae in the South Yellow Sea was a new safe and healthy sea food providing higher protein (26.46%-29.01%),lower fat (0.76%-0.91%) and higher dietary fiber (4.87%-6.58%), whose protein content was similar with the atta-ched algae from Zhejiang(independent t-test,P>0.05).The amino acid composition of protein was balance with 30.31%-33.83% for EAA/TAA, and the flavor amino acids contents were high ( 42.84%-46.89%); mean-while, the compositions of fatty acids in green tide algae from the South Yellow Sea were rich ,the contents of alpha linolenic acid was (32.36 ±6.58)%of total fatty acids .The green tide algae was a safe seaweed food with high pro-tein content (26.46%-29.01%), low fat content (0.76%-0.91%) and high fiber content (4.87%-6.58%).

  10. Space Nutrition: Effects on Bone and Potential Nutrition Countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2008-01-01

    Optimal nutrition will be critical for crew members who embark on space exploration missions. Nutritional assessment provides an opportunity to ensure that crewmembers begin their missions in optimal nutritional status, to document changes during a mission and , if necessary, to provide intervention to maintain that status throughout the mission, and to assesses changes after landing in order to facilitate the return to their normal status as soon as possible after landing. We report here the findings from our nutritional assessment of the US astronauts who participated in the first eight International Space Station (ISS) missions. Bone loss during space flight remains one of the most critical challenges to astronaut health on space exploration missions. An increase in bone resorption of ISS crew members after flight was indicated by several markers. Vitamin D status also remains a challenge for long-duration space travelers, who lack ultraviolet light exposure in the shielded craft. Many nutrients affect bone, including calcium, protein, fatty acids, sodium, and others. Data supporting their potential as countermeasures for space flight, as published in many papers, will be reviewed in this presentation. Defining nutrient requirements, and being able to provide and maintain those nutrients on exploration missions, will be critical for maintaining crew member health. Please note, this abstract is not required for the meeting. A presentation on the topics described above will be given. This abstract is for travel documentation only.

  11. Nutritional phenotype databases and integrated nutrition: from molecules to populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibney, Michael J; McNulty, Breige A; Ryan, Miriam F; Walsh, Marianne C

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a great expansion in the nature of new technologies for the study of all biologic subjects at the molecular and genomic level and these have been applied to the field of human nutrition. The latter has traditionally relied on a mix of epidemiologic studies to generate hypotheses, dietary intervention studies to test these hypotheses, and a variety of experimental approaches to understand the underlying explanatory mechanisms. Both the novel and traditional approaches have begun to carve out separate identities vís-a-vís their own journals, their own international societies, and their own national and international symposia. The present review draws on the advent of large national nutritional phenotype databases and related technological developments to argue the case that there needs to be far more integration of molecular and public health nutrition. This is required to address new joint approaches to such areas as the measurement of food intake, biomarker discovery, and the genetic determinants of nutrient-sensitive genotypes and other areas such as personalized nutrition and the use of new technologies with mass application, such as in dried blood spots to replace venipuncture or portable electronic devices to monitor food intake and phenotype. Future development requires the full integration of these 2 disciplines, which will provide a challenge to both funding agencies and to university training of nutritionists.

  12. The nutritional status in adolescent Spanish cyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Julián-Almárcegui

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adolescence is an important period of nutritional vulnerability due to the increased dietary requirements. Objective: To describe the nutritional status of adolescent cyclist and a group of normoactive controls. Methods: The HELENA Dietary Assessment Tool was used to evaluate the nutritional intake of 20 adolescent cyclists and 17 controls. Total energy intake, resting energy expenditure (REE, total energy expenditure (TEE, macronutrients and several micronutrients were registered and compared with dietary guidelines. Results: REE was lower and TEE higher in cyclists than in controls (both P < 0.01. Significant differences were observed in phosphorus and vitamin B1 being higher in cyclists (P < 0.05. Most participants, both cyclist and controls, did not reach the diet requirements for macronutrients, vitamins and minerals. Conclusion: Nutritional status of adolescent cyclists and controls seems not to fulfil the requirements in quantity and quality. Possible implications for actual and future health especially in athlete adolescents need further research.

  13. The changing nutrition scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Gopalan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The past seven decades have seen remarkable shifts in the nutritional scenario in India. Even up to the 1950s severe forms of malnutrition such as kwashiorkar and pellagra were endemic. As nutritionists were finding home-grown and common-sense solutions for these widespread problems, the population was burgeoning and food was scarce. The threat of widespread household food insecurity and chronic undernutrition was very real. Then came the Green Revolution. Shortages of food grains disappeared within less than a decade and India became self-sufficient in food grain production. But more insidious problems arising from this revolution were looming, and cropping patterns giving low priority to coarse grains and pulses, and monocropping led to depletion of soil nutrients and ′Green Revolution fatigue′. With improved household food security and better access to health care, clinical manifestations of severe malnutrition virtually disappeared. But the decline in chronic undernutrition and "hidden hunger" from micronutrient deficiencies was slow. On the cusp of the new century, an added factor appeared on the nutritional scene in India. With steady urban migration, upward mobility out of poverty, and an increasingly sedentary lifestyle because of improvements in technology and transport, obesity rates began to increase, resulting in a dual burden. Measured in terms of its performance in meeting its Millennium Development Goals, India has fallen short. Despite its continuing high levels of poverty and illiteracy, India has a huge demographic potential in the form of a young population. This advantage must be leveraged by investing in nutrition education, household access to nutritious diets, sanitary environment and a health-promoting lifestyle. This requires co-operation from all the stakeholders, including governments, non government organizations, scientists and the people at large.

  14. Chronic kidney disease: considerations for nutrition interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiber, Alison L

    2014-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is highly prevalent and has major health consequences for patients. Caring for patients with CKD requires knowledge of the food supply, renal pathophysiology, and nutrition-related medications used to work synergistically with diet to control the signs and symptoms of the disease. The nutrition care process and International Dietetic and Nutrition Terminology allow for systematic, holistic, quality care of patients with this complex, progressive disease. Nutrition interventions must be designed with the individual patients needs in mind while prioritizing factors with the largest negative impact on health outcomes and mortality risk. New areas of nutrition treatment are emerging that involve a greater focus on micronutrient needs, the microbiome, and vegetarian-style diets. These interventions may improve outcomes by decreasing inflammation, improving energy and protein delivery, and lowering phosphorus, electrolytes, and fluid retention.

  15. Quinoa: Nutritional, functional, and antinutritional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Antonio Manoel Maradini; Pirozi, Mônica Ribeiro; Borges, João Tomaz Da Silva; Pinheiro Sant'Ana, Helena Maria; Chaves, José Benício Paes; Coimbra, Jane Sélia Dos Reis

    2017-05-24

    We have prepared a review of the physical-chemical composition and the functional and anti-nutritional properties of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.). It is a plant of the Chenopodiaceae family, originally from the Andean regions, adaptable to different types of soils and climatic conditions. Its composition has attracted the attention of scientific community for its high nutritional value, being rich in proteins, lipids, fibers, vitamins, and minerals, with an extraordinary balance of essential amino acids. It is also gluten-free, a characteristic that enables its use by celiac patients. In spite of all these attributes, quinoa is not widely used by consumers due to the high cost of imported grain and little knowledge of its benefits. More studies are required to increase knowledge about this "pseudo-cereal" to demonstrate its functional and nutritional benefits and to study its anti-nutritional effects, since it presents high commercial value and excellent nutritional quality.

  16. New trends in nutritional status assessment of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, A; De Lorenzo, A; Cadeddu, F; Iacopino, L; Grande, M

    2011-05-01

    Nutritional status assessment and support should be considered a valuable measure within the overall oncology strategy. Despite extensive research in the field of clinical nutrition, definite guidelines to base rational nutritional assessment and support in cancer patients are still debated. This review examines different approaches to nutritional status in cancer patients. The assessment of nutritional status is usually based on anthropometric measures, biochemical or laboratory tests, clinical indicators and dietary assessment. At present, body composition (BC) is rarely measured in the clinical setting because it is thought to be too unmanageable and time-consuming. However, using new technologies, the estimation of fat, lean and body fluids, that is significant in the management of nutrition therapies in oncology, has become easy. The present study evaluates the different methods of nutrition assessment today available, especially body composition (BC) measurements. Furthermore, nutrition assessment, relevance of nutritional support and choice of nutritional strategy, in surgical patients, are discussed. Given the clinical relevance of nutritional intervention in patients' quality of life, the nutritional status assessment has a key role in oncological and surgical practice and should include BC assessment in order to tailor nutritional treatment to patients' individual requirements. Furthermore, administration of the supplemented diet before and after surgery seemed to be the best strategy to reduce complications and length of hospital stay.

  17. Preliminary design data package. Appendix C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-25

    The design requirements, design philosophy, method and assumptions, and preliminary computer-aided design of the Near-Term Hybrid Vehicle including its electric and heat power units, control equipment, transmission system, body, and overall vehicle characteristics are presented. (LCL)

  18. DAILY MEAL FREQUENCY OF SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS FROM LJUBLJANA IN RELATION TO SOME OF THEIR OTHER NUTRITIONAL AND LIFE-STYLE CHARACTERISTICS AND BODY MASS INDEX – PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Gabrijelčič-Blenkuš

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. The recommended number of daily meals is three to five. The aim of this study was to establish the number of meals, daily consumed by secondary school students from Ljubljana, and the relationship with nutritional and other habits, including bad habits, demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the secondary school students and their body mass index.Methods. In 1999, an cross-section epidemiological study was performed on a proportional sample of 296 pupils attending the third class of Ljubljana secondary schools. The applied dietary data collection methods were the survey and the 24-hour dietary recall. The body mass index was calculated on the basis of the measured body height and body mass values. The Chi-square test, t-test, variance analysis and the multivariant linear regression method were used for the analysis.Results. The students consume 3.16 meals per day on average (boys 3.44, girls 2.87. The students who reported a smaller number of meals per day consume statistically significantly less fruit, vegetables, milk, milk products and fish. They take hot meals less frequently, consume less often all daily meals, their daily meals are of a poorer quality in respect to their composition, they eat less often their meals in a sitting position, they feel a greater difference in diet between working week days and weekends, their regular nourishment is more influenced by school obligations, they have poorer knowledge of healthy dietary practices, smoke more often, are less satisfied with their weight, are less physically active and girls sleep less at nights. The inverse proportional relationship between the number of daily meals and the body mass index was not statistically significant. The multivariant linear regression model explained the low variance percentage (R2 = 0.28.Conclusions. The average number of daily meals consumed by schoolboys is at the lower border of recommendations, while the average number of daily meals

  19. Nutritional sustainability of pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Kelly S; Carter, Rebecca A; Yount, Tracy P; Aretz, Jan; Buff, Preston R

    2013-03-01

    Sustainable practices meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Applying these concepts to food and feed production, nutritional sustainability is the ability of a food system to provide sufficient energy and essential nutrients required to maintain good health in a population without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their nutritional needs. Ecological, social, and economic aspects must be balanced to support the sustainability of the overall food system. The nutritional sustainability of a food system can be influenced by several factors, including the ingredient selection, nutrient composition, digestibility, and consumption rates of a diet. Carbon and water footprints vary greatly among plant- and animal-based ingredients, production strategy, and geographical location. Because the pet food industry is based largely on by-products and is tightly interlinked with livestock production and the human food system, however, it is quite unique with regard to sustainability. Often based on consumer demand rather than nutritional requirements, many commercial pet foods are formulated to provide nutrients in excess of current minimum recommendations, use ingredients that compete directly with the human food system, or are overconsumed by pets, resulting in food wastage and obesity. Pet food professionals have the opportunity to address these challenges and influence the sustainability of pet ownership through product design, manufacturing processes, public education, and policy change. A coordinated effort across the industry that includes ingredient buyers, formulators, and nutritionists may result in a more sustainable pet food system.

  20. Pharmacological Nutrition in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Nutrición farmacológica en las enfermedades inflamatorias del instestino

    OpenAIRE

    F. G. Campos; D. L. Waitzberg; Teixeira,M. G.; D. R. Mucerino; D. R. Kiss; Habr-Gama, A.

    2003-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease- are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory respons...

  1. Nutrition for Children with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children and Cancer When Your Child Has Cancer Nutrition for Children with Cancer Nutrition is an important part of the health of ... help you ensure your child is getting the nutrition he or she needs. Why good nutrition is ...

  2. Liver Transplant: Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Liver Transplant: Nutrition for Veterans and the Public Nutrition Liver ... apply to transplant and liver disease patients. Pre-Transplant Protein Malnutrition -- Many patients with end stage liver ...

  3. Nutrition.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gov Sites FAQ Contact Us En Español Search Nutrition.Gov Search all USDA Advanced Search Browse by ... Phytonutrients Food Additives What's in Food FAQs Welcome Nutrition.gov is a USDA-sponsored website that offers ...

  4. Total parenteral nutrition - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007239.htm Total parenteral nutrition - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses ...

  5. Diabetes and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ...

  6. Total parenteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000177.htm Total parenteral nutrition To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses ...

  7. Cooking utensils and nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/002461.htm Cooking utensils and nutrition To use the sharing features on this page, ... Cooking utensils can have an effect on your nutrition. Function Pots, pans, and other tools used in ...

  8. Artificial Hydration and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ...

  9. Nutrition and athletic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002458.htm Nutrition and athletic performance To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nutrition can help enhance athletic performance. An active lifestyle ...

  10. Living with COPD: Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > COPD > Living With COPD Nutrition Most people are surprised to learn that the ... asking your doctor or visiting the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics at EatRight.org . Be sure to ...

  11. Nutrition - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF California Dental Association Nutrition Resources - English Nutrition Resources - Hmoob (Hmong) PDF U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants Indonesian (Bahasa Indonesia) Expand Section Choose MyPlate: 10 Tips to a ...

  12. "Smart" RCTs: Development of a Smartphone App for Fully Automated Nutrition-Labeling Intervention Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Ekaterina; Li, Nicole; Dunford, Elizabeth; Eyles, Helen; Crino, Michelle; Michie, Jo; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona

    2016-03-17

    There is substantial interest in the effects of nutrition labels on consumer food-purchasing behavior. However, conducting randomized controlled trials on the impact of nutrition labels in the real world presents a significant challenge. The Food Label Trial (FLT) smartphone app was developed to enable conducting fully automated trials, delivering intervention remotely, and collecting individual-level data on food purchases for two nutrition-labeling randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in New Zealand and Australia. Two versions of the smartphone app were developed: one for a 5-arm trial (Australian) and the other for a 3-arm trial (New Zealand). The RCT protocols guided requirements for app functionality, that is, obtaining informed consent, two-stage eligibility check, questionnaire administration, randomization, intervention delivery, and outcome assessment. Intervention delivery (nutrition labels) and outcome data collection (individual shopping data) used the smartphone camera technology, where a barcode scanner was used to identify a packaged food and link it with its corresponding match in a food composition database. Scanned products were either recorded in an electronic list (data collection mode) or allocated a nutrition label on screen if matched successfully with an existing product in the database (intervention delivery mode). All recorded data were transmitted to the RCT database hosted on a server. In total approximately 4000 users have downloaded the FLT app to date; 606 (Australia) and 1470 (New Zealand) users met the eligibility criteria and were randomized. Individual shopping data collected by participants currently comprise more than 96,000 (Australia) and 229,000 (New Zealand) packaged food and beverage products. The FLT app is one of the first smartphone apps to enable conducting fully automated RCTs. Preliminary app usage statistics demonstrate large potential of such technology, both for intervention delivery and data collection. Australian

  13. Nutrition support in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Nutrition support in hospitals is becoming an area of focus because of the evidence showing improved clinical outcome with nutrition support, its status as a human rights issue and its integration into quality assurance.......Nutrition support in hospitals is becoming an area of focus because of the evidence showing improved clinical outcome with nutrition support, its status as a human rights issue and its integration into quality assurance....

  14. Perioperative nutritional therapy in liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Ahmed; Kaido, Toshimi; Uemoto, Shinji

    2015-03-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition is frequently seen in patients with end-stage liver disease who undergo liver transplantation. This causes a deterioration of the patients' clinical condition and affects their post-transplantation survival. Accurate assessment of the nutritional status and adequate intervention are prerequisites for perioperative nutritional treatment. However, the metabolic abnormalities induced by liver failure make the traditional assessment of the nutritional status difficult. The methods that were recently developed for accurately assessing the nutritional status by body bioelectrical impedance may be implemented in pre-transplant management. Because preoperative malnutrition and the loss of skeletal muscle mass, called sarcopenia, have a significant negative impact on the post-transplantation outcome, it is essential to provide adequate nutritional support during all phases of liver transplantation. Oral nutrition is preferred, but tube enteral nutrition may be required to provide the necessary caloric intake. We herein discuss both bioelectrical impedance and the latest findings in the current perioperative nutritional interventions in liver transplant patients regarding synbiotics, micronutrients, branched-chain amino acid supplementation, the use of immune system modulating formulas, the fluid balance and the offering of nocturnal meals.

  15. Energy expenditure, nutrition and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskin, A E; Davies, J H; Wootton, S A; Beattie, R M

    2011-06-01

    Fundamental to appropriate nutritional prescription is an understanding of the conditions necessary for growth that include the requirements for energy in health and illness. Energy requirements need to be met by the dietary intake to prevent weight loss. A positive energy balance will result in weight gain. Energy requirement includes several components; the largest is the basal metabolic rate, although physical activity level and the energy needs of growth are important components. All aspects of energy metabolism are likely to be influenced by illness and impact on energy balance. Changes in dietary intake and physical activity are observed clinically but poorly described in most childhood illnesses. Changes in metabolic rate are poorly described in part owing to methodological problems. This review explores changes in energy expenditure associated with health and disease, highlights the lack of evidence underpinning this aspect of practical nutritional support and provides the clinician with a guide to the factors involved in estimating energy requirements, emphasising the importance of measuring the child's response to nutritional support.

  16. Nutrition Guide for Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Nutrition Guide for Toddlers KidsHealth > For Parents > Nutrition Guide ... español Guía de nutrición para sus hijos pequeños Nutrition Through Variety Growth slows somewhat during the toddler ...

  17. The importance of good nutrition in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, Gina

    2015-02-01

    Poor nutritional status, which is common in children with cerebral palsy (CP), has generated considerable interest because of its wide-ranging impact on the children's health and well-being. Understanding the causes of poor nutrition, and the appropriate measurements required to interpret the nutritional status in children with CP, are integral to developing appropriate nutritional intervention strategies. Focusing attention on improving nutrition early in the lives of children with CP affords families and care providers with a unique opportunity for intervention, which may result in better outcomes for the children.

  18. Optimising preterm nutrition: present and future

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Ann-Marie

    2016-04-01

    The goal of preterm nutrition in achieving growth and body composition approximating that of the fetus of the same postmenstrual age is difficult to achieve. Current nutrition recommendations depend largely on expert opinion, due to lack of evidence, and are primarily birth weight based, with no consideration given to gestational age and\\/or need for catch-up growth. Assessment of growth is based predominately on anthropometry, which gives insufficient attention to the quality of growth. The present paper provides a review of the current literature on the nutritional management and assessment of growth in preterm infants. It explores several approaches that may be required to optimise nutrient intakes in preterm infants, such as personalising nutritional support, collection of nutrient intake data in real-time, and measurement of body composition. In clinical practice, the response to inappropriate nutrient intakes is delayed as the effects of under- or overnutrition are not immediate, and there is limited nutritional feedback at the cot-side. The accurate and non-invasive measurement of infant body composition, assessed by means of air displacement plethysmography, has been shown to be useful in assessing quality of growth. The development and implementation of personalised, responsive nutritional management of preterm infants, utilising real-time nutrient intake data collection, with ongoing nutritional assessments that include measurement of body composition is required to help meet the individual needs of preterm infants.

  19. Public Health Nutrition Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torheim, Liv Elin; Birgisdottir, Bryndis Eva; Robertson, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Public Health Nutrition Education Liv Elin Torheim* 1, Bryndis Eva Birgisdottir2, 3, Inga Thorsdottir2, 3, Aileen Robertson4, Runa Midtvåge4, Chalida Mae Svastisalee4, Hanne Gillett4, Agneta Yngve5, Arja Erkkilä6 1Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Oslo and Akershus University College......) and healthy aging. Unhealthy dietary patterns, high blood pressure and obesity are major risk factors for NCDs such as cancers, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. There exists enormous potential to promote health and prevent diseases through targeting unhealthy life style, and it is crucial......, educational, social, economic, structural, political and/or legislative. The knowledge, skills, competencies and cultural heritage of the broader community should form a basis for all analyses and actions. The competencies required to be an effective PHN practitioner has been described by several scholars...

  20. Nutritional stretegies to prevent Urolithiasis in Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipismita samal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Urolithiasis is a common problem in both ruminants and non-ruminants and nutrition plays a significant role in predisposing urolithiasis. The nutritional factors mainly influence urinary constituents and pH, which affect stone nucleation and growth. While surgery can render a patient stone-free, non-operative treatment modalities are required to prevent and reduce the risk of recurrent urolithiasis. Moreover, long-term pharmacological therapy and its potential side effects often lead to subsequent failure. In this regard, nutritional management is the best preventive strategy against urolithiasis. [Vet. World 2011; 4(3.000: 142-144

  1. Intravenous nutrition during a twin pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamatsu, J T; Boyd, A T; Cooke, J; Vinall, P S; McMahon, M J

    1987-01-01

    A case is reported of a woman in the third trimester of a twin pregnancy who required intravenous nutrition because of inadequate absorption of nutrients due to a jejunoileal bypass. Weight gain was poor, and there was evidence of intrauterine growth retardation before commencement of intravenous feeding. She received overnight intravenous nutrition for 6 weeks and gained weight with ultrasound evidence of fetal growth. During the 33rd week of gestation, she was delivered of healthy twin males who were at appropriate birth weights and development for their age of gestation. The considerations in intravenous nutrition for a twin pregnancy after jejunoileal bypass are discussed.

  2. Negev nutritional studies: nutritional deficiencies in young and elderly populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, D; Shahar, D; Shai, I; Vardi, H; Bilenko, N

    2000-01-01

    The importance of nutrition to public health and preventive medicine is evident. Undernutrition is a main nutritional risk factor in the elderly and has been established as a cause of excess morbidity and mortality in different segments of the older population. In the infant population, inadequate nutrition is one of the causes of iron-deficiency anemia, which is associated with impaired physical and cognitive development and lowered immunity. The aim of this paper was to estimate the nutritional pattern and micronutrient deficiencies in elderly and young populations in the Negev. In southern Israel, 351 subjects over 64 years old reported mean dietary intake that was lower than that in younger persons and was independent of the presence of chronic diseases. Current data from southern Israel on healthy Jewish children revealed anemia prevalence of 15% in the second year of life. Data from recent prospective study on Bedouin children showed that anemia affected one quarter of children at age one year. Thus, infants in this area are at high risk for iron deficiency. The findings require the attention of public health authorities and food manufacturers, and should result in a range of activities including publicity and educational programs, fortification of foods, and supplementation programs in high risk-groups.

  3. Nutrition for the pediatric athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnithan, Viswanath B; Goulopoulou, Styliani

    2004-08-01

    A paucity of literature exists with regard to research on nutrition for the pediatric athlete. This lack of research makes the development of specific nutritional recommendations for young athletes problematic. This issue is made difficult by the macro- and micronutrient intake required for growth and development in conjunction with that required for sports. Exogenous carbohydrate drinks could be considered for the young athlete engaged in both endurance exercise and high-intensity exercise. Monitoring of the energy intake during resistance training in the pediatric athlete needs to be considered, as there is evidence to suggest that energy deficits may occur. If decrements in exercise performance are noted, then serum ferritin and hemoglobin concentrations should be monitored, as nonanemic iron deficiency is prevalent in the pediatric athlete. The pediatric athlete exercising in the heat is susceptible to voluntary dehydration and evidence exists to suggest that a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink will abolish this phenomenon.

  4. Nutritional studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambaut, P. C.; Smith, M. C., Jr.; Wheeler, H. O.

    1975-01-01

    Detailed metabolic studies were conducted of the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 flight crews, and the results are presented in tabular form. Intake and absorption data are also included. Apollo nutrient intakes were found to be characteristically hypocaloric. Estimates of body composition changes from metabolic balance data, from preflight and postflight weights and volumes, and from total body water and potassium provide no evidence for diminished caloric requirements during a flight. As observed during the Gemini Program and during periods of bed rest, measurements of bone density and metabolic balance confirm a tendency toward loss of skeletal tissue in weightlessness. No evidence exists that any inflight metabolic anomaly, including hypokalemia, was induced by marginal or deficient nutrient intakes. In general, the Apollo crewmen were well nourished and exhibited normal gastroenterological functions, although appetite was somewhat diminished and the organoleptic response to food was somewhat modified during flight.

  5. Nutrition Recommendations in Elderly and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkoukis, Hope

    2016-11-01

    Maintaining optimal health and well-being in the older adult requires understanding of how physiologic changes influence nutritional status, familiarity with the available validated tools to assess status, identification of factors predisposing older adults to malnutrition, and evidence-based practice regarding the nutritional needs of this age group. Evidence-based guidance on these core practice components is provided to the clinician in this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Iodine nutrition in pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Angela M; Pearce, Elizabeth N; Braverman, Lewis E

    2011-12-01

    Adequate iodine intake is required for the synthesis of thyroid hormones that are important for normal fetal and infant neurodevelopment. In this review, we discuss iodine physiology during pregnancy and lactation, methods to assess iodine sufficiency, the importance of adequate iodine nutrition, studies of iodine supplementation during pregnancy and lactation, the consequences of hypothyroidism during pregnancy, the current status of iodine nutrition in the United States, the global efforts toward achieving universal iodine sufficiency, and substances that may interfere with iodine use.

  7. Food modification versus oral liquid nutrition supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Heidi J

    2009-01-01

    Oral liquid nutrition supplements (ONS) are widely used in community, residential and healthcare settings. ONS are intended for individuals whose nutrient requirements cannot be achieved by conventional diet or food modification, or for the management of distinctive nutrient needs resulting from specific diseases and/or conditions. ONS appear to be most effective in patients with a body mass index of nutrition interventions.

  8. Graduate level training in nutrition: an integrated model for capacity building- a national report.

    OpenAIRE

    Robabeh Sheikholeslam; Hossein Ghassemi; Osman Galal; Abolghassem Djazayery; Nasrin Omidvar; Issa Nourmohammadi; TUAZON, Ma. Antonia G.

    2015-01-01

    Iran has been active in human nutrition training for the past five decades, but the existing curricular programs do not equip the graduates with the knowledge and skills required for solving food security and nutritional problems of the country. Given this, the Nutrition Department (ND) of Iran’s Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MOHME) initiated a curricular reform to develop responsive graduate programs in key areas of nutrition that fill the existing gaps in nutrition training with...

  9. Nutrition attitudes and knowledge in medical students after completion of an integrated nutrition curriculum compared to a dedicated nutrition curriculum: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Carolyn O; Ziniel, Sonja I; Delichatsios, Helen K; Ludwig, David S

    2011-08-12

    Nutrition education has presented an ongoing challenge to medical educators. In the 2007-2008 academic year, Harvard Medical School replaced its dedicated Preventive Medicine and Nutrition course with an integrated curriculum. The objective of the current study was to assess the effect of the curriculum change on medical student attitudes and knowledge about nutrition. A survey was administered in a quasi-experimental design to students in the last class of the dedicated curriculum (n = 131) and the first class of the integrated curriculum (n = 135) two years after each class completed the required nutrition course. Main measures were attitude scores based on modified Nutrition in Patient care Survey and satisfaction ratings, performance on a nutrition knowledge test, and demographic variables. Two-tailed t-tests were performed. Response rates were 50.4% and 42.2%. There were no differences between the groups in attitude scores from the Nutrition in Patient care Survey (p = 0.43) or knowledge scores (p = 0.63). Students with the integrated curriculum were less satisfied with both the quantity (p nutrition education, and were more likely to have completed optional online nutrition training modules (p = 0.0089). Medical student attitudes and knowledge about nutrition were not affected by the model of nutrition education they receive, though students in an integrated curriculum may feel their education is inadequate and seek additional training.

  10. [Enteral nutrition in the multiple trauma patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Izquierdo Riera, J A; Montejo González, J C

    1992-01-01

    bacterial translocation. The new concept of immunonutrition is opening up new expectations with regard to the possibility of reducing septic complications, which often lead to problems in the evolution of patients, by means of nutritional manipulation. Current knowledge has permitted the early administration of enteral nutrition in polytraumatized patients, although on occasions the nutritional requirements will have to be administered by the complementary use of enteral and parenteral nutrition.

  11. Preliminary Monthly Climatological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Preliminary Local Climatological Data, recorded since 1970 on Weather Burean Form 1030 and then National Weather Service Form F-6. The preliminary climate data pages...

  12. 78 FR 79567 - National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ... and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Parts 210 and 220 [FNS-2011-0019] RIN 0584-AE09 National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in Schools as Required by the...: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in Schools as required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of...

  13. Recent advances in primate nutritional ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righini, Nicoletta

    2017-04-01

    Nutritional ecology seeks to explain, in an ecological and evolutionary context, how individuals choose, acquire, and process food to satisfy their nutritional requirements. Historically, studies of primate feeding ecology have focused on characterizing diets in terms of the botanical composition of the plants consumed. Further, dietary studies have demonstrated how patch and food choice in relation to time spent foraging and feeding are influenced by the spatial and temporal distribution of resources and by social factors such as feeding competition, dominance, or partner preferences. From a nutritional perspective, several theories including energy and protein-to-fiber maximization, nutrient mixing, and toxin avoidance, have been proposed to explain the food choices of non-human primates. However, more recently, analytical frameworks such as nutritional geometry have been incorporated into primatology to explore, using a multivariate approach, the synergistic effects of multiple nutrients, secondary metabolites, and energy requirements on primate food choice. Dietary strategies associated with nutrient balancing highlight the tradeoffs that primates face in bypassing or selecting particular feeding sites and food items. In this Special Issue, the authors bring together a set of studies focusing on the nutritional ecology of a diverse set of primate taxa characterized by marked differences in dietary emphasis. The authors present, compare, and discuss the diversity of strategies used by primates in diet selection, and how species differences in ecology, physiology, anatomy, and phylogeny can affect patterns of nutrient choice and nutrient balancing. The use of a nutritionally explicit analytical framework is fundamental to identify the nutritional requirements of different individuals of a given species, and through its application, direct conservation efforts can be applied to regenerate and protect specific foods and food patches that offer the opportunity of a

  14. [Fiber and enteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Candela, C; de Cos Blanco, A I; Iglesias Rosado, C

    2002-01-01

    Dietary fibre is a mixture of various substances and is essential for maintaining appropriate intestinal functionality and it is currently considered to be a necessary part of a healthy diet. Current recommendations for fibre consumption by adults range from 20 to 35 g/day. Enteral nutrition is an emerging therapeutic variation in both hospital and domestic settings. To a great extent, this development has been made possible thanks to the design of new formulas that adapt better and better to the clinicla conditions or our patients. The type of fibre used in these preparations varies greatly. Some have only one source of fibre while others use differnet combinations. There are currently 32 formulas available on the Spanish market, without counting the modules or specific preparations of individual types of fibre. Despite the enormous advances in the knowledge of the beneficial effects of fibre, the fact of the matter is that enteral nutrition that we routinely prescribe in normal clinical practice does not contain fibre. The are several explanations for this, perhaps the most plausible is that these formulas may lead to problems in their administration and tolerance. It is necessary to choose the correct calibre of catheter and define the best infusion method and timing. Another difficulty may be the gastrointestinal tolerance of the formulas containing fibre. No large-scale problems of intolerance have however been described in healthy volunteers nor in patients with acute or chronic pathologies, although it is of fundamental importance to monitor the rhythm of depositions in all patients with enteral nutrition (EN) and ensure proper intake of liquids, which would also be useful to prevent occlusion of the catheter. The theoretical benefits of EN with fibre with a view to maintaining or improving normal intestinal structure and function are very varied. Nonetheless, it has noit yet been possible to prove many of these effects in controlled clinical trials. At the

  15. Enteral Nutrition in Dementia: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Brooke

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in dementia. The prevalence of dementia is predicted to rise worldwide partly due to an aging population. People with dementia may experience both cognitive and physical complications that impact on their nutritional intake. Malnutrition and weight loss in dementia correlates with cognitive decline and the progress of the disease. An intervention for long term eating difficulties is the provision of enteral nutrition through a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy tube to improve both nutritional parameters and quality of life. Enteral nutrition in dementia has traditionally been discouraged, although further understanding of physical, nutritional and quality of life outcomes are required. The following electronic databases were searched: EBSCO Host, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar for publications from 1st January 2008 and up to and including 1st January 2014. Inclusion criteria included the following outcomes: mortality, aspiration pneumonia, pressure sores, nutritional parameters and quality of life. Each study included separate analysis for patients with a diagnosis of dementia and/or neurological disease. Retrospective and prospective observational studies were included. No differences in mortality were found for patients with dementia, without dementia or other neurological disorders. Risk factors for poor survival included decreased or decreasing serum albumin levels, increasing age or over 80 years and male gender. Evidence regarding pneumonia was limited, although did not impact on mortality. No studies explored pressure sores or quality of life.

  16. Enteral nutrition in dementia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Joanne; Ojo, Omorogieva

    2015-04-03

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in dementia. The prevalence of dementia is predicted to rise worldwide partly due to an aging population. People with dementia may experience both cognitive and physical complications that impact on their nutritional intake. Malnutrition and weight loss in dementia correlates with cognitive decline and the progress of the disease. An intervention for long term eating difficulties is the provision of enteral nutrition through a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy tube to improve both nutritional parameters and quality of life. Enteral nutrition in dementia has traditionally been discouraged, although further understanding of physical, nutritional and quality of life outcomes are required. The following electronic databases were searched: EBSCO Host, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar for publications from 1st January 2008 and up to and including 1st January 2014. Inclusion criteria included the following outcomes: mortality, aspiration pneumonia, pressure sores, nutritional parameters and quality of life. Each study included separate analysis for patients with a diagnosis of dementia and/or neurological disease. Retrospective and prospective observational studies were included. No differences in mortality were found for patients with dementia, without dementia or other neurological disorders. Risk factors for poor survival included decreased or decreasing serum albumin levels, increasing age or over 80 years and male gender. Evidence regarding pneumonia was limited, although did not impact on mortality. No studies explored pressure sores or quality of life.

  17. Breast feeding and infant nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G V; Calvert, L J; Kanto, W P

    1978-04-01

    Breast feeding is a management problem requiring knowledge of the physiology of lactation, maternal and infant nutritional requirements, and specifics such as drugs which enter the milk. The job of the physician is to allay anxiety; this helps establish the let-down reflex and increases milk production. "Caking," mastitis and even abscesses are not indications for weaning. Rest, warm compresses and frequent nursing are indicated. Breast-fed infants have less tendency to obesity than those who are bottle-fed. Early solid foods in the diet are not needed.

  18. Preliminary reference Earth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewonski, Adam M.; Anderson, Don L.

    1981-06-01

    A large data set consisting of about 1000 normal mode periods, 500 summary travel time observations, 100 normal mode Q values, mass and moment of inertia have been inverted to obtain the radial distribution of elastic properties, Q values and density in the Earth's interior. The data set was supplemented with a special study of 12 years of ISC phase data which yielded an additional 1.75 × 10 6 travel time observations for P and S waves. In order to obtain satisfactory agreement with the entire data set we were required to take into account anelastic dispersion. The introduction of transverse isotropy into the outer 220 km of the mantle was required in order to satisfy the shorter period fundamental toroidal and spheroidal modes. This anisotropy also improved the fit of the larger data set. The horizontal and vertical velocities in the upper mantle differ by 2-4%, both for P and S waves. The mantle below 220 km is not required to be anisotropic. Mantle Rayleigh waves are surprisingly sensitive to compressional velocity in the upper mantle. High S n velocities, low P n velocities and a pronounced low-velocity zone are features of most global inversion models that are suppressed when anisotropy is allowed for in the inversion. The Preliminary Reference Earth Model, PREM, and auxiliary tables showing fits to the data are presented.

  19. Dietitians' Perspectives on Teaching Nutrition to Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Emily; Crowley, Jennifer; Laur, Celia; Ray, Sumantra; Ball, Lauren

    2017-08-01

    The provision of nutrition care by health professionals can facilitate improved patient nutrition behaviors. Some education institutions include nutrition in their medical curriculum; however, doctors and medical students continue to lack competence in providing nutrition care. Dietitians are increasingly teaching nutrition to medical students, yet evidence on the topic remains anecdotal. It is important to understand the experiences of these dietitians to support improvements in undergraduate medical nutrition education. The aim of this study was to explore dietitians' perspectives of teaching nutrition to medical students. A qualitative study was conducted in collaboration with the Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme (NNEdPro). Twenty-four dietitians who had provided nutrition education to medical students participated in individual semistructured interviews. Participants were from Australia (n = 5), New Zealand (n = 1), the United States (n = 6), Canada (n = 5), the United Kingdom (n = 5), Germany (n = 1), and Finland (n = 1). Data analysis was conducted using a constant comparative approach to thematic analysis. The dietitians expressed confidence in their ability to teach medical students and believed that they were the most appropriate professionals to administer the education. However, they were not confident that medical students graduate with sufficient nutrition competence and attributed this to poor curriculum planning for nutrition. Dietitians had access to useful resources and tools to support education, with opportunity to contribute further to integration of nutrition throughout medical curricula. This study suggests that dietitians are likely appropriate nutrition teachers in medical education. However, optimizing dietitians' role requires their further involvement in curriculum planning and development. Including dietitians as members of medical faculty would facilitate their input on nutrition throughout the curriculum, which could

  20. Optimizing patient nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Nina Rica Wium

    (Paper I). The present study is, to my knowledge, the only study investigating the validity of performed nutritional risk screenings by comparing them with medical records. Eight per cent of patients were correctly screened for nutritional risk. A total of 24% of 2393 patients were nutritionally screened......Malnutrition, under-nutrition and/or obesity, may develop due to disease but may also cause disease. The prevalence of under-nutrition among hospitalized patients is high: 40-60% are either already under-nourished on admittance or at-risk of becoming malnourished. As in the general population...... of prescription medication, and take longer to recover. Acknowledging the adverse effects of malnutrition on health, since 2006 it has been mandatory to screen all patients for nutritional risk within 24 hours of admittance at all hospitals in the Capital Region, Denmark. The compliance to and the validity...

  1. Optimizing patient nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Nina Rica Wium

    (Paper I). The present study is, to my knowledge, the only study investigating the validity of performed nutritional risk screenings by comparing them with medical records. Eight per cent of patients were correctly screened for nutritional risk. A total of 24% of 2393 patients were nutritionally screened......Malnutrition, under-nutrition and/or obesity, may develop due to disease but may also cause disease. The prevalence of under-nutrition among hospitalized patients is high: 40-60% are either already under-nourished on admittance or at-risk of becoming malnourished. As in the general population...... of prescription medication, and take longer to recover. Acknowledging the adverse effects of malnutrition on health, since 2006 it has been mandatory to screen all patients for nutritional risk within 24 hours of admittance at all hospitals in the Capital Region, Denmark. The compliance to and the validity...

  2. Nutrition for swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Gregory; Boyd, Kevin T; Burke, Louise M; Koivisto, Anu

    2014-08-01

    Swimming is a sport that requires considerable training commitment to reach individual performance goals. Nutrition requirements are specific to the macrocycle, microcycle, and individual session. Swimmers should ensure suitable energy availability to support training while maintaining long term health. Carbohydrate intake, both over the day and in relation to a workout, should be manipulated (3-10 g/kg of body mass/day) according to the fuel demands of training and the varying importance of undertaking these sessions with high carbohydrate availability. Swimmers should aim to consume 0.3 g of high-biological-value protein per kilogram of body mass immediately after key sessions and at regular intervals throughout the day to promote tissue adaptation. A mixed diet consisting of a variety of nutrient-dense food choices should be sufficient to meet the micronutrient requirements of most swimmers. Specific dietary supplements may prove beneficial to swimmers in unique situations, but should be tried only with the support of trained professionals. All swimmers, particularly adolescent and youth swimmers, are encouraged to focus on a well-planned diet to maximize training performance, which ensures sufficient energy availability especially during periods of growth and development. Swimmers are encouraged to avoid rapid weight fluctuations; rather, optimal body composition should be achieved over longer periods by modest dietary modifications that improve their food choices. During periods of reduced energy expenditure (taper, injury, off season) swimmers are encouraged to match energy intake to requirement. Swimmers undertaking demanding competition programs should ensure suitable recovery practices are used to maintain adequate glycogen stores over the entirety of the competition period.

  3. European consumers and nutrition labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wills, Josephine M.; Grunert, Klaus G.; Celemín, Laura Fernández

    2009-01-01

    Nutrition labelling of food in Europe is not compulsory, unless a nutrition or health claim is made for the product. The European Commission is proposing mandatory nutrition labelling, even front of pack labelling with nutrition information. Yet, how widespread is nutrition labelling in the EU...

  4. European consumers and nutrition labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wills, Josephine M.; Grunert, Klaus G.; Celemín, Laura Fernández

    2009-01-01

    Nutrition labelling of food in Europe is not compulsory, unless a nutrition or health claim is made for the product. The European Commission is proposing mandatory nutrition labelling, even front of pack labelling with nutrition information. Yet, how widespread is nutrition labelling in the EU...

  5. Toward personalized nutrition: comprehensive phytoprofiling and metabotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guoxiang; Li, Xin; Li, Houkai; Jia, Wei

    2013-04-05

    Nutrition research is increasingly concerned with the complex interactions between multicomponent dietary ingredients and the human metabolic regulatory system. The substantiation of nutritional health benefits is challenged by the intrinsic complexity of macro- and micronutrients and individualized human metabolic responses. Metabonomics, uniquely suited to assess metabolic responses to deficiencies or excesses of nutrients, is used to characterize the metabolic phenotype of individuals integrating genetic polymorphisms, metabolic interactions with commensal and symbiotic partners such as gut microbiota, as well as environmental and behavioral factors including dietary preferences. The two profiling strategies, metabolic phenotyping (metabotyping) and phytochemical profiling (phytoprofiling), greatly facilitate the measurement of these important health determinants and the discovery of new biomarkers associated with nutritional requirements and specific phytochemical interventions. This paper presents an overview of the applications of these two profiling approaches for personalized nutrition research, with a focus on recent advances in the study of the role of phytochemicals in regulating the human or animal metabolic regulatory system.

  6. Effective nutrition support programs for college athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinci, D M

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Husky Sport Nutrition Program at the University of Washington. This program is a component of the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics Total Student-Athlete Program, an NCAA-sponsored CHAMPS/Life Skills Program that provides life skills assistance to student-athletes. Successful integration of a sport nutrition program requires an understanding of the athletic culture, physiological milestones, and life stressors faced by college athletes. The sport nutritionist functions as an educator, counselor, and administrator. Team presentations and individual nutrition counseling provide athletes with accurate information on healthy eating behaviors for optimal performance. For women's sports, a multidisciplinary team including the sport nutritionist, team physician, clinical psychologist, and athletic trainer work to prevent and treat eating disorders. Case studies are presented illustrating the breadth of nutrition-related issues faced by a sport nutritionist working with college athletes.

  7. Nutritional Considerations for the Overweight Young Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Lisa; Timmons, Brian W

    2015-11-01

    Nutritional considerations for the overweight young athlete have not been thoroughly discussed in the scientific literature. With the high prevalence of childhood obesity, more children participating in sports are overweight or obese. This is particularly true for select sports, such as American football, where large size provides an added advantage. While sport participation should be encouraged because of the many benefits of physical activity, appropriate nutritional practices are vital for growth, and optimizing performance and health. The overweight young athlete may face certain challenges because of variable energy costs and nutrient requirements for growth and routine training, compared with nonoverweight athletes. Special attention should be given to adopting healthy lifestyle choices to prevent adverse health effects due to increased adiposity. In this review, we aim to discuss special nutritional considerations and highlight gaps in the literature concerning nutrition for overweight young athletes compared with their nonoverweight peers.

  8. Nutritional counseling in midwifery and obstetric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheyney, Melissa; Moreno-Black, Geraldine

    2010-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that pregnant women require healthy diets. However, the cultural idea of "eating for two" and what constitutes an "appropriate" diet during pregnancy have been contested grounds of research as guidelines have changed over the decades. Using a grounded theory approach, we examine how research on pregnancy nutrition is incorporated into practice and translated to patients by obstetricians and 2 categories of midwives--certified nurse midwives (CNMs) and direct-entry midwives (DEMs). Five themes emerged from interviews: (1) food and exercise as "two sides of the same coin"; (2) "good food" and "food that harms" dichotomies; (3) nutrition as holistic prevention; (4) institutionalized barriers to nutritional counseling; and (5) food and the obesity epidemic. An exploration of the conceptual connections between these themes by provider type suggests mechanisms that we argue may be functioning to produce, reproduce, and perpetuate midwifery and medical models of care and associated provider-effects on nutrition-related complications.

  9. Review on Ruminant Nutrition Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Haryanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research works in ruminant nutrition have been widely published, especially those related to the energy and protein utilization. The energy and protein requirements for maintenance and production in tropical regions may be different from those in the subtropical areas. Responses of different species of ruminants to energy and protein supplements were also observed. The synchronization of energy and protein availability has been considered as an important strategy in affecting the microbial fermentative process in the rumen and in affecting the animal performance. The inclusion of long-chained unsaturated fatty acids in the diets has been successfully affecting milk production with higher concentration of unsaturated fatty acids. Feedstuffs characteristics in terms of their degradability and fermentation by rumen microbial enzymes have been intensively studied; however, further experimentations are still needed to elucidate the specific fate of its nutritive components in the rumen and tissue levels.

  10. Nutrition and stroke

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Chen Ya

    2007-01-01

    ..., Homocysteinemia, and alcohol are the most significant modifiable risk factors of stroke. Of these, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, hyperlipidemia, homocysteinemia and alcoholism are obviously affected by lifestyle and nutrition...

  11. Nutritional support of children in the intensive care unit.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Nutritional support is an integral and essential part of the management of 5-10 percent of hospitalized children. Children in the intensive care unit are particularly likely to develop malnutrition because of the nature and duration of their illness, and their inability to eat by mouth. This article reviews the physiology of starvation and the development of malnutrition in children. A method of estimating the nutritional requirements of children is presented. The techniques of nutritional su...

  12. Nutrition Education in Australian Midwifery Programmes: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Arrish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Little research has explored how nutrition content in midwifery education prepares midwives to provide prenatal nutrition advice. This study examined the nature and extent of nutrition education provided in Australian midwifery programmes. A mixed-methods approach was used, incorporating an online survey and telephone interviews. The survey analysis included 23 course coordinators representing 24 of 50 accredited midwifery programmes in 2012. Overall, the coordinators considered nutrition in midwifery curricula and the midwife’s role as important. All programmes included nutrition content; however, eleven had only 5 to <10 hours allocated to nutrition, while two had a designated unit. Various topics were covered. Dietitians/other nutrition experts were rarely involved in teaching or reviewing the nutrition content. Interviews with seven coordinators revealed that nutrition education tended to be problem-oriented and at times based on various assumptions. Nutrition content was not informed by professional or theoretical models. The development of nutrition assessment skills or practical training for midwifery students in providing nutrition advice was lacking. As nutrition is essential for maternal and foetal health, nutrition education in midwifery programmes needs to be reviewed and minimum requirements should be included to improve midwives’ effectiveness in this area. This may require collaboration between nutrition experts and midwifery bodies.

  13. 62 NUTRITION IN HIV: A REVIEW *L. M. Houtzager *Nutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... nutritional status, treatment, food and nutrition interventions continues ... infection and poor nutritional status are interlinked. .... ART has on growth among infants and children ..... RN, Body composition studies in patients with ...

  14. Nutrition Academic Award: nutrition education in graduate medical education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woods, Margo N

    2006-01-01

    The Nutrition Academic Award received by Tufts University School of Medicine strengthened our first-year Nutrition and Medicine course and clearly resulted in more nutrition in third-year clerkships...

  15. THE EFFECTS OF PRELIMINARY RULINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana-Mădălina LARION

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study analyses the effects of the preliminary rulings rendered by the Court of Justice for the judicial body that made the reference and for other bodies dealing with similar cases, for the member states, for the European Union’ s institutions and for EU legal order. Starting from the binding effect of the preliminary judgment for national judicial bodies, which requires them to follow the ruling or make a new reference, to the lack of precedent doctrine in EU law, continuing with the possibility to indirectly verify the compatibility of national law of the member states with EU law and ending with the administrative or legislative measures that can or must be taken by the member states, the study intends to highlight the limits, nuances and consequences of the binding effect. It mentions the contribution of the national courts and of the Court of Justice of the European Union to the development of EU law, such as clarifying autonomous notions and it emphasizes the preliminary procedure's attributes of being a form of judicial protection of individual rights, as well as a means to review the legality of acts of EU institutions. The paper is meant to be a useful instrument for practitioners. Therefor, it also deals with the possibility and limits of asking new questions, in order to obtain reconsideration or a refinement of the legal issue and with the problem of judicial control over the interpretation and application of the preliminary ruling by the lower court.

  16. The role of nutritional assessment and early enteral nutrition for combined pancreas and kidney transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Sally; Asderakis, Argiris; Ilham, Adel; Elker, Doruk; Chapman, Dawn; Ablorsu, Elijah

    2017-02-01

    Early post-operative enteral nutrition is an important part of perioperative management and is strongly supported by ESPEN Guidelines. However, there is limited evidence into the use of Early Enteral Nutrition (EEN) after combined Pancreas and Kidney Transplantation (PKT). We know malnutrition in type-1 diabetics with end stage renal failure (ESRF) is a common problem and a significant risk factor. Therefore, we introduced EEN in our patients. We monitored and recorded nutritional data on 29 PKT recipients who underwent transplantation between Oct 2007 and Jan 2010 without a nutritional assessment or EEN [Monitored Group (MG)] and on 30 PKT recipients between Feb 2010 and Dec 2013 who received a nutritional assessment and EEN (Naso-jejunal feed or oral intake with supplementation, according to their nutritional status) [Fed Group (FG)]. The end-point was to assess patients' daily post-transplant nutritional intake. This was calculated as a percentage of estimated nutritional requirements using the Schofield equation with a 25% added stress factor and relevant activity factor. Following a literature search and realistic targets our aim was to reach >60% requirements: achievement of ≥60% energy requirements by day-7 (7d-60%) and at the time of discharge (total-60%) [13,14]. There was no significant difference between MG and FG patients in cold ischemic time (CIT), recipient-age and donor-age, Length of Stay and donor-creatinine. In contrast, FG patients were less frequently in predialysis status 41.4% vs. 26.7%, p = 0.001; and had higher incidence of BMI Figs. 1 and 2). The FG spent a greater proportion during the first week 66.7% vs. 31%, p = benefit from planned EEN and receive better nutritional support when compared to the patients managed with the historic, reactive approach to nutritional care. Nutritional intake in the first week as well as during the whole admission was superior in patients receiving active EEN despite a more difficult post

  17. 21 CFR 101.45 - Guidelines for the voluntary nutrition labeling of raw fruits, vegetables, and fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... listings for trans fat, dietary fiber, and sugars may be omitted from the charts or individual nutrition... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guidelines for the voluntary nutrition labeling of... Nutrition Labeling Requirements and Guidelines § 101.45 Guidelines for the voluntary nutrition labeling of...

  18. Exigências nutricionais de bezerros da raça Holandesa alimentados com concentrado e feno de capim-elefante Nutritional requirements of Holstein calves fed concentrate and elephant grass hay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Valter Nunes Nascimento

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Foram utilizados 13 bezerros machos da raça Holandesa, com idade média de 14 dias. Três animais foram abatidos no início do experimento (referência e os outros dez foram distribuídos aleatoriamente em dois tratamentos (ração farelada ou peletizada e abatidos aos 112 dias de idade para determinação das exigências nutricionais. Foram ajustadas equações de regressão do logaritmo da quantidade corporal de proteína, gordura e energia em função do peso de corpo vazio (PCVZ. As exigências líquidas de proteína e energia para ganho de 1 kg de PCVZ foram obtidas por derivação das equações de predição da composição corporal. Os conteúdos de proteína, gordura e energia aumentaram de acordo com o peso corporal. Os requerimentos líquidos de proteína e energia para ganho de peso de corpo vazio (GPCVZ elevaram quando o PCVZ variou de 25,74 até 85,81 kg. Foi obtida a equação para estimar a proteína retida em função do ganho médio diário (GMD e da energia retida (ER: PR = - 0,297083 + 4,19797 ganho de peso corporal em jejum (GPCJ + 0,0926327 ER (R² = 0,92. A equação obtida para descrever a relação entre a energia retida (ER, em Mcal, e o ganho diário de PCVZ (GPCVZ, em kg, para determinado PCVZ a partir dos dados deste trabalho, foi a seguinte: ER = 0,1004 × PCVZ0,75 × GDPCVZ0,5552. Os valores de energia líquida de mantença (ELm variaram de 1,10 para 2,72 Mcal/dia e energia líquida para ganho (ELg de 1,42 para 2,46 Mcal/dia quando o peso corporal aumentou de 30 para 100 kg. Dos 28 aos 112 dias de idade, aumenta a composição de proteína, gordura e energia no corpo vazio de bezerros machos da raça Holandesa.Thirteen male Holstein calves with average age of 14 days were used. Three animals were slaughtered at the beginning of the experiment (reference and ten others were randomly distributed in two treatments (ground or pelleted feed, and slaughtered at 112 days of age to determine the nutritional requirements

  19. Need for Intensive Nutrition Care After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bétry, Cécile; Disse, Emmanuel; Chambrier, Cécile; Barnoud, Didier; Gelas, Patrick; Baubet, Sandrine; Laville, Martine; Pelascini, Elise; Robert, Maud

    2017-02-01

    Severe nutrition complications after bariatric surgery remain poorly described. The aim of this case series was to identify specific factors associated with nutrition complications after bariatric surgery and to characterize their nutrition disorders. We retrospectively reviewed all people referred to the clinical nutrition intensive care unit of our university hospital after bariatric surgery from January 2013 to June 2015. Twelve persons who required artificial nutrition supplies (ie, enteral nutrition or parenteral nutrition) were identified. Seven persons underwent a "one-anastomosis gastric bypass" (OAGB) or "mini gastric bypass," 2 underwent a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 2 had a sleeve gastrectomy, and 1 had an adjustable gastric band. This case series suggests that OAGB could overexpose subjects to severe nutrition complications requiring intensive nutrition care and therefore cannot be considered a "mini" bariatric surgery. Even if OAGB is often considered a simplified surgical technique, it obviously requires as the other standard bariatric procedures a close follow-up by experimented teams aware of its specific complications.

  20. A Narrative Review of Social Media and Game-Based Nutrition Interventions Targeted at Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, Monica; Yeung, Sin Hang; Partridge, Stephanie; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2017-05-01

    The increased popularity of social media and mobile gaming among young adults provides an opportunity for innovative nutrition programs. This review evaluated the efficacy of these strategies in interventions targeted at 18- to 35-year-olds. The protocol was guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). Ten scientific databases, information technology conference proceedings, and gray literature were searched. Two reviewers conducted screening, data extraction, and quality assessments. Interventions were included if they used social media or electronic games. Comparisons were made pre- to post-intervention, or between intervention and control arms. Outcomes of interest included change in nutrition knowledge, attitudes, behavior, or weight and/or body composition. Eleven social media-based (randomized controlled trials [RCT] n=7) and six game-based [RCT n=1]) interventions were included. Overall quality of studies was low. Social media-based strategies included forum/blogs (n=5), Facebook (n=5), Twitter (n=1), YouTube (n=1), and chat rooms (n=1). Eight (RCT n=6) of 11 social media-based studies demonstrated improvements in outcomes. Findings suggested that social media may be more effective when combined with other strategies. Virtual reality games (n=3), web-based games (n=2), and a mobile application (n=1) were used in the gaming interventions. While a significant increase in knowledge was reported by three gaming studies (RCT=1), two used nonvalidated tools and longer-term measures of weight and behavioral outcomes were limited. The use of social media and gaming for nutrition promotion is in its infancy. Preliminary evidence suggests that these strategies have some utility for intervening with young adults. Further research using high-quality study designs is required, with measurement of outcomes over longer time periods. The systematic review protocol is registered with PROSPERO (registration number: CRD42015025427

  1. Toward a National Nutrition Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Jean

    1972-01-01

    Reviews changes in United States nutrition since the 1969 White House Conference on Food, Nutrition, and Health and identifies necessary components of public, private and expert contributions towards a policy for ensuring adequate nutrition for all Americans. (AL)

  2. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Learn Videos View More Understanding the New Nutrition Facts Label The new Nutrition Facts label features updated information to help consumers ... The Most Shared 1 The Basics of the Nutrition Facts Label 2 Is Raw Seafood Safe To ...

  3. A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial of Multifaceted Educational Intervention for Mild Cognitive Impairment Among Elderly Malays in Kuala Lumpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sa’ida Munira Johari

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: A 12-month educational intervention on nutritional, lifestyle, and cognitive exercise significantly improved nutritional status, knowledge, and attitude score. The study lacked power to demonstrate a statistically significant positive effect on cognitive functioning; thus, the preliminary findings should be confirmed in a larger trial.

  4. Test Your Nutrition IQ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李井岗

    2004-01-01

    All of us eat every day, but most of us don't understand nutrition. How much do you know about good nutrition? Please answer these twelve questions based on current ideas about food and health. The answers may surprise you.

  5. Nutrition: Too Many Gimmicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Tommy

    2002-01-01

    Notes that despite having access to vast nutritional knowledge, Americans today are more malnourished and obese than ever before. Concludes that eating normal, basic, ordinary foods in variety can supply all nutritional needs; gimmicks are not needed, and the search for the "quick-fix" must stop--it is not on any shelf. Includes the United States…

  6. [Nutrition and oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampman, E.

    2008-01-01

    The conclusion of a recent systematic review of the literature on the relation between nutrition, physical activity and cancer is that more than 30% of all cases of cancer can be prevented by improving nutrition and increasing physical activity. In The Netherlands, 1 out of 100 men and 1 out of 160

  7. Nutritional Hormesis and Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    Nutritional hormesis has the potential to serve as a pro-healthy aging intervention by reducing the susceptibility of the elderly to various chronic degenerative diseases and thereby extending human healthspan. Supportive evidence for nutritional hormesis arising from essential nutrients (vitamins and minerals), dietary pesticides (natural and synthetic), dioxin and other herbicides, and acrylamide will be reviewed and discussed.

  8. Nutritional hormesis and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Daniel P

    2009-11-16

    Nutritional hormesis has the potential to serve as a pro-healthy aging intervention by reducing the susceptibility of the elderly to various chronic degenerative diseases and thereby extending human healthspan. Supportive evidence for nutritional hormesis arising from essential nutrients (vitamins and minerals), dietary pesticides (natural and synthetic), dioxin and other herbicides, and acrylamide will be reviewed and discussed.

  9. Nutrition and allergic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neerven, van R.J.J.; Savelkoul, Huub

    2017-01-01

    The development of IgE-mediated allergic diseases is influenced by many factors, including genetic and environmental factors such as pollution and farming, but also by nutrition. In the last decade, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the impact that nutrition can have on

  10. Pregnancy nutrition surveillance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Pregnancy Nutrition Surveillance System is a useful tool in monitoring Healthy People 2010 objectives and is intended to provide a framework for analyzing data on the nutritional status and behavioral risk factors of pregnant women and the association to birth outcome. The data are useful to health professionals in providing prenatal care and developing programs to reduce pregnancy-related health risks.

  11. Nutrition and Educational Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitt, Ernesto

    1984-01-01

    Research studies concerning how nutrition affects educational performance are examined. From a developmental perspective it seems likely that the earlier the onset and the longer the duration of the nutritional deficiency the higher the probabilities of a cognitive deficit and poor school achievement in childhood and adolescence. (RM)

  12. The effect of a nutritional education program on the nutritional status of elderly patients in a long-term care hospital in Jeollanamdo province: health behavior, dietary behavior, nutrition risk level and nutrient intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bok Hee; Kim, Mi-Ju; Lee, Yoonna

    2012-02-01

    This study was conducted to assess improvements in nutritional status following the application of nutrition education to elderly patients in a long-term care hospital. The study was carried out from January to May 2009, during which a preliminary survey, a pretest, the application of nutrition education, and a post-test were applied in stages. The number of subjects at pretest was 81, and the number of participants included in the final analysis was 61 (18 men, 43 women), all of whom participated in both the nutrition education program and the post-test. The survey consisted of general demographic items, health behaviors, dietary behaviors, the Nutrition Screening Initiative checklist, and nutrient intake assessment (24 hour recall method). The nutrition education program lasted for four weeks. It included a basic education program, provided once a week, and mini-education program, which was offered daily during lunch times. The survey was conducted before and after the education program using the same assessment method, although some items were included only at pretest. When analyzing the changes in elderly patients after the nutritional education program, we found that, among subjective dietary behaviors, self-rated perceptions of health (P nutritional risk levels decreased. In terms of nutrient intake, subjects' intake of energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, calcium, phosphorus, iron, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin C all increased significantly (P nutritional education is effective in improving the nutritional status of elderly patients. We hope that the results of this study can be used as preliminary data for establishing guidelines for nutrition management tailored to elderly patients in long-term care hospitals.

  13. Good maternal nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breda, Joao; Robertson, Aileen

    This publication has three parts: •a summary of the results of a systematic review of the most recent evidence on maternal nutrition, the prevention of obesity and noncommunicable diseases; •a review of existing recommendations for nutrition, physical activity and weight gain during pregnancy...... in European countries; and •lists of possible opportunities for action in European countries. The overview and exploration of the national recommendations for nutrition, physical activity and weight gain during pregnancy are based on the results of a survey in which 51 of the 53 Member States in the WHO....... These are opportunities to promote nutrition and health throughout the life-course, ensure optimal diet-related fetal development and reduce the impact of morbidity and risk factors for noncommunicable diseases by improving maternal nutrition....

  14. [Perioperatory artificial nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, D A; Aller, R; Izaola, O

    2008-06-01

    Malnutrition increases post surgical morbimortality, hospital stance and economical costs. Possibilities of nutritional intervention in surgical patients are important. Early enteral nutrition is better than total parenteral nutrition in patients under surgery. Periroperaoty nutritional support must be administrated to patients with severe or middle undernutrition and will be under surgery, during 7-14 days before surgical intervention, if this intervention could be delayed. Total parenteral nutrition will be not used regularly in patients under mayor digestive surgical procedures. Inmunonutrition has been demonstrated useful in surgical patients. Evidence demonstrates that inmunotritional formulas decrease incidence of infections, hospital stance and time of ventilation in patients in UCI wards. New research areas have been explored in this topic area, carbohydrate utility in presurgical patients and probiotic in enteral formulas.

  15. Good maternal nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breda, Joao; Robertson, Aileen

    This publication has three parts: •a summary of the results of a systematic review of the most recent evidence on maternal nutrition, the prevention of obesity and noncommunicable diseases; •a review of existing recommendations for nutrition, physical activity and weight gain during pregnancy...... in European countries; and •lists of possible opportunities for action in European countries. The overview and exploration of the national recommendations for nutrition, physical activity and weight gain during pregnancy are based on the results of a survey in which 51 of the 53 Member States in the WHO....... These are opportunities to promote nutrition and health throughout the life-course, ensure optimal diet-related fetal development and reduce the impact of morbidity and risk factors for noncommunicable diseases by improving maternal nutrition....

  16. “Smart” RCTs: Development of a Smartphone App for Fully Automated Nutrition-Labeling Intervention Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nicole; Dunford, Elizabeth; Eyles, Helen; Crino, Michelle; Michie, Jo; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona

    2016-01-01

    Background There is substantial interest in the effects of nutrition labels on consumer food-purchasing behavior. However, conducting randomized controlled trials on the impact of nutrition labels in the real world presents a significant challenge. Objective The Food Label Trial (FLT) smartphone app was developed to enable conducting fully automated trials, delivering intervention remotely, and collecting individual-level data on food purchases for two nutrition-labeling randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in New Zealand and Australia. Methods Two versions of the smartphone app were developed: one for a 5-arm trial (Australian) and the other for a 3-arm trial (New Zealand). The RCT protocols guided requirements for app functionality, that is, obtaining informed consent, two-stage eligibility check, questionnaire administration, randomization, intervention delivery, and outcome assessment. Intervention delivery (nutrition labels) and outcome data collection (individual shopping data) used the smartphone camera technology, where a barcode scanner was used to identify a packaged food and link it with its corresponding match in a food composition database. Scanned products were either recorded in an electronic list (data collection mode) or allocated a nutrition label on screen if matched successfully with an existing product in the database (intervention delivery mode). All recorded data were transmitted to the RCT database hosted on a server. Results In total approximately 4000 users have downloaded the FLT app to date; 606 (Australia) and 1470 (New Zealand) users met the eligibility criteria and were randomized. Individual shopping data collected by participants currently comprise more than 96,000 (Australia) and 229,000 (New Zealand) packaged food and beverage products. Conclusions The FLT app is one of the first smartphone apps to enable conducting fully automated RCTs. Preliminary app usage statistics demonstrate large potential of such technology, both for

  17. Iron deficiency and overload in relation to nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg MQI; Jansen EHJM; LEO

    2000-01-01

    Nutritional iron intake in the Netherlands has been reviewed with respect to both iron deficiency and iron overload. In general, iron intake and iron status in the Netherlands are adequate and therefore no change in nutrition policy is required. The following aspects and developments, however, need

  18. Child Nutrition Labeling for Meat and Poultry Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Cheryl; And Others

    Prepared for food manufacturers, this publication contains instructions for calculating the contribution that a meat or poultry product makes toward the meal pattern requirements of child nutrition programs. It also contains instructions on how to apply for and obtain the approval for a label containing a child nutrition statement. These…

  19. Nutrition aspects of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranganu, Andreea; Camporeale, Jayne

    2009-12-01

    Lung cancer is the most common type of cancer, excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer, and is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Notable carcinogens involved in the development of lung cancer include smoking, secondhand smoke, and radon. Lung cancer is divided into 2 major types: non-small-cell lung cancer, the most prevalent, and small-cell lung cancer. Treatment includes surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination of the same. Medical nutrition therapy is often required for nutrition-related side effects of cancer treatment, which include but are not limited to anorexia, nausea and vomiting, and esophagitis. The best protection against lung cancer is avoidance of airborne carcinogens and increased consumption of fruits and vegetables. Studies have shown that smokers taking large amounts of beta-carotene and vitamin A supplements had increased lung cancer incidence and mortality. However, ingestion of beta-carotene from foods, along with a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, has a protective role against lung disease. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by lung cancer patients is prevalent; therefore, clinicians should investigate whether complementary and alternative therapies are used by patients and advise them on the use of these therapies to avoid any potential side effects and interactions with conventional therapies. The article concludes with a case study of a patient with non-small-cell lung cancer and illustrates the use of medical nutrition therapy in relation to cancer treatment side effects.

  20. [Update of enteral nutrition at the patient's home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Luna, P P; Parejo Campos, J; Fenoy Macías, J L

    1999-05-01

    Home enteral nutrition is the administration of enteral formulae into the digestive tract using a tube, with the objective of preventing or correcting malnutrition patients who are seen at home. Home enteral nutrition is a type of nutritional support that is growing, that improves the nutritional status of the patient with a lower cost and with a greater quality of life of the family unit than enteral nutrition in the hospital. The prevalence is clearly increasing although the data of the national registers of patients with at home enteral nutrition are under estimated. Patients who are candidates for home enteral nutrition can be all those with an indication for enteral nutrition and whose underlying disease is stabilized or does not require all the technical means of the hospital in a permanent and essential manner. Neoplasias and neurological diseases are those that benefit most from at home enteral nutrition and in all registries each group varies between 30 and 40%. All access routes and all enteral nutrition formulae can be used in patients with home enteral nutrition. The use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomies is ever more recommended in patients who need at home enteral nutrition for a period longer than 4 weeks. Since the publication of the Ministerial Order of June 2nd 1998, home enteral nutrition is considered a health care service that can be covered by the Social Security. This order lists a series of disease that are likely to be treated with at home enteral nutrition (in our opinion the list is not complete but it is likely to be changed in the future by an Assessing Committee), and it presents some basic norms that all patients must comply with, regardless of the autonomous community in which they live. Before beginning at home enteral nutrition the training of the patient and/or the family with regard to the management of at home enteral nutrition is essential. The existence of qualified personnel with experience in this nutritional support

  1. Nutritional aspects of selenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, M.

    1987-01-01

    The overall objective of this project was to investigate the effect of protein and/or dietary fiber supplementation on selenium absorption and metabolism. These relationships might be of importance in determining either minimum selenium nutritional requirements or levels of intake at which this mineral becomes toxic. Three studies compose the project. The first study involved the controlled feeding of fifteen young adults mice. Subjects were fed a laboratory-controlled diet with and without supplements of selenium or selenium plus guar gum. Selenium supplementation resulted in increased selenium excretion in urine and feces. Supplementation of guar gum, as a dietary fiber, tended to increase fecal selenium excretion and to decrease selenium balance and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity regardless of dietary selenium levels. In study II, seventy two weanling mice were fed varied levels of dietary selenium and protein. Numerically, urinary selenium excretion increased and fecal selenium excretion and selenium balance decreased with increased dietary protein level within the same level of dietary selenium; however, selenium absorption rate tended to decrease with increased dietary protein level. Whole blood and brain tissue glutathione peroxidase activities were higher in animals fed moderate protein level than those fed the other two protein levels. In study III, a survey was conducted to investigate the correlation between dietary fiber or protein intake and urinary selenium excretion. There was a negative correlation between dietary fiber and urinary selenium excretion levels while dietary protein and urinary selenium excretion were positively correlated.

  2. New Perspectives on Alzheimer's Disease and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Deborah R; Clare Morris, Martha; Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Shah, Raj C; Sijben, John; Yaffe, Kristine; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows nutritional factors influence the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its rate of clinical progression. Dietary and lifestyle guidelines to help adults reduce their risk have been developed. However, the clinical dementia picture remains complex, and further evidence is required to demonstrate that modifying nutritional status can protect the brain and prevent, delay, or reduce pathophysiological consequences of AD. Moreover, there is a pressing need for further research because of the global epidemic of overweight and obesity combined with longer life expectancy of the general population and generally observed decreases in body weight with aging and AD. A new research approach is needed, incorporating more sophisticated models to account for complex scenarios influencing the relationship between nutritional status and AD. Systematic research should identify and address evidence gaps. Integrating longitudinal epidemiological data with biomarkers of disease, including brain imaging technology, and randomized controlled interventions may provide greater insights into progressive and subtle neurological changes associated with dietary factors in individuals at risk for or living with AD. In addition, greater understanding of mechanisms involved in nutritional influences on AD risk and progression, such as oxidative stress and loss of neuronal membrane integrity, will better inform possible interventional strategies. There is consensus among the authors that nutritional deficits, and even states of excess, are associated with AD, but more work is needed to determine cause and effect. Appropriately designed diets or nutritional interventions may play a role, but additional research is needed on their clinical-cognitive effectiveness.

  3. NUTRITIONAL AND HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF LEGUMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mebrahtom Gebrelibanos*, Dinka Tesfaye, Y. Raghavendra and Biruk Sintayeyu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Legumes are plants in the family Fabaceae characterized by seeds in pods that are often edible though sometimes poisonous. The nutrient content (protein, carbohydrate and micronutrients of legumes contribute to address under-nutrition, especially protein-calorie malnutrition among children and nursing mothers in developing countries where supplementing cereal-based diets with legumes is suggested as one of the best solutions to protein calorie malnutrition. Anti-nutritional factors, in legumes, may limit their biological value and acceptance as a regular food item, yet they are readily removable and recent research has shown potential health benefits of some of these compounds; and hence, manipulation of processing conditions may be required to remove or reduce only those unwanted components. Moreover, legumes play a role in prevention, improvement and/or treatment of disease conditions such as, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, cancer diseases (e.g breast and prostate cancers and lowers blood cholesterol level. Most of these disease conditions are associated with over-nutrition and obesity and are considered as diseases of the rich. It is, therefore, claimed that including legumes in a health-promoting diet is important in meeting the major dietary recommendations to improve the nutritional status of undernourished as well as over-nourished individuals, and to reduce risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and cancer. In this review, some of the scientific viewpoints that attempt to justify the nutritional contributions, anti-nutritional considerations and health implications of legumes are discussed.

  4. Nitrogen Balance and Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Older Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland N. Dickerson

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Critically ill older patients with sarcopenia experience greater morbidity and mortality than younger patients. It is anticipated that unabated protein catabolism would be detrimental for the critically ill older patient. Healthy older subjects experience a diminished response to protein supplementation when compared to their younger counterparts, but this anabolic resistance can be overcome by increasing protein intake. Preliminary evidence suggests that older patients may respond differently to protein intake than younger patients during critical illness as well. If sufficient protein intake is given, older patients can achieve a similar nitrogen accretion response as younger patients even during critical illness. However, there is concern among some clinicians that increasing protein intake in older patients during critical illness may lead to azotemia due to decreased renal functional reserve which may augment the propensity towards worsened renal function and worsened clinical outcomes. Current evidence regarding protein requirements, nitrogen balance, ureagenesis, and clinical outcomes during nutritional therapy for critically ill older patients is reviewed.

  5. Nitrogen Balance and Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Older Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Roland N

    2016-04-18

    Critically ill older patients with sarcopenia experience greater morbidity and mortality than younger patients. It is anticipated that unabated protein catabolism would be detrimental for the critically ill older patient. Healthy older subjects experience a diminished response to protein supplementation when compared to their younger counterparts, but this anabolic resistance can be overcome by increasing protein intake. Preliminary evidence suggests that older patients may respond differently to protein intake than younger patients during critical illness as well. If sufficient protein intake is given, older patients can achieve a similar nitrogen accretion response as younger patients even during critical illness. However, there is concern among some clinicians that increasing protein intake in older patients during critical illness may lead to azotemia due to decreased renal functional reserve which may augment the propensity towards worsened renal function and worsened clinical outcomes. Current evidence regarding protein requirements, nitrogen balance, ureagenesis, and clinical outcomes during nutritional therapy for critically ill older patients is reviewed.

  6. Nutrition management of adolescent pregnancy: technical support paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    A high proportion of pregnant teens are nutritionally at risk and require nutrition intervention early and throughout their pregnancies. Although questions remain about continued growth, nutrition needs, and the extent of biological immaturity as risk factors, it is certain that the psychosocial and economic risks to the pregnant woman are great at this time. The nutrition needs of the teen can best be met by consumption of foods with a high concentration and balance of nutrients. The recommended weight gain should be achieved and will relate to the maturational stage and the prepregnant height-for-weight proportion. As an integral part of health care programs for pregnant teenagers, the nutrition consultant must be skillful in establishing rapport and developing a relationship within which to counsel patients in the nutritional aspects of reproduction. Counseling should extend to the postpartum period to have a significant and lasting effect on the future of the parents and child.

  7. Health education and nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpitsiori Ε.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over the centuries both the medical and wider health sectors have developed and many new inventions and discoveries have been made; however, the health sector has never stopped to be a current issue. Every time a possible cure of a disease was found, another disease appeared and affected humans. Therefore, the requirement of our time focuses mainly on early diagnosis, immediate intervention and prevention. Objective: By using the structures and services of the Greek Public Health, this study aims to explore the ways through which models on nutrition can be developed so that human illnesses will be avoided. Methods: The material of this review is based on the printed Greek and international literature and in electronic databases. In parallel, a cheirodialogi books, articles and studies from libraries with the help of keywords. Results: The need of a system managing the huge amount of information and the different interrelated Public Health sectors is now more pressing than ever before. The Public Health interferes collectively with perpetual efforts in improving population health. As a result, its main objective is to focus on prevention and primary care. In addition, the dissemination of healthy eating habits is of primary importance for the Public Health. Conclusions: The radical change to modern lifestyle, along with the reduction in leisure time, the transformation of family structure and the subsequent adoption of new dietary habits leading to the consumption of ready and standardized food, is one of the most serious challenges for Public Health in today's era. The issue of nutrition policy is not only confined to its hygiene aspect, but it has many other important components. At first, this policy accounts for a large amount of the total economic activity of a country, concerning the primary, secondary and tertiary sector, while at the same time it absorbs a large proportion of idividual consumption. Furthermore, it is linked

  8. Nutrition and nutritional issues for dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Mónica; Carvalho, Pedro; Moreira, Pedro; Teixeira, Vítor H

    2013-09-01

    Proper nutrition, not simply adequate energetic intake, is needed to achieve optimal dance performance. However, little scientific research exists concerning nutrition in dance, and so, to propose nutritional guidelines for this field, recommendations need to be based mainly on studies done in other physically active groups. To diminish the risk of energy imbalance and associated disorders, dancers must consume at least 30 kcal/kg fat-free mass/day, plus the training energy expenditure. For macronutrients, a daily intake of 3 to 5 g carbohydrates/kg, 1.2 to 1.7 g protein/kg, and 20 to 35% of energy intake from fat can be recommended. Dancers may be at increased risk of poor micronutrient status due to their restricted energy intake; micronutrients that deserve concern are iron, calcium, and vitamin D. During training, dancers should give special attention to fluid and carbohydrate intake in order to maintain optimal cognition, motivation, and motor skill performance. For competition/stage performance preparation, it is also important to ensure that an adequate dietary intake is being achieved. Nutritional supplements that may help in achieving specific nutritional goals when dietary intake is inadequate include multivitamins and mineral, iron, calcium, and vitamin D supplements, sports drinks, sports bars, and liquid meal supplements. Caffeine can also be used as an ergogenic aid. It is important that dancers seek dietary advice from qualified specialists, since the pressure to maintain a low body weight and low body fat levels is high, especially in styles as ballet, and this can lead to an unbalanced diet and health problems if not correctly supervised.

  9. Exigências nutricionais da grápia (Apuleia leiocarpa Vog. Macbride em solo podzólico vermelho amarelo Nutritional requirements of grápia (Apuleia leiocarpa Vog. Macbride in a red yellow podzolic soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Teixeira Nicoloso

    1999-06-01

    purpose of this study was to characterize the nutritional requirements of grápia in a red yellow podzolic soil by using the lacking nutrient technique. Grápia plants were cultivated in pots containing soil, under glasshouse conditions. Eighteen treatments were tested in a fatorial design (2 X 9. The factors consisted of two profiles of the same soil (A and B and nine fertilization treatments. The fertilization treatments were: (1 natural soil, (2 complete fertilization with macro and micronutrients (complete, (3 complete less N, (4 complete less P, (5 complete less K, (6 complete less Ca, (7 complete less Mg, (8 complete less S, and (9 complete less the micronutrients Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn, B and Mo. After 165 days of cultivation the growth parameters analysed were dry weight of roots and aerial part, relationship between dry weight of root and aerial part, number of leaves, total lenght of the root system, shoot diameter, height of the plant, number of shoot nodes, and the concentration of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Cu, Mn and Fe in the plants parts. The isolated omission of Ca, Mg, and of the micronutrients Zn, Cu, Fe and Mn from the fertilization do not affect the growth of grápia in height, shoot diameter, number of shoot nodes, number of leaves, and biomass accumulation, as well as the nutrient concentration in the plant tissues, indicating that the natural nutrient levels are adequate. The height of the plant, number of shoot nodes, number of leaves, total lenght of the root system, biomass accumulation and the nutrient concentration decrease strikingly by omitting P, S, N and K from the fertilization, for both profiles of the soil.

  10. [Nutritional problems of female adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Ortega, Ana Isabel; González Iglesias, María José; Gimeno Pita, Patricia; Ortega, Rosa M

    2015-07-18

    Feeding in infancy is necessary to allow proper growth and development. Health of these early stages of life may influence the development of many diseases in the future (atherosclerosis, osteoporosis, hypertension, obesity ...). Furthermore habits set in childhood will endure throughout life. Therefore, getting adequate dietary and health patterns in childhood is vital. In adolescence occur a number of changes: rapid growth, development of secondary sexual characteristics, changes in body composition, ... that will be a challenge when getting or keeping that adequate feeding and habits. In female population requirements of different micronutrients are increased (mainly iron) and also higher energy requirement than in later stages of life occurs. However, adolescents are the main population at risk for developing eating disorders, which can pose serious problems to meet these nutritional requirements to achieve optimal development. These features and others, such as pregnant adolescents, are what make them a population that should be taken special care from nutritional point of view. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  11. Sport Nutrition Knowledge, Behaviors and Beliefs of High School Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manore, Melinda M; Patton-Lopez, Megan M; Meng, Yu; Wong, Siew Sun

    2017-04-01

    For adolescent athletes (14-18 years), data on sport nutrition knowledge, behaviors and beliefs are limited, especially based on sex, race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. High school soccer players (n = 535; 55% female; 51% White, 41% Latino; 41% National School Lunch Program (NSLP) participants (80% Latino)) completed two questionnaires (demographic/health history and sport nutrition). The sport nutrition knowledge score was 45.6% with higher scores in NSLP-Whites vs. NSLP-Latinos (p nutritional requirements, but more than twice as likely to report that nutritional supplements were necessary for training (p sport nutrition education that enhances food selection skills for health and sport performance.

  12. Poverty nutrition linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Prema

    2007-10-01

    At the time of independence majority of Indians were poor. In spite of spending over 80 per cent of their income on food, they could not get adequate food. Living in areas of poor environmental sanitation they had high morbidity due to infections; nutrition toll due to infections was high because of poor access to health care. As a result, majority of Indians especially children were undernourished. The country initiated programmes to improve economic growth, reduce poverty, improve household food security and nutritional status of its citizens, especially women and children. India defined poverty on the basis of calorie requirement and focused its attention on providing subsidized food and essential services to people below poverty line. After a period of slow but steady economic growth, the last decade witnessed acceleration of economic growth. India is now one of the fastest growing economies in the world with gross domestic product (GDP) growth over 8 per cent. There has been a steady but slow decline in poverty; but last decade's rapid economic growth did not translate in to rapid decline in poverty. In 1970s, country became self sufficient in food production; adequate buffer stocks have been built up. Poor had access to subsidized food through the public distribution system. As a result, famines have been eliminated, though pockets of food scarcity still existed. Over the years there has been a decline in household expenditure on food due to availability of food grains at low cost but energy intake has declined except among for the poor. In spite of unaltered/declining energy intake there has been some reduction in undernutrition and increase in overnutrition in adults. This is most probably due to reduction in physical activity. Under the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) programme food supplements are being provided to children, pregnant and lactating women in the entire country. In spite of these, low birth weight rates are still over 30 per

  13. [Quality of artificial nutritional support in an intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Cabrera, L; O'Shanahan-Navarro, G; García-Martul, M; Ramírez Rodríguez, A; Sánchez-Palacios, M; Hernández-Medina, E

    2006-01-01

    To assess what are the reasons for discrepancies between the amount of nutrients delivered, prescribed and theoretical requirements, in an intensive care unit. Prospective cohort study over a 5 months period. Intensive Care Unit of the Insular University Hospital in Gran Canaria. Adult patients who were prescribed enteral and or parenteral nutrition for > or = 2 days and we followed them for the first 14 days of nutrition delivery. The prescribed and the delivered calories were calculated every day, whereas the theoretical requeriments were calculated after the ICU stay, by using the Harris-Benedict formula adjusted with a stress factor. Also the reason for cessation of enteral tube feeding > 1 hour in the days of artificial nutrition were analyzed. Fifty-nine consecutive patients, receiving nutritional support either enterally or intravenously, and 465 nutrition days analyzed. Nutrition was initiated within 48 hours after ICU admission. Enteral nutrition was the preferential route used. Seventy-nine percent of the mean caloric amount required was prescribed, and 66% was effectively delivered; also 88% of the amount prescribed was delivered. The low ratio of delivered-prescribed calories concerned principally enteral nutrition and was caused by gastrointestinal intolerance. We observe a wide variation in practice patterns among physicians to start, increase, reduce or stop enteral nutrition when symptoms of intolerance appear. In our ICU exists an important difference between the caloric theoretical requests and the quantity really delivered; this deficit is more clear in the enteral nutrition. The knowledge of this situation allows to take measures directed to optimizing the nutritional support of our patients. Possibly the motivation in the medical and nursery personnel in carrying out nutritional protocols it might be the most effective measurement, which it would be necessary to confirm in later studies.

  14. Chronobiology and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Y; Shibata, S

    2013-12-03

    Numerous long-term studies have investigated the circadian clock system in mammals, which organizes physiological functions, including metabolism, digestion, and absorption of food, and energy expenditure. Food or nutrition can be a synchronizer for the circadian clock systems, as potent as the external light-dark signal can be. Recent studies have investigated different kinds of food, frequency of consumption, and time of consumption for optimizing body clock and ensuring healthy habits. In this review, we discuss recent studies investigating chronobiology and nutrition, and then summarize available information as "Chrono-nutrition" for the development of a new standardized research strategy.

  15. Diabetes, Nutrition, and Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhafiz, Ahmed H; Sinclair, Alan J

    2015-08-01

    Aging is associated with body composition changes that lead to glucose intolerance and increased risk of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes increases with aging, and the prevalence has increased because of the increased life expectancy of the population. Lifestyle modifications through nutrition and exercise in combination with medications are the main components of diabetes management. The potential benefits of nutrition and exercise intervention in older people with diabetes are enormous. Nutrition and exercise training are feasible even in frail older people living in care homes and should take into consideration individual circumstances, cultural factors, and ethnic preferences.

  16. What is Nutrition & Metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Richard D; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2004-08-17

    A new Open Access journal, Nutrition & Metabolism (N&M) will publish articles that integrate nutrition with biochemistry and molecular biology. The open access process is chosen to provide rapid and accessible dissemination of new results and perspectives in a field that is of great current interest. Manuscripts in all areas of nutritional biochemistry will be considered but three areas of particular interest are lipoprotein metabolism, amino acids as metabolic signals, and the effect of macronutrient composition of diet on health. The need for the journal is identified in the epidemic of obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemias and related diseases, and a sudden increase in popular diets, as well as renewed interest in intermediary metabolism.

  17. Significance of combined nutritional and morphological precaecal parameters for feed evaluations in non-ruminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van P.

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis the hypothesis is tested that the nutritional evaluation of dietary formulations in non-ruminants requires both functional-nutritional and functional-morphological parameters. The functional-nutritional parameters provide data on the outcome of the digestive process. A

  18. 77 FR 48045 - Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Disqualified Recipient Reporting and Computer Matching...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... / Monday, August 13, 2012 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Parts 272 and 273 RIN 0584-AB51 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Disqualified Recipient Reporting and Computer Matching Requirements AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service, USDA....

  19. How Medical Students' Behaviors and Attitudes affect the Impact of a Brief Curriculum on Nutrition Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlair, Sheira; Hanley, Kathleen; Gillespie, Colleen; Disney, Lindsey; Kalet, Adina; Darby, Pamella C.; Frank, Erica; Spencer, Elsa; Harris, Jeff; Jay, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a nutrition curriculum and explore the influence of medical students' own nutrition practices on its impact. Methods: An anonymous survey was given to first-year medical students attending a required course immediately prior to and 2 weeks after a 2-hour interactive nutrition curriculum intervention in a large private urban…

  20. The Evolution of Research in Family and Consumer Sciences: Food, Nutrition, and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Eleanor D.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of research on food, nutrition, and health in the Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences and Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal 1985-2000 (n=172) identified four categories: (1) changes in dietary standards and nutrient requirements; (2) public policy and guidance on nutrition; (3) food behavior and nutrition intervention; and…

  1. Adaptive collective foraging in groups with conflicting nutritional needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Alistair M.; Lihoreau, Mathieu; Charleston, Michael A.; Buhl, Jerome; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Collective foraging, based on positive feedback and quorum responses, is believed to improve the foraging efficiency of animals. Nutritional models suggest that social information transfer increases the ability of foragers with closely aligned nutritional needs to find nutrients and maintain a balanced diet. However, whether or not collective foraging is adaptive in a heterogeneous group composed of individuals with differing nutritional needs is virtually unexplored. Here we develop an evolutionary agent-based model using concepts of nutritional ecology to address this knowledge gap. Our aim was to evaluate how collective foraging, mediated by social retention on foods, can improve nutrient balancing in individuals with different requirements. The model suggests that in groups where inter-individual nutritional needs are unimodally distributed, high levels of collective foraging yield optimal individual fitness by reducing search times that result from moving between nutritionally imbalanced foods. However, where nutritional needs are highly bimodal (e.g. where the requirements of males and females differ) collective foraging is selected against, leading to group fission. In this case, additional mechanisms such as assortative interactions can coevolve to allow collective foraging by subgroups of individuals with aligned requirements. Our findings indicate that collective foraging is an efficient strategy for nutrient regulation in animals inhabiting complex nutritional environments and exhibiting a range of social forms. PMID:27152206

  2. Adaptive collective foraging in groups with conflicting nutritional needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Alistair M; Lihoreau, Mathieu; Charleston, Michael A; Buhl, Jerome; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J

    2016-04-01

    Collective foraging, based on positive feedback and quorum responses, is believed to improve the foraging efficiency of animals. Nutritional models suggest that social information transfer increases the ability of foragers with closely aligned nutritional needs to find nutrients and maintain a balanced diet. However, whether or not collective foraging is adaptive in a heterogeneous group composed of individuals with differing nutritional needs is virtually unexplored. Here we develop an evolutionary agent-based model using concepts of nutritional ecology to address this knowledge gap. Our aim was to evaluate how collective foraging, mediated by social retention on foods, can improve nutrient balancing in individuals with different requirements. The model suggests that in groups where inter-individual nutritional needs are unimodally distributed, high levels of collective foraging yield optimal individual fitness by reducing search times that result from moving between nutritionally imbalanced foods. However, where nutritional needs are highly bimodal (e.g. where the requirements of males and females differ) collective foraging is selected against, leading to group fission. In this case, additional mechanisms such as assortative interactions can coevolve to allow collective foraging by subgroups of individuals with aligned requirements. Our findings indicate that collective foraging is an efficient strategy for nutrient regulation in animals inhabiting complex nutritional environments and exhibiting a range of social forms.

  3. Nutrition for synchronized swimming: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, Bronwen

    2011-10-01

    Synchronized swimming enjoys worldwide popularity and has been part of the formal Olympic program since 1984. Despite this, relatively little research has been conducted on participant nutrition practices and requirements, and there are significant gaps in the knowledge base despite the numerous areas in which nutrition could affect performance and safety. This review aimed to summarize current findings and identify areas requiring further research. Uniform physique in team or duet events may be more important than absolute values for muscularity or body fat, but a lean and athletic appearance remains key. Synchronized swimmers appear to have an increased risk of developing eating disorders, and there is evidence of delayed menarche, menstrual dysfunction, and lower bone density relative to population norms. Dietary practices remain relatively unknown, but micronutrient status for iron and magnesium may be compromised. More research is required across all aspects of nutrition status, anthropometry, and physiology, and both sports nutrition and sports medicine support may be required to reduce risks for participants.

  4. Nutritional assessment of the critically ill patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    statistics for the prevalence of at-risk elderly was even higher,. 46 ± 0.5% .... hypertension, HIV/AIDS, renal failure) that may influence requirements, previous .... In the case of suspicion of the presence of a nutritional anaemia, confirmation of.

  5. Preliminary rock mechanics laboratory: Investigation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oschman, K.P.; Hummeldorf, R.G.; Hume, H.R.; Karakouzian, M.; Vakili, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This document presents the rationale for rock mechanics laboratory testing (including the supporting analysis and numerical modeling) planned for the site characterization of a nuclear waste repository in salt. This plan first identifies what information is required for regulatory and design purposes, and then presents the rationale for the testing that satisfies the required information needs. A preliminary estimate of the minimum sampling requirements for rock laboratory testing during site characterization is also presented. Periodic revision of this document is planned.

  6. Triagem nutricional em adultos hospitalizados Nutritional screening in inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariur Gomes Beghetto

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Em hospitais, o objetivo de um procedimento de triagem nutricional é identificar indivíduos desnutridos ou em risco de desnutrição, possibilitando intervenção nutricional precoce e melhor alocação de recursos. Diferentes métodos são apresentados na literatura para esta finalidade: Malnutrition Screening Tool, Short Nutritional Assessment Questionnaire, Nutritional Risk Index, Nutrition Risk Score, Nutritional Risk Screening, Mini Nutritional Assessment, Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool, Nutritional Screening Tool, Nutritional Screening Equation. No entanto, o emprego de muitos destes instrumentos está limitado pela inadequada metodologia empregada na derivação e/ou validação, pela seleção de grupos específicos de pacientes, pela pouca praticidade ou por necessidade de um especialista para seu emprego. Na ausência de um padrão de referência para emitir o diagnóstico nutricional, desfechos clínicos relevantes devem balizar a derivação e a validação de novos instrumentos. Este trabalho descreve os instrumentos de triagem nutricional acima referidos e apresenta considerações quanto ao seu emprego para adultos hospitalizados não selecionados.In hospitals, the aim of a nutritional screening procedure is to identify malnourished individuals or those at risk of malnutrition, allowing early nutritional intervention and better allocation of resources. Different methods are presented in the literature for this purpose: Malnutrition Screening Tool, Short Nutritional Assessment Questionnaire, Nutritional Risk Index, Nutrition Risk Score, Nutritional Risk Screening, Mini Nutritional Assessment, Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool, Nutritional Screening Tool, Nutritional Screening Equation. However, the use of many of these instruments is limited by inadequate methodology employed in their derivation and / or validation, by selecting specific groups of patients, by their limited feasibility or by requiring an expert to

  7. [Modular enteral nutrition in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo Sanchís, S; Prenafeta Ferré, M T; Sempere Luque, M D

    1991-01-01

    Modular Enteral Nutrition may be a substitute for Parenteral Nutrition in children with different pathologies. Study of 4 children with different pathologies selected from a group of 40 admitted to the Maternal-Childrens Hospital "Valle de Hebrón" in Barcelona, who received modular enteral nutrition. They were monitored on a daily basis by the Dietician Service. Modular enteral nutrition consists of modules of proteins, peptides, lipids, glucids and mineral salts-vitamins. 1.--Craneo-encephalic traumatisms with loss of consciousness, Feeding with a combination of parenteral nutrition and modular enteral nutrition for 7 days. In view of the tolerance and good results of the modular enteral nutrition, the parenteral nutrition was suspended and modular enteral nutrition alone used up to a total of 43 days. 2.--55% burns with 36 days of hyperproteic modular enteral nutrition together with normal feeding. A more rapid recovery was achieved with an increase in total proteins and albumin. 3.--Persistent diarrhoea with 31 days of modular enteral nutrition, 5 days on parenteral nutrition alone and 8 days on combined parenteral nutrition and modular enteral nutrition. In view of the tolerance and good results of the modular enteral nutrition, the parenteral nutrition was suspended. 4.--Mucoviscidosis with a total of 19 days on modular enteral nutrition, 12 of which were exclusively on modular enteral nutrition and 7 as a night supplement to normal feeding. We administered proteic intakes of up to 20% of the total calorific intake and in concentrations of up to 1.2 calories/ml of the final preparation, always with a good tolerance. Modular enteral nutrition can and should be used as a substitute for parenteral nutrition in children with different pathologies, thus preventing the complications inherent in parenteral nutrition.

  8. Early Childhood Educator's Nutrition Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Christine; And Others

    This nutrition handbook is designed to provide enough information on nutrition and food habits to enable early childhood educators to add a nutrition dimension to children's learning activities. Topics covered are the role of nutrition in growth during the preschool years; nutrients and their functions; selecting a healthy diet; common nutritional…

  9. Improving Nutrition Through Multisectoral Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the nutrition sensitive social protection are: 1) target activities to the most nutritionally vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children less than 24 months; 2) include nutrition education and counseling activities within social protection interventions to increase household awareness of care giving and health seeking behaviors; 3) integrate nutrition serv...

  10. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  11. Food and Nutrition Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Programs Disaster Assistance State Systems Offices Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion (CNPP) FNS Regional Offices Partnerships and Outreach Civil Rights Food Safety (OFS) Human Resources (Careers) News USDA Makes It Easy for ...

  12. Nutrition in children posttransplantation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is little data looking at nutrition posttransplantation in children. Improvement in growth ... are provided by fat with some as medium chain triglycerides, if fat .... with physical activity is important to decrease the complications of metabolic ...

  13. Nutrition for Older Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Facts Fitness Fitness Find out more Categories Sports and Performance Training and Recovery Exercise Topics Fueling Your Workout Benefits of Physical Activity Exercise Nutrition Top Articles Man running - Protein ...

  14. Cystic fibrosis - nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in recipes. Add marshmallows to fruit or hot chocolate. Add raisins, dates, or chopped nuts and brown ... AP, Quinton H. Evidence-based practice recommendations for nutrition-related management of children and adults with cystic ...

  15. Diet and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need to know about Wilson Disease Diet and Nutrition Food . . . . Adherence to a low copper diet is ... dysarthria; rigid dystonia; pseudobulbar palsy; seizures; migraine headaches; insomnia Psychiatric: Depression; neuroses; personality changes; psychosis Other symptoms: ...

  16. Toxic Amblyopia (Nutritional Amblyopia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finds Additional Content Medical News Toxic Amblyopia (Nutritional Amblyopia) By James Garrity, MD, Whitney and Betty MacMillan ... Neuropathies) Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Optic Neuritis Papilledema Toxic Amblyopia Toxic amblyopia is damage to the optic nerve ...

  17. Nutritional rickets in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck-Nielsen, Signe; Jensen, Tina Kold; Gram, Jeppe

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study describes clinical and biochemical characteristics of nutritional rickets and risk factors at diagnosis among children living in Denmark. All medical records from patients with rickets referred to or discharged from hospitals in Southern Denmark from 1985 to 2005 were...... identified by register search. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients included were younger than 15 years of age and fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of primary, nutritional rickets. A total of 112 patients with nutritional rickets were included: 29 were of ethnic Danish origin, and 83 were immigrants. RESULTS...... girls older than 4 years of age, 78% were veiled. DISCUSSION: Nutritional rickets in Denmark is predominantly a disease among immigrants, but ethnic Danish patients comprised nearly half of all patients diagnosed before the age of 4 years, and they presented more frequently with hypocalcemic seizures...

  18. Celiac disease - nutritional considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002443.htm Celiac disease - nutritional considerations To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Celiac disease is an immune disorder passed down through families. ...

  19. Adult nutrition assessment tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    This tutorial presents a systematic approach to nutrition assessment based on a modern appreciation for the contributions of inflammation that serve as the foundation for newly proposed consensus definitions for malnutrition syndromes. Practical indicators of malnutrition and inflammation have been ...

  20. Personalized nutrition and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lu

    2014-08-01

    The past few decades have witnessed a rapid rise in nutrition-related disorders such as obesity in the United States and over the world. Traditional nutrition research has associated various foods and nutrients with obesity. Recent advances in genomics have led to identification of the genetic variants determining body weight and related dietary factors such as intakes of energy and macronutrients. In addition, compelling evidence has lent support to interactions between genetic variations and dietary factors in relation to obesity and weight change. Moreover, recently emerging data from other 'omics' studies such as epigenomics and metabolomics suggest that more complex interplays between the global features of human body and dietary factors may exist at multiple tiers in affecting individuals' susceptibility to obesity; and a concept of 'personalized nutrition' has been proposed to integrate this novel knowledge with traditional nutrition research, with the hope ultimately to endorse person-centric diet intervention to mitigate obesity and related disorders.

  1. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: revised 2015 standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in pediatric nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin-Folino, Nancy; Ogata, Beth N; Charney, Pamela J; Holt, Katrina; Brewer, Holly L; Sharrett, Mary K; Carney, Liesje N

    2015-03-01

    All of the health care professions recognize that care of infants and children is best managed as a specialty area of practice. Nutrition plays a key role in normal growth and development. Appropriate nutrition care is vital adjuvant therapy for infants and children with acute or chronic illness. Provision of nutrition services in pediatric practice requires that registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) have advanced knowledge in the focus area of pediatric nutrition. Therefore, the Pediatric Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Management Committee, has developed this revision of the Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for RDNs in Pediatric Nutrition as a resource for RDNs working in pediatric nutrition to assess skill level and to identify needs for professional development to advance practice in pediatric nutrition. This revision reflects recent advances in pediatric nutrition and replaces the previous Standards published in 2009. The Standards of Practice represent the four steps of the Nutrition Care Process as applied to the care of patients/clients. The Standards of Professional Performance represent six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. The Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance are complementary resources for RDNs working in pediatric nutrition and dietetics practice. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Importance of nutritional status in recovery from acute cholecystitis: benefit from enteral nutrition supplementation including medium chain triglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yukinobu; Inui, Kazuo; Yoshino, Junji; Wakabayashi, Takao; Okushima, Kazumu; Kobayashi, Takashi; Miyoshi, Hironao; Nakamura, Yuta

    2007-09-01

    This study was undertaken to clarify the importance of nutritional status in patients with acute cholecystitis, and also evaluate whether they benefited from enteral nutrition supplementation, including medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), during the convalescent stage. Patients with acute cholecystitis admitted to our hospital between April 1994 and March 2002 were classified into a poor nutrition group (n=40; total serum proteinnutrition group (n=71; >5.0 g/dl). Patients with poor nutrition were significantly more elderly than those with fair nutrition, and had significantly higher serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. The two groups did not differ significantly with respect to other laboratory data, gender distribution, or medical treatment. We supplemented ordinary meals with enteral nutrition including MCT in 16 patients during the convalescent stage (MCT group). We compared their length of hospital stay and days required to recovery to pre-admission functional status for activities of daily living (ADL) with the same intervals in 16 patients without supplementation (non-MCT group) selected to match for age, gender, and fair or poor nutritional status from among 111 patients. Hospitalizations were significantly longer in the poor nutrition group (43.0+/-2.2 days) than in the fair nutrition group (27.0+/-8.2 days). Significantly more days were required to recover ADL status in the poor nutrition group (12.0+/-7.2 days) than in the fair group (9.4+/-5.2 days). Hospitalizations were significantly shorter in the MCT group (20.1+/-15 days) than in the non-MCT group (35.4+/-12.8 days). Significantly fewer days were required to recover ADL status in the MCT group (10.9+/-7 days) than in the non-MCT group (13.1+/-6.8 days). Administration of enteral nutrition including MCT during convalescence from acute cholecystitis thus appears to promote functional recovery shorten hospital stay.

  3. No Appetite? How to Get Nutrition during Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... crackers, cheese with crackers, muffins, cottage cheese and chocolate milk are examples of high-calorie snacks requiring ... patient-education/eating-hints. Accessed Jan. 5, 2015. Nutrition in cancer care (PDQ). National Cancer Institute. http:// ...

  4. Study review : The European Nutrient Database (ENDB) for Nutritional Epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charrondiere, U.R.; Vignat, J.; Moller, A.; Ireland, J.; Becker, W.; Church, S.; Farran, A.; Holden, J.; Klemm, C.; Linardou, A.; Mueller, D.; Staveren, van W.A.

    2002-01-01

    Food composition databases (FCDB), as well as standardized calculation procedures are required for international studies on nutrition and disease to calculate nutrient intakes across countries. Comparisons of national FCDBs have shown that major improvements are needed in standardization and documen

  5. Nutritional diversity of leafy amaranth species grown in Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-07-31

    Jul 31, 2014 ... The food available food is of poor nutritional value, this causes malnutrition ..... body tissues and fluids (Ma G et al 2005). ... and is required as a component of the human diet. .... Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and.

  6. Nutritional management of a patient with an open abdomen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-08-14

    Aug 14, 2014 ... by haemodynamic instability, fluid restriction owing to renal failure and fistula formation in ..... Therefore, appropriate nutrition therapy in these patients becomes ... the nutrient requirements and replacing fluids and electrolytes.

  7. Nutrition in childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolo, Marie Claire

    2014-01-01

    Childhood is the stage in a human’s life associated with growth and development. Growth proceeds rapidly in early life, slows down in middle childhood and accelerates at puberty before linear growth ceases. With increasing age there is also physical and psychomotor maturation, which influences activity, body composition, feeding skills and food choices (Geissler, 2011). Adequate nutrition is essential for growth, health and development of children. Poor nutrition in...

  8. Niveles plasmáticos y eritrocitarios de zinc y cobre en pacientes críticos con nutrición parenteral y su relación con el contenido de las fórmulas: estudio preliminar Plasmatic and erythrocytic zinc and copper levels in critically ill patients on parenteral nutrition and their relationship with formulas content: preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M.ª Menéndez

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Estudiar, en pacientes graves que requirieron nutrición parenteral, la relación entre las cantidades de Zn y Cu presentes en las fórmulas, la evolución clínica y los cambios en algunos parámetros bioquímicos (niveles plasmáticos y eritrocitarios de Zn y Cu durante terapéutica nutricional parenteral. Pacientes y metodología: Se estudiaron 5 pacientes graves, adultos, sometidos a cirugía mayor abdominal, que requirieron nutrición parenteral. Se determinó: 1 zinc y cobre en las fórmulas parenterales; 2 en los pacientes, al comienzo (To y al final (Tf del tratamiento, en eritrocitos: Zinc (Zn-E y Cobre (Cu-E; en plasma, Zinc (Zn-Pl y en suero, core (Cu-S. Zinc y Cobre se determinaron por espectrometría de absorción atómica. Resultados: Los valores promedio ± desvío estándar y rangos (entre paréntesis fueron: fórmulas parenterales (µg/g: zinc: 6,0 ± 1,1 (2,2-7,0; cobre: 2,4 ± 0,7 (0,5-3,7. Parámetros bioquímicos: a To (n = 5; Zn-E (µg/ml: 21,6 ± 10,0 (13,6-36,1; Zn-Pl (µg/dl: 88 ± 72 (29-205; Cu-E (µg/dl: 113 ± 22 (83=144; Cu-S (µg/dl: 119 ± 24 (80-140. Dos pacientes murieron y en los 3 pacientes con evolución favorable los resultados fueron a Tf: Zn-E (µg/ml: 16,6 ± 0,1 (16,6-16,7; Zn-Pl (µg/dl: 77 ± 22 (60-102; Cu-E (µg/dl: 139 ± 29 (106-156; Cu-S (µg/dl: 172 ± 20 (158-195. Los resultados individuales comparados con los de referencia (individuos normales de Buenos Aires, con adecuación nutricional indicaron que los 3 pacientes con evolución favorable normalizaron los niveles de Zn-Pl y Zn-E. sin embargo, el Cu-S se incrementó en los 3 casos y el Cu-E en 2 de ellos. Conclusiones: Estos resultados evidencias que, en los pacientes estudiados, los niveles de zinc en las fórmulas parenterales serían adecuados para evitar la deficiencia, mientras que los de cobre podrían ser elevados.Objectives: To study in severe patients that required parenteral nutrition the relationship between Zn and Cu

  9. National Dairy Council Award for Excellence in Medical and Dental Nutrition Education Lecture, 1994: nutrition education in medical schools--the prospect before us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shils, M E

    1994-10-01

    The criteria usually used for evaluating the state of nutrition education in our medical schools include the numbers of schools with required nutrition courses, attendance at nutrition electives, student satisfaction with their nutrition teaching, and the number of postgraduate clinical nutrition programs. These criteria indicate either no change or actual decreases over the years. More important, barriers persist that exclude essential nutrition education for all students in the clinical years. This pessimistic evaluation is tempered by events that, if properly addressed, may lead to improvement. Changes in the traditional medical curriculum are occurring in an increasing number of schools. More curriculum planning, execution, and oversight by interdepartmental faculty (problem-based and small-group learning); a greater emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention; and expansion of primary care offer the potential for more emphasis on nutrition education. This will not happen automatically but requires a vigorous effort by the Society and its members to become involved in the reform movement.

  10. Nutrition of burned patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudaviciene, Daiva; Rimdeika, Rytis; Adamonis, Kestutis

    2004-01-01

    Burns form 5-12% of all traumas. About 2,200 of patients are annually hospitalized in Lithuania. In most cases people of the employable age get burned. The treatment is often long-lasting, and afterwards recovered patients often have invalidity from burn sequels. The mortality of hospitalized burned patients is about 10%. The most common causes of death are pulmonary edema, pneumonia, sepsis and multiorgan failure. All these complications are related with insufficient nutrition. These complications are extremely frequent and dangerous for patients with more than 20% of body burned. The nutritional support of burned patient gives a possibility to increase the survival probability, to decrease complication rate and hospitalization time. Currently in Lithuania there are no standards for burned patient nutrition. More attention is given to strategy of surgical strategy and techniques, as well as antibiotic therapy. This article is the review of the different aspects of artificial nutrition of burned patient: indications, modes of nutrition, mixtures and terms of nutritional support.

  11. Nutrition rehabilitation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massanet, Pablo Lucas; Petit, Laurent; Louart, Benjamin; Corne, Philippe; Richard, Celine; Preiser, Jean Charles

    2015-05-01

    The maintenance of homeostasis after severe injury requires the restoration of the physiological regulation of food intake. A wide array of functional alterations can hinder the intake of adequate amounts of nutrients to support the recovery from critical illness. These alterations encompass changes in the preprandial phase, reflected by a loss of appetite; changes in the prandial phase, yielding swallowing disorders; and changes in the postprandial phase, including impairments of gastric emptying, gut motility, and satiety. This tutorial aims to review these often overlooked features and to suggest recommendations for the nutrition rehabilitation of the critically ill. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  12. Enteral Nutrition and Care of Risky Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Kilicarslan Toruner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Making appropriate and effective enteral feeding is decreasing the morbidity and mortality rates of risky newborns. Most important problems during enteral feeding in risky newborns are realizing the enteral feeding needs late, not following enteral feeding protocols and errors in medical practices (misconnections etc.. The aim of this review article is to describe the gastrointestinal development, nutrition requirements, enteral nutrition, feeding intolerance and care of risky newborns. Increasing the awareness of health care professionals about this topic is promoted the quality of care in risky newborns. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(3.000: 227-233

  13. 7 CFR 220.7 - Requirements for participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... may be used to support a nonprofit nutrition program for the elderly, including a program funded under... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAM § 220.7 Requirements for participation. Link...

  14. 7 CFR 215.7 - Requirements for participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... authority under this part to support a nonprofit nutrition program for the elderly, including a program... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS SPECIAL MILK PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN § 215.7 Requirements for...

  15. Nutrition: ethics and social implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamet-Loedin, Inez H; Jenie, Iumar A

    2007-01-01

    In October 2003, the general conference of UNESCO adopted the International Declaration on Human Genetic Data, followed by the adoption of the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights in October 2005 to ensure the respect of human dignity and the protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms in the collection, processing, use and storage of human genetic data with the requirement of equality, justice and solidarity. Nutrigenomics studies the relationship between specific nutrients or diet and polymorphisms and gene expression; therefore, eventually diet can be tailored for each individual. The dietary intervention is based on collected human genetic data that eventually build knowledge of nutritional requirements, and the nutritional status of different human genotypes. This knowledge can be used to prevent, mitigate or cure chronic diseases. As in another branch of posthuman genome science, it is a global concern that the collected data should not be misused or create inequity. Some ethical issues raised and discussed in this paper are: (1) consent and confidentiality issues in the collection and storage of data, (2) genetic screening and how to prevent inequity, (3) regulatory oversight and in a wider context the need to improve public confidence in biotechnology-related science, (4) other social issues. The ethical issues in nutrigenomics need clear and concise guidelines developed in accordance with the universally adopted declarations and ethical concern needs to be integrated in the scientific design. Efforts to improve the public awareness, public participation and consultation need to be made at the early stage of the development of nutrigenomics.

  16. Guide and position of the International Society of Nutrigenetics/Nutrigenomics on personalised nutrition: Part 1 - fields of precision nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diversity in the genetic profile between individuals and specific ethnic groups affects nutrient requirements, metabolism and response to nutritional and dietary interventions. Indeed, individuals respond differently to lifestyle interventions (diet, physical activity, smoking, etc.). The sequencing...

  17. [Nutrition therapy in enterocutaneous fistula; from physiology to individualized treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Cano, Ameyalli Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Enterocutaneous fistula is the most common of all intestinal fistulas. Is a condition that requires prolonged hospital stay due to complications such as electrolyte imbalance, malnutrition, metabolic disorders and sepsis. Nutritional support is an essential part of the management; it favors intestinal and immune function, promotes wound healing and decreases catabolism. Despite the recognition of the importance of nutrition support, there is no strong evidence on its comprehensive management, which can be limiting when establishing specific strategies. The metabolic imbalance that a fistula causes is unknown. For low-output fistulas, energy needs should be based on resting energy expenditure, and provide 1.0 to 1.5 g/kg/d of protein, while in high-output fistulas energy requirement may increase up to 1.5 times, and provide 1.5 to 2.5 g/kg of protein. It is suggested to provide twice the requirement of vitamins and trace elements, and between 5 and 10 times that of Vitamin C and Zinc, especially for high-output fistulas. A complete nutritional assessment, including type and location of the fistula, are factors to consider when selecting nutrition support, whether is enteral or parenteral nutrition. The enteral route should be preferred whenever possible, and combined with parenteral nutrition when the requirements cannot be met. Nutritional treatment strategies in fistulas may include the use of immunomodulators and even stress management.

  18. Preliminary Opto-Mechanical Design for the X2000 Transceiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, H.; Page, N. A.

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary optical design and mechanical conceptual design for a 30 cm aperture transceiver are described. A common aperture is used for both transmit and receive. Special attention was given to off-axis and scattered light rejection and isolation of the receive channel from the transmit channel. Requirements, details of the design and preliminary performance analysis of the transceiver are provided.

  19. Fluid and Electrolyte Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Helen W.; Smith, Scott M.; Leach, Carolyn S.; Rice, Barbara L.

    1999-01-01

    Studies of fluid and electrolyte homeostasis have been completed since the early human space flight programs, with comprehensive research completed on the Spacelab Life Sciences missions SLS-1 and SLS-2 flights, and more recently on the Mir 18 mission. This work documented the known shifts in fluids, the decrease in total blood volume, and indications of reduced thirst. Data from these flights was used to evaluate the nutritional needs for water, sodium, and potassium. Interpretations of the data are confounded by the inadequate energy intakes routinely observed during space flight. This in turn results in reduced fluid intake, as food provides approximately 70% water intake. Subsequently, body weight, lean body mass, total body water, and total body potassium may decrease. Given these issues, there is evidence to support a minimum required water intake of 2 L per day. Data from previous Shuttle flights indicated that water intake is 2285 +/- 715 ml/day (mean +/- SD, n=26). There are no indications that sodium intake or homeostasis is compromised during space flight. The normal or low aldosterone and urinary sodium levels suggest adequate sodium intake (4047 +/- 902 mg/day, n=26). Because excessive sodium intake is associated with hypercalciuria, the recommended maximum amount of sodium intake during flight is 3500 mg/day (i.e., similar to the Recommended Dietary Allowance, RDA). Potassium metabolism appears to be more complex. Data indicate loss of body potassium related to muscle atrophy and low dietary intake (2407 +/- 548 mg/day, n=26). Although possibly related to measurement error, the elevations in blood potassium suggest alterations in potassium homeostasis. The space RDA for minimum potassium intake is 3500 mg/day. With the documented inadequate intakes, efforts are being made to increase dietary consumption of potassium.

  20. Basal Nutrition of Palm Kernel Meal and Preliminary Evaluation in Feeding Juvenile Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus%棕仁粕基础营养分析及其在尼罗罗非鱼养殖中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马方奎; 冷凯良; 吴文民; 马银辉; 陈西广

    2011-01-01

    本文对比研究了棕仁粕、豆柏、花生粕的基础营养及体外胃蛋白酶消化性,通过在实验饲料中添加2%、6%、10%的棕仁粕制备了四份等氮等能的饲料,初步评价了添加棕仁粕对罗非鱼生长、体组分以及血清学参数的影响.结果表明:棕仁柏作为蛋白水平相对略低,纤维含量较高的植物蛋白替代源,其体外胃蛋白酶消化率与豆粕和花生粕无明显差异,可以作为膳食饲料组分适量的添加到水产动物饲料中,而不会影响罗非鱼的正常生长;在罗非鱼养殖实验中,添加2%棕仁粕的饲料组,罗非鱼的增重率,饲料系数,蛋白利用率、鱼体的蛋白组分以及血清学参数与对照组相比无显著差异(P>0.05),添加至6%~10%后,罗飞鱼的生长表现开始下降,饲料系数开始上升,鱼体蛋白组分下降(P<0.05).作为棕仁粕在水产养殖领域的初步探索性应用研究,研究认为棕仁粕是可以用于水产饲料的成分使用的,添加比例不宜超过6%.%A preliminary study was conducted to evaluate the basal nutrition and pepsinum digestibility in virtro of Palm kernel meal, soya bean meal and peanut meal. In addition,the palm kernel meal (PKM) was graded and supplemented in a commercial diet to evaluate the effect on growth, feed utilization, body composition, serologic index of juvenile Nile tilapia. Results showed that PKM had relatively low protein content and high fibre content. There were no significant difference in vitro pepsinum digestibility (P > 0.05 ). In feeding experiments, growth performance, feed conversion ratio, body protein composition and serologic index of juvenile Nile tilapia were not affected until PKM was added up to 6% (P > 0.05) asa result of the decrease of feed protein level and digestibility of enteric canal to protein. In conclusion, PKM can be added into fish feed diets no more than 6 % and it was favorable to make further efforts on the utilization of PKM

  1. Nutritional support of the critically ill child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, K C; Ferraro-McDuffie, A; Wolff-Small, T

    1993-03-01

    There is a growing awareness that the nutrition an individual receives as a child may exert significant consequences later in life. The successful treatment of critically ill children influences their potential for full recovery and optimal outcome. This requires an understanding of how the child responds to stress and starvation. Daily energy needs of the child in the intensive care unit are highly variable. Specific knowledge of the nutritional assessment of these children, whether sustaining an acute or chronic illness, is required, as is an understanding of how the disease process affects the child. Further work needs to be done to evaluate how chronic illness affects the growth, development, and maturation of the child. Assessment parameters remain somewhat controversial, and recent studies indicate that, indeed, critically ill children may be overfed if standard equations are used to calculate needs. Poor clinical outcomes can occur if the child is underfed or overfed. The long-term results of specific diets, micronutrients, glutamine, and new access routes into the infant are not yet known. Research in these areas is rapidly growing, and the new knowledge will provide a greater ability to meet the individual needs of the critically ill child. Perhaps in the future the treatment of choice in patients with organ failure will involve specific micronutrients that influence the immune status and cellular degradation. In the meantime, critically ill children deserve to have their basic nutritional needs met, and nurses can do much to individualize the nutritional support required to produce optimal patient outcomes.

  2. Nutritional support in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; Puig, Celia; Soldevillla, Cristina; Barata, Anna; Cuquet, Jordi; Recasens, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease which involves the gastrointestinal tract in about 90% of cases. It may contribute to nutritional deterioration. To assess whether the application of a nutritional support protocol to these patients could improve their nutritional status and quality of life. Single center prospective study, performed on an outpatient basis, in a county hospital. The Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) was used to screen risk for malnutrition. Health questionnaire SF-36 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used to assess quality of life and psychopathology respectively. Weight, height, energy and protein requirements, macronutrient intake and nutritional biochemical parameters were evaluated. Nutritional intervention was performed in patients at risk for malnutrition. Of the 72 patients, 12.5% were at risk for malnutrition. Iron deficiency anemia (18.35%) and vitamin D deficiency (54%) were the most frequently observed nutritional deficits. The questionnaires on psychopathology and quality of life showed a high prevalence of anxiety and depression, and lower level poor quality of life in the physical and mental component. No significant improvements were observed in the weight, food intake, nutritional biochemical parameters, psychopathology and quality of life follow-up. Dietary intervention was able to maintain body weight and food intake. Iron deficiency anemia and vitamin D deficiency improved with iron and vitamine D supplements. No deterioration was observed in psychological assessment or quality of life. Studies with larger numbers of patients are needed to assess the efficacy of this intervention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimizing nutrition of the preterm infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, William W Jr

    2017-01-01

    The goal of nutrition of the preterm infant is to meet the growth rate of the healthy fetus of the same gestational age and to produce the same body composition of the healthy fetus in terms of organ growth, tissue components, and cell number and structure. Nutritional quantity and quality are fundamental for normal growth and development of preterm infants, including neurodevelopmental outcomes. Failure to provide the necessary amounts of all of the essential nutrients has produced not only growth failure, but also increased morbidity and less than optimal neurodevelopment. Growth velocities during the NICU hospitalization period for preterm infants exert a significant effect on neurodevelopmental and anthropometric outcomes. Despite the obvious need for optimal nutrition, growth failure is almost universal among preterm infants. There is every reason, therefore, to optimize nutrition of the preterm infant, in terms of total energy and protein, but also in terms of individual components such as amino acids, specific carbohydrates and lipids, and even oxygen. This review presents scientific rationale for nutrient requirements and practical guidelines and approaches to intravenous and enteral feeding for preterm infants. Intravenous feeding, including amino acids, should be started right after birth at rates that are appropriate for the gestational age of the infant. Enteral feeding should be started as soon as possible after birth, using mother's colostrum and milk as first choices. Enteral feeding should begin with trophic amounts and advanced as rapidly as tolerated, decreasing IV nutrition accordingly, while maintaining nutrient intakes at recommended rates. Feeding protocols are valuable for improving nutrition and related outcomes. Further research is needed to determine the optimal nutrition and rate of growth in preterm infants that will achieve optimal neurocognitive benefits while minimizing the longer-term risk of chronic diseases.

  4. Nutrition research to affect food and a healthy lifespan12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlhorst, Sarah D.; Russell, Robert; Bier, Dennis; Klurfeld, David M.; Li, Zhaoping; Mein, Jonathan R.; Milner, John; Ross, A. Catharine; Stover, Patrick; Konopka, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Proper nutrition offers one of the most effective and least costly ways to decrease the burden of many diseases and their associated risk factors, including obesity. Nutrition research holds the key to increasing our understanding of the causes of obesity and its related comorbidities and thus holds promise to markedly influence global health and economies. After outreach to 75 thought leaders, the American Society for Nutrition (ASN) convened a Working Group to identify the nutrition research needs whose advancement will have the greatest projected impact on the future health and well-being of global populations. ASN’s Nutrition Research Needs focus on the following high priority areas: 1) variability in individual responses to diet and foods; 2) healthy growth, development, and reproduction; 3) health maintenance; 4) medical management; 5) nutrition-related behaviors; and 6) food supply/environment. ASN hopes the Nutrition Research Needs will prompt collaboration among scientists across all disciplines to advance this challenging research agenda given the high potential for translation and impact on public health. Furthermore, ASN hopes the findings from the Nutrition Research Needs will stimulate the development and adoption of new and innovative strategies that can be applied toward the prevention and treatment of nutrition-related diseases. The multidisciplinary nature of nutrition research requires stakeholders with differing areas of expertise to collaborate on multifaceted approaches to establish the evidence-based nutrition guidance and policies that will lead to better health for the global population. In addition to the identified research needs, ASN also identified 5 tools that are critical to the advancement of the Nutrition Research Needs: 1) omics, 2) bioinformatics, 3) databases, 4) biomarkers, and 5) cost-effectiveness analysis. PMID:24038264

  5. Nutrition research to affect food and a healthy life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlhorst, Sarah D; Russell, Robert; Bier, Dennis; Klurfeld, David M; Li, Zhaoping; Mein, Jonathan R; Milner, John; Ross, A Catharine; Stover, Patrick; Konopka, Emily

    2013-08-01

    Proper nutrition offers one of the most effective and least costly ways to decrease the burden of many diseases and their associated risk factors, including obesity. Nutrition research holds the key to increasing our understanding of the causes of obesity and its related comorbidities and thus holds promise to markedly influence global health and economies. After outreach to 75 thought leaders, the American Society for Nutrition (ASN) convened a Working Group to identify the nutrition research needs whose advancement will have the greatest projected impact on the future health and well-being of global populations. ASN's Nutrition Research Needs focus on the following high priority areas: 1) variability in individual responses to diet and foods; 2) healthy growth, development, and reproduction; 3) health maintenance; 4) medical management; 5) nutrition-related behaviors; and 6) food supply/environment. ASN hopes the Nutrition Research Needs will prompt collaboration among scientists across all disciplines to advance this challenging research agenda given the high potential for translation and impact on public health. Furthermore, ASN hopes the findings from the Nutrition Research Needs will stimulate the development and adoption of new and innovative strategies that can be applied toward the prevention and treatment of nutrition-related diseases. The multidisciplinary nature of nutrition research requires stakeholders with differing areas of expertise to collaborate on multifaceted approaches to establish the evidence-based nutrition guidance and policies that will lead to better health for the global population. In addition to the identified research needs, ASN also identified 5 tools that are critical to the advancement of the Nutrition Research Needs: 1) omics, 2) bioinformatics, 3) databases, 4) biomarkers, and 5) cost-effectiveness analysis.

  6. Nutritional assessment in cirrhotic patients with hepaticencephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is one of the worstcomplications of liver disease and can be greatly influencedby nutritional status. Ammonia metabolism, inflammationand muscle wasting are relevant processes inHE pathophysiology. Malnutrition worsens the prognosisin HE, requiring early assessment of nutritional statusof these patients. Body composition changes inducedby liver disease and limitations superimposed by HEhamper the proper accomplishment of exams in thispopulation, but evidence is growing that assessmentof muscle mass and muscle function is mandatory dueto the role of skeletal muscles in ammonia metabolism.In this review, we present the pathophysiologicalaspects involved in HE to support further discussionabout advantages and drawbacks of some methods forevaluating the nutritional status of cirrhotic patients withHE, focusing on body composition.

  7. [Sanitary and nutritional control of the Catania school catering service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Elena; Allegra, Antonio Dino; Cannizzaro, Virginia; Fardella, Maristella; La Carrubba, Rosanna

    2005-01-01

    Sanitary and nutritional control of meals distributed by school catering services is one of the institutional duties of the Food Hygiene and Nutrition Services (Servizi Igiene Alimenti e Nutrizione - SIAN) of the Local Health Units. In order to carry out this activity properly it is necessary to ask oneself beforehand what the main outcome of control activities should be. The answer to this question can only be that "proper nutrition is essential for healthy growth". Starting from this assumption, control activities performed along the entire chain of the scholastic catering service, starting from the final dish served at school up to the primary producer, were reviewed. The review was carried out by a team of multiprofessionals which included a physician, a prevention technician, a dietician, a biologist, an agronomist and a veterinarian. Preliminary results are extremely positive and show that the multidisciplinary integration of roles entrusted to the coordinators of SIAN is crucial to obtaining the best results.

  8. A Systematic Review of Athletes’ and Coaches’ Nutrition Knowledge and Reflections on the Quality of Current Nutrition Knowledge Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakman, Gina L.; Forsyth, Adrienne; Devlin, Brooke L.; Belski, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Context: Nutrition knowledge can influence dietary choices and impact on athletic performance. Valid and reliable measures are needed to assess the nutrition knowledge of athletes and coaches. Objectives: (1) To systematically review the published literature on nutrition knowledge of adult athletes and coaches and (2) to assess the quality of measures used to assess nutrition knowledge. Data Sources: MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscuss, Web of Science, and SCOPUS. Study Selection: 36 studies that provided a quantitative measure of nutrition knowledge and described the measurement tool that was used were included. Data extraction: Participant description, questionnaire description, results (mean correct and responses to individual items), study quality, and questionnaire quality. Data synthesis: All studies were of neutral quality. Tools used to measure knowledge did not consider health literacy, were outdated with regards to consensus recommendations, and lacked appropriate and adequate validation. The current status of nutrition knowledge in athletes and coaches is difficult to ascertain. Gaps in knowledge also remain unclear, but it is likely that energy density, the need for supplementation, and the role of protein are frequently misunderstood. Conclusions: Previous reports of nutrition knowledge need to be interpreted with caution. A new, universal, up-to-date, validated measure of general and sports nutrition knowledge is required to allow for assessment of nutrition knowledge. PMID:27649242

  9. A Systematic Review of Athletes’ and Coaches’ Nutrition Knowledge and Reflections on the Quality of Current Nutrition Knowledge Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina L. Trakman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Context: Nutrition knowledge can influence dietary choices and impact on athletic performance. Valid and reliable measures are needed to assess the nutrition knowledge of athletes and coaches. Objectives: (1 To systematically review the published literature on nutrition knowledge of adult athletes and coaches and (2 to assess the quality of measures used to assess nutrition knowledge. Data Sources: MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscuss, Web of Science, and SCOPUS. Study Selection: 36 studies that provided a quantitative measure of nutrition knowledge and described the measurement tool that was used were included. Data extraction: Participant description, questionnaire description, results (mean correct and responses to individual items, study quality, and questionnaire quality. Data synthesis: All studies were of neutral quality. Tools used to measure knowledge did not consider health literacy, were outdated with regards to consensus recommendations, and lacked appropriate and adequate validation. The current status of nutrition knowledge in athletes and coaches is difficult to ascertain. Gaps in knowledge also remain unclear, but it is likely that energy density, the need for supplementation, and the role of protein are frequently misunderstood. Conclusions: Previous reports of nutrition knowledge need to be interpreted with caution. A new, universal, up-to-date, validated measure of general and sports nutrition knowledge is required to allow for assessment of nutrition knowledge.

  10. [The national food and nutrition policy and its dialogue with the national food and nutrition security policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Kelly Poliany de Souza; Jaime, Patricia Constante

    2014-11-01

    Food is one of the determinants and conditions of health and an inherent right of all people. The consequences of food and nutrition insecurity in the population, such as obesity, malnutrition and specific nutritional deficiencies, impact the health sector and have historically meant that it has assumed the responsibility for food and nutrition programs and policies in Brazil. However, ensuring food and nutrition security requires a combination of public policies, among which the National Food and Nutrition Policy of the Unified Health System (SUS) plays a fundamental role. This paper seeks to contribute to the debate on intersectoriality and health promotion based on presenting the National Food and Nutrition Policy and discussing its role as interface between the SUS and the National Food and Nutrition Security Policy and System. This perspective strongly suggests the combination of efforts to promote health and food and nutrition security in order to optimize initiatives developed in different sectors and accompanied by different policy councils that are not interrelated, enabling enhanced government and civil society action on the determinants of health and nutrition.

  11. Nutrition considerations for open-water swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Gregory; Koivisto, Anu; Gerrard, David; Burke, Louise M

    2014-08-01

    Open-water swimming (OWS) is a rapidly developing discipline. Events of 5-25 km are featured at FINA World Championships, and the international circuit includes races of 5-88 km. The Olympic OWS event, introduced in 2008, is contested over 10 km. Differing venues present changing environmental conditions, including water and ambient temperatures, humidity, solar radiation, and unpredictable tides. Furthermore, the duration of most OWS events (1-6 hr) creates unique physiological challenges to thermoregulation, hydration status, and muscle fuel stores. Current nutrition recommendations for open-water training and competition are either an extension of recommendations from pool swimming or are extrapolated from other athletic populations with similar physiological requirements. Competition nutrition should focus on optimizing prerace hydration and glycogen stores. Although swimmers should rely on self-supplied fuel and fluid sources for shorter events, for races of 10 km or greater, fluid and fuel replacement can occur from feeding pontoons when tactically appropriate. Over the longer races, feeding pontoons should be used to achieve desirable targets of up to 90 g/ hr of carbohydrates from multitransportable sources. Exposure to variable water and ambient temperatures will play a significant role in determining race nutrition strategies. For example, in extreme environments, thermoregulation may be assisted by manipulating the temperature of the ingested fluids. Swimmers are encouraged to work with nutrition experts to develop effective and efficient strategies that enhance performance through appropriate in-competition nutrition.

  12. [Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Villares, J M

    2008-05-01

    Parenteral nutrition associated liver disease (PNALD) is an important problem in patients who require longterm parenteral nutrition as well as in preterm infants. Prevalence varies according to different series. Clinical presentation is different in adults and infants. Although since its first descriptions several hypothesis have been elucidated, the aetiology is not quite clear. It is possible that different factors could be involved. PNALD risk factors can be classified in three groups: 1) those derived from the lack of enteral nutrition stimulus; 2) parenteral nutrition components acting as toxic or the lack of specific nutrients and 3) those due to the underlying disease. If PNALD appears in short-term PN and it presents only as a mild elevation of liver enzymes, there is no need to treat. On the contrary, when direct bilirubin is > 2 mg/dL and lasts longer, there is a need to consider different causes and to minimize risk factors. We review the different approaches to manage PNALD, including optimizing enteral nutrition, modify parenteral solutions, use of specific nutrients -taurine, choline, etc.- or the use of drugs (mainly ursodeoxicolic acid). If liver disease progresses to cirrhosis a liver transplant must be considered.

  13. Nutritional regulation of fetal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Frank H; Jaquiery, Anne L; Oliver, Mark H

    2013-01-01

    Fetal growth is largely regulated by nutritional supply. The placenta is responsible for fetal nutrient supply for much of pregnancy, but in early pregnancy nutrition is histiotrophic. Both placental size and efficiency, and fetal growth, may be affected by maternal nutritional state before and during very early pregnancy. In contrast, manipulating maternal nutrition during later stages of pregnancy has a smaller than expected effect on fetal growth. Maternal nutrition before and during early pregnancy also has a greater effect on gestation length than maternal nutrition later in pregnancy, suggesting that nutritional status may regulate both fetal growth trajectory and gestation length and that these two outcomes may be linked. Thus, determination of the nutritional factors regulating fetal growth, and potentially postnatal growth and body phenotype, may lie with the maternal nutritional status even before conception.

  14. Nutritional Status Assessment (SMO 016E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Zwart, S. R.; Heer, M.; Ericson, K.; Coburn, S. P.; Booth, S. A.; Jones, J. A.; Lupton, J.

    2009-01-01

    Until 2006, it was not been possible to assess nutritional status of crewmembers on the ISS during flight because blood and urine could not be collected during ISS missions. Postflight observations of alterations in status of several nutrients are troubling, and we require the ability to monitor the status of these nutrients during flight to determine if there is a specific impetus or timeframe for these changes. In addition to the monitoring of crew nutritional status during flight, in-flight sample collection would allow better assessment of countermeasure effectiveness. Collecting samples during flight is one of the objectives of SMO 016E, and it is also designed to expand the current medical requirement for nutritional assessment (MR016L) to include additional normative markers for assessing crew health and countermeasure effectiveness. Additional markers of bone metabolism will be measured to better monitor bone health and the effectiveness of countermeasures to prevent bone resorption. New markers of oxidative damage will be measured to better assess the type of oxidative insults that occur during space flight. The array of nutritional assessment variables will be expanded to include ones that will allow us to better understand changes in folate, vitamin K, and vitamin B6 status, as well as risk factors for cardiovascular and oxidative damage during and after flight. Stress hormones and hormones that affect bone and muscle metabolism will also be measured. Measuring these additional variables will allow us to better monitor the health of crewmembers and make more accurate recommendations for their rehabilitation. Several nutritional assessment variables are altered at landing, but it is not known how long these changes persist. We extended the original protocol to include an additional postflight blood and urine sample collection 30 days after landing. Data are being collected before, during, and after flight. These data will provide a complete survey of how

  15. 7 CFR 247.9 - Eligibility requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.9 Eligibility requirements. (a... termination of pregnancy; or (6) Elderly persons, i.e., persons at least 60 years of age. (b) What are...

  16. 45 CFR 1326.19 - Application requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO INDIAN TRIBES FOR SUPPORT AND NUTRITION SERVICES § 1326.19 Application requirements. A tribal... ability of the tribal organization to deliver supportive and nutrition services to older Indians, or...

  17. Time trend investigation of PCBs, PBDEs, and organochlorine pesticides in selected n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid rich dietary fish oil and vegetable oil supplements; nutritional relevance for human essential n-3 fatty acid requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Miriam N; Covaci, Adrian; Gheorghe, Adriana; Schepens, Paul

    2004-03-24

    In addition to being used in the food and animal feed industry, fish oils have also been used traditionally as dietary supplements. Due to the presence of long-chain n-3 fatty acids, fish oils have therapeutic benefits in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular, immunological, and arthritic diseases, as well as childhood deficiency diseases such as rickets, because of a high content of vitamin D. However, fish oils are also susceptible to contamination with lipophilic organic chemicals that are now ubiquitous contaminants of marine ecosystems. Many vegetable oils are sources of the shorter chain precursor forms of n-3 fatty acids, and in recent years the specialist dietary supplement market has expanded to include these oils in a variety of different formulations. This paper reports analytical results of selected contaminants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers, for a range of commercially available n-3 fatty acid rich fish and vegetable oil dietary supplements. Using principal component analysis, the values are compared with historic samples to elucidate time trends in contamination profiles. Levels of contaminants are discussed in relation to the nutritional benefits to the consumer of long- and short-chain forms of n-3 fatty acids.

  18. Preliminary Results on Charmed Meson Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sarwar, S; Paolone, V S; Reyes, M; Anjos, J C; Yager, P M; Bediaga, I; Göbel, C; Magnin, J; De Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; Dos Reis, A C; Simão, F R A; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Méndez, H; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vásquez, F; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; Ramírez, J E; O'Reilly, B; Vaandering, E W; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E E; Gourlay, S A; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Bianco, S; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Sarwar, S; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Park, K S; Rahimi, A; Gardner, R; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Myung, S S; Alimonti, G; Boschini, M; Brambilla, D; Caccianiga, B; Calandrino, A; D'Angelo, P; Di Corato, M; Dini, P; Giammarchi, M G; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Milazzo, L; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, A; Sala, S; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Merlo, M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Viola, L; Vitulo, P; Hernández, Pilar; López, A M; Méndez, L; Mirles, M A; Montiel, E; Olaya, D; Quinones, J; Rivera, C; Zhang-Mayaguez, Y; Copty, N K; Purohit, M; Cho, K; Handler, T; Engh, D; Johns, W E; Hosack, M; Nehring, M S; Sales, M; Sheldon, P D; Stenson, K; Webster, M S; Sheaff, M; Kwon, Y; Sarwar, Shahzad

    2001-01-01

    We report the preliminary measurement by the FOCUS Collaboration (E831 at Fermilab) of masses and widths of the L=1 charm mesons $D_2^{*0}$ and $D_2^{*+}$. The fit of the invariant mass distribution requires an additional term to account for a broad structure over background.

  19. 2016 TRI Preliminary Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    The TRI preliminary dataset includes the most current TRI data available and reflects toxic chemical releases and pollution prevention activities that occurred at TRI facilities during the 2016 calendar year.

  20. Nutrition in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirlich, M; Lochs, H

    2001-12-01

    Malnutrition is more common in elderly persons than in younger adults. Ageing itself, however, neither leads to malabsorption nor to malnutrition with the exception of a higher frequency of atrophic gastritis in older persons. Malnutrition in elderly people is therefore a consequence of somatic, psychic or social problems. Typical causes are chewing or swallowing disorders, cardiac insufficiency, depression, social deprivation and loneliness. Undernutrition is associated with a worse prognosis and is an independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality. Awareness of this problem is therefore important. For the evaluation of nutritional status, it must be remembered that most normal values are derived from younger adults and may not necessarily be suitable for elderly persons. Suitable tools for evaluating the nutritional status of elderly persons are e.g. the body mass index, weight loss within the last 6 months, the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) or the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA). An improvement in the nutritional status can be achieved by simple methods such as the preparation of an adequate diet, hand feeding, additional sip feeding or enteral nutrition.