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Sample records for preliminary hypervelocity impact

  1. Two-dimensional computer simulation of hypervelocity impact cratering: some preliminary results for Meteor Crater, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, J.B.; Burton, D.E.; Cunningham, M.E.; Lettis, L.A. Jr.

    1978-06-01

    A computational approach used for subsurface explosion cratering was extended to hypervelocity impact cratering. Meteor (Barringer) Crater, Arizona, was selected for the first computer simulation because it is one of the most thoroughly studied craters. It is also an excellent example of a simple, bowl-shaped crater and is one of the youngest terrestrial impact craters. Initial conditions for this calculation included a meteorite impact velocity of 15 km/s, meteorite mass of 1.67 x 10/sup 8/ kg, with a corresponding kinetic energy of 1.88 x 10/sup 16/ J (4.5 megatons). A two-dimensional Eulerian finite difference code called SOIL was used for this simulation of a cylindrical iron projectile impacting at normal incidence into a limestone target. For this initial calculation, a Tillotson equation-of-state description for iron and limestone was used with no shear strength. Results obtained for this preliminary calculation of the formation of Meteor Crater are in good agreement with field measurements. A color movie based on this calculation was produced using computer-generated graphics. 19 figures, 5 tables, 63 references.

  2. SPH Simulation of Hypervelocity Impacts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金柱; 张庆明; 龙仁容

    2004-01-01

    The smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method is a very important tool to resolve hypervelocity problems. The basic principle of SPH method and how to generate a proper SPH mesh is described. The results of SPH simulations of hypervelocity impacts on thin or thick aluminum plates, performed by using the LS-DYNA 3D computer code, are also reported. The forming process and composition of the debris clouds simulated are identical with the experiment results. It can be concluded that the simulation is reasonable and SPH method is an ideal method for hypervelocity impact simulation.

  3. Hypervelocity impact technology and applications: 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Chhabildas, Lalit C. (Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RWMW, Eglin AFB, FL)

    2008-07-01

    The Hypervelocity Impact Society is devoted to the advancement of the science and technology of hypervelocity impact and related technical areas required to facilitate and understand hypervelocity impact phenomena. Topics of interest include experimental methods, theoretical techniques, analytical studies, phenomenological studies, dynamic material response as related to material properties (e.g., equation of state), penetration mechanics, and dynamic failure of materials, planetary physics and other related phenomena. The objectives of the Society are to foster the development and exchange of technical information in the discipline of hypervelocity impact phenomena, promote technical excellence, encourage peer review publications, and hold technical symposia on a regular basis. It was sometime in 1985, partly in response to the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), that a small group of visionaries decided that a conference or symposium on hypervelocity science would be useful and began the necessary planning. A major objective of the first Symposium was to bring the scientists and researchers up to date by reviewing the essential developments of hypervelocity science and technology between 1955 and 1985. This Symposia--HVIS 2007 is the tenth Symposium since that beginning. The papers presented at all the HVIS are peer reviewed and published as a special volume of the archival journal International Journal of Impact Engineering. HVIS 2007 followed the same high standards and its proceedings will add to this body of work.

  4. Simulating plasma production from hypervelocity impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Alex; Close, Sigrid; Mathias, Donovan

    2015-09-01

    Hypervelocity particles, such as meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and are energetic enough to vaporize and ionize themselves and as well as a portion of the target material. The resulting plasma rapidly expands into the surrounding vacuum. While plasma measurements from hypervelocity impacts have been made using ground-based technologies such as light gas guns and Van de Graaff dust accelerators, some of the basic plasma properties vary significantly between experiments. There have been both ground-based and in-situ measurements of radio frequency (RF) emission from hypervelocity impacts, but the physical mechanism responsible and the possible connection to the impact-produced plasma are not well understood. Under certain conditions, the impact-produced plasma can have deleterious effects on spacecraft electronics by providing a new current path, triggering an electrostatic discharge, causing electromagnetic interference, or generating an electromagnetic pulse. Multi-physics simulations of plasma production from hypervelocity impacts are presented. These simulations incorporate elasticity and plasticity of the solid target, phase change and plasma formation, and non-ideal plasma physics due to the high density and low temperature of the plasma. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is used to perform a continuum dynamics simulation with these additional physics. By examining a series of hypervelocity impacts, basic properties of the impact produced plasma plume (density, temperature, expansion speed, charge state) are determined for impactor speeds between 10 and 72 km/s. For a large range of higher impact speeds (30-72 km/s), we find the temperature is unvarying at 2.5 eV. We also find that the plasma plume is weakly ionized for impact speeds less than 14 km/s and fully ionized for impact speeds greater than 20 km/s, independent of impactor mass. This is the same velocity threshold for the detection of RF emission in recent Van de Graaff

  5. Simulating plasma production from hypervelocity impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, Alex, E-mail: alexcf@stanford.edu; Close, Sigrid [Stanford University, Aeronautics and Astronautics, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Mathias, Donovan [NASA Ames Research Center, Bldg. 258, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Hypervelocity particles, such as meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and are energetic enough to vaporize and ionize themselves and as well as a portion of the target material. The resulting plasma rapidly expands into the surrounding vacuum. While plasma measurements from hypervelocity impacts have been made using ground-based technologies such as light gas guns and Van de Graaff dust accelerators, some of the basic plasma properties vary significantly between experiments. There have been both ground-based and in-situ measurements of radio frequency (RF) emission from hypervelocity impacts, but the physical mechanism responsible and the possible connection to the impact-produced plasma are not well understood. Under certain conditions, the impact-produced plasma can have deleterious effects on spacecraft electronics by providing a new current path, triggering an electrostatic discharge, causing electromagnetic interference, or generating an electromagnetic pulse. Multi-physics simulations of plasma production from hypervelocity impacts are presented. These simulations incorporate elasticity and plasticity of the solid target, phase change and plasma formation, and non-ideal plasma physics due to the high density and low temperature of the plasma. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is used to perform a continuum dynamics simulation with these additional physics. By examining a series of hypervelocity impacts, basic properties of the impact produced plasma plume (density, temperature, expansion speed, charge state) are determined for impactor speeds between 10 and 72 km/s. For a large range of higher impact speeds (30–72 km/s), we find the temperature is unvarying at 2.5 eV. We also find that the plasma plume is weakly ionized for impact speeds less than 14 km/s and fully ionized for impact speeds greater than 20 km/s, independent of impactor mass. This is the same velocity threshold for the detection of RF emission in recent

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hypervelocity Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Eli T.; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2007-03-01

    Outer space silicon solar cells are exposed to impacts with micro meteors that can destroy the surface leading to device failure. A protective coating of silicon nitride will protect against such failure. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are used to study how silicon/silicon nitride fails due to hypervelocity impacts. Three impactors made of silicon nitride are studied. Their cross-sectional areas, relative to the target, are as follows: the same as the target, half of the target, and a quarter of the target. Impactor speeds from 5 to 11 km/second yield several modes of failure, such as deformation of the target by the impactor and delimitation of the silicon nitride from the silicon at the interface. These simulations will give a much clearer picture of how solar cells composed of a silicon/silicon nitride interface will respond to impacts in outer space. This will ultimately lead to improved devices with longer life spans.

  7. Crater and cavity depth in hypervelocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadono, T.; Fujiwara, A.

    2003-04-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments with low-density mediums (e.g., foams) have been so far carried out to develop the instruments for intact capture of interplanetary dust particles. The results show that the impact leads a "cavity", a cylindrical or carrot (spindle) shaped vestige. Its shape depends on the condition of projectiles; when impact velocity is so low that projectiles are intact, the depth increases with impact velocity, while it decreases or is constant with impact velocity when the impact velocity is so high that projectiles are broken (e.g., Kadono, Planet. Space Sci. 47, 305--318, 1999). On the other hand, as described by Summers (NASA TN D-94, 1959), crater shape with high density targets (comparable to projectile density) also changes with impact velocity. At low velocities, the strength of projectile's materials is greater than the dynamic impact pressure and the projectile penetrates the target intact. The crater produced is deep and narrow. With increase in impact velocity, a point is reached at which the impact pressure is sufficient to cause the projectile to fragment into a few large pieces at impact. Then as the impact velocity is increased further, the projectile shatters into numerous small pieces and the penetration actually decreases. Finally a velocity is reached at which the typical fluid impact occurs, the crater formed is nearly hemispherical in shape. It appears that the situation in cavity formation with low density targets is quite similar to that in cratering with high density targets at low impact velocity. This similarity allows us to discuss cavity formation and cratering in a unified view. As described above, the previous experiments clearly suggest that the condition of projectiles plays important roles in both cratering and cavity formation. Hence here, by introducing a parameter that characterizes the condition of projectiles at the instance of impact, cratering processes such as projectile penetration and shock wave

  8. Experimental hypervelocity impact effects on simulated planetesimal materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, W. J.; Remo, J. L.; Schulze, J. F.; Young, R. P.

    Experimental results are presented from a series of hypervelocity impact tests on simulated comet and asteroid materials for the purpose of characterizing their response to hypervelocity kinetic energy impacts. The test objectives were to collect target response phenomenology data on cratering, momentum deposition and enhancement, target fragmentation, and material response under hypervelocity impact loading conditions. A carefully designed ballistic pendulum was used to measure momentum deposition into the targets. Observations and measurements of the impacted samples provide important insights into the response of these materials to kinetic energy impacts, especially in regards to unexpectedly large measured values of momentum enhancement to some of the targets. Such information is required to allow one to successfully deflect or fragment comets or asteroids which might someday be detected on collision trajectories with Earth.

  9. Theoretical Research Progress in High-Velocity/Hypervelocity Impact on Semi-Infinite Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Yunhou Sun; Cuncheng Shi; Zheng Liu; Desheng Wen

    2015-01-01

    With the hypervelocity kinetic weapon and hypersonic cruise missiles research projects being carried out, the damage mechanism for high-velocity/hypervelocity projectile impact on semi-infinite targets has become the research keystone in impact dynamics. Theoretical research progress in high-velocity/hypervelocity impact on semi-infinite targets was reviewed in this paper. The evaluation methods for critical velocity of high-velocity and hypervelocity impact were summarized. The crater shape,...

  10. Simulation of polyvinylidene fluoride detector response to hypervelocity particle impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poppe, Andrew, E-mail: poppe@lasp.colorado.ed [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, 2000 Colorado Ave, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Jacobsmeyer, Brian [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, 2000 Colorado Ave, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); James, David [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Horanyi, Mihaly [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, 2000 Colorado Ave, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2010-10-21

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) films have been utilized as interplanetary dust detectors for many years in a variety of space environments. PVDF serves as a dust detector by producing a 'depolarization' charge upon hypervelocity impact. Previous instruments have relied on empirical calibrations to establish the relationship between the mass and velocity of the impacting dust particle and the generated charge. Here, we present a new theoretical derivation of PVDF response to non-penetrating hypervelocity particle impacts. We compare our simulation results to experimental calibration data from the Cosmic Dust Experiment on the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere satellite and the Student Dust Counter on the New Horizons mission. The simulation results agree well with the experimental data, yet suggest a modified crater diameter scaling law for non-penetrating hypervelocity impacts into PVDF.

  11. Analysis of hypervelocity impact test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments conducted by the Department of Defense provide an adequate basis for the determination of the fragment distribution and number from hypervelocity collisions. Models trained on only a portion of the data are shown to bias samples too far from the population to be useful for averaging over debris distributions or estimating fragment production rates. The average fragment production exponent is more appropriate for those purposes.

  12. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impact: Consulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    A portion of the contract NAS8-38856, 'Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impacts,' from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), included consulting which was to be documented in the final report. This attachment to the final report contains memos produced as part of that consulting.

  13. Damage Analysis for Hypervelocity Impact Experiments on Spaceship Windows Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hewei P.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The hypervelocity impact characteristics in fused silica glass, which is used for the outermost pane of the windshield as the critical part of the thermal protection system of spacecraft, were studied by 37 impact experiments with different millimeter diameter projectiles up to the velocity of 7 km/s launched by two stage light-gas-gun facility. The empirical damage equations were obtained from experiment data by the least square method and they were compared with NASA damage equations.

  14. Flash characteristics of plasma induced by hypervelocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Long, Renrong; Zhang, Qingming; Xue, Yijiang; Ju, Yuanyuan

    2016-08-01

    Using a two-stage light gas gun, a series of hypervelocity impact experiments was conducted in which 6.4-mm-diameter spherical 2024-aluminum projectiles impact 23-mm-thick targets made of the same material at velocities of 5.0, 5.6, and 6.3 km/s. Both an optical pyrometer composed of six photomultiplier tubes and a spectrograph were used to measure the flash of the plasma during hypervelocity impact. Experimental results show that, at a projectile velocity of 6.3 km/s, the strong flash lasted about 10 μs and reached a temperature of 4300 K. Based on the known emission lines of AL I, spectral methods can provide the plasma electron temperature. An electron-temperature comparison between experiment and theoretical calculation indicates that single ionization and secondary ionization are the two main ionizing modes at velocities 5.0-6.3 km/s.

  15. Chemical fractionation resulting from the hypervelocity impact process on metallic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libourel, Guy; Ganino, Clément; Michel, Patrick; Nakamura, Akiko

    2016-10-01

    In a regime of hypervelocity impact cratering, the internal energy deposited in target + projectile region is large enough to melt and/or vaporize part of the material involved, which expands rapidly away from the impact site. Fast and energetic impact processes have therefore important chemical consequences on the projectile and target rock transformations during major impact events. Several physical and chemical processes occurred indeed in the short duration of the impact, e.g., melting, coating, mixing, condensation, crystallization, redox reactions, quenching, etc., all concurring to alter both projectile and target composition on the irreversible way.In order to document such hypervelocity impact chemical fractionation, we have started a program of impact experiments by shooting doped (27 trace elements) millimeter–sized basalt projectiles on metallic target using a two stages light gas gun. With impact velocity in the range from 0.25 to 7 km.s-1, these experiments are aimed i) to characterize chemically and texturally all the post-mortem materials (e.g., target, crater, impact melt, condensates, and ejectas), in order ii) to make a chemical mass balance budget of the process, and iii) to relate it to the kinetic energy involved in the hypervelocity impacts for scaling law purpose. Irrespective of the incident velocities, our preliminary results show the importance of redox processes, the significant changes in the ejecta composition (e.g., iron enrichment) and the systematic coating of the crater by the impact melt [1]. On the target side, characterizations of the microstructure of the shocked iron alloys to better constrain the shielding processes. We also show how these results have great implications in our understanding on the current surface properties of small bodies, and chiefly in the case of M-type asteroids. [1] Ganino C, Libourel G, Nakamura AM & Michel P (2015) Goldschmidt Abstracts, 2015 990.

  16. Survey of the hypervelocity impact technology and applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabildas, Lalit Chandra; Orphal, Dennis L.

    2006-05-01

    HVIS 2005 was a clear success. The Symposium brought together nearly two hundred active researchers and students from thirteen countries around the world. The 84 papers presented at HVIS 2005 constitute an ''update'' on current research and the state-of-the-art of hypervelocity science. Combined with the over 7000 pages of technical papers from the eight previous Symposia, beginning in 1986, all published in the International Journal of Impact Engineering, the papers from HVIS 2005 add to the growing body of knowledge and the progressing state-of-the-art of hypervelocity science. It is encouraging to report that even with the limited funding resources compared to two decades ago, creativity and ingenuity in hypervelocity science are alive and well. There is considerable overlap in different disciplines that allows researchers to leverage. Experimentally, higher velocities are now available in the laboratory and are ideally suited for space applications that can be tied to both civilian (NASA) and DoD military applications. Computationally, there is considerable advancement both in computer and modeling technologies. Higher computing speeds and techniques such as parallel processing allow system level type applications to be addressed directly today, much in contrast to the situation only a few years ago. Needless to say, both experimentally and computationally, the ultimate utility will depend on the curiosity and the probing questions that will be incumbent upon the individual researcher. It is quite satisfying that over two dozen students attended the symposium. Hopefully this is indicative of a good pool of future researchers that will be needed both in the government and civilian industries. It is also gratifying to note that novel thrust areas exploring different and new material phenomenology relevant to hypervelocity impact, but a number of other applications as well, are being pursued. In conclusion, considerable progress is still being

  17. Axial focusing of energy from a hypervelocity impact on earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boslough, M.B.; Chael, E.P.; Trucano, T.G.; Crawford, D.A.

    1994-12-01

    We have performed computational simulations to determine how energy from a large hypervelocity impact on the Earth`s surface would couple to its interior. Because of the first-order axial symmetry of both the impact energy source and the stress-wave velocity structure of the Earth, a disproportionate amount of energy is dissipated along the axis defined by the impact point and its antipode (point opposite the impact). For a symmetric and homogeneous Earth model, all the impact energy that is radiated as seismic waves into the Earth at a given takeoff angle (ray parameter), independent of azimuthal direction, is refocused (minus attenuation) on the axis of symmetry, regardless of the number of reflections and refractions it has experienced. Material on or near the axis of symmetry experiences more strain cycles with much greater amplitude than elsewhere, and therefore experiences more irreversible heating. The focusing is most intense in the upper mantle, within the asthenosphere, where seismic energy is most effectively converted to heat. For a sufficiently energetic impact, this mechanism might generate enough local heating to create an isostatic instability leading to uplift, possibly resulting in rifting, volcanism, or other rearrangement of the interior dynamics of the planet. These simulations demonstrate how hypervelocity impact energy can be transported to the Earth`s interior, supporting the possibility of a causal link between large impacts on Earth and major internally-driven geophysical processes.

  18. Hypervelocity Impact on Interfaces: A Molecular-Dynamics Simulations Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Owens, Eli T.; Leonard, Robert H.; Cockburn, Bronwyn C.

    2008-03-01

    Silicon/silicon nitride interfaces are found in micro electronics and solar cells. In either application the mechanical integrity of the interface is of great importance. Molecular-dynamics simulations are performed to study the failure of interface materials under the influence of hypervelocity impact. Silicon nitride plates impacting on silicon/silicon nitride interface targets of different thicknesses result in structural phase transformation and delamination at the interface. Detailed analyses of atomic velocities, bond lengths, and bond angles are used to qualitatively examine the respective failure mechanisms.

  19. Experimental Study of Hypervelocity Impact on Multi-Shock Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张庆明; 陈沿海; 黄风雷

    2004-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests on multi-shock shields are carried out in order to develop space structures against space debris impacts. Sheets of LY12 aluminum were used as bumpers. The total thickness of shield structure, which consists of several sheets with various thickness, is 3.0 mm or 2.0 mm. Results of the tests show that the type 0.5 mm+0.5 mm+0.5 mm+0.5 mm is a better choice of spacecraft shield structure.

  20. Survivability of bacteria ejected from icy surfaces after hypervelocity impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, Mark J; Galloway, James A; Bunch, Alan W; Brandão, Pedro F B

    2003-02-01

    Both the Saturnian and Jovian systems contain satellites with icy surfaces. If life exists on any of these icy bodies (in putative subsurface oceans for example) then the possibility exists for transfer of life from icy body to icy body. This is an application of the idea of Panspermia, wherein life migrates naturally through space. A possible mechanism would be that life, here taken as bacteria, could become frozen in the icy surface of one body. If a high-speed impact occurred on that surface, ejecta containing the bacteria could be thrown into space. It could then migrate around the local region of space until it arrived at a second icy body in another high-speed impact. In this paper we consider some of the necessary steps for such a process to occur, concentrating on the ejection of ice bearing bacteria in the initial impact, and on what happens when bacteria laden projectiles hit an icy surface. Laboratory experiments using high-speed impacts with a light gas gun show that obtaining icy ejecta with viable bacterial loads is straightforward. In addition to demonstrating the viability of the bacteria carried on the ejecta, we have also measured the angular and size distribution of the ejecta produced in hypervelocity impacts on ice. We have however been unsuccessful at transferring viable bacteria to icy surfaces from bacteria laden projectiles impacting at hypervelocities.

  1. Survival of fossils under extreme shocks induced by hypervelocity impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, M J; McDermott, K H; Price, M C; Yolland, L J

    2014-08-28

    Experimental data are shown for survival of fossilized diatoms undergoing shocks in the GPa range. The results were obtained from hypervelocity impact experiments which fired fossilized diatoms frozen in ice into water targets. After the shots, the material recovered from the target water was inspected for diatom fossils. Nine shots were carried out, at speeds from 0.388 to 5.34 km s(-1), corresponding to mean peak pressures of 0.2-19 GPa. In all cases, fragmented fossilized diatoms were recovered, but both the mean and the maximum fragment size decreased with increasing impact speed and hence peak pressure. Examples of intact diatoms were found after the impacts, even in some of the higher speed shots, but their frequency and size decreased significantly at the higher speeds. This is the first demonstration that fossils can survive and be transferred from projectile to target in hypervelocity impacts, implying that it is possible that, as suggested by other authors, terrestrial rocks ejected from the Earth by giant impacts from space, and which then strike the Moon, may successfully transfer terrestrial fossils to the Moon.

  2. Hypervelocity Impact Test Results for a Metallic Thermal Protection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Katherine L.; Poteet, Carl C.; Blosser, Max L.

    2003-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests have been performed on specimens representing metallic thermal protection systems (TPS) developed at NASA Langley Research Center for use on next-generation reusable launch vehicles (RLV). The majority of the specimens tested consists of a foil gauge exterior honeycomb panel, composed of either Inconel 617 or Ti-6Al-4V, backed with 2.0 in. of fibrous insulation and a final Ti-6Al-4V foil layer. Other tested specimens include titanium multi-wall sandwich coupons as well as TPS using a second honeycomb sandwich in place of the foil backing. Hypervelocity impact tests were performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Orbital Debris Simulation Facility. An improved test fixture was designed and fabricated to hold specimens firmly in place during impact. Projectile diameter, honeycomb sandwich material, honeycomb sandwich facesheet thickness, and honeycomb core cell size were examined to determine the influence of TPS configuration on the level of protection provided to the substructure (crew, cabin, fuel tank, etc.) against micrometeoroid or orbit debris impacts. Pictures and descriptions of the damage to each specimen are included.

  3. Experimental Study and Numerical Simulation of Hypervelocity Projectile Impact on Double-Wall Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈沿海; 张庆明; 黄风雷

    2004-01-01

    Tests of hypervelocity projectile impact on double-wall structure were performed with the front wall ranging from 0.5 mm to 2.0 mm thick and different impact velocities. Smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code in LS-DYNA was employed for the simulation of hypervelocity impact on the double-wall structure. By using elementary shock wave theory, the experimental results above are analyzed. The analysis can provide an explanation for the penetration mechanism of hypervelocity projectile impact on double-wall structure about the effect of front wall thickness and impact velocity.

  4. Hypervelocity impact effects on solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, M. Frank

    1992-01-01

    One of the space hazards of concern is the problem of natural matter and space debris impacting spacecraft. In addition to mechanical damage, impact velocities greater than 5 km/sec can produce shock induced ionization effects with resultant surface charging and complex chemical interactions. The upper limit of the velocity distribution for these particles is on the order of 70 km/sec. The second source of particulate matter is due to the presence of man and the machinery needed to place satellites in orbit. This 'man made' component of the space debris consists of waste, rocket exhaust, and debris caused by satellite break-up. Most of the particles are small. However as the size increases, debris purposefully thrown overboard such as garbage and human waste, combined with paint chips, plastic, wire fragments, bolts, etc., become formidable hazards which completely dominate the distribution function for some orbits. These larger fragments can produce penetration and spalling of the thick metallic structures associated with spacecraft. The particles most often encountered are aluminum oxide, associated with fuel residue, and paint chips. These debris types can have a wide range of particle sizes. It has been stated that the design of spacecraft will have to take the debris evolution into account and provide additional suitable armor for key components in the near future. The purpose of this work was to subject samples from solar power arrays, one of the key components of any spacecraft, to a debris flux typical of what might be found in space, and measure the degradation of the power panels after impact.

  5. Mass spectrometry of hyper-velocity impacts of organic micrograins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srama, Ralf; Woiwode, Wolfgang; Postberg, Frank; Armes, Steven P; Fujii, Syuji; Dupin, Damien; Ormond-Prout, Jonathan; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Kempf, Sascha; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Mocker, Anna; Grün, Eberhard

    2009-12-01

    The study of hyper-velocity impacts of micrometeoroids is important for the calibration of dust sensors in space applications. For this purpose, submicron-sized synthetic dust grains comprising either polystyrene or poly[bis(4-vinylthiophenyl)sulfide] were coated with an ultrathin overlayer of an electrically conductive organic polymer (either polypyrrole or polyaniline) and were accelerated to speeds between 3 and 35 km s(-1) using the Heidelberg Dust Accelerator facility. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry was applied to analyse the resulting ionic impact plasma using a newly developed Large Area Mass Analyser (LAMA). Depending on the projectile type and the impact speed, both aliphatic and aromatic molecular ions and cluster species were identified in the mass spectra with masses up to 400 u. Clusters resulting from the target material (silver) and mixed clusters of target and projectile species were also observed. Impact velocities of between 10 and 35 km s(-1) are suitable for a principal identification of organic materials in micrometeoroids, whereas impact speeds below approximately 10 km s(-1) allow for an even more detailed analysis. Molecular ions and fragments reflect components of the parent molecule, providing determination of even complex organic molecules embedded in a dust grain. In contrast to previous measurements with the Cosmic Dust Analyser instrument, the employed LAMA instrument has a seven times higher mass resolution--approximately 200--which allowed for a detailed analysis of the complex mass spectra. These fundamental studies are expected to enhance our understanding of cometary, interplanetary and interstellar dust grains, which travel at similar hyper-velocities and are known to contain both aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Fragment Identification and Statistics Method of Hypervelocity Impact SPH Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaotian; JIA Guanghui; HUANG Hai

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive treatment to the fragment identification and statistics for the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation of hypervelocity impact is presented.Based on SPH method, combined with finite element method (FEM), the computation is performed.The fragments are identified by a new pre- and post-processing algorithm and then converted into a binary graph.The number of fragments and the attached SPH particles are determined by counting the quantity of connected domains on the binary graph.The size, velocity vector and mass of each fragment are calculated by the particles' summation and weighted average.The dependence of this method on finite element edge length and simulation terminal time is discussed.An example of tungsten rods impacting steel plates is given for calibration.The computation results match experiments well and demonstrate the effectiveness of this method.

  7. Laboratory investigations of the survivability of bacteria in hypervelocity impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, M J; Shrine, N R; Mann, J; Bunch, A W; Brandao, P; Zarnecki, J C; Galloway, J A

    2001-01-01

    It is now well established that material naturally moves around the Solar System, even from planetary surface to planetary surface. Accordingly, the idea that life is distributed throughout space and did not necessarily originate on the Earth but migrated here from elsewhere (Panspermia) is increasingly deemed worthy of consideration. If life arrived at the Earth from space, its relative speed will typically be of order many km s-1, and the resulting collision with the Earth and its atmosphere will be in the hypervelocity regime. A mechanism for the bacteria to survive such an impact is required. Therefore a programme of hypervelocity impacts in the laboratory at (4.5 +/- 0.6) km s-1 was carried out using bacteria (Rhodococcus) laden projectiles. After impacts on a variety of target materials (rock, glass and metal) attempts were made to culture Rhodococcus from the surface of the resulting craters and also from the target material ejected during crater formation. Control shots with clean projectiles yielded no evidence for Rhodococcus growth from any crater surface or ejecta. When projectiles doped with Rhodococcus were used no impact crater surface yielded colonies of Rhodococcus. However, for four shots of bacteria into rock (two on chalk and two on granite) the ejecta was afterwards found to give colonies of Rhodococcus. This was not true for shots onto glass. In addition, shots into aerogel (density 96 kg m-3) were also carried out (two with clean projectiles and two with projectiles with Rhodococcus). This crudely simulated aero-capture in a planetary atmosphere. No evidence for Rhodococcus growth was found from the projectiles captured in the aerogel from any of the four shots.

  8. Theoretical Research Progress in High-Velocity/Hypervelocity Impact on Semi-Infinite Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhou Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the hypervelocity kinetic weapon and hypersonic cruise missiles research projects being carried out, the damage mechanism for high-velocity/hypervelocity projectile impact on semi-infinite targets has become the research keystone in impact dynamics. Theoretical research progress in high-velocity/hypervelocity impact on semi-infinite targets was reviewed in this paper. The evaluation methods for critical velocity of high-velocity and hypervelocity impact were summarized. The crater shape, crater scaling laws and empirical formulae, and simplified analysis models of crater parameters for spherical projectiles impact on semi-infinite targets were reviewed, so were the long rod penetration state differentiation, penetration depth calculation models for the semifluid, and deformed long rod projectiles. Finally, some research proposals were given for further study.

  9. Hypervelocity impact properties of graphene armor via molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang W.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypervelocity impact properties of two different graphene armor systems are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. One system is the so-called spaced armor which consists of a number of graphene plates spaced certain distance apart. Its response under normal impact of a spherical projectile is studied, focusing on the effect of the number of graphene monolayers per plate (denoted by n on the penetration resistance of the armor. We find that under normal impact by a spherical projectile the penetration resistance increases with decreasing number of monolayers per plate (n, and the best penetration resistance is achieved in the system with one graphene layer for each plate. Note that the monolayers in all the simulated multilayer graphene plates were AB-stacked. The second system being studied is the laminated copper/graphene composites with the graphene layers inside copper, on impact or back surface, or on both the impact and back surfaces. The simulation results show that under normal impact by a spherical projectile the laminated copper/graphene composite has much higher penetration resistance than the monolithic copper plate. The best efficiency is achieved when the graphene layers are on both the impact and back surfaces.

  10. Study of Hypervelocity Projectile Impact on Thick Metal Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawoon K. Roy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypervelocity impacts generate extreme pressure and shock waves in impacted targets that undergo severe localized deformation within a few microseconds. These impact experiments pose unique challenges in terms of obtaining accurate measurements. Similarly, simulating these experiments is not straightforward. This study proposed an approach to experimentally measure the velocity of the back surface of an A36 steel plate impacted by a projectile. All experiments used a combination of a two-stage light-gas gun and the photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV technique. The experimental data were used to benchmark and verify computational studies. Two different finite-element methods were used to simulate the experiments: Lagrangian-based smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH and Eulerian-based hydrocode. Both codes used the Johnson-Cook material model and the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state. Experiments and simulations were compared based on the physical damage area and the back surface velocity. The results of this study showed that the proposed simulation approaches could be used to reduce the need for expensive experiments.

  11. Modelling hypervelocity impacts into aluminum structures based on LDEF data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, C. R.; Atkinson, D. R.; Watts, A. J.; Wagner, J. R.; Allbrooks, M. K.; Hennessy, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Realizing and understanding the effects of the near-Earth space environment on a spacecraft during its mission lifetime is becoming more important with the regeneration of America's space program. Included among these potential effects are the following: erosion and surface degradation due to atomic oxygen impingement; ultraviolet exposure embrittlement; and delamination, pitting, cratering, and ring formation due to micrometeoroid and debris impacts. These effects may occur synergistically and may alter the spacecraft materials enough to modify the resultant crater, star crack, and/or perforation. This study concentrates on modelling the effects of micrometeoroid and debris hypervelocity impacts into aluminum materials (6061-T6). Space debris exists in all sizes, and has the possibility of growing into a potentially catastrophic problem, particularly since self-collisions between particles can rapidly escalate the number of small impactors. We have examined the morphologies of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) impact craters and the relationship between the observed impact damage on LDEF versus the existing models for both the natural (micrometeoroid) and manmade (debris) environments in order to better define these environments.

  12. Hypervelocity Impact Fusion with Compressed Deuterium-Tritium Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Olariu, S

    1998-01-01

    The neutron yields observed in inertial confinement fusion experiments for higher convergence ratios are about two orders of magnitude smaller than the neutron yields predicted by one-dimensional models, the discrepancy being attributed to the development of instabilities. We consider the possibility that ignition and a moderate gain could be achieved with existing laser facilities if the laser driver energy is used to produce only the radial compression of the fuel capsule to high densities but relatively low temperatures, while the ignition of the fusion reactions in the compressed fuel capsule will be effected by a synchronized hypervelocity impact. A positively-charged incident projectile can be accelerated to velocities of 3.5 x 10^6 m/s, resulting in ignition temperatures of about 4 keV, by a conventional low-beta linac having a length of 13 km if deuterium-tritium densities of 570 g/cm^3 could be obtained by laser-driven compression.

  13. Induction Heating of Hypervelocity Impact Samples to 2500 Degrees Centigrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Joshua; Pardo, Art; Henderson, Don; Rodriguez, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory (RHTL) at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was asked to heat samples up to 2500 degrees Centigrade (4532 degrees Fahrenheit) to simulate reentry scenarios of crafts where heated shields are impacted with single small particles ranging from 0.2 to 1.0 millimeters (.008 to.039 inches) of various materials. The team decided an electromagnetic induction (induction heater) was the best method to achieve and control the temperatures in a rapid manner. The samples consisted of three-dimensional carbon-carbon and two-dimensional carbon-phenolic, which are both electrically conductive. After several attempts the team was able to achieve over 2500 degrees Centigrade (4532 degrees Fahrenheit) in ambient atmosphere. When the system was moved to the target chamber and the vacuum system evacuated down to 250 millitorr, arcing occurred between the bus bars and tank, the feedthrough fittings that carried the coolant and current, and between the target sample and coil. To overcome this arcing, conformal coatings, room temperature vulcanization (RTV) silicone, and other non-conductive materials were used to isolate the electromagnetic fields.

  14. Improving Metallic Thermal Protection System Hypervelocity Impact Resistance Through Design of Experiments Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteet, Carl C.; Blosser, Max L.

    2001-01-01

    A design of experiments approach has been implemented using computational hypervelocity impact simulations to determine the most effective place to add mass to an existing metallic Thermal Protection System (TPS) to improve hypervelocity impact protection. Simulations were performed using axisymmetric models in CTH, a shock-physics code developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and validated by comparison with existing test data. The axisymmetric models were then used in a statistical sensitivity analysis to determine the influence of five design parameters on degree of hypervelocity particle dispersion. Several damage metrics were identified and evaluated. Damage metrics related to the extent of substructure damage were seen to produce misleading results, however damage metrics related to the degree of dispersion of the hypervelocity particle produced results that corresponded to physical intuition. Based on analysis of variance results it was concluded that the most effective way to increase hypervelocity impact resistance is to increase the thickness of the outer foil layer. Increasing the spacing between the outer surface and the substructure is also very effective at increasing dispersion.

  15. Influence of impact conditions on plasma generation during hypervelocity impact by aluminum projectile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weidong; Lv, Yangtao; Li, Jianqiao; Wang, Cheng; Ning, Jianguo

    2016-07-01

    For describing hypervelocity impact (relative low-speed as related to space debris and much lower than travelling speed of meteoroids) phenomenon associated with plasma generation, a self-developed 3D code was advanced to numerically simulate projectiles impacting on a rigid wall. The numerical results were combined with a new ionization model which was developed in an early study to calculate the ionized materials during the impact. The calculated results of ionization were compared with the empirical formulas concluded by experiments in references and a good agreement was obtained. Then based on the reliable 3D numerical code, a series of impacts with different projectile configurations were simulated to investigate the influence of impact conditions on hypervelocity impact generated plasma. It was found that the form of empirical formula needed to be modified. A new empirical formula with a critical impact velocity was advanced to describe the velocity dependence of plasma generation and the parameters of the modified formula were ensured by the comparison between the numerical predictions and the empirical formulas. For different projectile configurations, the changes of plasma charges with time are different but the integrals of charges on time almost stayed in the same level.

  16. Detection of electromagnetic pulses produced by hypervelocity micro particle impact plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Close, Sigrid; Lee, Nicolas; Johnson, Theresa; Goel, Ashish; Fletcher, Alexander [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Linscott, Ivan; Strauss, David; Lauben, David [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Srama, Ralf; Mocker, Anna; Bugiel, Sebastian [Institut für Raumfahrtsysteme, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 29, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    Hypervelocity micro particles (mass < 1 ng), including meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and produce plasmas that are initially dense (∼10{sup 28} m{sup −3}), but rapidly expand into the surrounding vacuum. We report the detection of radio frequency (RF) emission associated with electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) from hypervelocity impacts of micro particles in ground-based experiments using micro particles that are 15 orders of magnitude less massive than previously observed. The EMP production is a stochastic process that is influenced by plasma turbulence such that the EMP detection rate that is strongly dependent on impact speed and on the electrical charge conditions at the impact surface. In particular, impacts of the fastest micro particles occurring under spacecraft charging conditions representative of high geomagnetic activity are the most likely to produce RF emission. This new phenomenon may provide a source for unexplained RF measurements on spacecraft charged to high potentials.

  17. Response of Organic Materials to Hypervelocity Impacts (up to 11.2 km/sec)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, D. S.; Murphy, W. M.; Miller, G. P.; Grosch, D. J.; Walker, J. D.; Mullin, A.; Waite, J. H.

    1998-09-01

    It is speculated that organic-rich planetesimals played a role in the origin of life on Earth. However, the mechanism by which organics could have been delivered from space to a planetary surface is difficult to determine. Particularly problematic is the question of the stability of organic material under hypervelocity impact conditions. Although some evidence suggests organic molecules cannot survive impacts from projectile velocities greater than about 10 km/sec [1], other investigators have found that impacts create a favorable environment for post-shock recombination of organic molecules in the plume phase [2, 3]. Understanding the mechanisms involved in delivering organics to a planetary surface remains difficult to assess due to the lack of experimental results of hypervelocity impacts, particularly in the velocity range of tens of km/sec. Organic material preservation and destruction from impact shocks, the synthesis of organics in the post-impact plume environment, and implications of these processes for Earth and Mars can be investigated by launching an inorganic projectile into an analog planetesimal-and-bolide organic-rich target. We explored the pressure and temperature ranges of hypervelocity impacts (11.2 km/sec) through simulations with CTH impact physics computer code. Using an inhibited shaped-charge launcher, we also experimentally determined the response of organic material to hypervelocity impacts. Initial work focused on saturating well-characterized zeolitic tuff with an aqueous solution containing dissolved naphthalene, a common polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Porosity measurements, thin section, and x-ray diffraction analyses were performed to determine that the tuff is primarily fine-grained clinoptilolite. In order to distinguish between contaminants and compounds generated or destroyed in the impact, we tagged the aqueous component of our target with deuterium. Experimental tests revealed that to first order, naphthalene survived

  18. Hypervelocity impact on brittle materials of semi-infinite thickness: fracture morphology related to projectile diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Emma A.; Kay, Laurie; Shrine, Nick R. G.

    Hypervelocity impact on brittle materials produces features not observed on ductile targets. Low fracture toughness and high yield strength produce a range of fracture morphologies including cracking, spallation and shatter. For sub-mm diameter projectiles, impact features are characterised by petaloid spallation separated by radial cracks. The conchoidal or spallation diameter is a parameter in current cratering equations. An alternative method for interpreting hypervelocity impacts on glass targets of semi-infinite thickness is tested against impact data produced using the Light Gas Gun (LGG) facility at the University of Kent at Canterbury (UKC), U.K. Spherical projectiles of glass and other materials with diameters 30-300 μm were fired at ~5 km s^-1 at a glass target of semi-infinite thickness. The data is used to test a power law relationship between projectile diameter and crack length. The results of this work are compared with published cratering/spallation equations for brittle materials.

  19. Stochastic modeling of hypervelocity impacts in attitude propagation of space debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagnières, Luc B. M.; Sharf, Inna

    2017-02-01

    Bombardment of orbital debris and micrometeoroids on active and inoperative satellites is becoming an increasing threat to space operations and has significant consequences on space missions. Concerns with orbital debris have led agencies to start developing debris removal missions and knowing a target's rotational parameters ahead of time is crucial to the eventual success of such a mission. A new method is proposed, enabling the inclusion of hypervelocity impacts into spacecraft attitude propagation models by considering the transfer of angular momentum from collisions as a stochastic jump process. Furthermore, the additional momentum transfer due to ejecta created during these hypervelocity impacts, an effect known as momentum enhancement, is considered. In order to assess the importance of collisions on attitude propagation, the developed model is applied to two pieces of space debris by using impact fluxes from ESA's Meteoroid and Space Debris Terrestrial Environment Reference (MASTER) model.

  20. Test study on the performance of shielding configuration with stuffed layer under hypervelocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Fa-wei; Huang, Jie; Wen, Xue-zhong; Ma, Zhao-xia; Liu, Sen

    2016-10-01

    In order to study the cracking and intercepting mechanism of stuffed layer configuration on the debris cloud and to develop stuffed layer configuration with better performance, the hypervelocity impact tests on shielding configurations with stuffed layer were carried out. Firstly, the hypervelocity impact tests on the shielding configuration with stuffed layer of 3 layer ceramic fibre and 3 layer aramid fibre were finished, the study results showed that the debris cloud generated by the aluminum sphere impacting bumper at the velocity of about 6.2 km/s would be racked and intercepted by the stuffed layer configuration efficiently when the ceramic fibre layers and aramid fibre layers were jointed together, however, the shielding performance would be declined when the ceramic fibre layers and aramid fibre layers were divided by some distance. The mechanism of stuffed layer racking and intercepting the debris cloud was analyzed according to the above test results. Secondly, based on the mechanism of the stuffed layer cracking and intercepint debirs cloud the hypervelocity impact tests on the following three stuffed layer structures with the equivalent areal density to the 1 mm-thick aluminum plate were also carried out to compare their performance of cracking and intercepting debris cloud. The mechanisms of stuffed layer racking and intercepting the debris cloud were validated by the test result. Thirdly, the influence of the stuffed layer position on the shielding performance was studied by the test, too. The test results would provide reference for the design of better performance shielding configuration with stuffed layer.

  1. Damage Characteristics of the Logical Chip Module Due to Plasma Created by Hypervelocity Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Enling; Wu, Jin; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Lijiao; Xiang, Shenghai; Xia, Jin; Liu, Shuhua; He, Liping; Han, Yafei; Xu, Mingyang; Zhang, Shuang; Yuan, Jianfei

    2016-04-01

    To researching the damage characteristics of typical logical chip modules in spacecraft due to plasma generated by hypervelocity impacts, we have established a triple Langmuir probe diagnostic system and a logical chips measurement system, which were used to diagnose plasma characteristic parameters and the logical chip module's logical state changes due to the plasma created by a 7075 aluminum projectile hypervelocity impact on the 2A12 aluminum target. Three sets of experiments were performed with the collision speeds of 2.85 km/s, 3.1 km/s and 2.20 km/s, at the same incident angles of 30 degrees and logical chip module's positions by using a two-stage light gas gun loading system, a plasma characteristic parameters diagnostic system and a logical chip module's logical state measurement system, respectively. Electron temperature and density were measured at given position and azimuth, and damage estimation was performed for the logical chip module by using the data acquisition system. Experimental results showed that temporary damage could be induced on logical chip modules in spacecraft by plasma generated by hypervelocity impacts under the given experimental conditions and the sensors' position and azimuth. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 10972145, 11272218, 11472178), Program for Liaoning Excellent Talents in University of China (No. LR2013008), Open Foundation of Key Laboratory of Liaoning Weapon Science and Technology, Liaoning Province Talents Engineering Projects of China (No. 2012921044)

  2. Theory and experiments characterizing hypervelocity impact plasmas on biased spacecraft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nicolas; Close, Sigrid; Goel, Ashish; Lauben, David; Linscott, Ivan; Johnson, Theresa; Strauss, David; Bugiel, Sebastian; Mocker, Anna; Srama, Ralf

    2013-03-01

    Space weather including solar activity and background plasma sets up spacecraft conditions that can magnify the threat from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity impactors include both meteoroids, traveling between 11 and 72 km/s, and orbital debris, with typical impact speeds of 10 km/s. When an impactor encounters a spacecraft, its kinetic energy is converted over a very short timescale into energy of vaporization and ionization, resulting in a small, dense plasma. This plasma can produce radio frequency (RF) emission, causing electrical anomalies within the spacecraft. In order to study this phenomenon, we conducted ground-based experiments to study hypervelocity impact plasmas using a Van de Graaff dust accelerator. Iron projectiles ranging from 10-16 g to 10-11 g were fired at speeds of up to 70 km/s into a variety of target materials under a range of surface charging conditions representative of space weather effects. Impact plasmas associated with bare metal targets as well as spacecraft materials were studied. Plasma expansion models were developed to determine the composition and temperature of the impact plasma, shedding light on the plasma dynamics that can lead to spacecraft electrical anomalies. The dependence of these plasma properties on target material, impact speed, and surface charge was analyzed. Our work includes three major results. First, the initial temperature of the impact plasma is at least an order of magnitude lower than previously reported, providing conditions more favorable for sustained RF emission. Second, the composition of impact plasmas from glass targets, unlike that of impact plasmas from tungsten, has low dependence on impact speed, indicating a charge production mechanism that is significant down to orbital debris speeds. Finally, negative ion formation has a strong dependence on target material. These new results can inform the design and operation of spacecraft in order to mitigate future impact-related space weather

  3. Formation of melt droplets, melt fragments, and accretionary impact lapilli during a hypervelocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a model that describes the formation of melt droplets, melt fragments, and accretionary impact lapilli during a hypervelocity impact. Using the iSALE hydrocode, coupled to the ANEOS equation of state for silica, we create high-resolution two-dimensional impact models to track the motion of impact ejecta. We then estimate the size of the ejecta products using simple analytical expressions and information derived from our hydrocode models. Ultimately, our model makes predictions of how the size of the ejecta products depends on impactor size, impact velocity, and ejection velocity. In general, we find that larger impactor sizes result in larger ejecta products and higher ejection velocities result in smaller ejecta product sizes. We find that a 10 km diameter impactor striking at a velocity of 20 km/s creates millimeter scale melt droplets comparable to the melt droplets found in the Chicxulub ejecta curtain layer. Our model also predicts that melt droplets, melt fragments, and accretionary impact lapilli should be found together in well preserved ejecta curtain layers and that all three ejecta products can form even on airless bodies that lack significant volatile content. This prediction agrees with observations of ejecta from the Sudbury and Chicxulub impacts as well as the presence of accretionary impact lapilli in lunar breccia.

  4. Burst Pressure Failure of Titanium Tanks Damaged by Secondary Plumes from Hypervelocity Impacts on Aluminum Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahra, Henry; Ghosn, Louis; Christiansen, Eric; Davis, B. Alan; Keddy, Chris; Rodriquez, Karen; Miller, Joshua; Bohl, William

    2011-01-01

    Metallic pressure tanks used in space missions are inherently vulnerable to hypervelocity impacts from micrometeoroids and orbital debris; thereby knowledge of impact damage and its effect on the tank integrity is crucial to a spacecraft risk assessment. This paper describes tests that have been performed to assess the effects of hypervelocity impact (HVI) damage on Titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) pressure vessels burst pressure and characteristics. The tests consisted of a pair of HVI impact tests on water-filled Ti-6Al-4V tanks (water being used as a surrogate to the actual propellant) and subsequent burst tests as well as a burst test on an undamaged control tank. The tanks were placed behind Aluminum (Al) shields and then each was impacted with a 7 km/s projectile. The resulting impact debris plumes partially penetrated the Ti-6Al-4V tank surfaces resulting in a distribution of craters. During the burst tests, the tank that failed at a lower burst pressure did appear to have the failure initiating at a crater site with observed spall cracks. A fracture mechanics analysis showed that the tanks failure at the impact location may have been due to a spall crack that formed upon impact of a fragmentation on the Titanium surface. This result was corroborated with a finite element analysis from calculated Von-Mises and hoop stresses.

  5. Effect of impact angles on ejecta and crater shape of aluminum alloy 6061-T6 targets in hypervelocity impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi K.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the impact angle of projectiles on the crater shape and ejecta in thick aluminum alloy targets was investigated in hypervelocity impacts. When polycarbonate projectiles and aluminum alloy 6061-T6 target were used, the impact angle of the projectiles clearly affected the crater shape, as expected. The impact angle also affected the ejecta mass, ejecta size and scatter angle. However, the effect at 15∘ and 22.5∘ was not great. When the impact angles were 30∘ and 45∘, the effect was clearly confirmed. The impact angle clearly affected the axial ratio of ejecta fragments, c/a.

  6. A Kernel-Free Particle-Finite Element Method for Hypervelocity Impact Simulation. Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Keun; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2004-01-01

    An improved hybrid particle-finite element method has been developed for the simulation of hypervelocity impact problems. Unlike alternative methods, the revised formulation computes the density without reference to any kernel or interpolation functions, for either the density or the rate of dilatation. This simplifies the state space model and leads to a significant reduction in computational cost. The improved method introduces internal energy variables as generalized coordinates in a new formulation of the thermomechanical Lagrange equations. Example problems show good agreement with exact solutions in one dimension and good agreement with experimental data in a three dimensional simulation.

  7. Simulation of Hypervelocity Impact Effects on Reinforced Carbon-Carbon. Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Keun; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2004-01-01

    Spacecraft operating in low earth orbit face a significant orbital debris impact hazard. Of particular concern, in the case of the Space Shuttle, are impacts on critical components of the thermal protection system. Recent research has formulated a new material model of reinforced carbon-carbon, for use in the analysis of hypervelocity impact effects on the Space Shuttle wing leading edge. The material model has been validated in simulations of published impact experiments and applied to model orbital debris impacts at velocities beyond the range of current experimental methods. The results suggest that momentum scaling may be used to extrapolate the available experimental data base, in order to predict the size of wing leading edge perforations at impact velocities as high as 13 km/s.

  8. Hyper-velocity impact risk assessment and mitigation strategies in the context of future X-ray astronomy missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perinati, Emanuele; Rott, Martin; Santangelo, Andrea; Tenzer, Chris

    2017-06-01

    Future X-ray astronomy missions will be based on instruments with apertures much larger than those used up to now. Therefore, the risk posed by hyper-velocity dust grains in the space environment to the onboard instrumentation will increase, especially when a larger aperture is combined with a longer focal length. Starting from the lessons learned from the XMM and Swift satellites, we review the question of hyper-velocity impacts and discuss the expected impact-rate, risk of damage and possible mitigation strategies in the context of LOFT, eROSITA and ATHENA.

  9. Hypervelocity Impact Experiments in the Laboratory Relating to Lunar Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, M. J.; Parnell, J.; Bowden, S. A.; Crawford, I. A.

    2010-12-01

    The results of a set of laboratory impact experiments (speeds in the range 1-5 km s-1) are reviewed. They are discussed in the context of terrestrial impact ejecta impacting the Moon and hence lunar astrobiology through using the Moon to learn about the history of life on Earth. A review of recent results indicates that survival of quite complex organic molecules can be expected in terrestrial meteorites impacting the lunar surface, but they may have undergone selective thermal processing both during ejection from the Earth and during lunar impact. Depending on the conditions of the lunar impact (speed, angle of impact etc.) the shock pressures generated can cause significant but not complete sterilisation of any microbial load on a meteorite (e.g. at a few GPa 1-0.1% of the microbial load can survive, but at 20 GPa this falls to typically 0.01-0.001%). For more sophisticated biological products such as seeds (trapped in rocks) the lunar impact speeds generate shock pressures that disrupt the seeds (experiments show this occurs at approximately 1 GPa or semi-equivalently 1 km s-1). Overall, the delivery of terrestrial material of astrobiological interest to the Moon is supported by these experiments, although its long term survival on the Moon is a separate issue not discussed here.

  10. Composition of Plasma Formed from Hypervelocity Dust Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, N.; Close, S.; Rymer, A. M.; Mocker, A.

    2012-12-01

    Dust impacts can occur on all solar system bodies but are especially prevalent in the case of the Saturnian moons that are near or within the dust torus produced by Enceladus's plumes. Depending on the mass and charge on these plume particles, they will be influenced by both gravitational and electrodynamic forces, resulting in a range of possible impact speeds on the moons. The plasma formed upon impact can have very different characteristics depending on impact speed and on the electric field due to surface charging at the impact point. Through recent tests conducted at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics using a Van de Graaff dust accelerator, iron dust particles were electrostatically accelerated to speeds of 3-65 km/s and impacted on a variety of target materials including metallic and glassy surfaces. The target surfaces were connected to a biasing supply to represent surface charging effects. Because of the high specific kinetic energy of the dust particles, upon impact they vaporize along with part of the target surface and a fraction of this material is ionized forming a dense plasma. The impacts produced both positive and negative ions. We made measurements of the net current imparted by this expanding plasma at a distance of several centimeters from the impact point. By setting the bias of the target, we impose an electric field on the charge population, allowing a measurement of plasma composition through time of flight analysis. The figure shows representative measurements of the net current measured by a retarding potential analyzer (RPA) from separate 18 and 19 km/s impacts of 7 fg particles on a glassy surface that was negatively and positively biased, respectively. This target was an optical solar reflector donated by J. Likar of Lockheed Martin for these experiments. These results show that ions of both positive and negative charge can be formed through the mechanism of dust impacts, and has implications on the surface plasma environment

  11. Design and testing of miniaturized plasma sensor for measuring hypervelocity impact plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goel, A., E-mail: ashish09@stanford.edu; Tarantino, P. M.; Lauben, D. S.; Close, S. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    An increasingly notable component of the space environment pertains to the impact of meteoroids and orbital debris on spacecraft and the resulting mechanical and electrical damages. Traveling at speeds of tens of km/s, when these particles, collectively referred to as hypervelocity particles, impact a satellite, they vaporize, ionize, and produce a radially expanding plasma that can generate electrically harmful radio frequency emission or serve as a trigger for electrostatic discharge. In order to measure the flux, composition, energy distribution, and temperature of ions and electrons in this plasma, a miniaturized plasma sensor has been developed for carrying out in-situ measurements in space. The sensor comprises an array of electrostatic analyzer wells split into 16 different channels, catering to different species and energy ranges in the plasma. We present results from numerical simulation based optimization of sensor geometry. A novel approach of fabricating the sensor using printed circuit boards is implemented. We also describe the test setup used for calibrating the sensor and show results demonstrating the energy band pass characteristics of the sensor. In addition to the hypervelocity impact plasmas, the plasma sensor developed can also be used to carry out measurements of ionospheric plasma, diagnostics of plasma propulsion systems, and in other space physics experiments.

  12. Design and testing of miniaturized plasma sensor for measuring hypervelocity impact plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, A.; Tarantino, P. M.; Lauben, D. S.; Close, S.

    2015-04-01

    An increasingly notable component of the space environment pertains to the impact of meteoroids and orbital debris on spacecraft and the resulting mechanical and electrical damages. Traveling at speeds of tens of km/s, when these particles, collectively referred to as hypervelocity particles, impact a satellite, they vaporize, ionize, and produce a radially expanding plasma that can generate electrically harmful radio frequency emission or serve as a trigger for electrostatic discharge. In order to measure the flux, composition, energy distribution, and temperature of ions and electrons in this plasma, a miniaturized plasma sensor has been developed for carrying out in-situ measurements in space. The sensor comprises an array of electrostatic analyzer wells split into 16 different channels, catering to different species and energy ranges in the plasma. We present results from numerical simulation based optimization of sensor geometry. A novel approach of fabricating the sensor using printed circuit boards is implemented. We also describe the test setup used for calibrating the sensor and show results demonstrating the energy band pass characteristics of the sensor. In addition to the hypervelocity impact plasmas, the plasma sensor developed can also be used to carry out measurements of ionospheric plasma, diagnostics of plasma propulsion systems, and in other space physics experiments.

  13. Asteroid deflection using a kinetic impactor: Insights from hypervelocity impact experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerth, Tobias; Schäfer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of the planned AIDA mission [1], an impactor spacecraft (DART) hits the second component of the asteroid Didymos at hypervelocity. The impact crater will be observed from the AIM spacecraft and an observation of the ejecta plume is possible [1]. This allows conclusions to be drawn about the physical properties of the target material, and the momentum transfer will be studied [1]. In preparation for this mission, hypervelocity impact experiments can provide valuable information about the outcome of an impact event as a function of impactor and target material properties and, thus, support the interpretation of the data from the DART impact. In addition, these impact experiments provide an important means to validate numerical impact simulations required to simulate large-scale impacts that cannot be studied in laboratory experiments. Impact experiments have shown that crater morphology and size, crater growth and ejecta dynamics strongly depend on the physical properties of the target material [2]. For example, porous materials like sandstone lead to a shallower and slower ejection than low-porous materials like quartzite, and the cratering efficiency is reduced in porous targets leading to a smaller amount of ejected mass [3]. These phenomena result in a reduced momentum multiplication factor (often called "beta-value"), i.e. the ratio of the change in target momentum after the impact and the momentum of the projectile is smaller for porous materials. Hypervelocity impact experiments into target materials with different porosities and densities such as quartzite (2.9 %, 2.6 g/cm3), sandstone (25.3 %, 2 g/cm3), limestone (31 %, 1.8 g/cm3), and highly porous aerated concrete (87.5 %, 0.4 g/cm3) were conducted. Projectile velocities were varied between about 3 km/s and almost 7 km/s. A ballistic pendulum was used to measure the momentum transfer. The material strength required for scaling laws was determined for all target materials. The highest

  14. Investigation into debris cloud characterizations for oblique hypervelocity impact of projectiles on bumper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟; 管公顺; 庞宝君; 李强; 张永强

    2004-01-01

    All long-duration spacecraft in low-earth-orbit are subject to high velocity impacts by meteoroids and space debris. Such impacts are expected to occur at non-normal incidence angles and can cause severe damage to the spacecraft and its external flight-critical systems and possibly lead to catastrophic failure of the spacecraft.In order to ensure crew safety and proper function of internal and external spacecraft systems, the characteristics of a debris cloud generated by such impacts must be known. An analytical model is therefore developed for the characterization of the penetration and ricochet debris clouds created by the hypervelocity impact of an aluminum spherical projectile on an aluminum plate. This model employs normal and oblique shock wave theory to characterize the penetration and ricochet processes. The prediction results of center-of-mass trajectory and leading velocity of penetration and ricochet debris clouds are obtained and compared with numerical and experimental results in figures.

  15. Hypervelocity impact tests on Space Shuttle Orbiter RCC thermal protection material. [Reinforced Carbon-Carbon laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    It is noted that the Shuttle Orbiter will be more subject to meteoroid impact than previous spacecraft, due to its greater surface area and longer cumulative time in space. The Orbiter structural material, RCC, a reinforced carbon-carbon laminate with a diffused silicon carbide coating, is evaluated in terms of its resistance to hypervelocity impact. It was found that the specimens (disks with a mass of 34 g and a thickness of 5.0 mm) were cratered only on the front surface when the impact energy was 3 J or less. At 3 J, a trace of the black carbon interior was exposed. The specimens were completely penetrated when the energy was 34 J or greater.

  16. Vulnerability analysis of a pressurized aluminum composite vessel against hypervelocity impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hereil Pierre-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vulnerability of high pressure vessels subjected to high velocity impact of space debris is analyzed with the response of pressurized vessels to hypervelocity impact of aluminum sphere. Investigated tanks are CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastics overwrapped Al vessels. Explored internal pressure of nitrogen ranges from 1 bar to 300 bar and impact velocity are around 4400 m/s. Data obtained from Xrays radiographies and particle velocity measurements show the evolution of debris cloud and shock wave propagation in pressurized nitrogen. Observation of recovered vessels leads to the damage pattern and to its evolution as a function of the internal pressure. It is shown that the rupture mode is not a bursting mode but rather a catastrophic damage of the external carbon composite part of the vessel.

  17. Impact features tracing hypervelocity airbursts on earth from the atmosphere to the ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courty, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    In the absence of deep craters, impact features have been debated to possibly tracing proximal ejecta from yet undetected structure or airburst debris from a meteorite collision with the terrestrial atmosphere or lithosphere. We examine the possibility for impact features to have originated from the shock layer formed ahead of a hypervelocity collider in the earth atmosphere. This hypothesis is approached by comparing impact features from controlled materials to puzzling geological ones: (1) debris collected at the ground from a high altitude meteor airburst recorded on 2011 August 2nd in Southern France; (2) laboratory experiments performed for defense purposes at the CEA Gramat Center (France) with the Persephone hypervelocity light gas gun; (3) the Zhamanshin impact breccia, the Lybian glass, the Egyptian Dakhleh glass, the Tasmanian Darwin glass, the Australasian tektite strewnfield and the Australian Henbury crater field. The Persephone experiments include collisions from 4.1 to 7.9 km/s by a steel projectile embedded into a polycarbonate holder with a polystyrene separator on to a 40 mm thick aluminum target. The impact features been characterized by coupling Environmental SEM with EDS, Raman micro-spectrometry, XRD, TEM, Tof-SIMS, ICP-MS and isotope analyses. Similar carbonaceous polymorphs that are closely imbricated at meso to nano-scales to the crystallized components (including the metal blebs) and to the glass phases (spherules or matrix) are present in all the impact features studied. They dominantly consist of aliphatic polymers, rare aromatic compounds, with graphite-lonsdaleite inclusions. The Persephone experiments help relating the graphite-lonsdaleite couple to transformed organic residues by the transient high pressure shock (a few tens MPa) and the transient heating (ca 100°C) and the aliphatic polymers to new hydrocarbons that formed from the pulverized polycarbonate and polystyrene. The Persephone experiments provide the controlled situation

  18. Vulnerability analysis of a pressurized aluminum composite vessel against hypervelocity impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereil, Pierre-Louis; Plassard, Fabien; Mespoulet, Jérôme

    2015-09-01

    Vulnerability of high pressure vessels subjected to high velocity impact of space debris is analyzed with the response of pressurized vessels to hypervelocity impact of aluminum sphere. Investigated tanks are CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastics) overwrapped Al vessels. Explored internal pressure of nitrogen ranges from 1 bar to 300 bar and impact velocity are around 4400 m/s. Data obtained from Xrays radiographies and particle velocity measurements show the evolution of debris cloud and shock wave propagation in pressurized nitrogen. Observation of recovered vessels leads to the damage pattern and to its evolution as a function of the internal pressure. It is shown that the rupture mode is not a bursting mode but rather a catastrophic damage of the external carbon composite part of the vessel.

  19. Hypervelocity Dust Impacts in Space and the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Colorado CenterLunar Dust; Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) Team

    2013-10-01

    Interplanetary dust particles continually bombard all objects in the solar system, leading to the excavation of material from the target surfaces, the production of secondary ejecta particles, plasma, neutral gas, and electromagnetic radiation. These processes are of interest to basic plasma science, planetary and space physics, and engineering to protect humans and instruments against impact damages. The Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) has recently completed a 3 MV dust accelerator, and this talk will summarize our initial science results. The 3 MV Pelletron contains a dust source, feeding positively charged micron and sub-micron sized particles into the accelerator. We will present the technical details of the facility and its capabilities, as well as the results of our initial experiments for damage assessment of optical devices, and penetration studies of thin films. We will also report on the completion of our dust impact detector, the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX), is expected to be flying onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission by the time of this presentation. LDEX was tested, and calibrated at our dust accelerator. We will close by offering the opportunity to use this facility by the planetary, space and plasma physics communities.

  20. Finite element analysis of hypervelocity impact behaviour of CFRP-Al/HC sandwich panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadnis, Vaibhav A.; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical response of CFRP-Al/HC (carbon fibre-reinforced/epoxy composite face sheets with Al honeycomb core) sandwich panels to hyper-velocity impact (up to 1 km/s) is studied using a finite-element model developed in ABAQUS/Explicit. The intraply damage of CFRP face sheets is analysed by mean of a user-defined material model (VUMAT) employing a combination of Hashin and Puck criteria, delamination modelled using cohesive-zone elements. The damaged Al/HC core is assessed on the basis of a Johnson Cook dynamic failure model while its hydrodynamic response is captured using the Mie-Gruneisen equation of state. The results obtained with the developed finite-element model showed a reasonable correlation to experimental damage patterns. The surface peeling of both face sheets was evident, with a significant delamination around the impact location accompanied by crushing HC core.

  1. Hypervelocity Impact Behaviour of CFRP-A1/HC Sandwich Panel: Finite-Element Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadnis, Vaibhav A.; Roy, Anish; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2014-06-01

    The mechanical response of CFRP-Al/HC (carbon fibre- reinforced/epoxy composite face sheets with Al honeycomb core) sandwich panels to hyper-velocity impact ( 1 km/s) is studied using a finite-element model developed in ABAQUS/Explicit. The intraply damage of CFRP face sheets is analysed by the means of a user-defined material model (VUMAT) employing a combination of Hashin and Puck criteria and delamination is modelled using cohesive-zone elements. The damage of Al/HC core is assessed on the basis of a Johnson-Cook dynamic failure model while its hydrodynamic response is captured using the Mie- Gruneisen equation of state. The results obtained with the developed finite-element model showed a reasonable correlation to experimental damage patterns. The surface peeling of both face sheets was evident, with a significant delamination around the impact location accompanied by crushing of HC core.

  2. Finite element analysis of hypervelocity impact behaviour of CFRP-Al/HC sandwich panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phadnis Vaibhav A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical response of CFRP-Al/HC (carbon fibre-reinforced/epoxy composite face sheets with Al honeycomb core sandwich panels to hyper-velocity impact (up to 1 km/s is studied using a finite-element model developed in ABAQUS/Explicit. The intraply damage of CFRP face sheets is analysed by mean of a user-defined material model (VUMAT employing a combination of Hashin and Puck criteria, delamination modelled using cohesive-zone elements. The damaged Al/HC core is assessed on the basis of a Johnson Cook dynamic failure model while its hydrodynamic response is captured using the Mie-Gruneisen equation of state. The results obtained with the developed finite-element model showed a reasonable correlation to experimental damage patterns. The surface peeling of both face sheets was evident, with a significant delamination around the impact location accompanied by crushing HC core.

  3. Threshold for plasma phase transition of aluminum single crystal induced by hypervelocity impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming, E-mail: qmzhang@bit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Molecular dynamics method is used to study the threshold for plasma phase transition of aluminum single crystal induced by hypervelocity impact. Two effective simulation methods, piston-driven method and multi-scale shock technique, are used to simulate the shock wave. The simulation results from the two methods agree well with the experimental data, indicating that the shock wave velocity is linearly dependent on the particle velocity. The atom is considered to be ionized if the increase of its internal energy is larger than the first ionization energy. The critical impact velocity for plasma phase transition is about 13.0 km/s, corresponding to the threshold of pressure and temperature which is about 220 GPa and 11.0 × 10{sup 3 }K on the shock Hugoniot, respectively.

  4. Hypervelocity Impact Experiments on Epoxy/Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Composite Panels Reinforced with Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatiwada, Suman; Laughman, Jay W.; Armada, Carlos A.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Barrera, Enrique V.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced composites with multi-functional capabilities are of great interest to the designers of aerospace structures. Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) reinforced with high strength fibers provide a lightweight and high strength alternative to metals and metal alloys conventionally used in aerospace architectures. Novel reinforcements such as nanofillers offer potential to improve the mechanical properties and add multi-functionality such as radiation resistance and sensing capabilities to the PMCs. This paper reports the hypervelocity impact (HVI) test results on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber composites reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT). Woven UHMWPE fabrics, in addition to providing excellent impact properties and high strength, also offer radiation resistance due to inherent high hydrogen content. SWCNT have exceptional mechanical and electrical properties. BNNT (figure 1) have high neutron cross section and good mechanical properties that add multi-functionality to this system. In this project, epoxy based UHMWPE composites containing SWCNT and BNNT are assessed for their use as bumper shields and as intermediate plates in a Whipple Shield for HVI resistance. Three composite systems are prepared to compare against one another: (I) Epoxy/UHMWPE, (II) Epoxy/UHMWPE/SWCNT and (III) Epoxy/UHMWPE/SWCNT/BNNT. Each composite is a 10.0 by 10.0 by 0.11 cm3 panel, consisting of 4 layers of fabrics arranged in cross-ply orientation. Both SWCNT and BNNT are 0.5 weight % of the fabric preform. Hypervelocity impact tests are performed using a two-stage light gas gun at Rice University

  5. Recording and investigation of the seismic signal generated by hypervelocity impact experiments and numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güldemeister, N.; Moser, D.; Wünnemann, K.; Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.

    2013-09-01

    Meteorite impacts can cause environmental consequences, one of which is the generation of ground motions that may exceed the magnitude of the largest earthquakes [1]. Impacts generate shock waves that attenuate with distance until they even tually turn into seismic waves. Thus, meteorite impact may be considered as a source for seismic shaking similar to earthquakes. Seismic signals have been recorded in explosion experiments [2] and in hydrocode models of large impact events such as the Chicxulub crater [3]. To determine how much of the kinetic energy Ekin of the impactoris turned into seismic energy Eseis can be investigated experimentally (by recording the acoustic emission) or by numerical models. The ratio of Eseis/Ekin is the so called seismic efficiency k. The seismic efficiency depends on material properties (porosity) and is usually estimated to range between 10-2 and 10-6 [2,4]. In the framework of the "MEMIN" (multidisciplinary experimental and modeling impact crater research network) project a suite of hypervelocity impact experiments on a decimeter scale have been carried out [5]. We use acoustic emission (AE) technique and pressure gauges in high spatiotemporal Meteorite impacts can cause environmental consequences, one of which is the generation of ground motions that may exceed the magnitude of the largest earthquakes [1]. Impacts generate shock waves that attenuate with distance until they even tually turn into seismic waves. Thus, meteorite impact may be considered as a source for seismic shaking similar to earthquakes. Seismic signals have been recorded in explosion experiments [2] and in hydrocode models of large impact events such as the Chicxulub crater [3]. To determine how much of the kinetic energy Ekin of the impactoris turned into seismic energy Eseis can be investigated experimentally (by recording the acoustic emission) or by numerical models. The ratio of Eseis/Ekin is the so called seismic efficiency k. The seismic efficiency depends

  6. Determining the Onset of Amorphization of Crystalline Silicon due to Hypervelocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, C. Shane; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2009-03-01

    Atomistic simulations were performed to study a hypervelocity impactor striking a silicon/silicon nitride interface with varying silicon substrate thicknesses. Visualization indicates that the crystalline silicon amorphizes upon impact. The objective of the present study is to determine where the boundary between amorphous and crystalline silicon occurrs. In the analysis, the silicon substrate is separated into sixty layers and for each layer the average z displacement is determined. Our results show that the boundary between amorphous and crystalline silicon occurs between layers 20 and 22 for an impactor traveling at 5 km/s. This corresponds to a depth of approximately 32 Angstroms into the silicon. More detailed analyses reveals that the z displacement is noticeably larger for the layers that do not have a silicon atom bonded beneath them compared to the ones that do.

  7. Panspermia Survival Scenarios for Organisms that Survive Typical Hypervelocity Solar System Impact Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, D.

    2014-04-01

    Previous experimental studies have demonstrated the survivability of living cells during hypervelocity impact events, testing the panspermia and litho-panspermia hypotheses [1]. It has been demonstrated by the authors that Nannochloropsis Oculata Phytoplankton, a eukaryotic photosynthesizing autotroph found in the 'euphotic zone' (sunlit surface layers of oceans [2]), survive impacts up to 6.93 km s-1 (approx. shock pressure 40 GPa) [3, 4]. Also shown to survive impacts up to 5.49 km s-1 is the tardigrade species Hypsibius dujardini (a complex micro-animal consisting of 40,000 cells) [5, 6]. It has also been shown that they can survive sustained pressures up to 600 MPa using a water filled pressure capsule [7]. Additionally bacteria can survive impacts up to 5.4 km s-1 (~30 GPa) - albeit with a low probability of survival [1], and the survivability of yeast spores in impacts up to 7.4 km s-1 (~30 GPa) has also recently been demonstrated [8]. Other groups have also reported that the lichen Xanthoria elegans is able to survive shocks in similar pressure ranges (~40 GPa) [9]. Here we present various simulated impact regimes to show which scenarios are condusive to the panspermia hypothesis of the natural transfer of life (via an icy body) through space to an extraterrestrial environment.

  8. Survival of organic compounds in ejecta from hypervelocity impacts on ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, S. A.; Parnell, J.; Burchell, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts (HVIs) where organic-bearing ice constitutes the target material are important in several aspects of planetary and space science: (1) sampling of planetary surfaces using a hypervelocity projectile to impact the surface and eject surface materials for measurement or collection by a spacecraft; (2) the transfer of organic material between planetary bodies; and (3) providing energy for chemical processes involving surface materials. While small organic molecules (~6 carbon atoms), if present in surface materials, will likely be present in HVI-ejecta, uncertainty remains for larger organic molecules. It is the larger molecular weight compounds which could constitute direct evidence of life, and thus their survival within an HVI-ejecta plume is of key importance when evaluating strategies for life detection on icy bodies. It is not currently known what large organic molecules, and in what concentrations, may be present on icy bodies in the Solar System, but it is highly likely some will be more chemically stable during a HVI than others. Accordingly, in this study we examined a range of chemicals (β,β carotene, stearic acid and anthracene) with molecular weights between 178 and 536 daltons, and three different types of chemical structure. The compounds were solvated in a dimethylsulfoxide/water mixture and frozen. The frozen targets were impacted with steel spheres 1 and 1.5 mm in diameter at velocities of about 4.9 km s-1. Ice ejected during the impact was collected and underwent chemical analysis. The most labile compound (β,β carotene) was only detected (in small amounts) in the ejecta (and only that emitted at the lowest angles of ejection), although the other compounds were present in larger quantities and at a range of ejection angles. A concentration gradient was observed within the ejecta as a function of angle of ejection. This was not the same for both stearic acid and anthracene: the greatest concentrations of stearic acid were

  9. Hypervelocity Impact Performance of Open Cell Foam Core Sandwich Panel Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eric; Lear, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Metallic foams are a relatively new class of materials with low density and novel physical, mechanical, thermal, electrical and acoustic properties. Although incompletely characterized, they offer comparable mechanical performance to traditional spacecraft structural materials (i.e. honeycomb sandwich panels) without detrimental through-thickness channeling cells. There are two competing types of metallic foams: open cell and closed cell. Open cell foams are considered the more promising technology due to their lower weight and higher degree of homogeneity. Leading micrometeoroid and orbital debris shields (MMOD) incorporate thin plates separated by a void space (i.e. Whipple shield). Inclusion of intermediate fabric layers, or multiple bumper plates have led to significant performance enhancements, yet these shields require additional non-ballistic mass for installation (fasteners, supports, etc.) that can consume up to 35% of the total shield weight [1]. Structural panels, such as open cell foam core sandwich panels, that are also capable of providing sufficient MMOD protection, represent a significant potential for increased efficiency in hypervelocity impact shielding from a systems perspective through a reduction in required non-ballistic mass. In this paper, the results of an extensive impact test program on aluminum foam core sandwich panels are reported. The effect of pore density, and core thickness on shielding performance have been evaluated over impact velocities ranging from 2.2 - 9.3 km/s at various angles. A number of additional tests on alternate sandwich panel configurations of comparable-weight have also been performed, including aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels (see Figure 1), Nomex honeycomb core sandwich panels, and 3D aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels. A total of 70 hypervelocity impact tests are reported, from which an empirical ballistic limit equation (BLE) has been derived. The BLE is in the standard form suitable for implementation in

  10. Hypervelocity Impact Performance of Open Cell Foam Core Sandwich Panel Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, S.; Ordonez, E.; Christiansen, E. L.; Lear, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    Open cell metallic foam core sandwich panel structures are of interest for application in spacecraft micrometeoroid and orbital debris shields due to their novel form and advantageous structural and thermal performance. Repeated shocking as a result of secondary impacts upon individual foam ligaments during the penetration process acts to raise the thermal state of impacting projectiles ; resulting in fragmentation, melting, and vaporization at lower velocities than with traditional shielding configurations (e.g. Whipple shield). In order to characterize the protective capability of these structures, an extensive experimental campaign was performed by the Johnson Space Center Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility, the results of which are reported in this paper. Although not capable of competing against the protection levels achievable with leading heavy shields in use on modern high-risk vehicles (i.e. International Space Station modules), metallic foam core sandwich panels are shown to provide a substantial improvement over comparable structural panels and traditional low weight shielding alternatives such as honeycomb sandwich panels and metallic Whipple shields. A ballistic limit equation, generalized in terms of panel geometry, is derived and presented in a form suitable for application in risk assessment codes.

  11. Hypervelocity impact testing of advanced materials and structures for micrometeoroid and orbital debris shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2013-02-01

    A series of 66 hypervelocity impact experiments have been performed to assess the potential of various materials (aluminium, titanium, copper, stainless steel, nickel, nickel/chromium, reticulated vitreous carbon, silver, ceramic, aramid, ceramic glass, and carbon fibre) and structures (monolithic plates, open-cell foam, flexible fabrics, rigid meshes) for micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shielding. Arranged in various single-, double-, and triple-bumper configurations, screening tests were performed with 0.3175 cm diameter Al2017-T4 spherical projectiles at nominally 6.8 km/s and normal incidence. The top performing shields were identified through target damage assessments and their respective weight. The top performing candidate shield at the screening test condition was found to be a double-bumper configuration with a 0.25 mm thick Al3003 outer bumper, 6.35 mm thick 40 PPI aluminium foam inner bumper, and 1.016 mm thick Al2024-T3 rear wall (equal spacing between bumpers and rear wall). In general, double-bumper candidates with aluminium plate outer bumpers and foam inner bumpers were consistently found to be amongst the top performers. For this impact condition, potential weight savings of at least 47% over conventional all-aluminium Whipple shields are possible by utilizing the investigated materials and structures. The results of this study identify materials and structures of interest for further, more in-depth, impact investigations.

  12. Cassini Ring Plane Crossings: Hypervelocity Impact Risks to Sun Sensor Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allan Y.

    2016-01-01

    For both F/G and D-ring crossings: Probability of a penetration damage of the SSH (Sun Sensor Head) window glass is very low; Optical attenuation due to craters on the surface of the window glass caused by direct HVI (Hyper-Velocity Impact) by dust particle is estimated to be less than 1 percent; Optical attenuation due to secondary debris cloud generated by the disintegrated ring dust particles is estimated to be less than 1 percent. To better manage the Sun sensor damage risk during selected proximal orbit crossings, it is highly desirable to follow the contingency procedures mentioned in Section VII of the paper: Details of this contingency procedure are given in the paper entitled "Cassini Operational Sun Sensor Risk Management During Proximal Orbit Saturn Ring Plane Crossings" authored by David M. Bates. Based on results of risk analyses documented in this work and contingency planning work described in the paper mentioned above, we judge that the proximal orbit campaign will be safe from the viewpoint of dust HVI hazard.

  13. Geochemical processes between steel projectiles and silica-rich targets in hypervelocity impact experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Matthias; Hecht, Lutz; Deutsch, Alexander; Kenkmann, Thomas; Wirth, Richard; Berndt, Jasper

    2014-05-01

    The possibility of fractionation processes between projectile and target matter is critical with regard to the classification of the impactor type from geochemical analysis of impactites from natural craters. Here we present results of five hypervelocity MEMIN impact experiments (Poelchau et al., 2013) using the Cr-V-Co-Mo-W-rich steel D290-1 as projectile and two different silica-rich lithologies (Seeberger sandstone and Taunus quartzite) as target materials. Our study is focused on geochemical target-projectile interaction occurring in highly shocked and projectile-rich ejecta fragments. In all of the investigated impact experiments, whether sandstone or quartzite targets, the ejecta fragments show (i) shock-metamorphic features e.g., planar-deformation features (PDF) and the formation of silica glasses, (ii) partially melting of projectile and target, and (iii) significant mechanical and chemical mixing of the target rock with projectile material. The silica-rich target melts are strongly enriched in the "projectile tracer elements" Cr, V, and Fe, but have just minor enrichments of Co, W, and Mo. Inter-element ratios of these tracer elements within the contaminated target melts differ strongly from the original ratios in the steel. The fractionation results from differences in the reactivity of the respective elements with oxygen during interaction of the metal melt with silicate melt. Our results indicate that the principles of projectile-target interaction and associated fractionation do not depend on impact energies (at least for the selected experimental conditions) and water-saturation of the target. Partitioning of projectile tracer elements into the silicate target melt is much more enhanced in experiments with a non-porous quartzite target compared with the porous sandstone target. This is mainly the result of higher impact pressures, consequently higher temperatures and longer reaction times at high temperatures in the experiments with quartzite as

  14. Erosion of POSS-polyimide films under hypervelocity impact and atomic oxygen: The role of mechanical properties at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verker, R. [Space Environment Group, Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel)], E-mail: rverker@soreq.gov.il; Grossman, E. [Space Environment Group, Soreq NRC, Yavne 81800 (Israel); Eliaz, N. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2009-02-15

    Low Earth orbital debris impacts on the external surfaces of satellites have increased dramatically in recent years. Polyimides are used as the outer layer of thermal control insulation blankets, covering most of the external spacecraft surfaces that are exposed to the space environment. A recently developed material, named polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)-polyimide, shows significant enhancement in withstanding the space environment. In this work, the combined effect of ground-simulated hypervelocity space debris impacts and atomic oxygen (AO) on the erosion of POSS-containing polyimide films was investigated. During such hypervelocity impacts, elevated temperatures, on the order of hundreds degrees, are formed. A laser-driven flyer system was used to accelerate aluminum flyers to impact velocities of up to 3 km s{sup -1}. The impacted films were exposed to an oxygen RF plasma environment, simulating the effect of AO in the low Earth orbit. Impacted polyimide films exposed to AO revealed synergistic erosion effect, while impacted POSS-containing samples showed improved erosion resistance. The increased erosion rate of the impacted polyimide film is explained by formation of residual stresses that affect the oxidation mainly by increasing the diffusivity of oxygen into the subsurface layers. Mechanical properties of the POSS-containing samples performed at 450 deg. C and fractographic examination supports the above hypothesis.

  15. Light Emission and Dynamic Failure Mechanism of Hypervelocity Impact on Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu-Be Bulk Metallic Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Bao-Ru; ZHAN Zai-Ji; LIANG Bo; ZHANG Rui-Jun; WANG Wen-Kui

    2011-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact on rectangular plate-shaped ZrnThtCuw.sNiioB^.s bulk metallic glass (BMG) is performed by a two-stage light gas gun. The targets used in the experiment are BMG plates with a thickness of 5 mm. The projectile, spherical aluminum (3.1 mm in diameter), is accelerated up to various velocities; the light is detected with a radiometer. The emission lasts from 200 \\is up to 1500 \\is and the intensity increases from 44 to 900 W/(Sr-\\im). The duration and intensity of a light emission seem to depend on the impact velocity and the extent of target destruction through the formation of impact craters or penetration.%@@ Hypervelocity impact on rectangular plate-shaped Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 bulk metallic glass(BMG)is per-formed by a two-stage light gas gun.The targets used in the experiment are BMG plates with a thickness of 5 mm.The projectile,spherical aluminum(3.1 mm in diameter),is accelerated up to various velocities;the light is detected with a radiometer.The emission lasts from 200μs up to 1500μs and the intensity increases from 44 extent of target destruction through the formation of impact craters or penetration.

  16. Hypervelocity impact effect of molecules from Enceladus' plume and Titan's upper atmosphere on NASA's Cassini spectrometer from reactive dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; An, Qi; Cheng, Mu-Jeng; Goddard, William A; Beegle, Luther W; Hodyss, Robert

    2012-11-21

    The NASA/ESA Cassini probe of Saturn analyzed the molecular composition of plumes emanating from one of its moons, Enceladus, and the upper atmosphere of another, Titan. However, interpretation of this data is complicated by the hypervelocity (HV) flybys of up to ~18 km/sec that cause substantial molecular fragmentation. To interpret this data we use quantum mechanical based reactive force fields to simulate the HV impact of various molecular species and ice clathrates on oxidized titanium surfaces mimicking those in Cassini's neutral and ion mass spectrometer (INMS). The predicted velocity dependent fragmentation patterns and composition mixing ratios agree with INMS data providing the means for identifying the molecules in the plume. We used our simulations to predict the surface damage from the HV impacts on the INMS interior walls, which we suggest acts as a titanium sublimation pump that could alter the instrument's readings. These results show how the theory can identify chemical events from hypervelocity impacts in space plumes and atmospheres, providing in turn clues to the internal structure of the corresponding sources (e.g., Enceladus). This may be valuable in steering modifications in future missions.

  17. Radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts and its correlation with optical observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, T.; Maki, K.; Yamori, A.

    This paper describes the most interesting phenomena of radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts. A projectile of polycarbonate with 1.1 g weight was accelerated by a rail gun to 3.8 km/sec, and hit two targets which are a 2 mm thick aluminum plate upstream and a 45 mm diameter aluminum column downstream, respectively. The projectile first breaks wires to give a triggering signal to a data recorder, then penetrates the aluminum plate, and finally hit the column, The emitted radio-waves propagate through the chamber window, and are received by antennas at each frequency band. The receivers in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands consist of a low noise amplifier, a mixer, a local oscillator and an IF amplifier , respectively. The receiver in 1 MHz-band is a simple RF amplifier. The outputs of all receivers are fed to a data recorder which is actually a high-speed digital oscilloscope with a large amount of memory. The radio-waves were successfully recorded in 22 GHz-band with 500 MHz bandwidth, in 2 GHz-band with 300 MHz bandwidth, and in 1MHz-band. The waveforms in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands coincide well each other, and are composed of two groups of sharp impulses with a separation of about 20 micro seconds. The width of an impulse is less than 2 n sec. which is the resolution limit of the data recorder. We carried out optical observations using an ultra-high speed camera simultaneously through another window of the chamber. The time interval between scenes is 2 micro sec. We can see a faint light of the projectile before the first impact to the plate, and then a brilliant gas exploding backward from the plate and forward to the column. After hitting the column target, the brilliant gas flows to the chamber wall and is reflected back to make a mixture with dark gas in the chamber. Excellent correlation between radio-wave emission and the observed optical phenomena was obtained in the experiment. It is easily conceived that the radio-waves consist of quite a wide frequency

  18. Light Emission and Dynamic Failure Mechanism of Hypervelocity Impact on Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu-Be Bulk Metallic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bao-Ru; Zhan, Zai-Ji; Liang, Bo; Zhang, Rui-Jun; Wang, Wen-Kui

    2011-09-01

    Hypervelocity impact on rectangular plate-shaped Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 bulk metallic glass (BMG) is performed by a two-stage light gas gun. The targets used in the experiment are BMG plates with a thickness of 5 mm. The projectile, spherical aluminum (3.1 mm in diameter), is accelerated up to various velocities; the light is detected with a radiometer. The emission lasts from 200 μs up to 1500 μs and the intensity increases from 44 to 900 W/(Sr·μm). The duration and intensity of a light emission seem to depend on the impact velocity and the extent of target destruction through the formation of impact craters or penetration.

  19. Hypervelocity High Speed Projectile Imagery and Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Donald J.

    2009-01-01

    This DVD contains video showing the results of hypervelocity impact. One is showing a projectile impact on a Kevlar wrapped Aluminum bottle containing 3000 psi gaseous oxygen. One video show animations of a two stage light gas gun.

  20. Development of a Numerical Model of Hypervelocity Impact into a Pressurized Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M. A.; Davis, B. A.; Miller, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    considered a catastrophic failure. This assumption is conservative and made due to lack of knowledge on the level of allow-able damage to the composite overwrap that can be sustained and still allow successful completion of the mission. To quantify the allowable damage level to the composite overwrap involves assessing stress redistribution following damage as well as evaluating possible time-dependent mechanisms involved in the COPV response to an impact event. Limited published work in this subject has shown that COPV can withstand at least some level of damage due to high energy impacts. These observations have been confirmed and expanded upon in recent experimental research performed by NASA. This research has demonstrated that there is not only robustness in a COPV to compensate for CFRP damage, but has also identified two significant failure modes for pressurized COPV. The lowest threshold failure mode involves the perforation of the vessel, and the highest threshold failure mode is the catastrophic rupture. While both of these failure modes mean a loss of the COPV, system robustness affords some tolerance to the venting as opposed to the more catastrophic rupture. As a consequence, it is necessary to understand the conditions that result in the transition between these failure modes. The aforementioned experimental research has been performed in both the unpressurized and pressurized condition to identify the damage level that triggered the failure thresh-old. This COPV test program was sponsored by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC), and tests were performed at NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). Planning and coordination were provided by NASA JSC Hypervelocity Impact Technology (HVIT) group, and the COPVs were provided by the ISS Program. Unpressurized testing has been conducted at the pressure of the vacuum test chamber, while, the pressurized testing has been conducted at 290 +/- 10 bar (4,200 ? 100 psi) using nitrogen as the pressurizing gas, which

  1. Numerical investigations on pressurized AL-composite vessel response to hypervelocity impacts: Comparison between experimental works and a numerical code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mespoulet Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Response of pressurized composite-Al vessels to hypervelocity impact of aluminum spheres have been numerically investigated to evaluate the influence of initial pressure on the vulnerability of these vessels. Investigated tanks are carbon-fiber overwrapped prestressed Al vessels. Explored internal air pressure ranges from 1 bar to 300 bar and impact velocity are around 4400 m/s. Data obtained from experiments (Xray radiographies, particle velocity measurement and post-mortem vessels have been compared to numerical results given from LS-DYNA ALE-Lagrange-SPH full coupling models. Simulations exhibit an under estimation in term of debris cloud evolution and shock wave propagation in pressurized air but main modes of damage/rupture on the vessels given by simulations are coherent with post-mortem recovered vessels from experiments. First results of this numerical work are promising and further simulation investigations with additional experimental data will be done to increase the reliability of the simulation model. The final aim of this crossed work is to numerically explore a wide range of impact conditions (impact angle, projectile weight, impact velocity, initial pressure that cannot be explore experimentally. Those whole results will define a rule of thumbs for the definition of a vulnerability analytical model for a given pressurized vessel.

  2. Numerical investigations on pressurized AL-composite vessel response to hypervelocity impacts: Comparison between experimental works and a numerical code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mespoulet, Jérôme; Plassard, Fabien; Hereil, Pierre-Louis

    2015-09-01

    Response of pressurized composite-Al vessels to hypervelocity impact of aluminum spheres have been numerically investigated to evaluate the influence of initial pressure on the vulnerability of these vessels. Investigated tanks are carbon-fiber overwrapped prestressed Al vessels. Explored internal air pressure ranges from 1 bar to 300 bar and impact velocity are around 4400 m/s. Data obtained from experiments (Xray radiographies, particle velocity measurement and post-mortem vessels) have been compared to numerical results given from LS-DYNA ALE-Lagrange-SPH full coupling models. Simulations exhibit an under estimation in term of debris cloud evolution and shock wave propagation in pressurized air but main modes of damage/rupture on the vessels given by simulations are coherent with post-mortem recovered vessels from experiments. First results of this numerical work are promising and further simulation investigations with additional experimental data will be done to increase the reliability of the simulation model. The final aim of this crossed work is to numerically explore a wide range of impact conditions (impact angle, projectile weight, impact velocity, initial pressure) that cannot be explore experimentally. Those whole results will define a rule of thumbs for the definition of a vulnerability analytical model for a given pressurized vessel.

  3. Survival of Nannochloropsis Phytoplankton in Hypervelocity Impact Events up to Velocities of 6.07 km/s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, D. L. S.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    Studies have previously been conducted to verify the survivability of living cells during hypervelocity impact events to test the panspermia and lithopanspermia hypothesis [1], [2]. It has been demonstrated that bacteria survive impacts up to 5.4 km s-1 (approx. shock pressure 30 GPa) - albeit with a low probability of survival [1] whilst larger more complex objects (such as seeds) break up at ~1 km s-1 [2]. The survivability of yeast spores in impacts up to 7.4 km s-1 has also recently been shown [3]. We demonstrate here the survivability of Nannochloropsis Phytoplankton, a eukaryotic photosynthesizing autotroph found in the 'euphotic zone'(sunlit surface layers of oceans) [4] at impact velocities up to 6.07 km s-1. Phytoplankton from a culture sample was frozen and then fired into water (to simulate oceanic impacts, as described in [5]) using a light gas gun (LGG) [6]. The water was then retrieved and placed into a sealed culture vessel and left under a constant light source to check the viability of any remnant organisms.

  4. Survivability of copper projectiles during hypervelocity impacts in porous ice: A laboratory investigation of the survivability of projectiles impacting comets or other bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, K. H.; Price, M. C.; Cole, M.; Burchell, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    During hypervelocity impact (>a few km s-1) the resulting cratering and/or disruption of the target body often outweighs interest on the outcome of the projectile material, with the majority of projectiles assumed to be vaporised. However, on Earth, fragments, often metallic, have been recovered from impact sites, meaning that metallic projectile fragments may survive a hypervelocity impact and still exist within the wall, floor and/or ejecta of the impact crater post-impact. The discovery of the remnant impactor composition within the craters of asteroids, planets and comets could provide further information regarding the impact history of a body. Accordingly, we study in the laboratory the survivability of 1 and 2 mm diameter copper projectiles fired onto ice at speeds between 1.00 and 7.05 km s-1. The projectile was recovered intact at speeds up to 1.50 km s-1, with no ductile deformation, but some surface pitting was observed. At 2.39 km s-1, the projectile showed increasing ductile deformation and broke into two parts. Above velocities of 2.60 km s-1 increasing numbers of projectile fragments were identified post impact, with the mean size of the fragments decreasing with increasing impact velocity. The decrease in size also corresponds with an increase in the number of projectile fragments recovered, as with increasing shock pressure the projectile material is more intensely disrupted, producing smaller and more numerous fragments. The damage to the projectile is divided into four classes with increasing speed and shock pressure: (1) minimal damage, (2) ductile deformation, start of break up, (3) increasing fragmentation, and (4) complete fragmentation. The implications of such behaviour is considered for specific examples of impacts of metallic impactors onto Solar System bodies, including LCROSS impacting the Moon, iron meteorites onto Mars and NASA's "Deep Impact" mission where a spacecraft impacted a comet.

  5. Survival of yeast spores in hypervelocity impact events up to velocities of 7.4 km s-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, M. C.; Solscheid, C.; Burchell, M. J.; Josse, L.; Adamek, N.; Cole, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the survivability in hypervelocity impacts of yeast in spore form, and as mature cultures, at impact velocities from 1 to 7.4 km s-1, corresponding to an estimated peak shock pressure of ˜43 GPa. Spores from a yeast strain (BY4743), deficient in an enzyme required for uracil production, were fired into water (to simulate oceanic impact from space) using a light gas gun. The water was then retrieved and filtered and the resulting retentate and filtrate cultured to determine viability and survival rates of remnant spores. Yeast growth (confirmed as coming from the original sample as it had the same enzyme deficiency) was found in recovered samples at all impact speeds, albeit in smaller quantities at the higher speeds. The survival probabilities were measured as ˜50% at 1 km s-1, falling to ˜10-3% at 7.4 km s-1. This follows the pattern observed in previous work on survival of microbial life and spores exposed to extreme shock loading, where there is reasonable survival at low peak shock pressures with more severe lethality above a critical shock pressure at the GPa scale (here between 2 and 10 GPa). These results are explained in the context of a general model for survival against extreme shock and are relevant to the hypotheses of panspermia and litho-panspermia, showing that extreme shocks during transfer across space are not necessarily sterilising.

  6. Experimental Hypervelocity Dust Impact in Olivine: FIB/TEM Characterization of Micron-Scale Craters with Comparison to Natural and Laser-Simulated Small-Scale Impact Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, R.; Loeffler, M. J.; Rahman, Z.; Dukes, C.; IMPACT Team

    2017-01-01

    The space weathering of regoliths on airless bodies and the formation of their exospheres is driven to a large extent by hypervelocity impacts from the high relative flux of micron to sub-micron meteoroids that comprise approximately 90 percent of the solar system meteoroid population. Laboratory hypervelocity impact experiments are crucial for quantifying how these small impact events drive space weathering through target shock, melting and vaporization. Simulating these small scale impacts experimentally is challenging because the natural impactors are both very small and many have velocities above the approximately 8 kilometers-per-second limit attainable by conventional chemical/light gas accelerator technology. Electrostatic "dust" accelerators, such as the one recently developed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS), allow the experimental velocity regime to be extended up to tens of kilometers-per-second. Even at these velocities the region of latent target damage created by each impact, in the form of microcraters or pits, is still only about 0.1 to 10 micrometers in size. Both field-emission analytical scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and advanced field-emission scanning transmission electron microscopy (FE-STEM) are uniquely suited for characterizing the individual dust impact sites in these experiments. In this study, we have used both techniques, along with focused ion beam (FIB) sample preparation, to characterize the micrometer to nanometer scale effects created by accelerated dust impacts into olivine single crystals. To our knowledge this work presents the first TEM-scale characterization of dust impacts into a key solar system silicate mineral using the CCLDAS facility. Our overarching goal for this work is to establish a basis to compare with our previous results on natural dust-impacted lunar olivine and laser-irradiated olivine.

  7. Survival of the Tardigrade Hypsibius Dujardini during Hypervelocity Impact Events up to 5.49 km s-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, D.

    2014-04-01

    Studies have previously been conducted to verify the survivability of living cells during hypervelocity impact events to test the panspermia and lithopanspermia hypotheses [1, 2]. It has been demonstrated that bacteria survive impacts up to 5.4 km s-1 (approx. shock pressure 30 GPa) - albeit with a low probability of survival [1], whilst larger, more complex, objects (such as seeds) break up at ~1 km s-1 [2]. The survivability of yeast spores in impacts up to 7.4 km s-1 has also recently been shown [3]. Previous work by the authors demonstrated the survivability of Nannochloropsis Oculata Phytoplankton, a eukaryotic photosynthesizing autotroph found in the 'euphotic zone' (sunlit surface layers of oceans [4]), at impact velocities up to 6.07 km s-1 [5]. Other groups have also reported that lichens are able to survive shocks in similar pressure ranges [6]. However, whilst many simple single celled organisms have now been shown to survive such impacts (and the associated pressures) as those encountered during the migration of material from one planet to another [1, 3, 5], complex multicellular organisms have either largely not been tested or, those that have been, have not survived the process [2]. Hypsibius dujardini, like most species of tardigrade, are complex organisms composed of approximately 40,000 cells [7]. When humidity decreases they enter a highly dehydrated state known as a 'tun' and can survive extreme temperatures (as low as - 253°C or as high as 151°C), as well as exposure to Xrays and the vacuum of space [7]. Here we test the shock survivability of Hypsibius dujardini by firing a nylon projectile onto a frozen sample of water containing frozen tardigrades using a light gas gun (LGG) [8]. The recovered ice and water were then analysed under an optical microscope to check the viability of any remnant organisms that may have survived impact, and the pressures generated.

  8. First Principles Based Reactive Atomistic Simulations to Understand the Effects of Molecular Hypervelocity Impact on Cassini's Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Botero, A.; Cheng, M-J; Cvicek, V.; Beegle, Luther W.; Hodyss, R.; Goddard, W. A., III

    2011-01-01

    We report here on the predicted impact of species such as ice-water, CO2, CH4, and NH3, on oxidized titanium, as well as HC species on diamond surfaces. These simulations provide the dynamics of product distributions during and after a hypervelocity impact event, ionization fractions, and dissociation probabilities for the various species of interest as a function of impact velocity (energy). We are using these results to determine the relevance of the fragmentation process to Cassini INMS results, and to quantify its effects on the observed spectra.

  9. Hypervelocity Impacts on ISS Handrails and Evaluation of Alternative Materials to Prevent Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Glove Damage During EVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eruc; Davis, B. Alan; Ordonez, Erick

    2009-01-01

    During post-flight processing of STS-116, damage to crewmember Robert Curbeam's Phase VI Glove Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment was discovered. This damage consisted of: loss of RTV-157 palm pads on the thumb area on the right glove, a 0.75 inch cut in the Vectran adjacent to the seam and thumb pad (single event cut), constituting the worst glove damage ever recorded for the U.S. space program. The underlying bladder and restraint were found not be damaged by this event. Evaluation of glove damage found that the outer Vectran fibers were sliced as a result of contact with a sharp edge or pinch point rather than general wear or abrasion (commonly observed on the RTV pads). Damage to gloves was also noted on STS-118 and STS-120. One potential source of EMU glove damages are sharp crater lips on external handrails, generated by micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts. In this paper, the results of a hypervelocity impact (HVI) test program on representative and actual ISS handrails are presented. These tests were performed in order to characterize impact damage profiles on ISS handrails and evaluate alternatives for limiting risk to future missions. It was determined that both penetrating and non-penetrating MMOD impacts on aluminum and steel ISS handrails are capable of generating protruding crater profiles which exceed the heights required for EMU glove abrasion risk by an order of magnitude. Testing demonstrated that flexible overwraps attached to the outside of existing handrails are capable of limiting contact between hazardous crater formations and crewmember gloves during extravehicular activity (EVA). Additionally, replacing metallic handrails with high strength, low ductility, fiber reinforced composite materials would limit the formation of protruding crater lips on new ISS modules.

  10. Identification of minerals and meteoritic materials via Raman techniques after capture in hypervelocity impacts on aerogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, M J; Mann, J; Creighton, J A; Kearsley, A; Graham, G A; Esposito, A P; Franchi, I A; Westphal, A J; Snead, C

    2004-10-04

    For this study, an extensive suite of mineral particles analogous to components of cosmic dust were tested to determine if their Raman signatures can be recognized after hypervelocity capture in aerogel. The mineral particles were mainly of greater than 20 micrometers in size and were accelerated onto the silica aerogel by light gas gun shots. It was found that all the individual minerals captured in aerogel could be subsequently identified using Raman (or fluorescent) spectra. The beam spot size used for the laser illumination was of the order of 5 micrometers, and in some cases the captured particles were of a similar small size. In some samples fired into aerogel there was observed a shift in the wavenumbers of some of the Raman bands, a result of the trapped particles being at quite high temperatures due to heating by the laser. Temperatures of samples under laser illumination were estimated from the relative intensities of Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman bands, or, in the case of ruby particles, from the wavenumber of fluorescence bands excited by the laser. It was found that the temperature of particles in aerogel varied greatly, dependent upon laser power and the nature of the particle. In the worst case, some particles were shown to have temperatures in the 500-700 C range at a laser power of about 3 mW at the sample. However most of the mineral particles examined at this laser power had temperatures below 200 C. This is sufficiently low a temperature not to damage most materials expected to be found captured in aerogel in space. In addition, selected meteorite samples were examined to obtain Raman signatures of their constituent minerals and were then shot into aerogel. It was possible to find several Raman signatures after capture in aerogel and obtain a Raman map of a whole grain in situ in the aerogel. Finally, a Raman analysis was carried out of a particle captured in aerogel in space and carbonaceous material identified. In general therefore it is

  11. Fragmentation properties of spherical projectiles impacting at hypervelocity%球形弹丸超高速碰撞破碎特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪庆桃; 吴克刚; 李必红; 陈志阳

    2014-01-01

    讨论超高速碰撞数值模拟方法,用 ANSYS /AUTODYN 程序的 SPH 方法对球形弹丸超高速撞击时弹丸破碎、碎片云形成过程进行数值模拟并与实验结果比较,验证计算方法及模型参数的正确性。在此基础上研究钨合金、轧制均质装甲(Rolled Homogeneous Armor,RHA)两种材料球形弹丸破碎的临界速度随比值(ts /dp,ts为靶板厚,dp为弹丸直径)的变化规律,给出两种材料超高速碰撞时应变率及平均碎片尺寸随撞击速度的变化曲线以及碎片质量分布规律。%The numerical simulation method for the process of hypervelocity impact was discussed.The damage mechanism and the process of debris cloud forming were studied with the SPH method in ANSYS /AUTODYN code when spherical projectiles at hypervelocity impact a thin shield.The hypervelocity impact of projectiles made of tungsten alloy and RHA(Rolled Homogeneous Armor)material with the given constitutive models was numerically simulated and the results are in good agreement with the experimental results.The fragmentation-initiation threshold velocity of the projectile,the average fragment size and the distribution of fragment size,together with their variation with the change of impacting velocity were investigated.

  12. A SELF-CONSISTENT MODEL OF THE CIRCUMSTELLAR DEBRIS CREATED BY A GIANT HYPERVELOCITY IMPACT IN THE HD 172555 SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, H. J. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Lisse, C. M. [JHU-APL, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Chen, C. H. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wyatt, M. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Thebault, P. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon Principal Cedex (France); Henning, W. G. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gaidos, E. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Elkins-Tanton, L. T. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution for Science, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Bridges, J. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Morlok, A., E-mail: johns477@purdue.edu [Department of Physical Sciences, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-10

    Spectral modeling of the large infrared excess in the Spitzer IRS spectra of HD 172555 suggests that there is more than 10{sup 19} kg of submicron dust in the system. Using physical arguments and constraints from observations, we rule out the possibility of the infrared excess being created by a magma ocean planet or a circumplanetary disk or torus. We show that the infrared excess is consistent with a circumstellar debris disk or torus, located at {approx}6 AU, that was created by a planetary scale hypervelocity impact. We find that radiation pressure should remove submicron dust from the debris disk in less than one year. However, the system's mid-infrared photometric flux, dominated by submicron grains, has been stable within 4% over the last 27 years, from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (1983) to WISE (2010). Our new spectral modeling work and calculations of the radiation pressure on fine dust in HD 172555 provide a self-consistent explanation for this apparent contradiction. We also explore the unconfirmed claim that {approx}10{sup 47} molecules of SiO vapor are needed to explain an emission feature at {approx}8 {mu}m in the Spitzer IRS spectrum of HD 172555. We find that unless there are {approx}10{sup 48} atoms or 0.05 M{sub Circled-Plus} of atomic Si and O vapor in the system, SiO vapor should be destroyed by photo-dissociation in less than 0.2 years. We argue that a second plausible explanation for the {approx}8 {mu}m feature can be emission from solid SiO, which naturally occurs in submicron silicate ''smokes'' created by quickly condensing vaporized silicate.

  13. Limits on methane release and generation via hypervelocity impact of Martian analogue materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, M. C.; Ramkissoon, N. K.; McMahon, S.; Miljković, K.; Parnell, J.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Kearsley, A. T.; Blamey, N. J. F.; Cole, M. J.; Burchell, M. J.

    2014-04-01

    The quantity of methane in Mars' atmosphere, and the potential mechanism(s) responsible for its production, are still unknown. In order to test viable, abiotic, methangenic processes, we experimentally investigated two possible impact mechanisms for generating methane. In the first suite of experiments, basaltic rocks were impacted at 5 km s-1 and the quantity of gases (CH4, H2, He, N2, O2, Ar and CO2) released by the impacts was measured. In the second suite of experiments, a mixture of water ice, CO2 ice and anhydrous olivine grains was impacted to see if the shock induced rapid serpentinization of the olivine, and thus production of methane. The results of both suites of experiments demonstrate that impacts (at scales achievable in the laboratory) do not give rise to detectably enhanced quantities of methane release above background levels. Supporting hydrocode modelling was also performed to gain insight into the pressures and temperatures occurring during the impact events.

  14. Excess of L-alanine in amino acids synthesized in a plasma torch generated by a hypervelocity meteorite impact reproduced in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managadze, George G.; Engel, Michael H.; Getty, Stephanie; Wurz, Peter; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Shokolov, Anatoly G.; Sholin, Gennady V.; Terent'ev, Sergey A.; Chumikov, Alexander E.; Skalkin, Alexander S.; Blank, Vladimir D.; Prokhorov, Vyacheslav M.; Managadze, Nina G.; Luchnikov, Konstantin A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a laboratory reproduction of hypervelocity impacts of a carbon containing meteorite on a mineral substance representative of planetary surfaces. The physical conditions of the resulting impact plasma torch provide favorable conditions for abiogenic synthesis of protein amino acids: We identified glycine and alanine, and in smaller quantities serine, in the produced material. Moreover, we observe breaking of alanine mirror symmetry with L excess, which coincides with the bioorganic world. Therefore the selection of L-amino acids for the formation of proteins for living matter could have been the result from plasma processes occurring during the impact meteorites on the surface. This indicates that the plasma torch from meteorite impacts could play an important role in the formation of biomolecular homochirality. Thus, meteorite impacts possibly were the initial stage of this process and promoted conditions for the emergence of a living matter.

  15. Hypervelocity Impact of Unstressed and Stressed Titanium in a Whipple Configuration in Support of the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Service Module Propellant Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Christiansen, Eric; Piekutowski, Andrew; Lyons, Frankel; Keddy, Christopher; Salem, Jonathan; Poormon, Kevin; Bohl, William; Miller, Joshua; Greene, Nathanael; Rodriquez, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts were performed on six unstressed and six stressed titanium coupons with aluminium: shielding in order to assess the effects of the partial penetration damage on the post impact micromechanical properties of titanium and on the residual strength after impact. This work is performed in support of the defInition of the penetration criteria of the propellant and oxidizer tanks dome surfaces for the service module of the crew exploration vehicle where such a criterion is based on testing and analyses rather than on historical precedence. The objective of this work is to assess the effects of applied biaxial stress on the damage dynamics and morphology. The crater statistics revealed minute differences between stressed and unstressed coupon damage. The post impact residual stress analyses showed that the titanium strength properties were generally unchanged for the unstressed coupons when compared with undamaged titanium. However, high localized strains were shown near the craters during the tensile tests.

  16. Experimental hypervelocity impact into quartz sand. II - Effects of gravitational acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gault, D. E.; Wedekind, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental results for craters formed by aluminum spheres impacting at normal incidence against quartz sand targets in gravitational acceleration environments ranging from 0.073 to 1.0 g (g = 980 cm/sq sec) are reported. Impact velocities varied from 0.4 to 8.0 km/sec. Crater dimensions and formation times are compared with results from a simplified dimensional analysis of the cratering processes. Although the comparison indicates a dominant role of gravity relative to the target strength for craters formed in sand, the results serve primarily to emphasize that both gravity and strength are variables of fundamental significance to cratering processes.

  17. Hypervelocity impact studies using a rotating mirror framing laser shadowgraph camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Vance C.; Crews, Jeanne Lee

    1988-01-01

    The need to study the effects of the impact of micrometeorites and orbital debris on various space-based systems has brought together the technologies of several companies and individuals in order to provide a successful instrumentation package. A light gas gun was employed to accelerate small projectiles to speeds in excess of 7 km/sec. Their impact on various targets is being studied with the help of a specially designed continuous-access rotating-mirror framing camera. The camera provides 80 frames of data at up to 1 x 10 to the 6th frames/sec with exposure times of 20 nsec.

  18. Experimental hypervelocity impact into quartz sand - Distribution and shock metamorphism of ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeffler, D.; Gault, D. E.; Wedekind, J.; Polkowski, G.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented for vertical impacts of 0.3-g cylindrical plastic projectiles into noncohesive quartz sand in which vertical and horizontal reference strate were employed by using layers of colored sand. The impacts were performed at velocities of 5.9-6.9 km/sec with a vertical gun ballistic range. The craters, 30-33 cm in diameter, reveal a radial decay of the ejecta mass per unit area with a power of -2.8 to -3.5. Material displaced from the upper 15% of the crater depth d is represented within the whole ejecta blanked, material from deeper than 28% of d is deposited inside 2 crater radii, and no material from deeper than 33% of d was ejected beyond the crater rim. Shock-metamorphosed particles (glassy agglutinates, cataclastic breccias, and comminuted quartz) amount to some 4% of the total displaced mass and indicate progressive zones of decay of shock intensity from a peak pressure of 300 kbar. The shock-metamorphosed particles and the shock-induced change in the grain size distribution of ejected samples have close analogies to the basic characteristics of the lunar regolith. Possible applications to regolith formation and to ejecta formations of large-scale impact craters are discussed.

  19. Analysis of Regolith Simulant Ejecta Distributions from Normal Incident Hypervelocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David L.; Cooke, William; Suggs, Rob; Moser, Danielle E.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established the Constellation Program. The Constellation Program has defined one of its many goals as long-term lunar habitation. Critical to the design of a lunar habitat is an understanding of the lunar surface environment; of specific importance is the primary meteoroid and subsequent ejecta environment. The document, NASA SP-8013 'Meteoroid Environment Model Near Earth to Lunar Surface', was developed for the Apollo program in 1969 and contains the latest definition of the lunar ejecta environment. There is concern that NASA SP-8013 may over-estimate the lunar ejecta environment. NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) has initiated several tasks to improve the accuracy of our understanding of the lunar surface ejecta environment. This paper reports the results of experiments on projectile impact into powdered pumice and unconsolidated JSC-1A Lunar Mare Regolith simulant targets. Projectiles were accelerated to velocities between 2.45 and 5.18 km/s at normal incidence using the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR). The ejected particles were detected by thin aluminum foil targets strategically placed around the impact site and angular ejecta distributions were determined. Assumptions were made to support the analysis which include; assuming ejecta spherical symmetry resulting from normal impact and all ejecta particles were of mean target particle size. This analysis produces a hemispherical flux density distribution of ejecta with sufficient velocity to penetrate the aluminum foil detectors.

  20. Comparison of Ejecta Distributions from Normal Incident Hypervelocity Impact on Lunar Regolith Simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David L.; Cooke, William; Scruggs, Rob; Moser, Danielle E.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is progressing toward long-term lunar habitation. Critical to the design of a lunar habitat is an understanding of the lunar surface environment; of specific importance is the primary meteoroid and subsequent ejecta environment. The document, NASA SP-8013, was developed for the Apollo program and is the latest definition of the ejecta environment. There is concern that NASA SP-8013 may over-estimate the lunar ejecta environment. NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) has initiated several tasks to improve the accuracy of our understanding of the lunar surface ejecta environment. This paper reports the results of experiments on projectile impact into powered pumice and unconsolidated JSC-1A Lunar Mare Regolith stimulant (JSC-1A) targets. The Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) was used to accelerate projectiles to velocities in excess of 5 km/s and impact the targets at normal incidence. The ejected particles were detected by thin aluminum foil targets placed around the impact site and angular distributions were determined for ejecta. Comparison of ejecta angular distribution with previous works will be presented. A simplistic technique to characterize the ejected particles was formulated and improvements to this technique will be discussed for implementation in future tests.

  1. Impact of Flight Enthalpy, Fuel Simulant, and Chemical Reactions on the Mixing Characteristics of Several Injectors at Hypervelocity Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozda, Tomasz G.; Baurle, Robert A.; Drummond, J. Philip

    2016-01-01

    conditions. The mixing parameters of interest, such as mixing efficiency and total pressure recovery, are then computed and compared to the values obtained from RAS under the true enthalpy conditions and using helium and hydrogen. Finally, the impact of combustion on mixing, often deemed small enough to neglect at hypervelocity conditions, is assessed by comparing the results obtained from the hydrogen-fueled reacting and non-reacting RAS. For reacting flows, in addition to mixing efficiency and total pressure recovery, the combustion efficiency and thrust potential are also considered. In all of the simulations, the incoming air Mach number and the fuel-to-air ratio are the same, while the total pressure, total enthalpy, and the fuel simulant vary depending on the case considered. It is found that under some conditions the "cold" flow experiments are a good approximation of the flight.

  2. Two-stage light-gas magnetoplasma accelerator for hypervelocity impact simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khramtsov, P. P.; Vasetskij, V. A.; Makhnach, A. I.; Grishenko, V. M.; Chernik, M. Yu; Shikh, I. A.; Doroshko, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    The development of macroparticles acceleration methods for high-speed impact simulation in a laboratory is an actual problem due to increasing of space flights duration and necessity of providing adequate spacecraft protection against micrometeoroid and space debris impacts. This paper presents results of experimental study of a two-stage light- gas magnetoplasma launcher for acceleration of a macroparticle, in which a coaxial plasma accelerator creates a shock wave in a high-pressure channel filled with light gas. Graphite and steel spheres with diameter of 2.5-4 mm were used as a projectile and were accelerated to the speed of 0.8-4.8 km/s. A launching of particle occurred in vacuum. For projectile velocity control the speed measuring method was developed. The error of this metod does not exceed 5%. The process of projectile flight from the barrel and the process of a particle collision with a target were registered by use of high-speed camera. The results of projectile collision with elements of meteoroid shielding are presented. In order to increase the projectile velocity, the high-pressure channel should be filled with hydrogen. However, we used helium in our experiments for safety reasons. Therefore, we can expect that the range of mass and velocity of the accelerated particles can be extended by use of hydrogen as an accelerating gas.

  3. Aerogel keystones: extraction of complete hypervelocity impact events from aerogel collectors

    CERN Document Server

    Westphal, A J; Butterworth, A L; Graham, G A; Bradley, J P; Bajt, S; Grant, P G; Bench, G; Brennan, S E; Pianetta, Piero A; Westphal, Andrew J.; Snead, Christopher J.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Graham, Giles A.; Bradley, John P.; Bajt, Sasa; Grant, Patrick G.; Bench, Graham; Brennan, Sean; Pianetta, Piero

    2003-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust mission will return the first samples from a solid solar-system body since Apollo, and the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust ever collected. Although sophisticated laboratory instruments exist for the analysis of Stardust samples, techniques for the recovery of particles and particle residues from aerogel collectors remain primitive. Here we describe our recent progress in developing techniques for extracting small volumes of aerogel, which we have called ``keystones,'' which completely contain particle impacts but minimize the damage to the surrounding aerogel collector. These keystones can be fixed to custom-designed micromachined silicon fixtures (so-called ``microforklifts''). In this configuration the samples are self-supporting, which can be advantageous in situations in which interference from a supporting substrate is undesirable. The keystones may also be extracted and placed onto a substrate without a fixture. We have also demonstrated the capability of ho...

  4. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of Materials for Additive Construction: Applications on Earth, the Moon, and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez, Erick; Edmunson, Jennifer; Fiske, Michael; Christiansen, Eric; Miller, Josh; Davis, Bruce Alan; Read, Jon; Johnston, Mallory; Fikes, John

    2017-01-01

    Additive Construction is the process of building infrastructure such as habitats, garages, roads, berms, etcetera layer by layer (3D printing). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) are pursuing additive construction to build structures using resources available in-situ. Using materials available in-situ reduces the cost of planetary missions and operations in theater. The NASA team is investigating multiple binders that can be produced on planetary surfaces, including the magnesium oxide-based Sorel cement; the components required to make Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), the common cement used on Earth, have been found on Mars. The availability of OPC-based concrete on Earth drove the USACE to pursue additive construction for base housing and barriers for military operations. Planetary and military base structures must be capable of resisting micrometeoroid impacts with velocities ranging from 11 to 72km/s for particle sizes 200 micrometers or more (depending on protection requirements) as well as bullets and shrapnel with a velocity of 1.036km/s with projectiles 5.66mm diameter and 57.40mm in length, respectively.

  5. Aerogel Keystones: Extraction Of Complete Hypervelocity Impact Events From Aerogel Collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westphal, A J; Snead, C; Butterworth, A; Graham, G A; Bradley, J; Bajt, S; Grant, P G; Bench, G; Brennan, S; Piannetta, P

    2003-11-07

    In January 2006, the Stardust mission will return the first samples from a solid solar-system body since Apollo, and the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust ever collected. Although sophisticated laboratory instruments exist for the analysis of Stardust samples, techniques for the recovery of particles and particle residues from aerogel collectors remain primitive. Here we describe our recent progress in developing techniques for extracting small volumes of aerogel, which we have called ''keystones,'' which completely contain particle impacts but minimize the damage to the surrounding aerogel collector. These keystones can be fixed to custom-designed micromachined silicon fixtures (so-called ''microforklifts''). In this configuration the samples are self-supporting, which can be advantageous in situations in which interference from a supporting substrate is undesirable. The keystones may also be extracted and placed onto a substrate without a fixture. We have also demonstrated the capability of homologously crushing these unmounted keystones for analysis techniques which demand flat samples.

  6. The effects of hypervelocity impact on Whipple shield at cryogenic temperatures%低温下Whipple防护结构超高速撞击效应研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨继运; 徐坤博; 简亚彬; 曹燕; 李宇; 龚自正; 赵晶晶

    2011-01-01

    文章研究了低温下空间碎片对典型Whipple防护结构的超高速撞击效应.首先在二级轻气炮设备上研制出使用液氮可将撞击靶冷却至-150℃且满足低温超高速撞击试验要求的低温装置.利用该装置开展了低温条件下的超高速撞击试验,对低温和室温两种条件下的试验结果进行了比对,并分别对缓冲屏穿孔特性、碎片云特性和后墙损伤特性之间的差异进行了分析.文章最后给出低温下典型Whipple防护结构的弹道极限曲线.%This paper studies the effects of the hypervelocity impact on typical Whipple Shields at cryogenic temperatures. The cryogenic setup, installed in the target chamber of a two-stage light-gas gun, is developed to cool the targets down to -150 °C with liquid nitrogen to provide the essential condition for tests of shield structures at cryogenic temperatures. Several hypervelocity impact tests were carried out at cryogenic temperatures, and the impact results are compared with those obtained at room temperature, including the characteristics of bumper penetration, debris cloud, and rear wall damage. The ballistic limit curves of typical Whipple shields at cryogenic temperatures are obtained.

  7. Hyper-velocity impact test and simulation of a double-wall shield concept for the Wide Field Monitor aboard LOFT

    CERN Document Server

    Perinati, E; Santangelo, A; Suchy, S; Tenzer, C; Del Monte, E; Herder, J -W den; Diebold, S; Feroci, M; Rachevski, A; Vacchi, A; Zampa, G; Zampa, N

    2014-01-01

    The space mission LOFT (Large Observatory For X-ray Timing) was selected in 2011 by ESA as one of the candidates for the M3 launch opportunity. LOFT is equipped with two instruments, the Large Area Detector (LAD) and the Wide Field Monitor (WFM), based on Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs). In orbit, they would be exposed to hyper-velocity impacts by environmental dust particles, which might alter the surface properties of the SDDs. In order to assess the risk posed by these events, we performed simulations in ESABASE2 and laboratory tests. Tests on SDD prototypes aimed at verifying to what extent the structural damages produced by impacts affect the SDD functionality have been performed at the Van de Graaff dust accelerator at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg. For the WFM, where we expect a rate of risky impacts notably higher than for the LAD, we designed, simulated and successfully tested at the plasma accelerator at the Technical University in Munich (TUM) a double-wall shield...

  8. 超高速碰撞下体心立方纯铁的变形孪晶%Deformation Twinning in BCC Iron Under Hypervelocity Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪川皓; 王富耻; 徐强; 马壮; 王扬卫

    2011-01-01

    采用非火药驱动二级轻气炮技术将2017A1合金弹丸以3 km/s速度撞击纯铁靶板,通过光学显微镜、扫描电镜和透射电镜研究了纯铁材料的微观组织演化.根据微观组织的不同特征可将纯铁靶板分为细晶区、高密度孪晶区和低密度孪晶区.在低密度孪晶区的主要变形方式为{112}面的孪晶,而高密度孪晶区主要变形方式为{112}面的孪晶和{110}、{112}及{123}面的位错之间的交互作用.超高速碰撞下孪晶形成机制与普通变形条件下没有区别,但是孪晶形貌区别较大,高密度位错聚集在孪晶界附近造成孪晶界面模糊;螺位错在孪晶界上分解导致沿着孪晶界发生弯曲和凹痕甚至孪晶的断裂.%Deformation microstructure of pure iron under hypervelocity impact at a speed of 3 km/s was studied by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that the deformed microstructure beneath the crater can be classified as three zones: fine crystal, high dense twin and low dense twin. At high dense twinning zone, the plastic deformation mechanism of BCC pure iron under hypervelocity impact is {112} deformation twinning and dislocation slips of {110}, {112} and (123). The morphological features of twins under impact are different from the conventional deformation. The stress concentration is caused by the dense dislocations assembled adjacent the twin boundary. The kink or flaw along the twin boundary is resulted by the screw dislocations dissociation at the twin boundary.

  9. Hypervelocity Aerodynamics and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-06

    Report: Hypervelocity Aerodynamics and Control 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) T. C. Adamson, Jr. and R. IA. Howe 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE...6] pulse applied. If the Mxyz system as shown is Fig. 3 r 3. , is used, then we have R21= k costo -t4 ksin yot 1 6r= ro 1 (4) -- (6k 2 - 5 -30k 2 sin

  10. Impulsive control for hypervelocity missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magness, R. W.

    1981-05-01

    A hypervelocity agile interceptor/quickshot is being developed for defense of ballistic missile launch sites. A guidance and control system is required to achieve the missile guidance accuracy necessary for direct target impact. Attitude control systems evaluated for the agile interceptor included aerodynamic controls, thrust vector controls and impulsive motor controls. The solid squib impulsive control motion was selected because of high response rate, low weight and low volume. A baseline motor configuration was designed and a solid propellant squib was developed for use in the control system. Ballistic pendulum and bench tests were conducted with a test impulsive control motor to measure nominal performance, establish the standard deviation of performance, and define requirements to prevent sympathetic ignition. A dynamic control wind tunnel test was also conducted to determine the impulse augmentation due to the impulsive motor jet interaction with the missile boundary layer. The degree and direction of augmentation was measured for variations in Mach number and angle of attack.

  11. Survival of Organic Materials in Hypervelocity Impacts of Ice on Sand, Ice, and Water in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Stephen A.; Cole, Michael; Parnell, John

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The survival of organic molecules in shock impact events has been investigated in the laboratory. A frozen mixture of anthracene and stearic acid, solvated in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), was fired in a two-stage light gas gun at speeds of ∼2 and ∼4 km s−1 at targets that included water ice, water, and sand. This involved shock pressures in the range of 2–12 GPa. It was found that the projectile materials were present in elevated quantities in the targets after impact and in some cases in the crater ejecta as well. For DMSO impacting water at 1.9 km s−1 and 45° incidence, we quantify the surviving fraction after impact as 0.44±0.05. This demonstrates successful transfer of organic compounds from projectile to target in high-speed impacts. The range of impact speeds used covers that involved in impacts of terrestrial meteorites on the Moon, as well as impacts in the outer Solar System on icy bodies such as Pluto. The results provide laboratory evidence that suggests that exogenous delivery of complex organic molecules from icy impactors is a viable source of such material on target bodies. Key Words: Organic—Hypervelocity—Shock—Biomarkers. Astrobiology 14, 473–485. PMID:24901745

  12. Survival of fossilised diatoms and forams in hypervelocity impacts with peak shock pressures in the 1-19 GPa range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, M. J.; Harriss, K. H.; Price, M. C.; Yolland, L.

    2017-07-01

    Previously it has been shown that diatom fossils embedded in ice could survive impacts at speeds of up to 5 km s-1 and peak shock pressures up to 12 GPa. Here we confirm these results using a different technique, with diatoms carried in liquid water suspensions at impact speeds of 2-6 km s-1. These correspond to peak shock pressures of 3.8-19.8 GPa. We also report on the results of similar experiments using forams, at impact speeds of 4.67 km s-1 (when carried in water) and 4.73 km s-1 (when carried in ice), corresponding to peak shock pressures of 11.6 and 13.1 GPa respectively. In all cases we again find survival of recognisable fragments, with mean fragment size of order 20-25 μm. We compare our results to the peak shock pressures that ejecta from giant impacts on the Earth would experience if it subsequently impacted the Moon. We find that 98% of impacts of terrestrial ejecta on the Moon would have experienced peak pressures less than 20 GPa if the ejecta were a soft rock (sandstone). This falls to 82% of meteorites if the ejecta were a hard rock (granite). This assumes impacts on a solid lunar surface. If we approximate the surface as a loose regolith, over 99% of the impacts involve peak shock pressures below 20 GPa. Either way, the results show that a significant fraction of terrestrial meteorites impacting the Moon will do so with peak shock pressures which in our experiments permit the survival of recognisable fossil fragments.

  13. MLITemp: A computer program to predict the thermal effects associated with hypervelocity impact damage to space station MLI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, W. K.; Giridharan, V.

    1991-01-01

    A family of user-friendly, DOS PC based, Microsoft BASIC programs written to provide spacecraft designers with empirical predictions of space debris damage to orbiting spacecraft are described. Spacecraft wall temperatures and condensate formation is also predicted. The spacecraft wall configuration is assumed to consist of multilayered insulation (MLI) placed between a Whipple style bumper and the pressure wall. Impact damage predictions are based on data sets of experimental results obtained from simulating debris impacts on spacecraft using light gas guns on earth. A module of the program facilitates the creation of the database of experimental results that is used by the damage prediction modules to predict damage to the bumper, the MLI, and the pressure wall. A finite difference technique is used to predict temperature distributions in the pressure wall, the MLI, and the bumper. Condensate layer thickness is predicted for the case where the pressure wall temperature drops below the dew point temperature of the spacecraft atmosphere.

  14. Microbial rock inhabitants survive hypervelocity impacts on Mars-like host planets: first phase of lithopanspermia experimentally tested.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, Gerda; Stöffler, Dieter; Ott, Sieglinde; Hornemann, Ulrich; Cockell, Charles S; Moeller, Ralf; Meyer, Cornelia; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Fritz, Jörg; Schade, Sara; Artemieva, Natalia A

    2008-02-01

    The scenario of lithopanspermia describes the viable transport of microorganisms via meteorites. To test the first step of lithopanspermia, i.e., the impact ejection from a planet, systematic shock recovery experiments within a pressure range observed in martian meteorites (5-50 GPa) were performed with dry layers of microorganisms (spores of Bacillus subtilis, cells of the endolithic cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, and thalli and ascocarps of the lichen Xanthoria elegans) sandwiched between gabbro discs (martian analogue rock). Actual shock pressures were determined by refractive index measurements and Raman spectroscopy, and shock temperature profiles were calculated. Pressure-effect curves were constructed for survival of B. subtilis spores and Chroococcidiopsis cells from the number of colony-forming units, and for vitality of the photobiont and mycobiont of Xanthoria elegans from confocal laser scanning microscopy after live/dead staining (FUN-I). A vital launch window for the transport of rock-colonizing microorganisms from a Mars-like planet was inferred, which encompasses shock pressures in the range of 5 to about 40 GPa for the bacterial endospores and the lichens, and a more limited shock pressure range for the cyanobacterium (from 5-10 GPa). The results support concepts of viable impact ejections from Mars-like planets and the possibility of reseeding early Earth after asteroid cataclysms.

  15. 铝球弹丸高速斜撞击铝Whipple防护结构时后板的损伤特性%Damage Characteristics of Rear Walls of Aluminum Whipple Shields by Oblique Hypervelocity Impact of Aluminum Spheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管公顺; 哈跃; 庞宝君

    2012-01-01

    In order to simulate and study the oblique hypervelocity impacts of space debris on bumper of spacecrafts,a series of oblique hypervelocity impact experiments of aluminum Whipple shields are car- ried out by a two-stage light gas gun. The aluminum alloy projectile diameter is 3.97 mm, the impact velocities range from 1.14 to 5.35 km/s,and the impact angles range from 0° to 70°. The crater distributions on the rear wall of aluminum Whipple shield obliquely impacted by aluminum spheres are obtained and analyzed. In addition, the forecast equations for crater distribution on the rear wall of aluminum Whipple shield by oblique hyperveloeity impact are derived. The results indicate that there are two crater distribution areas on the rear wall under hypervelocity oblique impact. The critical fragmen- tation velocity of projectile will bring effect on the relationship between the impact damage law of rear wall and impact angle. For aluminum alloy Whipple shield,there exists a critical initial collision angle at which the impact damage on the rear wall is the most severe.%为了研究空间碎片对航天器防护结构的高速斜撞击损伤特性,采用二级轻气炮发射铝球弹丸,对铝Whipple防护结构进行高速斜撞击实验。弹丸直径为3.97mm,撞击速度为1.14~5.35km/s,撞击角度为0°~70°。实验得到了铝Whipple防护结构在不同撞击速度区间的后板损伤模式,分析了后板撞击损伤及弹坑分布特性,建立了预测铝球弹丸高速斜撞击铝Whipple防护结构时后板弹坑分布的经验公式。结果表明:在大角度斜撞击条件下,对于一定的撞击速度,铝Whipple防护结构的后板弹坑分布会出现两个区域;弹丸的撞击破碎临界速度将影响后板损伤随撞击角的变化关系;对于铝Whipple防护结构,存在使后板撞击损伤最严重的临界撞击角。

  16. Preliminary Study of Realistic Blast Impact on Cultured Brain Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    hippocampal slice samples to better understand blast-induced brain damage. 15. SUBJECT TERMS RDX spheres , organotypic cultures of hippocampus, small...Preliminary Study of Realistic Blast Impact on Cultured Brain Slices by Thuvan Piehler, Rohan Banton, Lars Piehler, Richard Benjamin, Ray...Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5066 ARL-TR-7197 April 2015 Preliminary Study of Realistic Blast Impact on Cultured Brain Slices Thuvan

  17. Numerical simulation of honeycomb sandwich panel under hypervelocity impact of ice particle%冰粒超高速撞击蜂窝板的数值模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单立; 郑世贵; 闫军

    2014-01-01

    With the orbital debris environment worsening,research on the hypervelocity im-pact phenomena of orbital debris attracts more and more interests of investigators all over the world.The density of some orbital debris is close to ice.Honeycomb sandwich panels are the im-portant component parts of spacecraft structures and protect equipments inside.Therefore,re-search on honeycomb sandwich panel under hypervelocity impact of ice particle is very imperative and necessary.In this study,we used numerical simulation method to study honeycomb sand-wich panels which are impacted by ice particles and evaluated their performance of resisting the hypervelocity impact of ice particles.The results show that ice particles can penetrate honeycomb sandwich panels.The ice particle of 1mm in diameter penetrated the honeycomb sandwich panel at the velocity of 12km/s;the ice particle of 2mm in diameter penetrated the honeycomb sand-wich panel at the velocity of 11km/s or 12km/s;the ice particle of 3mm in diameter penetrated the honeycomb sandwich panel at the velocity of 5km/s and above;the ice particle of 4mm or 5mm in diameter penetrated the honeycomb sandwich panel at the velocity of 3km/s and above. When the honeycomb sandwich panels are penetrated,a lot of debris dash out through the hole of the rare panel and will destroy equipments inside the spacecraft.Additionally,when the kinetic energy of ice particles are close,the diameters of the ice particles will affect the simulation results.%随着人类航天活动日益增多,空间碎片环境逐渐恶化,对航天器在轨安全运行造成严重威胁,各国学者开展了空间碎片超高速撞击数值模拟研究。目前的研究中一般采用铝弹丸代替空间碎片,但是还有部分空间碎片的密度接近冰的密度,对于冰粒的超高速撞击研究还很少且不透彻。蜂窝板是构成航天器舱壁的主要结构,对航天器内部设备起到保护作用,有必要开展冰粒超高速撞

  18. Characterization of Debris from the DebriSat Hypervelocity Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, M.; Kleespies, J.; Patankar, K.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Krisko, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    The DebriSat project is an effort by NASA and the DoD to update the standard break-up model for objects in orbit. The DebriSat object, a 56 kg representative LEO satellite, was subjected to a hypervelocity impact in April 2014. For the hypervelocity test, the representative satellite was suspended within a "soft-catch" arena formed by polyurethane foam panels to minimize the interactions between the debris generated from the hypervelocity impact and the metallic walls of the test chamber. After the impact, the foam panels and debris not caught by the panels were collected and shipped to the University of Florida where the project has now advanced to the debris characterization stage. The characterization effort has been divided into debris collection, measurement, and cataloguing. Debris collection and cataloguing involves the retrieval of debris from the foam panels and cataloguing the debris in a database. Debris collection is a three-step process: removal of loose debris fragments from the surface of the foam panels; X-ray imaging to identify/locate debris fragments embedded within the foam panel; extraction of the embedded debris fragments identified during the X-ray imaging process. As debris fragments are collected, they are catalogued into a database specifically designed for this project. Measurement involves determination of size, mass, shape, material, and other physical properties and well as images of the fragment. Cataloguing involves a assigning a unique identifier for each fragment along with the characterization information.

  19. Non-silica aerogels as hypervelocity particle capture materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    The Stardust sample return mission to the comet Wild 2 used silica aerogel as the principal cometary and interstellar particle capture and return medium. However, since both cometary dust and interstellar grains are composed largely of silica, using a silica collector complicates the science that can be accomplished with these particles. The use of non-silica aerogel in future extra-terrestrial particle capture and return missions would expand the scientific value of these missions. Alumina, titania, germania, zirconia, tin oxide, and resorcinol/formaldehyde aerogels were produced and impact tested with 20, 50, and 100μm glass microspheres to determine the suitability of different non-silica aerogels as hypervelocity particle capture mediums. It was found that non-silica aerogels do perform as efficient hypervelocity capture mediums, with alumina, zirconia, and resorcinol/formaldehyde aerogels proving to be the best of the materials tested.

  20. Chunk projectile launch using the Sandia Hypervelocity Launcher Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Trucano, T.G.; Reinhart, W.D.; Hall, C.A.

    1994-07-01

    An experimental technique is described to launch an intact ``chunk,`` i.e. a 0.3 cm thick by 0.6 cm diameter cylindrical titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) flyer, to 10.2 km/s. The ability to launch fragments having such an aspect ratio is important for hypervelocity impact phenomenology studies. The experimental techniques used to accomplish this launch were similar but not identical to techniques developed for the Sandia HyperVelocity Launcher (HVL). A confined barrel impact is crucial in preventing the two-dimensional effects from dominating the loading response of the projectile chunk. The length to diameter ratio of the metallic chunk that is launched to 10.2 km/s is 0.5 and is an order of magnitude larger than those accomplished using the conventional hypervelocity launcher. The multi-dimensional, finite-difference (finite-volume), hydrodynamic code CTH was used to evaluate and assess the acceleration characteristics i.e., the in-bore ballistics of the chunky projectile launch. A critical analysis of the CTH calculational results led to the final design and the experimental conditions that were used in this study. However, the predicted velocity of the projectile chunk based on CTH calculations was {approximately} 6% lower than the measured velocity of {approximately}10.2 km/S.

  1. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  2. 超高速碰撞实验中跟进气体对等离子体信号的影响%Influence of the Sequela Gas Accompanied with the Plasma Generated by Hypervelocity Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张东江; 张庆明; 甘云丹; 李一磊

    2011-01-01

    针对二级轻气炮加载铝弹丸超高速碰撞靶板产生等离子体的过程中,弹丸后面跟进气体有可能对等离子体信号造成影响的问题,利用三探针、磁线圈、高温计等实验设备分别对有铝弹丸和无弹丸两发实验进行了诊断测量,得出了相应的电子温度、磁感应强度、物质温度变化曲线.比较实验结果得出:弹丸超高速碰撞靶板产生等离子体的过程中跟进气体信号幅值较小,不会对实验结果造成明显影响.%During the measurement of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact in the two-stage gas gun, the gas following the projectile might disturb the physical measurement of plasma signal. The triple probe, coil and pyrometer were used to detect how much the influence of the sequela gas. By comparison, the results show that the signal value of the sequela gas is relatively small and could not produce obvious influence to the measurement of plasma parameter.

  3. Preliminary study to AP mine neutralisation by EFP impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulman, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    A preliminary study has been conducted into the response of anti-personnel mines at the impact of an Explosively Formed Projectile (EFP). The objective was to obtain a low order reaction (preferably a deflagration) to minimise collateral damage. Further the method should be capable to neutralise min

  4. 航天器舷窗玻璃超高速撞击损伤与M/OD撞击风险评估%Hypervelocity impact damage of fused silica glass and M/OD impact risk assessment of spacecraft windshield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞贺伟; 龚自正; 张文兵; 杨继运; 童靖宇

    2007-01-01

    用北京卫星环境工程研究所的18mm口径二级轻气炮(TLGG)和20 J激光驱动微小飞片装置(LDFF-20)对用作航天器舷窗玻璃的熔融石英玻璃的超高速撞击损伤特性进行了实验研究和分析.其中,TLGG发射的球形铝弹丸直径分别为1 mm和3 mm,速度2~6.5 km/s;LDFF-20发射的圆柱形飞片厚度7 μm,直径1 mm,速度1~8.3 km/s.撞击结果为:对12 mm厚的熔融石英玻璃,直径为3mm的弹丸甚至在2.8 km/s的低速下就将其穿透,而直径为1 mm的弹丸在6.5km/s的高速下没有穿透,这说明弹丸直径对撞击损伤特性有很强的影响;LDFF-20发射的微小飞片的撞击仅在玻璃表面产生很浅的凹坑,没有裂纹产生,但微小飞片的累积撞击损伤明显地降低了玻璃的透光性.实验初步获得了侵彻深度PC、侵彻直径D1与弹丸撞击速度Vp、弹丸质量Mp之间的经验关系.依据实验结果和目前的微流星体/空间碎片(M/OD)环境工程模型,建议对于高度为400 km、轨道倾角42°、寿命为3年的典型航天器,其舷窗玻璃的临界安全(非穿透)厚度至少为12mm.%Hypervelocity impact experiments were conducted on fused silica glass to obtain the damage characteristics and to build a damage model using Ly12 aluminum spheres of diameters 1 mm and 3 mm launched by the two-stage-light-gas gun of up to 6.5 km/s, and the small aluminum flyer of 1 mm in diameter and 7 μm in thickness launched by a laser-driven flyer facility of up to 8.3 km/s, developed by Beijing Institute of Spacecraft Environment (BISEE). The empirical damage equations were obtained to approximately predict the penetration depth (PC) and its diameter (D1) as a function of impact parameters (projectile velocityVp, mass Mp). For the Ly12 A1 projectile of 3 mm diameter sphere, the glass was perforated thoroughly even at a low impact velocity of 2.80 km/s. This means that the projectile diameter plays a major role with respect to the impact damage. The damage

  5. Fort Drum Preliminary Fiscal Impact Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-01

    of inmigrants 0 Fiscal histories, projections, and impacts for counties, cities, towns, villages, school districts, and the state. The results of...distribution of the inmigrating population within the three counties. Thus, an accurate forecast of the expected distribution of the inmigrating population is a...The distribution of inmigration to the school districts was made using the analysis explained in Chapter 3. Children associated with 800 new on-post

  6. Turbulent spots in hypervelocity flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Joseph S.; Leyva, Ivett A.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2017-04-01

    The turbulent spot propagation process in boundary layer flows of air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and air/carbon dioxide mixtures in thermochemical nonequilibrium at high enthalpy is investigated. Experiments are performed in a hypervelocity reflected shock tunnel with a 5-degree half-angle axisymmetric cone instrumented with flush-mounted fast-response coaxial thermocouples. Time-resolved and spatially demarcated heat transfer traces are used to track the propagation of turbulent bursts within the mean flow, and convection rates at approximately 91, 74, and 63% of the boundary layer edge velocity, respectively, are observed for the leading edge, peak, and trailing edge of the spots. A simple model constructed with these spot propagation parameters is used to infer spot generation rates from observed transition onset to completion distance. Spot generation rates in air and nitrogen are estimated to be approximately twice the spot generation rates in air/carbon dioxide mixtures.

  7. Recent progresses of laser-driven flyer technique and micro-space debris hypervelocity impact tests in China Academy of Space Technology%CAST激光驱动微小飞片及其超高速撞击效应研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹燕; 牛锦超; 牟永强; 徐坤博; 马子良; 龚自正

    2015-01-01

    激光驱动飞片技术(LDFT)在模拟微米级空间碎片对航天器的超高速撞击效应方面具有独特的优势。文章全面介绍了北京卫星环境工程研究所在激光驱动飞片技术与微米级空间碎片超高速撞击效应地面模拟研究中取得的若干进展,包括激光驱动飞片的理论计算、超高速飞片的稳定发射技术、超高速飞片速度瞬态测量技术、航天器外露表面的超高速撞击特性、超高速撞击累积损伤评价方法,以及微米级空间碎片超高速撞击防护技术探索等研究。同时,展望了激光驱动飞片技术以及微米级空间碎片累积撞击实验研究的发展方向。%The laser-driven flyer technique (LDFT) has many advantages in simulating the micro-space debris hypervelocity impact. This paper reviews recent progresses in the laser-driven flyer system for space debris hypervelocity impact simulations conducted in CAST, including:1) the theoretical analysis of the flyer velocity based on the Lawrence Model;2) a new kind of velocity in-situ measurement technology developed for the laser-driven flyer system;3) the flyers accelerated up to 8km/s with good repeatability using two-layer targets;4) hypervelocity impact experiments of micro-space debris for spacecraft surface materials, and the degradation laws of material functional performance; 5) the cumulative damage evaluation method is studied; 6) the diamond-like carbon (DLC) film employed to protect the optical materials against micro-space debris impact. At last, the new trend of laser-driven flyer hypervelocity impact research is discussed.

  8. Calculations supporting HyperVelocity Launcher development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trucano, T.G.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a HyperVelocity Launcher (also referred to as HVL) in which a thin flier plate (nominally 1 mm thick) is launched to velocities in excess of 12 km/s. The length to diameter ratio of these launched flier plates varies from 0.02 to 0.06. The launch technique is based upon using structured, time-dependant, high-pressure, high-acceleration pulses to drive the flier plates. Such pulses are achieved by using a graded-density material to impact a stationary flier. A computational and experimental program at Sandia seeks to extend this technique to allow launching thick plates whose length-to-diameter ratio is 10 to 20 times larger than thin plates. Hydrodynamic codes are used to design modifications to the basic technique. The authors have controlled and used these effects to successfully launch a chunk-flier, consisting of 0.33 gm of titanium alloy, 0.3 cm thick by 0.6 cm in diameter, to a velocity of 10.2 km/s. This is the largest chunky size ever launched at this velocity from a gas gun configuration.

  9. 超高速撞击Kevlar纤维布填充防护结构研究%Optimal Structural Design of Stuffed Shields with Kevlar Fiber Clothes against Hypervelocity Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宝玺; 哈跃; 邓云飞; 庞宝君

    2013-01-01

    A series of impact experiments are conducted to investigate the ballistic performances of stuffed Whipple shields with Kevlar fiber clothes using a two-stage light gas gun facilities. Based on the impact limit curve of Nextel/Kevlar stuffed Whipple shields,the protective performances of Kevlar stuffed Whipple shields,the damage morphology and mechanism of stuffed material and bulkhead are obtained and compared. The main results show as following: the stuffed Whipple shields with Kevlar fiber clothes have excellent protection performance at the low impact velocity;the double-layer packing structure can improve the protective performance. Kevlar fibers sufficiently absorb energy by plastic deformation and fracture when the impact velocity is low. In addition, high temperature melting and carbonization phenomenon appear in the hypervelocity region, which help break up and melt the projectiles that minimize the damage to cabin wall. This exploratory method provides us a useful way to make the ballistic performances of stuffed Whipple shields more perfect in space debris protection field.%利用二级轻气炮,对Kevlar纤维布填充Whipple防护结构进行了超高速撞击实验研究.基于Nextel/Kevlar撞击极限曲线,分析了单层及双层Kevlar纤维布填充防护结构的防护性能以及填充材料、舱壁的损伤情况.实验表明,Kevlar纤维布填充Whipple防护结构在低速区具有优良的防护性能.分层布局可改善Kevlar纤维布填充Whipple防护结构在低速区的防护性能.在低速区,Kevlar纤维丝主要依靠大量的塑性变形及断裂吸收弹丸的动能;在高速区,Kevlar纤维丝存在高温熔化及碳化现象,使弹丸破碎或熔化为更小的碎片或熔球,从而减轻对舱壁的损伤.

  10. Computational Simulation of Hypervelocity Penetration Using Adaptive SPH Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANG Hongfu; MENG Lijun

    2006-01-01

    The normal hypervelocity impact of an Al-thin plate by an Al-sphere was numerically simulated by using the adaptive smoothed particle hydrodynamics (ASPH) method.In this method,the isotropic smoothing algorithm of standard SPH is replaced with anisotropic smoothing involving ellipsoidal kernels whose axes evolve automatically to follow the mean particle spacing as it varies in time,space,and direction around each particle.Using the ASPH,the anisotropic volume changes under strong shock condition are captured more accurately and clearly.The sophisticated features of meshless and Lagrangian nature inherent in the SPH method are kept for treating large deformations,large inhomogeneities and tracing free surfaces in the extremely transient impact process.A two-dimensional ASPH program is coded with C + +.The developed hydrocode is examined for example problems of hypervelocity impacts of solid materials.The results obtained from the numerical simulation are compared with available experimental ones.Good agreement is observed.

  11. 基于声发射的单层铝板高速撞击损伤类型识别%Damage Identification of Single Aluminum Plate Produced by Hypervelocity Impact Based Acoustic Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘武刚; 庞宝君; 韩增尧; 张辉

    2011-01-01

    In order to ensure the astronauts ' safety and apacecraft normal operation , the design of sensor systems to the detect damage impacts on spacecraft become an important problem of spacecraft design. Numerical simulations of acoustic emission ( AE) signals produced by projectile hypervelocity impacting on an Aluminum plate at normal direction are carried out hy using the SPH ( smoothed particle hydrodynamics) technique of AUTODYN hydro-codes in this paper. The results are given by using two dimensional simulations. In order to separate characteristics of different wave modes, the AE signals are divided into low frequency and high frequency modes by means of wavelet time-frequency transform and reconstruction.The results show that the damage condition of the spacecraft can be represented by the amplitudes of the reconstructed impaet signals. The patterns of impact damage can be divided into three types according to the ratio of second to first peak amplitudes of AE reconstructed low frequency signals.%针对基于声发射技术的在轨航天器遭受空间碎片撞击损伤的评估问题,采用AUTODYN软件进行了弹丸超高速正撞击铝板所产生声发射波动信号的数值模拟,给出了二维模拟结果;对所得到的声发射信号进行小波重构,得到低频和高频部分的信号.通过研究低频和高频信号的峰值变化,发现第一和第二峰值幅度与撞击速度的变化具有一定的规律性,通过低频第二峰值幅度与第一峰值幅度比值将高速撞击损伤模式分为成坑、锥形穿孔和圆柱形穿孔三种类型.

  12. 超高速撞击玄武岩及Kevlar纤维布填充防护结构研究%THE OPTIMAL STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF STUFFED SHIELDS WITH BASALT AND KEVLAR FIBER CLOTHES AGAINST HYPERVELOCITY IMPACTING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宝玺; 哈跃; 邓云飞; 庞宝君

    2012-01-01

    The impact ballistic performances of stuffed whipple shields with basalt and Kevlar fiber clothes are investigated by two-stage light gas gun facilities. Protective performance,damage morphology and mechanism of stuffed material and cabm walls are obtained, compared with the impact limit curve of Nextel/Kevlar stuffed whipple shields. In addition, the influence of epoxy resin coating on the protective performance are discussed. The data shows that stuffed whipple shields with basalt and kevlar fiber clothes have excellent protective properties in the high impact velocity. Coating with epoxy resin glue improve the prevention performance. Basalt fibers absorb energy by breaking projectile. Kevlar fibers have plastic deformation and fracture. Melting phenomenon and carbonation process appear in the hypervelocity regions.%利用二级轻气炮对玄武岩及Kevlar纤维布填充Whipple防护结构进行了超高速撞击实验研究.以Nextel/Kevlar撞击极限曲线为参照,分析了双层未涂胶玄武岩及Kevlar纤维布填充防护结构和双层涂环氧树脂胶玄武岩及Kevlar纤维布填充防护结构的防护性能、填充材料及舱壁的损伤情况.实验表明:双层未涂胶玄武岩及Kevlar纤维布填充防护结构和双层涂环氧树脂胶玄武岩及Kevlar纤维布填充防护结构在高速区都具有优良的防护性能.此外.通过涂环氧树脂胶改善了玄武岩及Kevlar纤维布填充防护结构在高速区的防护性能.Kevlar纤维丝在低速区主要依靠塑性变形及断裂吸收弹丸的动能,玄武岩纤维丝在高速区主要依靠脆性断裂及高温碳化将弹丸破碎或融化为尺寸更小的碎片或熔球,减轻了对舱壁的损伤.玄武岩及Kevlar纤维丝在高速区存在高温熔化及碳化现象.

  13. Numerical Modeling and Parameter Identification for Kevlar Laminate Under the Condition of Hypervelocity Impact%Kevlar层合板超高速撞击数值建模及参数识别

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘滨涛; 贾光辉; 黄海

    2011-01-01

    A method of numerical modeling and parameter identification for a Kevlar laminate is proposed in this paper because of the complex mechanical behaviors and inaccurate parameters under the condition of hypervelocity impact. In the method. an orthotropic constitulive model, Chang-Chang failure model, and a finite element method are selected to describe the mechanical behaviors of Kevlar laminates; furthermore, the successive response surface technique is applied to identify the inaccurate parameters. Minimum least square residuals between simulation results and test results are taken as optimization objective. By using the method, eight numerical models for Al projeclile impacting Kevlar laminates, are modeled and the four parameters of failure criteria are identified. Numerical simulations have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method.%针对Kevlar层合板在超高速撞击条件下的力学特性的复杂性及参数不准确对数值仿真的不利影响,提出一种使用正交各向异性本构模型,Chang-Chang复合材料失效模型和有限元方法对Kevlar层合板的超高速撞击力学特性进行建模并运用连续响应面技术对材料失效模型参数进行识别的方法.然后使用该方法建立了与现有文献中的试验工况相对应的数值模型,并把Kevlar层合板材料失效模型的4个参数作为优化变量,以仿真结果与试验结果的二乘残差最小作为优化目标,使用连续响应面技术建立参数优化模型,由此识别这些参数.结果表明,该建模方法能正确描述Kevlar层合板的超高速撞击力学特性,采用识别后的参数进行仿真计算可以显著提高数值模型的仿真精度.

  14. Preliminary assessment of beam impact consequences on LHC Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Cauchi, M; Bertarelli, A; Bruce, R; Carra, F; Dallocchio, A; Deboy, D; Mariani, N; Rossi, A; Lari, L; Mollicone, P; Sammut, N

    2011-01-01

    The correct functioning of the LHC collimation system is crucial to attain the desired LHC luminosity performance. However, the requirements to handle high intensity beams can be demanding. In this respect, the robustness of the collimators plays an important role. An accident, which causes the proton beam to hit a collimator, might result in severe beam-induced damage and, in some cases, replacement of the collimator, with consequent downtime for the machine. In this paper, several case studies representing different realistic beam impact scenarios are shown. A preliminary analysis of the thermal response of tertiary collimators to beam impact is presented, from which the most critical cases can be identified. Such work will also help to give an initial insight on the operational constraints of the LHC by taking into account all relevant collimator damage limits.

  15. Preliminary study of impact fragility to RC wall subjected to aircraft impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sang Shup; Hahm, Dae Gi; Choi, In Kil [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    International experience has shown that internal and external hazards such as fires, earthquakes, and aircraft impacts can be significant safety contributors to the risk to infrastructures such as nuclear power plants. Since the aircraft accident at the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001, an aircraft impact problem has been increasingly of the interest and is one of important categories of an unexpected external hazard field. To date, aircraft impact analyses has most focused on the response analysis to the target structures. However, this preliminary study carried out an impact fragility analysis to reinforced concrete (RC) wall subjected to an aircraft impact. The aircraft velocity is used as the important variable of this study. The impact analysis of the applied Ri era's forcing function is used by Abaqus/Explicit.

  16. DebriSat Hypervelocity Impact Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    STATES AIR FORCE NOTICES When US Government drawings, specifications, or other data are used for any purpose other than a definitely related...failure. However, the area reduction alone was not enough to cause a failure. The Range G launcher has a taper of the bore diameter that...effectively reduces the diameter toward the muzzle exit. This taper is used to account for the normal material erosion on the outside of the projectile. The

  17. Survival of the impactor during hypervelocity collisions - I. An analogue for low porosity targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdellidou, C.; Price, M. C.; Delbo, M.; Ioannidis, P.; Cole, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent observations of asteroidal surfaces indicate the presence of materials that do not match the bulk lithology of the body. A possible explanation for the presence of these exogenous materials is that they are products of interasteroid impacts in the Main Belt, and thus interest has increased in understanding the fate of the projectile during hypervelocity impacts. In order to gain insight into the fate of impactor, we have carried out a laboratory programme, covering the velocity range of 0.38-3.50 km s-1, devoted to measuring the survivability, fragmentation and final state of the impactor. Forsterite olivine and synthetic basalt projectiles were fired on to low porosity (disruption, Q*, between peridot and basalt projectiles. However, we found very similar behaviour of the size frequency distributions for the hypervelocity shots (>1 km s-1). After each shot, we examined the largest peridot fragments with Raman spectroscopy and no melt or alteration in the final state of the projectile was observed.

  18. Constraining Milky Way mass with Hypervelocity Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Fragione, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    We show that hypervelocity stars (HVSs) ejected from the center of the Milky Way galaxy can be used to constrain the mass of its halo. The asymmetry in the radial velocity distribution of halo stars due to escaping HVSs depends on the halo potential (escape speed) as long as the round trip orbital time is shorter than the stellar lifetime. Adopting a characteristic HVS travel time of $300$ Myr, which corresponds to the average mass of main sequence HVSs ($3.2$ M$_{\\odot}$), we find that current data favors a mass for the Milky Way in the range $(1.2$-$1.7)\\times 10^{12} \\mathrm{M}_\\odot$.

  19. Transit probabilities around hypervelocity and runaway stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragione, G.; Ginsburg, I.

    2017-04-01

    In the blooming field of exoplanetary science, NASA's Kepler Space Telescope has revolutionized our understanding of exoplanets. Kepler's very precise and long-duration photometry is ideal for detecting planetary transits around Sun-like stars. The forthcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is expected to continue Kepler's legacy. Along with transits, the Doppler technique remains an invaluable tool for discovering planets. The next generation of spectrographs, such as G-CLEF, promise precision radial velocity measurements. In this paper, we explore the possibility of detecting planets around hypervelocity and runaway stars, which should host a very compact system as consequence of their turbulent origin. We find that the probability of a multiplanetary transit is 10-3 ≲ P ≲ 10-1. We therefore need to observe ∼10-1000 high-velocity stars to spot a transit. However, even if transits are rare around runaway and hypervelocity stars, the chances of detecting such planets using radial velocity surveys is high. We predict that the European Gaia satellite, along with TESS and the new-generation spectrographs G-CLEF and ESPRESSO, will spot planetary systems orbiting high-velocity stars.

  20. Hypervelocity Star Candidates in the SEGUE G & K Dwarf Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Palladino, Lauren E; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Beers, Timothy C; Lee, Young Sun; Schneider, Donald P

    2013-01-01

    We identify 13 candidate hypervelocity stars from the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) G and K dwarf samples. Previous searches for hypervelocity stars have only focused on large radial velocities; in this study we also use proper motions to select the candidates. We determine the hypervelocity likelihood of each candidate, considering the significant errors often associated with high proper motion stars via Monte Carlo simulations. We find that more than half of the candidates exceed their escape velocities with at least 90% probability. All of our candidates also have less than a 60% chance of being a high velocity fluke within the SEGUE sample. Based on orbits calculated using the observed 6-d positions and velocities, few, if any, of these candidates originate from the Galactic Center. If these candidates are truly hypervelocity stars, they were not ejected by interactions with the Milky Way's supermassive black hole. This calls for a more serious examination of alternati...

  1. Galileo Infrared Observations of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 G Impact Fireball: A Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R. W.; Weissman, P. R.; Segura, M.; Hui, J.; Smythe, W. D.; Johnson, T.; Baines, K. H.; Drossart, P.; Encrenaz, T.; Leader, F. E.; Team, NIMS Science

    1995-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft was fortuitously situated for a direct view of the impacts of the fragments of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 in Jupiter's atmosphere. The Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer instrument observed several of the impact events in several discrete bands and with a temporal resolution of roughly five seconds. This report provides a preliminary description of the fireball phase.

  2. Transits Probabilities Around Hypervelocity and Runaway Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Fragione, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    In the blooming field of exoplanetary science, NASA's Kepler Space Telescope has revolutionized our understanding of exoplanets. Kepler's very precise and long-duration photometry is ideal for detecting planetary transits around Sun-like stars. The forthcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is expected to continue Kepler's legacy. In this paper, we explore the possibility of detecting planetary transits around hypervelocity and runaway stars, which should host a very compact system as consequence of their turbulent origin. We find that the probability of a multi-planetary transit is $10^{-3}\\lesssim P\\lesssim 10^{-1}$. We therefore need to observe $\\sim 10-1000$ high-velocity stars to spot a transit. We predict that the European Gaia satellite, along with TESS, could spot such transits.

  3. A test facility for hypervelocity rarefied flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrossan, M. N.; Chiu, H.-H.; Mee, D. J.

    2001-08-01

    This paper describes a rarefied hypervelocity test facility producing gas speeds greater than 7 km/s. The X1 expansion tube at The University of Queensland has been used to produce nitrogen flows at 8.9 and 9.5 km/s with test flow durations of 50 and 40 μs respectively. Rarefied flow is indicated by values of the freestream breakdown parameter >0.1 (Cheng's rarefaction parameter tank. Nominal conditions in the expansion are derived from CFD predictions. Measured bar gauge (Pitot) pressures show that the flow is radially uniform when the Pitot pressure has decreased by a factor ten. The measured bar gauge pressures are an increasing fraction of the expected Pitot pressure as the rarefaction parameters increase.

  4. Environmental impact directory system: preliminary implementation for geothermal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, F.D.; Hall, R.T.; Fullenwider, E.D.

    1976-07-01

    An Environmental Impact Directory System (EIDS) was proposed as a method for a computerized search of the widely distributed data files and models pertaining to energy-related environmental effects. To define the scope and content of the system, an example was prepared for the case of geothermal energy. The resulting sub-directory is known as GEIDs (Geothermal Environmental Impact Directory System). In preparing or reviewing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), the user may employ GEIDS as an extensive checklist to make sure he has taken into account all predictable impacts at any level of severity.

  5. The Impact of Reality Therapy in a School for Emotionally Disturbed Youth: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Kevin I.

    This preliminary report examined the impact of W. Glasser's Reality Therapy techniques on teacher attitudes and the behavior of emotionally disturbed elementary and middle school students. A summary of Glasser's Control Theory and his recent revisions pertaining to Reality Therapy techniques is included as well as a review of the outcome…

  6. Preliminary Comparison of the Response of LHC Tertiary Collimators to Proton and Ion Beam Impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Cauchi, M; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Lari, L; Mollicone, P; Sammut, N

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider is designed to bring into collision protons as well as heavy ions. Accidents involving impacts on collimators can happen for both species. The interaction of lead ions with matter differs to that of protons, thus making this scenario a new interesting case to study as it can result in different damage aspects on the collimator. This paper will present a preliminary comparison of the response of collimators to proton and ion beam impacts.

  7. On the Origin of Hypervelocity Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q.; Lu, Y.

    2011-05-01

    Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) moving in the Galactic halo are mainly B-type stars with origin of their progenitors unknown. OB stars are also populated in the Galactic Center (GC), with many being hosted in a clockwise rotating young stellar (CWS) disk within half a parsec from the central massive black hole (MBH) and their formation remaining puzzles. We find that the majority of the detected HVSs are spatially correlated with the plane of the stellar disk. By demonstrating that HVSs can well memorize the injecting direction of their progenitors, we conclude that most of the HVSs probably originate from the CWS disk. Our results not only confirm the GC origin of HVSs but also imply that the central disk should persist or be frequently rejuvenated over the past 200 Myr, which adds a new challenge to the stellar disk formation and provides insights to the longstanding problem of gas fueling into MBHs. A future survey of HVSs in the southern hemisphere will provide a check for the origin of HVSs.

  8. Preliminary impact assessment of effusive eruptions at Etna volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Annalisa; Michaud-Dubuy, Audrey; Branca, Stefano; De Beni, Emanuela; Del Negro, Ciro

    2016-04-01

    Lava flows are a recurring and widespread form of volcanic activity that threaten people and property around the world. The growing demographic congestion around volcanic structures increases the potential risks and costs that lava flows represent, and leads to a pressing need for faster and more accurate assessment of lava flow impact. To fully evaluate potential effects and losses that an effusive eruption may cause to society, property and environment, it is necessary to consider the hazard, the distribution of the exposed elements at stake and the associated vulnerability. Lava flow hazard assessment is at an advanced state, whereas comprehensive vulnerability assessment is lacking. Cataloguing and analyzing volcanic impacts provide insight on likely societal and physical vulnerabilities during future eruptions. Here we quantify the lava flow impact of two past main effusive eruptions of Etna volcano: the 1669, which is the biggest and destructive flank eruption to have occurred on Etna in historical time, and the 1981, lasting only 6 days, but characterized by an intense eruptive dynamics. Different elements at stake are considered, including population, hospitals, critical facilities, buildings of historic value, industrial infrastructures, gas and electricity networks, railways, roads, footways and finally land use. All these elements were combined with the 1669 and 1981 lava flow fields to quantify the social damage and economic loss.

  9. Health impacts of garage workers: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muttamara, S. (AIT, Bangkok (Thailand). Division of Environmental Engineering); Alwis, K.U.

    1994-05-01

    This research study was carried out in two automobile repair garages situated in the Bangkok metropolitan area, employing 47 and 12 workers respectively. Air sampling, biological monitoring (blood, urine), noise monitoring, and audiometry of workers were done to assess the occupational environment and its impact on the workers. The occupational hygiene survey was carried out to observe the working conditions of both garages. It was found that conditions at both sites have a strong negative impact on the health of workers. The lead in air of Garage 1 was 0.20 mg/m[sup 3] which is the same as the threshold limit value (TLV) for lead in air for a working environment. The level of lead in blood of four workers of each garage was above the exposed level. According to the occupational hygiene survey carried out at both garages, 79% of workers of Garage 1 and 70% of workers of Gage 2 suffered from redness of the eyes (eye pain, gritty feeling), and 5% and 2% of workers of Garage 1 and Garage 2 respectively, complained about breathing difficulties. Control measures should be taken to minimize pollution due to dust, fumes, and noise which would reduce the health impacts and lead to a healthier workforce.

  10. Preliminary assessment of soil erosion impact during forest restoration process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yen-Jen; Chang, Cheng-Sheng; Tsao, Tsung-Ming; Wey, Tsong-Huei; Chiang, Po-Neng; Wang, Ya-Nan

    2014-05-01

    Taiwan has a fragile geology and steep terrain. The 921 earthquake, Typhoon Toraji, Typhoon Morakot, and the exploitation and use of the woodland by local residents have severely damaged the landscape and posed more severe challenges to the montane ecosystem. A land conservation project has been implemented by the Experimental Forest of National Taiwan University which reclaimed approximately 1,500 hectares of leased woodland from 2008 to 2010, primarily used to grow bamboo, tea trees, betel nut, fruit, and vegetable and about 1,298 hectares have been reforested. The process of forest restoration involves clear cutting, soil preparation and a six-year weeding and tending period which may affect the amount of soil erosion dramatically. This study tried to assess the impact of forest restoration from the perspective of soil erosion through leased-land recovery periods and would like to benefit the practical implementation of reforestation in the future. A new plantation reforested in the early 2013 and a nearby 29-year-old mature forest were chosen as experimental and comparison sites. A self-designed weir was set up in a small watershed of each site for the runoff and sediment yield observation. According to the observed results from May to August 2013, a raining season in Taiwan, the runoff and erosion would not as high as we expected, because the in-situ soil texture of both sites is sandy loam to sandy with high percentage of coarse fragment which increased the infiltration. There were around 200 kg to 250 kg of wet sand/soil yielded in mature forest during the hit of Typhoon Soulik while the rest of the time only suspended material be yielded at both sites. To further investigate the influence of the six-year weeding and tending period, long term observations are needed for a more completed assessment of soil erosion impact.

  11. Super-Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) evaluation volume 2: Preliminary impact and market transformation assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.D.; Conger, R.L.

    1996-08-01

    The Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) is a collaborative utility program intended to transform the market for energy-efficient and environmentally friendly refrigerators. It is one of the first examples of a large-scale {open_quotes}market transformation{close_quotes} energy efficiency program. This report documents the preliminary impact and market transformation evaluation of SERP ({open_quotes}the Program{close_quotes}). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this evaluation for the U.S. Department of Energy. This study focuses on the preliminary impact evaluation and market transformation assessment, but also presents limited process evaluation information. It is based on interviews with refrigerator dealers and manufacturers, interviews with utility participants, industry data, and information from the Program administrators. Results from this study complement those from prior process evaluation also conducted by PNNL. 42 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. The techniques of metallic foil electrically exploding driving hypervelocity flyer to more than 10 km/s for shock wave physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiji; He, Jia; Zhao, Jianheng; Tan, Fuli; Sun, Chengwei; Mo, Jianjun; Xong, Xin; Wu, Gang

    2011-09-01

    Electrical explosion of metallic foil or wire is widely used to the fields of material science (preparation of nao-meter materials), dynamics of materials, and high energy density physics. In this paper, the techniques of gaining hypervelocity flyer driven by electrical explosion of metallic foil were researched, which are used to study dynamics of materials and hypervelocity impact modeling of space debris. Based on low inductance technologies of pulsed storage energy capacitor, detonator switch and parallel plate transmission lines with solid films insulation, two sets of experimental apparatuses with storage energy of 14.4 kJ and 40 kJ were developed for launching hypervelocity flyer. By means of the diagnostic technologies of velocity interferometer system for any reflectors and fibre-optic pins, the hypervelocity polyester (Mylar) flyers were gained. For the apparatus of 14.4 kJ, flyer of diameter ϕ6 ˜ ϕ10 mm and thickness of 0.1 ˜ 0.2 mm was accelerated to the hypervelocity of 10 ˜ 14 km/s. And for the apparatus of 40 kJ, flyer of diameter ϕ20 ˜ 30 mm and thickness of 0.2 mm was launched to the velocity of 5 ˜ 8 km/s. The flatness of the flyer is not more than 34 ns for the flyer with diameter of 20 mm, and less than 22 ns for the flyer with diameter of 10 mm. Based on the Lagrange hydrodynamic code, one dimensional simulation was done by introducing database of equation of states, discharging circuit equation and Joule heat equation, and modifying energy equation. The simulation results are well agreed with the experimental results in accelerating processing. The simulation results can provide good advices in designing new experiments and developing new experimental devices. Finally, some experiments of materials dynamics and hypervelocity impact of space debris were done by using the apparatus above. The results show that the apparatus of metallic foil electrically exploding driving hypervelocity flyer is a good and versatile tool for shock dynamics.

  13. Impacts from Deployment Barriers on the United States Wind Power Industry: Overview & Preliminary Findings (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Heimiller, D.

    2012-09-01

    Regardless of cost and performance some wind projects are unable to proceed to commissioning as a result of deployment barriers. Principal deployment barriers in the industry today include: wildlife, public acceptance, access to transmission, and radar. To date, methods for understanding these non-technical barriers have failed to accurately characterize the costs imposed by deployment barriers and the degree of impact to the industry. Analytical challenges include limited data and modeling capabilities. Changes in policy and regulation, among other factors, also add complexity to analysis of impacts from deployment barriers. This presentation details preliminary results from new NREL analysis focused on quantifying the impact of deployment barriers on the wind resource of the United States, the installed cost of wind projects, and the total electric power system cost of a 20% wind energy future. In terms of impacts to wind project costs and developable land, preliminary findings suggest that deployment barriers are secondary to market drivers such as demand. Nevertheless, impacts to wind project costs are on the order of $100/kW and a substantial share of the potentially developable windy land in the United States is indeed affected by deployment barriers.

  14. A Hypervelocity Experimental Research Database (HERD): Support for the Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate Code Validation Program (COVAL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Scott A.; Anderson, Charles E., Jr.; Hertel, Eugene S., Jr.; Hunt, Ronald D.

    The Hypervelocity Experimental Research Database (HERD) described in this paper was developed to aid researchers with code validation for impacts that occur at velocities faster than the testable regime. Codes of concern include both hydrocodes and fast-running analytical or semi-empirical models used to predict the impact phenomenology and damage that results to projectiles and targets. There are several well documented experimental programs that can serve as benchmarks for code validation; these are identified and described. Recommendations for further experimentation (a canonical problem) to provide validation data are also discussed.

  15. Survival of the impactor during hypervelocity collisions I: An analogue for low porosity targets

    CERN Document Server

    Avdellidou, C; Delbo, M; Ioannidis, P; Cole, M J

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of asteroidal surfaces indicate the presence of materials that do not match the bulk lithology of the body. A possible explanation for the presence of these exogenous materials is that they are products of inter-asteroid impacts in the Main Belt, and thus interest has increased in understanding the fate of the projectile during hypervelocity impacts. In order to gain insight into the fate of impactor we have carried out a laboratory programme, covering the velocity range of 0.38 - 3.50 km/s, devoted to measuring the survivability, fragmentation and final state of the impactor. Forsterite olivine and synthetic basalt projectiles were fired onto low porosity (1 km/s). After each shot, we examined the largest peridot fragments with Raman spectroscopy and no melt or alteration in the final state of the projectile was observed.

  16. Reactive molecular dynamics of hypervelocity collisions of PETN molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landerville, A C; Oleynik, I I; White, C T

    2009-11-05

    Born-Oppenheimer direct dynamics classical trajectory simulations of bimolecular collisions of PETN molecules have been performed to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of hypervelocity chemistry relevant to initiating reactions immediately behind the shock wavefront in energetic molecular crystals. The solid-state environment specifies the initial orientations of colliding molecules. The threshold velocities for initiating chemistry for a variety of crystallographic orientations were correlated with available experimental data on anisotropic shock sensitivity of PETN. Collisions normal to the planes (001) and (110) were found to be most sensitive with threshold velocities on the order of characteristic particle velocities in detonating PETN. The production of NO2 is the dominant reaction pathway in most of the reactive cases. The simulations show that the reactive chemistry, driven by dynamics rather than temperature during hypervelocity collisions, can occur at a very short time scale (10(-13) s) under highly nonequilibrium conditions.

  17. Hypervelocity stars from young stellar clusters in the Galactic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Fragione, Giacomo; Kroupa, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The enormous velocities of the so called hypervelocity stars (HVSs) derive, likely, from close interactions with massive black holes, binary stars encounters or supernova explosions. In this paper, we investigate the origin of hypervelocity stars as consequence of the close interaction between the Milky Way central massive black hole and a passing-by young stellar cluster. We found that both single and binary HVSs may be generated in a burst-like event, as the cluster passes near the orbital pericentre. High velocity stars will move close to the initial cluster orbital plane and in the direction of the cluster orbital motion at the pericentre. The binary fraction of these HVS jets depends on the primordial binary fraction in the young cluster. The level of initial mass segregation determines the value of the average mass of the ejected stars. Some binary stars will merge, continuing their travel across and out of the Galaxy as blue stragglers.

  18. Boxing and mixed martial arts: preliminary traumatic neuromechanical injury risk analyses from laboratory impact dosage data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Adam J; Benzel, Edward C; Miele, Vincent J; Morr, Douglas R; Prakash, Vikas

    2012-05-01

    In spite of ample literature pointing to rotational and combined impact dosage being key contributors to head and neck injury, boxing and mixed martial arts (MMA) padding is still designed to primarily reduce cranium linear acceleration. The objects of this study were to quantify preliminary linear and rotational head impact dosage for selected boxing and MMA padding in response to hook punches; compute theoretical skull, brain, and neck injury risk metrics; and statistically compare the protective effect of various glove and head padding conditions. An instrumented Hybrid III 50th percentile anthropomorphic test device (ATD) was struck in 54 pendulum impacts replicating hook punches at low (27-29 J) and high (54-58 J) energy. Five padding combinations were examined: unpadded (control), MMA glove-unpadded head, boxing glove-unpadded head, unpadded pendulum-boxing headgear, and boxing glove-boxing headgear. A total of 17 injury risk parameters were measured or calculated. All padding conditions reduced linear impact dosage. Other parameters significantly decreased, significantly increased, or were unaffected depending on padding condition. Of real-world conditions (MMA glove-bare head, boxing glove-bare head, and boxing glove-headgear), the boxing glove-headgear condition showed the most meaningful reduction in most of the parameters. In equivalent impacts, the MMA glove-bare head condition induced higher rotational dosage than the boxing glove-bare head condition. Finite element analysis indicated a risk of brain strain injury in spite of significant reduction of linear impact dosage. In the replicated hook punch impacts, all padding conditions reduced linear but not rotational impact dosage. Head and neck dosage theoretically accumulates fastest in MMA and boxing bouts without use of protective headgear. The boxing glove-headgear condition provided the best overall reduction in impact dosage. More work is needed to develop improved protective padding to minimize

  19. Ballistics Modeling for Non-Axisymmetric Hypervelocity Smart Bullets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-03

    1DoD PETTT, Dynamics Research Corporation, Andover, MA; on-site at NRL. Railgun 67-6754-04 Ballistics Modeling for non-Axisymmetric Hypervelocity...report is concerned with calculating the trajectory of the projectile fired from an electromagnetic launcher, or railgun , which attains supersonic...at supersonic speeds [1]. In the case of a railgun , there is no requirement involving a casing or high pressure seal. Instead, there is a requirement

  20. Preliminary safety evaluation of an aircraft impact on a near-surface radioactive waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Frano, R.; Forasassi, G.; Pugliese, G. [Department of Industrial and Civil Engineering (DICI), University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    The aircraft impact accident has become very significant in the design of a nuclear facilities, particularly, after the tragic September 2001 event, that raised the public concern about the potential damaging effects that the impact of a large civilian airplane could bring in safety relevant structures. The aim of this study is therefore to preliminarily evaluate the global response and the structural effects induced by the impact of a military or commercial airplane (actually considered as a 'beyond design basis' event) into a near surface radioactive waste (RWs) disposal facility. The safety evaluation was carried out according to the International safety and design guidelines and in agreement with the stress tests requirements for the security track. To achieve the purpose, a lay out and a scheme of a possible near surface repository, like for example those of the El Cabril one, were taken into account. In order to preliminarily perform a reliable analysis of such a large-scale structure and to determine the structural effects induced by such a types of impulsive loads, a realistic, but still operable, numerical model with suitable materials characteristics was implemented by means of FEM codes. In the carried out structural analyses, the RWs repository was considered a 'robust' target, due to its thicker walls and main constitutive materials (steel and reinforced concrete). In addition to adequately represent the dynamic response of repository under crashing, relevant physical phenomena (i.e. penetration, spalling, etc.) were simulated and analysed. The preliminary assessment of the effects induced by the dynamic/impulsive loads allowed generally to verify the residual strength capability of the repository considered. The obtained preliminary results highlighted a remarkable potential to withstand the impact of military/large commercial aircraft, even in presence of ongoing concrete progressive failure (some penetration and spalling of the

  1. Design and commissioning test results for the hypervelocity launcher research complex battery power supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornette, James B.; Sterrett, John D.; Lippert, Jack R.; Williams, Robert W.

    1989-08-01

    The preliminary design of the battery power supply (BPS) was reported to the 6th IEEE Pulsed Power conference. In 1987, the final design was completed, assembled, and sequentially verified during approximately 1750 operational verification tests. These experiments consisted of single string verifications at 1000 amperes to a system discharge of 2,150,000 amperes. Final system design is very similar to the preliminary design previously presented. System fabrication is complete and at the present time consists of 858, 16 battery series strings resulting in 13,728 operational batteries. The final switching design has evolved into several levels of redundancy at varying current levels. These include 36 pneumatic, 100,000 ampere switches that control 24, 16 battery strings in parallel. These switches are used for the primary make and break of system current to charge the inductor. There are also 18 pneumatic crowbar switches at the 24 string level that are used to short the inductor from the BPS prior to system opening. At the string level there are 2000 ampere dc contactors that are used as a secondary current break and to pre-set the BPS in the appropriate parallel/series configuration prior to a discharge sequence. Explosively driven opening and closing switches are also employed at the interface junction to any Hypervelocity launcher test article.

  2. 超高速撞击作用下 C/SiC 薄板抗冲击特性研究%Impact resistance characteristics of C/SiC plate under hypervelocity load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨扬; 徐绯; 寇剑锋; 汤忠斌

    2014-01-01

    The impact resistance of thermal protective system is an important determinant for the safety service of space airplane in orbit.Based on impact experiments,a debris cloud structure model of plain-woven C/SiC composite under impact load was proposed and analysed qualitatively,in which the special axial columnar high energy zone of C/SiC debris cloud was emphasized.Based on the Autodyn orthotropic composite model,the material parameters were derived, whose rationality was verified by the comparison of numerical results with the experimental results.The residual velocity of projectile,the axial average velocity and the distributed angle of debris cloud were selected as the main characteristic parameters according to the debris cloud characteristics of C/SiC composite.Taking Al spherical projectile as the impacting object,the impact resistance of a C/SiC plate was analysed and assessed under various conditions.%针对空天飞行器热防护系统抗冲击性能,基于已得实验结果对冲击载荷作用的平纹编织C/SiC复合材料薄板碎片云团结构定性建模及分析,获得 C /SiC 碎片云中特殊轴向柱状高能区。基于 Autodyn 正交各向异性材料模型推导材料参数并与实验对比,验证模型及参数的合理性。据 C /SiC 碎片云团特点选取弹丸剩余速度、碎片云轴向平均速度及分散角作为主要特征参数,并以球形 Al 弹丸薄板撞击模型为对象,对超高速撞击多种工况 C /SiC 面板的抗冲击性能进行规律分析及评估。

  3. Employment impacts of selected solar and conventional energy systems: a framework for comparisons and preliminary findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smeltzer, K.K.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary comprehensive analyses of quantitative and qualitative employment effects of selected solar and conventional energy systems are presented. It proposes a framework for analyzing the direct, indirect, induced, displacement, disposable income, and qualitative employment effects of alternative energy systems. The analyses examine current research findings on these effects for a variety of solar and conventional energy sources and compare expected employment impacts. In general, solar energy systems have higher direct and indirect employment requirements than do conventional energy systems. In addition, employment displaced from conventional sources and employment effects due to changes in consumers' disposable income are highly significant variables in net employment comparisons. Analyses of the size and location of projected energy developments suggest that dispersed solar energy systems have a more beneficial impact on host communities than do large conventional facilities, regardless of the relative magnitude of employment per unit of energy output.

  4. The Dysarthria Impact Profile: A Preliminary French Experience with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban Letanneux

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This preliminary study aimed to adapt the Dysarthria Impact Profile (DIP in French and to confirm its relevance for the assessment of the psychosocial impact of dysarthria in Parkinson's disease (PD. The DIP scale was administered to 10 people with PD and 10 age-matched control subjects. The DIP psychometric properties were calculated (discriminant validity, internal consistency, and concurrent validity, notably by using the Voice Handicap Index (VHI for interscale comparisons. The French version of the DIP discriminated people with PD from control subjects (χ2 test, P<0.05. Good internal consistency was observed in both populations (Cronbach’s α=0.93 for PD people and α=0.76 for control subjects. The DIP was highly correlated with the VHI (Spearman’s ρ=-0.70, P<0.01, confirming the external validity of the scale. There was no direct relationship between PD speech and quality of life as assessed by the Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39. Our preliminary data suggest that the French version of the DIP has the potential to make a useful contribution for the assessment and outcome management in acquired dysarthria for both clinicians and researchers.

  5. New experimental capability to investigate the hypervelocity micrometeoroid bombardment of cryogenic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Andrew Oakleigh; Dee, Richard; Gudipati, Murthy S.; Horányi, Mihály; James, David; Kempf, Sascha; Munsat, Tobin; Sternovsky, Zoltán; Ulibarri, Zach

    2016-02-01

    Ice is prevalent throughout the solar system and beyond. Though the evolution of many of these icy surfaces is highly dependent on associated micrometeoroid impact phenomena, experimental investigation of these impacts has been extremely limited, especially at the impactor speeds encountered in space. The dust accelerator facility at the Institute for Modeling Plasmas, Atmospheres, and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT) of NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute has developed a novel cryogenic system that will facilitate future study of hypervelocity impacts into ice and icy regolith. The target consists of a copper block, cooled by liquid nitrogen, upon which layers of vapor-deposited ice, pre-frozen ice, or icy regolith can be built in a controlled and quantifiable environment. This ice can be grown from a variety of materials, including H2O, CH3OH, NH3, and slurries containing nanophase iron. Ice temperatures can be varied between 96 K and 150 K and ice thickness greater than 150 nm can be accurately measured. Importantly, the composition of ion plumes created during micrometeoroid impacts onto these icy layers can be measured even in trace amounts by in situ time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. In this paper, we present the fundamental design components of the cryogenic target chamber at IMPACT and proof-of-concept results from target development and from first impacts into thick layers of water ice.

  6. Post-impact climate conditions on early Mars: preliminary results from GCM simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steakley, Kathryn; Murphy, Jim; Kahre, Melinda A.; Haberle, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Observations imply that liquid water was stable on Mars' surface during the late Noachian/early Hesperian era, with valley networks forming roughly 3.5-3.75 billion years ago, possibly from precipitation and runoff (Fassett & Head 2008, Icarus 195, 61; Hynek et al., 2010, JGR Planets, 115, E09008). Climate models, however, struggle to reproduce such warm conditions (Forget et al., 2013, Icarus 21, 81). Volcanism and impacts have been suggested as mechanisms of either inducing a warm and wet environment or causing local melting in a cold and wet environment. Comets and asteroids are capable of injecting into the atmosphere both kinetic energy from the impact and water from the object itself and from vaporized surface and subsurface ice. Segura et al. (2008, JGR Planets 113, E11007) find using a 1-D atmospheric model that significant rainfall and periods of above-freezing temperatures lasting months to years can follow impacts of objects between 30 and 100 km in diameter. We revisit this work utilizing a 3-D global climate model (GCM) to consider the effects of dynamics, topography, global surface ice variations, etc. We present preliminary results from the NASA ARC Mars GCM investigating global temperature and precipitation behavior in a post-impact, early Mars environment.

  7. HYPERFUSE: a hypervelocity inertial confinement system for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowitz, H.; Powell, J.R.; Wiswall, R.

    1980-01-01

    Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from a LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 129/I, /sup 99/Tc, etc. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n,2n), (n,..cap alpha..), (n,..gamma..), etc.) that convert the long-lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product. The transmutation parametric studies conclude that the design of the hypervelocity projectiles should emphasize the achievement of high densities in the transmutation regions (greater than the DT fusion fuel density), as well as the DT ignition and burn criterion (rho R = 1.0 to 3.0) requirements. These studies also indicate that masses on the order of 1.0 g at densities of rho greater than or equal to 500.0 g/cm/sup 3/ are required for a practical fusion-based fission product transmutation system.

  8. Preliminary survey on the impact of Schmallenberg virus on sheep flocks in South of Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saegerman, C; Martinelle, L; Dal Pozzo, F; Kirschvink, N

    2014-10-01

    Between late February and May 2012, a preliminary anonym survey was conducted among sheep farmers in south of Belgium in order to contribute to future estimations of the economic losses caused by Schmallenberg virus (SBV). Based on clinical signs consistent with SBV infection, this survey involved 13 meat sheep flocks considered as positive flocks with subsequent SBV detection by RT-qPCR [SBV-positive flocks (PF); total of 961 animals], and 13 meat sheep flocks considered as negative flocks (NF; total of 331 animals). These preliminary results indicated several significant characteristics that were more present in PF than in NF. These include an increased rate of abortions (6.7% in PF versus 3.2% in NF), of lambs born at term but presenting malformations (10.1% in PF versus 2.0% in NF) and of dystocia (10.1% in PF versus 3.4% in NF). Lamb mortality during the first week of life was reported more frequently in PF (8 of 13 PF, 61.5%) than in NF (1 of 13 NF, 7.7%). In PF, the observed prolificacy rate was 2-fold lower (93%) than expected (186%). The implementation of a survey at larger scale, including a high number of breeders, is necessary to allow a more detailed analysis of the SBV impact in the sheep sector.

  9. Climate Change Impact on Hydrological Extremes: Preliminary Results from the Polish-Norwegian Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, Renata J.; Bogdanowicz, Ewa; Debele, Sisay E.; Doroszkiewicz, Joanna; Hisdal, Hege; Lawrence, Deborah; Meresa, Hadush K.; Napiórkowski, Jarosław J.; Osuch, Marzena; Strupczewski, Witold G.; Wilson, Donna; Wong, Wai Kwok

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the background, objectives, and preliminary outcomes from the first year of activities of the Polish-Norwegian project CHIHE (Climate Change Impact on Hydrological Extremes). The project aims to estimate the influence of climate changes on extreme river flows (low and high) and to evaluate the impact on the frequency of occurrence of hydrological extremes. Eight "twinned" catchments in Poland and Norway serve as case studies. We present the procedures of the catchment selection applied in Norway and Poland and a database consisting of near-natural ten Polish and eight Norwegian catchments constructed for the purpose of climate impact assessment. Climate projections for selected catchments are described and compared with observations of temperature and precipitation available for the reference period. Future changes based on those projections are analysed and assessed for two periods, the near future (2021-2050) and the far-future (2071-2100). The results indicate increases in precipitation and temperature in the periods and regions studied both in Poland and Norway.

  10. A preliminary investigation: the impact of microscopic condenser on depth of field in cytogenetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Liqiang; Qiu, Yuchen; Li, Zheng; Li, Yuhua; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    As one of the important components of optical microscopes, the condenser has a considerable impact on system performance, especially on the depth of field (DOF). DOF is a critical technical feature in cytogenetic imaging that may affect the efficiency and accuracy of clinical diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of microscopic condenser on DOF using a prototype of transmitted optical microscope, based on objective and subjective evaluations. After the description of the relationship between condenser and objective lens and the theoretical analysis of the condenser impact on system numerical aperture and DOF, a standard resolution pattern and several cytogenetic samples are adopted to assess the condenser impact on DOF, respectively. The experimental results of these objective and subjective evaluations are in agreement with the theoretical analysis and show that, under the specific intermediate range of condenser numerical aperture ( NAcond ), the DOF value decreases with the increase of NAcond . Although the above qualitative results are obtained under the experimental conditions with a specific prototype system, the methods presented in this preliminary investigation could offer useful guidelines for optimizing operational parameters in cytogenetic imaging.

  11. Hypervelocity accelerators with electro-thermo-chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Kazunari

    1991-08-01

    A novel kind of electro-thermo-chemical (ETC) launcher for the acceleration of multikilogram-size projectiles to hypervelocity is proposed. The novel launcher concept utilizes the hot hydrogen gas generated by the chemical interaction between water and aluminum in order to accelerate the projectiles to a thermal velocity close to that of the light gas. This interaction is triggered by the Joule heating of the aluminum wire in water. Two possible designs for the accelerator concept are considered in detail. Further acceleration of the projectile near the muzzle is also discussed.

  12. Chemical and Thermal Nonequilibrium Heat-Transfer Analysis for Hypervelocity, Low Reynolds Number Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kevin G.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical and thermal nonequilibrium phenomena are studied in the stagnation region of a hypervelocity blunt body. This investigation is motivated by the need to predict the heat-transfer rate to the leading edge of aeromaneuvering orbital transfer vehicles. Flight speeds of approximately 10 km/s at altitudes of approximately 80 km are considered for body radii of 1-50 cm. The analysis is based on continuum theory and is applicable to the viscous and incipient merged layer regimes of rarefied flow. A two-species, two-temperature gas model is assumed. Comparisons are made with previous theories, experimental data, and results based on the thermodynamic equilibrium assumption. The equation accounting for vibrational nonequilibrium is presented and its effects on flow properties are discussed. Parameters requiring further investigation are identified. Preliminary results indicate that the inclusion of vibrational relaxation has little effect on the heat-transfer rate for a fully catalytic surface. However, vibrational nonequilibrium may increase the heat-transfer rate to a noncatalytic surface, depending on the degree of nonequilibrium.

  13. Chemical and thermal nonequilibrium heat transfer analysis for hypervelocity, low Reynolds number flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K. G.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical and thermal nonequilibrium phenomena are studied in the stagnation region of a hypervelocity blunt body. This investigation is motivated by the need to predict the heat transfer rate to the leading edge of Aeromaneuvering Orbital Transfer Vehicles. Flight speeds of approximately 10 km/s at altitudes of approximately 80 km are considered for body radii of 1 to 50 cm. The analysis is based on continuum theory and is applicable to the viscous-layer and incipient-merged-layer rarefied-flow regimes. A two-species, two-temperature gas model is assumed. Comparisons are made with previous theories, experimental data, and results based on the thermodynamic equilibrium assumption. The equation accounting for vibrational nonequilibrium is presented and its effects on flow properties are discussed. Parameters which require further investigation are identified. Preliminary results indicate that the inclusion of vibrational relaxation has little effect on heat transfer rate for a catalytic surface. However, vibrational nonequilibrium may increase the heat transfer rate to a noncatalytic surface, depending on the degree of nonequilibrium.

  14. Hypervelocity Impact Fusion with Compressed Deuterium-Tritium Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Olariu, Silviu

    1998-01-01

    The neutron yields observed in inertial confinement fusion experiments for higher convergence ratios are about two orders of magnitude smaller than the neutron yields predicted by one-dimensional models, the discrepancy being attributed to the development of instabilities. We consider the possibility that ignition and a moderate gain could be achieved with existing laser facilities if the laser driver energy is used to produce only the radial compression of the fuel capsule to high densities ...

  15. Reaction of Projectiles with Targets during Hypervelocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Rod; Bless, Stephan; Persad, Chadee; Manthiram, Karthish

    2009-06-01

    Hollow tungsten projectiles were filled with bismuth oxide or copper and shot into aluminum blocks at 2200 m/s. The blocks were cut open, and the contents and morphology of the penetration channels were examined. In the case of copper fill, the channel was found to be filled with a black foam containing closed-cell bubbles. X-ray diffraction revealed the presence of CuAl2, indicating reaction with the aluminum target. In the case of bismuth oxide, there was little foam, but the penetration channel walls had many craters, which contained nodules of bismuth metal, again indicating reaction with the target. There were variations in crater diameter apparently corresponding to the onset and termination of the reactions. The exothermic nature of the reactions produced cracks in the target blocks.

  16. FTIR Analyses of Hypervelocity Impact Deposits: DebriSat Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-27

    fractured quartz window Exposed surfaces are covered with a matte gray coating and fine debris Multi layer insulation 21 Top Whipple Plate Exoscan...Many witness plate samples were fractured /destroyed. Witness Plate Samples: Direct Exposure (4) 1” fused silica (D) (1) 1” Z-93 painted Al (1) 1...Microscope Labsphere integrating sphere in sample compartment at right Thermo-Nicolet Model 6700 FTIR Spectrometer • Sources: • Globar (IR), Tungsten

  17. A preliminary strategic environmental impact assessment of mineral and hydrocarbon activities on the Nuussuaq peninsula, West Greenland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boertmann, D.; Asmund, G.; Glahder, C.; Tamstorf, M.

    2008-01-15

    There is an increasing interest for mineral and hydrocarbon exploration in Greenland and in both regards the Nuussuaq peninsula is in focus. This preliminary strategic environmental impact assessment describes the status of the biological knowledge from the area and designates potential conflicts between activities and the biological environment. Furthermore biological knowledge gaps are identified. These should be filled before specific environmental impacts assessments can be carried out and relevant studies to fill these data gaps are proposed. (au)

  18. Hybrid Particle-Element Simulation of Impact on Composite Orbital Debris Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the development of new numerical methods and new constitutive models for the simulation of hypervelocity impact effects on spacecraft. The research has included parallel implementation of the numerical methods and material models developed under the project. Validation work has included both one dimensional simulations, for comparison with exact solutions, and three dimensional simulations of published hypervelocity impact experiments. The validated formulations have been applied to simulate impact effects in a velocity and kinetic energy regime outside the capabilities of current experimental methods. The research results presented here allow for the expanded use of numerical simulation, as a complement to experimental work, in future design of spacecraft for hypervelocity impact effects.

  19. Hybrid Guidance Control for a Hypervelocity Small Size Asteroid Interceptor Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebenay, Melak M.; Lyzhoft, Joshua R.; Barbee, Brent W.

    2017-01-01

    Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) are comets and/or asteroids that have orbits in proximity with Earth's own orbit. NEOs have collided with the Earth in the past, which can be seen at such places as Chicxulub crater, Barringer crater, and Manson crater, and will continue in the future with potentially significant and devastating results. Fortunately such NEO collisions with Earth are infrequent, but can happen at any time. Therefore it is necessary to develop and validate techniques as well as technologies necessary to prevent them. One approach to mitigate future NEO impacts is the concept of high-speed interceptor. This concept is to alter the NEO's trajectory via momentum exchange by using kinetic impactors as well as nuclear penetration devices. The interceptor has to hit a target NEO at relative velocity which imparts a sufficient change in NEO velocity. NASA's Deep Impact mission has demonstrated this scenario by intercepting Comet Temple 1, 5 km in diameter, with an impact relative speed of approximately 10 km/s. This paper focuses on the development of hybrid guidance navigation and control (GNC) algorithms for precision hypervelocity intercept of small sized NEOs. The spacecraft's hypervelocity and the NEO's small size are critical challenges for a successful mission as the NEO will not fill the field of view until a few seconds before intercept. The investigation needs to consider the error sources modeled in the navigation simulation such as spacecraft initial state uncertainties in position and velocity. Furthermore, the paper presents three selected spacecraft guidance algorithms for asteroid intercept and rendezvous missions. The selected algorithms are classical Proportional Navigation (PN) based guidance that use a first order difference to compute the derivatives, Three Plane Proportional Navigation (TPPN), and the Kinematic Impulse (KI). A manipulated Bennu orbit that has been changed to impact Earth will be used as a demonstrative example to compare the

  20. Hypervelocity Stars: Young and Heavy or Old and Light?

    CERN Document Server

    Heber, Uli; Edelmann, Heinz; Napiwotzki, Ralf; O`Toole, Simon; Brown, Warren; Altmann, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The first three hyper-velocity stars (HVS) unbound to the Galaxy were serendipitously discovered in 2005. The only suggested origin of hyper-velocity stars is the Galactic Centre as it hosts a super-massive black hole capable of accelerating stars to such high velocities. Only one HVS, the sdO star US 708, is known to be an old low mass star, while HE 0437$-$5439 is an apparently normal early-type B-star, too short-lived to originate from the Galactic Centre, but could possibly come from the LMC. A systematic survey has led to the discovery of seven new HVS of late B-type (similar to the prototype HVS1), which can either be massive stars 3 M(sun) or horizontal branch stars, sufficiently long-lived to have travelled from the Galactic Centre. We present new spectral analyses of five known HVS as well as of a newly discovered candidate. It is possible that the late B-type HVS are a mix of main sequence and evolved BHB stars. In view of the time scale problem we revisit HE 0437$-$5439 and discuss a possible sublu...

  1. Preliminary Screening Assessment of the Potential Impact of the Phosphate Fertilizer Industry on Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Sweeck, Lieve; Vives i Batlle, Jordi [SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    The activities of the phosphate industry may lead to enhanced levels of naturally occurring radioactivity in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. We here perform a preliminary environmental risk assessment (ERA) of the activities of the phosphate industry (phosphate ore mining, phosphate fertilizer factories, phosphate export platforms). We evaluated the environmental impact of 5 phosphate fertilizer plants (located in Belgium, Spain, Syria, Egypt, Brazil) and one phosphate-mine and phosphate-export platforms in the harbour(both located in Syria). These sites were selected because of the enhanced concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides in the surrounding environments. The ERICA non-human biota assessment tool was used to predict radiation dose rates to the reference organisms and associated risks. Reference organisms were those assigned as default by the ERICA Tool. Potential impact is expressed as a risk quotient (RQ) based on a radiation screening value of 10 μGy h{sup -1}. If RQ ≤ 1, the environment is unlikely at risk and further radiological assessment is deemed not to be required. For all the cases assessed, RQ exceeded 1 for at least one of the reference organisms. {sup 226}Ra or {sup 210}Po were generally the highest contributors to the dose. The aquatic ecosystems in the vicinity of the phosphate fertilizer plants in Tessenderlo (Belgium), Huelva (Spain), Goias (Brazil) and the terrestrial environment around the phosphate mine in Palmyra (Syria) are the ecosystems predicted most at risk. (authors)

  2. In-Flight Imaging Systems for Hypervelocity and Re-Entry Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — It is proposed to create a rugged, reliable, compact, standardized imaging system for hypervelocity and re-entry vehicles using sapphire windows, small imagers, and...

  3. Navy Lasers, Railgun, and Hypervelocity Projectile: Background and Issues for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    wavelengths of light (i.e., “sweet spots” in the electromagnetic spectrum ) where atmospheric absorption by water vapor is markedly reduced. Lasers can be...surface ships to defend themselves against enemy missiles—solid state lasers (SSLs), the electromagnetic railgun (EMRG), and the hypervelocity...SSLs), the electromagnetic railgun (EMRG), and the hypervelocity projectile (HVP). 1 Any one of these new weapon technologies, if successfully

  4. Characterization of Orbital Debris via Hyper-Velocity Laboratory-Based Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, Heather; Liou, J.-C.; Anz-Meador, Phillip; Sorge, Marlon; Opiela, John; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Huynh, Tom; Krisko, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Existing DOD and NASA satellite breakup models are based on a key laboratory test, Satellite Orbital debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), which has supported many applications and matched on-orbit events involving older satellite designs reasonably well over the years. In order to update and improve these models, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office, in collaboration with the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center, The Aerospace Corporation, and the University of Florida, replicated a hypervelocity impact using a mock-up satellite, DebriSat, in controlled laboratory conditions. DebriSat is representative of present-day LEO satellites, built with modern spacecraft materials and construction techniques. Fragments down to 2 mm in size will be characterized by their physical and derived properties. A subset of fragments will be further analyzed in laboratory radar and optical facilities to update the existing radar-based NASA Size Estimation Model (SEM) and develop a comparable optical-based SEM. A historical overview of the project, status of the characterization process, and plans for integrating the data into various models will be discussed herein.

  5. Characterization of Orbital Debris via Hyper-Velocity Laboratory-Based Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, Heather; Liou, J.-C.; Krisko, Paula; Opiela, John; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Sorge, Marlon; Huynh, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Existing DoD and NASA satellite breakup models are based on a key laboratory test, Satellite Orbital debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), which has supported many applications and matched on-orbit events involving older satellite designs reasonably well over the years. In order to update and improve these models, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office, in collaboration with the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center, The Aerospace Corporation, and the University of Florida, replicated a hypervelocity impact using a mock-up satellite, DebriSat, in controlled laboratory conditions. DebriSat is representative of present-day LEO satellites, built with modern spacecraft materials and construction techniques. Fragments down to 2 mm in size will be characterized by their physical and derived properties. A subset of fragments will be further analyzed in laboratory radar and optical facilities to update the existing radar-based NASA Size Estimation Model (SEM) and develop a comparable optical-based SEM. A historical overview of the project, status of the characterization process, and plans for integrating the data into various models will be discussed herein.

  6. Preliminary evaluation of aircraft impact on a near term nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frano, R. Lo, E-mail: rosa.lofrano@ing.unipi.it [Department of Mechanical, Nuclear and Production Engineering, University of PISA, L.go L. Lazzarino 2, via Diotisalvi, no. 2-56126 Pisa (Italy); Forasassi, G. [Department of Mechanical, Nuclear and Production Engineering, University of PISA, L.go L. Lazzarino 2, via Diotisalvi, no. 2-56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of military/civilian airplanes crash in a NPP were evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We adequately simulated the global response and safety margin of an SMR reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The analyses allowed to represent the progressive failure/damaging processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The outer containment seemed to suffer some localized penetration and spalling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results highlighted the plant integrity is ensured despite the impact damages. - Abstract: For the assessment of the safety and durability of a nuclear power plant (NPP), the containment building behaviour shall be evaluated, under various service and extreme conditions, both natural or produced by natural accident or vicious man activities, like September 2001 jet aircraft crashes. The aim of this paper is to preliminary evaluate the effects and consequences of the energy transmitted to the outer containment walls (according to the international safety and design code guidelines, as NRC or IAEA ones) due to a military or civil aircraft impact into a nuclear plant, considered as a 'beyond design basis' event. To perform reliable analysis of such a large-scale structure and determine the structural effects of the propagation of this types of impulsive loads (response of containment structure), a realistic but still feasible numerical model with suitable materials characteristics were used by means of which relevant physical phenomena are reflected. Moreover a sensitivity analysis has also been carried out considering the effects of different containment wall thickness and reinforced/prestressed concrete features. The obtained results were analysed to check the NPP containment strength margins.

  7. Shatter Cones and Associated Shock-Metamorphic Microdeformations in Minerals - The Case of the Sudbury Impact Structure, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrière, L.; Osinski, G. R.

    2013-08-01

    Shatter cones are the only diagnostic evidence of hypervelocity impact that develop on a macro- to megascopic scale. We report here on new macroscopic and petrographic investigations of shatter cone samples from the Sudbuy impact structure (Canada).

  8. Small-bore hypervelocity Electromagnetic Launcher research facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurn, T. W.; Chapelle, S.; Lupan, S. P.; Holland, L.; Homeyer, W. G.; Rawls, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    A small-bore hypervelocity Electromagnetic Launcher laboratory research facility has been developed which has launched a 2-g projectile to a velocity in excess of 3.5 km/sec. This turn-key laboratory includes a 1 cm, square-bore railgun with a helium gas preaccelerator; a modular 328 kJ capacitor bank; a fiber-optically linked programmable logic control system with a graphical operator interface; a data acquisition system with current, magnetic, and projectile position diagnostics; and a flight range which provides in-flight velocity measurements and safely stops and contains the projectile. The control system fires the preaccelerator and, on receipt of an optical signal, fires the capacitor bank modules simultaneously or in a staggered mode. Armature separation and stalling limit the overall performance of the system. Changes in pulse shape and bore materials significantly improved performance. Attention is given to methods used to minimize armature separation and improve performance.

  9. STUDY ON FLUID MECHANICS OF HYPERVELOCITY LIQUID JETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Hong-hui; Tetsu Sakakura

    2003-01-01

    The fluid mechanics in the generation of hypervelocity water jets, light oil jets and glycerin jets was studied. Framing high-speed photography and single-shot photography were used to observe the jets directly. The purposes of this study is to investigate the disintegration and atomization processes at the velocity of 2km/s-3km/s as well as the auto-ignition and self-combustion of the light oil jets. Therefore, in the jet velocity measurement in addition to the high-speed photography, the results by other methods such as the laser beams cutting method and the shock wave detection using pressure transducers were also given. In the observation of the jets events, the illumination phenomenon was found, which may be regarded as the result of the auto-ignition and combustion of the light oil jets. Finally, the Munroe jet was studied.

  10. Small-scale bioenergy initiatives: brief description and preliminary lessons on livelihood impacts from case studies in Asia, Latin America and Afica. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-01-15

    Fifteen case studies from Africa, Asia, and Latin America were undertaken to assess the impacts that different types of local-level bioenergy initiatives can have on rural livelihoods. The report concludes with preliminary lessons and recommendations for further work.

  11. Hypervelocity launching of flyers at the SG-III prototype laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, Min; Chu, Genbai; Zhu, Bin; He, Weihua; Xi, Tao; Fan, Wei; Xin, Jianting; Gu, Yuqiu, E-mail: yqgu@caep.cn [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2016-01-21

    Experiments of laser-driven hypervelocity flyers have been conducted at the SG-III prototype laser facility. Using the continuum phase plate technique, four laser beams each with a 3-ns quadratic profile are configured to produce relatively uniform irradiated spots of diameter size either 500 μm or 2000 μm. With the former, specifically designed multi-layered flyers (polyimide/copper) were accelerated by shock impedance and reverberation techniques via direct laser ablation to a super-high averaged velocity of 55 km/s, much faster than recently reported results. Light-emission signals of shock breakout and flyer impact on flat or stepped windows were obtained that indicated good planarity and integrity for the flyer. In the latter, single-layered aluminum flyers were gradually accelerated to a terminal velocity of 11 km/s, as measured by optical velocimetry, without melting and vaporization. The results suggest that the SG-III prototype laser facility has the capability to launch high-speed flyers to create extreme conditions for investigating the science of shock compression and its equation of state.

  12. Fragmentation of Millimeter-Size Hypervelocity Projectiles on Combined Mesh-Plate Bumpers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Cherniaev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This numerical study evaluates the concept of a combined mesh-plate bumper as a shielding system protecting unmanned spacecraft from small (1 mm orbital debris impacts. Two-component bumpers consisting of an external layer of woven mesh (aluminum or steel directly applied to a surface of the aluminum plate are considered. Results of numerical modeling with a projectile velocity of 7 km/s indicate that, in comparison to the steel mesh-combined bumper, the combination of aluminum mesh and aluminum plate provides better fragmentation of small hypervelocity projectiles. At the same time, none of the combined mesh/plate bumpers provide a significant increase of ballistic properties as compared to an aluminum plate bumper. This indicates that the positive results reported in the literature for bumpers with metallic meshes and large projectiles are not scalable down to millimeter-sized particles. Based on this investigation’s results, a possible modification of the combined mesh/plate bumper is proposed for the future study.

  13. Summary of preliminary contaminant impacts investigations in the Clinch River Basin, Virginia, using multiple bioassessment techniques

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1992 multiple investigations were performed to collect preliminary information to direct future studies aimed at characterizing contaminant problems in the Clinch...

  14. Shock detachment process on cones in hypervelocity flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, Ivett A.

    1999-11-01

    The shock detachment process on cones in hypervelocity flows is one of the most sensitive flows to relaxation effects. The critical angle for shock detachment under frozen conditions can be very different from the critical angle under chemical and thermal equilibrium. The rate of increase of the detachment distance with cone angle is also affected by the relaxation rate. The purpose of this study is to explain the effects of nonequilibrium on the shock detachment distance and its growth rate on cones in hypervelocity flows. The study consists of an experimental and a computational program. The experimental part has been carried out at Caltech's hypervelocity reflected shock tunnel (T5). Six different free-stream conditions have been chosen, four using N2 as the test gas and two using CO2. About 170 shots were performed on 24 cones. The cones range in diameter from 2 cm to 16 cm with half-angles varying from 55° to 75°. The experimental data obtained are holographic interferograms of every shot, and surface temperature and pressure measurements for the bigger cones. Extensive numerical simulations were made for the N2 flows and some were also made for the CO2 flows. The code employed is a Navier-Stokes solver that can account for thermal and chemical nonequilibrium in axisymmetric flows. The experimental and computational data obtained for the shock detachment distance confirms a previous theoretical model that predicts the detachment distance will grow more slowly for relaxing flows than for frozen or equilibrium flows. This difference is explained in terms of the behavior of the sonic line inside the shock layer. Different growth rates result when the detachment distance is controlled by the diameter of the cone (frozen and equilibrium cases) than when it is controlled by the extent of the relaxation zone inside the shock layer (nonequilibrium flows). The experimental data are also complemented with computational data to observe the behavior of the detachment

  15. The Large-Scale Electrochemistry and Possible Consequences of Deep Impact Mission to Tempel 1

    CERN Document Server

    Drobyshevski, E M; Schmidt, A A

    2005-01-01

    Some consequences of hypervelocity impact onto the comet Tempel 1 nucleus are considered under assumption that SP comets are fragments of massive icy envelopes of Ganymede-like bodies saturated by products of ice electrolysis that underwent global explosions.

  16. Hypervelocity star candidates in the SEGUE G and K dwarf sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palladino, Lauren E.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Schlesinger, Katharine J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Lee, Young Sun [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Schneider, Donald P., E-mail: lauren.e.palladino.1@vanderbilt.edu, E-mail: k.holley@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We present 20 candidate hypervelocity stars from the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) G and K dwarf samples. Previous searches for hypervelocity stars have only focused on large radial velocities; in this study, we also use proper motions to select the candidates. We determine the hypervelocity likelihood of each candidate by means of Monte Carlo simulations, considering the significant errors often associated with high proper motion stars. We find that nearly half of the candidates exceed their escape velocities with at least 98% probability. Every candidate also has less than a 25% chance of being a high-velocity fluke within the SEGUE sample. Based on orbits calculated using the observed six-dimensional positions and velocities, few, if any, of these candidates originate from the Galactic center. If these candidates are truly hypervelocity stars, they were not ejected by interactions with the Milky Way's supermassive black hole. This calls for a more serious examination of alternative hypervelocity-star ejection scenarios.

  17. Constraining the Milky Way mass with hypervelocity stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragione, G.; Loeb, A.

    2017-08-01

    Although a variety of techniques have been employed for determining the Milky Way dark matter halo mass distribution, the range of allowed masses spans both light and heavy values. Knowing the precise mass of our Galaxy is important for placing the Milky Way in a cosmological ΛCDM context. We show that hypervelocity stars (HVSs) ejected from the center of the Milky Way galaxy can be used to constrain the mass of its dark matter halo. We use the asymmetry in the radial velocity distribution of halo stars due to escaping HVSs, which depends on the halo potential (escape speed) as long as the round trip orbital time is shorter than the stellar lifetime, to discriminate between different models for the Milky Way gravitational potential. Adopting a characteristic HVS travel time of 330 Myr, which corresponds to the average mass of main sequence HVSs, we find that current data favors a mass for the Milky Way in the range (1.2 - 1.9) ×1012M⊙ .

  18. THE FIRST HYPERVELOCITY STAR FROM THE LAMOST SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zheng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, UT 84112 (United States); Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Newberg, Heidi Jo [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Deng, Licai; Zhang, Haotong; Liu, Chao [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Grillmair, Carl J. [Spitzer Science Center, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lépine, Sébastien [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, 25 Park Place, Suite 605, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Yanny, Brian [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Jin, Ge [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhang, Yong, E-mail: zhengzheng@astro.utah.edu [Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210042 (China)

    2014-04-20

    We report the first hypervelocity star (HVS) discovered from the LAMOST spectroscopic survey. It is a B-type star with a heliocentric radial velocity of about 620 km s{sup –1}, which projects to a Galactocentric radial velocity component of ∼477 km s{sup –1}. With a heliocentric distance of ∼13 kpc and an apparent magnitude of ∼13 mag, it is the closest bright HVS currently known. With a mass of ∼9 M {sub ☉}, it is one of the three most massive HVSs discovered so far. The star is clustered on the sky with many other known HVSs, and its position suggests a possible connection to Galactic center structures. With the current poorly determined proper motion, a Galactic center origin of this HVS remains consistent with the data at the 1σ level, while a disk runaway origin cannot be excluded. We discuss the potential of the LAMOST survey to discover a large statistical sample of HVSs of different types.

  19. The First Hypervelocity Star from the LAMOST Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Zheng; Beers, Timothy C; Carlin, Jeffrey L; Deng, Licai; Grillmair, Carl J; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Lepine, Sebastien; Yanny, Brian; Zhang, Haotong; Liu, Chao; Ge, Jin; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    We report the first hypervelocity star (HVS) discovered from the LAMOST spectroscopic survey. It is a B-type star with a heliocentric radial velocity about 620 km/s, which projects to a Galactocentric radial velocity component of ~477 km/s. With a heliocentric distance of ~13 kpc and an apparent magnitude of ~13 mag, it is the nearest and brightest HVS currently known. With a mass of ~9Msun, it is very similar to HVS HE 0437-5439 in its stellar properties; the two stars are the most massive HVSs known so far. The star is clustered on the sky with many other known HVSs, with the position suggesting a possible connection to Galactic center structures. With the current poorly-determined proper motion, a Galactic center origin of this HVS remains consistent with the data at the 2-3sigma level. We discuss the potential of the LAMOST survey to discover a large statistical sample of HVSs of different types.

  20. Hypervelocity intracluster stars ejected by supermassive black hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Holley-Bockelmann, K; Mihos, J C; Feldmeier, J J; Ciardullo, R; McBride, C; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Feldmeier, John J.; Ciardullo, Robin; Bride, Cameron Mc

    2005-01-01

    Hypervelocity stars have been recently discovered in the outskirts of galaxies, such as the unbound star in the Milky Way halo, or the three anomalously fast intracluster planetary nebulae (ICPNe) in the Virgo Cluster. These may have been ejected by close 3-body interactions with a binary supermassive black hole (SMBBH), where a star which passes within the semimajor axis of the SMBBH can receive enough energy to eject it from the system. Stars ejected by SMBBHs may form a significant sub-population with very different kinematics and mean metallicity than the bulk of the intracluster stars. The number, kinematics, and orientation of the ejected stars may constrain the mass ratio, semimajor axis, and even the orbital plane of the SMBBH. We investigate the evolution of the ejected debris from a SMBBH within a clumpy and time-dependent cluster potential using a high resolution, self-consistent cosmological N-body simulation of a galaxy cluster. We show that the predicted number and kinematic signature of the fas...

  1. Kinematics in galactic tidal tails - A source for Hypervelocity stars?

    CERN Document Server

    Piffl, Tilmann; Steinmetz, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    [abridged] In this work we study in detail the kinematics of tidal debris stars to investigate the implications of the new scenario that the observed sample of Hypervelocity stars could partly originate from a dwarf-host galaxy collision. We use a suite of N-body simulations following the encounter of a satellite galaxy with its Milky Way-type host galaxy to gather statistics on the properties of stripped-off stars. We study especially the orbital energy distribution of this population. We quantify the typical pattern in angular and phase space formed by the debris stars. We further develop a simple stripping model predicting the kinematics of stripped-off stars. We show that the distribution of orbital energies in the tidal debris has a typical form which can be described quite accurately by a simple function. Based on this we develop a method to predict the energy distribution which allows us to evaluate the significance and the implications of high velocity stars in satellite tidal debris. Generally tidal ...

  2. Numerical investigation of combustion field of hypervelocity scramjet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shikong; Li, Jiang; Qin, Fei; Huang, Zhiwei; Xue, Rui

    2016-12-01

    A numerical study of the ground testing of a hydrogen-fueled scramjet engine was undertaken using the commercial computational-fluid-dynamics code CFD++. The simulated Mach number was 12. A 7-species, 9-reaction-step hydrogen-air chemistry kinetics system was adopted for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulation. The two-equation SST turbulence model, which takes into account the wall functions, was used to handle the turbulence-chemistry interactions. The results were validated by experimentally measuring the wall pressure distribution, and the values obtained proved to be in good agreement. The flow pattern at non-reaction/reaction is presented, as are the results of analyzing the supersonic premix/non-premix flame structure, the reaction heat release distribution in different modes, and the change in the equivalence ratio. In this study, we realize the working mode of a hypervelocity engine and provide some suggestions for the combustion organization of the engine as well as offer insight into the potential for exploiting the processes of combustion and flow.

  3. MMT hypervelocity star survey. III. The complete survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J., E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We describe our completed spectroscopic survey for unbound hypervelocity stars (HVSs) ejected from the Milky Way. Three new discoveries bring the total number of unbound late B-type stars to 21. We place new constraints on the nature of the stars and on their distances using moderate resolution MMT spectroscopy. Half of the stars are fast rotators; they are certain 2.5-4 M {sub ☉} main sequence stars at 50-120 kpc distances. Correcting for stellar lifetime, our survey implies that unbound 2.5-4 M {sub ☉} stars are ejected from the Milky Way at a rate of 1.5 × 10{sup –6} yr{sup –1}. These unbound HVSs are likely ejected continuously over the past 200 Myr and do not share a common flight time. The anisotropic spatial distribution of HVSs on the sky remains puzzling. Southern hemisphere surveys like SkyMapper will soon allow us to map the all-sky distribution of HVSs. Future proper motion measurements with Hubble Space Telescope and Gaia will provide strong constraints on origin. Existing observations are all consistent with HVS ejections from encounters with the massive black hole in the Galactic center.

  4. The Impact of 2008 Global Financial Crisis on the Performance of Selected Indonesian Stocks: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Suparman

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This research is a preliminary study that analyzes the impact of the US financial markets on Indonesian financial markets during the 2008 global financial crisis. It specifically investigates the occurrence of contagion effect in the Indonesian IHSG index and selected LQ45 stocks with the US S&P500 index by the measurement of correlation using simple correlation, EWMA, OGARCH, and DCC GARCH. It also attempts to discuss on the decoupling of Indonesian market and provide recommendations on dealing with future similar events.

  5. Thrust Enhancement in Hypervelocity Nozzles by Chemical Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D. J.; Carpenter, Mark H.; Drummond, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    In the hypersonic flight regime, the air-breathing supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) has been shown to be a viable propulsion system. The current designs of scramjet engines provide performance benefits only up to a Mach number of 14. Performance losses increase rapidly as the Mach number increases. To extend the applicability of scram'jets beyond Mach 14, research is being conducted in the area of inlet and wave drag reduction, skin-friction and heat-transfer reduction, nozzle loss minimization, low-loss mixing, and combustion enhancement. For high Mach number applications, hydrogen is the obvious fuel choice because of its high energy content per unit mass in comparison with conventional fuels. These flight conditions require engines to operate at supersonic internal velocities, high combustor temperatures, and low static pressures. The high static temperature condition enhances the production of radicals such as H and OH, and the low-pressure condition slows the reaction rates, particularly the recombination reactions. High-temperature and low-pressure constraints, in combination with a small residence time, result in a radical-rich exhaust gas mixture exiting the combustor. At high Mach number conditions (due to low residence time), H and OH do not have enough time to recombine ; thus, a significant amount of energy is lost as these high-energy free radical are exhausted. The objective of the present study is to conduct a flowfield analysis for a typical nozzle geometry for NASP-type vehicle to assess for thrust enhancement in hypervelocity nozzles by substituting small amount of phosphine for hydrogen.

  6. On The Spatial Distribution and the Origin of Hypervelocity Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Youjun; Zhang, Fupeng; Yu, Qingjuan

    2010-02-01

    Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) escaping away from the Galactic halo are dynamical products of interactions of stars with the massive black hole(s) (MBH) in the Galactic Center (GC). They are mainly B-type stars with their progenitors unknown. OB stars are also populated in the GC, with many being hosted in a clockwise-rotating young stellar (CWS) disk within half a parsec from the MBH and their formation remaining puzzles. In this paper, we demonstrate that HVSs can well memorize the injecting directions of their progenitors using both analytical arguments and numerical simulations, i.e., the ejecting direction of an HVS is almost anti-parallel to the injecting direction of its progenitor. Therefore, the spatial distribution of HVSs maps the spatial distribution of the parent population of their progenitors directly. We also find that almost all the discovered HVSs are spatially consistent with being located on two thin disk planes. The orientation of one plane is consistent with that of the (inner) CWS disk, which suggests that most of the HVSs originate from the CWS disk or a previously existed disk-like stellar structure with an orientation similar to it. The rest of HVSs may be correlated with the plane of the northern arm of the mini-spiral in the GC or the plane defined by the outer warped part of the CWS disk. Our results not only support the GC origin of HVSs but also imply that the central disk (or the disk structure with a similar orientation) should persist or be frequently rejuvenated over the past 200 Myr, which adds a new challenge to the stellar disk formation and provides insights to the longstanding problem of gas fueling into MBHs.

  7. 超高速星搜寻研究进展%Research Progress on Searching for Hyper-velocity Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李荫碧; 罗阿理; 赵刚

    2012-01-01

    Hyper-velocity stars are believed to be ejected out from the Galactic center through dynamical interactions of (binary) stars with the central super-massive black hole(s), and are capable of escaping from the Galaxy. The discovery of hyper-velocity stars is a powerful proof of the super-mass black hole existing in the Galactic center. So far, 18 unbound hyper-velocity stars have been found, with more hyper-velocity stars to be uncovered in future, they can serve as useful tool to investigate the structure of the galaxy, such as the shape and orientation of Galactic halo, the Galactic potential model and the initial mass function in the Galactic center. In this paper, we review the major progress in the field of searching for the hyper-velocity stars. The first three hyper-velocity stars were discovered serendipitously by Brown, Hirsch, Edelmann and their cooperators in the year 2005. These stars were found in three different spectroscopic surveys of blue stars in the Galatic halo. Their spectra, kinematics and possible originations have been extensively analyzed. Shortly after the discovery of the first three, many astronomers began to search for more hyper-velocity stars using the massive photometric and spectroscopic data. Brown and his collaborators found 15 massive blue unbound hyper-velocity stars in the photometric data of DR4, DR5, DR6, DR7, and DR8 of the SDSS, within which is probably a BHB star. Tillich and his cooperators found one A type main-sequence hyper-velocity stars from 10000 halo stars, which is thought to originate from the edge of the Galactic disk rather than the Galactic center. Kollmeier and her collaborators proposed to search for low-mass metal-rich hyper-velocity stars in the SDSS spectroscopic data, and finally came up with 6 metal-poor F and G type hyper-velocity stars candidates. Li and her cooperators also tried to seek low-mass hyper-velocity stars in the SDSS spectroscopic data, and finally found 13 low-mass metal-poor F and G type

  8. Preliminary thermo-mechanical analysis of angular beam impact on LHC collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Cauchi, M; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Dallocchio, A; Deboy, D; Mariani, N; Rossi, A; Lari, L; Mollicone, P; Sammut, N

    2012-01-01

    The correct functioning of the LHC Collimation System is crucial to attain the desired LHC luminosity performance. However, the requirements to handle high intensity beams can be demanding. In this respect, accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess their effect on the robustness of the collimators. One of the most probable accident scenarios identified is an asynchronous beam dump coupled with slight angular misalignment errors of the collimator installation at the beam-line. Previous work presented a preliminary thermal evaluation of the extent of beam-induced damage for such scenarios, where it was shown that in some cases, a tilt of the jaw could actually serve to mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. This paper will further analyze the response of tertiary collimators in presence of such angular jaw alignments. Such work will also help to start identifying optimal operational conditions.

  9. Value impact assessment: A preliminary assessment of improvement opportunities at the Quantico Central Heating Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambley, M.R.; Weakley, S.A.

    1990-09-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary assessment of opportunities for improvement at the US Marine Corps (USMC) Quantico, Virginia, Central Heating Plant (CHP). This study is part of a program intended to provide the CHP staff with a computerized Artificial Intelligence (AI) decision support system that will assist in a more efficient, reliable, and safe operation of their plant. As part of the effort to provide the AI decision support system, a team of six scientists and engineers from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) visited the plant to characterize the conditions and environment of the CHP. This assessment resulted in a list of potential performance improvement opportunities at the CHP. In this report, 12 of these opportunities are discussed and qualitatively analyzed. 70 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Preliminary Study on Evaluation System of Capability of Composites to Withstand Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Zhen; CHEN Pu-hui; YANG Sheng-chun

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes the authors' experimental study on the characterization system of composite behavior to withstand impact. The content includes: (1)The dent depth is the best parameter describing the impact damage state. (2) There exists the knee point phenomenon for damage resistance behavior (i. e. the relationship between impact energy or contact force and dent depth) and damage tolerance behavior (i. e. the relationship between dent depth and compressive failure strain or stress) of composite laminates. (3) The physical meaning of the knee point phenomenon is that the failure mechanisms change of damaged composites to fiber breakage in the first front plies from matrix crack and delamination.Some suggestions on the characterization system of composite behavior to withstand impact were proposed.

  11. A Preliminary Study of Internet Based Ticketing System Impacts on Selected Travel Agencies in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Saleh Khuja; Abdul Manaf Bohari

    2012-01-01

    The impact of the Internet based ticketing systems has made information easily accessible to consumers and has therefore established a direct link between consumers and suppliers. This study focuses on the impact of the Internet based ticketing systems on the travel agency in Langkawi, Malaysia. The major method was included in-depth interviews with travel agents to explore and refine the major issues that faced by the industry. Interviews with consumers were also carried out to ascertain the...

  12. The Impact of an Online Intervention (Brainology) on the Mindset and Resiliency of Secondary School Pupils: A Preliminary Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Claire; Topping, Keith; Hannah, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary study investigated the impact of the online interactive programme Brainology (which aimed to encourage a growth mindset) on the mindset, resiliency and sense of mastery of secondary school pupils. A quasi-experimental pre-, post- and follow-up mixed-methods study was carried out with 33 participants aged 13-14 years. The measures…

  13. The Impact of an Online Intervention (Brainology) on the Mindset and Resiliency of Secondary School Pupils: A Preliminary Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Claire; Topping, Keith; Hannah, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary study investigated the impact of the online interactive programme Brainology (which aimed to encourage a growth mindset) on the mindset, resiliency and sense of mastery of secondary school pupils. A quasi-experimental pre-, post- and follow-up mixed-methods study was carried out with 33 participants aged 13-14 years. The measures…

  14. The Impact of CBT and ACT Models Using Psychology Trainee Therapists: A Preliminary Controlled Effectiveness Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappalainen, Raimo; Lehtonen, Tuula; Skarp, Eerika; Taubert, Eija; Ojanen, Markku; Hayes, Steven C.

    2007-01-01

    The present study compares the impact of individualized treatment provided by trainee therapists based on a traditional cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) model. Fourteen therapists were given initial training in CBT and ACT. Outpatients (N = 28) were randomized to either approach, with each therapist…

  15. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coughlin, Katie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Shen, Hongxia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Chan, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; McDevitt, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Sturges, Andrew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2013-02-07

    Policies aimed at energy conservation and efficiency have broad environmental and economic impacts. Even if these impacts are relatively small, they may be significant compared to the cost of implementing the policy. Methodologies that quantify the marginal impacts of reduced demand for energy have an important role to play in developing accurate measures of both the benefits and costs of a given policy choice. This report presents a methodology for estimating the impacts of reduced demand for electricity on the electric power sector as a whole. The approach uses the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), a mid-range energy forecast model developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA)(DOE EIA 2013). The report is organized as follows: In the rest of this section the traditional NEMS-BT approach is reviewed and an outline of the new reduced form NEMS methodology is presented. Section 2 provides an overview of how the NEMS model works, and describes the set of NEMS-BT runs that are used as input to the reduced form approach. Section 3 presents our NEMS-BT simulation results and post-processing methods. In Section 4 we show how the NEMS-BT output can be generalized to apply to a broader set of end-uses. In Section 5 we disuss the application of this approach to policy analysis, and summarize some of the issues that will be further investigated in Part 2 of this study.

  16. Impact of Chromosome 4p- Syndrome on Communication and Expressive Language Skills: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Althea T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to examine the impact of Chromosome 4p- syndrome on the communication and expressive language phenotype of a large cross-cultural population of children, adolescents, and adults. Method: A large-scale survey study was conducted and a descriptive research design was used to analyze quantitative and…

  17. Preliminary Characterization Results from the DebriSat Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, M.; Shiotani, B.; Kleespies, J.; Toledo-Burdett, R.; Moraguez, M.; Carrasquila, M.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.

    2016-01-01

    The DebriSat project is a continuing effort sponsored by NASA and DoD to update existing break-up models using data obtained from two separate hypervelocity impact tests used to simulate on-orbit collisions. To protect the fragments resulting from the impact tests, "soft-catch" arenas made of polyurethane foam panels were utilized. After each impact test, the test chamber was cleaned and debris resulting from the catastrophic demise of the test article were collected and shipped to the University of Florida for post-impact processing. The post-impact processing activities include collecting, characterizing, and cataloging of the fragments. Since the impact tests, a team of students has been working to characterize the fragments in terms of their mass, size, shape, color and material content. The focus of the 20 months since the impact tests has been on the collection of 2 millimeters- and larger fragments resulting from impact test on the 56 kilogram-representative LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellite referred to as DebriSat. To date we have recovered in excess of 115,000 fragments, 30,000 more than the prediction of 85,000 fragments from the existing model. We continue to collect fragments but have transitioned to the characterization phase of the post-impact activities. Since the start of the characterization phase, the focus has been to utilize automation to (i) expedite fragment characterization process and (ii) minimize human-in-the- loop. We have developed and implemented such automated processes; e.g., we have automated the data entry process to reduce operator errors during transcription of the measurement data. However, at all steps of the process, there is human oversight to ensure the integrity of the data. Additionally, we have developed and implemented repeatability and reproducibility tests to ensure that the instrumentation used in the characterization process is accurate and properly calibrated. In this paper, the implemented processes are described and

  18. Energy Impact of Different Penetrations of Connected and Automated Vehicles: A Preliminary Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios-Torres, Jackeline [ORNL; Malikopoulos, Andreas [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Previous research reported in the literature has shown the benefits of traffic coordination to alleviate congestion, and reduce fuel consumption and emissions. However, there are still many remaining challenges that need to be addressed before a massive deployment of fully automated vehicles. This paper aims to investigate the energy impacts of different penetration rates of connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) and their interaction with human-driven vehicles. We develop a simulation framework for mixed traffic (CAVs interacting with human-driven vehicles) in merging roadways and analyze the energy impact of different penetration rates of CAVs on the energy consumption. The Gipps car following model is used along with heuristic controls to represent the driver decisions in a merging roadways traffic scenario. Using different penetration rates of CAVs, the simulation results indicated that for low penetration rates, the fuel consumption benefits are significant but the total travel time increases. The benefits in travel time are noticeable for higher penetration rates of CAVs.

  19. Generic Environmental Impact Statement. Air Force Low Altitude Flying Operations. Preliminary Draft. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    and Marketing ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory PSD Prevention of Significant Deterioration RAs Restricted Areas SAC Strategic Air Command SO 2 sulfur...resources under IR-700. However, significant impacts have not been reported to the New York Department of Agriculture and Markets (Butcher 1987...nesting of bald eagles at particular sites in Salt River and Verde River canyons, which is an important issue with 3 birdwatchers . The preservation of

  20. Information Communication Technology (ICT) for Disabled Persons in Bangladesh: Preliminary Study of Impact/Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Zahid, Md.,; Ashraf, Md.,; Malik, Bushra; Hoque, Md.,

    2013-01-01

    Part 7: Shorter Papers; International audience; To meet the need of digital inclusion and to mitigate the digital divide between disable and general people different ICT interventions are implemented in different developing and developed countries. But question arises to what extent these interventions are successful? Are these interventions are successful for creating new hope and confidence among disabled people? In this working paper we have tried to find the impact of these interventions ...

  1. Experimental demonstration of plasma-drag acceleration of a dust cloud to hypervelocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticoş, C M; Wang, Zhehui; Wurden, G A; Kline, J L; Montgomery, D S; Dorf, L A; Shukla, P K

    2008-04-18

    Simultaneous acceleration of hundreds of dust particles to hypervelocities by collimated plasma flows ejected from a coaxial gun is demonstrated. Graphite and diamond grains with radii between 5 and 30 microm, and flying at speeds up to 3.7 km/s, have been recorded with a high-speed camera. The observations agree well with a model for plasma-drag acceleration of microparticles much larger than the plasma screening length.

  2. Holographic and PLIF measurements of free-flight hypervelocity flows in the AEDC Range G facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havener, George; Smith, Michael S.

    1992-07-01

    A laser diagnostics approach to investigating hypervelocity flows is presented which is based on pulsed laser holography (PLH) and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF). PLH is used to visualize projectiles and near-wake flow fields, and holographic interferometry provides optical phase maps that are reducible to flow density. PLIF is used to visualize the distribtion of nitric oxide and to quantify number densities in planes across the wake.

  3. Transition Delay in Hypervelocity Boundary Layers By Means of CO2/Acoustic Instability Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-16

    They also concluded that injection was destabilizing and proposed that using acoustic absorption by porous material downstream of the injection...with Combined Injection and Acoustic Absorptive Coating.” Final Report on EOARD GRANT No. FA8655-12-D-0003, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0040 TRANSITION DELAY IN HYPERVELOCITY BOUNDARY LAYERS BY MEANS OF CO2/ ACOUSTIC INSTA Joseph Shepherd CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF

  4. 3-D Tomographic Imaging of the Chicxulub Impact Crater: Preliminary Results From EW#0501

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendra, A. T.; Barton, P. J.; Vermeesch, P. M.; Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M. R.; Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G. L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Melosh, H. J.; McDonald, M. A.; Goldin, T.; Mendoza, K.

    2005-05-01

    The Chicxulub impact structure provides a unique opportunity to investigate the sub-surface morphology of large craters on Earth and other planets. The structure of the crater interior is still poorly known and there is much uncertainty over the sequence of events by which these large craters form and the magnitude of the subsequent catastrophic environmental effects. In early 2005, a reflection-refraction survey aboard the R/V Maurice Ewing imaged the deep structure of the Chicxulub impact. We present wide-angle data collected by a 3-D grid of 50 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs), 86 three-component land stations and a 6 km long hydrophone streamer. The OBS grid, designed to image the peak ring and underlying structure of the northwestern quadrant of the crater, recorded shots from several seismic profiles in various orientations. Many of these profiles extended past the crater rim imaging to the base of the crust. Travel-time picks from this dataset, combined with existing 1996 data, will be inverted using the JIVE3-D tomographic inversion program to create a fully 3-D velocity model of the crater interior. The interpretation of the velocity model will focus on the morphology of the peak ring and the central uplift, and the distribution of breccia and suevite (an impact related breccia/melt) in the centre of the crater. We will calculate the Poisson's ratio for different areas of the crater using both the P-wave velocity model and S-wave arrivals, including those from the 1996 land station data. Comparisons of these values with measurements on the Yaxcopoil-1 core taken from within the crater provide ground-truth for our tomographic model. The contrast in Poisson's ratio between areas of suevite and the surrounding rock further constrain the distribution of breccia and suevite.

  5. Advances in applied superconductivity: A preliminary evaluation of goals and impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolsky, A. M.; Daniels, E. J.; Giese, R. F.; Harkness, J. B. L.; Johnson, L. R.; Rote, D. M.; Zwick, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    This document is meant to aid the U.S. Department of Energy, Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy by discussing the likely impacts of recent results from research on superconducting materials. The discussions in this document concern terrestrial applications that would substantially affect the production and use of electricity. The sections of the report each address a particular topic. The topics are: (1) electric generators, (2) transformers, (3) power transmission, (4) magnetic energy storage, (5) electric motors, (6) separation industry, and (7) maglev (magnetic-levitation) trains.

  6. Composition and modal frequencies of hypervelocity particles less than 1 millimeter in diameter in low-Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, R. P.; See, T. H.; Hoerz, F.

    1993-01-01

    We have continued to systematically analyze the projectile residues associated with hypervelocity impact features on the surfaces of the 'Chemistry of Micrometeoroid Experiment' (CME) that was in low-Earth orbit (LEO) for 5.7 years aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Last year we reported on the systematic analysis, via SEM-EDX methods, of all craters greater than 20 microns in diameter on the collectors from LDEF's trailing edge and approximately 200 craters greater than 75 microns in diameter from the aluminum 1100 substrates from the forward-facing surfaces. This latter group represents less than 20 percent of all craters on the A11 collectors, because the particle flux is substantially higher for the forward-facing orientations relative to the trailing-edge surfaces. To date, we have analyzed some 600 craters on the A11 aluminum collectors, yet this report summarizes only 400 features, because not all of the results have been completely reduced and entered into our database.

  7. Hardening in a Time--Evolving Stellar Background: Hyper--Velocity Stars, Orbital Decay and Prediction for Lisa

    CERN Document Server

    Haardt, F; Madau, P

    2006-01-01

    We study the long-term evolution of massive black hole binaries (MBHBs) at the centers of galaxies using detailed full three-body scattering experiments. Stars, drawn from a distribution unbound to the binary, are ejected by the gravitational slingshot. We quantify the effect of secondary slingshots -- stars returning on small impact parameter orbits to have a second super-elastic scattering with the MBHB -- on binary separation. Even in the absence of two-body relaxation or gas dynamical processes, very unequal mass binaries of mass M=10^7 solar masses can shrink to the gravitational wave emission regime in less than a Hubble time, and are therefore a target for the planned Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). Three-body interactions create a subpopulation of hypervelocity stars on nearly radial, corotating orbits, with a spatial distribution that is initially highly flattened in the inspiral plane of the MBHB, but becomes more isotropic with decreasing binary separation. The mass ejected is ~0.7 times...

  8. Impact of psychoeducation intervention module on parents of children with autism spectrum disorders: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suravi Patra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD in India face a host of challenges, while seeking care which ranges from unavailability of information to difficulty in availing services. Aims: To develop a psycho-education intervention module for parents of children with ASD and to study its impact on parent stress and knowledge. Settings and Design: Child Guidance Clinic Department of Psychiatry, Government Medical College and Hospital, Chandigarh. Interventional study. Methodology: Parents of children diagnosed with ASD as per Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition criteria, recruited through consecutive sampling. Total number of 18 participants participated in the two phase study. Phase I included preparation of a parent training module through a four stage process and Phase II was evaluation of impact of the final version of the module on parental stress and knowledge. Statistical Analysis: Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test using SPSS version 17.0. Results: There was an improvement in all the domains of parenting stress and knowledge. Social stress score and total stress score showed significant improvement. Conclusions: Parent psycho-education intervention module on ASD decreases parenting stress, and improves knowledge about ASD. Psycho-education intervention module is a feasible and acceptable way of parent empowerment.

  9. Preliminary study on impact assessment of climate change on building risks induced by typhoons in Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nishijima, Kazuyoshi; Maruyama, Takashi; Graf, Mathias

    The present paper investigates possible impacts of the climate change on building risks caused by typhoons. The inputs to this investigation are: (1) outcomes from the numerical simulations with a Global Climate Model (GCM) developed under the framework of the KAKUSHIN program, (2) statistics...... on building damage in the event of Typhoon Songda, and (3) numerical simulation of the wind field induced by the typhoon Songda with the JMA Non- Hydrostatic Model (JMA-NHM). The first input is utilized to develop two sets of probabilistic typhoon models; i.e. corresponding to the current climate...... and the future climate subject to the climate change, whereas the other inputs are utilized to develop a model for structural performance of buildings. Taking basis in these models, changes of building risks under the climate change are investigated. The result shows that the building risks slightly decrease...

  10. Preliminary study on impact assessment of climate change on building risks induced by typhoons in Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nishijima, Kazuyoshi; Maruyama, Takashi; Graf, Mathias

    The present paper investigates possible impacts of the climate change on building risks caused by typhoons. The inputs to this investigation are: (1) outcomes from the numerical simulations with a Global Climate Model (GCM) developed under the framework of the KAKUSHIN program, (2) statistics...... on building damage in the event of Typhoon Songda, and (3) numerical simulation of the wind field induced by the typhoon Songda with the JMA Non- Hydrostatic Model (JMA-NHM). The first input is utilized to develop two sets of probabilistic typhoon models; i.e. corresponding to the current climate...... and the future climate subject to the climate change, whereas the other inputs are utilized to develop a model for structural performance of buildings. Taking basis in these models, changes of building risks under the climate change are investigated. The result shows that the building risks slightly decrease...

  11. [Preliminary study on main impacting factors on brand equity of listed traditional Chinese medicine companies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei; Geng, Dong-Mei; Rong, Xue; Li, Zi; Liu, Wei; Yang, Li; Xu, Si-Qun; Jie, Xiao-Qian

    2013-05-01

    The brand equity is valuable intangible assets of traditional Chinese medicine companies, who are excellent representatives of traditional Chinese medicine enterprises and the most promising ones to good international medicine brands. However, there is still no systematic study on how to correctly evaluate the brand equity of listed traditional Chinese medicine companies at present. To make it clear, the main impacting factors on brand equity of listed traditional Chinese medicine companies, both structured open outline pre-research and closed questionnaire research were adopted for the field survey, and some suggestions for how to protect and enhance the brand equity were also presented on the basis of survey and analysis, in the hope of improving the brand management level of listed traditional Chinese medicine companies, and making a beneficial exploration for the development of brand theory of the traditional Chinese medicine industry.

  12. Preliminary Assessment of Potential Habitat Composites' Durability when Exposed to a Long-Term Radiation Environment and Micrometeoroid Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Graves, Russell; Golden, John; Atwell, William; O'Rouke, Mary Jane; Hill, Charles; Alred, John

    2011-01-01

    NASA's exploration goals include extending human presence beyond low earth orbit (LEO). As a result, habitation for crew is a critical requirement for meeting this goal. However, habitats are very large structures that contain a multitude of subsystems to sustain human life over long-durations in space, and one of the key challenges has been keeping weight to a minimum in order to reduce costs. Thus, light-weight and multifunctional structural materials are of great interest for habitation. NASA has started studying polymeric composite materials as potential lightweight and multifunctional structural materials for use in long-duration spaceflight. However, little is known about the survivability of these materials when exposed to the space environment outside of LEO for long durations. Thus, a study has been undertaken to investigate the durability of composite materials when exposed to long-duration radiation. Furthermore, as an addition to the primary study, a secondary preliminary investigation has been started on the micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) susceptibility of these materials after radiation exposure. The combined effects of radiation and MMOD impacts are the focus of this paper.

  13. A Preliminary Geochemical Study of Crystalline Melt from the Manson Impact Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotev, R. L.; Jolliff, B. L.; Rockow, K. M.; Haskin, L. A.; Crossey, L. J.

    1993-07-01

    Although the Manson impact structure (35 km in diameter) in Iowa is of general interest because its age coincides with the end of the Cretaceous Period [1,2], it also provides an opportunity to study systematically the effects of a single, moderate-sized impact in a setting where the preimpact geology is reasonably well understood. We are interested in the extent of compositional uniformity in melt produced in large impacts and the causes of any compositional variation among different small samples of crystalline melt breccia. This understanding is useful for interpretation of data from lunar impact-melt breccias, for which we have less geologic control. We have obtained concentrations of ~30 elements in samples from the M-1 core taken on the flank of the central peak of the Manson impact structure in Iowa [3-6]. The sample set consists of 49 representative samples of breccia matrix determined (by visual inspection) to contain minimal mineralized vugs, fractures, or large or altered clasts [5]. The core consists of three principal units [3]: sedimentary clast breccia (SCB), 54-106-m depth; crystalline clast breccia, melt matrix (CCB-M), 106- 147-m depth; and crystalline clast breccia, sandy matrix (CCB-S), 163-214-m depth; there is an ~16-m "transition zone" between CCB-M and CCB-S. The sandy- matrix breccias, which are believed to be "in-situ brecciated basement with injected melt and shale fragments" [4], may be the equivalent of lunar "fragmental breccias" [e.g., 7]. They contain large clasts, some bigger than the core diameter, and, consequently, are variable in composition at the sample mass studied here (1-4 g). Samples of the overlying melt-matrix breccias (CCB-M) are more uniform in composition. However, the concentrations of some elements (Na, Ca, Sc, Cr, Fe, and Co) generally increase with depth through CCB-M (unit 1 of [4]), while other elements decrease (K, Sb, Cs, La, Hf, and Ta). These trends continue through the transition zone to the CCB-S. Thus

  14. Land grabbing: a preliminary quantification of economic impacts on rural livelihoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kyle F; D'Odorico, Paolo; Rulli, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Global demands on agricultural land are increasing due to population growth, dietary changes and the use of biofuels. Their effect on food security is to reduce humans' ability to cope with the uncertainties of global climate change. In light of the 2008 food crisis, to secure reliable future access to sufficient agricultural land, many nations and corporations have begun purchasing large tracts of land in the global South, a phenomenon deemed "land grabbing" by popular media. Because land investors frequently export crops without providing adequate employment, this represents an effective income loss for local communities. We study 28 countries targeted by large-scale land acquisitions [comprising 87 % of reported cases and 27 million hectares (ha)] and estimate the effects of such investments on local communities' incomes. We find that this phenomenon can potentially affect the incomes of ~12 million people globally with implications for food security, poverty levels and urbanization. While it is important to note that our study incorporates a number of assumptions and limitations, it provides a much needed initial quantification of the economic impacts of large-scale land acquisitions on rural livelihoods.

  15. Hypervelocity Microparticle Impact Studies: Simulating Cosmic Dust Impacts on the Dustbuster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, D. E.; Manning, H. L. K.; Bailey, C. L.; Farnsworth, J. T.; Ahrens, T. J.; Beauchamp, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Iron and copper microparticles accelerated to 2-20 km/s in a 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator were used to test a recently-developed cosmic dust mass spectrometer, known as the Dustbuster. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. The impact of Body Worlds on adult visitors' knowledge on human anatomy: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Guilherme R B C; Finn, Gabrielle M

    2016-05-01

    Body Worlds is an anatomical exhibition that shows human remains to the public. It has been considered controversial since it raises ethical tensions and issues. However, organizers and supporters of Body Worlds have claimed the exhibition is intended to promote visitors' understanding over the human body. Despite these claims, no studies were found that support or refute the hypothesis that a visit to Body Worlds increases the public's objective knowledge on human anatomy. Consequently, the objective of this study was to determine the impact of Body Worlds on anatomical knowledge. We constructed and delivered a questionnaire to both a previsit random sample and a postvisit random sample of visitors of Body Worlds' event Facets of Life, in Berlin. The questionnaire was available in both English and German languages and contained (a) basic sociodemographic questions and (b) a valid and reliable anatomy quiz. The quiz consisted of 16 multiple-choice questions that assessed the ability to identify the location of major anatomical structures on the human body. Average scores achieved on the quiz by the postvisit sample (X¯= 9.08, s = 2.48, n = 164) were significantly higher (unpaired t = 3.3957, P = 0.0008) than those achieved by the previsit sample (X¯= 8.11, s = 2.69, n = 167). Our results suggest that a visit to Body Worlds' event Facets of Life may have a beneficial effect in anatomical knowledge. However, further studies with better empirical designs and fewer limitations are needed to confirm our results.

  17. "Preliminary Evaluation of Climate Change impact in the Codegua's River Irrigation Improvement Project"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricchetti, Franco; Vargas, Ximena

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the impact of Climate Change in one of the projected dams for farming activities in Codegua's catchment, near to Santiago, Chile. This reservoir is one of the twenty that will be built by the Hydraulics Infrastructure Management Department of Chile in the next years. The design is based on the concept of "Irrigation Security", defined as the quotient between the number of years where is possible to deliver the crop demand and the total of years. It must be greater than 85% to approve the project. The evaluation of Climate Change is based in two scenarios: RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5. The forecast hydroclimatology is based in General Circulation Model MPI-ESM, from Max Planck Institute, Germany. The evaluation considers two future periods: a near future (2020-2055) and a further future (2065-2100). First, statistical downscaling of precipitation and temperature time series are made and then the yearly inflow to the dam is estimated by a simple rainfall-runoff relation, the future evapotranspiration is estimated by Penman-Monteith method and with an empirical mathematical relation, based in Blaney and Criddle method. For this reason, the analysis included additional scenarios to incorporate the uncertainty in the evapotranspiration estimation as well as on tributary volumes from the basin to the dam, for each Climate Change scenarios. Climate Change in the zone of study indicates that precipitations will be lower than the present and the temperature will increase. For example, the results predict that precipitation in the best scenario, for near future, will go down 15% and temperature will increase in 0.6 (°C). For the further future in the worst scenarios, model predicts that precipitation will go down around 30% and temperature will increase 2.5 (°C). This coupled effects modify in a great way the water supply and demand in the zone of study. With the new hydrology forecast for the future, the "Irrigation Security" is recalculated in

  18. A preliminary vulnerability assessment for Ísafjörður, Iceland : coastal management options to reduce impacts of sea-level rise and storm surges

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Meidinger

    2011-01-01

    Climate change science argues that by the end of the 21st century, the global mean sea-level rise may easily exceed 1 metre, possibly accompanied by an increase in storm intensity. Although climate change is a global phenomenon, its impacts vary greatly according to scale and geographic region. This study took into account the United Nations’ recommendations and the research objectives stated by the Icelandic Ministry of the Environment, and conducted a preliminary coastal vulnerability asses...

  19. Impact of exposure to tobacco smoke, arsenic, and phthalates on locally advanced cervical cancer treatment—preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia A. Neamtiu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Cancer research is a national and international priority, with the efficiency and effectiveness of current anti-tumor therapies being one of the major challenges with which physicians are faced. Objective To assess the impact of exposure to tobacco smoke, arsenic, and phthalates on cervical cancer treatment. Methods We investigated 37 patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma who underwent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We determined cotinine and five phthalate metabolites in urine samples collected prior to cancer treatment, by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and urinary total arsenic by atomic absorption spectrometry with hydride generation. We used linear regression to evaluate the effects of cotinine, arsenic, and phthalates on the change in tumor size after treatment, adjusted for confounding variables. Results We detected no significant associations between urinary cotinine, arsenic, or phthalate monoesters on change in tumor size after treatment, adjusted for urine creatinine, age, baseline tumor size, and cotinine (for arsenic and phthalates. However, higher %mono-ethylhexyl phthalate (%MEHP, a putative indicator of phthalate diester metabolism, was associated with a larger change in tumor size (β = 0.015, 95% CI [0.003–0.03], P = 0.019. Conclusion We found no statistically significant association between the urinary levels of arsenic, cotinine, and phthalates metabolites and the response to cervical cancer treatment as measured by the change in tumor size. Still, our results suggested that phthalates metabolism may be associated with response to treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer. However, these observations are preliminary and will require confirmation in a larger, more definitive investigation.

  20. Impact of exposure to tobacco smoke, arsenic, and phthalates on locally advanced cervical cancer treatment—preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Michael S.; Dumitrascu, Irina; Roba, Carmen A.; Pop, Cristian; Ordeanu, Claudia; Balacescu, Ovidiu; Gurzau, Eugen S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer research is a national and international priority, with the efficiency and effectiveness of current anti-tumor therapies being one of the major challenges with which physicians are faced. Objective To assess the impact of exposure to tobacco smoke, arsenic, and phthalates on cervical cancer treatment. Methods We investigated 37 patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma who underwent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We determined cotinine and five phthalate metabolites in urine samples collected prior to cancer treatment, by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and urinary total arsenic by atomic absorption spectrometry with hydride generation. We used linear regression to evaluate the effects of cotinine, arsenic, and phthalates on the change in tumor size after treatment, adjusted for confounding variables. Results We detected no significant associations between urinary cotinine, arsenic, or phthalate monoesters on change in tumor size after treatment, adjusted for urine creatinine, age, baseline tumor size, and cotinine (for arsenic and phthalates). However, higher %mono-ethylhexyl phthalate (%MEHP), a putative indicator of phthalate diester metabolism, was associated with a larger change in tumor size (β = 0.015, 95% CI [0.003–0.03], P = 0.019). Conclusion We found no statistically significant association between the urinary levels of arsenic, cotinine, and phthalates metabolites and the response to cervical cancer treatment as measured by the change in tumor size. Still, our results suggested that phthalates metabolism may be associated with response to treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer. However, these observations are preliminary and will require confirmation in a larger, more definitive investigation. PMID:27652000

  1. Study of Forebody Injection and Mixing with Application to Hypervelocity Airbreathing Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axdahl, Erik; Kumar, Ajay; Wilhite, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The use of premixed, shock-induced combustion in the context of a hypervelocity, airbreathing vehicle requires effective injection and mixing of hydrogen fuel and air on the vehicle forebody. Three dimensional computational simulations of fuel injection and mixing from flush-wall and modified ramp and strut injectors are reported in this study. A well-established code, VULCAN, is used to conduct nonreacting, viscous, turbulent simulations on a flat plate at conditions relevant to a Mach 12 flight vehicle forebody. In comparing results of various fuel injection strategies, it is found that strut injection provides the greatest balance of performance between mixing efficiency and stream thrust potential.

  2. Bacillus subtilis spores on artificial meteorites survive hypervelocity atmospheric entry: implications for Lithopanspermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Link, Lindsey; Melosh, H Jay; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2005-12-01

    An important but untested aspect of the lithopanspermia hypothesis is that microbes situated on or within meteorites could survive hypervelocity entry from space through Earth's atmosphere. The use of high-altitude sounding rockets to test this notion was explored. Granite samples permeated with spores of Bacillus subtilis strain WN511 were attached to the exterior telemetry module of a sounding rocket and launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico into space, reaching maximum atmospheric entry velocity of 1.2 km/s. Maximum recorded temperature during the flight was measured at 145 degrees C. The surfaces of the post-flight granite samples were swabbed and tested for recovery and survival of WN511 spores, using genetic markers and the unique DNA fingerprint of WN511 as recovery criteria. Spore survivors were isolated at high frequency, ranging from 1.2% to 4.4% compared with ground controls, from all surfaces except the forward-facing surface. Sporulation-defective mutants were noted among the spaceflight survivors at high frequency (4%). These experiments constitute the first report of spore survival to hypervelocity atmospheric transit, and indicate that sounding rocket flights can be used to model the high-speed atmospheric entry of bacteria-laden artificial meteorites.

  3. Characterization of hypervelocity metal fragments for explosive initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, John D.; Bowden, Patrick R.; Guildenbecher, Daniel R.; Olles, Joseph D.

    2017-07-01

    The fragment impact response of two plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) formulations was studied using explosively driven aluminum fragments. A generic aluminum-capped detonator generated sub-mm aluminum particles moving at hypersonic velocities. The ability of these fragments to initiate reaction or otherwise damage two PBX materials was assessed using go/no-go experiments at standoff distances of up to 160 mm. Lower density PBX 9407 (RDX-based) was initiable at up to 115 mm, while higher density PBX 9501 (HMX-based) was only initiable at up to 6 mm. Several techniques were used to characterize the size, distribution, and velocity of the particles. Witness plate materials, including copper and polycarbonate, and backlit high speed video were used to characterize the distribution of particles, finding that the aluminum cap did not fragment homogeneously but rather with larger particles in a ring surrounding finer particles. Finally, precise digital holography experiments were conducted to measure the three-dimensional shape and size of the fastest-moving fragments, which ranged between 100 and 700 μm and traveled between 2.2 and 3.2 km/s. Crucially, these experiments showed variability in the fragmentation in terms of the number of fragments at the leading edge of the fragment field, indicating that both single and multiple shock impacts could be imparted to the target material. These types of data are critical for safety experiments and hydrocode simulations to quantify shock-to-detonation transition mechanisms and the associated risk-margins for these materials.

  4. Hypervelocity Capture of Meteoritic Particles in Nonsilica Aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Jones; G Flynn

    2011-12-31

    The Stardust mission captured particles from the comet 81P/Wild 2 in gradient density silica aerogel and returned the collected samples to earth in 2006. The analyses of these particles have revealed several new insights into the formation of our solar system. However, since the aerogel used as the capture material was silica, the elemental analyses of the silica-rich particles were made more complicated in certain ways due to the mixing of the silicon of the particles and that of the aerogel. By using a nonsilica aerogel, future elemental analyses of silica-rich particles captured in aerogel could be made more straightforward. Resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), alumina, and zirconia aerogels were impact tested with meteoritic fragments and the captured fragments were mapped with synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe (XRM) and the particles were analyzed with X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The resorcinol/formaldehyde aerogel proved to be the best capture material, in that it could be keystoned and XRF could be used to locate and analyze particles that were less than 10 {micro}m.

  5. Preliminary environmental assessment of selected geopressured - geothermal prospect areas: Louisiana Gulf coast region. Volume I. Comparison of prospect areas on the basis of potential environmental impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newchurch, E.J.; Bachman, A.L.; Bryan, C.F.; Harrison, D.P.; Muller, R.A.; Newman, J.P. Jr.; Smith, C.G. Jr.; Bailey, J.I. Jr.; Kelly, G.G.; Reibert, K.C.

    1978-10-15

    The results of a preliminary environmental assessment of the following geopressured-geothermal prospect areas in the Louisiana Gulf coast region are presented: South Johnson's Bayou, Sweet Lake, Rockefeller Refuge, Southeast Pecan Island, Atchafalaya Bay, and Lafourche Crossing. These prospect areas have been compared to determine their relative environmental acceptability for the test program. Trade-offs among the prospects in terms of potential impacts are highlighted. This assessment was made on the basis of the nature and extent of the proposed testing activities in view of the environmental characteristics of each prospect area: land use, geology and geohydrology, air quality, water resources and quality, ecological systems, and natural hazards. The comparison of prospect areas includes consideration of worst case situations. However, we believe that the test program activities, because they are so small in scale, will not result in major adverse impacts.

  6. A Dipole on the Sky: Predictions for Hypervelocity Stars from the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Boubert, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    We predict the distribution of hypervelocity stars (HVSs) ejected from the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), under the assumption that the dwarf galaxy hosts a central massive black hole (MBH). For the majority of stars ejected from the LMC the orbital velocity of the LMC has contributed a significant fraction of their galactic rest frame velocity, leading to a dipole density distribution on the sky. We quantify the dipole using spherical harmonic analysis and contrast with the monopole expected for HVSs ejected from the Galactic Center. There is a tendril in the density distribution that leads the LMC which is coincident with the well-known and unexplained clustering of HVSs in the constellations of Leo and Sextans. Our model is falsifiable, since it predicts that Gaia will reveal a large density of HVSs in the southern hemisphere.

  7. Applied Impact Physics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickert, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    Applied impact physics research is based on the capability to examine impact processes for a wide range of impact conditions with respect to velocity as well as mass and shape of the projectile. For this reason, Fraunhofer EMI operates a large variety of launchers that address velocities up to ordnance velocities as single stage powder gun but which can also be operated as two-stage light gas guns achieving the regime of low earth orbital velocity. Thereby for projectile masses of up to 100 g hypervelocity impact phenomena up to 7.8 km/s can be addressed. Advanced optical diagnostic techniques like microsecond video are used as commercial systems but - since impact phenomena are mostly related with debris or dust - specialized diagnostics are developed in-house like x-ray cinematography and x-ray tomography. Selected topics of the field of applied impact physics will be presented like the interesting behavior of long rods penetrating low-density materials or experimental findings at hypervelocity for this class of materials as well as new x-ray diagnositic techniques.

  8. Hypervelocity launchers

    CERN Document Server

    Igra, Ozer

    2016-01-01

    In the present volume numerous descriptions of Ram accelerators are presented. These descriptions provide good overview on the progress made and the present state of the Ram accelerator technology worldwide.  In addition, articles describing light gas gun, ballistic range including a chapter dealing with shock waves in solids are given. Along with the technical description of considered facilities, samples of obtained results are also included. Each chapter is written by an expert in the described topic providing a comprehensive description of the discussed phenomena.  .

  9. Defining the coupled effects of cryogenic, space-radiation, and hypervelocity impact damamge on COPV's Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The intent of the proposed effort is to investigate the detailed composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) performance characteristics after being subject to...

  10. Failure Mechanisms of Ni-H2 and Li-Ion Batteries Under Hypervelocity Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. E.; Lyons, F.; Christiansen, E. L.; Lear, D. M.

    2017-01-01

    Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion) batteries have yielded significant performance advantages for many industries, including the aerospace industry, and have been selected to replace nickel hydrogen (Ni-H2) batteries for the International Space Station (ISS) program to meet the energy storage demands. As the ISS uses its vast solar arrays to generate its power, the solar ar-rays meet their sunlit power demands and supply excess power to battery packs for power de-livery on the sun obscured phase of the approximate 90 minute low Earth orbit. These large battery packs are located on the exterior of the ISS, and as such, the battery packs are ex-posed to external environment threats like naturally occurring meteoroids and artificial orbital debris (MMOD). While the risks from these solid particle environments has been known and addressed to an acceptable risk of failure through shield design, it is not possible to completely eliminate the risk of loss of these assets on orbit due to MMOD, and as such, failure consequences to the ISS have been considered.

  11. DebrisLV Hypervelocity Impact Post-Shot Physical Results Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-27

    catch  foam  has  not  yet  been  processed  to   extract  fragments;   however,  three  unexpected  mechanisms  for... Earth   orbit   −  Designed  and  built  at  The  Aerospace  Corpora3on   −  Incorporated  a  flight-­‐grade  hydrazine...Metal deposition, condensation, and flaking Ø New, mechanism for producing untrackable (i.e., less than 1 cm) space-debris fragments 35 36 Bare

  12. Defining the coupled effects of cryogenic, space-radiation, and hypervelocity impact damamge on COPV's Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the research proposed herein is to define the coupled (combined) effect of critical environments on the structural performance of composite overwrap...

  13. Preliminary Analysis of the Social and Scientific Impact of the UAEM-ININ M.Sc. and D.Sc. Graduate Programme in Medical Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsoura, Eleni; Isaac-Olive, Keila; Torres-Garcia, Eugenio; Camacho-Lopez, Miguel Angel; Hardy-Perez, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    Sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in 1994, the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) started in Mexico a teaching and training programme (Diplomado) in Radiotherapy Medical Physics. Based on this experience, the Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México (UAEM) and the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) launched two years later, the first Graduate Programme in Science (M.Sc. and D.Sc.), specialised in Medical Physics in Mexico. A preliminary analysis of the social and scientific impact of the UAEM-ININ Programme is presented in this work based on the achievements attained, regarding the number of graduated Medical Physicists, their geographic and academic origin, their current professional activities and the number of scientific publications produced as a result of the thesis, as well as their citations.

  14. Treatment of mechanically sorted organic waste by bioreactor landfill: Experimental results and preliminary comparative impact assessment with biostabilization and conventional landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maria, Francesco; Micale, Caterina; Sisani, Luciano; Rotondi, Luca

    2016-09-01

    Treatment and disposal of the mechanically sorted organic fraction (MSOF) of municipal solid waste using a full-scale hybrid bioreactor landfill was experimentally analyzed. A preliminary life cycle assessment was used to compare the hybrid bioreactor landfill with the conventional scheme based on aerobic biostabilization plus landfill. The main findings showed that hybrid bioreactor landfill was able to achieve a dynamic respiration index (DRI)55% v/v started within 140days from MSOF disposal, allowing prompt energy recovery and higher collection efficiency. With the exception of fresh water eutrophication with the bioreactor scenario there was a reduction of the impact categories by about 30% compared to the conventional scheme. Such environmental improvement was mainly a consequence of the reduction of direct and indirect emissions from conventional aerobic biostabilization and of the lower amount of gaseous loses from the bioreactor landfill. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dioxin symposium Berlin:Ccurrent views on the impact of dioxins and furans on human health and the environment. Preliminary evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-11-01

    This volume gives a preliminary evaluation of the statement of the Symposium on dioxins of the Federal Health Office in November 1992. With this, the following aspects of effects of dioxins and furans on the human health and the environment are dealt with in detail: Cancer ogenity, immune toxicity, teratogenity, neurotoxicity, TDI-values, dioxins and furans in mother`s milk, emission to the environment and emission sources, environmental impact, transfer, state measures and limiting values, necessary measures for emission restriction. (UHE) [Deutsch] Der vorliegende Band gibt eine vorlaeufige Bewertung der Stellungnahmen des Dioxinsymposiums des Umweltbundesamtes im November 1992. Dabei werden die folgenden Aspekte der Auswirkungen von Dioxinen und Furanen auf die menschliche Gesundheit und die Umwelt ausfuehrlich behandelt: Kanzerogenitaet, Immunotoxizitaet, Teratogenitaet, Neurotoxizitaet, TDI-Werte, Dioxine und Furane in der Muttermilch, Emission in die Umwelt und Emissionsquellen, Umweltbelastung, Oekotoxizitaet, Transfer, staatliche Massnahmen und Grenzwerte, notwendige Massnahmen zur Emissionsbegrenzung. (UHE)

  16. Targeted prostate cancer screening in men with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 detects aggressive prostate cancer: preliminary analysis of the results of the IMPACT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Anita V; Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Barbachano, Yolanda;

    2011-01-01

    Study Type - Diagnostic (validating cohort)
Level of Evidence 1b OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the role of targeted prostate cancer screening in men with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, an international study, IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening...... in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls), was established. This is the first multicentre screening study targeted at men with a known genetic predisposition to prostate cancer. A preliminary analysis of the data is reported. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Men aged 40-69 years from families with BRCA1 or BRCA2...... mutations were offered annual prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, and those with PSA >3 ng/mL, were offered a prostate biopsy. Controls were men age-matched (± 5 years) who were negative for the familial mutation. RESULTS: In total, 300 men were recruited (205 mutation carriers; 89 BRCA1, 116 BRCA2...

  17. A dynamic study of fragmentation and energy loss during high velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, Ralph H.

    1992-07-01

    Research conducted under this contract can be divided into two main areas: hypervelocity (in the range up to 7 km/s) and high velocity (less than 1 km/s). Work in the former was performed at NASA-MSFC using the Light Gas Gun Facility. The lower velocity studies were conducted at Auburn University using the ballistic gun. The emphasis of the project was on the hypervelocity phenomenon especially in the characterization of the debris cloud formed by the primary impact events. Special devices were made to determine the angular distributions of momentum and energy of the debris cloud as a function of impact conditions. After several iteration processes, it was decided to concentrate on the momentum effort. Prototype devices were designed, fabricated, and tested. These devices were based on the conservation of momentum. Distributions of the debris cloud formed were measured by determining the amount of momentum transferred from the debris cloud to strategically placed pendulum measurement devices. The motion of the pendula was monitored using itegrated opto-interrupters. The distribution of momentum in the debris cloud was found to be a strong function of the impact condition. Small projectiles at high velocities were observed to produce finely dispersed debris whereas large projectiles generated discrete particles in the debris. Results also show that the momentum in the forward direction was enhanced due to the impact. This phenomenon of momentum multiplication was also observed in other studies and in computer simulations. It was initially planned to determine the energy distribution using deformation energy in a rod with strain gauges. Results from preliminary studies show that this technique is acceptable but too tedious. A new technique was explored based on measuring the heating effect of the debris cloud using an IR camera. The feasibility and sensitivity was established at Auburn University.

  18. Preliminary assessment of the aquatic impacts of a proposed defense waste processing facility at the Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the literature indicates that a significant body of descriptive information exists concerning the aquatic ecology of Upper Three Runs Creek and Four Mile Creek of the Savannah River Plant south of Aiken, South Carolina. This information is adequate for preparation of an environmental document evaluating these streams. These streams will be impacted by construction and operation of a proposed Defense Waste Processing Facility for solidification of high level defense waste. Potential impacts include (1) construction runoff, erosion, and siltation, (2) effluents from a chemical and industrial waste treatment facility, and (3) radionuclide releases. In order to better evaluate potential impacts, recommend mitigation methods, and comply with NEPA requirements, additional quantitative biological information should be obtained through implementation of an aquatic baseline program.

  19. Preliminary manual of the wind farms impacts study; Manuel preliminaire de l'etude d'impact des parcs eoliens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-11-01

    This document aims to present and propose tools and methods allowing the improve the environmental quality of the future wind farms projects. After a presentation of general notions on the wind farms and the economy of the wind energy, it presents the regulation and the procedures concerning the environmental impact. It proposes then the main possible effects and the impacts study themes. (A.L.B.)

  20. Preliminary methodology to assess the national and regional impact of U.S. wind energy development on birds and bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffendorfer, James E.; Beston, Julie A.; Merrill, Matthew D.; Stanton, Jessica C.; Corum, Margo D.; Loss, Scott R.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Johnson, Douglas H.; Erickson, Richard A.; Heist, Kevin W.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a methodology to assess the impacts of wind energy development on wildlife; it is a probabilistic, quantitative assessment methodology that can communicate to decision makers and the public the magnitude of these effects on species populations. The methodology is currently applicable to birds and bats, focuses primarily on the effects of collisions, and can be applied to any species that breeds in, migrates through, or otherwise uses any part of the United States. The methodology is intended to assess species at the national scale and is fundamentally different from existing methods focusing on impacts at individual facilities.

  1. Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the §1603 Treasury Grant Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, Daniel [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Porro, Gian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Goldberg, Marshall [MRG & Associates, Nevada City, CA (United States)

    2012-04-09

    This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the §1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the §1603 grant program.

  2. Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the §1603Treasury Grant Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, Daniel [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Porro, Gian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Goldberg, Marshall [MRG and Associates, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-04-01

    This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the §1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the §1603 grant program.

  3. Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the ..Section..1603 Treasury Grant Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, D.; Porro, G.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-04-01

    This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the Section 1603 grant program.

  4. Improving the Language Skills of Pre-Kindergarten Students: Preliminary Impacts of the "Let's Know!" Experimental Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Megan; Arthur, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Improving children's oral language skills is an important focus of educational research and practice; however, relatively few interventions have demonstrated impacts on these skills. This work makes a unique contribution to our understanding of the effects of language-focused interventions in pre-kindergarten settings by examining…

  5. Improving the Language Skills of Pre-Kindergarten Students: Preliminary Impacts of the "Let's Know!" Experimental Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Megan; Arthur, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Improving children's oral language skills is an important focus of educational research and practice; however, relatively few interventions have demonstrated impacts on these skills. This work makes a unique contribution to our understanding of the effects of language-focused interventions in pre-kindergarten settings by examining…

  6. The western Greenland Sea. A preliminary strategic environmental impact assessment of hydrocarbon activities in the KANUMAS East area; Greenland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boertmann, D.; Johansen, K.; Maltha Rasmussen, L.; Schiedek, D.; Ugarte, F.; Mosbech, A.; Frederiksen, M.; Bjerrum, M.

    2009-05-15

    The environmental impacts of exploration activities will mainly be disturbance from activities creating noise such as seismic surveys and drilling. The impacts are expected to be relatively small, local and temporary, because of the intermittent nature of the exploration activities. Furthermore, the season for exploration activities is very short and limited to the few months with light ice conditions (June-October). The activities during development, production and transport are on the other hand long-lasting, and there are several activities which have the potential to cause severe environmental impacts. Careful Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) procedures, application of Best Available Technique (BAT) and Best Environmental Practice (BEP), zero-discharge policy and planning in combination with thorough background studies and application of the Precautionary Principle can mitigate most of these. The environmentally most severe accident would be a large oil spill. This has the potential to impact the marine ecosystem on all levels from primary production to the top predators. Oil spill trajectory modelling was carried out by DMI as a part of this SEIA. In most of the modelled oil spill drift scenarios oil does not reach the coasts, but stays offshore. However, three of the 24 scenarios indicate 11 that under certain conditions, oil may reach shores up to several hundred kilometres from the spill site. (ln)

  7. The eastern Baffin Bay. A preliminary strategic environmental impact assessment of hydrocarbon activities in the KANUMAS West area; Greenland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boertmann, D.; Johansen, K.; Maltha Rasmussen, L.; Schiedek, D.; Ugarte, F.; Mosbech, A.; Frederiksen, M.; Bjerrum, M.

    2009-05-15

    The environmental impacts of exploration activities will mainly be disturbance from activities creating noise such as seismic surveys and drilling. The impacts are expected to be relatively small, local and temporary, because of the intermittent nature of the exploration activities. Furthermore, the season for exploration activities is very short and limited to the few months with light ice conditions (June-October). The activities during development, production and transport are on the other hand long-lasting, and there are several activities which have the potential to cause severe environmental impacts. Careful Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) procedures, application of Best Available Technique (BAT) and Best Environmental Practice (BEP), zero-discharge policy and planning in combination with thorough background studies and application of the Precautionary Principle can mitigate most of these. The environmentally most severe accident would be a large oil spill. This has the potential to impact the marine ecosystem on all levels from primary production to the top predators. Oil spill trajectory modelling was carried out by DMI as a part of this SEIA. In most of the modelled oil spill drift scenarios oil does not reach the coasts, but stays offshore. However, three of the 24 scenarios indicate that under certain conditions, oil may reach shores up to several hundred kilometres from the spill site. (ln)

  8. Community Policing: A Preliminary Assessment of Environmental Impact with Panel Data on Program Implementation in U.S. Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ni; Zhao, Jihong; Lovrich, Nicholas P.

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the environmental impact on the programmatic implementation of community-oriented policing (COP) in large municipal police agencies during the 1990s. Three waves of nationwide surveys (1993, 1996, and 2000) based on a random sample of 281 municipalities and the corresponding police agencies were used for our analysis. Based…

  9. Terrace Zone Structure in the Chicxulub Impact Crater Based on 2-D Seismic Reflection Profiles: Preliminary Results From EW#0501

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, M. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Gorney, D. L.; Christeson, G. L.; Barton, P. J.; Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M. R.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Melosh, H. J.; Vermeesch, P. M.; Surendra, A. T.; Goldin, T.; Mendoza, K.

    2005-05-01

    Terrace zones, central peaks, and flat floors characterize complex craters like the Chicxulub impact crater located near the northeast coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. The subsurface crater structure was studied using seismic reflection surveying in Jan/Feb 2005 by the R/V Maurice Ewing. We present 2-D seismic profiles including constant radius, regional, and grid profiles encompassing the 195 km width of the crater. These diversely oriented lines clearly show the terrace zones and aid in the search for crater ejecta as we investigate the formation of the crater including the incidence angle and direction of the extraterrestrial object that struck the Yucatan Peninsula 65 million years ago (K-T boundary). Terrace zones form in complex craters after the modification stage as a result of the gravitational collapse of overextended sediment back into the crater cavity. The terrace zone is clearly imaged on seismic profiles confirming the complex structure of the Chixculub crater. Recent work on reprocessed 1996 profiles found different sizes and spacing of the terraces and concluded that the variations in radial structure are a result of an oblique impact. A SW-NE profile from this study was the only line to show a concentration of deformation near the crater rim hinting that the northeast was the downrange direction of impact. We confirm this narrowing in terrace spacing using a profile with a similar orientation in the 2005 images. Through integration of the new dense grid of profiles and radial lines from the 1996 and 2005 surveys we map the 3-D variability of the terrace zones to further constrain impact direction and examine the formative processes of the Chixculub and other large impact craters.

  10. Ejection of Hyper-Velocity Stars from the Galactic Centre by Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgardt, H; Zwart, S P; Baumgardt, Holger; Gualandris, Alessia; Zwart, Simon Portegies

    2006-01-01

    We have performed N-body simulations of the formation of hyper-velocity stars (HVS) in the centre of the Milky Way due to inspiralling intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). We considered IMBHs of different masses, all starting from circular orbits at an initial distance of 0.1 pc. We find that the IMBHs sink to the centre of the Galaxy due to dynamical friction, where they deplete the central cusp of stars. Some of these stars become HVS and are ejected with velocities sufficiently high to escape the Galaxy. Since the HVS carry with them information about their origin, in particular in the moment of ejection, the velocity distribution and the direction in which they escape the Galaxy, detecting a population of HVS will provide insight in the ejection processes and could therefore provide indirect evidence for the existence of IMBHs. Our simulations show that HVS are generated in short bursts which last only a few Myrs until the IMBH is swallowed by the supermassive black hole (SMBH). HVS are ejected almost i...

  11. The Nature of Hypervelocity Stars and the Time Between Their Formation and Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Warren R; Geller, Margaret J; Kenyon, Scott J

    2012-01-01

    We obtain Keck HIRES spectroscopy of HVS5, one of the fastest unbound stars in the Milky Way halo. We show that HVS5 is a 3.62 +- 0.11 Msun main sequence B star at a distance of 50 +- 5 kpc. The difference between its age and its flight time from the Galactic center is 105 +-18(stat)+-30(sys) Myr; flight times from locations elsewhere in the Galactic disk are similar. This 10^8 yr `arrival time' between formation and ejection is difficult to reconcile with any ejection scenario involving massive stars that live for only 10^7 yr. For comparison, we derive arrival times of 10^7 yr for two unbound runaway B stars, consistent with their disk origin where ejection results from a supernova in a binary system or dynamical interactions between massive stars in a dense star cluster. For HVS5, ejection during the first 10^7 yr of its lifetime is ruled out at the 3-sigma level. Together with the 10^8 yr arrival times inferred for three other well-studied hypervelocity stars (HVSs), these results are consistent with a Ga...

  12. THE NATURE OF HYPERVELOCITY STARS AND THE TIME BETWEEN THEIR FORMATION AND EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Cohen, Judith G., E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jlc@astro.caltech.edu [Palomar Observatory, Mail Stop 249-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-07-20

    We obtain Keck HIRES spectroscopy of HVS5, one of the fastest unbound stars in the Milky Way halo. We show that HVS5 is a 3.62 {+-} 0.11 M{sub Sun} main-sequence B star at a distance of 50 {+-} 5 kpc. The difference between its age and its flight time from the Galactic center is 105 {+-} 18 (stat) {+-}30 (sys) Myr; flight times from locations elsewhere in the Galactic disk are similar. This 10{sup 8} yr 'arrival time' between formation and ejection is difficult to reconcile with any ejection scenario involving massive stars that live for only 10{sup 7} yr. For comparison, we derive arrival times of 10{sup 7} yr for two unbound runaway B stars, consistent with their disk origin where ejection results from a supernova in a binary system or dynamical interactions between massive stars in a dense star cluster. For HVS5, ejection during the first 10{sup 7} yr of its lifetime is ruled out at the 3{sigma} level. Together with the 10{sup 8} yr arrival times inferred for three other well-studied hypervelocity stars (HVSs), these results are consistent with a Galactic center origin for the HVSs. If the HVSs were indeed ejected by the central black hole, then the Galactic center was forming stars {approx_equal}200 Myr ago, and the progenitors of the HVSs took {approx_equal}100 Myr to enter the black hole's loss cone.

  13. Joint constraints on the Galactic dark matter halo and Galactic Centre from hypervelocity stars

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Elena M; Cacciato, M; Kuiack, M; Sari, R

    2016-01-01

    The mass assembly history of the Milky Way is an outstanding issue that can inform both theory of galaxy formation and the underlying cosmological model. For this reason, observational constraints on the properties of both its baryonic and dark matter contents are sought. Here we show that hypervelocity stars (HVSs) can in principle provide such constraints. We model the observed velocity distribution of HVSs, produced by tidal break-up of stellar binaries caused by Sgr A*. Considering a Galactic Centre (GC) binary population consistent with that observed in more accessible star forming regions, a marginally acceptable fit to current HVS data can be obtained only if the escape velocity from the GC to 50 kpc is $V_{\\rm G} \\lower.5ex\\hbox{$\\; \\buildrel 800$ km/s. Models in this region, however, would not reproduce circular velocity data, would require a binary population in the GC increasingly different from those observed elsewhere and dark matter haloes increasingly inconsistent with predictions in the $\\Lam...

  14. The Hypervelocity Star SDSS J090745.0+024507 is a Short-Period Variable

    CERN Document Server

    Fuentes, C I; Gaudi, B S; McLeod, B A; Bogdanov, S B; Hartman, J D; Hickox, R C; Holman, M J; Fuentes, Cesar I.; Leod, Brian A. Mc; Bogdanov, Slavko B.; Hartman, Joel D.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Holman, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    We present high-precision photometry of the hypervelocity star SDSS J090745.0+024507 (HVS), which has a Galactic rest-frame radial velocity of v=709 km/s, and so has likely been ejected from the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center. Our data were obtained on two nights using the MMT 6.5m telescope, and is supplemented by lower precision photometry obtained on four nights using the FLWO 1.2m telescope. The high-precision photometry indicates that the HVS is a short-period, low-amplitude variable, with period P=0.2-2 days and amplitude A = 2-10%. Together with the known effective temperature of T_eff ~ 10,500 K (spectral type B9), this variability implies that the HVS is a member of the class of slowly pulsating B-type main sequence stars, thus resolving the previously-reported two-fold degeneracy in the luminosity and distance of the star. The HVS has a heliocentric distance of 71 kpc, and an age of ~0.35 Gyr. The time of ejection from the center of the Galaxy is < 100 Myr, and thus the existence ...

  15. HE 0437-5439 -- an unbound hyper-velocity main-sequence B-type star

    CERN Document Server

    Edelmann, H; Heber, U; Christlieb, N; Reimers, D; Edelmann, Heinz; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Heber, Uli; Christlieb, Norbert; Reimers, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of a 16th magnitude star, HE0437-5439, with a heliocentric radial velocity of +723+-3km/s. A quantitative spectral analysis of high-resolution optical spectra obtained with the VLT and the UVES spectrograph shows that HE0437-5439 is a main sequence B-type star with Teff=20350K, log g=3.77, solar within a factor of a few helium abundance and metal content, rotating at v sin i=54km/s. Using appropriate evolutionary tracks we derive a mass of 8 Msun and a corresponding distance of 61 kpc. Its galactic rest frame velocity is at least 563km/s, almost twice the local Galactic escape velocity, indicating that the star is unbound to the Galaxy. Numerical kinematical experiments are carried out to constrain its place of birth. It has been suggested that such hyper-velocity stars can be formed by the tidal disruption of a binary through interaction with the super-massive black hole at the Galactic center (GC). HE0437-5439 needs about 100Myrs to travel from the GC to its presentposition, much lon...

  16. Short-term impacts of air pollutants in Switzerland: Preliminary scenario calculations for selected Swiss energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreani-Aksoyoglu, S.; Keller, J. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    In the frame of the comprehensive assessment of Swiss energy systems, air quality simulations were performed by using a 3-dimensional photo-chemical dispersion model. The objective is to investigate the impacts of pollutants in Switzerland for future options of Swiss energy systems. Four scenarios were investigated: Base Case: simulations with the projected emissions for the year 2030, Scenario 1) all nuclear power plants were replaced by oil-driven combined cycle plants (CCP), Scenarios 2 to 4) traffic emissions were reduced in whole Switzerland as well as in the cities and on the highways separately. Changes in the pollutant concentrations and depositions, and the possible short-term impacts are discussed on the basis of exceedences of critical levels for plants and limits given to protect the public health. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs.

  17. Impact of an implantable steroid contraceptive (etonogestrel-releasing implant) on quality of life and sexual function: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carlo, Costantino; Sansone, Anna; De Rosa, Nicoletta; Gargano, Virginia; Tommaselli, Giovanni Antonio; Nappi, Carmine; Bifulco, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the impact of etonogestrel (ENG)-implant used for contraceptive purpose on Quality of life (QoL) and on sexual function (FSF) of healthy Italian women. The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaire and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) validated questionnaire were administered at baseline, 3 and 6 months after insertion of Nexplanon. The implant seems to have a positive impact on QoL after the first three months of therapy. Users showed an improved general health status and physical role status. The implant did not show negative effects on libido and on sexual function. In the first three months of treatment, users experienced a temporary reduction of vitality, mental health, social functioning and emotional role functioning, which seem to disappear after six months of therapy.

  18. A preliminary impact assessment of typhoon wind risk of residential buildings in Japan under future climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nishijima, Kazuyoshi; Maruyama, Takashi; Graf, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    This paper performs a quantitative impact assessment of the climate change on typhoon wind risk, focusing on residential buildings in Japan. The risk is assessed based on (1) the typhoon event set extracted from the simulation by the super-high resolution atmospheric general circulation model dev...... of the building portfolio remains unchanged. Based on these results, the assumptions and inputs to the assessment are critically reviewed. Thereby, the needs of further research efforts toward more credible and comprehensive assessment are addressed.......This paper performs a quantitative impact assessment of the climate change on typhoon wind risk, focusing on residential buildings in Japan. The risk is assessed based on (1) the typhoon event set extracted from the simulation by the super-high resolution atmospheric general circulation model...

  19. Environmental Impact Analysis Process. Preliminary Environmental Constraints Survey U.S. Air Force, Space Division Advanced Launch System (ALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    America . All of the proposed onshore facilities lie within tsunami hazard zone Number Four: earthquake-generated waves between 30 and 50 feet could...coastal sites on VAFB is one of the highest I in North America . As a result, ground-disturbing projects like ALS would require extensive archaeological... agricultura crops and livestock, deterioration of materials and property, an* adverse impacts on the environment. g. (UV fluorescence) In presence of

  20. Preliminary results of the Social Impact Research Group of MEDEX: the request database (2000–2002 of two Meteorological Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Amaro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the aims of the MEDEX project is to improve the knowledge of high-impact weather events in the Mediterranean. According to the guidelines of this project, a pilot study was carried out in two regions of Spain (the Balearic Islands and Catalonia by the Social Impact Research group of MEDEX. The main goal is to suggest some general and suitable criteria about how to analyse requests received in Meteorological Services arising out of the damage caused by weather events. Thus, all the requests received between 2000 and 2002 at the Servei Meteorològic de Catalunya as well as at the Division of AEMET in the Balearic Islands were analysed.

    Firstly, the proposed criteria in order to build the database are defined and discussed. Secondly, the temporal distribution of the requests for damage claims is analysed. On average, almost half of them were received during the first month after the event happened. During the first six months, the percentage increases by 90%. Thirdly, various factors are taken into account to determine the impact of specific events on society. It is remarkable that the greatest number of requests is for those episodes with simultaneous heavy rain and strong wind, and finally, those that are linked to high population density.

  1. The Impact of Restricting Over-the-Counter Sales of Antimicrobial Drugs: Preliminary Analysis of National Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Maria Luísa; Boszczowski, Icaro; Mortari, Naíma; Barrozo, Lígia Vizeu; Chiaravalloti Neto, Francisco; Lobo, Renata Desordi; Pedroso de Lima, Antonio Carlos; Levin, Anna S

    2015-09-01

    To describe the nationwide impact of a restrictive law on over-the-counter sales of antimicrobial drugs, implemented in Brazil in November 2010. Approximately 75% of the population receives healthcare from the public health system and receives free-of-charge medication if prescribed. Total sales in private pharmacies as compared with other channels of sales of oral antibiotics were evaluated in this observational study before and after the law (2008-2012). Defined daily dose per 1000 inhabitants per day (DDD/TID) was used as standard unit. In private pharmacies the effect of the restrictive law was statistically significant (P sales was observed (P = 0.643). The impact in the South and Southeast (more developed) regions was higher than in the North, Northeast, and Mid-West. The state capitals had a 19% decrease, compared with 0.8% increase in the rest of the states. Before the law, the sales of antimicrobial drugs were steadily increasing. From November 2010, with the restrictive law, there was an abrupt drop in sales followed by an increase albeit at a significantly lower rate. The impact was higher in regions with better socio-economic status.

  2. A preliminary approach to quantifying the overall environmental risks posed by development projects during environmental impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Sam; Chadès, Iadine

    2017-01-01

    Environmental impact assessment (EIA) is used globally to manage the impacts of development projects on the environment, so there is an imperative to demonstrate that it can effectively identify risky projects. However, despite the widespread use of quantitative predictive risk models in areas such as toxicology, ecosystem modelling and water quality, the use of predictive risk tools to assess the overall expected environmental impacts of major construction and development proposals is comparatively rare. A risk-based approach has many potential advantages, including improved prediction and attribution of cause and effect; sensitivity analysis; continual learning; and optimal resource allocation. In this paper we investigate the feasibility of using a Bayesian belief network (BBN) to quantify the likelihood and consequence of non-compliance of new projects based on the occurrence probabilities of a set of expert-defined features. The BBN incorporates expert knowledge and continually improves its predictions based on new data as it is collected. We use simulation to explore the trade-off between the number of data points and the prediction accuracy of the BBN, and find that the BBN could predict risk with 90% accuracy using approximately 1000 data points. Although a further pilot test with real project data is required, our results suggest that a BBN is a promising method to monitor overall risks posed by development within an existing EIA process given a modest investment in data collection.

  3. A preliminary assessment of asteroid shapes produced by impact disruption and re-creation: Application to the AIDA target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnouin, Olivier; Michel, Patrick; Richardson, Derek

    2016-04-01

    In order to understand the origin of the 65803 Didymos, the target of the Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment mission, and gain insights on the origin and evolution of the asteroid's162173 Ryugu and 101955 Bennu, we investigate systematically the shapes of all re-accumulated fragments produced by the catastrophic disruption of a parent body that is 1 km in diameter or larger. These new fragments eventually become new asteroids of the size that current sample-return missions plan to explore. We choose a range of impact conditions by varying the parent bodies' strength, size and porosity, and the velocity and size of the projectile. Impact conditions range from near the catastrophic threshold, usually designated by Q*, where half of the target's mass escapes, to far greater values above this threshold. Our numerical investigations of the catastrophic disruption, which are undertaken using an SPH hydrocode, include a model of fragmentation for porous materials. The gravitationally dominated phase of reaccumulation of our asteroids is computed using the N-body code pkdgrav. At sufficiently slow impact speeds in the N-body model, particles are permitted to stick, forming irregular, competent pieces that can gather into non-idealized rubble piles as a result of re-accumulation. Shape and spin information of re-accumulated bodies are thus preserved. Due to numerical expense, this first study uses what we call a hard-sphere model, rather than a soft-sphere spring and dashpot model. This latter model is more commonly used in granular flow simulations for which detailed treatment of the multicontact physics is needed, which is not the case here, and comes at the expense of much smaller timesteps. With the hard-sphere model, there are three supported collision outcomes for bonded aggregates: sticking on contact (to grow the aggregate); bouncing (computed for these generally non-central impacts); and fragmentation (wherein the particles involved become detached from

  4. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH IMPACTS OF SEDIMENT DECONTAMINATION FACILITIES FOR NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROWE,M.D.; KLEIN,R.C.; JONES,K.W.

    1999-07-31

    elsewhere. This report provides a preliminary evaluation, or ``screening assessment,'' of potential occupational, public, and environmental health risks from dredging, transporting, and treating contaminated harbor sediments with thermal treatment methods to render them suitable for disposal or beneficial use. The assessment was done in stages as the project advanced and data became available from other tasks on characteristics of sediments and treatment processes.

  5. Impact of an educational program on the quality of life of patients with lymphedema: A preliminary evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaise, Sophie; Satger, Bernadette; Pernod, Gilles; Richaud, Cécile; Villemur, Béatrice; Carpentier, Patrick H

    2017-09-01

    We report on the preliminary evaluation of a well-designed program, Living with Lymphedema. This longitudinal cohort study assessed patients' quality of life using questionnaires. Our main objective was to evaluate the satisfaction of the patients and their adherence to the program. This was done using a specific questionnaire of satisfaction as well as by noting patients' adherence to the program (number of patients attending all three consultations). The secondary objective was to assess the effect of the program on the patient's quality of life. The assessment criteria were the evolution of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and EuroQol questionnaire scores between the first (C1) and third (C3) consultations. The Living with Lymphedema program targeted all patients with lymphedema in the Grenoble (France) conurbation and within the GRANTED health care network that includes vascular medicine specialists, primary care physicians, physical therapists, and dietitians in the Alpine region of France. All studied patients were ambulatory patients. The GRANTED network took care only of the educational aspect of the disease. All patients with primary or secondary lymphedema were offered the Living with Lymphedema program, whatever their age and the location of the lymphedema (upper or lower limbs). The collection of patient data conformed to the ethical and administrative regulations of the regional health authority. Grenoble Institutional Review Board (CPP Sud-Est V; No. 5891) approval for the study was specifically obtained for this evaluation on December 24, 2012. The program was built around one-to-one consultations, group workshops, and more specialized appointments. It was complementary to the routine medical care received by the patient (not evaluated in this study). It proposed three individual "educational" consultations, seven group workshops, and two specialized consultations with a dietitian. All the consultations or workshops were

  6. Impact of age, verified occupation and lifestyle on semen parameters of infertile males in Jaipur: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Asha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lifestyle factors are the amendable habits and ways of life that can greatly influence overall health and well-being, including fertility. Infertility is a medico-socio problem, and a large proportion of childless people are confronted with social stigmatization and personal frustration. It has become more socially acceptable to delay fatherhood, but the heritable consequences of this trend remain poorly understood. Advancing paternal age, occupation and lifestyle has been implicated in a broad range of abnormal reproductive and genetic outcomes. Objective: The study presents a preliminary datum about the relationship of age, occupation and verified lifestyle on semen parameters in infertile males of Jaipur (Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: Clinical examination, history of infertility, age, occupation, lifestyle, etc., of 102 infertile subjects were recorded predesigned performa. Results: Based on age subjects were divided into two groups. The respective age of infertile subjects in groups I and II ranged 19-30 years and 31-45 years. A significant (P < 0.05 decline was observed in sperm motility and vitality above the age of 30 years (group II as compared to below than 30 years (group I of age. A significant inverse (r = −0.25, −0.20, P < 0.05 correlation were found between sperm motility and vitality to age of group II. In group I, conversely, these parameters was found to be positively correlated with age. Highest prevalence of azoospermia occurs in farmers (66.66%, 50% in groups I and II. The least azoospermia was found among casual laborers in both high and low age groups. In group, I highest percentage of azoospermia (55.55% subject were alcoholic, and smoker (50% and 50% severe oligozoospermia subjects were smokers in both the groups. Conclusion: The age is intimately related to decreasing in sperm motility and vitality, whereas, least effect is observed on sperm count. Occupationally, the highest prevalence of abnormal

  7. Long-Run Impact of Corn-Based Ethanol on the Grain, Oilseed, and Livestock Sectors: A Preliminary Assessment, The

    OpenAIRE

    Amani Elobeid; Simla Tokgoz; Dermot J. Hayes; Bruce A. Babcock; Hart, Chad E.

    2006-01-01

    The ongoing growth of corn-based ethanol production raises some fundamental questions about what impact continued growth will have on U.S. and world agriculture. Estimates of the long-run potential for ethanol production can be made by calculating the corn price at which the incentive to expand ethanol production disappears. Under current ethanol tax policy, if the prices of crude oil, natural gas, and distillers grains stay at current levels, then the break-even corn price is $4.05 per bushe...

  8. Seismically Imaged Architecture of the Chicxulub Impact Crater: Preliminary Results From the Last Cruise of the R/V Maurice Ewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, S. S.; Barton, P. J.; Christeson, G.; Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M. R.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Melosh, H. J.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; McDonald, M.; Vermeesch, P. M.; Surendra, A. T.; Goldin, T.; Mendoza, K.; Sears, T. J.

    2005-05-01

    A new suite of multi-channel seismic reflection lines image key structural elements of the 195 km wide Chicxulub Impact Crater, the best preserved, large impact crater on Earth. The seismic transects, acquired using the R/V Maurice Ewing in January and February 2005, include regional radial lines (dip-oriented), a regional constant-radius profile (strike-oriented), and a dense grid of lines spaced 2 km by 5 km apart near the center of the crater. The radial lines image, from the exterior to interior, the crater rings, crater rim, slump blocks, and peak ring providing an enhanced look at the 3-D architecture of Chicxulub. The constant-radius profile, together with the radial lines, was designed to study any radial variations in deformation, or possibly ejecta, which may lend insight into impact angle and direction. The grid of lines near the crater center examine the structural relationships between the slump blocks, peak ring, and central uplift which according to impact modeling all formed within minutes of the Cretaceous-Tertiary impact. The regional lines, both radial and the constant radius profile, largely confirm the observations of the regional seismic lines collected in 1996. Both datasets show the existence of at least one ring outside of the crater rim and an elevated crater rim with as much as 500 m of offset between the top of the crater rim and the KT boundary within the crater that was subsequently buried by ~1 km of Tertiary sediments. Our preliminary interpretations from the seismic grid near the crater center yield a general architecture of the central crater that includes a 10-15 km wide, doughnut-shaped peak ring that lies ~25 km from the crater center. Underlying the peak ring are sediments with inconsistent reflectivity (possibly breccia), underlain by inward slumped blocks of varying widths, and underlain by ~10 km thick package of reflective lower crust ending with the Moho. The slump blocks, where imaged, underlie the peak ring suggesting

  9. A preliminary investigation into the impact of a pesticide combination on human neuronal and glial cell lines in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Coleman

    Full Text Available Many pesticides are used increasingly in combinations during crop protection and their stability ensures the presence of such combinations in foodstuffs. The effects of three fungicides, pyrimethanil, cyprodinil and fludioxonil, were investigated together and separately on U251 and SH-SY5Y cells, which can be representative of human CNS glial and neuronal cells respectively. Over 48h, all three agents showed significant reductions in cellular ATP, at concentrations that were more than tenfold lower than those which significantly impaired cellular viability. The effects on energy metabolism were reflected in their marked toxic effects on mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, evidence of oxidative stress was seen in terms of a fall in cellular thiols coupled with increases in the expression of enzymes associated with reactive species formation, such as GSH peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. The glial cell line showed significant responsiveness to the toxin challenge in terms of changes in antioxidant gene expression, although the neuronal SH-SY5Y line exhibited greater vulnerability to toxicity, which was reflected in significant increases in caspase-3 expression, which is indicative of the initiation of apoptosis. Cyprodinil was the most toxic agent individually, although oxidative stress-related enzyme gene expression increases appeared to demonstrate some degree of synergy in the presence of the combination of agents. This report suggests that the impact of some pesticides, both individually and in combinations, merits further study in terms of their impact on human cellular health.

  10. An Economic Impact Analysis of the Proposed Yakima/Klickitat Fishery Enhancement Project; Preliminary Design Report, Appendix D.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mack, Richard S.; Cocheba, Donald J.; Green, Daniel; Hedrick, David W.

    1989-12-27

    The objective of this study is to estimate the economic impact of the proposed Yakima/Klickitat Production Project on the local economies of the Yakima and Klickitat subbasins. The project, when operating at planned maximum production, will augment the total number of salmon and steelhead returning to the subbasins by 77,600 and will increase the sustainable terminal harvest by 55,160. These estimates do not include fish harvested in the ocean or in the mainstem Columbia. In addition to evaluating the impacts of the construction, operations and maintenance, experimentation and monitoring, and harvest activities described in the Draft Environmental Assessment (Bonneville Power Administration, 1989), our analysis also evaluates some passageway improvements and Phase II screening of irrigation structures. Both of these augmentations are required In order for the project to reach maximum planned harvest levels. The study area includes the Yakima Subbasin economy (Yakima and Kittitas counties), the mid-Columbia Basin/Klickitat Subbasin economies (Klickitat, Hood River, and Wasco counties), and the Tri-Cities economy (Benton and Franklin counties). The study period extends from 1990 through 2015: from preconstruction planning activities through reaching maximum production.

  11. Preliminary assessment of the impacts and effects of the South Pacific tsunami of September 2009 in Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominey-Howes, D.

    2009-12-01

    The September 2009 tsunami was a regional South Pacific event of enormous significance. Our UNESCO-IOC ITST Samoa survey used a simplified version of a ‘coupled human-environment systems framework’ (Turner et al., 2003) to investigate the impacts and effects of the tsunami in Samoa. Further, the framework allowed us to identify those factors that affected the vulnerability and resilience of the human-environment system before, during and after the tsunami - a global first. Key findings (unprocessed) include: Maximum run-up exceeded 14 metres above sea level Maximum inundation (at right angles to the shore) was approximately 400 metres Maximum inundation with the wave running parallel with the shore (but inland), exceeded 700 metres Buildings sustained varying degrees of damage Damage was correlated with depth of tsunami flow, velocity, condition of foundations, quality of building materials used, quality of workmanship, adherence to the building code and so on Buildings raised even one metre above the surrounding land surface suffered much less damage Plants, trees and mangroves reduced flow velocity and flow depth - leading to greater chances of human survival and lower levels of building damage The tsunami has left a clear and distinguishable geological record in terms of sediments deposited in the coastal landscape The clear sediment layer associated with this tsunami suggests that older (and prehistoric) tsunamis can be identified, helping to answer questions about frequency and magnitude of tsunamis The tsunami caused widespread erosion of the coastal and beach zones but this damage will repair itself naturally and quickly The tsunami has had clear impacts on ecosystems and these are highly variable Ecosystems will repair themselves naturally and are unlikely to preserve long-term impacts It is clear that some plant (tree) species are highly resilient and provided immediate places for safety during the tsunami and resources post-tsunami People of Samoa are

  12. Preliminary Assessment of Potential Impacts to Dungeness Crabs from Disposal of Dredged Materials from the Columbia River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, Walter H.; Miller, Martin C.; Williams, Greg D.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Skalski, John R.

    2006-02-01

    Dredging of the Columbia River navigation channel has raised concerns about dredging-related impacts on Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister). The overall objectives of this effort are to synthesize what is known about disposal effects on Dungeness crabs (Phase 1) and to offer approaches to quantify the effects, including approaches to gain a population-level perspective on any effects found in subsequent studies (Phase 2). This report documents Phase 1, which included (1) development of a conceptual model to integrate knowledge about crab biology and the physical processes occurring during disposal, (2) application of physics-based numerical modeling of the disposal event to understand the physical forces and processes to which a crab might be exposed during disposal, (3) conduct of a vulnerability analysis to identify the potential mechanisms by which crabs may be injured, and (4) recommendations of topics and approaches for future studies to assess the potential population-level effects of disposal on Dungeness crabs. The conceptual model first recognizes that disposal of dredged materials is a physically dynamic process with three aspects: (1) convective descent and bottom encounter, (2) dynamic collapse and spreading, and (3) mounding. Numerical modeling was used to assess the magnitude of the potentially relevant forces and extent of mounding in single disposal events. The modeling outcomes show that predicted impact pressure, shear stress, and mound depth are greatly reduced by discharge in deep water, and somewhat reduced at longer discharge duration. The analysis of numerical modeling results and vulnerabilities indicate that the vulnerability of crabs to compression forces under any of the disposal scenarios is low. For the deep-water disposal scenarios, the maximum forces and mounding do not appear to be sufficiently high enough to warrant concern for surge currents or burial at the depths involved (over 230 ft). For the shallow-water (45 to 65 ft), short

  13. Preliminary Measurement of the K-Shell Ionization Cross Sections of Ti by Positron Impact in the Low Energy Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田丽霞; 刘慢天; 朱敬军; 安竹; 王宝义; 秦秀波

    2012-01-01

    Measurements were performed of K-shell ionization cross sections of Ti element by 10~30 keV positron impact using the thick-target method. The effects of multiple scattering of incident positron and from bremsstrahlung photons and annihilation photons with the thick-target method are discussed with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. Meanwhile, the Monte Carlo method is also applied to determine the detection efficiencies of X- and γ-ray detectors. Our experimental K-shell ionization cross sections for Ti element are compared with the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) theoretical predictions, and it is found that the agreement of the experimental data and theoretical values is good and this indicates that the experimental method adopted in this study is applicable.

  14. Aquatic monitoring programs conducted during environmental impact assessments in Canada: preliminary assessment before and after weakened environmental regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Brynn; Walker, Tony R

    2017-03-01

    Aquatic monitoring programs are imperative for the functioning of the environmental impact assessment (EIA) process and a cornerstone for industrial compliance in Canada. However, in 2012, several leading pieces of federal environmental legislation (e.g., Canadian Environmental Assessment Act c.19, s. 52, 2012) were drastically altered, effectively weakening levels of environmental protection for aquatic ecosystems during project developments. This paper assesses the impact of CEAA 2012 on aquatic monitoring programs (and subsequent monitoring data reporting) across Canada for ten projects (five completed pre-CEAA 2012 and five completed post-CEAA 2012). Projects included four energy and six mining projects and were selected based on the following criteria: (i) representative of Canada's resource economy; (ii) project information was publicly available; and (iii) strong public interest. Projects pre- and post-CEAA 2012 exhibited few apparent differences before and after environmental regulatory changes. However, wide discrepancies exist in numbers and types of parameters reported, along with a lack of consistency in reporting. Projects pre-CEAA 2012 provided more follow-up monitoring commitments. Although qualitative differences remain inconclusive, this paper highlights requirements for further assessment of aquatic monitoring and follow-up programs in Canada. Recommendations for the government to consider during reviews of the federal environmental assessment processes include (i) improved transparency on the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency website ( https://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/ ); (ii) creation of a legally binding standardized aquatic monitoring program framework to ensure that all Canadian aquatic ecosystems are monitored with equal rigour; and (iii) commitments and justification related to frequency of aquatic monitoring of water quality.

  15. Ultrasonographic Fetal Growth Charts: An Informatic Approach by Quantitative Analysis of the Impact of Ethnicity on Diagnoses Based on a Preliminary Report on Salentinian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Tinelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clear guidance on fetal growth assessment is important because of the strong links between growth restriction or macrosomia and adverse perinatal outcome in order to reduce associated morbidity and mortality. Fetal growth curves are extensively adopted to track fetal sizes from the early phases of pregnancy up to delivery. In the literature, a large variety of reference charts are reported but they are mostly up to five decades old. Furthermore, they do not address several variables and factors (e.g., ethnicity, foods, lifestyle, smoke, and physiological and pathological variables, which are very important for a correct evaluation of the fetal well-being. Therefore, currently adopted fetal growth charts are inadequate to support the melting pot of ethnic groups and lifestyles of our society. Customized fetal growth charts are needed to provide an accurate fetal assessment and to avoid unnecessary obstetric interventions at the time of delivery. Starting from the development of a growth chart purposely built for a specific population, in the paper, authors quantify and analyse the impact of the adoption of wrong growth charts on fetal diagnoses. These results come from a preliminary evaluation of a new open service developed to produce personalized growth charts for specific ethnicity, lifestyle, and other parameters.

  16. The IAHR project CCHE-Climate Change impact on the Hydrological cycle, water management and Engineering: an overview and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzi, Roberto; Kojiri, T.; Mynett, A.; Barontini, S.; van de Giesen, N.; Kolokytha, E.; Ngo, L. A.; Oreamuno, R.; Renard, B.; Sighomnou, D.; Vizina, A.

    2010-05-01

    IAHR, the International Association for Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research launched a research Project called Climate Change impact on the Hydrological cycle, water management and Engineering (IAHR CCHE Project). It was motivated by the fact that, although it is now well accepted that, in the light of the recent IPCC reports the vast majority of members of the scientific community are convinced that the climate is changing or at least will experience a significant fluctuation already during the current century, it is perceived that some hydrologists, water experts and hydraulic engineers are not yet ready to incorporate climate change scenarios in their designs for such projects as: - flood protection and river training, - dam rehabilitation, - water resources management under water scarcity and changes in the hydrological regimes. The objective of the project is to encourage a close co-operation between the scientific and engineering communities in taking appropriate and timely action in response to the impact of climate change on the hydrological regime and on water resource projects. The project aims at reporting on (a) the current state of knowledge as regards the impact of projected climate change on the hydrological regime in different regions of the world, where these regions are defined not just in geographic terms but also on the basis of their level of economic and water resources development; (b) the extent to which these impacts are recognized and taken into account by national water authorities, engineering organizations and other regulating bodies in setting their standard practices and procedures for the planning, design and operation of water works. These adaptation measures will include both "hard" responses, such as the construction or enlargement of engineering structures, and "soft" responses, such as changes in legislation or the operating rules of existing structures. An overview of the project and preliminary results extracted from of

  17. The Preliminary Ruling Decision in the Case of Google vs. Louis Vuitton Concerning the AdWord Service and its Impact on the Community Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Gongol

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The internet user after entering the keywords obtains two kinds of search results – natural and sponsored ones. The following paper deals with the issue of using keywords which correspond to trademarks registered by a third party for advertising purposes through internet search portals such as Google, Yahoo, Bing, Seznam, Centrum etc. (in principle web search portals. The objective of this article is to analyze decided cases dealing with the AdWords service issued by the Court of Justice of the European Union and compare them also with the attitude in similar disputes in the U.S. Within this knowledge it is necessary to determine the impact of these decisions on further national courts decisions of European Union member states. Moreover there is also legal impact on copyright law and responsibility of internet search engines deduced. The method of the analysis of courts decisions is used and the method of legal comparison is applied to different attitudes in similar cases. Where a third party uses a sign which is identical with the trademark in relation to goods or services identical with those for which the mark is registered, the trademark proprietor is allowed to prohibit such use if it is liable to affect one of the functions of the mark (particularly the function of indicating origin. Regarding to the liability of the Internet search engine itself, decisions of the courts in matters of Internet search engines in the European Union vary from state to state. Whereas the German courts tend to currently access the responsibility for the outcome of the search engines more freely, the French courts are often more stringent. Differently, we can say much more liberal, is the access of the U.S. courts to this issue. Preliminary ruling decision in case of Louis Vuitton Malletier SA vs. Google, Inc. and community practice in further cases follow similar (liberal decisions of the courts of the U.S.

  18. Impact of comorbidity on three month follow-up outcome of children with ADHD in a child guidance clinic: Preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangan Srinivasaraghavan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is one of the common neurodevelopmental disorders. Aims: Study objective is to report impact of comorbidities on short-term outcome in children with ADHD followed in a child guidance clinic. Settings and Design: This was done in a child guidance clinic run jointly by the pediatric and psychiatry department at a tertiary teaching hospital. This is a 3 month prospective follow-up study to assess the outcome in ADHD children. Materials and Methods: Children attending pediatric department with behavioral problems or poor scholastic performance were screened for ADHD and further confirmation of diagnosis was done by semistructured interview of the child and parent. Children functional assessment and ADHD symptom profile was compared at baseline and at follow-up. We screened for and excluded those showing autistic spectrum disorder and having worse than mild mental retardation. Baseline variables were compared between improved and not improved subgroups and impact of these variables on outcome at 3-month follow-up was analyzed. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics. Results: Of the 25 children completing the study, at the end of 3 months, 15 improved (not fulfilling criteria for ADHD and 10 did not improve. Applying Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (K-SADS for diagnosis of psychiatric comorbidities, six had associated psychiatric comorbidities. This was significantly higher in those who did not improve. Conclusions: Presence of comorbidities at baseline was found to affect outcome at 3 month assessment in this preliminary study. Future studies with larger sample and longer follow-up are needed for finding the predictors of outcome in ADHD children in developing nations.

  19. Preliminary study of the impact of pig or goat manure fertilization of a meadow on oribatid mites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seniczak Anna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of pig or goat manure fertilization of a meadow with doses of 80 kg N ha−1, 140 kg N ha−1, and 200 kg N ha−1 (plots 1-6 on oribatid mites. A control plot (0 was left unfertilized. The manure was applied to the meadow in the early spring of 2012, and soil samples were collected in the spring of 2012 and 2013. In total, 6053 oribatid mites were examined, including 1163 juveniles. The effect of fertilizing on the Oribatida depended on the dose of manure, but not on its type. A low dose of pig or goat manure did not affect the density of Oribatida, whereas the other doses decreased it, but only the highest doses decreased it significantly, compared to the control. Species diversity decreased with the dose of manure. In total, 24 species of Oribatida were found and some species reacted differently to both types of manure. For example, a low dose of pig manure significantly increased the density of Eupelops occultus, whereas the density of other species significantly decreased under the influence of the highest dose of pig manure (Achipteria coleoptrata, highest doses of pig and goat manure (Galumna obvia, Liebstadia similis, and medium and highest doses of goat manure (Scheloribates laevigatus.

  20. A Preliminary Study on the Measures to Assess the Organizational Safety: The Cultural Impact on Human Error Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The Fukushima I nuclear accident following the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011 occurred after twelve years had passed since the JCO accident which was caused as a result of an error made by JCO employees. These accidents, along with the Chernobyl accident, associated with characteristic problems of various organizations caused severe social and economic disruptions and have had significant environmental and health impact. The cultural problems with human errors occur for various reasons, and different actions are needed to prevent different errors. Unfortunately, much of the research on organization and human error has shown widely various or different results which call for different approaches. In other words, we have to find more practical solutions from various researches for nuclear safety and lead a systematic approach to organizational deficiency causing human error. This paper reviews Hofstede's criteria, IAEA safety culture, safety areas of periodic safety review (PSR), teamwork and performance, and an evaluation of HANARO safety culture to verify the measures used to assess the organizational safety

  1. [Impact of International Association of Urological Pathology Gleason scoring system on prostatic carcinoma grading: a preliminary analysis of 185 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gongwei; Shen, Danhua

    2014-10-01

    To explore the impact of the 2005 International Association of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Gleason score (GS) system on prostatic carcinoma grading. Using the 1977 revision and ISUP version of GS system, 112 needle biopsies, 18 transurethral resections of the prostate and 55 radical prostatectomies were scored. The proportion of grading discrepancy was observed and compared between the two versions of GS. Gleason scores of 3+3, 3+4 and 4+3 accounted for 47.0% (87/185), 11.4% (21/185) and 17.3% (32/185) in the modified system, and accounted for 25.9% (48/185), 21.6% (40/185) and 27.6 % (51/185) in ISUP system, respectively. The percentages of primary grade by modified vs. ISUP system were 62.7% (116/185) vs.50.8% (94/185) for grade 3, and 31.4% (58/185) vs. 41.6% (77/185) for grade 4. The percentages of secondary grade by modified vs. ISUP system were 65.9% (122/185) vs. 54.6% (101/185) for grade 3, and 21.1% (39/185) vs. 31.4% (58/185) for grade 4. ISUP system is different from the modified system. Compared with the modified system, the proportion scored by ISUP system tends to decline for GS 3+3 but increase for GS 3+4 and 4+3.

  2. Joint constraints on the Galactic dark matter halo and GC from hypervelocity stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Elena M.; Marchetti, T.; Cacciato, M.; Kuiack, M.; Sari, R.

    2017-01-01

    The mass assembly history of the Milky Way can inform both theory of galaxy formation and the underlying cosmological model. Thus, observational constraints on the properties of both its baryonic and dark matter contents are sought. Here we show that hypervelocity stars (HVSs) can in principle provide such constraints. We model the observed velocity distribution of HVSs, produced by tidal break-up of stellar binaries caused by Sgr A*. Considering a Galactic Centre (GC) binary population consistent with that inferred in more observationally accessible regions, a fit to current HVS data with significance level >5% can only be obtained if the escape velocity from the GC to 50 kpc is V_G ≲ 850 km s-1, regardless of the enclosed mass distribution. When a NFW matter density profile for the dark matter halo is assumed, haloes with V_G ≲ 850 km s-1are in agreement with predictions in the ΛCDM model and that a subset of models around M200 ˜ 0.5 - 1.5 × 1012M⊙ and r_s ≲ 35 kpc can also reproduce Galactic circular velocity data. HVS data alone cannot currently exclude potentials with VG > 850 km s-1. Finally, specific constraints on the halo mass from HVS data are highly dependent on the assumed baryonic mass potentials. This first attempt to simultaneously constrain GC and dark halo properties is primarily hampered by the paucity and quality of data. It nevertheless demonstrates the potential of our method, that may be fully realised with the ESA Gaia mission.

  3. CFD Analysis of Mixing Characteristics of Several Fuel Injectors at Hypervelocity Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozda, Tomasz G.; Drummond, J. Philip; Baurle, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    CFD analysis is presented of the mixing characteristics and performance of three fuel injectors at hypervelocity flow conditions. The calculations were carried out using the VULCAN-CFD solver and Reynolds-Averaged Simulations (RAS). The high Mach number flow conditions match those proposed for the planned experiments conducted as a part of the Enhanced Injection and Mixing Project (EIMP) at the NASA Langley Research Center. The EIMP aims to investigate scramjet fuel injection and mixing physics, improve the understanding of underlying physical processes, and develop enhancement strategies and functional relationships relevant to flight Mach numbers greater than eight. Because of the high Mach number flow considered, the injectors consist of a fuel placement device, a strut; and a fluidic vortical mixer, a ramp. These devices accomplish the necessary task of distributing and mixing fuel into the supersonic cross-flow albeit via different strategies. Both of these devices were previously studied at lower flight Mach numbers where they exhibited promising performance in terms of mixing efficiency and total pressure recovery. For comparison, a flush-wall injector is also included. This type of injector generally represents the simplest method of introducing fuel into a scramjet combustor, however, at high flight Mach number conditions, the dynamic pressure needed to induce sufficient fuel penetration may be difficult to achieve along with other requirements such as achieving desired levels of fuel-to-air mixing at the required equivalence ratio. The three injectors represent the baseline configurations planned for the experiments. The current work discusses the mixing flow field behavior and differences among the three fuel injectors, mixing performance as described by the mixing efficiency and the total pressure recovery, and performance considerations based on the thrust potential.

  4. An artificial neural network to discover hypervelocity stars: candidates in Gaia DR1/TGAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, T.; Rossi, E. M.; Kordopatis, G.; Brown, A. G. A.; Rimoldi, A.; Starkenburg, E.; Youakim, K.; Ashley, R.

    2017-09-01

    The paucity of hypervelocity stars (HVSs) known to date has severely hampered their potential to investigate the stellar population of the Galactic Centre and the Galactic potential. The first Gaia data release (DR1, 2016 September 14) gives an opportunity to increase the current sample. The challenge is the disparity between the expected number of HVSs and that of bound background stars. We have applied a novel data mining algorithm based on machine learning techniques, an artificial neural network, to the Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution catalogue. With no pre-selection of data, we could exclude immediately ∼99 per cent of the stars in the catalogue and find 80 candidates with more than 90 per cent predicted probability to be HVSs, based only on their position, proper motions and parallax. We have cross-checked our findings with other spectroscopic surveys, determining radial velocities for 30 and spectroscopic distances for five candidates. In addition, follow-up observations have been carried out at the Isaac Newton Telescope for 22 stars, for which we obtained radial velocities and distance estimates. We discover 14 stars with a total velocity in the Galactic rest frame >400 km s-1, and five of these have a probability of >50 per cent of being unbound from the Milky Way. Tracing back their orbits in different Galactic potential models, we find one possible unbound HVS with v ∼ 520 km s-1, five bound HVSs and, notably, five runaway stars with median velocity between 400 and 780 km s-1. At the moment, uncertainties in the distance estimates and ages are too large to confirm the nature of our candidates by narrowing down their ejection location, and we wait for future Gaia releases to validate the quality of our sample. This test successfully demonstrates the feasibility of our new data-mining routine.

  5. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1993-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) can be used to model hypervelocity impact phenomena via the addition of a strength of materials treatment. SPH is the only technique that can model such problems efficiently due to the combination of 3-dimensional geometry, large translations of material, large deformations, and large void fractions for most problems of interest. This makes SPH an ideal candidate for modeling of asteroid impact, spacecraft shield modeling, and planetary accretion. In this paper we describe the derivation of the strength equations in SPH, show several basic code tests, and present several impact test cases with experimental comparisons.

  6. Impact of infection with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV on the risk of cancer among children in Malawi - preliminary findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batumba Mkume

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of infection with HIV on the risk of cancer in children is uncertain, particularly for those living in sub-Saharan Africa. In an ongoing study in a paediatric oncology centre in Malawi, children (aged ≤ 15 years with known or suspected cancers are being recruited and tested for HIV and their mothers or carers interviewed. This study reports findings for children recruited between 2005 and 2008. Methods Only children with a cancer diagnosis were included. Odds ratios (OR for being HIV positive were estimated for each cancer type (with adjustment for age ( Results Of the 586 children recruited, 541 (92% met the inclusion criteria and 525 (97% were tested for HIV. Overall HIV seroprevalence was 10%. Infection with HIV was associated with Kaposi sarcoma (29 cases; OR = 93.5, 95% CI 26.9 to 324.4 and with non-Burkitt, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (33 cases; OR = 4.4, 95% CI 1.1 to 17.9 but not with Burkitt lymphoma (269 cases; OR = 2.2, 95% CI 0.8 to 6.4. Conclusions In this study, only Kaposi sarcoma and non-Burkitt, non-Hodgkin lymphoma were associated with HIV infection. The endemic form of Burkitt lymphoma, which is relatively frequent in Malawi, was not significantly associated with HIV. While the relatively small numbers of children with other cancers, together with possible limitations of diagnostic testing may limit our conclusions, the findings may suggest differences in the pathogenesis of HIV-related malignancies in different parts of the world.

  7. Romanian version of the oral health impact profile-49 questionnaire: validation and preliminary assessment of the psychometrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    GRECU, ALEXANDRU-GRATIAN; DUDEA, DIANA; BALAZSI, ROBERT; DUMITRASCU, DAN LUCIAN

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Oral Health Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) represents a multidimensional structure, being measured by complex instruments, such as the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP). The aim of this present study is to develop and test the psychometric properties of an initial Romanian (OHIP-49Ro) version. Methods The original OHIP-49 version was translated using a forward-backward technique into the Romanian OHIP-49Ro, which was applied in an interview form to 150 patients of the Second Medical Clinique of Internal Medicine, Cluj-Napoca. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was applied, in order to evaluate the factor structure and construct validity of the OHIP-49Ro. Results The correlations between the OHIP-49Ro subscales were all positive and statistically significant. Cronbach’s Alpha coefficients values are above 0.7 for all subscales, providing support for the internal consistency of OHIP-49Ro scale scores. Regarding the CFA, for the seven factor model, the Bentler scaled chi-square (S–Bχ2) indicated a value of 2193.74 (df=1091; p=0.001), the CFI a value of 0.740, the TLI a value of 0.72 and RMSEA the value of 0.82. Conclusions The results of this study suggest a high internal consistency of the OHIP-49Ro instrument. Due to the correlations between several sets of factors, and the multiple-factorial load for several items, the OHIP-49Ro’s factorial structure requires further research on different samples and in different cultural and educational contexts. PMID:26733752

  8. Preliminary observations on the impact of complex stress histories on sandstone response to salt weathering: laboratory simulations of process combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, S.; Smith, B. J.; Warke, P. A.

    2007-03-01

    Historic sandstone structures carry an inheritance, or a ‘memory’, of past stresses that the stone has undergone since its placement in a façade. This inheritance, which conditions present day performance, may be made up of long-term exposure to a combination of low magnitude background environmental factors (for example, salt weathering, temperature and moisture cycling) and, superimposed upon these, less frequent but potentially high magnitude events or ‘exceptional’ factors (for example, lime rendering, severe frost events, fire). The impact of complex histories on the decay pathways of historic sandstone is not clearly understood, but this paper seeks to improve that understanding through the use of a laboratory ‘process combination’ study. Blocks of quartz sandstone (Peakmoor, from NW England) were divided into subsets that experienced different histories (lime rendering and removal, fire and freeze-thaw cycles in isolation and combination) that reflected the event timeline of a real medieval sandstone monument in NE Ireland, Bonamargy Friary (McCabe et al. 2006b). These subsets were then subject to salt weathering cycles using a 10% salt solution of NaCl and MgSO4 that represents the ‘every-day’ stress environment of, for example, sandstone structures in coastal, or polluted urban, location. Block response to salt weathering was monitored by collecting, drying and weighing the debris that was released as blocks were immersed in the salt solution at the beginning of each cycle. The results illustrate the complexity of the stone decay system, showing that seemingly small variations in stress history can produce divergent response to salt weathering cycles. Applied to real-world historic sandstone structures, this concept may help to explain the spatial and temporal variability of sandstone response to background environmental factors on a single façade, and encourage conservators to include the role of stress inheritance when selecting and

  9. Cross - cultural adaptation and preliminary validation of the Turkish version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale among 5-6-year-old children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peker Kadriye

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Turkey, formal pre-primary education for children 5- 6 years old provides the ideal setting for school-based oral health promotion programs and oral health care services. To develop effective oral health promotion programs, there is a need to assess this target group's subjective oral health needs as well as clinical needs. The Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS is a well-known instrument for assessing oral health quality of life in children aged 0-5 years old and their families. This study aimed to adapt the ECOHIS for children 5-6 years old in a Turkish-speaking community and to undertake a preliminary investigation of its psychometric properties. Methods The Turkish version of the ECOHIS was obtained with forward/backward translations, expert panels and pre-testing and it was tested in a convenience sample of 121 parents of 5- 6 year-old children attending nursery classes of three public schools. Data were collected through clinical examinations and self-completed questionnaires. The main analyses were carried out on the imputed data set. The validity of content, face, construct, discriminant and convergent and as well as the reliability of internal and test-retest of the ECOHIS were evaluated. Sensitivity analysis was performed to examine the effect of the complete case analysis for managing "Don't know" responses on the validity and reliability of the ECOHIS. Results The analysis of the imputed data set showed that Cronbach's alphas for the child and family sections were 0.92 and 0.84 respectively, and for the whole scale was 0.93. The intraclass correlation coefficient for test-retest was 0.86. The scale scores on the child and parent sections indicating worse quality of life were significantly associated with poor parental ratings of their child's oral health, high caries experience, higher gingival index scores and problem-orientated dental attendance, supporting its construct, convergent and

  10. Mindfulness meditation, well-being, and heart rate variability: a preliminary investigation into the impact of intensive Vipassana meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krygier, Jonathan R; Heathers, James A J; Shahrestani, Sara; Abbott, Maree; Gross, James J; Kemp, Andrew H

    2013-09-01

    Mindfulness meditation has beneficial effects on brain and body, yet the impact of Vipassana, a type of mindfulness meditation, on heart rate variability (HRV) - a psychophysiological marker of mental and physical health - is unknown. We hypothesised increases in measures of well-being and HRV, and decreases in ill-being after training in Vipassana compared to before (time effects), during the meditation task compared to resting baseline (task effects), and a time by task interaction with more pronounced differences between tasks after Vipassana training. HRV (5-minute resting baseline vs. 5-minute meditation) was collected from 36 participants before and after they completed a 10-day intensive Vipassana retreat. Changes in three frequency-domain measures of HRV were analysed using 2 (Time; pre- vs. post-Vipassana)× 2 (Task; resting baseline vs. meditation) within subjects ANOVA. These measures were: normalised high-frequency power (HF n.u.), a widely used biomarker of parasympathetic activity; log-transformed high frequency power (ln HF), a measure of RSA and required to interpret normalised HF; and Traube-Hering-Mayer waves (THM), a component of the low frequency spectrum linked to baroreflex outflow. As expected, participants showed significantly increased well-being, and decreased ill-being. ln HF increased overall during meditation compared to resting baseline, while there was a time∗task interaction for THM. Further testing revealed that pre-Vipassana only ln HF increased during meditation (vs. resting baseline), consistent with a change in respiration. Post-Vipassana, the meditation task increased HF n.u. and decreased THM compared to resting baseline, suggesting post-Vipassana task-related changes are characterised by a decrease in absolute LF power, not parasympathetic-mediated increases in HF power. Such baroreflex changes are classically associated with attentional load, and our results are interpreted in light of the concept of 'flow' - a state of

  11. Experimental studies of oblique impact. [of meteorites on planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gault, D. E.; Wedekind, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Meteoritic materials most probably impact planetary bodies along oblique trajectories inclined less than 45 deg above their surfaces. Laboratory studies of hypervelocity impacts against rock and particulate media are presented that indicate important effects of obliquity on crater size, shape, and ejecta distribution. The effects are particularly important to crater size-frequency analyses and geologic interpretations of crater formations. Impacts at shallow incidence, which are not uncommon, lead to ricochet of the impacting object accompanied with some entrained excavated materials at velocities only slightly reduced from the pre-impact value.

  12. The impact of depression and somatic symptoms on treatment outcomes in patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a preliminary study in a naturalistic treatment setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, J S; Ko, H J; Wang, S-M; Cho, K J; Kim, J C; Lee, S-J; Pae, C-U

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of depression and somatic symptoms on treatment outcomes in Korean male patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) attending a routine clinical practice. This was a 12-week prospective observational study (n = 80). The Korean version of the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) to measure the severity of CP/CPPS, the Korean version of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) to assess depression, the Korean version of the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (PHQ-15) to evaluate somatisation and the Korean version of the EuroQol Questionnaire-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), specifically the EQ-5D utility index and the EQ-5D visual analogue scale (EQ-5D VAS), to assess quality of life, were utilised and given at baseline and week 12. The primary and secondary end-points in this study were changes in the NIH-CPSI total score from baseline to week 12 according to depression and somatisation. The change in NIH-CPSI total score was significantly higher in those without depression than in those with depression (p = 0.003), with a magnitude of difference of 2.8. The responder rate (a ≥ 4 point decrease in NIH-CPSI total score from baseline) was significantly higher in those without depression (42.9%) than in those with depression (17.2%, p = 0.023). However, significant differences were not observed between the two groups in the other outcome measures or in all study outcomes between subjects with or without somatisation. A logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence or absence of depression may be a principal predictor of response to treatment. These preliminary results indicate that depression may have a negative impact on treatment outcome and is a likely predictor of response to treatment in patients with CP/CPPS. However, additional studies with adequate power and improved design are necessary to further support the present findings. © 2014

  13. Optimization of large amorphous silicon and silica structures for molecular dynamics simulations of energetic impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samela, Juha, E-mail: juha.samela@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Norris, Scott A. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75205 (United States); Nordlund, Kai [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Aziz, Michael J. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    A practical method to create optimized amorphous silicon and silica structures for molecular dynamics simulations is developed and tested. The method is based on the Wooten, Winer, and Weaire algorithm and combination of small optimized blocks to larger structures. The method makes possible to perform simulations of either very large cluster hypervelocity impacts on amorphous targets or small displacements induced by low energy ion impacts in silicon.

  14. Preliminary Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Antonio San Antonio International Airport To Aus tin To Corpus Christi Brooks AFB 281 Camp Bullis Military Reservation LEGEND B ro o ks /0 0 2...Emergency Response Act (AHERA) P.L. 99-519 and P.L. 101-637, provide the regulatory basis for managing ACM in kindergarten through twelfth grade school

  15. Microscopic Effects of Shock Metamorphism in Crystalline Rocks Correlated With Shock Induced Changes in Density, Haughton Impact Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, A. C.; Osinski, G.; Moser, D.

    2009-05-01

    Asteroid and comet impacts are an important geological process on all solid planetary bodies, including Earth, and involve pressures and temperatures that may reach several hundred GPa and several thousand K [1] over very limited spatial and temporal scales. This results in shock metamorphism and alters the target material on both megascopic and microscopic scales [2]. Many shock metamorphic features are unique to hypervelocity impact environments and are, therefore, diagnostic of such an event [1,2]. Of particular interest for this study is the effect of hypervelocity impact on the density of the target material. In the case of crystalline target rocks, shock metamorphism results in an increase of pore space and impact induced fractures which act to decrease the density. The Haughton impact structure is a well-preserved late Eocene (39 ± 2 Ma) complex impact structure, situated near the western end of Devon Island (75°22'N, 89°41'W) [3]. The geology of the area consists of a sedimentary sequence unconformably overlying crystalline Precambrian gneisses of the Canadian Shield. Since the impact, Devon Island has remained tectonically stable and Haughton remains well-preserved despite being subjected to several glaciations. The excellent preservation of the structure is largely due to the primarily cold and relatively dry environment that has existed in the Arctic since the Eocene [3]. Samples of crystalline material were collected from 36 sites within the impact breccia unit of the Haughton impact structure. These samples display a wide range of density and physical appearance. The type of shock effect(s) created depends upon the pressures and temperatures involved as well as the composition, density and material's location in the target. The samples found in the Haughton impact structure show a wide range of shock effects and thus were exposed to a variety of different conditions likely due to their in-situ positions relative to the impact. Polished thin sections

  16. Response of composite laminates on impact of high velocity projectiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siva Kumar, K.; Balakrishna Bhat, T. [Defence Metallurgical Research Lab., Hyderabad (India)

    1998-05-01

    Past work on damage of composites subjected to low velocity and hypervelocity impact has been briefly reviewed and some new results on the glass fibre reinforced plastic composite laminates impacted with high velocity projectiles are presented. The effect of thickness of the laminates and the angle of attack on the energy absorption by the composite laminates and the area of damage caused by impact are described. A correlation is made between the energy absorption and the area of damage. Also described is a new method called infiltration radiography useful for assessing the damage in laminated composites upon ballistic impact. (orig.) 28 refs.

  17. MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM-PRELIMINARY REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

    2010-08-18

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that comes in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter offgas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of

  18. MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM - PRELIMINARY REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

    2009-03-25

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that come in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter off-gas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of

  19. Predicted Space Motions for Hypervelocity and Runaway Stars: Proper Motions and Radial Velocities for the GAIA Era

    CERN Document Server

    Kenyon, Scott J; Brown, Warren R; Geller, Margaret J

    2014-01-01

    We predict the distinctive three dimensional space motions of hypervelocity stars (HVSs) and runaway stars moving in a realistic Galactic potential. For nearby stars with distances less than 10~kpc, unbound stars are rare; however, proper motions isolate bound HVSs and runaways from indigenous halo stars. Towards the Galactic Center, high proper motion stars are a unique signature of HVSs or runaways. At larger distances of 20-100 kpc, unbound HVSs are much more common than runaways; radial velocities easily distinguish both from indigenous halo stars. Comparisons of the predictions with existing observations are encouraging. Although the models fail to match observations of solar-type HVS candidates from SEGUE, they agree well with data for B-type HVS and runaways from other surveys. Complete samples of g <= 20 stars with GAIA should provide clear tests of formation models for HVSs and runaways and will enable accurate probes of the shape of the Galactic potential.

  20. Predicted space motions for hypervelocity and runaway stars: proper motions and radial velocities for the Gaia Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bromley, Benjamin C., E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu [Department of Physics, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E, Rm 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We predict the distinctive three-dimensional space motions of hypervelocity stars (HVSs) and runaway stars moving in a realistic Galactic potential. For nearby stars with distances less than 10 kpc, unbound stars are rare; proper motions alone rarely isolate bound HVSs and runaways from indigenous halo stars. At large distances of 20-100 kpc, unbound HVSs are much more common than runaways; radial velocities easily distinguish both from indigenous halo stars. Comparisons of the predictions with existing observations are encouraging. Although the models fail to match observations of solar-type HVS candidates from SEGUE, they agree well with data for B-type HVS and runaways from other surveys. Complete samples of g ≲ 20 stars with Gaia should provide clear tests of formation models for HVSs and runaways and will enable accurate probes of the shape of the Galactic potential.

  1. Final Results of Shuttle MMOD Impact Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, J. L.; Christiansen, E. L.; Lear, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database documents damage features on each Orbiter thought to be from micrometeoroids (MM) or orbital debris (OD). Data is divided into tables for crew module windows, payload bay door radiators and thermal protection systems along with other miscellaneous regions. The combined number of records in the database is nearly 3000. Each database record provides impact feature dimensions, location on the vehicle and relevant mission information. Additional detail on the type and size of particle that produced the damage site is provided when sampling data and definitive spectroscopic analysis results are available. Guidelines are described which were used in determining whether impact damage is from micrometeoroid or orbital debris impact based on the findings from scanning electron microscopy chemical analysis. Relationships assumed when converting from observed feature sizes in different shuttle materials to particle sizes will be presented. A small number of significant impacts on the windows, radiators and wing leading edge will be highlighted and discussed in detail, including the hypervelocity impact testing performed to estimate particle sizes that produced the damage.

  2. A preliminary study of the impact of the ERS 1 C band scatterometer wind data on the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts global data assimilation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ross N.

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of the impact of the ERS 1 scatterometer wind data on the current European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis and forecast system has been carried out. Although the scatterometer data results in changes to the analyses and forecasts, there is no consistent improvement or degradation. Our results are based on comparing analyses and forecasts from assimilation cycles. The two sets of analyses are very similar except for the low level wind fields over the ocean. Impacts on the analyzed wind fields are greater over the southern ocean, where other data are scarce. For the most part the mass field increments are too small to balance the wind increments. The effect of the nonlinear normal mode initialization on the analysis differences is quite small, but we observe that the differences tend to wash out in the subsequent 6-hour forecast. In the Northern Hemisphere, analysis differences are very small, except directly at the scatterometer locations. Forecast comparisons reveal large differences in the Southern Hemisphere after 72 hours. Notable differences in the Northern Hemisphere do not appear until late in the forecast. Overall, however, the Southern Hemisphere impacts are neutral. The experiments described are preliminary in several respects. We expect these data to ultimately prove useful for global data assimilation.

  3. Accelerator experiments with soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles: application to ongoing projects of future X-ray missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perinati, E.; Diebold, S.; Kendziorra, E.;

    2012-01-01

    We report on our activities, currently in progress, aimed at performing accelerator experiments with soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles. They include tests of different types of X-ray detectors and related components (such as filters) and measurements of scattering of soft protons...... and hyper-velocity dust particles off X-ray mirror shells. These activities have been identified as a goal in the context of a number of ongoing space projects in order to assess the risk posed by environmental radiation and dust and qualify the adopted instrumentation with respect to possible damage...... or performance degradation. In this paper we focus on tests for the Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) used aboard the LOFT space mission. We use the Van de Graaff accelerators at the University of T\\"ubingen and at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg, for soft proton and hyper...

  4. Accelerator experiments with soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles: application to ongoing projects of future X-ray missions

    CERN Document Server

    Perinati, E; Kendziorra, E; Santangelo, A; Tenzer, C; Jochum, J; Bugiel, S; Srama, R; Del Monte, E; Feroci, M; Rubini, A; Rachevski, A; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Rashevskaya, I; Vacchi, A; Azzarello, P; Bozzo, E; Herder, J -W den; Zane, S; Brandt, S; Hernanz, M; Leutenegger, M A; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Meidinger, N; Strüder, L; Cordier, B; Götz, D; Fraser, G W; Osborne, J P; Dennerl, K; Freyberg, M; Friedrich, P

    2012-01-01

    We report on our activities, currently in progress, aimed at performing accelerator experiments with soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles. They include tests of different types of X-ray detectors and related components (such as filters) and measurements of scattering of soft protons and hyper-velocity dust particles off X-ray mirror shells. These activities have been identified as a goal in the context of a number of ongoing space projects in order to assess the risk posed by environmental radiation and dust and qualify the adopted instrumentation with respect to possible damage or performance degradation. In this paper we focus on tests for the Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) used aboard the LOFT space mission. We use the Van de Graaff accelerators at the University of T\\"ubingen and at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg, for soft proton and hyper-velocity dust tests respectively. We present the experimental set-up adopted to perform the tests, status of the activities...

  5. An Innovative Solution to NASA's NEO Impact Threat Mitigation Grand Challenge and Flight Validation Mission Architecture Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Hypervelocity Asteroid Intercept Vehicle (HAIV) mission architecture, which blends a hypervelocity kinetic impactor with a subsurface nuclear explosion for optimal...

  6. The Microstructure of Lunar Micrometeorite Impact Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The peak of the mass flux of impactors striking the lunar surface is made up of objects approximately 200 micrometers in diameter that erode rocks, comminute regolith grains, and produce agglutinates. The effects of these micro-scale impacts are still not fully understood. Much effort has focused on evaluating the physical and optical effects of micrometeorite impacts on lunar and meteoritic material using pulsed lasers to simulate the energy deposited into a substrate in a typical hypervelocity impact. Here we characterize the physical and chemical changes that accompany natural micrometeorite impacts into lunar rocks with long surface exposure to the space environment (12075 and 76015). Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations were obtained from cross-sections of approximately 10-20 micrometers diameter craters that revealed important micro-structural details of micrometeorite impact processes, including the creation of npFe (sup 0) in the melt, and extensive deformation around the impact site.

  7. Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohse, Detlef; Bergmann, Raymond; Mikkelsen, Rene; Zeilstra, Christiaan; Meer, van der Devaraj; Versluis, Michel

    2004-01-01

    A lot of information on impacts of solid bodies on planets has been extracted from remote observations of impact craters on planetary surfaces; experiments however with large enough impact energies as compared to the energy stored in the ground are difficult. We approach this problem by downscaled e

  8. Hypervelocity Impact: Proceedings of the 1992 Symposium Held in Austin, Texas on 17-19 November 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    during early bulging b = (d.p + di2 )/2 is used. Figure 15 shows x/b as a funcion of x. x/b increases at small distances strongly with x, becomes one...Elsevier Science P’ublishers WV.Amsterdar. Weber. ;\\I. J1. (1986). CR I?( andbook, of Laser Scienice and Technology,. Vol. IV. (CRC Press. Boca Haton. FL

  9. Development of Techniques for Investigating Energy Contributions to Target Deformation and Penetration During Reactive Projectile Hypervelocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    stachel aus Aluminium sind Gegenstand dieser Masterarbeit. Es werden die Gründe beobachteter Zielverformung mit Hilfe von speziellen Verfahren im FEM...34:J ,.// \\ Moteriol: 1 Jeff Mason jmoson30illinois.edu 6061 A I urn in urn t-------------- University of Illinois

  10. LMC origin of the hyper-velocity star HE 0437-5439. Beyond the supermassive black hole paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    Przybilla, N; Heber, U; Firnstein, M; Butler, K; Napiwotzki, R; Edelmann, H

    2008-01-01

    Context: Hyper-velocity stars move so fast that only a supermassive black hole (SMBH) seems to be capable to accelerate them. Hence the Galactic centre (GC) is their only suggested place of origin. Edelmann et al. (2005) found the early B-star HE0437-5439 to be too short-lived to have reached its current position in the Galactic halo if ejected from the GC, except if being a blue straggler. Its proximity to the LMC suggested an origin from this galaxy. Aims: The chemical signatures of stars at the GC are significantly different from those in the LMC. Hence, an accurate measurement of the abundance pattern of HE0437-5439 will yield a new tight constraint on the place of birth of this star. Methods: High-resolution spectra obtained with UVES on the VLT are analysed using state-of-the-art non-LTE modelling techniques. Results: We measured abundances of individual elements to very high accuracy in HE0437-5439 as well as in two reference stars, from the LMC and the solar neighbourhood. The abundance pattern is not...

  11. Hypervelocity Code to Design Light Gas Guns to Achieve 10km/s+ Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — With over 100,000,000 particles smaller than 1 cm in low earth orbit, it is critical that shielding will adequately protect from impacts of this size.  A 3SLGG...

  12. A Preliminary Investigation of Dual Mode Fracture Sustained by Graphite/Epoxy Laminates Impacted by High-Velocity Spherical Metallic Projectiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Ended Penetrators", Foreign Object Damage to Composites, ASTM STP 568, 1975, pp 159-172. 8. Caprino , G., "Residual Strength Prediction of Impacted...CFRP Laminates", Journal of Composite Materials, Vol. 18, November 1984, pp 508-518. 9. Crivelli, V.I., G. Caprino , A. Di Ilio, and L. Carrino, "Impact

  13. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in the United States. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    This report is one of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United States and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. This report describes laws and regulatory programs in the United States. Subsequent reports will (1) describe public utility rate regulatory procedures and practices as they might affect an ICES, (2) analyze each of the aforementioned regulatory programs to identify impediments to the development of ICES, and (3) recommend potential changes in legislation and regulatory practices and procedures to overcome such impediments.

  14. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in the United States. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    This report is a summary of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United states and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). A brief summary of public utility regulatory programs, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority is presented in this report to identify how such programs and authority may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. Subsequent reports will (1) describe public utility rate regulatory procedures and practices as they might affect an ICES, (2) analyze each of the aforementioned regulatory programs to identify impediments to the development of ICES, and (3) recommend potential changes in legislation and regulatory practices and procedures to overcome such impediments.

  15. The impact of loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) for CIN 2,3 on spontaneous preterm delivery in twin pregnancies by assisted reproductive technique: preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavattini, Andrea; Stortoni, Piergiorgio; Mancioli, Francesca; Puglia, Danila; Tranquilli, Andrea Luigi; Liverani, Carlo Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the frequency of spontaneous preterm delivery before 35 weeks in 7 dichorionic twin pregnancies obtained after loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2,3 with respect to 21 twin pregnancies without previous cervical treatment. All the pregnancies were obtained after assisted reproduction techniques (ART). Same age at delivery was observed between two groups (p = 0.81) and none of our twin pregnancies after LEEP had a threatened preterm labor while four controls (19%) underwent a spontaneous preterm delivery (p = 0.35). These preliminary data seem to indicate that LEEP may not be responsible of spontaneous preterm delivery in twin pregnancies subsequent to ART.

  16. The impact of a large-scale quality improvement programme on work engagement: preliminary results from a national cross-sectional-survey of the 'Productive Ward'

    OpenAIRE

    White, Mark; Wells, John S G; Butterworth, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Background: Quality improvement (QI) Programmes, like the Productive Ward: Releasing-time-to-care initiative, aim to 'engage' and 'empower' ward teams to actively participate, innovate and lead quality improvement at the front line. However, little is known about the relationship and impact that QI work has on the 'engagement' of the clinical teams who participate and vice-versa. Objective: This paper explores and examines the impact of a large-scale QI programme, the Productive Ward, on the ...

  17. The impact of political violence on health and health services in Cape Town, South Africa, 1986: methodological problems and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yach, D

    1988-07-01

    Cape Town, South Africa experienced an upsurge in the level of political violence from May to July of 1986. To determine the impact of the political violence on health and health services, selected routinely available information was analyzed, a community survey was conducted of 1,540 randomly selected households in high, medium, and low impact areas (defined using police and community reports), and a survey of 162 nurses (75 per cent response rate) working in clinic and maternity services in Cape Town's townships was undertaken. Methodological problems were encountered in relation to sampling, interviewer allocation to areas, and access to routinely available information. Nevertheless, a consistent picture emerged from the studies that: demonstrated the impact of political violence on attendance at routine health service facilities (for hypertension, tuberculosis, immunizations, antenatal and postnatal services); highlighted the disruptions caused to basic services in high impact areas (water, street lighting, sanitation and transport); documented the problems experienced by nurses in performing their usual services and by patients obtaining access to their services; showed that high impact areas had three times higher rates of gunshot wounds than low impact areas during the period.

  18. A Preliminary Study on the Reliability of the Malay Version of PedsQL™ Family Impact Module among Caregivers of Children with Disabilities in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Azriani Ab; Mohamad, Norsarwany; Imran, Musa Kamarul; Ibrahim, Wan Pauzi Wan; Othman, Azizah; Aziz, Aniza Abd; Harith, Sakinah; Ibrahim, Mohd Ismail; Ariffin, Nor Hashimah; Van Rostenberghe, Hans

    2011-10-01

    No previous study has assessed the impact of childhood disability on parents and family in the context of Malaysia, and no instrument to measure this impact has previously been available. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine the reliability of a Malay version of the PedsQL™ Family Impact Module that measures the impact of children with disabilities (CWD) on their parents and family in a Malaysian context. The study was conducted in 2009. The questionnaire was translated forward and backward before it was administered to 44 caregivers of CWD to determine the internal consistency reliability. The test for Cronbach's alpha was performed. The internal consistency reliability was good. The Cronbach's alpha for all domains was above 0.7, ranging from 0.73 to 0.895. The Malay version of the PedsQL™ Family Impact Module showed evidence of good internal consistency reliability. However, future studies with a larger sample size are necessary before the module can be recommended as a tool to measure the impact of disability on Malay-speaking Malaysian families.

  19. Modeling of the merging, liner formation, implosion of hypervelocity plasma jets for the PLX- α project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott; Schillo, Kevin; Samulyak, Roman; Stoltz, Peter; Beckwith, Kris

    2015-11-01

    A suite of numerical tools will support the conical and 4 π plasma-liner-formation experiments for the PLX- α project. A new Lagrangian particles (LP) method will provide detailed studies of the merging of plasma jets and plasma-liner formation/convergence. A 3d smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code will simulate conical (up to 9 jets) and 4 π spherical (up to 60 jets) liner formation and implosion. Both LP and SPH will use the same tabular EOS generated by Propaceos, thermal conductivity, optically thin radiation and physical viscosity models. With LP and SPH,the major objectives are to study Mach-number degradation during jet merging, provide RMS amplitude and wave number of the liner nonuniformity at the leading edge, and develop scaling laws for ram pressure and liner uniformity as a function of jet parameters. USIM, a 3D multi-fluid plasma code, will be used to perform 1D and 2D simulations of plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF) to identify initial conditions in which the ``liner gain'' exceeds unity. A brief overview of the modeling program will be provided. Results from SPH modeling to support the PLX- α experimental design will also be presented, including preliminary ram-pressure scaling and non-uniformity characterization.

  20. Preliminary Monthly Climatological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Preliminary Local Climatological Data, recorded since 1970 on Weather Burean Form 1030 and then National Weather Service Form F-6. The preliminary climate data pages...

  1. Preliminary assessment of the health and environmental effects of coal utilization in the midwest. Volume I. Energy scenarios, technology characterizations, air and water resource impacts, and health effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-01

    An initial evaluation of the major health and environmental issues associated with increased coal use in the six midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin is presented. Using an integrated assessment approach, the evaluation proceeds from a base-line scenario of energy demand and facility siting for the period 1975 to 2020. Emphasis is placed on impacts from coal extraction, land reclamation, coal combustion for electrical generation, and coal gasification. The range of potential impacts and constraints is illustrated by a second scenario that represents an expected upper limit for coal utilization in Illinois. Included are: (1) a characterization of the energy demand and siting scenarios, coal related technologies, and coal resources, and (2) the related impacts on air quality, water availability, water quality, and human health.

  2. Extent of thermal ablation suffered by model organic microparticles during aerogel capture at hypervelocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, M. J.; Foster, N. J.; Ormond-Prout, J.; Dupin, D.; Armes, S. P.

    2009-11-01

    New model organic microparticles are used to assess the thermal ablation that occurs during aerogel capture at speeds from 1 to 6 km s-1. Commercial polystyrene particles (20 µm diameter) were coated with an ultrathin 20 nm overlayer of an organic conducting polymer, polypyrrole. This overlayer comprises only 0.8% by mass of the projectile but has a very strong Raman signature, hence its survival or destruction is a sensitive measure of the extent of chemical degradation suffered. After aerogel capture, microparticles were located via optical microscopy and their composition was analyzed in situ using Raman microscopy. The ultrathin polypyrrole overlayer survived essentially intact for impacts at ~1 km s-1, but significant surface carbonization was found at 2 km s-1, and major particle mass loss at ≥3 km s-1. Particles impacting at ~6.1 km s-1 (the speed at which cometary dust was collected in the NASA Stardust mission) were reduced to approximately half their original diameter during aerogel capture (i.e., a mass loss of 84%). Thus significant thermal ablation occurs at speeds above a few km s-1. This suggests that during the Stardust mission the thermal history of the terminal dust grains during capture in aerogel may be sufficient to cause significant processing or loss of organic materials. Further, while Raman D and G bands of carbon can be obtained from captured grains, they may well reflect the thermal processing during capture rather than the pre-impact particle’s thermal history.

  3. Impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellmuth, M.; Kabat, P.

    2003-01-01

    Even without the impacts of climate change, water managers face prodigious challenges in meeting sustainable development goals. Growing populations need affordable food, water and energy. Industrial development demands a growing share of water resources and contaminates those same resources with its

  4. Impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellmuth, M.; Kabat, P.

    2003-01-01

    Even without the impacts of climate change, water managers face prodigious challenges in meeting sustainable development goals. Growing populations need affordable food, water and energy. Industrial development demands a growing share of water resources and contaminates those same resources with its

  5. The impact of a large-scale quality improvement programme on work engagement: Preliminary results from a national cross-sectional-survey of the 'Productive Ward'

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, Mark

    2014-05-14

    Quality improvement (QI) Programmes, like the Productive Ward: Releasing-time-to-care initiative, aim to \\'engage\\' and \\'empower\\' ward teams to actively participate, innovate and lead quality improvement at the front line. However, little is known about the relationship and impact that QI work has on the \\'engagement\\' of the clinical teams who participate and vice-versa.

  6. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination IV: Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy analyses of impact features in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, Anna L.; Westphal, Andrew J.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Gainsforth, Zack; Stodolna, Julien; Frank, David R.; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, SašA.; Bastien, Ron K.; Bassim, Nabil; Bechtel, Hans A.; Borg, Janet; Brenker, Frank E.; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Flynn, George; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R.; Hillier, Jon K.; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Hvide, Brit; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J.; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leroux, Hugues; Leonard, Ariel; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Nittler, Larry R.; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Ja; Postberg, Frank; Price, Mark C.; Sandford, Scott A.; Tresseras, Juan-Angel Sans; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Silversmit, Geert; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Solé, Vicente A.; Srama, Ralf; Stadermann, Frank J.; Stephan, Thomas; Sterken, Veerle J.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Sutton, Steven; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; von Korff, Joshua; Wordsworth, Naomi; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-09-01

    We report the quantitative characterization by synchrotron soft X-ray spectroscopy of 31 potential impact features in the aerogel capture medium of the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector. Samples were analyzed in aerogel by acquiring high spatial resolution maps and high energy-resolution spectra of major rock-forming elements Mg, Al, Si, Fe, and others. We developed diagnostic screening tests to reject spacecraft secondary ejecta and terrestrial contaminants from further consideration as interstellar dust candidates. The results support an extraterrestrial origin for three interstellar candidates: I1043,1,30 (Orion) is a 3 pg particle with Mg-spinel, forsterite, and an iron-bearing phase. I1047,1,34 (Hylabrook) is a 4 pg particle comprising an olivine core surrounded by low-density, amorphous Mg-silicate and amorphous Fe, Cr, and Mn phases. I1003,1,40 (Sorok) has the track morphology of a high-speed impact, but contains no detectable residue that is convincingly distinguishable from the background aerogel. Twenty-two samples with an anthropogenic origin were rejected, including four secondary ejecta from impacts on the Stardust spacecraft aft solar panels, nine ejecta from secondary impacts on the Stardust Sample Return Capsule, and nine contaminants lacking evidence of an impact. Other samples in the collection included I1029,1,6, which contained surviving solar system impactor material. Four samples remained ambiguous: I1006,2,18, I1044,2,32, and I1092,2,38 were too dense for analysis, and we did not detect an intact projectile in I1044,3,33. We detected no radiation effects from the synchrotron soft X-ray analyses; however, we recorded the effects of synchrotron hard X-ray radiation on I1043,1,30 and I1047,1,34.

  7. IMPACTS !

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    (Photo courtesy of Don Davis / NASA)The University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale of Lausanne (EPFL) are organising the 4th series of public lectures on astronomy, on the theme of "Impacts". The schedule is as follows: Il y a 100 ans : une explosion dans la Tunguska – Dr. Frédéric COURBIN, EPFL Les impacts sur Terre – Prof. Didier Queloz, UNIGE La fin des dinosaures – Dr. Stéphane Paltani, UNIGE Wednesday 7 May 2008, from 7.00 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. Auditoire CO1, EPFL, Ecublens Thursday 08 May 2008, from 7.00 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. Auditoire Rouiller, Uni-Dufour, Genève All 3 lectures will be givent each evening! Admission free Information: 022 379 22 00

  8. Microcraters formed in hot glass by hypervelocity projectiles. [lunar environment simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedder, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Microcraters were formed in heated soda-lime glass by the normal incidence of spheres of plastic or fused silica with diameters between 0.8 and 4.5 microns and velocities between 2.5 and 10 km/s. The morphology of the craters in targets at temperatures up to 800 C is little different from those formed in unheated glass. Spallation still occurs to the same extent and above the same velocity threshold, but the spalls sag and sharp edges become dull in a few seconds at temperatures above the softening point. There is a small increase in the flow of glass from the central pit into a narrow lip at the higher temperatures, but this lip is often removed by spallation, especially at the higher velocities of impact. There is no evidence of a splashed lip with strings of melt overlying the spalled area. The results in conjunction with other evidence suggest that most lunar craters of micrometer size with a smooth central pit, splashed lip, and a spallation zone are the result of primary impacts.

  9. The impact of winter 2012 cold outbreak over the Northern Adriatic Sea dynamics: preliminary comparison among data and high resolution operational atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davolio, Silvio; Miglietta, Mario M.; Carniel, Sandro; Benetazzo, Alvise; Buzzi, Andrea; Drofa, Oxana; Falco, Pierpaolo; Fantini, Maurizio; Malguzzi, Piero; Ricchi, Antonio; Russo, Aniello; Paccagnella, Tiziana; Sclavo, Mauro

    2013-04-01

    exceptionally dense water formation, registered during the 2012 winter in the northern Adriatic region. During late January and early February, indeed, the basin was characterized by a persistent and exceptional cold anomaly responsible for large energy losses due to cold and extremely strong winds. Sea waters temperatures dropped to about 6°C and the Venice lagoon got partially covered by ice. In the period of interest, available measurements in the northern Adriatic Sea (temperature, salinity, density, wind speed, direction and inferred heat fluxes) were used, together with satellite measurements, to carry out a first semi-quantitative comparison among existing meteorological models implemented over the region. Namely, the work presents an intercomparison among three state-of-the-art, non-hydrostatic NWP models: COSMO-I7, WRF and MOLOCH. All models are run in operational mode, and their results are used by several Regional authorities and institutions for weather forecasting and support to civil protection decision. Therefore, this evaluation is a useful assessment preliminary to a full coupling of the above mentioned atmospheric models with existing ocean models already implemented in the region (e.g. ROMS in the COAWST system). Preliminary results show also some uncommon mesoscale structures reproduced by the models in the proximity of the central-south Italian coast, and highlight their possible influence on the local surface sea circulation. These effects will be soon explored by means of fully-coupled ocean-atmosphere models within on-going projects.

  10. A preliminary randomized clinical trial comparing diode laser and scalpel periosteal incision during implant surgery: impact on postoperative morbidity and implant survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnaz, Aysan; Jamali, Raika; Mohammadi, Farnush; Khorsand, Afshin; Moslemi, Neda; Fekrazad, Reza

    2017-08-31

    The aim of this preliminary randomized clinical trial was to compare: (1) post-operative morbidity after application of laser or scalpel incision for flap advancement during implant surgery and bone grafting and (2) implant survival rate following flap advancement with laser or scalpel incision after 6 months of loading. Eighteen patients who were scheduled for dental implant placement and simultaneous bone grafting were randomly assigned to test or control groups. Diode laser (810 nm, 2 W, pulse interval 200 μs; pulse length 100 μs, 400-μm initiated fiber tip), or scalpel (control) was used to sever the periosteum to create a tension-free flap. Visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score, rate of nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumption, intensity of swelling, and ecchymosis were measured for the six postsurgical days. Six months after loading, implant survival was assessed. VAS pain score (during the first four postoperative days), rate of NSAID consumption (during the first three postoperative days), and intensity of swelling (during the first five postoperative days) were significantly lower in the test group compared to the control group (All P values < 0.05). One patient in the control group experienced ecchymosis. All implants were successful in function. Application of laser for performing periosteal releasing incision reduced the incidence and severity of postoperative morbidity of the patients undergone implant surgery in conjunction with bone augmentation procedure. We did not find any detrimental effect of laser incision on the implant survival within 6 months of loading.

  11. The complex impact of five years of stress related to life-threatening events on pregnancy outcomes: a preliminary retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, M; Keren, N; Eden, A; Tsangen, S; Weizman, A; Zalsman, G

    2015-02-01

    To study the impact of chronic, life-threatening stressors in the form of daily missile attacks, for five consecutive years, on pregnancy outcomes. Charts of deliveries from two neighboring towns in the south of Israel, covering the years 2000 and 2003-2008, were reviewed retrospectively. One city had been exposed to missile attacks, while the other was not. For each year, 100 charts were chosen at random. Significant association was found between exposure to stress and frequency of pregnancy complications (P=0.047) and premature membrane rupture (P=0.029). A more detailed analysis, based on dividing the stressful years into three distinct periods: early (2003-2004), intermediate (2005-2006) and late (2007-2008), revealed that preterm deliveries were significantly more frequent (P=0.044) during the intermediate period, as was premature membrane rupture during the late period (P=0.014). Exposure to chronic life-threatening stress resulted in more pregnancy complications and in particular more premature membrane ruptures. The impact was most significant during the middle period of the 5-year-exposure to the stressor. Hence it seems that factors of duration and habituation may play a role in the impact of chronic, life-threatening stressors on pregnancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Organic compound alteration during hypervelocity collection of carbonaceous materials in aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, M. K.; Clemett, S. J.; Sandford, S. A.; McKay, D. S.; Zare, R. N.

    2009-03-01

    The NASA Stardust mission brought to Earth micron-size particles from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2 using aerogel, a porous silica material, as the capture medium. A major challenge in understanding the organic inventory of the returned comet dust is identifying, unambiguously, which organic molecules are indigenous to the cometary particles, which are produced from carbon contamination in the Stardust aerogel, and which are cometary organics that have been modified by heating during the particle capture process. Here it is shown that 1) alteration of cometary organic molecules along impact tracks in aerogel is highly dependent on the original particle morphology, and 2) organic molecules on test-shot terminal particles are mostly preserved. These conclusions are based on two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) examinations of test shots with organic-laden particles (both tracks in aerogel and the terminal particles themselves).

  13. Chemical projectile-target interaction during hypervelocity cratering experiments (MEMIN project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, M.; Hecht, L.; Deutsch, A.; Kenkmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    The detection and identification of meteoritic components in impact-derived rocks are of great value for confirming an impact origin and reconstructing the type of extraterrestrial material that repeatedly stroke the Earth during geologic evolution [1]. However, little is known about processes that control the projectile distribution into the various impactites that originate during the cratering and excavation process, and inter-element fractionation between siderophile elements during impact cratering. In the context of the MEMIN project, cratering experiments have been performed using spheres of Cr-V-Co-Mo-W-rich steel and of the iron meteorite Campo del Cielo (IAB) as projectiles accelerated to about 5 km/s, and blocks of Seeberger sandstone as target. The experiments were carried out at the two-stage acceleration facilities of the Fraunhofer Ernst-Mach-Institute (Freiburg). Our results are based on geochemical analyses of highly shocked ejecta material. The ejecta show various shock features including multiple sets of planar deformations features (PDF) in quartz, diaplectic quartz, and partial melting of the sandstone. Melting is concentrated in the phyllosilicate-bearing sandstone matrix but involves quartz, too. Droplets of molten projectile have entered the low-viscosity sandstone melt but not quartz glass. Silica-rich sandstone melts are enriched in the elements that are used to trace the projectile, like Fe, Ni, Cr, Co, and V (but no or little W and Mo). Inter-element ratios of these "projectile" tracer elements within the contaminated sandstone melt may be strongly modified from the original ratios in the projectiles. This fractionation most likely result from variation in the lithophile or siderophile character and/or from differences in reactivity of these tracer elements with oxygen [2] during interaction of metal melt with silicate melt. The shocked quartz with PDF is also enriched in Fe and Ni (experiment with a meteorite iron projectile) and in Fe

  14. Preliminary assessment of the impact of long-term fire treatments on in situ soil hydrology in the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward S. Riddell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been significant attention focused on the impacts of fire frequency and season of burn on ecological processes in the Kruger National Park (KNP. Whilst there has been some examination of these fire effects on soil properties, the explicit linkages of these effects to the hydrology of soils in burnt areas has remained a gap in our understanding. During August 2010, a field scoping campaign was undertaken to assess the impacts, if any, of long-term fire treatments on the hydrology of soils on the experimental burn plots (EBPs in the KNP. Using various hydrometric and soil physical characterisation instruments soil, hydraulic conductivity and soil strength variations were determined across the extreme fire treatment on the EBPs, the annual August (high fire frequency plots and the control (no burn plots, on both the granite and basalt geologies of Pretoriuskop and Satara, respectively. It was found that there were soil hydrological and structural differences to fire treatments on the basalt burn plots, but that these were not as clear on the granite burn plots. In particular, hot, frequent fires appeared to reduce the variation in soil hydraulic conductivity on the annual burn plots on the basalts and led to reduced cohesive soil strength at the surface.Conservation implications: The KNP burn plots are one of the longest running and well studied fire experiments on African savannahs. However, the impacts of fire management on hydrological processes in these water-limited ecosystems remains a gap in our understanding and needs to be considered within the context of climate and land-use changes in the savannah biome.

  15. Possible Impact of 190G > A CCR2 and Δ32 CCR5 Mutations on Decrease of the HBV Vaccine Immunogenicity—A Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganczak, Maria; Skonieczna-Żydecka, Karolina; Drozd-Dąbrowska, Marzena; Adler, Grażyna

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chemokine genetic variations are involved in infectious diseases such as hepatitis B virus (HBV). Several allelic variants might, in theory, affect the outcome of vaccination. Objectives: This study was carried out to examine the associations of Δ32 CCR5 and 190G > A CCR2 polymorphisms with a response to a primary course of three HBV vaccinations. Methods: Between December 2014 and December 2016, patients from three randomly selected primary care clinics in the West Pomeranian region (Poland), 1 month after receiving the third dose of HBV vaccine, were enrolled. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system version 3.0 was used to detect anti-HBs and anti-HBc totals. The identification of polymorphisms were performed by a polymerase chain reaction technique using a single primer extension assay. Genotype distributions of responders versus non-responders to HBV vaccination were compared on the basis of anti-HBs level. Results: In 149 patients (mean age 60 years) the mean anti-HBs level was 652.2 ± 425.9 mIU/mL (range: 0–1111.0 mIU/mL). There were 14.1% (n = 21) non-responders to the HBV vaccine (anti-HBs anti-HBs levels in Δ32/Δ32 homozygotes were observed (Me = 61 mIU/mL vs. Me = 660.2 mIU/mL; p = 0.048). As age was found to be a correlate to the anti-HBs titer (r = −0.218, p = 0.0075; 95% CI: −0.366–−0.059)—an analysis of a co-variance was performed which found a statistically significant (p = 0.04) difference in anti-HBs titres between Δ32/Δ32 homozygotes and other CCR5 genotypes. The association between anti-HBs titres and CCR2 genotypes was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Our study—which is a preliminary report that suggest this topic deserves further observation with larger sample sizes, different ethnicities, and other single nucleotide poly-morphisms (SNPs)—suggests the possible involvement of CCR5 polymorphism in impairing the immunologic response to HBV vaccination, predominantly in relation to the passage

  16. The effectiveness of a group-based acceptance and commitment additive therapy on rehabilitation of female outpatients with chronic headache: preliminary findings reducing 3 dimensions of headache impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo'tamedi, Hadi; Rezaiemaram, Payman; Tavallaie, Abaas

    2012-01-01

    Examine whether acceptance and commitment additive therapy is effective in reducing the experience of sensory pain, disability, and affective distress because of chronic headache in a sample of outpatient Iranian females. Chronic headaches have a striking impact on sufferers in terms of pain, disability, and affective distress. Although several Acceptance and Commitment Therapy outcome studies for chronic pain have been conducted, their findings cannot be completely generalized to chronic headaches because headache-related treatment outcome studies have a different emphasis in both provision and outcomes. Moreover, the possible role of Iranian social and cultural contexts and of gender-consistent issues involved in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy outcomes deserve consideration. This study used a randomized pretest-post-test control group design. The sample was selected from consecutive female outpatients with chronic headache, attending and/or referred to a headache clinic in a governmental hospital from April 2011 to June 2011. In total, 80 female outpatients were interviewed, and after implementing inclusion/exclusion criteria, thirty females were considered eligible to participate in the study. Half (n = 15) were randomly selected to participate in the treatment group. Four participants of this group failed to complete the treatment sessions (n = 11). The Acceptance and Commitment Therapy group received the medical treatment as usual and 8 sessions of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. The other half (n = 15) served as the control group that received only medical treatment as usual. The short form of McGill pain questionnaire, the migraine disability assessment scale, and the trait subscale of the state-trait anxiety inventory were administered, which operationalized 3 dimensions of impact of chronic headache, sensory pain, disability, and emotional distress, respectively, to explore the impact of recurrent headache episodes. Pretest and post

  17. Feasibility and preliminary results of SPECT/CT arthrography of the wrist in comparison with MR arthrography in patients with suspected ulnocarpal impaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, Klaus [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Kantonsspital Luzern, Roentgeninstitut/Nuklearmedizin, Luzern (Switzerland); Steurer-Dober, Isabelle; Huellner, Martin W.; Sol Perez Lago, Maria del; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Tornquist, Katharina [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Silva, Angela J. da [Advanced Molecular Imaging, Philips Healthcare, San Jose, CA (United States); Bodmer, Elvira; Wartburg, Urs von; Hug, Urs [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Division of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Lucerne (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and performance of SPECT/CT arthrography of the wrist in comparison with MR arthrography in patients with suspected ulnocarpal impaction. This prospective study included 28 wrists of 27 patients evaluated with SPECT/CT arthrography and MR arthrography. Iodine contrast medium and gadolinium were injected into the distal radioulnar and midcarpal joints. Late-phase SPECT/CT was performed 3.5 h after intravenous injection of approximately 650 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-DPD. MR and SPECT/CT images were separately reviewed in relation to bone marrow oedema, radionuclide uptake, and tears in the scapholunate (SL) and lunotriquetral (LT) ligaments and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and an overall diagnosis of ulnar impaction. MR, CT and SPECT/CT imaging findings were compared with each other, with the surgical findings in 12 patients and with clinical follow-up. The quality of MR arthrography and SPECT/CT arthrography images was fully diagnostic in 23 of 28 wrists (82 %) and 25 of 28 wrists (89 %), respectively. SPECT/CT arthrography was not diagnostic for ligament lesions due to insufficient intraarticular contrast in one wrist. MR and SPECT/CT images showed concordant findings regarding TFCC lesions in 22 of 27 wrists (81 %), SL ligament in 22 of 27 wrists (81 %) and LT ligament in 23 of 27 wrists (85 %). Bone marrow oedema on MR images and scintigraphic uptake were concordant in 21 of 28 wrists (75 %). MR images showed partial TFCC defects in four patients with normal SPECT/CT images. MR images showed bone marrow oedema in 4 of 28 wrists (14 %) without scintigraphic uptake, and scintigraphic uptake was present without MR bone marrow oedema in three wrists (11 %). Regarding diagnosis of ulnar impaction the concordance rate between CT and SPECT/CT was 100 % and reached 96 % (27 of 28) between MR and SPECT/CT arthrography. The sensitivity and specificity of MR, CT and SPECT/CT arthrography were 93 %, 100 % and 100 %, and 93 %, 93 % and 93

  18. The impact of e-Procurement practice in Indonesia government: A Preliminary Study (The case of Electronic Procurement Service at Bekasi District)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candra, S.; E Gunawan, F.

    2017-01-01

    In digital economy, government of Indonesia uses the internet to deliver services and to communicate with citizens and organizations. One of applications are e-Procurement and LPSE is a unit to hold the service system of e-Procurement. Procurement of goods and services electronically in addition will increase transparency and accountability, improve market access and healthy competition, as well as improving the efficiency of the procurement process. Based on the background and specific objectives to be achieved, then the research will be viewed from e-Marketplace participation, Trust and its impact on the performance of existing procurement within the institution. Methods of data analysis used in this research is by using analysis of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) by using the program Partial Least Square (PLS) to examine the relationship between variables. The population used in this study is an enterprise as well as other clients using the system LPSE Bekasi District. There are three part in this study population, namely the provision of a company, customer, and supplier of LPSE users amounted to 60 users. From data analysis, there are one hypothesis that rejected. The implication of this study are implementation of e-procurement and e-marketplace participation giving impact to procurement performance.

  19. Preliminary Assessment of the Impact on Reactor Vessel dpa Rates Due to Installation of a Proposed Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Core in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, Charles R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    An assessment of the impact on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) reactor vessel (RV) displacements-per-atom (dpa) rates due to operations with the proposed low enriched uranium (LEU) core described by Ilas and Primm has been performed and is presented herein. The analyses documented herein support the conclusion that conversion of HFIR to low-enriched uranium (LEU) core operations using the LEU core design of Ilas and Primm will have no negative impact on HFIR RV dpa rates. Since its inception, HFIR has been operated with highly enriched uranium (HEU) cores. As part of an effort sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), conversion to LEU cores is being considered for future HFIR operations. The HFIR LEU configurations analyzed are consistent with the LEU core models used by Ilas and Primm and the HEU balance-of-plant models used by Risner and Blakeman in the latest analyses performed to support the HFIR materials surveillance program. The Risner and Blakeman analyses, as well as the studies documented herein, are the first to apply the hybrid transport methods available in the Automated Variance reduction Generator (ADVANTG) code to HFIR RV dpa rate calculations. These calculations have been performed on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Institutional Cluster (OIC) with version 1.60 of the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) computer code.

  20. The dynamic model on the impact of biodiesel blend mandate (B5) on Malaysian palm oil domestic demand: A preliminary finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Norhaslinda Zainal; Applanaidu, Shri-Dewi; Sapiri, Hasimah

    2014-12-01

    Over the last ten years, world biofuels production has increased dramatically. The biodiesel demand is driven by the increases in fossil fuel prices, government policy mandates, income from gross domestic product and population growth. In the European Union, biofuel consumption is mostly driven by blending mandates in both France and Germany. In the case of Malaysia, biodiesel has started to be exported since 2006. The B5 of 5% blend of palm oil based biodiesel into diesel in all government vehicles was implemented in February 2009 and it is expected to be implemented nationwide in the nearest time. How will the blend mandate will project growth in the domestic demand of palm oil in Malaysia? To analyze this issue, a system dynamics model was constructed to evaluate the impact of blend mandate implementation on the palm oil domestic demand influence. The base run of simulation analysis indicates that the trend of domestic demand will increase until 2030 in parallel with the implementation of 5 percent of biodiesel mandate. Finally, this study depicts that system dynamics is a useful tool to gain insight and to experiment with the impact of changes in blend mandate implementation on the future growth of Malaysian palm oil domestic demand sector.

  1. Power-Law Scaling of the Impact Crater Size-Frequency Distribution on Pluto: A Preliminary Analysis Based on First Images from New Horizons' Flyby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholkmann F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent (14 th July 2015 flyby of NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft of the dwarf planet Pluto resulted in the first high-resolution images of the geological surface- features of Pluto. Since previous studies showed that the impact crater size-frequency distribution (SFD of different celestial objects of our solar system follows power-laws, the aim of the present analysis was to determine, for the first time, the power-law scaling behavior for Pluto’s crater SFD based on the first images available in mid-September 2015. The analysis was based on a high-resolution image covering parts of Pluto’s re- gions Sputnik Planum , Al-Idrisi Montes and Voyager Terra . 83 impact craters could be identified in these regions and their diameter ( D was determined. The analysis re- vealed that the crater diameter SFD shows a statistically significant power-law scaling ( α = 2.4926±0.3309 in the interval of D values ranging from 3.75±1.14 km to the largest determined D value in this data set of 37.77 km. The value obtained for the scaling coefficient α is similar to the coefficient determined for the power-law scaling of the crater SFDs from the other celestial objects in our solar system. Further analysis of Pluto’s crater SFD is warranted as soon as new images are received from the spacecraft.

  2. Applying a soft-robotic glove as assistive device and training tool with games to support hand function after stroke: Preliminary results on feasibility and potential clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange-Lasonder, Gerdienke B; Radder, Bob; Kottink, Anke I R; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Buurke, Jaap H; Rietman, Johan S

    2017-07-01

    Recent technological developments regarding wearable soft-robotic devices extend beyond the current application of rehabilitation robotics and enable unobtrusive support of the arms and hands during daily activities. In this light, the HandinMind (HiM) system was developed, comprising a soft-robotic, grip supporting glove with an added computer gaming environment. The present study aims to gain first insight into the feasibility of clinical application of the HiM system and its potential impact. In order to do so, both the direct influence of the HiM system on hand function as assistive device and its therapeutic potential, of either assistive or therapeutic use, were explored. A pilot randomized clinical trial was combined with a cross-sectional measurement (comparing performance with and without glove) at baseline in 5 chronic stroke patients, to investigate both the direct assistive and potential therapeutic effects of the HiM system. Extended use of the soft-robotic glove as assistive device at home or with dedicated gaming exercises in a clinical setting was applicable and feasible. A positive assistive effect of the soft-robotic glove was proposed for pinch strength and functional task performance 'lifting full cans' in most of the five participants. A potential therapeutic impact was suggested with predominantly improved hand strength in both participants with assistive use, and faster functional task performance in both participants with therapeutic application.

  3. Novel composites of $\\beta$-SiAlON and radome manufacturing technology developed at ARCI, Hyderabad, for hypervelocity vehicles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IBRAM GANESH

    2017-04-01

    Keeping the importance of developing suitable radome (a word derived from radar $+$ dome) materials and near-net shape consolidation technique for manufacturing radomes suitable for hypersonic ($\\gt$mach 5) radar-guided missilesin India, the International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Hyderabad, hasinitiated an in-house R&D programme and successfully developed a complete process know-how for manufacturing defectfreeprototype $\\beta$-SiAlON-based radome structures with all the desired properties. As a part of this R&D programme, totalsix separate sub-projects mentioned below were undertaken and executed: (i) identification of the best composition out of$\\beta$-Si$^{6−z}$Al$_z$O$_z$N$_{8−z}$ ($0 ≤ z ≤ 4.1$) solid solution, which possesses a right combination of properties required for radome applications, (ii) designing of an AlN-free precursor mixture for consolidating $\\beta$-Si$_4$Al$_2$O$_2$N$_6$ ceramics by following aqueous colloidal processing routes, (iii) development of a process for passivating water-sensitive AlN powder against hydrolysis, (iv) development of aqueous gelcasting (GC) and hydrolysis-assisted solidification (HAS) powder processing routes for consolidating dense $\\beta$-SiAlON ceramics using highly solids loaded ($\\gt$50 vol%) aqueous slurries, (v) development ofan hydrolysis-induced aqueous gelcasting (GCHAS) process, a novel near-net-shape consolidation technique, to produceradomes with very high-production yields and (vi) development of an economic route for synthesizing the low-dielectricconstant and high strength novel $\\beta$-SiAlON-SiO$_2$ ceramic composites. In this paper, (i) the basis for choosing $\\beta$-SiAlON based ceramics for hypervelocity radome applications, and (ii) the various bottle-neck problems faced, while executing this entire R&D work and the way they were overcome have been critically analysed and discussed systematically, while citing all the relevant and

  4. 40 CFR 8.6 - Preliminary environmental review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preliminary environmental review. 8.6 Section 8.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF NONGOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES IN ANTARCTICA § 8.6 Preliminary environmental review. (a) Unless an...

  5. Racemization of Valine by Impact-Induced Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Takase, Atsushi; Sekine, Toshimori; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takamichi

    2017-05-01

    Homochirality plays an important role in all living organisms but its origin remains unclear. It also remains unclear whether such chiral molecules survived terrestrial heavy impact events. Impacts of extraterrestrial objects on early oceans were frequent and could have affected the chirality of oceanic amino acids when such amino acids accumulated during impacts. This study investigated the effects of shock-induced heating on enantiomeric change of valine with minerals such as olivine ([Mg0.9, Fe0.1]2SiO4), hematite (Fe2O3), and calcite (CaCO3). With a shock wave generated by an impact at 0.8 km/s, both uc(d)- and uc(l)-enriched valine were significantly decomposed and partially racemized under all experimental conditions. Different minerals had different shock impedances; therefore, they provided different P-T conditions for identical impacts. Furthermore, the high pH of calcite promoted the racemization of valine. The results indicate that in natural hypervelocity impacts, amino acids in shocked oceanic water would have decomposed completely, since impact velocity and the duration of shock compression and heating are typically greater in hypervelocity impact events than those in experiments. Even with the shock wave by the impact of small and decelerated projectiles in which amino acids survive, the shock heating may generate sufficient heat for significant racemization in shocked oceanic water. However, the duration of shock induced heating by small projectiles is limited and the population of such decelerated projectiles would be limited. Therefore, even though impacts of asteroids and meteorites were frequent on the prebiotic Earth, impact events would not have significantly changed the ee of proteinogenic amino acids accumulated in the entire ocean.

  6. Coaching to vision versus coaching to improvement needs: a preliminary investigation on the differential impacts of fostering positive and negative emotion during real time executive coaching sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Anita R

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on intentional change theory (ICT; Boyatzis, 2006), this study examined the differential impact of inducing coaching recipients' vision/positive emotion versus improvement needs/negative emotion during real time executive coaching sessions. A core aim of the study was to empirically test two central ICT propositions on the effects of using the coached person's Positive Emotional Attractor (vision/PEA) versus Negative Emotional Attractor (improvement needs/NEA) as the anchoring framework of a onetime, one-on-one coaching session on appraisal of 360° feedback and discussion of possible change goals. Eighteen coaching recipients were randomly assigned to two coaching conditions, the coaching to vision/PEA condition and the coaching to improvement needs/NEA condition. Two main hypotheses were tested. Hypothesis1 predicted that participants in the vision/PEA condition would show higher levels of expressed positive emotion during appraisal of 360° feedback results and discussion of change goals than recipients in the improvement needs/NEA condition. Hypothesis2 predicted that vision/PEA participants would show lower levels of stress immediately after the coaching session than improvement needs/NEA participants. Findings showed that coaching to vision/the PEA fostered significantly lower levels of expressed negative emotion and anger during appraisal of 360° feedback results as compared to coaching to improvements needs/the NEA. Vision-focused coaching also fostered significantly greater exploration of personal passions and future desires, and more positive engagement during 360° feedback appraisal. No significant differences between the two conditions were found in emotional processing during discussion of change goals or levels of stress immediately after the coaching session. Current findings suggest that vision/PEA arousal versus improvement needs/NEA arousal impact the coaching process in quite different ways; that the coach's initial framing of the

  7. NO TRAIN NO GRAIN: THE IMPACT OF INCREASED DEMAND FOR RAIL SERVICES BY THE ENERGY SECTOR ON WHEAT PRICES—A PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Villegas Ortiz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Rail service is often the most cost-effective available alternative for shipping agricultural commodities in the Upper Midwest Region of the United States. The recent energy boom has created new competition for the use of shipping services. As oil has taken up freight space on railways, it has become more costly for farmers in states like Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota to reach grain markets, resulting in millionaire losses. Using oil nearby prices as the proxy, I study three particular effects of increased competition for rail services. First, I use national measures to study the impact of track congestion on wheat basis. Then, I examine how the expansion of the energy sector may have had different effects on prices received by wheat producers in the Midwest and in the Gulf Coast. Finally, I investigate whether the construction of new regional liquid pipeline networks is linked to regional wheat prices

  8. Susceptibility of Solar Arrays to Micrometeoroid and Space Debris Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmerohn, Martin; Rott, Martin; Gerhard, Andreas; Schafer, Frank; D'Accolti, Gianfelice

    2014-08-01

    The susceptibility of solar arrays to micrometeoroid and space debris impact was studied in a comprehensive study to clarify 1) whether, 2) in which manner and 3) under which conditions GEO telecom satellite solar arrays are affected by hypervelocity impact events. Impact induced discharges have been generated in highly instrumented impact experiments using a two- staged light gas guns and a plasma dynamic accelerator. The discharges were found to be temporary and without consequences for the functioning of the power generating network of state-of-the-art solar arrays designs. Permanently sustained destructive discharges have been generated for current-voltage characteristics that are significantly exceeding current ESD safe levels. The highest risk of impact induced failure of GEO solar arrays is posed by micrometeoroids and space debris hitting transfer harness cable bundles on its rear side.

  9. Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Smaller Particle Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J.C.; Opiela, J.; Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G.; Webb, R.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Colaux, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The radiator shield on the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) was subject to optical inspection following return from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009. The survey revealed over 600 impact features of > 300 micrometers diameter, from exposure in space for 16 years. Subsequently, an international collaborative programme of analysis was organized to determine the origin of hypervelocity particles responsible for the damage. Here we describe examples of the numerous smaller micrometeoroid (MM) impact features (< 700 micrometers diameter) which excavated zinc orthotitanate (ZOT) paint from the radiator surface, but did not incorporate material from underlying Al alloy; larger impacts are described by [3]. We discuss recognition and interpretation of impactor remains, and MM compositions found on WFPC2.

  10. Preliminary simulations of planned experiments to study the impact of trace gases on the capacity of the Weyburn-Midale field to store carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, S; Hao, Y

    2009-11-13

    The CO{sub 2} stream injecting into the Weyburn-Midale field can be generally classified as a reducing stream with residual H{sub 2}S and low-molecular weight hydrocarbons. The composition of the CO{sub 2} gas stream from the Dakota Gasification Company is reported to be 95% CO{sub 2}, 4% hydrocarbons, and 1% H{sub 2}S by volume (Huxley 2006). In addition to the H{sub 2}S introduced at the injection wells, significant concentrations of H{sub 2}S are thought to have been produced in-situ by sulfate reducing bacteria from previous water floods for enhanced oil production. Produced gas compositions range in H{sub 2}S concentrations from 1 to 6 volume percent. The produced gas, including the trace impurities, is re-injected into the field. Although there is no evidence for inorganic reduction of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} to H{sub 2}S at the Weyburn-Midale field, Sitchler and Kazuba (2009) suggest that SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} can be inorganically reduced to elemental sulfur in highly reducing environments based on a natural analog study of the Madison Formation in Wyoming. They propose that elevated concentrations of CO{sub 2} dissolve anhydrite to produce the sulfate that is then reduced. Oxidizing CO{sub 2} streams with residual O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} typical of streams captured from oxyfuel and post combustion processes are not presently an issue at the Weyburn-Midale field. However it is possible that the oxidizing CO{sub 2} streams may be injected in the future in carbonate reservoirs similar to the Weyburn-Midale field. To date there are few modeling and experimental studies that have explored the impact of impurity gases in CO{sub 2} streams targeted for geologic storage (Gale 2009). Jacquemet et al (2009) reviewed select geochemical modeling studies that explored the impact of SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S impurities in the waste streams (Gunter et al., 2000, Knauss et al., 2005, Xu et al., 2007). These studies collectively show that SO{sub 2} significantly reduces the pH when

  11. The impact of a large-scale quality improvement programme on work engagement: preliminary results from a national cross-sectional-survey of the 'Productive Ward'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark; Wells, John S G; Butterworth, Tony

    2014-12-01

    Quality improvement (QI) Programmes, like the Productive Ward: Releasing-time-to-care initiative, aim to 'engage' and 'empower' ward teams to actively participate, innovate and lead quality improvement at the front line. However, little is known about the relationship and impact that QI work has on the 'engagement' of the clinical teams who participate and vice-versa. This paper explores and examines the impact of a large-scale QI programme, the Productive Ward, on the 'work engagement' of the nurses and ward teams involved. Using the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES), we surveyed, measured and analysed work engagement in a representative test group of hospital-based ward teams who had recently commenced the latest phase of the national 'Productive Ward' initiative in Ireland and compared them to a control group of similar size and matched (as far as is possible) on variables such as ward size, employment grade and clinical specialty area. 338 individual datasets were recorded, n=180 (53.6%) from the Productive Ward group, and n=158 (46.4%) from the control group; the overall response rate was 67%, and did not differ significantly between the Productive Ward and control groups. The work engagement mean score (±standard deviation) in the Productive group was 4.33(±0.88), and 4.07(±1.06) in the control group, representing a modest but statistically significant between-group difference (p=0.013, independent samples t-test). Similarly modest differences were observed in all three dimensions of the work engagement construct. Employment grade and the clinical specialty area were also significantly related to the work engagement score (pengagement (the vigour, absorption and dedication) of ward-based teams. The use and suitability of the UWES as an appropriate measure of 'engagement' in QI interventions was confirmed. The engagement of nurses and front-line clinical teams is a major component of creating, developing and sustaining a culture of improvement. Copyright

  12. China's far below replacement fertility and its long-term impact: Comments on the preliminary results of the 2010 census

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwei Zhao

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese government conducted its sixth national census in 2010 and released its major results in April 2011. According to the National Bureau of Statistics the quality of the census was very high. Although the currently released census results consist of limited statistics only, they shed new light on China's recent fertility levels, which have been debated among scholars and policy makers for more than a decade. The 2010 census results, however, also show considerable inconsistencies with those published by the United Nations Population Division recently. This paper will, on the basis of newly published census results and other available evidence, further examine China's recent fertility decline and its impact on the country's long-term development. It will also comment on the major discrepancies between the results of Chinese government recent population projection, the United Nations' World Population Prospects, the 2010 Revision and China's 2010 census, and investigate the underlying causes that have led to these differences.

  13. Analysis of Multiple Precipitation Products and Preliminary Assessment of Their Impact on Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) Land Surface States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalck, Jon; Meng, Jesse; Rodel, Matt; Houser, paul

    2005-01-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are computer programs, similar to weather and climate prediction models, which simulate the stocks and fluxes of water (including soil moisture, snow, evaporation, and runoff) and energy (including the temperature of and sensible heat released from the soil) after they arrive on the land surface as precipitation and sunlight. It is not currently possible to measure all of the variables of interest everywhere on Earth with sufficient accuracy and space-time resolution. Hence LSMs have been developed to integrate the available observations with our understanding of the physical processes involved, using powerful computers, in order to map these stocks and fluxes as they change in time. The maps are used to improve weather forecasts, support water resources and agricultural applications, and study the Earth's water cycle and climate variability. NASA's Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) project facilitates testing of several different LSMs with a variety of input datasets (e.g., precipitation, plant type). Precipitation is arguably the most important input to LSMs. Many precipitation datasets have been produced using satellite and rain gauge observations and weather forecast models. In this study, seven different global precipitation datasets were evaluated over the United States, where dense rain gauge networks contribute to reliable precipitation maps. We then used the seven datasets as inputs to GLDAS simulations, so that we could diagnose their impacts on output stocks and fluxes of water. In terms of totals, the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) had the closest agreement with the US rain gauge dataset for all seasons except winter. The CMAP precipitation was also the most closely correlated in time with the rain gauge data during spring, fall, and winter, while the satellitebased estimates performed best in summer. The GLDAS simulations revealed that modeled soil moisture is highly

  14. Phosphategypsum wastes in Venice lagoon. Radiological impact; Le discariche di fosfogessi nella laguna di Venezia. Valutazioni preliminari dell'impatto radiologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, M; Blasi, M; Guogang, J.; Rosamilia, S.; Sansone, U. [Agenzia Nazionale per la Protezione dell' Ambiente, Rome (Italy); Biancotto, R.; Bidoli, P.; Sepulcri, D. [Agenzia Regionale di Prevenzione e Protezione del Veneto, Venice (Italy). Dipt. provinciale di Venezia; Cavolo, F. [Smilax, Mira, VE (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    The phosphoric minerals utilized in phosphoric acid production, presents high concentrations of radioactive materials: U238, Th 232, K 40. The phosphogypsum is the waste material obtained in the phosphoric acid production in wet process. This type of production method is employed for many years in Venice lagoon (Porto Marghera chemical plants). In this paper are reported evaluations of radiological impact on aquatic environment of lagoon. [Italian] Con il termine di fosfogessi si intende comunemente il materiale di risulta che si ottiene nella produzione di acido fosforico attraverso la via umida (attacco acido). Questa tipologia di produzione che ha operato per diversi decenni a Porto Marghera, e' finalizzata allo scopo di ottenere acido fosforico principalmente per l'industria dei fertilizzanti e quindi come prodotto intermedio per la chimica e per le preparazioni alimentari. Il fosforo, elemento principale della reazione, era ricavato da rocce fosfatiche di origine sedimentaria marina provenienti per lo piu' dall'Africa settentrionale. Il sistema produttivo utilizzato negli impianti di Porto Marghera era basato su una reazione principale, che partendo dal minerale attraverso un attacco acido, produceva acido fosforico: Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} (Minerale Fosforico) + 3H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (Acido Solforico) + 3H{sub 2}O (Acqua) {yields} 2H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} (Acido fosforico) + 3CaSO{sub 4}H{sub 2}O (Solfato di calcio (gesso)). In particolare il minerale era preventivamente macinato e vagliato, quindi si procedeva alla sua miscelazione con l'acido fosforico ed alla successiva reazione del composto ottenuto.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of peptides after high-energy impact on the icy matrix: Preliminary step for further UV-induced formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontareva, Natalia B.; Kuzicheva, Evgenia A.; Shelegedin, Vladimir N.

    2009-04-01

    In the interstellar medium, the most probable source of organic molecules could be non-equilibrium processes driven by photons, cosmic rays, shock waves and solid bodies' collisions. The dense cold phase of ISM host icy dust grains - important chemical catalyst during its life cycle. Such particles consist of mineral core composed by silicate or olivine admixed with metal sulfides and oxides, with the water-icy envelope containing organic molecules. Organic molecules in the ISM evolve and become later incorporated in solar system material (comets and meteorites). The formation of polypeptides from single amino acids was traced in simulation experiments representing the inner structure of icy dust grains. Experimental chamber was irradiated at subzero temperatures at the dosage of 2.54 kRad/min. Solid frozen solutions of Gly and Phe were taken as the experimental samples inserted into the metal tube kept at subzero temperatures in the presence of liquid nitrogen. Formation of di- and tri-peptides was demonstrated after applying mass-spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) techniques. Having polypeptides within the icy matrix, dust grains with ice mantles are transported to warm, dense and active protostellar regions, where ultraviolet irradiation may become important and alter the grain composition. Furthermore UVC radiation may contribute to the formation of additional amounts of polypeptides, since short-wave photons are totally adsorbed by a thin outer layer. This presumption coincides with our previous investigations concerning UV impact on prebiotic formation of the main biological molecules. Combination of two irradiation types in different stages of interstellar flight could compensate the effects of low reagents concentration and temperature. Since the primordial Earth had no atmosphere, the natural carriers could get freely onto its surface and thus raise the concentration of organic molecules.

  16. A globular cluster toward M87 with a radial velocity < – 1000 km s{sup –1}: the first hypervelocity cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Strader, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Romanowsky, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San José State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Brodie, Jean P. [University of California Observatories, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Moore, Ben; Diemand, Jurg [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Martizzi, Davide, E-mail: caldwell@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We report the discovery of an object near M87 in the Virgo Cluster with an extraordinary blueshift of –1025 km s{sup –1}, offset from the systemic velocity by >2300 km s{sup –1}. Evaluation of photometric and spectroscopic data provides strong evidence that this object is a distant massive globular cluster, which we call HVGC-1 in analogy to Galactic hypervelocity stars. We consider but disfavor more exotic interpretations, such as a system of stars bound to a recoiling black hole. The odds of observing an outlier as extreme as HVGC-1 in a virialized distribution of intracluster objects are small; it appears more likely that the cluster was (or is being) ejected from Virgo following a three-body interaction. The nature of the interaction is unclear, and could involve either a subhalo or a binary supermassive black hole at the center of M87.

  17. In situ measurements of impact-induced pressure waves in sandstone targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerth, Tobias; Schäfer, Frank; Nau, Siegfried; Kuder, Jürgen; Poelchau, Michael H.; Thoma, Klaus; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    In the present study we introduce an innovative method for the measurement of impact-induced pressure waves within geological materials. Impact experiments on dry and water-saturated sandstone targets were conducted at a velocity of 4600 m/s using 12 mm steel projectiles to investigate amplitudes, decay behavior, and speed of the waves propagating through the target material. For this purpose a special kind of piezoresistive sensor capable of recording transient stress pulses within solid brittle materials was developed and calibrated using a Split-Hopkinson pressure bar. Experimental impact parameters (projectile size and speed) were kept constant and yielded reproducible signal curves in terms of rise time and peak amplitudes. Pressure amplitudes decreased by 3 orders of magnitude within the first 250 mm (i.e., 42 projectile radii). The attenuation for water-saturated sandstone is higher compared to dry sandstone which is attributed to dissipation effects caused by relative motion between bulk material and interstitial water. The proportion of the impact energy radiated as seismic energy (seismic efficiency) is in the order of 10-3. The present study shows the feasibility of real-time measurements of waves caused by hypervelocity impacts on geological materials. Experiments of this kind lead to a better understanding of the processes in the crater subsurface during a hypervelocity impact.

  18. Impact of the economic crisis on human mobility in Japan : a preliminary note L’impact de la crise économique sur la mobilité humaine au Japon : note préliminaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Ishikawa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The central aim of this paper is to explore the impact of the global economic crisis on different categories of human mobility, including migration and tourism, in Japan. The major findings can be summarized as follows. First, since the fall of 2008 the crisis has had a far-reaching influence on Japan, for both the ethnic majority and minorities. Second, the intensity of the negative impact has varied by metropolitan areas and nationalities. Japanese nationals in the Tokyo metropolitan area and migrant workers (particularly Brazilians in the Nagoya metropolitan area and central Japan manufacturing prefectures are the most affected population groups. Finally, support programs by the Japanese government were problematic, and, in particular, the program that provided incentives for migrant workers to voluntarily return to their home countries was introduced too late. However, it is too early to clearly elucidate the full impact of the crisis, since the latest available data confirm that the current situation remains in a state of crisis.L’article vise à explorer l’impact de la crise économique mondiale sur différentes catégories de mobilité humaine au Japon, y compris les migrations et le tourisme. Les résultats principaux de l’étude peuvent se résumer comme suit. En premier lieu, depuis l’automne 2008, la crise a eu une influence non négligeable sur le pays, à la fois pour la majorité et pour les minorités ethniques. Ensuite, l’intensité de l’impact négatif a varié selon les zones métropolitaines et les nationalités. Les nationaux de la zone métropolitaine de Tokyo, ainsi que les travailleurs migrants (surtout des Brésiliens de la zone de Nagoya et des préfectures manufacturières du centre sont les groupes les plus touchés. Enfin, les programmes d’aide mis en place par le gouvernement japonais se sont révélés problématiques, en particulier celui qui offrait des incitations au retour volontaire vers les pays

  19. Whole-organ CT perfusion of the pancreas: impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality, perfusion parameters and radiation dose in 256-slice CT-preliminary findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xie

    significant impact on the perfusion parameters of normal pancreas compared to the conventional FBP reconstruction using a 256-slice CT scanner.

  20. The Bath Adolescent Pain--Parental Impact Questionnaire (BAP-PIQ): development and preliminary psychometric evaluation of an instrument to assess the impact of parenting an adolescent with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Abbie; Eccleston, Christopher; McCracken, Lance M; Connell, Hannah; Clinch, Jacqui

    2008-07-31

    When an adolescent has chronic pain many aspects of a parent's life can be affected, including their emotional and social functioning. The assessment of this multidimensional parental impact is an essential, yet often neglected, clinical task. This study reports on the development and psychometric evaluation of the Bath Adolescent Pain--Parental Impact Questionnaire (BAP-PIQ), an assessment tool comprising multiple scales thought to be relevant for better understanding changes in functioning and behavior associated with parenting an adolescent with chronic pain. A sample of 194 parents of adolescents with chronic pain, recruited from three UK clinics, completed the 94 item draft inventory. Frequency and item correlation analyses resulted in a final inventory of 62 items. Internal consistency of all eight scales was established based on Cronbach's alpha. Convergent validity was undertaken by comparison of individual scales with existing validated measures of parental stress, mood, parenting behavior, marital adjustment, and general functioning. The temporal reliability of each scale was established using a sub-sample of 46 participants over a 14-day period. Psychometric evaluation suggests that the inventory yields a reliable and valid assessment of the multiple impacts of parenting an adolescent with chronic pain. The BAP-PIQ may offer a comprehensive assessment of these impacts in both a research and a clinical setting. Further study of the validity of BAP-PIQ scales and their ability to detect clinically meaningful change would be of use. Additional data from samples comprising fathers of adolescents with chronic pain and parents of adolescents with non-musculoskeletal pain would be of benefit.

  1. The fate or organic matter during planetary accretion - Preliminary studies of the organic chemistry of experimentally shocked Murchison meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingle, Tracy N.; Tyburczy, James A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.; Becker, Christopher H.

    1992-01-01

    The fate of organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites during hypervelocity (1-2 km/sec) impacts is investigated using results of experiments in which three samples of the Murchison (CM2) carbonaceous chondrite were shocked to 19, 20, and 36 GPa and analyzed by highly sensitive thermal-desorption photoionization mass spectrometry (SALI). The thermal-desorptive SALI mass spectra of unshocked CM2 material revealed presence of indigenous aliphatic, aromatic, sulfur, and organosulfur compounds, and samples shocked to about 20 GPa showed little or no loss of organic matter. On the other hand, samples shocked to 36 GPa exhibited about 70 percent loss of organic material and a lower alkene/alkane ratio than did the starting material. The results suggest that it is unlikely that the indigenous organic matter in carbonaceous chondritelike planetesimals could have survived the impact on the earth in the later stages of earth's accretion.

  2. Preliminary survivability analysis of manned spacecraft following orbital debris penetration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; HAN ZengYao; LIMing; ZHENG ShiGui

    2009-01-01

    Meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) may cause severe damages or even catastrophic failures for long-term manned spacecrafts in orbit due to the hypervelocity impact (HVI) destruction. It is essential to quantitatively assess the M/OD risk of manned spacecraft, in this paper, the catastrophic failure as-sessment function is successfully integrated into the Meteoroid & Orbital Debris Assessment and Op-timization System Tools (MODAOST), which is the M/OD risk assessment system developed by China Academy of Space Technology. The survivability assessment for the US Lab by MODAOST was con-sistent with that of the Manned Spacecraft Crew Survivability computer code (MSCSurv). Meanwhile,the simulation process showed that this function was more effective than MSCSurv for the application of the standard methodology of M/OD risk assessment instead of the Monte Carlo model. This function expands the ability of MODAOST in predicting the survivability of the typical catastrophic failure modes such as crew hypoxia and the critical cracking.

  3. Preliminary survivability analysis of manned spacecraft following orbital debris penetration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Meteoroid and orbital debris(M/OD) may cause severe damages or even catastrophic failures for long-term manned spacecrafts in orbit due to the hypervelocity impact(HVI) destruction.It is essential to quantitatively assess the M/OD risk of manned spacecraft.In this paper,the catastrophic failure as-sessment function is successfully integrated into the Meteoroid & Orbital Debris Assessment and Op-timization System Tools(MODAOST),which is the M/OD risk assessment system developed by China Academy of Space Technology.The survivability assessment for the US Lab by MODAOST was con-sistent with that of the Manned Spacecraft Crew Survivability computer code(MSCSurv).Meanwhile,the simulation process showed that this function was more effective than MSCSurv for the application of the standard methodology of M/OD risk assessment instead of the Monte Carlo model.This function expands the ability of MODAOST in predicting the survivability of the typical catastrophic failure modes such as crew hypoxia and the critical cracking.

  4. Preliminary hazards analysis -- vitrification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coordes, D.; Ruggieri, M.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for mixed waste vitrification by joule heating. The purpose of performing a PHA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PHA is then followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title 1 and 2 design. The PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during the facility`s construction and testing. It should be completed before routine operation of the facility commences. This PHA addresses the first four chapters of the safety analysis process, in accordance with the requirements of DOE Safety Guidelines in SG 830.110. The hazards associated with vitrification processes are evaluated using standard safety analysis methods which include: identification of credible potential hazardous energy sources; identification of preventative features of the facility or system; identification of mitigative features; and analyses of credible hazards. Maximal facility inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials are postulated to evaluate worst case accident consequences. These inventories were based on DOE-STD-1027-92 guidance and the surrogate waste streams defined by Mayberry, et al. Radiological assessments indicate that a facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous materials assessment indicates that a Mixed Waste Vitrification facility will be a Low Hazard facility having minimal impacts to offsite personnel and the environment.

  5. Research in Hypervelocity Gasdynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    aero - dynamics", J. Spacecraft ., 21, 136. Park, C. 1985 "On convergence of computation of chemically reacting flows", AIAA 85-0247. Vincenti, W. G...Print film Neutral density filter Wollaston prism BaWindoss Shutter B nps filter-- Polarizers--’ Digital delay generator (camera shutter and laser firing...1958 Theory of stagnation point heat transfer in dissociated air. J. Aero . Sci. 25, 73-85. Non-equilibrium dissociating flow over spheres 405 HORNUNG

  6. Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Experimental Simulation of Micrometeoroid Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, M. C.; Kearsley, A. T.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Spratt, J.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J. C.; Ross, D. K.; Opiela, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact features have been recognized on painted surfaces returned from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Here we describe experiments that help us to understand their creation, and the preservation of micrometeoroid (MM) remnants. We simulated capture of silicate and sulfide minerals on the Zinc orthotitanate (ZOT) paint and Al alloy plate of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) radiator, which was returned from HST after 16 years in low Earth orbit (LEO). Our results also allow us to validate analytical methods for identification of MM (and orbital debris) impacts in LEO.

  7. 2016 TRI Preliminary Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    The TRI preliminary dataset includes the most current TRI data available and reflects toxic chemical releases and pollution prevention activities that occurred at TRI facilities during the 2016 calendar year.

  8. Impact-Generated Dust Clouds Surrounding the Galilean Moons

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, H; Grün, E; Kr\\"uger, Harald~; Krivov, Alexander V.; Gr\\"un, Eberhard

    2003-01-01

    Tenuous dust clouds of Jupiter's Galilean moons Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto have been detected with the in-situ dust detector on board the Galileo spacecraft. The majority of the dust particles have been sensed at altitudes below five radii of these lunar-sized satellites. We identify the particles in the dust clouds surrounding the moons by their impact direction, impact velocity, and mass distribution. Average particle sizes are 0.5 to $\\rm 1 \\mu m$, just above the detector threshold, indicating a size distribution with decreasing numbers towards bigger particles. Our results imply that the particles have been kicked up by hypervelocity impacts of micrometeoroids onto the satellites' surfaces. The measured radial dust density profiles are consistent with predictions by dynamical modeling for satellite ejecta produced by interplanetary impactors (Krivov et al., PSS, 2003, 51, 251--269), assuming yield, mass and velocity distributions of the ejecta from laboratory measurements. The dust clouds of the th...

  9. Impact features on Stardust: implications for comet 81P/Wild 2 dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörz, Friedrich; Bastien, Ron; Borg, Janet; Bradley, John P; Bridges, John C; Brownlee, Donald E; Burchell, Mark J; Chi, Miaofang; Cintala, Mark J; Dai, Zu Rong; Djouadi, Zahia; Dominguez, Gerardo; Economou, Thanasis E; Fairey, Sam A J; Floss, Christine; Franchi, Ian A; Graham, Giles A; Green, Simon F; Heck, Philipp; Hoppe, Peter; Huth, Joachim; Ishii, Hope; Kearsley, Anton T; Kissel, Jochen; Leitner, Jan; Leroux, Hugues; Marhas, Kuljeet; Messenger, Keiko; Schwandt, Craig S; See, Thomas H; Snead, Christopher; Stadermann, Frank J; Stephan, Thomas; Stroud, Rhonda; Teslich, Nick; Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep M; Tuzzolino, A J; Troadec, David; Tsou, Peter; Warren, Jack; Westphal, Andrew; Wozniakiewicz, Penelope; Wright, Ian; Zinner, Ernst

    2006-12-15

    Particles emanating from comet 81P/Wild 2 collided with the Stardust spacecraft at 6.1 kilometers per second, producing hypervelocity impact features on the collector surfaces that were returned to Earth. The morphologies of these surprisingly diverse features were created by particles varying from dense mineral grains to loosely bound, polymineralic aggregates ranging from tens of nanometers to hundreds of micrometers in size. The cumulative size distribution of Wild 2 dust is shallower than that of comet Halley, yet steeper than that of comet Grigg-Skjellerup.

  10. Advanced diagnostics for impact-flash spectroscopy on light-gas guns.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breiland, William George; Reinhart, William Dodd; Miller, Paul Albert; Brown, Justin L.; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III (,; ); Mangan, Michael A.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Chhabildas, Lalit Chandra; Grine, Albert D.; Wanke, Michael Clement; Alexander, C. Scott

    2007-03-01

    This study is best characterized as new technology development for implementing new sensors to investigate the optical characteristics of a rapidly expanding debris cloud resulting from hypervelocity impact regimes of 7 to 11 km/s. Our gas guns constitute a unique test bed that match operational conditions relevant to hypervelocity impact encountered in space engagements. We have demonstrated the use of (1) terahertz sensors, (2) silicon diodes for visible regimes, (3) germanium and InGaAs sensors for the near infrared regimes, and (4) the Sandia lightning detectors which are similar to the silicon diodes described in 2. The combination and complementary use of all these techniques has the strong potential of ''thermally'' characterizing the time dependent behavior of the radiating debris cloud. Complementary spectroscopic measurements provide temperature estimates of the impact generated debris by fitting its spectrum to a blackbody radiation function. This debris is time-dependent as its transport/expansion behavior is changing with time. The rapid expansion behavior of the debris cools the cloud rapidly, changing its thermal/temperature characteristics with time. A variety of sensors that span over a wide spectrum, varying from visible regime to THz frequencies, now gives us the potential to cover the impact over a broader temporal regime starting from high pressures (Mbar) high-temperatures (eV) to low pressures (mbar) low temperatures (less than room temperature) as the debris expands and cools.

  11. Topaz II preliminary safety assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Albert C.; Standley, Vaughn; Voss, Susan S.; Haskin, Eric

    1993-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz II space nuclear power system. A preliminary safety assessment was conducted to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. As part of this assessment, a safety policy and safety functional requirements were developed to guide both the safety assessment and future Topaz II activities. A review of the Russian flight safety program was conducted and documented. Our preliminary safety assessment included a top level event tree, neutronic analysis of normal and accident configurations, an evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity, a reentry and disposal analysis, and analysis of postulated launch abort impact accidents, and an analysis of postulated propellant fire and explosion accidents. Based on the assessment, it appears that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the U.S. with some possible system modifications. The principal system modifications will probably include design changes to preclude water flooded criticality and to assure intact reentry.

  12. Shock metamorphism and impact melting in small impact craters on Earth: Evidence from Kamil crater, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Agnese; Folco, Luigi; D'Orazio, Massimo; Frezzotti, Maria Luce; Cordier, Carole

    2014-12-01

    Kamil is a 45 m diameter impact crater identified in 2008 in southern Egypt. It was generated by the hypervelocity impact of the Gebel Kamil iron meteorite on a sedimentary target, namely layered sandstones with subhorizontal bedding. We have carried out a petrographic study of samples from the crater wall and ejecta deposits collected during our first geophysical campaign (February 2010) in order to investigate shock effects recorded in these rocks. Ejecta samples reveal a wide range of shock features common in quartz-rich target rocks. They have been divided into two categories, as a function of their abundance at thin section scale: (1) pervasive shock features (the most abundant), including fracturing, planar deformation features, and impact melt lapilli and bombs, and (2) localized shock features (the least abundant) including high-pressure phases and localized impact melting in the form of intergranular melt, melt veins, and melt films in shatter cones. In particular, Kamil crater is the smallest impact crater where shatter cones, coesite, stishovite, diamond, and melt veins have been reported. Based on experimental calibrations reported in the literature, pervasive shock features suggest that the maximum shock pressure was between 30 and 60 GPa. Using the planar impact approximation, we calculate a vertical component of the impact velocity of at least 3.5 km s-1. The wide range of shock features and their freshness make Kamil a natural laboratory for studying impact cratering and shock deformation processes in small impact structures.

  13. Spectroscopic twin to the hypervelocity sdO star US 708 and three fast sdB stars from the Hyper-MUCHFUSS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegerer, E.; Heber, U.; Geier, S.; Irrgang, A.; Kupfer, T.; Fürst, F.; Schaffenroth, J.

    2017-05-01

    Important tracers for the dark matter halo of the Galaxy are hypervelocity stars (HVSs), which are faster than the local escape velocity of the Galaxy and their slower counterparts, the high-velocity stars in the Galactic halo. Such HVSs are believed to be ejected from the Galactic centre (GC) through tidal disruption of a binary by the super-massive black hole (Hills mechanism). The Hyper-MUCHFUSS survey aims at finding high-velocity potentially unbound hot subdwarf stars. We present the spectroscopic and kinematical analyses of a He-sdO as well as three candidates among the sdB stars using optical Keck/ESI and VLT (X-shooter, FORS) spectroscopy. Proper motions are determined by combining positions from early-epoch photographic plates with those derived from modern digital sky surveys. The Galactic rest frame velocities range from 203 km s-1 to 660 km s-1, indicating that most likely all four stars are gravitationally bound to the Galaxy. With Teff = 47 000 K and a surface gravity of log g = 5.7, SDSS J205030.39-061957.8 (J2050) is a spectroscopic twin of the hypervelocity He-sdO US 708. As for the latter, the GC is excluded as a place of origin based on the kinematic analysis. Hence, the Hills mechanism can be excluded for J2050. The ejection velocity is much more moderate (385 ± 79 km s-1) than that of US 708 (998 ± 68 km s-1). The binary thermonuclear supernova scenario suggested for US 708 would explain the observed properties of J2050 very well without pushing the model parameters to their extreme limits, as required for US 708. Accordingly, the star would be the surviving donor of a type Ia supernova. Three sdB stars also showed extreme kinematics; one could be a HVS ejected from the GC, whereas the other two could be ejected from the Galactic disk through the binary supernova mechanism. Alternatively, they might be extreme halo stars.

  14. Preliminary Analysis of Google+'s Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we provide a preliminary analysis of Google+ privacy. We identified that Google+ shares photo metadata with users who can access the photograph and discuss its potential impact on privacy. We also identified that Google+ encourages the provision of other names including maiden name, which may help criminals performing identity theft. We show that Facebook lists are a superset of Google+ circles, both functionally and logically, even though Google+ provides a better user interfac...

  15. UVISS preliminary visibility analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this work is to obtain a preliminary assessment of the sky visibility for anastronomical telescope located on the express pallet of the International SpaceStation (ISS)} taking into account the major constraints imposed on the instrument by the ISSattitude and structure. Part of the w......The goal of this work is to obtain a preliminary assessment of the sky visibility for anastronomical telescope located on the express pallet of the International SpaceStation (ISS)} taking into account the major constraints imposed on the instrument by the ISSattitude and structure. Part...

  16. The Asteroid Impact Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnelli, Ian; Galvez, Andres; Mellab, Karim

    2016-04-01

    The Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) is a small and innovative mission of opportunity, currently under study at ESA, intending to demonstrate new technologies for future deep-space missions while addressing planetary defense objectives and performing for the first time detailed investigations of a binary asteroid system. It leverages on a unique opportunity provided by asteroid 65803 Didymos, set for an Earth close-encounter in October 2022, to achieve a fast mission return in only two years after launch in October/November 2020. AIM is also ESA's contribution to an international cooperation between ESA and NASA called Asteroid Impact Deflection Assessment (AIDA), consisting of two mission elements: the NASA Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission and the AIM rendezvous spacecraft. The primary goals of AIDA are to test our ability to perform a spacecraft impact on a near-Earth asteroid and to measure and characterize the deflection caused by the impact. The two mission components of AIDA, DART and AIM, are each independently valuable but when combined they provide a greatly increased scientific return. The DART hypervelocity impact on the secondary asteroid will alter the binary orbit period, which will also be measured by means of lightcurves observations from Earth-based telescopes. AIM instead will perform before and after detailed characterization shedding light on the dependence of the momentum transfer on the asteroid's bulk density, porosity, surface and internal properties. AIM will gather data describing the fragmentation and restructuring processes as well as the ejection of material, and relate them to parameters that can only be available from ground-based observations. Collisional events are of great importance in the formation and evolution of planetary systems, own Solar System and planetary rings. The AIDA scenario will provide a unique opportunity to observe a collision event directly in space, and simultaneously from ground-based optical and

  17. Time-resolved wave-profile measurements at impact velocities of 10 km/s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Furnish, M.D.; Reinhart, W.D.

    1998-06-01

    Development of well-controlled hypervelocity launch capabilities is the first step to understand material behavior at extreme pressures and temperatures not available using conventional gun technology. In this paper, techniques used to extend both the launch capabilities of a two-stage light-gas gun to 10 km/s and their use to determine material properties at pressures and temperature states higher than those ever obtained in the laboratory are summarized. Time-resolved interferometric techniques have been used to determine shock loading and release characteristics of materials impacted by titanium and aluminum fliers launched by the only developed three-stage light-gas gun at 10 km/s. In particular, the Sandia three stage light gas gun, also referred to as the hypervelocity launcher, HVL, which is capable of launching 0.5 mm to 1.0 mm thick by 6 mm to 19 mm diameter plates to velocities approaching 16 km/s has been used to obtain the necessary impact velocities. The VISAR, interferometric particle-velocity techniques has been used to determine shock loading and release profiles in aluminum and titanium at impact velocities of 10 km/s.

  18. Mass Spectum Imaging of Organics Injected into Stardust Aerogel by Cometary Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemett, S. J.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.

    2014-01-01

    Comets have largely escaped the hydrothermal processing that has affected the chemistry and mineralogy of even the most primitive meteorites. Consequently, they are expected to better preserve nebular and interstellar organic materials. Organic matter constitutes roughly 20-30% by weight of vol-atile and refractory cometary materials [1,2]. Yet organic matter identified in Stardust aerogel samples is only a minor component [3-5]. The dearth of intact organic matter, fine-grained and pre-solar materials led to suggestions that comet 81P/Wild-2 is com-posed largely of altered materials, and is more similar to meteorites than the primitive view of comets [6]. However, fine-grained materials are particularly susceptible to alteration and destruction during the hypervelocity impact. While hypervelocity capture can cause thermal pyrolysis of organic phases, some of the impacting organic component appears to have been explosively dispersed into surrounding aerogel [7]. We used a two-step laser mass spectrometer to map the distribution of organic matter within and sur-rounding a bulbous Stardust track to constrain the dispersion of organic matter during the impact.

  19. Preliminary report of wrapped impacted bone graft using titanium mesh for repair of large segmental bone defect%钛网包裹打压植骨修复大段骨缺损初步报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷渠东; 顾三军; 孙振中; 马运宏

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the preliminary outcomes of wrapped impacted bone graft using titanium mesh for repair of large segmental bone defect. Methods From January 2009 to December 2012,6 cases of large segmental bone defect of lone bone after fractures were treated with wrapped impacted bone graft using titanium mesh to repair the defect. The location of fracture and defect:1 respective casein femur and humerus,2 respective cases in tibia and radius.The length of bone defect was from 5.2 cm to 9.0 cm with an average of 6.5cm.Fixation methods:intramedullary nail was used in 2 cases and plate in 4 cases.collateral injuries such as tendon or nerve injury could be foundin 2 cases. Cancellous bone with a volume two times than the defect bone was harvested from theposterior or/and anterior segments of the bilateral ilium etc. Titanium mesh was used and placed to wrap the defect, then the bone granules was impacted closely into the titanium mesh.The recovered length of bone defect was from 5.2 cm to 9.0 cm with an average of 6.3 cm. Results Incisions underwent primary healing. Following-up ranging from 12 to 46 months, with an average of 18 months,revealed that all fractures with bone defects healed; the clinical healing time ranged from 4.0 months to 6.5 months with an average of 5.1 months. no breakingor loosening of the fixator was noted.at the last follow-up,the function of the adjacent joints was excellent in 1 case, good in 4 cases and fair in 1 case. Conclusion Wrapped impacted bone graft using titanium mesh for repair of large segmental bone defect has advantages of bing simple, safe, fast in healing and excellent in efficacy.%目的:探讨钛网包裹打压植骨修复大段骨缺损的初步治疗效果。方法2009年1月~2012年12月,采用钛网包裹打压植骨修复6例长骨骨折后大段骨缺损。骨折骨缺损部位:股骨和肱骨各1例,胫骨、桡骨各2例。骨缺损长度5.2~9.0 cm,平均6.5 cm。固定方法:髓内钉2

  20. UVISS preliminary visibility analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this work is to obtain a preliminary assessment of the sky visibility for anastronomical telescope located on the express pallet of the International SpaceStation (ISS)} taking into account the major constraints imposed on the instrument by the ISSattitude and structure. Part...

  1. Residual microstructure associated with impact crater in Ti-6Al-4V meshes reinforced 5A06Al alloy matrix composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Q; Chen, G Q; Jiang, L T; Hussain, M; Han, X L; Sun, D L; Wu, G H

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, TC4(m)/5A06Al composite was hypervelocity impacted by 2024 aluminium projectile with the diameter of 2mm and with the impact velocity of 3.5 km/s. The residual microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM). The TC4-Al interface before impact was composed of TiAl(3) phase and Ti(3)Al phase. Near the pithead, separation of TC4 fibers and Al matrix occurred along the impact direction. Around the middle of the crater, TC4 fibers were sheared into several sections. Near the bottom of crater, adiabatic shear band (ASB) occurred in TC4 fiber, while the angle between shear plane and cross section was 45°. The crack propagated along TC4-Ti(3)Al interface during impact and some Ti(3)Al phase at the TC4-Al interface transformed to amorphous with few nanocrystals after hypervelocity impact. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. EUPORIAS: plans and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buontempo, C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in our understanding and ability to forecast climate variability have meant that skilful predictions are beginning to be routinely made on seasonal to decadal (s2d) timescales. Such forecasts have the potential to be of great value to a wide range of decision-making, where outcomes are strongly influenced by variations in the climate. In 2012 the European Commission funded EUPORIAS, a four year long project to develop prototype end-to-end climate impact prediction services operating on a seasonal to decadal timescale, and assess their value in informing decision-making. EUPORIAS commenced on 1 November 2012, coordinated by the UK Met Office leading a consortium of 24 organisations representing world-class European climate research and climate service centres, expertise in impacts assessments and seasonal predictions, two United Nations agencies, specialists in new media, and commercial companies in climate-vulnerable sectors such as energy, water and tourism. The poster describes the setup of the project, its main outcome and some of the very preliminary results.

  3. New evidence for impact origin of the Bushveld Complex, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    The importance of hypervelocity impacts as a geologic process is demonstrated by the example of the Bushveld Complex and the (nearby) Vredefort Ring. Each is interpreted as the result of four simultaneous impacts modified by large-scale endogenic processes triggered by the impact event. The layered mafic sequence and the voluminous red granite associated with the complex are endogenic magmas, probably generated by pressure release accompanying crater excavation. Shock melting of older sedimentary rocks must have produced a layer of impact melt (the Rooiberg Felsite), the upper part of which was extruded over its originally chilled crust as a series of thick lava flows. Field evidence and radiometric age determinations indicate that the Bushveld Complex formed approximately 2000 billion years ago.

  4. Engineering Polymer Blends for Impact Damage Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L.; Smith, Russell W.; Working, Dennis C.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    Structures containing polymers such as DuPont's Surlyn® 8940, demonstrate puncture healing when impacted by a 9 millimeter projectile traveling from speeds near 300 meters per second (1,100 feet per second) to hypervelocity impacts in the micrometeoroid velocity range of 5 kilometers per second (16,000 feet per second). Surlyn® 8940 puncture heals over a temperature range of minus 30 degrees Centigrade to plus 70 degrees Centigrade and shows potential for use in pressurized vessels subject to impact damage. However, such polymers are difficult to process and limited in applicability due to their low thermal stability, poor chemical resistance and overall poor mechanical properties. In this work, several puncture healing engineered melt formulations were developed. Moldings of melt blend formulations were impacted with a 5.56 millimeter projectile with a nominal velocity of 945 meters per second (3,100 feet per second) at about 25 degrees Centigrade, 50 degrees Centigrade and 100 degrees Centigrade, depending upon the specific blend being investigated. Self-healing tendencies were determined using surface vacuum pressure tests and tensile tests after penetration using tensile dog-bone specimens (ASTM D 638-10). For the characterization of tensile properties both pristine and impacted specimens were tested to obtain tensile modulus, yield stress and tensile strength, where possible. Experimental results demonstrate a range of new puncture healing blends which mitigate damage in the ballistic velocity regime.

  5. Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

  6. On Preliminary Breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, W. H.; Petersen, D.

    2013-12-01

    The preliminary breakdown phase of a negative cloud-to-ground lightning flash was observed in detail. Observations were made with a Photron SA1.1 high-speed video camera operating at 9,000 frames per second, fast optical sensors, a flat-plate electric field antenna covering the SLF to MF band, and VHF and UHF radio receivers with bandwidths of 20 MHz. Bright stepwise extensions of a negative leader were observed at an altitude of 8 km during the first few milliseconds of the flash, and were coincident with bipolar electric field pulses called 'characteristic pulses'. The 2-D step lengths of the preliminary processes were in excess of 100 meters, with some 2-D step lengths in excess of 200 meters. Smaller and shorter unipolar electric field pulses were superposed onto the bipolar electric field pulses, and were coincident with VHF and UHF radio pulses. After a few milliseconds, the emerging negative stepped leader system showed a marked decrease in luminosity, step length, and propagation velocity. Details of these events will be discussed, including the possibility that the preliminary breakdown phase consists not of a single developing lightning leader system, but of multiple smaller lightning leader systems that eventually join together into a single system.

  7. Study of a transaugmented two-stage small circular-bore railgun for injection of hypervelocity hydrogen pellets as a fusion reactor refueling mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompkins, M.W.; Anderson, M.A.; Feng, Q.; Zhang, J.; Kim, K. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Injection of hypervelocity hydrogen pellets has become widely accepted as the most effective means of refueling magnetically confined fusion reactors. Pellet velocities on the order of 10 km/s are desired and hydrogen pellet erosion during acceleration must be minimized. It is important to maintain uniform bore surfaces during repetitive shots, implying that, if a railgun is to be used to accelerate the pellets, damage to the sidewalls and rails of the railgun due to local heating must be limited. In order to reduce the amount of power dissipated within the bore and increase the propulsive force generated by the plasma-arc armature while minimizing losses due to pellet, rail, and sidewall ablation, the authors have employed a magnetic field transaugmentation mechanism consisting of a two-turn pulsed electromagnet. The two-stage gun consists of a light-gas gun which accelerates a 4- to 5-mg pellet to a speed around 1.2 km/s and injects it into the plasma-arc armature railgun. Currently, they have achieved a final output velocity for a hydrogen pellet of 2.11 km/s with a time-averaged acceleration of 4,850 km/s{sup 2} using a 58-cm railgun pulsed with a peak rail current of 9.2 kA and 28.0 kA of transaugmentation current. This paper will present a description of the hydrogen-pellet-injector railgun system, a discussion of the data on hydrogen pellet acceleration, and projections for future systems.

  8. Momentum transfer from oblique impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Gault, Donald E.

    1987-05-01

    A completely satisfactory experiment would be in a low gravity environment where the effect of momentum imparted by ejecta impacting the surface can be removed or controlled from momentum transfer during impact. Preliminary estimates can be made using a ballistic pendulum. Such experiments were initiated at the NASA-Ames Vertical Gun Range in order to examine momentum transfer due to impact vaporization for oblique impacts. The preliminary results indicate that momentum from oblique impacts is very inefficient: decreasing with increasing impact velocity and perhaps size; increasing with decreasing density; and increasing with increasing impact angle. At face value, such results minimize the effect of momentum transfer by grazing impact; the more probable impact angles of 30 deg would have a greater effect, contrary to the commonly held impression.

  9. Impact-driven planetary desiccation: The origin of the dry Venus

    CERN Document Server

    Kurosawa, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    The fate of surface water on Venus is one of the most important outstanding problems in comparative planetology. Here a new concept is proposed to explain water removal on a steam-covered proto Venus, referred to as impact-driven planetary desiccation. Since a steam atmosphere is photochemically unstable, water vapor dissociates into hydrogen and oxygen. Then, hydrogen escapes easily into space through hydrodynamic escape driven by strong extreme ultraviolet radiation from the young Sun. The focus is on the intense impact bombardment during the terminal stage of planetary accretion as generators of a significant amount of reducing agent. The fine-grained ejecta remove the residual oxygen, the counter part of escaped hydrogen, via the oxidation of iron-bearing rocks in a hot atmosphere. Thus, hypervelocity impacts cause net desiccation of the planetary surface. I constructed a stochastic cratering model using a Monte Carlo approach to investigate the cumulative mass of nonoxidized, ejected rocks due to the int...

  10. Environmental Survey preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque (SNLA). The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SNLA, and interviews with site personnel. 85 refs., 49 figs., 48 tabs.

  11. Ruiz Volcano: Preliminary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Volcano, Colombia (4.88°N, 75.32°W). All times are local (= GMT -5 hours).An explosive eruption on November 13, 1985, melted ice and snow in the summit area, generating lahars that flowed tens of kilometers down flank river valleys, killing more than 20,000 people. This is history's fourth largest single-eruption death toll, behind only Tambora in 1815 (92,000), Krakatau in 1883 (36,000), and Mount Pelée in May 1902 (28,000). The following briefly summarizes the very preliminary and inevitably conflicting information that had been received by press time.

  12. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Basset, R.; Bastien, R.; Bechtel, H.; Bleuet, P.; Borg, J.; Brenker F.; Bridges, J.

    2009-01-01

    In January 2006 the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, C omet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return o f contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approximately 0.1m(exp 2) in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the co llecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Col lector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 m(exp 2-) day during two periods before the co metary encounter. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination ( ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the collection using no ndestructive techniques. The ISPE consists of six interdependent proj ects: (1) Candidate identification through automated digital microsco py and a massively distributed, calibrated search (2) Candidate extr action and photodocumentation (3) Characterization of candidates thro ugh synchrotronbased FourierTranform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), S canning XRay Fluoresence Microscopy (SXRF), and Scanning Transmission Xray Microscopy (STXM) (4) Search for and analysis of craters in f oils through FESEM scanning, Auger Spectroscopy and synchrotronbased Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) (5) Modeling of interstell ar dust transport in the solar system (6) Laboratory simulations of h ypervelocity dust impacts into the collecting media

  13. Impromptu Speaking and Interpretation Studies: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to look at forensics-based competition events and determine what, if any, impact they could have on the language learning and public speaking skills of interpreters in training. This paper details the nature of the impromptu and extemporaneous speaking events in forensics competitions and introduces a…

  14. Impromptu Speaking and Interpretation Studies: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to look at forensics-based competition events and determine what, if any, impact they could have on the language learning and public speaking skills of interpreters in training. This paper details the nature of the impromptu and extemporaneous speaking events in forensics competitions and introduces a…

  15. Preliminary environmental assessment for the satellite power system (SPS). Volume 1. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-10-01

    A summary of the preliminary assessment of the environmental impacts of a SPS is given. Microwave health and ecological effects, other effects on health and the environment, effects on the atmosphere, and effects on communications systems are summarized. (WHK)

  16. Preliminary Analysis of Effects of Reduced Discharge onThermal Habitat of Pedersen Warm Springs Channel

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A preliminary report to study the potential impacts of possible flow reductions in thermal spring systems located in the Warm Springs area of Moapa Valley NWR on the...

  17. IMPACT fragmentation model developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.

    2016-09-01

    The IMPACT fragmentation model has been used by The Aerospace Corporation for more than 25 years to analyze orbital altitude explosions and hypervelocity collisions. The model is semi-empirical, combining mass, energy and momentum conservation laws with empirically derived relationships for fragment characteristics such as number, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and spreading velocity as well as event energy distribution. Model results are used for several types of analysis including assessment of short-term risks to satellites from orbital altitude fragmentations, prediction of the long-term evolution of the orbital debris environment and forensic assessments of breakup events. A new version of IMPACT, version 6, has been completed and incorporates a number of advancements enabled by a multi-year long effort to characterize more than 11,000 debris fragments from more than three dozen historical on-orbit breakup events. These events involved a wide range of causes, energies, and fragmenting objects. Special focus was placed on the explosion model, as the majority of events examined were explosions. Revisions were made to the mass distribution used for explosion events, increasing the number of smaller fragments generated. The algorithm for modeling upper stage large fragment generation was updated. A momentum conserving asymmetric spreading velocity distribution algorithm was implemented to better represent sub-catastrophic events. An approach was developed for modeling sub-catastrophic explosions, those where the majority of the parent object remains intact, based on estimated event energy. Finally, significant modifications were made to the area-to-mass ratio distribution to incorporate the tendencies of different materials to fragment into different shapes. This ability enabled better matches between the observed area-to-mass ratios and those generated by the model. It also opened up additional possibilities for post-event analysis of breakups. The paper will discuss

  18. Laser Prevention of Earth Impact Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jonathan W.; Howell, Joe (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Today we are seeing the geological data base constantly expanding as new evidence from past impacts with the Earth are discovered and investigated. It is now commonly believed that a hypervelocity impact occurring approximately 65 million years ago in the Yucatan Peninsula area was the disaster responsible for the extinction of almost 70% of the species of life on Earth including of course the dinosaurs. What is sobering is that we believe now that this was just one of several such disasters and that some of the others caused extinctions to even a greater extent. Preventing collisions with the Earth by hypervelocity asteroids, meteoroids, and comets is the most important problem facing human civilization. While there are many global problems facing our planet including overpopulation, pollution, disease, and deforestation; none of these offer the potential of rapid, total extinction. Rapid is the operative word here in that many of the global problems we face may indeed, if not sufficiently addressed, pose a similar long-term threat. However, with the impact threat, a single, almost unpredictable event could lead to a chain reaction of disasters that would end everything mankind has worked to achieve over the centuries. Our chances of being hit are greater than our chance of winning the lottery. We now believe that while there are only about 2000-earth orbit crossing rocks great than 1 kilometer in diameter, there may be as many as 100,000 rocks in the 100 m size range. The 1 kilometer rocks are difficult to detect and even harder to track. The 100 m class ones are almost impossible to find with today's technology. Can anything be done about this fundamental existence question facing us? The answer is a resounding yes. By using an intelligent combination of Earth and space based sensors coupled with high-energy laser stations in orbit, we can deflect rocks from striking the Earth. This is accomplished by irradiating the surface of the rock with sufficiently intense

  19. Impact to groundwater resources by landfill foundry industries waste in Tandil, Buenos Aires, Argentina. A preliminary study; Impacto al recurso hidrico subterraneo por vertedero de residuos de industrias de fundicion en Tandil, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Un estudio preliminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel, R. E.; Ruiz de Galarreta, V. A.; Banda Noriega, R. B.

    2009-07-01

    In Tandil city, in Buenos Aires province, Argentina, the foundry industry is one of the most important production lines. The waste generated by these industries has historically been disposed as fill material in pit quarries and brick works of the likelihood that some of his constituents leach contacting the underground water resources. The aim of this paper is to present the preliminaries results hydrochemical and hydrodynamic study conducted in a landfill of waste foundry industries. The work is around developing a disposal site with the measurement of groundwater levels and taking water samples along an annual hydrological cycle (November 2007 - November 2008). The hydrodynamic analysis shows that the groundwater flow is from the west from a rocky area where high variance across the study area. Hydrochemistry in relation to concentrations of nitrate and electrical conductivity vary significantly upstream and downstream of the landfill. (Author) 9 refs.

  20. A Preliminary Jupiter Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, W B

    2016-01-01

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses, and a hydrogen-helium-rich envelope with...

  1. A Preliminary Jupiter Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Militzer, B.

    2016-03-01

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen-helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses and a hydrogen-helium-rich envelope with approximately three times solar metallicity.

  2. Thermal energy storage in aquifiers: preliminary information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.D.

    1979-12-01

    Topics discussed include: conceptual designs; numerical modelling; field experiments; relevant technical information; feasibility studies; preliminary aquifer selection considerations; and preliminary design and operating considerations. (TFD)

  3. Impact-driven ice loss in outer Solar System satellites: Consequences for the Late Heavy Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; Korycansky, D. G.

    2012-05-01

    We use recent hydrodynamical results (Kraus, R.G., Senft, L.G., Stewart, S.S. [2011]. Icarus, 214, 724-738) for the production of water vapor by hypervelocity impacts on ice targets to assess which present-day major satellites of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus would have lost mass due to impact vaporization during an era of massive bombardment similar to the Late Heavy Bombardment in the inner Solar System. Using impactor populations suggested by recent work (Charnoz, S., Morbidelli, A., Dones, L., Salmon, J. [2009]. Icarus, 199, 413-428; Barr, A.C., Canup, R.M. [2010]. Nat. Geosci., 3, 164-167), we find that several satellites would have lost all their HO; we suggest that the most likely resolution of this paradox is that either the LHB delivered ≈10 times less mass to the outer Solar System than predicted by the standard Nice Model, or that the inner satellites formed after the LHB.

  4. Potential space debris shield structure using impact-initiated energetic materials composed of polytetrafluoroethylene and aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Qingming; Long, Renrong; Zhang, Kai; Guo, Jun

    2016-03-01

    A whipple shield using Al/PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) energetic material to protect against space debris is presented. The hypervelocity impact characteristics were investigated experimentally using a two-stage light gas gun at velocities between 3 and 6 km/s. A good protection of the shield was obtained through comparative experiments which used the same bumper areal density. The results showed that the critical projectile diameter can be improved by 28% by contrast with the Christiansen ballistic limit equations. The Al/PTFE energetic material bumper can break up the projectile into smaller, less massive, and slower projectiles due to the combined effect of impact and explosion, thereby producing a sharp rise in the spacecraft protection ability.

  5. The Preliminaries of a Reference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butler, Graham; Sadl, Urska

    2017-01-01

    by the reasons why the Court after an oral hearing held in the presence of the parties and eight intervening Member States, and after hearing the Advocate General did not deliver one. The comment examines the legal framework, as well as the detailed procedural rules and guidelines that govern the cooperation...... of national courts in the preliminary reference procedure. It highlights the fact that preliminary references can only work when the preliminaries of a reference – the culture of sincere cooperation and litigation, efficient communication and flexible procedural rules – are in place....

  6. 旅游开发初级阶段农村居民对旅游影响感知的实证研究——以安顺市罗仙村为例%Perceived Tourism Impact of Local Residents in a Rural Area at the Preliminary Stage of Tourism Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斌; 俞洋

    2015-01-01

    An empirical study is conducted to probe into local residents' perceived impact of tourism development at its earliest stage at backward rural village in Anshun City, Guizhou Province. The results indicate that residents demonstrate both positive and negative perspectives in terms of tourism impact on local economy, environment and social culture. Generally, residents feel no strong impact from tourism industry when it is still at the preliminary stage and they tend to show a stronger positive attitude towards the industry. And, residents perceive that tourism development has stronger positive effect on local economy but more signiifcantly negative impact on local environment and social culture possibly because the negative effect has not emerged when at the early stage of tourism development.%以安顺市罗仙村为例,探讨了旅游开发初级阶段农村居民对旅游开发影响的感知.因子分析发现,居民感知表现为旅游开发对经济、社会文化和环境影响三个方面以及积极的和消极的影响两个维度.总体上,在旅游开发的初级阶段,当地居民对旅游开发的积极影响感知强于消极影响,表明旅游业对当地负面影响还未充分显现.在三个变量中,对于经济影响的积极感知较强,对于社会文化和环境的负面感知也比较显著.

  7. Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Microanalysis and Recognition of Micrometeoroid Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J. C.; Opiela, J.; Grime, G. W.; Webb, R. P.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V. V.; Colaux, J. L.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Postflight surveys of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) on the Hubble Space Telescope have located hundreds of features on the 2.2 by 0.8 m curved plate, evidence of hypervelocity impact by small particles during 16 years of exposure to space in low Earth orbit (LEO). The radiator has a 100 - 200 micron surface layer of white paint, overlying 4 mm thick Al alloy, which was not fully penetrated by any impact. Over 460 WFPC2 samples were extracted by coring at JSC. About half were sent to NHM in a collaborative program with NASA, ESA and IBC. The structural and compositional heterogeneity at micrometer scale required microanalysis by electron and ion beam microscopes to determine the nature of the impactors (artificial orbital debris, or natural micrometeoroids, MM). Examples of MM impacts are described elsewhere. Here we describe the development of novel electron beam analysis protocols, required to recognize the subtle traces of MM residues.

  8. National Coal Utilization Assessment. a preliminary assessment of the health and environmental effects of coal utilization in the Midwest. Volume I. Energy scenarios, technology characterizations, air and water resource impacts, and health effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    This report presents an initial evaluation of the major health and environmental issues associated with increased coal use in the six midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Using an integrated assessment approach, the evaluation proceeds from a base-line scenario of energy demand and facility siting for 1975-2020. Emphasis is placed on impacts from coal extraction, land reclamation, coal combustion for electrical generation, and coal gasification. The range of potential impacts and constraints is illustrated by a second scenario that represents an expected upper limit for coal utilization in Illinois. The following are among the more significant issues identified and evaluated in this study: If environmental and related issues can be resolved, coal will continue to be a major source of energy for the Midwest; existing sulfur emission constraints will increase use of western coal; the resource requirements and environmental impacts of coal utilization will require major significant environmental and economic tradeoffs in site selection; short-term (24-hr) ambient standards for sulfur dioxide will limit the sizes of coal facilities or require advanced control technologies; an impact on public health may result from long-range transport of airborne sulfur emissions from coal facilities in the Midwest; inadequately controlled effluents from coal gasification may cause violations of water-quality standards; the major ecological effects of coal extraction are from pre-mining and post-reclamation land use; and sulfur dioxide is the major potential contributor to effects on vegetation of atmospheric emissions from coal facilities.

  9. A PRELIMINARY JUPITER MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, W. B. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Militzer, B. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen–helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses and a hydrogen–helium-rich envelope with approximately three times solar metallicity.

  10. Preliminary reference Earth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewonski, Adam M.; Anderson, Don L.

    1981-06-01

    A large data set consisting of about 1000 normal mode periods, 500 summary travel time observations, 100 normal mode Q values, mass and moment of inertia have been inverted to obtain the radial distribution of elastic properties, Q values and density in the Earth's interior. The data set was supplemented with a special study of 12 years of ISC phase data which yielded an additional 1.75 × 10 6 travel time observations for P and S waves. In order to obtain satisfactory agreement with the entire data set we were required to take into account anelastic dispersion. The introduction of transverse isotropy into the outer 220 km of the mantle was required in order to satisfy the shorter period fundamental toroidal and spheroidal modes. This anisotropy also improved the fit of the larger data set. The horizontal and vertical velocities in the upper mantle differ by 2-4%, both for P and S waves. The mantle below 220 km is not required to be anisotropic. Mantle Rayleigh waves are surprisingly sensitive to compressional velocity in the upper mantle. High S n velocities, low P n velocities and a pronounced low-velocity zone are features of most global inversion models that are suppressed when anisotropy is allowed for in the inversion. The Preliminary Reference Earth Model, PREM, and auxiliary tables showing fits to the data are presented.

  11. Arapahoe NWR diversion reconstruction : Preliminary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a preliminary plan for a diversion reconstruction for Hubbard #2. Oklahoma #1, Dryer, Hill and Crowder sites on the Arapahoe National Wildlife Refuge.

  12. Surveys of Returned ISS Hardware for MMMOD Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, J. L.; Christiansen, E. L.; Lear, D. M.; Nagy, K.; Berger, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    Since February 2001, the Hypervelocity Impact Technology (HVIT) group at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston has performed 35 post-flight inspections on space exposed hardware returned from the International Space Station (ISS). Data on 1,188 observations of micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) damage have been collected from these inspections. Survey documentation typically includes impact feature location and size measurements as well as microscopic photography (25-200x). Sampling of impacts sites for projectile residue was performed for the largest features. Results of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis to discern impactor source are included in the database when available. This paper will focus on two inspections, the Pressurized Mating Adapter 2 (PMA-2) cover returned in 2015 after 1.6 years exposure with 26 observed impact features, and two Airlock shield panels returned in 2010 after 8.75 years exposure with 58 MMOD impacts. Feature sizes from the observed data are compared to predictions using the Bumper 3 risk assessment code.

  13. The Investigation of Hypervelocity Gouging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    The Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) facility at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico , is a ground based test facility designed to test items...Friedrichs KO, and Lewy H, ‘ Uber die partiellen Differenzengleichungen der mathematischen Physik’, Mathematische Annalen Vol. 100, pp 32-74 (1928

  14. Preliminary Analysis on Environmental Impact of Relocation of Cities and Towns in the Three Gorges Reservoir Region%三峡工程库区城镇迁建环境影响初步分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE; Lian-fang

    2001-01-01

    At the normal pool level of 175 m, the inundated areas of the Three Gor ges Reservoir involve 2 cities, 11 county seats and 140 towns. The population o f the cities and towns under the inundated line totals 393 000 people(1985). The se affected cities and towns will be rebuilt by means of moving back ward to a higher elevation or to other places.The cities and towns to be relocated are the regional political, economic and cu ltural centres, and serve as traffic complexes and places of goods gathering and dist ributing. They are also the seats containing some important cultural re lics and historic sites, landscaping and scenic spots. The relocation of the cit ies and towns will generate far-reaching impacts on regional socio-economy and e nvironment. The unreasonable excavation and fill or the improper protective meas ures adopted may induce land slide,collapse and soil loss. The ruins a nd wastes will affect the water quality in the early period of impoundment of th e Three Gorges Reservoir. A large demand of timber may result in forest fa ll excessively in the local area of the reservoir region, and lower forest and vegetation coverage rate may lead to soil loss. The relocation of the cities an d towns will increase urbanization in reservoir, improve the infrastructure, enh ance their location function and economic radiation capacity. The negative impa ct will r each its maximum during relocation peak period, and the environmental quality wi ll be progressively improved with the recovery of the functions of the relocated cities and towns and the implementation of environmental protection measures. F inally, the negative impact will be offset, and the negative impact will be chan ged into positive environmental elements.

  15. Short-term monitoring of benzene air concentration in an urban area: a preliminary study of application of Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test to assess pollutant impact on global environment and indoor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Maria Chiara; De Felice, Marco; Morlino, Roberta; Fuselli, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    In step with the need to develop statistical procedures to manage small-size environmental samples, in this work we have used concentration values of benzene (C6H6), concurrently detected by seven outdoor and indoor monitoring stations over 12 000 minutes, in order to assess the representativeness of collected data and the impact of the pollutant on indoor environment. Clearly, the former issue is strictly connected to sampling-site geometry, which proves critical to correctly retrieving information from analysis of pollutants of sanitary interest. Therefore, according to current criteria for network-planning, single stations have been interpreted as nodes of a set of adjoining triangles; then, a) node pairs have been taken into account in order to estimate pollutant stationarity on triangle sides, as well as b) node triplets, to statistically associate data from air-monitoring with the corresponding territory area, and c) node sextuplets, to assess the impact probability of the outdoor pollutant on indoor environment for each area. Distributions from the various node combinations are all non-Gaussian, in the consequently, Kruskal-Wallis (KW) non-parametric statistics has been exploited to test variability on continuous density function from each pair, triplet and sextuplet. Results from the above-mentioned statistical analysis have shown randomness of site selection, which has not allowed a reliable generalization of monitoring data to the entire selected territory, except for a single "forced" case (70%); most important, they suggest a possible procedure to optimize network design.

  16. Short-term monitoring of benzene air concentration in an urban area: a preliminary study of application of Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test to assess pollutant impact on global environment and indoor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Mura

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In step with the need to develop statistical procedures to manage small-size environmental samples, in this work we have used concentration values of benzene (C6H6, concurrently detected by seven outdoor and indoor monitoring stations over 12 000 minutes, in order to assess the representativeness of collected data and the impact of the pollutant on indoor environment. Clearly, the former issue is strictly connected to sampling-site geometry, which proves critical to correctly retrieving information from analysis of pollutants of sanitary interest. Therefore, according to current criteria for network-planning, single stations have been interpreted as nodes of a set of adjoining triangles; then, a node pairs have been taken into account in order to estimate pollutant stationarity on triangle sides, as well as b node triplets, to statistically associate data from air-monitoring with the corresponding territory area, and c node sextuplets, to assess the impact probability of the outdoor pollutant on indoor environment for each area. Distributions from the various node combinations are all non-Gaussian, in the consequently, Kruskal-Wallis (KW non-parametric statistics has been exploited to test variability on continuous density function from each pair, triplet and sextuplet. Results from the above-mentioned statistical analysis have shown randomness of site selection, which has not allowed a reliable generalization of monitoring data to the entire selected territory, except for a single "forced" case (70%; most important, they suggest a possible procedure to optimize network design.

  17. Impact of maximum Standardized Uptake Value (SUVmax evaluated by 18-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT on survival for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma: a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miura Takeshi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this era of molecular targeting therapy when various systematic treatments can be selected, prognostic biomarkers are required for the purpose of risk-directed therapy selection. Numerous reports of various malignancies have revealed that 18-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG accumulation, as evaluated by positron emission tomography, can be used to predict the prognosis of patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax from 18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT on survival for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Methods A total of 26 patients with advanced or metastatic RCC were enrolled in this study. The FDG uptake of all RCC lesions diagnosed by conventional CT was evaluated by 18F-FDG PET/CT. The impact of SUVmax on patient survival was analyzed prospectively. Results FDG uptake was detected in 230 of 243 lesions (94.7% excluding lung or liver metastases with diameters of less than 1 cm. The SUVmax of 26 patients ranged between 1.4 and 16.6 (mean 8.8 ± 4.0. The patients with RCC tumors showing high SUVmax demonstrated poor prognosis (P = 0.005 hazard ratio 1.326, 95% CI 1.089-1.614. The survival between patients with SUVmax equal to the mean of SUVmax, 8.8 or more and patients with SUVmax less than 8.8 were statistically different (P = 0.0012. This is the first report to evaluate the impact of SUVmax on advanced RCC patient survival. However, the number of patients and the follow-up period were still not extensive enough to settle this important question conclusively. Conclusions The survival of patients with advanced RCC can be predicted by evaluating their SUVmax using 18F-FDG-PET/CT. 18F-FDG-PET/CT has potency as an "imaging biomarker" to provide helpful information for the clinical decision-making.

  18. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Florida. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Florida Public Service Commission. The Commission is comprised of five members appointed by the governor with the approval of the senate. The governor must choose his appointees from a list of persons recommended by the nine-person Florida Public Service Commission Nominating Council. Commissioners serve either three- or four-year terms. They must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests in any utility subject to the jurisdiction of the Commission. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supersedes that of local governments. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  19. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in New Hampshire. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    Public utilities in New Hampshire are regulated by the Public Utilities Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed for six-year terms by the Governor with the advice and consent of the council. Members of the Commission must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests in any public utility. The Commission is charged with the general regulation and supervision of public utilities. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supercedes that of local government. The Commission may suspend the operation of local zoning laws. Local governments do retain the right to license the use of public ways by utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  20. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Vermont. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Vermont Public Service Board (PSC). The PSB is comprised of three members appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. PSB members serve six year terms. Members must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests in any company subject to the supervision of the PSB. Local governments retain little regulatory authority over public utilities. Local governments are responsible for regulating the use of streets and other public property, but any person aggrieved by a local decision may appeal to the PSB within thirty days. The PSB is to review the local action at a public hearing and its decision is final. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  1. The underground economy in the U.S.A.: preliminary new evidence on the impact of income tax rates (and other factors on aggregate tax evasion 1975-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Cebula

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This empirical study seeks to identify determinants of the underground economy in the U.S. in the form of aggregate federal personal income tax evasion over the period 1975-2008, with a specific focus upon the impact of higher federal income tax rates on tax evasion. In this study, we use the most recent data available on aggregate personal income tax evasion, data that are derived from the General Currency Ratio Model and measured in the form of the ratio of unreported AGI to reported AGI. Most other studies of federal income tax evasion for the U.S. do not use data this current. It is found that the impact of increases in the federal income tax rate on aggregate personal income tax evasion may, on balance, be ambiguous, possibly suggesting that the income effect is negative and outweighs the positive substitution effect for the representative taxpayer. It is also found that the degree of aggregate personal income tax evasion may be an increasing function of the percentage of federal personal income tax returns characterized by itemized deductions and a decreasing function of the Tax Reform Act of 1986 (during the first two years of implementation, the ratio of the tax free interest rate yield on high grade municipals to the interest rate yield on ten year Treasury notes, and higher audit rates of filed federal income tax returns (as a measure of risk from tax evasion by IRS personnel. Finally, unpopular wars may provide a secondary benefit for and therefore act as an inducement for greater tax evasion.

  2. A computational model for assessing high-velocity debris impact in space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, M.; Garcia, V.

    2017-07-01

    Man-made space debris is dominating the background meteorite environment with a growing debris population leading to increased collision risks for satellites, especially in the low Earth orbit and geostationary orbit protected environments. Here we present a computational model for estimating the effect of hypervelocity impact from debris particles on non-shielded propellant and pressurant tanks. Eulerian hydrocode simulation is utilised to model firstly penetration and shock wave formation in the propellant and secondly subsequent detonation wave propagation and interaction with the tank wall. Furthermore, reactive molecular dynamics is used to estimate the risk of detonation in a liquid hydrazine layer. We present simulations of a 3.5 mm aluminium spherical debris particle at a velocity of 14 km/s relative to a hydrazine tank. We find that the degree of damage is strongly dependent on tank temperature and hence on the satellite thermal configuration at its end of life.

  3. A computational model for assessing high-velocity debris impact in space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, M.; Garcia, V.

    2017-01-01

    Man-made space debris is dominating the background meteorite environment with a growing debris population leading to increased collision risks for satellites, especially in the low Earth orbit and geostationary orbit protected environments. Here we present a computational model for estimating the effect of hypervelocity impact from debris particles on non-shielded propellant and pressurant tanks. Eulerian hydrocode simulation is utilised to model firstly penetration and shock wave formation in the propellant and secondly subsequent detonation wave propagation and interaction with the tank wall. Furthermore, reactive molecular dynamics is used to estimate the risk of detonation in a liquid hydrazine layer. We present simulations of a 3.5 mm aluminium spherical debris particle at a velocity of 14 km/s relative to a hydrazine tank. We find that the degree of damage is strongly dependent on tank temperature and hence on the satellite thermal configuration at its end of life.

  4. Role of the granular nature of meteoritic projectiles in impact crater morphogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Bartali, Roberto; Nahmad-Molinari, Yuri; Sarochi, Damiano; Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2013-01-01

    By means of novel volume-diameter aspect ratio diagrams, we ponder on the current conception of crater morphogenesis analyzing crater data from beam explosions, hypervelocity collisions and drop experiments and comparing them with crater data from three moons (the Moon, Callisto, and Ganymede) and from our own experimental results. The distinctive volume-diameter scaling laws we discovered make us to conclude that simple and complex craters in satellites and planets could have been formed by granular vs. granular collisions and that central peaks and domes in complex craters were formed by a dynamic confinement of part of the impacting projectile, rather than by the uplift of the target terrain. A granulometric analysis of asteroids and central peaks and domes inside complex craters, shows boulder size distributions consistent with our hypothesis that crater internal features are the remnants of granular impactors.

  5. Preliminary study on mechanics-based rainfall kinetic energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jiuqin Ms.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A raindrop impact power observation system was employed to observe the real-time raindrop impact power during a rainfall event and to analyze the corresponding rainfall characteristics. The experiments were conducted at different simulated rainfall intensities. As rainfall intensity increased, the observed impact power increased linearly indicating the power observation system would be satisfactory for characterizing rainfall erosivity. Momentum is the product of mass and velocity (Momentum=MV, which is related to the observed impact power value. Since there is no significant difference between momentum and impact power, observed impact power can represent momentum for different rainfall intensities. The relationship between momentum and the observed impact power provides a convenient way to calculate rainfall kinetic energy. The value of rainfall kinetic energy based on the observed impact power was higher than the classic rainfall kinetic energy. The rainfall impact power based kinetic energy and the classic rainfall kinetic energy showed linear correlation, which indicates that the raindrop impact power observation system can characterize rainfall kinetic energy. The article establishes a preliminary way to calculate rainfall kinetic energy by using the real-time observed momentum, providing a foundation for replacing the traditional methods for estimating kinetic energy of rainstorms.

  6. Preliminary results of the correlation between ion concentrations in rainwater samples and atmospheric back trajectories as a part of the study {open_quotes}impact to acid rain in the deterioration of Mexican Maya monuments{close_quotes} (project Conacyt-UNAM: 0128T9106)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, A.H.; Saavedra, M.I.; Snchez, P.; Camacho, R. [Univ. of Mexico (Mexico)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The environmental Pollution Section at the Center of Atmospheric Sciences, National Autonomus University of Mexico (UNAM), has been conducting a research project on their potential of impact of acid rain on the Mexican Maya monuments since 1993. As a part of such study, 49 rainwater samples were collected during the years 1994 through 1995 at the Puerto Morelos Oceanographic Station Located close to the Tulum Maya ruins in the State of Qintana Roo. The rain water samples were collected using an automatic rain collector. After the rain event, the water samples were transferred to clean Nalgene bottles. The bottles were stored under refrigeration prior to their shipment to the UNAM laboratory in Mexico City. Concentrations of anions Cl{sup -}, NO{sup -}{sub 3}, and SO{sup 2-}{sub 4} and cations Na{sup +}, NH{sup +}{sub 4}, K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+} an Ca{sup 2+} were determined by the High Pressure Ion Chromatographic Procedure. The pH of samples was measured in the laboratory. Also, wind back upper trajectories which arrived to the Puerto Morelos are at the same date of each rain event, were calculated using the GMCC atmospheric trajectory program at NOAA. A thorough analysis on the relations between anions and cations is made and preliminary correlations of these results with the calculated long range trajectories are explored in order to find the possible origin of the event.

  7. Deflection by kinetic impact: Sensitivity to asteroid properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck Syal, Megan; Michael Owen, J.; Miller, Paul L.

    2016-05-01

    Impacting an asteroid with a spacecraft traveling at high speed delivers an impulsive change in velocity to the body. In certain circumstances, this strategy could be used to deflect a hazardous asteroid, moving its orbital path off of an Earth-impacting course. However, the efficacy of momentum delivery to asteroids by hypervelocity impact is sensitive to both the impact conditions (particularly velocity) and specific characteristics of the target asteroid. Here we numerically model asteroid response to kinetic impactors under a wide range of initial conditions, using an Adaptive Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code. Impact velocities spanning 1-30 km/s were investigated, yielding, for a particular set of assumptions about the modeled target material, a power-law dependence consistent with a velocity-scaling exponent of μ = 0.44. Target characteristics including equation of state, strength model, porosity, rotational state, and shape were varied, and corresponding changes in asteroid response were documented. The kinetic-impact momentum-multiplication factor, β, decreases with increasing asteroid cohesion and increasing porosity. Although increased porosity lowers β, larger porosities result in greater deflection velocities, as a consequence of reduced target masses for asteroids of fixed size. Porosity also lowers disruption risk for kinetic impacts near the threshold of disruption. Including fast (P = 2.5 h) and very fast (P = 100 s) rotation did not significantly alter β but did affect the risk of disruption by the impact event. Asteroid shape is found to influence the efficiency of momentum delivery, as local slope conditions can change the orientation of the crater ejecta momentum vector. These results emphasize the need for asteroid characterization studies to bracket the range of target conditions expected at near-Earth asteroids while also highlighting some of the principal uncertainties associated with the kinetic-impact deflection strategy.

  8. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Maryland. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities in Maryland is vested in the Public Service Commission under the authority of the Public Service Commission Law. The Commission consists of five commissioners who are appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the Senate. Commissioners must be or become citizens of Maryland, at least three are to serve full time, and one of the commissioners is to be nominated as chairman. The tenure of each commissioner is six years and their terms are on a staggered schedule. Commissioners are eligible for reappointment. The Public Service Commission Law provides that the Commission's powers an jurisdiction shall extend to the full extent permitted by the Constitution and laws of the United States. Local governments in Maryland are not given regulatory power over public service companies. The only power that local governments have over the operations of utilities is the power to grant franchises. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  9. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in North Carolina. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    Under the Public Utilities Act of 1965, utilities in North Carolina are regulated by the State's Utility Commission. The Commission consists of seven members who are appointed by the governor, subject to confirmation by the General Assembly sitting in joint session. The Commissioners serve eight year terms and the governor designates one of the commissioners as chairman. The Commission has an office of the executive director, who is appointed to a six year term by the governor subject to confirmaion by the General Assembly. The executive director heads the Commission's public staff. The public staff's duties include reviewing, investigating, and making recommendations on utility rates and services and intervention on behalf of the public in proceedings affecting consumer rates and generating plant certification. The Commission has the same power to regulate the operation of privately-owned public utilities within municipalities as it has to control those ouside. The only power over privately-owned utilities reserved to the municipalities is the power to grant franchises. A municipality may maintain its own utility systems, and such systems are not subject to the control and jurisdiction of the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  10. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Pennsylvania. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is generally vested in the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission. The Commission is comprised of five members appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of two-thirds of the senate. Commission members are appointed for 10 year terms. They must be free from any employment which is incompatible with the duties of the Commission, and are subject to a statutory code of ethics. The Commission is charged with responsibility for enforcing the Public Utility Law. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supersedes that of local governments. The Commission, for example, may grant exemptions from local zoning requirements, and has approving authority over privileges or franchises granted by municipalities to public utilities. The Commission, however, has no authority over municipally owned utilities operating within municipal boundaries. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  11. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Maine. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Maine Supreme Court holds that the regulation of the operations of public utilities is an exercise of the police powers of the state. The legislature has delegated such regulatory authority to the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The statutes provide no role for local government in the regulation of public utilities. The PUC consists of three full time members, appointed by the Governor subject to review by the Joint Standing Committee on Public Utilities and to confirmation by the Legislature. They each serve seven year terms. One member is designated by the Governor as chairman. The Commission appoints a secretary, assistant secretary, director of transportation, and, with the approval of the Attorney General, a general counsel. A member of the PUC cannot have any official or professional connection or relation with or hold any stock or securities in any public utility. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  12. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Rhode Island. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Rhode Island statutes vest in the Public Utility Commission and the Division of Public Utilities the exclusive power and authority to regulate public utility companies in that state. Both bodies have been established within the Department of Business Regulation but are independent of the Department's director and are not under his jurisdiction. The jurisdiction to regulate utilities is shared by the Commission and the Division. The Commission serves as a quasi-judicial tribunal with jurisdiction, powers, and duties to hold investigations and hearings involving rates, sufficiency and resonableness of facilities, gas, electric, water, and pipeline public utilities. The administrator, who is chief executive officer of the Division, is responsible for exercising the jurisdiction, supervision, powers, and duties not specifically assigned to the Commission. By virtue of his office, the chairman of the Commission serves also as the administrator and he supervises and directs the execution of all laws relating to public utilities and carriers and all regulations and orders of the Commission governing the conduct and charges of public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  13. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Oregon. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Public Utility Commissioner of Oregon. The Commissioner is appointed by the governor, subject to confirmation by the senate, for a term of four years. He must be free of any pecuniary or employment interest in any business subject to the jurisdiction of the Commissioner. While the Commissioner is primarily responsible for regulating public utilities, local governments do retain some control over utility operations within municipal boundaries. A local government may determine by contract or prescribe by ordinance the quality and character of service furnished by a public utility and may control the use of streets and other public property by public utilities. Municipalities may require public utilities to make any modifications, additions, or extensions to facilities as are necessary to the public interest. In addition, local governments may fix, by contract or ordinance, the rates to be charged by public utilities furnishing service within a municipality. The Commissioner, however, has the power to review any of the above-described local actions. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  14. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Iowa. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Iowa State Commerce Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor with the approval of two-thirds of the senate. Commissioners are appointed for six-year terms. They must be free from employment or pecuniary interests in any public utility. Although the right to grant franchises is specifically reserved for municipalities, local governments exercise no regulatory authority over the provision of utility services by public utilities. Municipally-owned utilities, however, are specifically excepted from rate regulation by the Commission. The regulation of rates charged by municipally-owned utilities is the responsibility of local governments. The Commission is given no authority to review decisions of local governments with respect to rates. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  15. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Michigan. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Michigan Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of three members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Commission members are appointed for six-year terms. They must be free from pecuniary and employment interests incompatible with the duties of the Commission. The Commission is vested with complete power and jurisdiction to regulate all public utilities in the state except any municipally-owned utility. The Commission may not change any rates fixed in or regulated by a franchise granted by a municipality. Upon submission to the Commission by the municipality and the public utility operating in the municipality, the Commission may investigate and fix rates and establish rules and conditions of service. The jurisdiction of the Commission extends to all public utilities except municipally-owned utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  16. The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, andImproving Symptoms:Transforming Institutional Care approach: preliminary data from the implementation of a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services nursing facility demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Nazir, Arif; Holtz, Laura R; Maurer, Helen; Miller, Ellen; Hickman, Susan E; La Mantia, Michael A; Bennett, Merih; Arling, Greg; Sachs, Greg A

    2015-01-01

    The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, and Improving Symptoms: Transforming Institutional Care (OPTIMISTIC) project aims to reduce avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay residents enrolled in 19 central Indiana nursing facilities. This clinical demonstration project, funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovations Center, places a registered nurse in each nursing facility to implement an evidence-based quality improvement program with clinical support from nurse practitioners. A description of the model is presented, and early implementation experiences during the first year of the project are reported. Important elements include better medical care through implementation of Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers tools and chronic care management, enhanced transitional care, and better palliative care with a focus on systematic advance care planning. There were 4,035 long-stay residents in 19 facilities enrolled in OPTIMISTIC between February 2013 and January 2014. Root-cause analyses were performed for all 910 acute transfers of these long stay residents. Of these transfers, the project RN evaluated 29% as avoidable (57% were not avoidable and 15% were missing), and opportunities for quality improvement were identified in 54% of transfers. Lessons learned in early implementation included defining new clinical roles, integrating into nursing facility culture, managing competing facility priorities, communicating with multiple stakeholders, and developing a system for collecting and managing data. The success of the overall initiative will be measured primarily according to reduction in avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay nursing facility residents.

  17. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in South Carolina. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    Pursuant to constitutional South Carolina mandate the General Assembly has created the Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of seven members elected to four year terms by the General Assembly. One commissioner is elected from each of seven districts corresponding to the congressional districts as they existed as of January 1, 1930. The commissioners elect one of their members as chairman. The South Carolina statutes contain separate chapters dealing with the regulation of public utilities and electric utilities. Public utility includes the furnishing of gas or heat (other than by means of electricity) to the public. While the Commission is granted general supervisory and regulatory powers over public utilities and electric utilities, total governments retain some control over electrical utilities. All municipality's have the power to grant exclusive franchises to such utilities for the furnishing of light to the municipality and its inhabitants. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  18. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in South Dakota. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The South Dakota Public Utilities Commission is authorized by statute to regulate gas and electric utilities. The Commission consists of three elected commissioners each of whom serves for a six year term. The Commissioners are elected by district and each must, at the time of election, be a resident of the district from which he has been elected. Each Commissioner must reside in the state capital and devote his entire time to the duties of his office. The Commission is part of the Department of Commerce and Consumer Protection. Municipal power to regulate privately owned electric and gas public utilities was terminated in 1975. A municipally-owned electric utility has the authority to regulate the sale, use, and rates of electric power and energy which it provides. The Commission has no authority to regulate steam, heat, and refrigeration systems; that power resides in cities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  19. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in California. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Constitution of the State of California grants to the Legislature control over persons and private corporations that own or operate a line, plant, or system for the production, generation, or transmission of heat, light, water, or power to be furnished either directly or indirectly to or for the public. The Constitution establishes the Public Utilities Commission and grants certain specific powers to the PUC, including the power to fix rates, establish rules and prescribe a uniform system of accounts. The Constitution also recognizes that the Legislature has plenary power to confer additional authority and jurisdiction upon the PUC. The Constitution prohibits regulation by a city, county, or other municipal body of matters over which the Legislature has granted regulatory power to the PUC. This provision does not, however, impair the right of any city to grant franchises for public utilities. The California legislature has enacted the California Public Utilities Code and has designated the PUC as the agency to implement the regulatory provisions of the Code. The Public Utilities Commission consists of five members appointed by the governor and approved by the senate, a majority of the membership concurring, for staggered 6-year terms. Certain limited powers over the conduct of public utilities may still be exercised by municipalities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  20. Preliminary analysis of the inclusion of security passive systems to reduce the impact of accidents in nuclear power plants; Analisis preliminar de la inclusion de sistemas pasivos de seguridad para reducir el impacto de accidentes en centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez J, J.; Morales S, J. B. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Circuito Interior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: jersonsanchez@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (MX)

    2011-11-15

    In this work is presented a conceptual analysis of possible benefits and limitations that potentially represents the introduction of security passive systems to reduce the events impact of very low probability and high risk to the systems of radioactive material confinement of a light water reactor. These events are related with the possibility that a hydrogen explosion is presented as consequence of the accumulation of the same hydrogen in the contention of the reactor, in a scenario of severe accident. This accumulated hydrogen can be liberated in the reactor building or primary contention, where the conditions of their atmosphere make but prone the combustion. The catalytic recombination represents a viable option for the hydrogen concentrations decrease and because this recombination is highly exothermic, is important to analyze and to know if the recombined vapor to high temperature can be used in combination with vapor injectors that in turn, they are passive systems. In the following sections an explanation is presented about the use of the mentioned systems, as well as some results on the behavior of the vapor injectors. (Author)

  1. esophageal cancer: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Maddah Safaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Dysphagia is a common initial presentation in locally advanced esophageal cancer and negatively impacts patient quality of life and treatment compliance. To induce fast relief of dysphagia in patients with potentially operable esophageal cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy was applied prior to definitive radiochemotherapy. Material and methods : In this single arm phase II clinical trial between 2013 to 2014 twenty patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (17 squamous cell and 3 adenocarcinoma were treated with upfront 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy, followed by 50.4 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. Results : Tumor response, as measured by endoscopy and/or computed tomography scan, revealed complete remission in 16 and partial response in 4 patients (overall response rate 100%. Improvement of dysphagia was induced by brachytherapy within a few days and maintained up to the end of treatment in 80% of patients. No differences in either response rate or dysphagia resolution were found between squamous cell and adenocarcinoma histology. The grade 2 and 3 acute pancytopenia or bicytopenia reported in 4 patients, while sub-acute adverse effects with painful ulceration was seen in five patients, occurring after a median of 2 months. A perforation developed in one patient during the procedure of brachytherapy that resolved successfully with immediate surgery. Conclusions : Brachytherapy before EBRT was a safe and effective procedure to induce rapid and durable relief from dysphagia, especially when combined with EBRT.

  2. THE EFFECTS OF PRELIMINARY RULINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana-Mădălina LARION

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study analyses the effects of the preliminary rulings rendered by the Court of Justice for the judicial body that made the reference and for other bodies dealing with similar cases, for the member states, for the European Union’ s institutions and for EU legal order. Starting from the binding effect of the preliminary judgment for national judicial bodies, which requires them to follow the ruling or make a new reference, to the lack of precedent doctrine in EU law, continuing with the possibility to indirectly verify the compatibility of national law of the member states with EU law and ending with the administrative or legislative measures that can or must be taken by the member states, the study intends to highlight the limits, nuances and consequences of the binding effect. It mentions the contribution of the national courts and of the Court of Justice of the European Union to the development of EU law, such as clarifying autonomous notions and it emphasizes the preliminary procedure's attributes of being a form of judicial protection of individual rights, as well as a means to review the legality of acts of EU institutions. The paper is meant to be a useful instrument for practitioners. Therefor, it also deals with the possibility and limits of asking new questions, in order to obtain reconsideration or a refinement of the legal issue and with the problem of judicial control over the interpretation and application of the preliminary ruling by the lower court.

  3. Post-impact performance of composites; Predicting Compression after Impact (CAI) in composite laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esrall, F.

    2013-01-01

    Impact damage has been known to seriously limit the performance of composite aircraft structures. In the preliminary design phase, tens of thousands of subparts need to be analyzed for impact. Over the years, many approaches have been proposed to study the creation of impact damage and to determine

  4. Preliminary Evaluation of the Impact of a Writing Assessment System on Teaching and Learning* Evaluación preliminar del impacto de un sistema de evaluación en la enseñanza y el aprendizaje

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Patricia Muñoz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the conviction that valid and reliable assessments can foster positive changes in instruction, we implemented a writing assessment system in the adult English program at the Language Center, EAFIT University, Medellín. To evaluate the impact of the system, we analyzed the improvement of 27 students' writings over time. We also examined the quality of their teachers' (n=35 teaching and assessment routines. Student progress was measured by looking at the syntactic complexity of the texts using an average number of words per T-unit. Teachers' instructional practices were examined through portfolio analyses. Results show some improvement in students' writings and that the teachers need to provide a better response to students by appropriately using the required assessment tools.Con base en la creencia de que las evaluaciones válidas y confiables pueden motivar cambios positivos en la enseñanza y el aprendizaje, implementamos un sistema de evaluación para la escritura en el programa de inglés de un centro de idiomas en Colombia. Para evaluar el impacto del sistema, analizamos las mejoras de 27 escritos a través del tiempo. Igualmente se analizó la calidad de las prácticas de enseñanza y evaluación de 35 profesores. Las mejoras en los escritos se determinaron a través de la complejidad sintáctica usando como medida el promedio de número de palabras por texto entre unidades T. Las prácticas de evaluación y enseñanza se evaluaron mediante el análisis de portafolios de escritura. Los resultados indican ciertas mejoras en los escritos y la necesidad de proporcionar mayor entrenamiento y orientación para que los profesores utilicen el sistema de evaluación de manera más apropiada.

  5. Preliminary Inquiry of Impact of Different Sibling Relation upon a Girl’s Psychological Development%不同同胞关系对女孩心理发展的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付雨; 张莉

    2015-01-01

    通过探索四种家庭关系对女孩的人格特征、人际关系、安全感的影响及它们的关系,以期在女孩的培养教育上起一定的指导作用、并帮助女孩更清楚的了解自己和进行良好个人发展,同时,对心理学临床工作提供一定的参考。随机抽取117名女生,以 Rosenberg 自尊量表、人际信任量表、卡氏16种人格因素测验、个人评价问卷、安全感量表等量表组成的女生心理发展综合问卷为工具,研究了不同同胞关系对女孩心理发展的五个方面的影响。结果表明:(1)姐妹关系中,作为姐姐的本人与其同胞的他人信任度有显著的负相关;姐妹关系中,作为妹妹的本人与其同胞的自尊水平和人际安全感皆呈显著正相关;姐弟关系中,姐姐与弟弟的独立性呈显著的正相关。兄妹关系中,妹妹与哥哥在安全感的两个因子上皆呈显著正相关。(2)对五个女生组五个心理因素差异性分析显示,在姐妹关系中,姐姐组和妹妹组的自尊水平、他人信任度、人际安全感三个心理特征上有显著差异;姐妹关系中的姐姐组和兄妹关系中妹妹组的自尊水平有显著差异;姐妹关系中姐姐组和独生女组自尊水平也存在有显著差异。姐妹关系中妹妹组与姐弟关系中姐姐组自尊水平存在显著差异。(3)在五个心理特征上,大部分的特征同胞关系是没有对女孩造成明显的影响的。%Through the probe into the impacts of the four kinds of family ties having on girls`personality characteristics, interpersonal relationship and sense of security,along with their interrelations,this survey is aimed at finding some directive functions on girls`education,and apart from that,helps girls gain a better understanding of themselves and thus to realize a good personal development.Meanwhile,it is also expected to shed some light on psychology clinical work.A sampling of 1 1 7 girls

  6. Surveys of ISS Returned Hardware for MMOD Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, James; Christiansen, E.; Lear, D.; Nagy, K.

    2017-01-01

    Since February 2001, the Hypervelocity Impact Technology (HVIT) group at the Johnson Space Center in Houston has performed 26 post-flight inspections on space exposed hardware that have been returned from the International Space Station. Data on 1,024 observations of MMOD damage have been collected from these inspections. Survey documentation typically includes impact feature location and size measurements as well as microscopic photography (25-200x). Sampling of impacts sites for projectile residue was performed for the largest features. Results of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis to discern impactor source is included in the database. This paper will summarize the post-flight MMOD inspections, and focus on two inspections in particular: (1) Pressurized Mating Adapter-2 (PMA-2) cover returned in 2015 after 1.6 years exposure with 26 observed damages, and (2) Airlock shield panels returned in 2010 after 8.7 years exposure with 58 MMOD damages. Feature sizes from the observed data are compared to predictions using the Bumper risk assessment code.

  7. Subsurface damage from oblique impacts into low-impedance layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickle, A. M.; Schultz, P. H.

    2012-07-01

    Layered planetary surfaces occur ubiquitously in the solar system, where sedimentary sequences or icy layers overlay crystalline bedrock. Previous experimental studies investigated how the presence of weak layer overlying a strong basement affects crater morphology, subsurface damage and soft-sediment compression. Numerical studies generally focus on the final morphology as a function of thicknesses and burial depths of weak layers. In field studies of impact craters, the shock state of minerals is a key metric. Here, we evaluate the effect of a surficial low-impedance layer on peak pressure magnitudes and consequent damage extent in the competent substrate. Laboratory experiments coupled with 3D CTH models of oblique (30° from horizontal) hypervelocity impacts at laboratory and planetary scales show that surface layers with a thickness on the order of the projectile diameter shield the underlying surface and absorb/scatter ˜70% of the impact energy. Numerical simulations reveal that surficial layers reduce peak pressure magnitudes within the subsurface by ˜60-70%, while damage in the substrate is due to shear failure. Sedimentary layers are more efficient shields than icy layers, but both reduce the extent of subsurface damage and the resulting shock levels recorded by minerals. These results indicate that a thin surficial low impedance layer mitigates the expression of shocked minerals in the substrate even when a structural response is still observed.

  8. Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment mission: the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, A.; Michel, P.

    2015-10-01

    The Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission will be the first space experiment to demonstrate asteroid impact hazard mitigation by using a kinetic impactor. AIDA is a joint ESA-NASA cooperative project, which includes the ESA Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) rendezvous spacecraft and the NASA Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission. The AIDA target is the near-Earth binary asteroid 65803 Didymos, which will make an unusually close approach to Earth in October, 2022. The ~300-kg DART spacecraft is designed to impact the Didymos secondary at 6.5 km/s and demonstrate the ability to modify its trajectory through momentum transfer. The primary goals of AIDA are (i) to investigate the binary near-Earth asteroid (65803) Didymos, (ii) to demonstrate asteroid deflection by kinetic impact and to characterize the deflection. The primary DART objectives are to demonstrate a hypervelocity impact on the Didymos moon and to determine the resulting deflection from ground-based observatories. The DART impact on the Didymos secondary will cause a measurable change in the orbital period of the binary.

  9. 45 CFR 150.217 - Preliminary determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preliminary determination. 150.217 Section 150.217... Are Failing To Substantially Enforce HIPAA Requirements § 150.217 Preliminary determination. If, at... designees). (b) Notifies the State of CMS's preliminary determination that the State has failed to...

  10. Paleomagnetism of Lonar Crater Impact Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick-Bethell, I.; Weiss, B. P.; Maloof, A. C.; Stewart, S. T.; Louzada, K. L.; Soule, S. A.; Swanson-Hysell, N.

    2006-12-01

    The source of magnetic fields on extraterrestrial bodies is largely unknown. There is particularly little information about magnetic fields on asteroids and the Moon for the last 3 billion years because most samples from these bodies predate this time. An exception is the small amount of impact-melt which has been continuously created by hypervelocity impactors over most of solar system history. Impact melt can be used to test the controversial hypothesis that magnetic fields on extraterrestrial bodies were predominantly the product of impact-produced plasmas rather than of core dynamos. However, to date only a small amount of impact melt has been analyzed paleomagnetically. To assess the quality of impact melts as recorders of magnetic fields, in January 2004 and January 2005 we collected thousands of samples of basaltic glass from the perimeter of Lonar Crater, a 1.8 km diameter impact crater which formed approximately 50,000 years ago in the Deccan Traps in Maharashtra, India. Lonar crater is a unique extraterrestrial analog because it is the only fresh impact crater on the Earth in a basaltic target. Most glass samples have rounded features and are between 0.01 and 1 cm in size, indicating that they are fladen and impact spherules (microtektites) formed from molten ejecta that cooled in mid-air while subject to rotational and aerodynamic forces. We have found that both types of glasses are strongly magnetic (saturation remanence of ~2 A m-1), contain ferromagnetic crystals that are predominantly single domain in size, and have no significant remanence anisotropy. The glasses also carry a natural remanent magnetization (NRM) presumably acquired just after the impact. However, alternating field demagnetization results in large directional changes of the magnetic moment, with little decrease in moment intensity. We interpret this unusual behavior as progressive removal of different coercivity components that cooled while the orientation of the spinning glasses

  11. Impact of Solar Array Designs on High Voltage Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Ferguson, Dale; Piszczor, Mike; ONeill, Mark

    2006-01-01

    As power levels of advanced spacecraft climb above 25 kW, higher solar array operating voltages become attractive. Even in today s satellites, operating spacecraft buses at 100 V and above has led to arcing in GEO communications satellites, so the issue of spacecraft charging and solar array arcing remains a design problem. In addition, micrometeoroid impacts on all of these arrays can also lead to arcing if the spacecraft is at an elevated potential. For example, tests on space station hardware disclosed arcing at 75V on anodized A1 structures that were struck with hypervelocity particles in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) plasmas. Thus an understanding of these effects is necessary to design reliable high voltage solar arrays of the future, especially in light of the Vision for Space Exploration of NASA. In the future, large GEO communication satellites, lunar bases, solar electric propulsion missions, high power communication systems around Mars can lead to power levels well above 100 kW. As noted above, it will be essential to increase operating voltages of the solar arrays well above 80 V to keep the mass of cabling needed to carry the high currents to an acceptable level. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to discuss various solar array approaches, to discuss the results of testing them at high voltages, in the presence of simulated space plasma and under hypervelocity impact. Three different types of arrays will be considered. One will be a planar array using thin film cells, the second will use planar single or multijunction cells and the last will use the Stretched Lens Array (SLA - 8-fold concentration). Each of these has different approaches for protection from the space environment. The thin film cell based arrays have minimal covering due to their inherent radiation tolerance, conventional GaAs and multijunction cells have the traditional cerium-doped microsheet glasses (of appropriate thickness) that are usually attached with Dow Corning DC 93-500 silicone

  12. 保护性耕作下农田土壤风蚀量及其影响因子的研究初报%A Preliminary Study on Soil Wind Erosion and its Impact Factors with Conservation Tillage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琳; 王俊英; 刘永霞; 周继红; 韩烈刚

    2009-01-01

    [研究目的]通过对保护性耕作下土壤风蚀影响与控制的研究,旨在为指导京郊裸露农田治理和结构调整,生态补贴的实施提供理论依据.[方法]2008年4月采用移动式风洞仪进行研究,并得出以下初步结论:[结果](1)六种地块下土壤风蚀量以裸露翻旋地最高,种植越冬覆盖作物能显著降低土壤风蚀量;不同免耕播种机和秸秆处理方式下,风蚀量区别主要在于播种机,以迪尔风蚀量最低,农哈哈机型最高;四种耕作方式下土壤风蚀量以旋耕地最高,翻耕地比旋耕地降低80.81%,重耙和免耕地风蚀量分别比旋耕地降低95.35%和97.71%;冬小麦五种不同播期下土壤风蚀量随着播期的推后逐渐增大.(2)四种作物中小麦田的覆盖率最高,其次为紫花苜蓿和小黑麦,油菜覆盖率最低;四种耕作方式下耙耕小麦田覆盖率最高为84.00%,旋耕最低为55.33%;五个播期下9月27日播种的小麦田覆盖率显著高于其他播期,10月7日和10月12日最低.(3)将土壤风蚀量作为依变量,覆盖率、作物株高和土壤容重作为自变量进行多元回归分析,并建立多元回归方程:Y=173.186-0.449X1-0.485X2-72.699X3.%In this paper, we studied farmland soil wind erosion and its impact factors in Beijing city under con-servation tillage in use of Movable Erosion Wind Tunnel. The results show that (1) the volume of soil wind ero-sion in rotary exposed farmland shows the highest spin in Six plots, cover crops planted in winter can signifi-cantly reduce the volume of soil erosion; In different no-tillage methods and straw treatment, the amount of wind erosion depends on seeding-machine, and the volume of Deere comes up to minimum, agricultural haha maximum; Volume of soil erosion in rotary reach the highest spin in four farming methods, plough tillage less 80.81% than rotary, and harrow tillage less 97.71%,no tillage less 95.35%; With the delay of sowing dates, the amount of soil erosion in

  13. 焦虑状态对动脉功能的影响及可能机制的初步探讨%A preliminary study of anxiety impact on arterial function and potential mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付春; 孙宁玲; 陈源源

    2015-01-01

    目的:以血管功能为切入点,从人群中筛查出有心因因素(紧张焦虑状态、广泛性焦虑)的亚健康人群作为研究对象,探讨焦虑状态对动脉功能的可能影响及机制。方法采用医院焦虑量表选取门诊患者为焦虑状态组(33例)和本院健康体检职工为健康对照组(15名),以握力试验进行交感神经兴奋应激试验,应激试验前后监测动脉功能、测定血浆儿茶酚胺(去甲肾上腺素、肾上腺素、多巴胺)和 C 反应蛋白,并进行24 h 动态血压及动态动脉弹性功能监测。结果焦虑状态组患者在血压最高值及心率最慢时的系统动脉阻力(SVR)均高于健康对照组[(1823.81±390.20) dyn•s•cm -5比(1710.10±328.81) dyn•s•cm -5,(1668.90±280.78) dyn•s•cm -5比(1546.80±172.80) dyn•s•cm -5,均为 P ﹤0.05];焦虑状态组患者握力试验后的 SVR 较健康对照组升高[(1701.29±345.51)dyn•s•cm -5比(1467.87±290.49)dyn•s•cm -5,P ﹤0.05];焦虑状态组患者交感应激后体内儿茶酚胺水平各组分(去甲肾上腺素、肾上腺素、多巴胺)水平均较健康对照组升高,但差异均无统计学意义(均为 P ﹥0.05)。结论焦虑状态可能造成早期动脉功能改变,进而增加心血管病的远期发病风险。%Objective Taking the vascular function as a start point, we screened the crowds for sub-healthy population with psychological factors (nervous anxiety state and generalized anxiety) as the study subjects and explored the possible impact and mechanism of anxious state on arterial function. Methods Clinic outpatients with anxiety disorders as the anxiety group (n = 33) and healthy hospital employees in health examination as the control group (n = 15) were enrolled. Sympathetic stimulation was quantified by the grip strength test, and the artery function monitoring, plasma catecholamine and C-reaction protein levels were measured before and after the test. The 24-hour ambulatory blood

  14. Age and effects of the Odessa meteorite impact, western Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Vance T.; Kring, David A.; Mayer, James H.; Goble, Ronald J.

    2005-12-01

    The Odessa meteorite craters (Texas, United States) include a main crater (˜160 m diameter, ˜30 m deep) plus four smaller meteorite craters. The main crater was sampled by coring (to 22 m depth) to better understand its origin and history. Dating by optically stimulated luminescence indicates that it was produced immediately prior to ca. 63.5 ± 4.5 ka. Sediment filling the crater includes impact breccias produced at the time of impact; wind-dominated silts with minor amounts of pond sediments deposited ca. 63.5 ka, probably just after the impact, and ca. 53 ± 2 ka; wind-dominated silt ca. 38 ± 1.7 ka; and playa muds with a wind-blown silt component younger than 36 ka. The environment was arid or semiarid at the time of impact based on characteristics of soils on the surrounding landscape. The impact caused severe damage within 2 km and produced >1000 km/hr winds and thermal pulse. Animals within a 1 1.5-km-diameter area were probably killed. This is only the second well-dated Pleistocene hypervelocity impact crater in North America.

  15. Amorphization of silicon induced by nanodroplet impact: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, Fernan; Gamero-Castaño, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    The hypervelocity impact of electrosprayed nanodroplets on crystalline silicon produces an amorphous layer with a thickness comparable to the droplet diameters. The phase transition is puzzling considering that amorphization has not been observed in macroscopic shock compression of silicon, the only apparent difference being the several orders of magnitude disparity between the sizes of the macroscopic and nanodroplet projectiles. This article investigates the physics of the amorphization by modeling the impact of a nanodrop on single-crystal silicon via molecular dynamics. The simulation shows that the amorphization results from the heating and subsequent melting of a thin layer of silicon surrounding the impact area, followed by an ultrafast quenching with cooling rates surpassing 1013 K/s. These conditions impede crystalline growth in the supercooled liquid phase, which finally undergoes a glass transition to render a disordered solid phase. The high temperature field near the impact interface is a localized effect. The significantly different temperatures and cooling rates near the surface and in the bulk explain why amorphization occurs in nanodroplet impact, while it is absent in macroscopic shock compression. Since these high temperatures and ultrafast quenching rates are likely to occur in other materials, nanodroplet impact may become a general amorphatization technique for treating the surfaces of most crystalline substrates.

  16. Impact melt rocks from the Ries structure, Germany: an origin as impact melt flows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinski, Gordon R.

    2004-10-01

    The production of impact melt rocks and glasses is a characteristic feature of hypervelocity impact events on Earth and other planetary bodies. This investigation represents the first detailed study of an unusual series of coherent impact melt rocks intermittently exposed around the periphery of the ~24-km diameter, ~14.5 Ma Ries impact structure, Germany. Optical and analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals that the groundmass comprises sanidine, plagioclase, quartz and ilmenite (decreasing order of abundance) with the interstices filled by either fresh or devitrified glassy mesostasis. Primary crystallites display skeletal, dendritic and/or spherulitic textures indicating rapid crystallization from a melt. The mesostasis is characterized by extreme chemical heterogeneity (e.g., FeO and Al 2O 3 contents from ~1 to ~62-80 wt.%). This is likely due to a combination of crystal-liquid fractionation during rapid cooling and crystallization of an originally incompletely homogenized melt. Vapor phase crystallization of sanidine and cristobalite occurred in miarolitic cavities during late-stage cooling of the impact melts. The most likely protolith for the impact melt rocks are granitic rocks present in the crystalline basement target. The high volatile content of the mesostasis suggests that a large volatile component was retained from this protolith. Field observations together with analytical data and micro-textures indicate that the Ries impact melt rocks were molten at the time of, and after, deposition. Field relations with other impactites also suggest that these rocks were emplaced subsequent to the excavation stage of crater formation and that they are not, therefore, ballistic ejecta. Thus, it is proposed that the Ries impact melt rocks were emplaced as ground-hugging impact melt flows that emanated from different regions of the evolving transient cavity during the modification stage of crater formation. This is consistent with, and in fact

  17. The Chicxulub impact structure: What does the Yaxcopoil-1 drill core reveal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbra, T.

    2013-05-01

    The Chicxulub impact structure, one of the largest impact structures on Earth, was formed 65 Ma by hypervelocity impact which led to the large mass-extinction at K-Pg boundary. This well preserved but buried structure has undergone numerous drillings and studies aimed to understand the formation mechanism, structure and age of the crater. The Yaxcopoil-1 (Yax-1) drill core, located in the southern sector of the Chicxulub crater, in the outer part of an annular trough, 62 km from the crater center, was drilled by ICDP in 2001-2002. Petrophysical, rock- and paleomagnetic studies of Yax-1 (Elbra and Pesonen, 2011) showed that physical properties characterize the various lithological units. Dependence on mineral composition rather than fabric was observed in pre-impact lithologies contrarily to the post-impact and impact rocks where the physical properties were dominated by porosity and reflected, in case of impactites, the impact formation mechanism with its numerous features resulting from melting, brecciation and fracturing. Furthermore, while the pre- and post-impact lithologies in Yax-1 are mostly dia- or paramagnetic, the impactite units indicated enhanced magnetizations and the presence of ferromagnetic, probably hydrothermally deposited magnetite and pyrrhotite. The sharp contrast of the impactites to the target and to post-impact lithologies allowed establishing the contact (especially the K-Pg boundary) between. The anisotropy, shape and orientation of the magnetic fraction illustrated the fabric randomization and showed the influence of impact-related redeposition and hydrothermal activity. The paleomagnetic data suggested that the Chicxulub impact occurred during the reverse polarity geomagnetic chron 29R, which is in agreement with the isotopic dates of the Chicxulub impact as well as with expected K-Pg boundary polarity. Reference Elbra, T. and Pesonen, L.J., 2011. Physical properties of the Yaxcopoil-1 deep drill core, Chicxulub impact structure, Mexico

  18. Impact Flash Physics: Modeling and Comparisons With Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, E.; Stickle, A. M.; Ernst, C. M.; Schultz, P. H.; Mehta, N. L.; Brown, R. C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Michaelis, C. H.; Erlandson, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Hypervelocity impacts frequently generate an observable "flash" of light with two components: a short-duration spike due to emissions from vaporized material, and a long-duration peak due to thermal emissions from expanding hot debris. The intensity and duration of these peaks depend on the impact velocity, angle, and the target and projectile mass and composition. Thus remote sensing measurements of planetary impact flashes have the potential to constrain the properties of impacting meteors and improve our understanding of impact flux and cratering processes. Interpreting impact flash measurements requires a thorough understanding of how flash characteristics correlate with impact conditions. Because planetary-scale impacts cannot be replicated in the laboratory, numerical simulations are needed to provide this insight for the solar system. Computational hydrocodes can produce detailed simulations of the impact process, but they lack the radiation physics required to model the optical flash. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) developed a model to calculate the optical signature from the hot debris cloud produced by an impact. While the phenomenology of the optical signature is understood, the details required to accurately model it are complicated by uncertainties in material and optical properties and the simplifications required to numerically model radiation from large-scale impacts. Comparisons with laboratory impact experiments allow us to validate our approach and to draw insight regarding processes that occur at all scales in impact events, such as melt generation. We used Sandia National Lab's CTH shock physics hydrocode along with the optical signature model developed at APL to compare with a series of laboratory experiments conducted at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range. The experiments used Pyrex projectiles to impact pumice powder targets with velocities ranging from 1 to 6 km/s at angles of 30 and 90 degrees with respect to

  19. [Even cigarette butts can impact environment and health: preliminary considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Gianrocco; Gorini, Giuseppe; Chellini, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    In Italy, every year about 72 billion of cigarette butts are thrown away in the environment. Cigarette butts represent 50% of the wastes of urban areas (parks, roads) in the world, and 40% of Mediterranean Sea wastes. In particular, total polluting load is constituted of 1,872 Bq millions of Polonium-210, assuming 75 mBq per cigarette butt, and 1,800 tons of volatile organic compounds. As a matter of fact, according to several surveys, cigarette butts are considered by smokers and non-smokers as a common and acceptable waste in the environment. In 2008, European Union issued a Directive on wastes considering the «extended producer responsibility» (i.e., every industry is liable for costs of collection, transport and disposal of its own products). In October 2012, the Italian Parliament proposed a bill that classifies cigarette butts as special wastes in the frame of this responsibility. It could be interesting in the future to follow the legislative process of that bill in the Italian Parliament in order to show how strong it will be supported.

  20. Fort Drum Preliminary Fiscal Impact Analysis: Technical Appendices,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    home construction spread over a 5-year period (1985 to 1990). The inmigration that would be caused by the on-base and private sector construction can be...expansion, this minimum level of inmigration is estimated to be 10 percent of the total demand. These persons will be supervisory personnel and...dependents of inmigrating job holders are also a significant source of labor for the service sector. This is particularly true of the military dependents who

  1. Preliminary research on environmental impact of woodland grazing by pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Mani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available 6 castrate pigs about 30 kg live weight each entered in a fence into hilly woodland area. The pigs were bred until about 140 kg live weight. After 10 months of pasture breeding, the environmental damages (cover ground, plants and soil characteristics by rooting and trampling were evaluated. The damages to cover ground and to shrubs and to physical structure (Fissures and Aggregate stability caused hydro-geological instability with soil erosion and landslides. Removing surface layers of soil caused considerable loss of organic matter (Total Organic Carbon and Total Nitrogen, microbial activity (Microbial ATP and breathing and enzyme activity changes (Total β−glucosidase and Extra cellular β−glucosidase. Damages to native plants are different in relation to the root and the trunk kinds, and to the palatability of leaves and apexes which result inversely related whit the abundance of disagreeable substances content (ADL, Tannins, Resins, Latex.

  2. Geochemical evidence from the Sudbury structure for crustal redistribution by large bolide impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungall, James E; Ames, Doreen E; Hanley, Jacob J

    2004-06-03

    Deformation and melting of the crust during the formation of large impact craters must have been important during the Earth's early evolution, but such processes remain poorly understood. The 1.8-billion-year-old Sudbury structure in Ontario, Canada, is greater than 200 km in diameter and preserves a complete impact section, including shocked basement rocks, an impact melt sheet and fallback material. It has generally been thought that the most voluminous impact melts represent the average composition of the continental crust, but here we show that the melt sheet now preserved as the Sudbury Igneous Complex is derived predominantly from the lower crust. We therefore infer that the hypervelocity impact caused a partial inversion of the compositional layering of the continental crust. Using geochemical data, including platinum-group-element abundances, we also show that the matrix of the overlying clast-laden Onaping Formation represents a mixture of the original surficial sedimentary strata, shock-melted lower crust and the impactor itself.

  3. Preliminaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desde el jardín de Freud

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Desde el Jardín de Freud se encuentra indexada en el IBN-Publindex (Colciencias, en categoría C, y en Latindex. También se encuentra en las siguientes bases de datos y catálogos: ebsco, Dialnet, Rebiun, Doaj y e-Revistas.

  4. Preliminary ECLSS waste water model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Donald L.; Holder, Donald W., Jr.; Alexander, Kevin; Shaw, R. G.; Hayase, John K.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary waste water model for input to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Water Processor (WP) has been generated for design purposes. Data have been compiled from various ECLSS tests and flight sample analyses. A discussion of the characterization of the waste streams comprising the model is presented, along with a discussion of the waste water model and the rationale for the inclusion of contaminants in their respective concentrations. The major objective is to establish a methodology for the development of a waste water model and to present the current state of that model.

  5. Preliminary ECLSS waste water model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Donald L.; Holder, Donald W., Jr.; Alexander, Kevin; Shaw, R. G.; Hayase, John K.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary waste water model for input to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Water Processor (WP) has been generated for design purposes. Data have been compiled from various ECLSS tests and flight sample analyses. A discussion of the characterization of the waste streams comprising the model is presented, along with a discussion of the waste water model and the rationale for the inclusion of contaminants in their respective concentrations. The major objective is to establish a methodology for the development of a waste water model and to present the current state of that model.

  6. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented.

  7. Sociology of diagnosis: a preliminary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutel, Annemarie

    2009-03-01

    Diagnoses are the classification tools of medicine, and are pivotal in the ways medicine exerts its role in society. Their sociological study is commonly subsumed under the rubrics of medicalisation, history of medicine and theory of disease. Diagnosis is, however, a powerful social tool, with unique features and impacts which deserve their own specific analysis. The process of diagnosis provides the framework within which medicine operates, punctuates the values which medicine espouses, and underlines the authoritative role of both medicine and the doctor. Diagnosis takes place at a salient juncture between illness and disease, patient and doctor, complaint and explanation. Despite calls for its establishment, almost two decades ago (Brown 1990), there is not yet a clear sociology of diagnosis. This paper argues that there should be, and, as a first step, draws together a number of threads of medical sociology that potentially contribute to this proposed sociology of diagnosis, including the place of diagnosis in the institution of medicine, the social framing of disease definitions, the means by which diagnosis confers authority to medicine, and how that authority is challenged. Through this preliminary review, I encourage sociology to consider the specific role of diagnosis in view of establishing a specific sub-disciplinary field.

  8. Inca expansion and parasitism in the Lluta Valley: preliminary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoro Calogero

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the impact of cultural change on parasitism has been a central goal in archaeoparasitology. The influence of civilization and the development of empires on parasitism has not been evaluated. Presented here is a preliminary analysis of the change in human parasitism associated with the Inca conquest of the Lluta Valley in Northern Chile. Changes in parasite prevalence are described. It can be seen that the change in life imposed on the inhabitants of the Lluta Valley by the Incas caused an increase in parasitism.

  9. Modeling and Testing of EVs - Preliminary Study and Laboratory Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Guang-Ya; Marra, Francesco; Nielsen, Arne Hejde

    2010-01-01

    impact at different geographical areas, as well as driving and charging patterns. Electric circuit model is deployed in this work to represent the electrical properties of a lithium-ion battery. This paper reports the preliminary modeling and validation work based on manufacturer data sheet and realistic......Electric vehicles (EVs) are expected to play a key role in the future energy management system to stabilize both supply and consumption with the presence of high penetration of renewable generation. A reasonably accurate model of battery is a key element for the study of EVs behavior and the grid...... tests, followed by the suggestions towards a feasible battery model for further studies....

  10. Infrared Spectroscopy of Wild 2 Particle Hypervelocity Tracks in Stardust Aerogel: Evidence for the presence of Volatile Organics in Comet Dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajt, S; Sandford, S A; Flynn, G J; Matrajt, G; Snead, C J; Westphal, A J; Bradley, J P

    2007-08-28

    Infrared spectroscopy maps of some tracks, made by cometary dust from 81P/Wild 2 impacting Stardust aerogel, reveal an interesting distribution of volatile organic material. Out of six examined tracks three show presence of volatile organic components possibly injected into the aerogel during particle impacts. When particle tracks contained excess volatile organic material, they were found to be -CH{sub 2}-rich. Off-normal particle tracks could indicate impacts by lower velocity particles that could have bounced off the Whipple shield, therefore carry off some contamination from it. However, this theory is not supported by data that show excess organic-rich material in normal and off-normal particle tracks. It is clear that the population of cometary particles impacting the Stardust aerogel collectors also include grains that contained little or none of this volatile organic component. This observation is consistent with the highly heterogeneous nature of the collected grains, as seen by a multitude of other analytical techniques. We propose that at least some of the volatile organic material might be of cometary origin based on supporting data shown in this paper. However, we also acknowledge the presence of carbon (primarily as -CH{sub 3}) in the original aerogel, which complicates interpretation of these results.

  11. Effects of Social Psychological Phenomena on School Psychologists' Ethical Decision-Making: A Preliminary Empirical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Laurie McGarry; Lasser, Jon; Reardon, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary, exploratory study examines the impact of select social psychological phenomena on school-based ethical decision-making of school psychologists. Responses to vignettes and hypothetical statements reflecting several social psychological phenomena were collected from 106 practicing school psychologists. Participants were asked to…

  12. Ecological risk assessment as a framework for environmental impact assessments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Claassen, Marius

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental impact assessments in South Africa are usually conducted according to the integrated environmental management (IEM) procedure. The preliminary investigation reported here, indicated that most of the ecological requirements specified...

  13. Preliminary Investigation of a Paraglider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogallo, Francis M.; Lowry, John G.; Croom, Delwin R.; Taylor, Robert T.

    1960-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the aerodynamic and control characteristics of a flexible glider similar to a parachute in construction has been made at the Langley Research Center to evaluate its capabilities as a reentry glider. Preliminary weight estimates of the proposed vehicle indicate that such a structure can be made with extremely low wing loading. Maximum temperatures during the reentry maneuver might be held as low as about 1,500 F. The results of wind-tunnel and free-glide tests show that the glider when constructed of nonporous material performed extremely well at subsonic speeds and could be flown at angles of attack from about 200 to 900. At supersonic speeds the wing showed none of the unfavorable tendencies exhibited by conventional parachutes at these speeds, such as squidding and breathing. Several methods of packing and deploying the glider have been successfully demonstrated. The results of this study indicate that this flexible-lifting-surface concept may provide a lightweight controllable paraglider for manned space vehicles.

  14. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 Preliminary Qualitative Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Liu, Bing; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

    2010-05-25

    A preliminary qualitative analysis of all addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 that were included in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 was conducted. All 44 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2007 from Standard 90.1-2004 were evaluated by DOE for their impact on energy efficiency. DOE preliminarily determined whether that addenda would have a positive, neutral, or negative impact on overall building efficiency.

  15. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 Preliminary Qualitative Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Liu, Bing; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

    2010-05-25

    A preliminary qualitative analysis of all addenda to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 that were included in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 was conducted. All 44 addenda processed by ASHRAE in the creation of Standard 90.1-2007 from Standard 90.1-2004 were evaluated by DOE for their impact on energy efficiency. DOE preliminarily determined whether that addenda would have a positive, neutral, or negative impact on overall building efficiency.

  16. Data Collected During the Post-Flight Survey of Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris Impact Features on the Hubble Wide Field Planetary Camera 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opiela, J. N.; Liou, J.-C.; Anz-Meador, P. D.

    2010-01-01

    Over a period of five weeks during the summer of 2009, personnel from the NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office and Meteoroid Environment Office performed a post-flight examination of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) radiator. The objective was to record details about all micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) impact features with diameters of 300 micron and larger. The WFPC-2 was located in a clean room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Using a digital microscope, the team examined and recorded position, diameter, and depth information for each of 685 craters. Taking advantage of the digital microscope's data storage and analysis features, the actual measurements were extracted later from the recorded images, in an office environment at the Johnson Space Center. Measurements of the crater include depth and diameter. The depth was measured from the undisturbed paint surface to the deepest point within the crater. Where features penetrate into the metal, both the depth in metal and the paint thickness were measured. In anticipation of hypervelocity tests and simulations, several diameter measurements were taken: the spall area, the area of any bare metal, the area of any discolored ("burned") metal, and the lips of the central crater. In the largest craters, the diameter of the crater at the surface of the metal was also measured. The location of each crater was recorded at the time of inspection. This paper presents the methods and results of the crater measurement effort, including the size and spatial distributions of the impact features. This effort will be followed by taking the same measurements from hypervelocity impact targets simulating the WFPC-2 radiator. Both data sets, combined with hydrocode simulation, will help validate or improve the MMOD environment in low Earth orbit.

  17. A 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator as a tool for planetary and impact physics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocker, Anna; Bugiel, Sebastian; Auer, Siegfried; Baust, Günter; Colette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Fiege, Katherina; Grün, Eberhard; Heckmann, Frieder; Helfert, Stefan; Hillier, Jonathan; Kempf, Sascha; Matt, Günter; Mellert, Tobias; Munsat, Tobin; Otto, Katharina; Postberg, Frank; Röser, Hans-Peter; Shu, Anthony; Sternovsky, Zoltán; Srama, Ralf

    2011-09-01

    Investigating the dynamical and physical properties of cosmic dust can reveal a great deal of information about both the dust and its many sources. Over recent years, several spacecraft (e.g., Cassini, Stardust, Galileo, and Ulysses) have successfully characterised interstellar, interplanetary, and circumplanetary dust using a variety of techniques, including in situ analyses and sample return. Charge, mass, and velocity measurements of the dust are performed either directly (induced charge signals) or indirectly (mass and velocity from impact ionisation signals or crater morphology) and constrain the dynamical parameters of the dust grains. Dust compositional information may be obtained via either time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the impact plasma or direct sample return. The accurate and reliable interpretation of collected spacecraft data requires a comprehensive programme of terrestrial instrument calibration. This process involves accelerating suitable solar system analogue dust particles to hypervelocity speeds in the laboratory, an activity performed at the Max Planck Institut für Kernphysik in Heidelberg, Germany. Here, a 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator electrostatically accelerates charged micron and submicron-sized dust particles to speeds up to 80 km s(-1). Recent advances in dust production and processing have allowed solar system analogue dust particles (silicates and other minerals) to be coated with a thin conductive shell, enabling them to be charged and accelerated. Refinements and upgrades to the beam line instrumentation and electronics now allow for the reliable selection of particles at velocities of 1-80 km s(-1) and with diameters of between 0.05 μm and 5 μm. This ability to select particles for subsequent impact studies based on their charges, masses, or velocities is provided by a particle selection unit (PSU). The PSU contains a field programmable gate array, capable of monitoring in real time the particles' speeds and charges, and

  18. A 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator as a tool for planetary and impact physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocker, Anna; Bugiel, Sebastian; Srama, Ralf [IRS, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); MPI fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Auer, Siegfried [A and M Associates, PO Box 421, Basye, Virginia 22810 (United States); Baust, Guenter; Matt, Guenter; Otto, Katharina [MPI fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Colette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Kempf, Sascha; Munsat, Tobin; Shu, Anthony; Sternovsky, Zoltan [LASP, University of Colorado, 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Fiege, Katherina; Postberg, Frank [Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Stuttgart (Germany); MPI fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Gruen, Eberhard [MPI fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); LASP, University of Colorado, 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Heckmann, Frieder [Steinbeis-Innovationszentrum Raumfahrt, Gaeufelden (Germany); Helfert, Stefan [Helfert Informatik, Mannheim (Germany); Hillier, Jonathan [Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Stuttgart (Germany); Mellert, Tobias [IRS, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); and others

    2011-09-15

    Investigating the dynamical and physical properties of cosmic dust can reveal a great deal of information about both the dust and its many sources. Over recent years, several spacecraft (e.g., Cassini, Stardust, Galileo, and Ulysses) have successfully characterised interstellar, interplanetary, and circumplanetary dust using a variety of techniques, including in situ analyses and sample return. Charge, mass, and velocity measurements of the dust are performed either directly (induced charge signals) or indirectly (mass and velocity from impact ionisation signals or crater morphology) and constrain the dynamical parameters of the dust grains. Dust compositional information may be obtained via either time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the impact plasma or direct sample return. The accurate and reliable interpretation of collected spacecraft data requires a comprehensive programme of terrestrial instrument calibration. This process involves accelerating suitable solar system analogue dust particles to hypervelocity speeds in the laboratory, an activity performed at the Max Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, Germany. Here, a 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator electrostatically accelerates charged micron and submicron-sized dust particles to speeds up to 80 km s{sup -1}. Recent advances in dust production and processing have allowed solar system analogue dust particles (silicates and other minerals) to be coated with a thin conductive shell, enabling them to be charged and accelerated. Refinements and upgrades to the beam line instrumentation and electronics now allow for the reliable selection of particles at velocities of 1-80 km s{sup -1} and with diameters of between 0.05 {mu}m and 5 {mu}m. This ability to select particles for subsequent impact studies based on their charges, masses, or velocities is provided by a particle selection unit (PSU). The PSU contains a field programmable gate array, capable of monitoring in real time the particles' speeds

  19. Computational Design of the Cavity in the Enhanced Hypervelocity Launcher%汇聚型超高速发射装置的发射腔计算设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宇; 柏劲松; 王翔; 谭华; 李平

    2016-01-01

    使用多介质流体高精度计算程序(MFPPM,Multi-Fluid Piecewise Parabolic Method)对汇聚型超高速发射装置的发射腔进行了计算设计.根据发射腔角度的不同,提出了3种改进的发射腔结构,计算研究了发射腔角度和TPX厚度对二级飞片速度、速度差异和击靶位置平面性的影响.计算结果表明:在3种TPX厚度以及击靶位置下,使用第2种发射腔结构发射出的二级飞片的平面性最好、速度最高、汇聚效果最强,但平面性范围最小,且二级飞片自由面速度差异变大,其平面性难以得到维持.%Computational design of the cavity in the enhanced hypervelocity launcher was carried out using Eulerian code Multi-Fluid Piecewise Parabolic Method (MFPPM).Three kinds of improved configurations of the cavity were presented with varied angles of the cavity.We numerically investigated the effects of the angle and the thickness of the TPX on the velocity,the velocity difference and the planarity of the flier.Our results show that with the given thicknesses and position of the target,the planarity and the velocity of the flier launched by the second kind of the improved configuration are significantly improved,but the range of the planarity is reduced and the velocity differences of the flier surface are increased so that the desirable planarity cannot be maintained.

  20. THE GALACTIC CENTER S-STARS AND THE HYPERVELOCITY STARS IN THE GALACTIC HALO: TWO FACES OF THE TIDAL BREAKUP OF STELLAR BINARIES BY THE CENTRAL MASSIVE BLACK HOLE?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fupeng; Lu Youjun [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Yu Qingjuan [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-05-10

    In this paper, we investigate the link between the hypervelocity stars (HVSs) discovered in the Galactic halo and the Galactic center (GC) S-stars, under the hypothesis that they are both the products of the tidal breakup of the same population of stellar binaries by the central massive black hole (MBH). By adopting several hypothetical models for binaries to be injected into the vicinity of the MBH and doing numerical simulations, we realize the tidal breakup processes of the binaries and their follow-up dynamical evolution. We find that many statistical properties of the detected HVSs and GC S-stars could be reproduced under some binary injecting models, and their number ratio can be reproduced if the stellar initial mass function is top-heavy (e.g., with slope {approx} - 1.6). The total number of the captured companions is {approx}50 that have masses in the range {approx}3-7 M{sub Sun} and semimajor axes {approx}< 4000 AU and survive to the present within their main-sequence lifetime. The innermost one is expected to have a semimajor axis {approx}300-1500 AU and a pericenter distance {approx}10-200 AU, with a significant probability of being closer to the MBH than S2. Future detection of such a close star would offer an important test to general relativity. The majority of the surviving ejected companions of the GC S-stars are expected to be located at Galactocentric distances {approx}< 20 kpc, and have heliocentric radial velocities {approx} - 500-1500 km s{sup -1} and proper motions up to {approx}5-20 mas yr{sup -1}. Future detection of these HVSs may provide evidence for the tidal breakup formation mechanism of the GC S-stars.