WorldWideScience

Sample records for preliminary facility cost

  1. Experiments, conceptual design, preliminary cost estimates and schedules for an underground research facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korbin, G.; Wollenberg, H.; Wilson, C.; Strisower, B.; Chan, T.; Wedge, D.

    1981-09-01

    Plans for an underground research facility are presented, incorporating techniques to assess the hydrological and thermomechanical response of a rock mass to the introduction and long-term isolation of radioactive waste, and to assess the effects of excavation on the hydrologic integrity of a repository and its subsequent backfill, plugging, and sealing. The project is designed to utilize existing mine or civil works for access to experimental areas and is estimated to last 8 years at a total cost for contruction and operation of $39.0 million (1981 dollars). Performing the same experiments in an existing underground research facility would reduce the duration to 7-1/2 years and cost $27.7 million as a lower-bound estimate. These preliminary plans and estimates should be revised after specific sites are identified which would accommodate the facility.

  2. PHOEBUS/UHTREX: a preliminary study of a low-cost facility for transient tests of LMFBR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, W.L. (comp.)

    1976-08-01

    The results of a brief preliminary design study of a facility for transient nuclear tests of fast breeder reactor fuel are described. The study is based on the use of a reactor building originally built for the UHTREX reactor, and the use of some reactor hardware and reactor design and fabrication technology remaining from the Phoebus-2 reactor of the Rover nulcear rocket propulsion program. The facility is therefore currently identified as the PHOEBUS/UHTREX facility. This facility is believed capable of providing early information regarding fast reactor core accident energetics issues which will be very valuable to the overall LMFBR safety program. Facility performance in conjunction with a reference 127-fuel pin experiment is described. Low cost and early availability of the facility were emphasized in the selection of design features and parameters.

  3. Preliminary benefit-cost analysis of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) power addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callaway, J.M.; Lezberg, A.J.; Scott, M.J.; Tawil, J.J.

    1984-07-01

    The primary objective of this report is to conduct a preliminary benefit-cost study for the proposed power addition to FFTF to determine whether the project is cost-effective. If the project is authorized, construction will begin in 1986 and end in 1991. Full power operation is scheduled to begin in 1991 and a project life of 20 years is assumed. The undiscounted cost during the construction period of the FFTF power addition is estimated to be approximately $117 million over the construction period (1984 dollars). An additional $3 million is estimated as the opportunity cost - or value of these resources in their most favorable alternative use - of surplus FFTF equipment and unused CRBR equipment, including materials for steam generator fabrication. The annual operating and maintenance cost of the project is estimated to be about $2.1 million in 1984 dollars. 20 references.

  4. Heavy oil recovery process: Conceptual engineering of a downhole methanator and preliminary estimate of facilities cost for application to North Slope Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondouin, M.

    1991-10-31

    The West Sak (Upper Cretaceous) sands, overlaying the Kuparuk field, would rank among the largest known oil fields in the US, but technical difficulties have so far prevented its commercial exploitation. Steam injection is the most successful and the most commonly-used method of heavy oil recovery, but its application to the West Sak presents major problems. Such difficulties may be overcome by using a novel approach, in which steam is generated downhole in a catalytic Methanator, from Syngas made at the surface from endothermic reactions (Table 1). The Methanator effluent, containing steam and soluble gases resulting from exothermic reactions (Table 1), is cyclically injected into the reservoir by means of a horizontal drainhole while hot produced fluids flow form a second drainhole into a central production tubing. The downhole reactor feed and BFW flow downward to two concentric tubings. The large-diameter casing required to house the downhole reactor assembly is filled above it with Arctic Pack mud, or crude oil, to further reduce heat leaks. A quantitative analysis of this production scheme for the West Sak required a preliminary engineering of the downhole and surface facilities and a tentative forecast of well production rates. The results, based on published information on the West Sak, have been used to estimate the cost of these facilities, per daily barrel of oil produced. A preliminary economic analysis and conclusions are presented together with an outline of future work. Economic and regulatory conditions which would make this approach viable are discussed. 28 figs.

  5. The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Preliminary design review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document presents information about the Mixed Waste Management Facility. Topics discussed include: cost and schedule baseline for the completion of the project; evaluation of alternative options; transportation of radioactive wastes to the facility; capital risk associated with incineration; radioactive waste processing; scaling of the pilot-scale system; waste streams to be processed; molten salt oxidation; feed preparation; initial operation to demonstrate selected technologies; floorplans; baseline revisions; preliminary design baseline; cost reduction; and project mission and milestones.

  6. The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Preliminary design review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document presents information about the Mixed Waste Management Facility. Topics discussed include: cost and schedule baseline for the completion of the project; evaluation of alternative options; transportation of radioactive wastes to the facility; capital risk associated with incineration; radioactive waste processing; scaling of the pilot-scale system; waste streams to be processed; molten salt oxidation; feed preparation; initial operation to demonstrate selected technologies; floorplans; baseline revisions; preliminary design baseline; cost reduction; and project mission and milestones.

  7. Preliminary design for a maglev development facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, H.T.; He, J.L.; Chang, S.L.; Bouillard, J.X.; Chen, S.S.; Cai, Y.; Hoppie, L.O.; Lottes, S.A.; Rote, D.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Zhang, Z.Y. [Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States); Myers, G.; Cvercko, A. [Sterling Engineering, Westchester, IL (United States); Williams, J.R. [Alfred Benesch and Co., Chicago, IL (United States)

    1992-04-01

    A preliminary design was made of a national user facility for evaluating magnetic-levitation (maglev) technologies in sizes intermediate between laboratory experiments and full-scale systems. A technical advisory committee was established and a conference was held to obtain advice on the potential requirements of operational systems and how the facility might best be configured to test these requirements. The effort included studies of multiple concepts for levitating, guiding, and propelling maglev vehicles, as well as the controls, communications, and data-acquisition and -reduction equipment that would be required in operating the facility. Preliminary designs for versatile, dual 2-MVA power supplies capable of powering attractive or repulsive systems were developed. Facility site requirements were identified. Test vehicles would be about 7.4 m (25 ft) long, would weigh form 3 to 7 metric tons, and would operate at speeds up to 67 m/s (150 mph) on a 3.3-km (2.05-mi) elevated guideway. The facility would utilize modular vehicles and guideways, permitting the substitution of levitation, propulsion, and guideway components of different designs and materials for evaluation. The vehicle would provide a test cell in which individual suspension or propulsion components or subsystems could be tested under realistic conditions. The system would allow economical evaluation of integrated systems under varying weather conditions and in realistic geometries.

  8. Preliminary design for a maglev development facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, H.T.; He, J.L.; Chang, S.L.; Bouillard, J.X.; Chen, S.S.; Cai, Y.; Hoppie, L.O.; Lottes, S.A.; Rote, D.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Zhang, Z.Y. (Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States)); Myers, G.; Cvercko, A. (Sterling Engineering, Westchester, IL (United States)); Williams, J.R. (Alfred Benesch and Co., Chicago, IL (United States))

    1992-04-01

    A preliminary design was made of a national user facility for evaluating magnetic-levitation (maglev) technologies in sizes intermediate between laboratory experiments and full-scale systems. A technical advisory committee was established and a conference was held to obtain advice on the potential requirements of operational systems and how the facility might best be configured to test these requirements. The effort included studies of multiple concepts for levitating, guiding, and propelling maglev vehicles, as well as the controls, communications, and data-acquisition and -reduction equipment that would be required in operating the facility. Preliminary designs for versatile, dual 2-MVA power supplies capable of powering attractive or repulsive systems were developed. Facility site requirements were identified. Test vehicles would be about 7.4 m (25 ft) long, would weigh form 3 to 7 metric tons, and would operate at speeds up to 67 m/s (150 mph) on a 3.3-km (2.05-mi) elevated guideway. The facility would utilize modular vehicles and guideways, permitting the substitution of levitation, propulsion, and guideway components of different designs and materials for evaluation. The vehicle would provide a test cell in which individual suspension or propulsion components or subsystems could be tested under realistic conditions. The system would allow economical evaluation of integrated systems under varying weather conditions and in realistic geometries.

  9. Preliminary design for a MAGLEV development facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, H. T.; He, J. L.; Chang, S. L.; Bouillard, J. X.; Chen, S. S.; Cai, Y.; Hoppie, L. O.; Lottes, S. A.; Rote, D. M.; Zhang, Z. Y.

    1992-04-01

    A preliminary design was made of a national user facility for evaluating magnetic-levitation (maglev) technologies in sizes intermediate between laboratory experiments and full-scale systems. A technical advisory committee was established and a conference was held to obtain advice on the potential requirements of operational systems and how the facility might best be configured to test these requirements. The effort included studies of multiple concepts for levitating, guiding, and propelling maglev vehicles, as well as the controls, communications, and data-acquisition and -reduction equipment that would be required in operating the facility. Preliminary designs for versatile, dual 2-MVA power supplies capable of powering attractive or repulsive systems were developed. Facility site requirements were identified. Test vehicles would be about 7.4 m (25 ft) long, would weigh from 3 to 7 metric tons, and would operate at speeds up to 67 m/s (150 mph) on a 3.3-km (2.05-mi) elevated guideway. The facility would utilize modular vehicles and guideways, permitting the substitution of levitation, propulsion, and guideway components of different designs and materials for evaluation. The vehicle would provide a test cell in which individual suspension or propulsion components or subsystems could be tested under realistic conditions. The system would allow economical evaluation of integrated systems under varying weather conditions and in realistic geometries.

  10. Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

    1992-10-01

    The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

  11. Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

    1992-10-01

    The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

  12. National Ignition Facility design, performance, and cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, W.J.; Paisner, J.A.; Lowdermilk, W.H. [and others

    1994-09-16

    A conceptual design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been completed and its cost has been estimated by a multilaboratory team. To maximize the performance/cost ratio a compact, segmented amplifier is used in a multipass architecture. Many recent optical and laser technology developments have been incorporated into the final design. The Beamlet project has successfully demonstrated the new concept. The mission of ICF Program using the NEF is to achieve ignition and gain in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects experiments, and for civilian applications such as inertial fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high energy density.

  13. Data Element Dictionary: Facilities. Preliminary Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Charles R.

    The draft includes--(1) comments on file structure, (2) descriptions of dictionary organization and format, (3) alphabetical lists of elements, and (4) facilities related elements in dictionary form. The data element definitions in this draft are compatible with the Higher Education Facilities Classification and Inventory Procedures Manual, which…

  14. Estimated Annual Maintenance Costs for Educational Facilities in Eritrea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagnby, Bo Hellisen

    Global estimated annual costs for undertaking basic maintenance of all educational facilities in Eritrea.......Global estimated annual costs for undertaking basic maintenance of all educational facilities in Eritrea....

  15. Lead Coolant Test Facility Systems Design, Thermal Hydraulic Analysis and Cost Estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soli Khericha; Edwin Harvego; John Svoboda; Ryan Dalling

    2012-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory prepared a preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic coolant. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research needs listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements were identified as listed: (1) Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger; (2) Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core; (3) Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control; (4) Demonstrate Safe Operation; and (5) Provision for Future Testing. This paper discusses the preliminary design of systems, thermal hydraulic analysis, and simplified cost estimate. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 4200 C. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M (in 2006 $). It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  16. Lead coolant test facility systems design, thermal hydraulic analysis and cost estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khericha, Soli, E-mail: slk2@inel.gov [Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Harvego, Edwin; Svoboda, John; Evans, Robert [Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Dalling, Ryan [ExxonMobil Gas and Power Marketing, Houston, TX 77069 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The Idaho National Laboratory prepared a preliminary technical and functional requirements (T and FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic coolant. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research needs listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements were identified as listed below: Bullet Develop and demonstrate feasibility of submerged heat exchanger. Bullet Develop and demonstrate open-lattice flow in electrically heated core. Bullet Develop and demonstrate chemistry control. Bullet Demonstrate safe operation. Bullet Provision for future testing. This paper discusses the preliminary design of systems, thermal hydraulic analysis, and simplified cost estimated. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 4200 Degree-Sign C. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M (in 2006 $). It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  17. Preliminary Multivariable Cost Model for Space Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Parametric cost models are routinely used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. Previously, the authors published two single variable cost models based on 19 flight missions. The current paper presents the development of a multi-variable space telescopes cost model. The validity of previously published models are tested. Cost estimating relationships which are and are not significant cost drivers are identified. And, interrelationships between variables are explored

  18. Construction Cost Growth for New Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubic, Jr., William L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-05-25

    Cost growth and construction delays are problems that plague many large construction projects including the construction of new Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. A study was conducted to evaluate cost growth of large DOE construction projects. The purpose of the study was to compile relevant data, consider the possible causes of cost growth, and recommend measures that could be used to avoid extreme cost growth in the future. Both large DOE and non-DOE construction projects were considered in this study. With the exception of Chemical and Metallurgical Research Building Replacement Project (CMRR) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), cost growth for DOE Nuclear facilities is comparable to the growth experienced in other mega construction projects. The largest increase in estimated cost was found to occur between early cost estimates and establishing the project baseline during detailed design. Once the project baseline was established, cost growth for DOE nuclear facilities was modest compared to non-DOE mega projects.

  19. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. [ed.

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  20. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. (ed.)

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  1. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Pantex Facility, Amarillo, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Pantex Facility, conducted November 3 through 14, 1986.The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialist, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Pantex Facility. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Pantex Facility, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Pantex Facility Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Survey for the Pantex Facility. 65 refs., 44 figs., 27 tabs.

  2. Budgeting Facilities Operation Costs Using the Facilities Operation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    composting are included. Excludes: hazardous, biological, toxic, corrosive, reactive, flammable, radioactive wastes, and construction and demolition...debris resulting from construction contracts. Also excluded are the recycling and composting programs paid by Environmental PEs. 5. Real Property...waxes, toilet tissue, mops, brooms) Accounts for all activities associated with the management and costs for custodial (i.e. carpet cleaning, window

  3. Fuzzy case based reasoning in sports facilities unit cost estimating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zima, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    This article presents an example of estimating costs in the early phase of the project using fuzzy case-based reasoning. The fragment of database containing descriptions and unit cost of sports facilities was shown. The formulas used in Case Based Reasoning method were presented, too. The article presents similarity measurement using a few formulas, including fuzzy similarity. The outcome of cost calculations based on CBR method was presented as a fuzzy number of unit cost of construction work.

  4. Estimation of marginal costs at existing waste treatment facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Sanchez, Veronica; Hulgaard, Tore; Hindsgaul, Claus

    2016-01-01

    This investigation aims at providing an improved basis for assessing economic consequences of alternative Solid Waste Management (SWM) strategies for existing waste facilities. A bottom-up methodology was developed to determine marginal costs in existing facilities due to changes in the SWM system...... (CHP) and another with only power generation (Power), affected by diversion strategies of five waste fractions (fibres, plastic, metals, organics and glass), named "target fractions". The study assumed three possible responses to waste diversion in the WtE facilities: (i) biomass was added to maintain......, based on the determination of average costs in such waste facilities as function of key facility and waste compositional parameters. The applicability of the method was demonstrated through a case study including two existing Waste-to-Energy (WtE) facilities, one with co-generation of heat and power...

  5. Estimation of marginal costs at existing waste treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Veronica; Hulgaard, Tore; Hindsgaul, Claus; Riber, Christian; Kamuk, Bettina; Astrup, Thomas F

    2016-04-01

    This investigation aims at providing an improved basis for assessing economic consequences of alternative Solid Waste Management (SWM) strategies for existing waste facilities. A bottom-up methodology was developed to determine marginal costs in existing facilities due to changes in the SWM system, based on the determination of average costs in such waste facilities as function of key facility and waste compositional parameters. The applicability of the method was demonstrated through a case study including two existing Waste-to-Energy (WtE) facilities, one with co-generation of heat and power (CHP) and another with only power generation (Power), affected by diversion strategies of five waste fractions (fibres, plastic, metals, organics and glass), named "target fractions". The study assumed three possible responses to waste diversion in the WtE facilities: (i) biomass was added to maintain a constant thermal load, (ii) Refused-Derived-Fuel (RDF) was included to maintain a constant thermal load, or (iii) no reaction occurred resulting in a reduced waste throughput without full utilization of the facility capacity. Results demonstrated that marginal costs of diversion from WtE were up to eleven times larger than average costs and dependent on the response in the WtE plant. Marginal cost of diversion were between 39 and 287 € Mg(-1) target fraction when biomass was added in a CHP (from 34 to 303 € Mg(-1) target fraction in the only Power case), between -2 and 300 € Mg(-1) target fraction when RDF was added in a CHP (from -2 to 294 € Mg(-1) target fraction in the only Power case) and between 40 and 303 € Mg(-1) target fraction when no reaction happened in a CHP (from 35 to 296 € Mg(-1) target fraction in the only Power case). Although average costs at WtE facilities were highly influenced by energy selling prices, marginal costs were not (provided a response was initiated at the WtE to keep constant the utilized thermal capacity). Failing to systematically

  6. Preliminary safety evaluation (PSE) for Sodium Storage Facility at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, B.R.

    1994-09-30

    This evaluation was performed for the Sodium Storage Facility (SSF) which will be constructed at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) in the area adjacent to the South and West Dump Heat Exchanger (DHX) pits. The purpose of the facility is to allow unloading the sodium from the FFTF plant tanks and piping. The significant conclusion of this Preliminary Safety Evaluation (PSE) is that the only Safety Class 2 components are the four sodium storage tanks and their foundations. The building, because of its imminent risk to the tanks under an earthquake or high winds, will be Safety Class 3/2, which means the building has a Safety Class 3 function with the Safety Class 2 loads of seismic and wind factored into the design.

  7. The pretreatment cost of a pyroprocess facility in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. K.; Youn, S. R.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, H. J.; Ko, W. I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Shale gas still has many disadvantages such as significant technological difficulties and high costs even when the fracking technology is used to extract shale gas since shale gas is dispersed widely. Moreover, it is estimated that the shale gas can be used for about 60 years, which is comparable to the period estimated for oil deposits. Another concern is that the climate may change due to the discharge of harmful gas produced during the gas extraction process. PRIDE facility producing 10 ton/year uranium ingot was set as the cost object for the cost estimation, and it was possible to increase cost calculation's accuracy level since labor cost and expenses incurred in this facility were the costs incurred in actuality. In the end, First-In, First Out process costing method was used to calculate the pretreatment cost of pyroprocess. According to the cost calculation results, the pretreatment cost was estimated as $195/kgHM and the cost share of the pretreatment of pyroprocess was calculated as 20%. Accordingly, electrochemical reduction process is the process requires most cost, followed by the cost of electro-winning process.

  8. Mirror Fusion Test Facility: Superconducting magnet system cost analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-07-01

    At the request of Victor Karpenko, Project manager for LLL`s Mirror Fusion Test Facility, EG&G has prepared this independent cost analysis for the proposed MFTF Superconducting Magnet System. The analysis has attempted to show sufficient detail to provide adequate definition for a basis of estimating costs.

  9. Depreciation cost for the capital investment of a pyroprocess facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. K.; Lee, S. H.; Ko, W. I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The pyroprocess produces U/TRU metal ingots using four important processes, pretreatment, electrochemical reduction, electrorefining and electrowinning, in order to recycle spent fuel. KAPF+'s capacity is shown the cost that is injected into the KAPF+. The pyroprocess unit cost is data that are essential for inputting to calculate the pyroprocess-Sodiumcooled Fast Reactor (SFR) nuclear fuel cycle cost. Moreover, since the pyroprocess facility's depreciation cost is included in the manufacturing indirect cost of the pyroprocess cost, it can become an important element for judging the pyroprocess' economic viability. Since the pyroprocess unit cost calculates the sum of the costs that are incurred each year by dividing with the total amount of U/TRU ingot produced, the pyroprocess unit cost uncertainty increases as well when the uncertainty of the costs incurred by each year increases. KAPF+, which is a commercialization facility, was set as the cost object, and the existing methods (straightline method and fixed percentage of declining-balance method) used today and the depreciation cost of the ADDM were subjected to a comparative analysis. The results are as follows. First, in case of the straight-line method that calculated the durable period as 40 years, and in case of ADDM that factored in a 5% deceleration rate, the difference in the depreciation costs of $65.26/kgHM and $119.05/kgHM resulted during the first and last years, respectively. Accordingly, it was analyzed that there is a significant difference in terms of the cost of the capital investment every year depending on the depreciation method. Secondly, since the depreciation cost is a component of the manufacturing indirect cost, it is necessary to maintain a trend that is similar to that of the direct labor cost in addition to the direct material cost.

  10. Evaluation of syngas production unit cost of bio-gasification facility using regression analysis techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Yangyang; Parajuli, Prem B.

    2011-08-10

    Evaluation of economic feasibility of a bio-gasification facility needs understanding of its unit cost under different production capacities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the unit cost of syngas production at capacities from 60 through 1800Nm 3/h using an economic model with three regression analysis techniques (simple regression, reciprocal regression, and log-log regression). The preliminary result of this study showed that reciprocal regression analysis technique had the best fit curve between per unit cost and production capacity, with sum of error squares (SES) lower than 0.001 and coefficient of determination of (R 2) 0.996. The regression analysis techniques determined the minimum unit cost of syngas production for micro-scale bio-gasification facilities of $0.052/Nm 3, under the capacity of 2,880 Nm 3/h. The results of this study suggest that to reduce cost, facilities should run at a high production capacity. In addition, the contribution of this technique could be the new categorical criterion to evaluate micro-scale bio-gasification facility from the perspective of economic analysis.

  11. Preliminary Concept for a Mars Sample Receiving Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Peter; Nelson, Bradley; Pauli, Urs; Kray, Randy; Huntley, Paul; Ross, Ferries; Heuer, Markus; Hofmann, Beda A.

    High Containment Facilities have been designed and constructedover 50 years, mainly focused on diagnostics of agriculture and human agents and more recently a focus on research of high consequence pathogens. With the project of Mars Sample Return to Earth, a new era on design has began. While in conventional containment design, the goal is mainly on the protection of staff and the environment, in SRF design an additional requirement becomes essential: the protection of the sample to a degree which is unknown and usually not requested in molecular biology. The talk presents preliminary results of an ESA study for a concept of a high containment that includes not only the highest standard for personnel and environmental protection but includes also modern technologies like Micro-robotics in order to guarantee for a pristine sample that allows Life Search and Biohazard tests without contamination of Earth bound organic material.

  12. The preliminary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) materials data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Joan G.; Strickland, John W.; Davis, John M.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Materials Data Base was developed by the LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG). The LDEF Materials Data Base is envisioned to eventually contain the wide variety and vast quantity of materials data generated for LDEF. The data is searchable by optical, thermal, and mechanical properties, exposure parameters (such as atomic oxygen flux), and author(s) or principal investigator(s). The LDEF Materials Data Base was incorporated into the Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS). MAPTIS is a collection of materials data which was computerized and is available to engineers, designers, and researchers in the aerospace community involved in the design and development of spacecraft and related hardware. This paper describes the LDEF Materials Data Base and includes step-by-step example searches using the data base. Information on how to become an authorized user of the system is included.

  13. Preliminary Cost Estimates of Pollution Control Technologies for Geothermal Developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, R.; Houser, G.; Richard, G.; Cotter, J.; Weller, P.; Pulaski, E.

    1979-10-01

    This is the first report from the EPA estimating the cost of technology for mitigating pollution that might arise from geothermal power systems. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has taken an initial step towards the establishment of regulatory standards for the geothermal industry by preparing a document entitled Pollution Control Guidance for Geothermal Energy Development. This report supports that document by providing pollution control cost information. The objective of this report is to provide preliminary cost estimates for air and water pollution treatment and disposal technologies applicable for geothermal energy conversion systems. Cost estimates include both annualized capital investment and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs for various levels of environmental requirements. [DJE-2005

  14. A cross-monotonic cost sharing method for the facility location game with service installation costs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU DaChuan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the metric uncapacitated facility location game with service installation costs. Our main result is an 11-approximate cross-monotonic cost-sharing method under the assumption that the installation cost depends only on the service type.

  15. A cross-monotonic cost sharing method for the facility location game with service installation costs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,we consider the metric uncapacitated facility location game with service installation costs. Our main result is an 11-approximate cross-monotonic cost-sharing method under the assumption that the installation cost depends only on the service type.

  16. Basic requirements for a preliminary conceptual design of the Korea advanced pyroprocess facility (KAPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Hee; Ko, Won Il; Chang, Hong Lae; Song, Dae Yong; Kwon, Eun Ha; Lee, Jung Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing technologies for pyroprocessing for spent PWR fuels. This study is part of a long term R and D program in Korea to develop an advanced recycle system that has the potential to meet and exceed the proliferation resistance, waste minimization, resource minimization, safety and economic goals of approved Korean Government energy policy, as well as the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) program. To support this R and D program, KAERI requires that an independent estimate be made of the conceptual design and cost for construction and operation of a 'Korea Advanced Pyroprocessing Facility', This document describes the basic requirements for preliminary conceptual design of the Korea Advanced Pyroprocess Facility (KAPF). The presented requirements will be modified to be more effective and feasible on an engineering basis during the subsequent design process.

  17. NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION. Preliminary Observations on Indirect Costs for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-24

    NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Preliminary Observations on Indirect Costs for Research Statement of John Neumann, Director...on Science , Space, and Technology, House of Representatives For Release on Delivery Expected at 10:00 a.m. ET Wednesday, May 24th, 2017 GAO-17...testimony before the Subcommittee on Research and Technology and the Subcommittee on Oversight, Committee on Science , Space, and Technology, House of

  18. Progress in preliminary studies at Ottana Solar Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demontis, V.; Camerada, M.; Cau, G.; Cocco, D.; Damiano, A.; Melis, T.; Musio, M.

    2016-05-01

    The fast increasing share of distributed generation from non-programmable renewable energy sources, such as the strong penetration of photovoltaic technology in the distribution networks, has generated several problems for the management and security of the whole power grid. In order to meet the challenge of a significant share of solar energy in the electricity mix, several actions aimed at increasing the grid flexibility and its hosting capacity, as well as at improving the generation programmability, need to be investigated. This paper focuses on the ongoing preliminary studies at the Ottana Solar Facility, a new experimental power plant located in Sardinia (Italy) currently under construction, which will offer the possibility to progress in the study of solar plants integration in the power grid. The facility integrates a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant, including a thermal energy storage system and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) unit, with a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) plant and an electrical energy storage system. The facility has the main goal to assess in real operating conditions the small scale concentrating solar power technology and to study the integration of the two technologies and the storage systems to produce programmable and controllable power profiles. A model for the CSP plant yield was developed to assess different operational strategies that significantly influence the plant yearly yield and its global economic effectiveness. In particular, precise assumptions for the ORC module start-up operation behavior, based on discussions with the manufacturers and technical datasheets, will be described. Finally, the results of the analysis of the: "solar driven", "weather forecasts" and "combined storage state of charge (SOC)/ weather forecasts" operational strategies will be presented.

  19. Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soli T. Khericha

    2006-09-01

    This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  20. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) conceptual design activity reduced cost report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    This report describes the results of a preliminary reevaluation of the design and cost of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) Project in response to the request from the 28th FPCC meeting in January 1999. Two major ideas have been considered: 1) reduction of the total construction cost through elimination of the previously planned facility upgrade and 2) a facility deployment in 3 stages with capabilities for limited experiments in the first stage. As a result, the size and complexity of the facility could be significantly reduced, leading to substantial cost savings. In addition to these two ideas, this study also included a critical review of the original CDA specification with the objective of elimination of nonessential items. For example, the number of lithium targets was reduced from two to one. As a result of these changes in addition to the elimination of the upgrade, the total cost estimate was very substantially reduced from 797.2 MICF to 487.8 MICF, where 1 MICF = 1 Million of the IFMIF Conversion Units (approximately $1M US January, 1996). (author)

  1. Transmission cost minimization strategies for wind-electric generating facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, R. [Northern States Power Company, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Integrating wind-electric generation facilities into existing power systems presents opportunities not encountered in conventional energy projects. Minimizing outlet cost requires probabilistic value-based analyses appropriately reflecting the wind facility`s operational characteristics. The wind resource`s intermittent nature permits relaxation of deterministic criteria addressing outlet configuration and capacity required relative to facility rating. Equivalent capacity ratings of wind generation facilities being a fraction of installed nameplate rating, outlet design studies contingency analyses can concentrate on this fractional value. Further, given its non-dispatchable, low capacity factor nature, a lower level of redundancy in outlet facilities is appropriate considering the trifling contribution to output unreliability. Further cost reduction opportunities arise from {open_quotes}wind speed/generator power output{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}wind speed/overhead conductor rating{close_quotes} functions` correlation. Proper analysis permits the correlation`s exploitation to safely increase line ratings. Lastly, poor correlation between output and utility load may permit use of smaller conductors, whose higher (mostly off-peak) losses are economically justifiable.

  2. Wastewater characterization of IPEN facilities - a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Lucilena R.; Goncalves, Cristina; Terazan, Wagner R.; Cotrim, Marycel E.B.; Pires, Maria Aparecida F., E-mail: lrmonteiro@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    As part of IPEN's Environmental Monitoring Program, wastewater sample collection and analysis was implemented on a daily basis. CQMA- Centro de Quimica e Meio Ambiente was responsible for the determination of total, fixed and volatile solids, pH, metals (as Al, Sb, Ba, Cd, Pb, Co, Cu, Cr, Hg, Mo, Ni, Ag, Na, Zn, Ca, Mg, Be, Sn, Li, K, Sr, Ti and V), semimetals (As, B, Se and Si) and anions (such as chloride, nitrate, sulfate and fluoride). The results were compared to the legal values established by the Sao Paulo State regulation 8,468/76, which defines the maximum permitted values for most of the studied substances in wastewater, aiming its releasing in public wastewater treatment system. The evaluation of this parameters concentration on Ipen's effluent implies that 50% of the wastewater corresponds to organic matter due to the sanitary load and inorganic macro elements, mainly as sodium, potassium, calcium. The only parameter not found in accordance with Brazilian legislation was pH in four out of the one hundred and seven samples collected throughout 2009 (2.8% of the samples analyzed). This preliminary study showed the effluents generated at Ipen's facility is characterized by the presence of organic matter and macro elements, commonly found in sanitary wastewater and it is in compliance with Sao Paulo regulations. (author)

  3. Preliminary study for small animal preclinical hadrontherapy facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, G.; Pisciotta, P.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Romano, F.; Cammarata, F.; Marchese, V.; Forte, G. I.; Lamia, D.; Minafra, L.; Bravatá, V.; Acquaviva, R.; Gilardi, M. C.; Cuttone, G.

    2017-02-01

    Aim of this work is the study of the preliminary steps to perform a particle treatment of cancer cells inoculated in small animals and to realize a preclinical hadrontherapy facility. A well-defined dosimetric protocol was developed to explicate the steps needed in order to perform a precise proton irradiation in small animals and achieve a highly conformal dose into the target. A precise homemade positioning and holding system for small animals was designed and developed at INFN-LNS in Catania (Italy), where an accurate Monte Carlo simulation was developed, using Geant4 code to simulate the treatment in order to choose the best animal position and perform accurately all the necessary dosimetric evaluations. The Geant4 application can also be used to realize dosimetric studies and its peculiarity consists in the possibility to introduce the real target composition in the simulation using the DICOM micro-CT image. This application was fully validated comparing the results with the experimental measurements. The latter ones were performed at the CATANA (Centro di AdroTerapia e Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) facility at INFN-LNS by irradiating both PMMA and water solid phantom. Dosimetric measurements were performed using previously calibrated EBT3 Gafchromic films as a detector and the results were compared with the Geant4 simulation ones. In particular, two different types of dosimetric studies were performed: the first one involved irradiation of a phantom made up of water solid slabs where a layer of EBT3 was alternated with two different slabs in a sandwich configuration, in order to validate the dosimetric distribution. The second one involved irradiation of a PMMA phantom made up of a half hemisphere and some PMMA slabs in order to simulate a subcutaneous tumour configuration, normally used in preclinical studies. In order to evaluate the accordance between experimental and simulation results, two different statistical tests were made: Kolmogorov test and

  4. IFMIF, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity cost report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennich, M.J. [comp.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the cost estimate for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) at the completion of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). The estimate corresponds to the design documented in the Final IFMIF CDA Report. In order to effectively involve all the collaborating parties in the development of the estimate, a preparatory meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1996 to jointly establish guidelines to insure that the estimate was uniformly prepared while still permitting each country to use customary costing techniques. These guidelines are described in Section 4. A preliminary cost estimate was issued in July 1996 based on the results of the Second Design Integration Meeting, May 20--27, 1996 at JAERI, Tokai, Japan. This document served as the basis for the final costing and review efforts culminating in a final review during the Third IFMIF Design Integration Meeting, October 14--25, 1996, ENEA, Frascati, Italy. The present estimate is a baseline cost estimate which does not apply to a specific site. A revised cost estimate will be prepared following the assignment of both the site and all the facility responsibilities.

  5. Cost calculations for decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, I. (Studsvik Nuclear AB (Sweden)); Backe, S. (Institute for Energy Technology (Norway)); Cato, A.; Lindskog, S. (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (Sweden)); Efraimsson, H. (Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (Sweden)); Iversen, Klaus (Danish Decommissioning (Denmark)); Salmenhaara, S. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland)); Sjoeblom, R. (Tekedo AB, (Sweden))

    2008-07-15

    Today, it is recommended that planning of decommission should form an integral part of the activities over the life cycle of a nuclear facility (planning, building and operation), but it was only in the nineteen seventies that the waste issue really surface. Actually, the IAEA guidelines on decommissioning have been issued as recently as over the last ten years, and international advice on finance of decommissioning is even younger. No general international guideline on cost calculations exists at present. This implies that cost calculations cannot be performed with any accuracy or credibility without a relatively detailed consideration of the radiological prerequisites. Consequently, any cost estimates based mainly on the particulars of the building structures and installations are likely to be gross underestimations. The present study has come about on initiative by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) and is based on a common need in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The content of the report may be briefly summarised as follows. The background covers design and operation prerequisites as well as an overview of the various nuclear research facilities in the four participating countries: Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The purpose of the work has been to identify, compile and exchange information on facilities and on methodologies for cost calculation with the aim of achieving an 80 % level of confidence. The scope has been as follows: 1) to establish a Nordic network 2) to compile dedicated guidance documents on radiological surveying, technical planning and financial risk identification and assessment 3) to compile and describe techniques for precise cost calculations at early stages 4) to compile plant and other relevant data A separate section is devoted in the report to good practice for the specific purpose of early but precise cost calculations for research facilities, and a separate section is devoted to techniques for assessment of cost

  6. Conceptual capital-cost estimate and facility design of the Mirror-Fusion Technology Demonstration Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    This report contains contributions by Bechtel Group, Inc. to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the final report on the conceptual design of the Mirror Fusion Technology Demonstration Facility (TDF). Included in this report are the following contributions: (1) conceptual capital cost estimate, (2) structural design, and (3) plot plan and plant arrangement drawings. The conceptual capital cost estimate is prepared in a format suitable for inclusion as a section in the TDF final report. The structural design and drawings are prepared as partial inputs to the TDF final report section on facilities design, which is being prepared by the FEDC.

  7. The Cost of Supplying Segmented Consumers From a Central Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turkensteen, Marcel; Klose, Andreas

    consider three measures of dispersion of demand points: the average distance between demand points, the maximum distance and the surface size.In our distribution model, all demand points are restocked from a central facility. The observed logistics costs are determined using the tour length estimations......Organizations regularly face the strategic marketing decision which groups of consumers they should target. A potential problem, highlighted in Steenkamp et al. (2002), is that the target consumers may be so widely dispersed that an organization cannot serve its customers cost-effectively. We...... measure if there are many stops on a route and with our average distance measure if there are relatively few....

  8. SECONDARY WASTE/ETF (EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY) PRELIMINARY PRE-CONCEPTUAL ENGINEERING STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAY TH; GEHNER PD; STEGEN GARY; HYMAS JAY; PAJUNEN AL; SEXTON RICH; RAMSEY AMY

    2009-12-28

    This pre-conceptual engineering study is intended to assist in supporting the critical decision (CD) 0 milestone by providing a basis for the justification of mission need (JMN) for the handling and disposal of liquid effluents. The ETF baseline strategy, to accommodate (WTP) requirements, calls for a solidification treatment unit (STU) to be added to the ETF to provide the needed additional processing capability. This STU is to process the ETF evaporator concentrate into a cement-based waste form. The cementitious waste will be cast into blocks for curing, storage, and disposal. Tis pre-conceptual engineering study explores this baseline strategy, in addition to other potential alternatives, for meeting the ETF future mission needs. Within each reviewed case study, a technical and facility description is outlined, along with a preliminary cost analysis and the associated risks and benefits.

  9. A user-friendly approach to cost accounting in laboratory animal facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David G

    2011-08-19

    Cost accounting is an essential management activity for laboratory animal facility management. In this report, the author describes basic principles of cost accounting and outlines steps for carrying out cost accounting in laboratory animal facilities. Methods of post hoc cost accounting analysis for maximizing the efficiency of facility operations are also described.

  10. Study of fast reactor safety test facilities. Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.I.; Boudreau, J.E.; McLaughlin, T.; Palmer, R.G.; Starkovich, V.; Stein, W.E.; Stevenson, M.G.; Yarnell, Y.L.

    1975-05-01

    Included are sections dealing with the following topics: (1) perspective and philosophy of fast reactor safety analysis; (2) status of accident analysis and experimental needs; (3) experiment and facility definitions; (4) existing in-pile facilities; (5) new facility options; and (6) data acquisition methods. (DG)

  11. Prenatal screening costs at a large military treatment facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiv, Erin; Sale, Taylor J; Simsiman, Amanda; Leininger, William M; Lutgendorf, Monica A

    2017-07-01

    Prenatal screening with cell-free DNA (cfDNA) offers improved detection of Down syndrome (T21) compared to conventional screening. These tests are expensive and have fewer detectable anomalies. Our objective was to investigate potential costs and test performance of screening algorithms when accounting for detectable aneuploidies. This is a cost analysis for a large military treatment facility. Using a theoretical delivery cohort and published performance data, universal screening with cfDNA was compared to sequential screening, comparing T21 to all detectable aneuploidies. Predicted test performance and costs were calculated. A cohort of 3000 deliveries was used. For T21, universal cfDNA is more expensive ($1,346,064) than sequential screening ($244,885), but has a lower false positive rate and avoids 101 invasive diagnostic tests. An additional case of T21 is detected with a marginal cost of $1,101,179. For all detectable aneuploidies, cfDNA is more expensive ($1,353,660) than sequential screening ($239,189), and 59 invasive diagnostic tests are avoided. Sequential screening detects an additional case of aneuploidy, with a cost savings of $1,114,471. Although cfDNA is superior in detecting T21 cases, sequential screening is superior when considering all aneuploidies detectable. The cost increase with universal cfDNA is significant, and is not justified with small improvements in the performance.

  12. Preliminary Closure Plan for the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURBANK, D.A.

    2000-08-31

    This document describes the preliminary plans for closure of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) disposal facility to be built by the Office of River Protection at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington. The facility will provide near-surface disposal of up to 204,000 cubic meters of ILAW in engineered trenches with modified RCRA Subtitle C closure barriers.

  13. 48 CFR 52.215-16 - Facilities Capital Cost of Money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Money. 52.215-16 Section 52.215-16 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION....215-16 Facilities Capital Cost of Money. As prescribed in 15.408(h), insert the following provision: Facilities Capital Cost of Money (JUN 2003) (a) Facilities capital cost of money will be an allowable...

  14. Moly99 Production Facility: Report on Beamline Components, Requirements, Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishofberger, Kip A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-23

    In FY14 we completed the design of the beam line for the linear accelerator production design concept. This design included a set of three bending magnets, quadrupole focusing magnets, and octopoles to flatten the beam on target. This design was generic and applicable to multiple different accelerators if necessary. In FY15 we built on that work to create specifications for the individual beam optic elements, including power supply requirements. This report captures the specification of beam line components with initial cost estimates for the NorthStar production facility.This report is organized as follows: The motivation of the beamline design is introduced briefly, along with renderings of the design. After that, a specific list is provided, which accounts for each beamline component, including part numbers and costs, to construct the beamline. After that, this report details the important sections of the beamline and individual components. A final summary and list of follow-on activities completes this report.

  15. Analysis of Unit Process Cost for an Engineering-Scale Pyroprocess Facility Using a Process Costing Method in Korea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sungki Kim; Wonil Ko; Sungsig Bang

    2015-01-01

    ...) metal ingots in a high-temperature molten salt phase. This paper provides the unit process cost of a pyroprocess facility that can process up to 10 tons of pyroprocessing product per year by utilizing the process costing method...

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory corregated metal pipe saw facility preliminary safety analysis report. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-09-19

    This Preliminary Safety Analysis Report addresses site assessment, facility design and construction, and design operation of the processing systems in the Corrugated Metal Pipe Saw Facility with respect to normal and abnormal conditions. Potential hazards are identified, credible accidents relative to the operation of the facility and the process systems are analyzed, and the consequences of postulated accidents are presented. The risk associated with normal operations, abnormal operations, and natural phenomena are analyzed. The accident analysis presented shows that the impact of the facility will be acceptable for all foreseeable normal and abnormal conditions of operation. Specifically, under normal conditions the facility will have impacts within the limits posted by applicable DOE guidelines, and in accident conditions the facility will similarly meet or exceed the requirements of all applicable standards. 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Preliminary siting characterization Salt Disposition Facility - Site B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyatt, D.

    2000-01-04

    A siting and reconnaissance geotechnical program has been completed in S-Area at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This program investigated the subsurface conditions for the area known as ``Salt Disposition Facility (SDF), Site B'' located northeast of H-Area and within the S-Area. Data acquired from the Site B investigation includes both field exploration and laboratory test data.

  18. 48 CFR 52.215-17 - Waiver of Facilities Capital Cost of Money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Capital Cost of Money. 52.215-17 Section 52.215-17 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.215-17 Waiver of Facilities Capital Cost of Money. As prescribed in 15.408(i), insert the following clause: Waiver of Facilities Capital Cost of Money (OCT 1997) The Contractor did...

  19. 78 FR 63176 - Notice of Preliminary Determination of a Qualifying Conduit Hydropower Facility and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Preliminary Determination of a Qualifying Conduit Hydropower... hydropower facility, pursuant to section 30 of the Federal Power Act, as amended by section 4 of the Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013 (HREA). The 22 kW Orchard City Water Treatment Plant...

  20. Risk management study for the Hanford Site facilities: Risk reduction cost comparison for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, G.A.; Egge, R.G.; Senger, E.; Shultz, M.W.; Taylor, W.E.

    1994-02-01

    This document provides a cost-comparison evaluation for implementing certain risk-reduction measures and their effect on the overall risk of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities. The evaluation is based on conditions that existed at the time the risk evaluation team performed facility investigations, and does not acknowledge risk-reduction measures that occurred soon after risk identification. This evaluation is one part of an overall risk management study for these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1450-km{sup 2} Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30 km southeast of the 200 Area. This cost-comparison evaluation (1) determines relative costs for reducing risk to acceptable levels; (2) compares the cost of reducing risk using different risk-reduction options; and (3) compares the cost of reducing risks at different facilities. The result is an identification of the cost effective risk-reduction measures. Supporting information required to develop costs of the various risk-reduction options also is included.

  1. Farm Fuel Alcohol Project: preliminary report on facility design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pile, R S; Badger, P C; Roetheli, J C; Waddell, Jr, E L

    1979-09-01

    This report describes the design of a farm-based ethanol production system to be built by TVA at Muscle Shoals, Alabama. This facility will include cooking, fermentation, and distillation equipment to allow production of 8000 to 12,000 gallons of fuel ethanol during a three to four month period each year. Output will be about 10 gallons of 190-proof ethanol per hour. Present components are sized to allow 12 to 14 hour daily operation as a semi-continuous batch system. Intent of the project is to document equipment and energy requirements, ethanol yields, and feasibility of small farm-based ethanol plants for farm fuel self-sufficiency. Cooking and fermentation will be batch-type operations, and packed distillation columns will be used for separating ethanol from the fermented beer. Energy recovery and waste heat use are integrated when feasible. The fermented beer will be fed directly to the distillation columns without separation of solids. Although this is an area of concern, an economical method of separation could not be identified.

  2. Estimating costs and manpower requirements for conventional wastewater treatment facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patterson, W.L; Banker, R.F

    1971-01-01

    Data for estimating average construciton costs, operation and maintenance costs, and manpower staffing requirements, are presented for conventional wastewater treatment plants ranging from 1 to 100...

  3. Preliminary assessment report for Kent National Guard Facility (Installation 53065), 24410 Military Road, Kent, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketels, P.; Aggarwal, P.; Rose, C.M.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Washington Army National Guard property in Kent, Washington. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment.

  4. Preliminary Study on Causative Factors Leading to Construction Cost Overrun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftab Hameed Memon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cost is the fundamental component for any construction project. However, cost overrun is observed as one of the most frequently occurring issues in construction projects worldwide and need to be studied more to alleviate this issue in the future. This trend is more severe in developing countries where these overruns sometimes exceeds 100% of the anticipated cost of the project.   Like other countries, construction industry in Malaysia is also facing a lot of challenges such as the delay to complete the project in time, the expenditure exceeding the budget, the building defects and over dependent of foreign workers. The ultimate effects of project delay also results in exceeding cost. This leads to serious need of addressing the critical issue of construction cost overrun. To avoid construction cost overrun, very first and most important step is to identify and understand the causes and factors responsible for that. Hence, this paper is aimed to identify various factors responsible for construction cost overrun. Through a comprehensive study of literature review, common factors causing cost overrun resulting in identification of 78 factors were mapped in frequency table. A questionnaire survey and interviews were carried out amongst selected experienced personnel for expert opinion to identify the significant factors causing cost overrun in Malaysia. Five respondents were selected from each of the respondents groups including client, consultant and contractor. The questionnaire responses were analyzed by average index method, which resulted in identification of 59 common factors causing construction cost overrun in Malaysia. Results show that poor design & delays in Design, unrealistic contract duration & requirements imposed, lack of experience, late delivery of materials & equipment, relationship between management & labour, delay preparation & approval of drawings, inadequate planning & scheduling, poor site management & supervision and

  5. Quality Cost in the Construction Industry ' Preliminary Findings in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhtar Che Ali

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the key areas being emphasis in ISO 9001 Quality Management System (QMS is performance measurement towards continual improvement. Among the primary measuring tools is quality cost approach. Quality cost has been well practice in manufacturing sector but slowly gain its importance in construction industry. In fact Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK has reckoned quality cost as one of the tool and technique in few of its management processes. In view of such circumstances that has prompted an effort to undertake a study to ascertain the level of knowledge and practice on quality cost in Malaysian construction landscape. The targeted group of respondents was the personnel in the project management team. Capitalizing Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB National Electronic Tendering Initiatives (NETI road shows which were held in year 2007 throughout the country, the author was able to garner 263 respondents representing the project management team. Subsequently the data gathered from the completed forms were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS software. General findings indicated that the level of knowledge and practice on quality cost among the project management team were relatively low. One of the main contributing factors was poor knowledge in the area related to quality cost. Despite of such scenario most of the respondents showed their interest in acquiring knowledge in the field of quality cost. Hence quality cost approach is at the infancy stage in Malaysian construction industry.

  6. Preliminary Safety Design Report for Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Solack; Carol Mason

    2012-03-01

    A new onsite, remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled low-level waste disposal for remote-handled low-level waste from the Idaho National Laboratory and for nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled low-level waste in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This preliminary safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by discussing site characteristics that impact accident analysis, by providing the facility and process information necessary to support the hazard analysis, by identifying and evaluating potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled low-level waste, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  7. Cost modelling as decision support when locating manufacturing facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Windmark

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology for cost estimation in developing decision supports for production location issues. The purpose is to provide a structured work procedure to be used by practitioners to derive the knowledge needed to make informed decisions on where to locate production. This paper present a special focus on how to integrate cost effects during the decision process. The work procedure and cost models were developed in close collaboration with a group of industrial partners. The result is a structure of cost estimation tools aligned to different steps in the work procedure. The cost models can facilitate both cost estimation for manufacturing a product under new preconditions, including support costs, and cost simulations to analyse the risks of wrong estimations and uncertainties in the input parameters. Future research aims to test the methodology in ongoing transfer projects to further understand difficulties in managing global production systems. In existing models and methods presented in the literature, cost is usually estimated on a too aggregated level to be suitable for decision support regarding production system design. The cost estimation methodology presented here provides new insights on cost driving factors related to the production system.

  8. Preliminary Design Report of Fluid System of PDRC Performance Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Eoh, Jae-Hyuk; Seong, Seung-Hwan; Han, Ji-Woong; Choi, Byoung-Hae; Kim, Seong-O

    2008-10-15

    PDRC (Passive Decay Heat Removal Circuit) is a safety grade passive residual heat removal system of KALIMER-600. In order to assess the long- and short-term cooling capabilities of PDRC and produce the experimental data for the verification of the performance and safety analysis codes, PDRC performance test was planned for. In this study, the overall design requirements and the preliminary design data for the fluid system of test facility are presented. The fluid system of the facility is composed of the primary heat transport system, the PDRC, the IHX air cooling system and the sodium supply/purification system. The preliminarily designed facility is scaled-down to 1/4 for length, 1/400 for volume from the primary heat transport system and the PDRC of KALIMER-600 based on a reliable scaling method. It can simulate the cooling of primary heat transport system for the full temperature condition in case of the reactor and pump trips. The produced preliminary design data will be used in the future as the basic information for a detailed design, an establishment of experimental requirement and an assessment of the appropriateness of facility design.

  9. 42 CFR 413.186 - Payment exception: Self-dialysis training costs in pediatric facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment exception: Self-dialysis training costs in....186 Payment exception: Self-dialysis training costs in pediatric facilities. (a) Qualification. To qualify for an exception to the prospective payment rate based on self-dialysis training costs,...

  10. Cost recovery of NGO primary health care facilities: a case study in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam Khurshid

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the cost recovery of primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. This study estimated the cost recovery of a primary health care facility run by Building Resources Across Community (BRAC, a large NGO in Bangladesh, for the period of July 2004 - June 2005. This health facility is one of the seven upgraded BRAC facilities providing emergency obstetric care and is typical of the government and private primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. Given the current maternal and child mortality in Bangladesh and the challenges to addressing health-related Millennium Development Goal (MDG targets the financial sustainability of such facilities is crucial. Methods The study was designed as a case study covering a single facility. The methodology was based on the 'ingredient approach' using the allocation techniques by inpatient and outpatient services. Cost recovery of the facility was estimated from the provider's perspective. The value of capital items was annualized using 5% discount rate and its market price of 2004 (replacement value. Sensitivity analysis was done using 3% discount rate. Results The cost recovery ratio of the BRAC primary care facility was 59%, and if excluding all capital costs, it increased to 72%. Of the total costs, 32% was for personnel while drugs absorbed 18%. Capital items were17% of total costs while operational cost absorbed 12%. Three-quarters of the total cost was variable costs. Inpatient services contributed 74% of total revenue in exchange of 10% of total utilization. An average cost per patient was US$ 10 while it was US$ 67 for inpatient and US$ 4 for outpatient. Conclusion The cost recovery of this NGO primary care facility is important for increasing its financial sustainability and decreasing donor dependency, and achieving universal health coverage in a developing country setting. However, for improving the cost recovery of the health facility, it needs to increase

  11. PRELIMINARY STUDY TO PRIMARY EDUCATION FACILITIES (A Comparison Study between Indonesia and Developed Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Yosita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This writing is a preliminary study to condition of primary education facilities in Indonesia, and then comparing these with theories as well as various relevant cases aimed to know the problem more obviously. Basically, there is difference between primary education facilities in Indonesia with those in developed countries. Meanwhile on the other hand, the condition as well as the completion of education facility is actually as the main factor contributes to address the purpose of learning process. If building design, interior and also site plan were dynamic in form, space, colour and tools, those would be probably more stimulate activity and influence into the growth of students. However, lastly, it is still required further analysis, as an example analysis to student's behaviour in spaces of learning environment, more detail and within enough time, not only at indoor but also at outdoor.

  12. Waste Management Facilities cost information for low-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

  13. Assessment of activity-based pyroprocess costs for an engineering-scale facility in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ki; Ko, Won Il [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Analysis Department, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Sung Sig [Dept. of Business and Technology Management, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    This study set the pyroprocess facility at an engineering scale as a cost object, and presented the cost consumed during the unit processes of the pyroprocess. For the cost calculation, the activity based costing (ABC) method was used instead of the engineering cost estimation method, which calculates the cost based on the conceptual design of the pyroprocess facility. The calculation results demonstrate that the pyroprocess facility's unit process cost is $194/kgHM for pretreatment, $298/kgHM for electrochemical reduction, $226/kgHM for electrorefining, and $299/kgHM for electrowinning. An analysis demonstrated that the share of each unit process cost among the total pyroprocess cost is as follows: 19% for pretreatment, 29% for electrochemical reduction, 22% for electrorefining, and 30% for electrowinning. The total unit cost of the pyroprocess was calculated at $1,017/kgHM. In the end, electrochemical reduction and the electrowinning process took up most of the cost, and the individual costs for these two processes was found to be similar. This is because significant raw material cost is required for the electrochemical reduction process, which uses platinum as an anode electrode. In addition, significant raw material costs are required, such as for Li3PO4, which is used a lot during the salt purification process.

  14. Assessment of activity-based pyroprocess costs for an engineering-scale facility in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungki Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study set the pyroprocess facility at an engineering scale as a cost object, and presented the cost consumed during the unit processes of the pyroprocess. For the cost calculation, the activity based costing (ABC method was used instead of the engineering cost estimation method, which calculates the cost based on the conceptual design of the pyroprocess facility. The calculation results demonstrate that the pyroprocess facility's unit process cost is $194/kgHM for pretreatment, $298/kgHM for electrochemical reduction, $226/kgHM for electrorefining, and $299/kgHM for electrowinning. An analysis demonstrated that the share of each unit process cost among the total pyroprocess cost is as follows: 19% for pretreatment, 29% for electrochemical reduction, 22% for electrorefining, and 30% for electrowinning. The total unit cost of the pyroprocess was calculated at $1,017/kgHM. In the end, electrochemical reduction and the electrowinning process took up most of the cost, and the individual costs for these two processes was found to be similar. This is because significant raw material cost is required for the electrochemical reduction process, which uses platinum as an anode electrode. In addition, significant raw material costs are required, such as for Li3PO4, which is used a lot during the salt purification process.

  15. Cost analysis of a disaster facility at an apex tertiary care trauma center of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For the Commonwealth Games 2010, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre (JPNATC of India had been directed by the Director General Health Services and Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, to set up a specialized unit for the definitive management of the injured/unwell athletes, officials, and related personnel coming for the Commonwealth Games in October 2010. The facility included a 20-bedded fully equipped ward, six ICU beds with ventilator capacity, one very very important person observation area, one perioperative management cubicle, and one fully modular and integrated operating room. Objective: The objective of this study was to calculate the cost of disaster facility at JPNATC, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. Methodology: Traditional (average or gross costing methodology was used to arrive at the cost for the provisioning of these services by this facility. Results: The annual cost of providing services at disaster facility at JPNATC, New Delhi, was calculated to be INR 61,007,334.08 (US$ 983,989.258 while the per hour cost was calculated to be INR 7061.03 of the total cost toward the provisioning of services by disaster facility where 26% was the capital cost and 74% was the operating cost. Human resource caters to maximum chunk of the expenditures (47%. Conclusion: The results of this costing study will help in the future planning of resource allocation within the financial constraints (US$ 1 = INR 62 in the year 2013.

  16. The cost of child health inequalities in Aotearoa New Zealand: a preliminary scoping study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mills Clair

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health inequalities have been extensively documented, internationally and in New Zealand. The cost of reducing health inequities is often perceived as high; however, recent international studies suggest the cost of “doing nothing” is itself significant. This study aimed to develop a preliminary estimate of the economic cost of health inequities between Māori (indigenous and non-Māori children in New Zealand. Methods Standard quantitative epidemiological methods and “cost of illness” methodology were employed, within a Kaupapa Māori theoretical framework. Data were obtained from national data collections held by the New Zealand Health Information Service and other health sector agencies. Results Preliminary estimates suggest child health inequities between Māori and non-Māori in New Zealand are cost-saving to the health sector. However the societal costs are significant. A conservative “base case” scenario estimate is over $NZ62 million per year, while alternative costing methods yield larger costs of nearly $NZ200 million per annum. The total cost estimate is highly sensitive to the costing method used and Value of Statistical Life applied, as the cost of potentially avoidable deaths of Māori children is the major contributor to this estimate. Conclusions This preliminary study suggests that health sector spending is skewed towards non-Māori children despite evidence of greater Māori need. Persistent child health inequities result in significant societal economic costs. Eliminating child health inequities, particularly in primary care access, could result in significant economic benefits for New Zealand. However, there are conceptual, ethical and methodological challenges in estimating the economic cost of child health inequities. Re-thinking of traditional economic frameworks and development of more appropriate methodologies is required.

  17. Practice patterns, case mix, Medicare payment policy, and dialysis facility costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, R A; Held, P J; Orzol, S M; Dor, A

    1999-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of case mix, practice patterns, features of the payment system, and facility characteristics on the cost of dialysis. The nationally representative sample of dialysis units in the 1991 U.S. Renal Data System's Case Mix Adequacy (CMA) Study. The CMA data were merged with data from Medicare Cost Reports, HCFA facility surveys, and HCFA's end-stage renal disease patient registry. We estimated a statistical cost function to examine the determinants of costs at the dialysis unit level. The relationship between case mix and costs was generally weak. However, dialysis practices (type of dialysis membrane, membrane reuse policy, and treatment duration) did have a significant effect on costs. Further, facilities whose payment was constrained by HCFA's ceiling on the adjustment for area wage rates incurred higher costs than unconstrained facilities. The costs of hospital-based units were considerably higher than those of freestanding units. Among chain units, only members of one of the largest national chains exhibited significant cost savings relative to independent facilities. Little evidence showed that adjusting dialysis payment to account for differences in case mix across facilities would be necessary to ensure access to care for high-cost patients or to reimburse facilities equitably for their costs. However, current efforts to increase dose of dialysis may require higher payments. Longer treatments appear to be the most economical method of increasing the dose of dialysis. Switching to more expensive types of dialysis membranes was a more costly means of increasing dose and hence must be justified by benefits beyond those of higher dose. Reusing membranes saved money, but the savings were insufficient to offset the costs associated with using more expensive membranes. Most, but not all, of the higher costs observed in hospital-based units appear to reflect overhead cost allocation rather than a difference in real resources devoted to treatment

  18. Light ion production for a future radiobiological facility at CERN: preliminary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford-Haworth, Joshua; Bellodi, Giulia; Küchler, Detlef; Lombardi, Alessandra; Röhrich, Jörg; Scrivens, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Recent medical applications of ions such as carbon and helium have proved extremely effective for the treatment of human patients. However, before now a comprehensive study of the effects of different light ions on organic targets has not been completed. There is a strong desire for a dedicated facility which can produce ions in the range of protons to neon in order to perform this study. This paper will present the proposal and preliminary investigations into the production of light ions, and the development of a radiobiological research facility at CERN. The aims of this project will be presented along with the modifications required to the existing linear accelerator (Linac3), and the foreseen facility, including the requirements for an ion source in terms of some of the specification parameters and the flexibility of operation for different ion types. Preliminary results from beam transport simulations will be presented, in addition to some planned tests required to produce some of the required light ions (lithium, boron) to be conducted in collaboration with the Helmholtz-Zentrum für Materialien und Energie, Berlin.

  19. Preliminary Evaluation of PGSFR DHR Heat Exchangers Performance Using STELLA-1 Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jonggan; Eoh, Jae-Hyuk; Yeom, Sujin; Lee, Jewhan; Kim, Tae-Joon; Hwang, Inkoo; Cho, Chungho; Kim, Jong-Man; Cho, Youngil; Jung, Min-Hwan; Gam, Da-Young; Jeong, Ji-Young [Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The STELLA program for PGSFR decay heat removal (DHR) performance demonstration is in progress at KAERI. As the first phase of the program, the STELLA-1 facility has been constructed and separate effect tests for heat exchangers of DHRS have been conducted. Two kinds of heat exchangers including a shell-and-tube type sodium-to-sodium heat exchanger (DHX) and a helical-tube type sodium-to-air heat exchanger (AHX) were tested for design codes V-V, e.g. SHXSA and AHXSA. In this paper, firstly, overall characteristics of the STELLA-1 facility are described briefly. Secondly, the performance tests of the DHX and AHX rely on a steady-state result of a heat transfer experiment. Thus experimental procedures to obtain the steady-state result are described and steady-state conditions for the heat exchanger performance test are clearly defined. Lastly, experimental results and calculation results obtained from the design codes are also compared as a preliminary work for the design code V-V. The PGSFR DHR heat exchangers performance was experimentally demonstrated using the STELLA-1 facility, and the experimental results and the prediction of the design code were compared as a preliminary work for the design code V-V. The experimental results of the DHX and AHX were in good agreement with the estimation of the SHXSA and AHXSA codes, respectively.

  20. Preliminary Design of Large Scale Sodium Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Ho; Kim, Tae Joon; Eoh, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Hyeong Yeon; Lee, Jae Han; Jeong, Ji Young; Park, Su Ki; Han, Ji Woong; Yoo, Yong Hwan; Lee, Yong Bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    A large scale sodium thermal-hydraulic test facility is being designed for verification of the advanced design concept of the passive decay heat removal circuit (PDRC) in a medium- or large-sized pool-type SFR. In the test, its cooling capability during the long- and short-term periods after the reactor trip will be evaluated, and also the produced experimental data will be utilized for the assessment and verification of the safety and performance analysis codes. Starting with the preliminary design of the test facility this year using KALIMER-600 as a reference reactor, the basic and the detailed designs will be made through 2011-2012 based on the demonstration reactor which is intended to be constructed by 2028 according to a long-term national SFR development plan. The installation is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2013, and the main experiments will commence from 2015 after the startup test in 2014. This paper briefly introduces the preliminary design features which were produced as a first step to assess the appropriateness of the facility design methodology.

  1. Reducing Operating Costs by Optimizing Space in Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    consolidation. Until the S-File can talk to other systems and pull the data this analysis must be accomplished manually . 6) Incorporate space efficiency...Reference Manual . Public Works and Government Services Canada. British Columbia. McGregor, Wes. (2000). Facilities Management and the Business of...floor plans listed in Appendix B. AutoCAD 2010 was the software used. Other software suites may differ slightly in method or terminology. Although

  2. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  3. Beam Dynamics for the Preliminary Phase of the New CLIC Test Facility (CTF3)

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, R; Rinolfi, Louis; Risselada, Thys; Royer, P; Tecker, F A

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) RF power source studies, the scheme of electron pulse compression and bunch frequency mulitiplication, using injection by RF deflectors into an isochronous ring, will be tested, at low charge, during the preliminary phase of the new CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN. In this paper, we describe the beam dynamics studies made in order to assess the feasibility of the bunch combination experiment, as well as the related beam measurements performed on the LEP Pre-Injector complex (LPI) before its transformation into CTF3

  4. Preliminary study of Low-Cost Micro Gas Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikri, M.; Ridzuan, M.; Salleh, Hamidon

    2016-11-01

    The electricity consumption nowadays has increased due to the increasing development of portable electronic devices. The development of low cost micro gas turbine engine, which is designed for the purposes of new electrical generation Micro turbines are a relatively new distributed generation technology being used for stationary energy generation applications. They are a type of combustion turbine that produces both heat and electricity on a relatively small scaled.. This research are focusing of developing a low-cost micro gas turbine engine based on automotive turbocharger and to evaluation the performance of the developed micro gas turbine. The test rig engine basically was constructed using a Nissan 45V3 automotive turbocharger, containing compressor and turbine assemblies on a common shaft. The operating performance of developed micro gas turbine was analyzed experimentally with the increment of 5000 RPM on the compressor speed. The speed of the compressor was limited at 70000 RPM and only 1000 degree Celsius at maximum were allowed to operate the system in order to avoid any failure on the turbocharger bearing and the other components. Performance parameters such as inlet temperature, compressor temperature, exhaust gas temperature, and fuel and air flow rates were measured. The data was collected electronically by 74972A data acquisition and evaluated manually by calculation. From the independent test shows the result of the system, The speed of the LP turbine can be reached up to 35000 RPM and produced 18.5kw of mechanical power.

  5. Preliminary Authorization Basis Documentation for the Proposed Bio Safety Level 3 (BSl-3) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenbach, T J; Nguyen, S N

    2003-09-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is proposing to construct a biosafety level (BSL-3) facility at Site 200 in Livermore, California. Biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) is a designation assigned by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and National Institutes Health (NIH) for handling infectious organisms based on the specific microorganisms and associated operations. Biosafety levels range from BSL-1 (lowest hazard) to BSL-4 (highest hazard). Details about the BSL-3 criteria are described in the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)/National Institutes of Health (NIH)'s publication ''Biosafety Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories'' (BMBL), 4th edition (CDC 1999): The BSL-3 facility will be built in accordance with the required BMBL guidelines. This Preliminary Authorization Basis Documentation (PABD) for the proposed BSL-3 facility has been prepared in accordance with the current contractual requirements at LLNL. This includes the LLNL Environment, Safety, and Health Manual (ES&H Manual) and applicable Work Smart Standards, including the biosafety standards, such as the aforementioned BMBL and the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules: The proposed BSL-3 facility is a 1,100 ft{sup 2}, one-story permanent prefabricated facility, which will have three individual BSL-3 laboratory rooms (one of which is an animal biosafety level-3 [ABSL-3] laboratory to handle rodents), a mechanical room, clothes-change and shower rooms, and small storage space (Figure 3.1). The BSL-3 facility will be designed and operated accordance with guidelines for BSL-3 laboratories established by the CDC and the NIH. No radiological, high explosives, fissile, or propellant material will be used or stored in the proposed BSL-3 facility. The BSL-3 facility will be used to develop scientific tools to identify and understand the pathogens of medical, environmental, and forensic importance. Microorganisms that are to

  6. Low-Cost Security Measures for School Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses a variety of school safety and security measures that may be implemented at little or no cost and without the use of complex technology. Measures are presented according to these categories: (1) General; (2) Outside the Building; and (3) Inside the Building.

  7. The Cost of Supplying Segmented Consumers From a Central Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turkensteen, Marcel; Klose, Andreas

    Organizations regularly face the strategic marketing decision which groups of consumers they should target. A potential problem, highlighted in Steenkamp et al. (2002), is that the target consumers may be so widely dispersed that an organization cannot serve its customers cost-effectively. We...

  8. Low Cost Organization of a Mental Retardation Facility Staff Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Ed

    1985-01-01

    A 700-volume specialized library was organized at average cost per title of less than $1.50 despite lack of personnel and limited funds. A plan was developed to classify titles using Library of Congress and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), and a cataloging service was located to produce card sets and book labels. (EJS)

  9. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume II: Cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle cost estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This document contains Volume II of the Closure Study for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Calcined Solids Storage Facility. This volume contains draft information on cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle costs for the four options described in Volume I: (1) Risk-Based Clean Closure; NRC Class C fill, (2) Risk-Based Clean Closure; Clean fill, (3) Closure to landfill Standards; NRC Class C fill, and (4) Closure to Landfill Standards; Clean fill.

  10. APT cost scaling: Preliminary indications from a Parametric Costing Model (PCM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-02-03

    A Parametric Costing Model has been created and evaluate as a first step in quantitatively understanding important design options for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) concept. This model couples key economic and technical elements of APT in a two-parameter search of beam energy and beam power that minimizes costs within a range of operating constraints. The costing and engineering depth of the Parametric Costing Model is minimal at the present {open_quotes}entry level{close_quotes}, and is intended only to demonstrate a potential for a more-detailed, cost-based integrating design tool. After describing the present basis of the Parametric Costing Model and giving an example of a single parametric scaling run derived therefrom, the impacts of choices related to resistive versus superconducting accelerator structures and cost of electricity versus plant availability ({open_quotes}load curve{close_quotes}) are reported. Areas of further development and application are suggested.

  11. To Build or Not to Build: Addressing Facilities Needs While Controlling Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadamus, James A.

    2015-01-01

    When trustees, presidents, and senior college administrators meet, one topic dominates the conversation: how to keep education quality high and costs down. To keep quality high, college leaders need to have strong faculties and state-of-the-art facilities for teaching and research. Quality counts but it also costs, and that is where the pressures…

  12. Cost Implications of an Interim Storage Facility in the Waste Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarrell, Joshua J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Joseph, III, Robert Anthony [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Rob L [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petersen, Gordon M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nutt, Mark [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Carter, Joe [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Cotton, Thomas [Complex Systems Group, Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report provides an evaluation of the cost implications of incorporating a consolidated interim storage facility (ISF) into the waste management system (WMS). Specifically, the impacts of the timing of opening an ISF relative to opening a repository were analyzed to understand the potential effects on total system costs.

  13. Analysis of Unit Process Cost for an Engineering-Scale Pyroprocess Facility Using a Process Costing Method in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungki Kim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pyroprocessing, which is a dry recycling method, converts spent nuclear fuel into U (Uranium/TRU (TRansUranium metal ingots in a high-temperature molten salt phase. This paper provides the unit process cost of a pyroprocess facility that can process up to 10 tons of pyroprocessing product per year by utilizing the process costing method. Toward this end, the pyroprocess was classified into four kinds of unit processes: pretreatment, electrochemical reduction, electrorefining and electrowinning. The unit process cost was calculated by classifying the cost consumed at each process into raw material and conversion costs. The unit process costs of the pretreatment, electrochemical reduction, electrorefining and electrowinning were calculated as 195 US$/kgU-TRU, 310 US$/kgU-TRU, 215 US$/kgU-TRU and 231 US$/kgU-TRU, respectively. Finally the total pyroprocess cost was calculated as 951 US$/kgU-TRU. In addition, the cost driver for the raw material cost was identified as the cost for Li3PO4, needed for the LiCl-KCl purification process, and platinum as an anode electrode in the electrochemical reduction process.

  14. MARTA: A LOW-COST ASTRONOMICAL ROBOTIC FACILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Salto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Marta (Maciarol Robotic Telescopes Array est ́a planeado c omo una instalaci ́on que permite a sus componentes trabajar conjuntamente o de forma individual en tareas astr on ́omicas utilizando telescopios de aperturas mo- destas y CCDs y otros dispositivos comerciales ajustados a u n presupuesto de bajo coste. Con este equipo, somos capaces de obtener datos cient ́ıficos operando remota mente, tanto en modo rob ́otico como autom ́atico.

  15. Optimal pricing policies for services with consideration of facility maintenance costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ruey Huei; Lin, Yi-Fang

    2012-06-01

    For survival and success, pricing is an essential issue for service firms. This article deals with the pricing strategies for services with substantial facility maintenance costs. For this purpose, a mathematical framework that incorporates service demand and facility deterioration is proposed to address the problem. The facility and customers constitute a service system driven by Poisson arrivals and exponential service times. A service demand with increasing price elasticity and a facility lifetime with strictly increasing failure rate are also adopted in modelling. By examining the bidirectional relationship between customer demand and facility deterioration in the profit model, the pricing policies of the service are investigated. Then analytical conditions of customer demand and facility lifetime are derived to achieve a unique optimal pricing policy. The comparative statics properties of the optimal policy are also explored. Finally, numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effects of parameter variations on the optimal pricing policy.

  16. Cost and schedule estimate to construct the tunnel and shaft remedial shielding concept, Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-11-30

    The report provides an estimate of the cost and associated schedule to construct the tunnel and shaft remedial shielding concept. The cost and schedule estimate is based on a preliminary concept intended to address the potential radiation effects on Line D and Line Facilities in event of a beam spill. The construction approach utilizes careful tunneling methods based on available excavation and ground support technology. The tunneling rates and overall productivity on which the cost and project schedule are estimated are based on conservative assumptions with appropriate contingencies to address the uncertainty associated with geological conditions. The report is intended to provide supplemental information which will assist in assessing the feasibility of the tunnel and shaft concept and justification for future development of this particular aspect of remedial shielding for Line D and Line D Facilities.

  17. Vulnerability Assessments and Resilience Planning at Federal Facilities. Preliminary Synthesis of Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, R. H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL)/Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Joint Global Change Research Inst.; Blohm, A. J. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Delgado, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL)/Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Joint Global Change Research Inst.; Henriques, J. J. [James Madison Univ., Harrisonburg, VA (United States); Malone, E L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL)/Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Joint Global Change Research Inst.

    2015-08-15

    U.S. government agencies are now directed to assess the vulnerability of their operations and facilities to climate change and to develop adaptation plans to increase their resilience. Specific guidance on methods is still evolving based on the many different available frameworks. Agencies have been experimenting with these frameworks and approaches. This technical paper synthesizes lessons and insights from a series of research case studies conducted by the investigators at facilities of the U.S. Department of Energy and the Department of Defense. The purpose of the paper is to solicit comments and feedback from interested program managers and analysts before final conclusions are published. The paper describes the characteristics of a systematic process for prioritizing needs for adaptation planning at individual facilities and examines requirements and methods needed. It then suggests a framework of steps for vulnerability assessments at Federal facilities and elaborates on three sets of methods required for assessments, regardless of the detailed framework used. In a concluding section, the paper suggests a roadmap to further develop methods to support agencies in preparing for climate change. The case studies point to several preliminary conclusions; (1) Vulnerability assessments are needed to translate potential changes in climate exposure to estimates of impacts and evaluation of their significance for operations and mission attainment, in other words into information that is related to and useful in ongoing planning, management, and decision-making processes; (2) To increase the relevance and utility of vulnerability assessments to site personnel, the assessment process needs to emphasize the characteristics of the site infrastructure, not just climate change; (3) A multi-tiered framework that includes screening, vulnerability assessments at the most vulnerable installations, and adaptation design will efficiently target high-risk sites and infrastructure

  18. Revealing the costs of air pollution from industrial facilities in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, M. (EMRC, Brussels (Belgium)); Wagner, A.; Davies, T. (AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)); Spadaro, J. (SERC, Charlotte, NC (United States)); Adams, M. (EEA, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2011-11-15

    This European Environment Agency (EEA) report assesses the damage costs to health and the environment resulting from pollutants emitted from industrial facilities. It is based on the latest information, namely for 2009, publicly available through the European Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (E-PRTR, 2011) in line with the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Aarhus Convention regarding access to environmental information. This report investigates the use of a simplified modelling approach to quantify, in monetary terms, the damage costs caused by emissions of air pollutants from industrial facilities reported to the E-PRTR pollutant register. The approach is based on existing policy tools and methods, such as those developed under the EU's CAFE programme for the main air pollutants. This study also employs other existing models and approaches used to inform policymakers about the damage costs of pollutants. Together, the methods are used to estimate the impacts and associated economic damage caused by a number of pollutants emitted from industrial facilities, including: (1) ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs), particulate matter (PM{sub 10}) and sulphur oxides (SO{sub x}); (2) heavy metals; (3) benzene, dioxins and furans, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); (4) carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The cost of damage caused by emissions from the E-PRTR industrial facilities in 2009 is estimated as being at least EUR 102-169 billion. A small number of industrial facilities cause the majority of the damage costs to health and the environment. Fifty per cent of the total damage cost occurs as a result of emissions from just 191 (or 2 %) of the approximately 10 000 facilities that reported at least some data for releases to air in 2009. Three quarters of the total damage costs are caused by the emissions of 622 facilities, which comprise 6 % of the total number. Of the

  19. Preliminary validation of RELAP5/Mod4.0 code for LBE cooled NACIE facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Indu; Khanna, Ashok, E-mail: akhanna@iitk.ac.in

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Detail discussion of thermo physical properties of Lead Bismuth Eutectic incorporated in the code RELAP5/Mod4.0 included. • Benchmarking of LBE properties in RELAP5/Mod4.0 against literature. • NACIE facility for three different power levels (10.8, 21.7 and 32.5 kW) under natural circulation considered for benchmarking. • Preliminary validation of the LBE properties against experimental data. • NACIE facility for power level 22.5 kW considered for validation. - Abstract: The one-dimensional thermal hydraulic computer code RELAP5 was developed for thermal hydraulic study of light water reactor as well as for nuclear research reactors. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the code RELAP5/Mod4.0 for analysis of research reactors. This paper consists of three major sections. The first section presents detailed discussions on thermo-physical properties of Lead Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) incorporated in RELAP5/Mod4.0 code. In the second section, benchmarking of RELAP5/Mod4.0 has been done with the Natural Circulation Experimental (NACIE) facility in comparison with Barone’s simulations using RELAP5/Mod3.3. Three different power levels (10.8 kW, 21.7 kW and 32.5 kW) under natural circulation conditions are considered. Results obtained for LBE temperatures, temperature difference across heat section, pin surface temperatures, mass flow rates and heat transfer coefficients in heat section heat exchanger are in agreement with Barone’s simulation results within 7% of average relative error. Third section presents validation of RELAP5/Mod4.0 against the experimental data of NACIE facility performed by Tarantino et al. test number 21 at power of 22.5 kW comparing the profiles of temperatures, mass flow rate and velocity of LBE. Simulation and experimental results agree within 7% of average relative error.

  20. Smoke-Free Medical Facility Campus Legislation: Support, Resistance, Difficulties and Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gary Wheeler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Although medical facilities restrict smoking inside, many people continue to smoke outside, creating problems with second-hand smoke, litter, fire risks, and negative role modeling. In 2005, Arkansas passed legislation prohibiting smoking on medical facility campuses. Hospital administrators (N=113 were surveyed pre- and post-implementation. Administrators reported more support and less difficulty than anticipated. Actual cost was 10-50% of anticipated cost. Few negative effects and numerous positive effects on employee performance and retention were reported. The results may be of interest to hospital administrators and demonstrate that state legislation can play a positive role in facilitating broad health-related policy change.

  1. Preliminary control system design and analysis for the Space Station Furnace Facility thermal control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M. E.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) thermal control system (TCS) preliminary control system design and analysis. The SSFF provides the necessary core systems to operate various materials processing furnaces. The TCS is defined as one of the core systems, and its function is to collect excess heat from furnaces and to provide precise cold temperature control of components and of certain furnace zones. Physical interconnection of parallel thermal control subsystems through a common pump implies the description of the TCS by coupled nonlinear differential equations in pressure and flow. This report formulates the system equations and develops the controllers that cause the interconnected subsystems to satisfy flow rate tracking requirements. Extensive digital simulation results are presented to show the flow rate tracking performance.

  2. The costs of failure: A preliminary assessment of major energy accidents, 1907-2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovacool, Benjamin K. [Energy Governance Program, Centre on Asia and Globalisation, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2008-05-15

    A combination of technical complexity, tight coupling, speed, and human fallibility contribute to the unexpected failure of large-scale energy technologies. This study offers a preliminary assessment of the social and economic costs of major energy accidents from 1907 to 2007. It documents 279 incidents that have been responsible for $41 billion in property damage and 182,156 deaths. Such disasters highlight an often-ignored negative externality to energy production and use, and emphasize the need for further research. (author)

  3. Actinide Partitioning-Transmutation Program Final Report. V. Preconceptual designs and costs of partitioning facilities and shipping casks (appendix 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This Appendix contains cost estimate documents for the Fuels Reprocessing Plant Waste Treatment Facility. Plant costs are summarized by Code of Accounts and by Process Function. Costs contribution to each account are detailed. Process equipment costs are detailed for each Waste Treatment Process. Service utility costs are also summarized and detailed.

  4. Pilot Implementation and Preliminary Evaluation of START:AV Assessments in Secure Juvenile Correctional Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarais, Sarah L; Sellers, Brian G; Viljoen, Jodi L; Cruise, Keith R; Nicholls, Tonia L; Dvoskin, Joel A

    2012-01-01

    The Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability: Adolescent Version (START:AV) is a new structured professional judgment guide for assessing short-term risks in adolescents. The scheme may be distinguished from other youth risk assessment and treatment planning instruments by its inclusion of 23 dynamic factors that are each rated for both vulnerability and strength. In addition, START:AV is also unique in that it focuses on multiple adverse outcomes-namely, violence, self-harm, suicide, unauthorized leave, substance abuse, self-neglect, victimization, and general offending-over the short-term (i.e., weeks to months) rather than long-term (i.e., years). This paper describes a pilot implementation and preliminary evaluation of START:AV in three secure juvenile correctional facilities in the southern United States. Specifically, we examined the descriptive characteristics and psychometric properties of START:AV assessments completed by 21 case managers on 291 adolescent offenders (250 boys and 41 girls) at the time of admission. Results provide preliminary support for the feasibility of completing START:AV assessments as part of routine practice. Findings also highlight differences in the characteristics of START:AV assessments for boys and girls and differential associations between the eight START:AV risk domains. Though results are promising, further research is needed to establish the reliability and validity of START:AV assessments completed in the field.

  5. Preliminary assessment report for Redmond Army National Guard Facility, Installation 53120, Redmond, Washington. Installation Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketels, P.; Aggarwal, P.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Washington Army National Guard (WAARNG) property in Redmond, Washington. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Redmond ARNG property, Phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. The environmentally significant operations (ESOs) associated with the property are (1) supply/storage of hazardous materials, (2) weapons cleaning, (3) the underground storage tanks (USTs), and (4) the use of herbicides. These ESOs are no longer active because of the closure of OMS 10 activities in 1988.

  6. Study on critical heat flux in narrow rectangular channel with repeated-rib roughness. 1. Experimental facility and preliminary experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Terada, Atsuhiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Hino, Ryutaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-10-01

    In the design of a spallation target system, the water cooling system, for example a proton beam window and a safety hull, is used with narrow channels, in order to remove high heat flux and prevent lowering of system performance by absorption of neutron. And in narrow channel, heat transfer enhancement using 2-D rib is considered for reduction the cost of cooling component and decrease inventory of water in the cooling system, that is, decrease of the amount of irradiated water. But few studies on CHF with rib have been carried out. Experimental and analytical studies with rib-roughened test section, in 10:1 ratio of pitch to height, are being carried out in order to clarify the CHF in rib-roughened channel. This paper presents the review of previous researches on heat transfer in channel with rib roughness, overview of the test facility and the preliminary experimental and analytical results. As a result, wall friction factors were about 3 times as large as that of smooth channel, and heat transfer coefficients are about 2 times as large as that of smooth channel. The obtained CHF was as same as previous mechanistic model by Sudo. (author)

  7. Advanced depreciation cost analysis for a commercial pyroprocess facility in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ki; Ko, Won Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Sae Rom; Gao, Ruxing [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yang Hon; Bang, Sung Sig [Dept. of Business and Technology Management, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to present a rational depreciation method for a pyroprocess cost calculation. Toward this end, the so-called advanced decelerated depreciation method (ADDM) was developed that complements the limitations of the existing depreciation methods such as the straight-line method and fixed percentage of declining-balance method. ADDM was used to show the trend of the direct material cost and direct labor cost compared to the straight-line or fixed percentage of the declining-balance methods that are often used today. As a result, it was demonstrated that the depreciation cost of the ADDM, which assumed a pyroprocess facility's life period to be 40 years with a deceleration rate of 5%, takes up 4.14% and 27.74% of the pyroprocess unit cost ($781/kg heavy metal) in the 1st and final years, respectively. In other words, it was found that the ADDM can cost the pyroprocess facility's capital investment rationally every year. Finally, ADDM's validity was verified by confirming that the sum of the depreciation cost by year, and the sum of the purchasing cost of the building and equipment, are the same.

  8. The preliminary design of the optical Thomson scattering diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datte, P.; Ross, J. S.; Froula, D.; Galbraith, J.; Glenzer, S.; Hatch, B.; Kilkenny, J.; Landen, O.; Manuel, A. M.; Molander, W.; Montgomery, D.; Moody, J.; Swadling, G.; Weaver, J.; Vergel de Dios, G.; Vitalich, M.

    2016-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 laser beam facility designed to support the Stockpile Stewardship, High Energy Density and Inertial Confinement Fusion programs. We report on the preliminary design of an Optical Thomson Scattering (OTS) diagnostic that has the potential to transform the community's understanding of NIF hohlraum physics by providing first principle, local, time-resolved measurements of under-dense plasma conditions. The system design allows operation with different probe laser wavelengths by manual selection of the appropriate beamsplitter and gratings before the shot. A deep-UV probe beam (λ0 between 185-215 nm) will optimally collect Thomson scattered light from plasma densities of 5 x 1020 electrons/cm3 while a 3ω probe will optimally collect Thomson scattered light from plasma densities of 1 x 1019 electrons/cm3. We report the phase I design of a two phase design strategy. Phase I includes the OTS recording system to measure background levels at NIF and phase II will include the integration of a probe laser.

  9. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR...

  10. Cost calculations for decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear research facilities, Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Inga [StudsvikNuclear AB (Sweden); Backe, S. [Institute for Energy Technology (Norway); Iversen, Klaus [Danish Decommissioning (Denmark); Lindskog, S [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (Sweden); Salmenhaara, S. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Sjoeblom, R. [Tekedo AB (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    Today, it is recommended that planning of decommission should form an integral part of the activities over the life cycle of a nuclear facility. However, no actual international guideline on cost calculations exists at present. Intuitively, it might be tempting to regard costs for decommissioning of a nuclear facility as similar to those of any other plant. However, the presence of radionuclide contamination may imply that the cost is one or more orders of magnitude higher as compared to a corresponding inactive situation, the actual ratio being highly dependent on the level of contamination as well as design features and use of the facility in question. Moreover, the variations in such prerequisites are much larger than for nuclear power plants. This implies that cost calculations cannot be performed with any accuracy or credibility without a relatively detailed consideration of the radiological and other prerequisites. Application of inadequate methodologies especially at early stages has often lead to large underestimations. The goals of the project and the achievements described in the report are as follows: 1) Advice on good practice with regard to: 1a) Strategy and planning; 1b) Methodology selection; 1c) Radiological surveying; 1d) Uncertainty analysis; 2) Techniques for assessment of costs: 2a) Cost structuring; 2b) Cost estimation methodologies; 3) Compilation of data for plants, state of planning, organisations, etc.; 3a) General descriptions of relevant features of the nuclear research facilities; 3b) General plant specific data; 3c) Example of the decommissioning of the R1 research reactor in Sweden; 3d) Example of the decommissioning of the DR1 research reactor in Denmark. In addition, but not described in the present report, is the establishment of a Nordic network in the area including an internet based expert system. It should be noted that the project is planned to exist for at least three years and that the present report is an interim one

  11. A preliminary benefit-cost study of a Sandia wind farm.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Griffin, Taylor; Loose, Verne W.

    2011-03-01

    In response to federal mandates and incentives for renewable energy, Sandia National Laboratories conducted a feasibility study of installing an on-site wind farm on Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base property. This report describes this preliminary analysis of the costs and benefits of installing and operating a 15-turbine, 30-MW-capacity wind farm that delivers an estimated 16 percent of 2010 onsite demand. The report first describes market and non-market economic costs and benefits associated with operating a wind farm, and then uses a standard life-cycle costing and benefit-cost framework to estimate the costs and benefits of a wind farm. Based on these 'best-estimates' of costs and benefits and on factor, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, the analysis results suggest that the benefits of a Sandia wind farm are greater than its costs. The analysis techniques used herein are applicable to the economic assessment of most if not all forms of renewable energy.

  12. A preliminary benefit-cost study of a Sandia wind farm.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Griffin, Taylor; Loose, Verne W.

    2011-03-01

    In response to federal mandates and incentives for renewable energy, Sandia National Laboratories conducted a feasibility study of installing an on-site wind farm on Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base property. This report describes this preliminary analysis of the costs and benefits of installing and operating a 15-turbine, 30-MW-capacity wind farm that delivers an estimated 16 percent of 2010 onsite demand. The report first describes market and non-market economic costs and benefits associated with operating a wind farm, and then uses a standard life-cycle costing and benefit-cost framework to estimate the costs and benefits of a wind farm. Based on these 'best-estimates' of costs and benefits and on factor, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, the analysis results suggest that the benefits of a Sandia wind farm are greater than its costs. The analysis techniques used herein are applicable to the economic assessment of most if not all forms of renewable energy.

  13. Engineering evaluation/cost analysis for the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The deactivated 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility (233-S Facility) is located in the 200 Area. The facility has undergone severe degradation due to exposure to extreme weather conditions. A rapid freeze and thaw cycle occurred at the Hanford Site during February 1996, which caused cracking to occur on portions of the building`s roof. This has resulted in significantly infiltration of water into the facility, which provides a pathway for potential release of radioactive material into the environment (air and/or ground). The weather caused several existing cracks in the concrete portions of the structure to lengthen, increasing the potential for failed confinement of the radioactive material in the building. Differential settlement has also occurred, causing portions of the facility to separate from the main building structure thus creating a potential for release of radioactive material t the environment. An expedited removal action is proposed to ensure that a release from the 233-S Facility does not occur. The US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), in cooperation with the EPA, has prepared this Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) pursuant to CERCLA. Based on the evaluation, RL has determined that hazardous substances in the 233-S Facility may present a potential threat to human health and/or the environment, and that an expedited removal action is warranted. The purpose of the EE/CA is to provide the framework for the evaluation and selection of a technology from a viable set of alternatives for a removal action.

  14. Cost and cost-effectiveness of community based and health facility based directly observed treatment of tuberculosis in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robberstad Bjarne

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying new approaches to tuberculosis treatment that are effective and put less demand to meagre health resources is important. One such approach is community based direct observed treatment (DOT. The purpose of the study was to determine the cost and cost effectiveness of health facility and community based directly observed treatment of tuberculosis in an urban setting in Tanzania. Methods Two alternative strategies were compared: health facility based directly observed treatment by health personnel and community based directly observed treatment by treatment supervisors. Costs were analysed from the perspective of health services, patients and community in the year 2002 in US $ using standard methods. Treatment outcomes were obtained from a randomised-controlled trial which was conducted alongside the cost study. Smear positive, smear negative and extra-pulmonary TB patients were included. Cost-effectiveness was calculated as the cost per patient successfully treated. Results The total cost of treating a patient with conventional health facility based DOT and community based DOT were $ 145 and $ 94 respectively. Community based DOT reduced cost by 35%. Cost fell by 27% for health services and 72% for patients. When smear positive and smear negative patients were considered separately, community DOT was associated with 45% and 19% reduction of the costs respectively. Patients used about $ 43 to follow their medication to health facility which is equivalent to their monthly income. Indirect costs were as important as direct costs, contributing to about 49% of the total patient's cost. The main reason for reduced cost was fewer number of visits to the TB clinic. Community based DOT was more cost-effective at $ 128 per patient successfully treated compared to $ 203 for a patient successfully treated with health facility based DOT. Conclusion Community based DOT presents an economically attractive option to complement

  15. A methodology to identify stranded generation facilities and estimate stranded costs for Louisiana's electric utility industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Robert Frank, III

    1998-12-01

    The electric utility industry in the United States is currently experiencing a new and different type of growing pain. It is the pain of having to restructure itself into a competitive business. Many industry experts are trying to explain how the nation as a whole, as well as individual states, will implement restructuring and handle its numerous "transition problems." One significant transition problem for federal and state regulators rests with determining a utility's stranded costs. Stranded generation facilities are assets which would be uneconomic in a competitive environment or costs for assets whose regulated book value is greater than market value. At issue is the methodology which will be used to estimate stranded costs. The two primary methods are known as "Top-Down" and "Bottom-Up." The "Top-Down" approach simply determines the present value of the losses in revenue as the market price for electricity changes over a period of time into the future. The problem with this approach is that it does not take into account technical issues associated with the generation and wheeling of electricity. The "Bottom-Up" approach computes the present value of specific strandable generation facilities and compares the resulting valuations with their historical costs. It is regarded as a detailed and difficult, but more precise, approach to identifying stranded assets and their associated costs. This dissertation develops a "Bottom-Up" quantitative, optimization-based approach to electric power wheeling within the state of Louisiana. It optimally evaluates all production capabilities and coordinates the movement of bulk power through transmission interconnections of competing companies in and around the state. Sensitivity analysis to this approach is performed by varying seasonal consumer demand, electric power imports, and transmission inter-connection cost parameters. Generation facility economic dispatch and transmission interconnection bulk power transfers, specific

  16. Process cost and facility considerations in the selection of primary cell culture clarification technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felo, Michael; Christensen, Brandon; Higgins, John

    2013-01-01

    The bioreactor volume delineating the selection of primary clarification technology is not always easily defined. Development of a commercial scale process for the manufacture of therapeutic proteins requires scale-up from a few liters to thousands of liters. While the separation techniques used for protein purification are largely conserved across scales, the separation techniques for primary cell culture clarification vary with scale. Process models were developed to compare monoclonal antibody production costs using two cell culture clarification technologies. One process model was created for cell culture clarification by disc stack centrifugation with depth filtration. A second process model was created for clarification by multi-stage depth filtration. Analyses were performed to examine the influence of bioreactor volume, product titer, depth filter capacity, and facility utilization on overall operating costs. At bioreactor volumes cost savings compared to clarification using centrifugation. For bioreactor volumes >5,000 L, clarification using centrifugation followed by depth filtration offers significant cost savings. For bioreactor volumes of ∼ 2,000 L, clarification costs are similar between depth filtration and centrifugation. At this scale, factors including facility utilization, available capital, ease of process development, implementation timelines, and process performance characterization play an important role in clarification technology selection. In the case study presented, a multi-product facility selected multi-stage depth filtration for cell culture clarification at the 500 and 2,000 L scales of operation. Facility implementation timelines, process development activities, equipment commissioning and validation, scale-up effects, and process robustness are examined. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  17. Multi-country analysis of treatment costs for HIV/AIDS (MATCH: facility-level ART unit cost analysis in Ethiopia, Malawi, Rwanda, South Africa and Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elya Tagar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Today's uncertain HIV funding landscape threatens to slow progress towards treatment goals. Understanding the costs of antiretroviral therapy (ART will be essential for governments to make informed policy decisions about the pace of scale-up under the 2013 WHO HIV Treatment Guidelines, which increase the number of people eligible for treatment from 17.6 million to 28.6 million. The study presented here is one of the largest of its kind and the first to describe the facility-level cost of ART in a random sample of facilities in Ethiopia, Malawi, Rwanda, South Africa and Zambia. METHODS & FINDINGS: In 2010-2011, comprehensive data on one year of facility-level ART costs and patient outcomes were collected from 161 facilities, selected using stratified random sampling. Overall, facility-level ART costs were significantly lower than expected in four of the five countries, with a simple average of $208 per patient-year (ppy across Ethiopia, Malawi, Rwanda and Zambia. Costs were higher in South Africa, at $682 ppy. This included medications, laboratory services, direct and indirect personnel, patient support, equipment and administrative services. Facilities demonstrated the ability to retain patients alive and on treatment at these costs, although outcomes for established patients (2-8% annual loss to follow-up or death were better than outcomes for new patients in their first year of ART (77-95% alive and on treatment. CONCLUSIONS: This study illustrated that the facility-level costs of ART are lower than previously understood in these five countries. While limitations must be considered, and costs will vary across countries, this suggests that expanded treatment coverage may be affordable. Further research is needed to understand investment costs of treatment scale-up, non-facility costs and opportunities for more efficient resource allocation.

  18. Preliminary test results from the CELSS Test Facility Engineering Development Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliss, Mark H.; Macelroy, R. D.; Blackwell, C. C.; Borchers, B. A.; Drews, M. E.; Longabaugh, J. R.; Yendler, B. S.; Zografos, A. I.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the NASA Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Program, a CELSS Test Facility (CTF) is being planned for installation on the Space Station. The CTF will be used to provide data on the productivity and efficiency of a variety of CELSS higher plant crops grown in the microgravity environment of the Space Station. Tight environmental control will be maintained while data on gas exchange rates and biomass accumulation rates are collected. In order to obtain an early realistic determination of the subsystem and system requirements necessary to provide the environmental conditions specified for CTF crop productivity experiments, an Engineering Development Unit (EDU) has been designed, constructed and is in the process of subsystem and system testing at NASA Ames Research Center. The EDU is a ground test-bed which will be used to characterize the integrated performance of major subsystem technologies, to evaluate hardware candidates and control strategies required for the CTF, and to further define the ability to meet CTF requirements within present Space Station constraints. This paper reviews the functional requirements for the EDU, and focuses on the performance evaluation and test results of the various subsystems. Preliminary integrated performance results and control system operation are addressed, and plans for future science and technology testing are discussed.

  19. Application of Boosting Regression Trees to Preliminary Cost Estimation in Building Construction Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yoonseok

    2015-01-01

    Among the recent data mining techniques available, the boosting approach has attracted a great deal of attention because of its effective learning algorithm and strong boundaries in terms of its generalization performance. However, the boosting approach has yet to be used in regression problems within the construction domain, including cost estimations, but has been actively utilized in other domains. Therefore, a boosting regression tree (BRT) is applied to cost estimations at the early stage of a construction project to examine the applicability of the boosting approach to a regression problem within the construction domain. To evaluate the performance of the BRT model, its performance was compared with that of a neural network (NN) model, which has been proven to have a high performance in cost estimation domains. The BRT model has shown results similar to those of NN model using 234 actual cost datasets of a building construction project. In addition, the BRT model can provide additional information such as the importance plot and structure model, which can support estimators in comprehending the decision making process. Consequently, the boosting approach has potential applicability in preliminary cost estimations in a building construction project.

  20. Application of Boosting Regression Trees to Preliminary Cost Estimation in Building Construction Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonseok Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the recent data mining techniques available, the boosting approach has attracted a great deal of attention because of its effective learning algorithm and strong boundaries in terms of its generalization performance. However, the boosting approach has yet to be used in regression problems within the construction domain, including cost estimations, but has been actively utilized in other domains. Therefore, a boosting regression tree (BRT is applied to cost estimations at the early stage of a construction project to examine the applicability of the boosting approach to a regression problem within the construction domain. To evaluate the performance of the BRT model, its performance was compared with that of a neural network (NN model, which has been proven to have a high performance in cost estimation domains. The BRT model has shown results similar to those of NN model using 234 actual cost datasets of a building construction project. In addition, the BRT model can provide additional information such as the importance plot and structure model, which can support estimators in comprehending the decision making process. Consequently, the boosting approach has potential applicability in preliminary cost estimations in a building construction project.

  1. Comprehensive development plans for the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal facility in Korea and preliminary safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kang Il; Kim, Jin Hyeong; Kwon, Mi Jin; Jeong, Mi Seon; Hong, Sung Wook; Park, Jin Beak [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The disposal facility in Gyeongju is planning to dispose of 800,000 packages of low- and intermediate- level radioactive waste. This facility will be developed as a complex disposal facility that has various types of disposal facilities and accompanying management. In this study, based on the comprehensive development plan of the disposal facility, a preliminary post-closure safety assessment is performed to predict the phase development of the total capacity for the 800,000 packages to be disposed of at the site. The results for each scenario meet the performance target of the disposal facility. The assessment revealed that there is a significant impact of the inventory of intermediate-level radionuclide waste on the safety evaluation. Due to this finding, we introduce a disposal limit value for intermediate-level radioactive waste. With stepwise development of safety case, this development plan will increase the safety of disposal facilities by reducing uncertainties within the future development of the underground silo disposal facilities.

  2. A preliminary systems-engineering study of an advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, W. J. D.; Donakowski, T. D.; Tison, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    An advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility concept was synthesized at a conceptual level with the objective of minimizing estimated hydrogen-production costs. The concept is a closely-integrated, fully-dedicated (only hydrogen energy is produced) system whose components and subsystems are predicted on ''1985 technology.'' The principal components are: (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating a helium-Brayton/ammonia-Rankine binary cycle with a helium reactor-core exit temperature of 980 C, (2) acyclic d-c generators, (3) high-pressure, high-current-density electrolyzers based on solid-polymer electrolyte technology. Based on an assumed 3,000 MWt HTGR the facility is capable of producing 8.7 million std cu m/day of hydrogen at pipeline conditions, 6,900 kPa. Coproduct oxygen is also available at pipeline conditions at one-half this volume. It has further been shown that the incorporation of advanced technology provides an overall efficiency of about 43 percent, as compared with 25 percent for a contemporary nuclear-electric plant powering close-coupled contemporary industrial electrolyzers.

  3. Contamination Sources Effects Analysis (CSEA) - A Tool to Balance Cost/Schedule While Managing Facility Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    A CSEA is similar to a Failure Modes Effects Analysis (FMEA). A CSEA tracks risk, deterrence, and occurrence of sources of contamination and their mitigation plans. Documentation is provided spanning mechanical and electrical assembly, precision cleaning, thermal vacuum bake-out, and thermal vacuum testing. These facilities all may play a role in contamination budgeting and reduction ultimately affecting test and flight. With a CSEA, visibility can be given to availability of these facilities, test sequencing and trade-offs. A cross-functional team including specialty engineering, contamination control, electrostatic dissipation, manufacturing, testing, and material engineering participate in an exercise that identifies contaminants and minimizes the complexity of scheduling these facilities considering their volatile schedules. Care can be taken in an efficient manner to insure correct cleaning processes are employed. The result is reduction in cycle time ("schedule hits"), reduced cost due to rework, reduced risk and improved communication and quality while achieving adherence to the Contamination Control Plan.

  4. Cost-based optimization of a nuclear reactor core design: a preliminary model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacco, Wagner F.; Alves Filho, Hermes [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico. Dept. de Modelagem Computacional]. E-mails: wfsacco@iprj.uerj.br; halves@iprj.uerj.br; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Reatores]. E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    A new formulation of a nuclear core design optimization problem is introduced in this article. Originally, the optimization problem consisted in adjusting several reactor cell parameters, such as dimensions, enrichment and materials, in order to minimize the radial power peaking factor in a three-enrichment zone reactor, considering restrictions on the average thermal flux, criticality and sub-moderation. Here, we address the same problem using the minimization of the fuel and cladding materials costs as the objective function, and the radial power peaking factor as an operational constraint. This cost-based optimization problem is attacked by two metaheuristics, the standard genetic algorithm (SGA), and a recently introduced Metropolis algorithm called the Particle Collision Algorithm (PCA). The two algorithms are submitted to the same computational effort and their results are compared. As the formulation presented is preliminary, more elaborate models are also discussed (author)

  5. Low-Cost Facile Fabrication of Flexible Transparent Copper Electrodes by Nanosecond Laser Ablation

    KAUST Repository

    Paeng, Dongwoo

    2015-03-27

    © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Low-cost Cu flexible transparent conducting electrodes (FTCEs) are fabricated by facile nanosecond laser ablation. The fabricated Cu FTCEs show excellent opto-electrical properties (transmittance: 83%, sheet resistance: 17.48 Ω sq-1) with outstanding mechanical durability. Successful demonstration of a touch-screen panel confirms the potential applicability of Cu FTCEs to the flexible optoelectronic devices.

  6. Fermilab Central Computing Facility: Energy conservation report and mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krstulovich, S.F.

    1986-11-12

    This report is developed as part of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Project Title II Design Documentation Update under the provisions of DOE Document 6430.1, Chapter XIII-21, Section 14, paragraph a. As such, it concentrates primarily on HVAC mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis and should be considered as a supplement to the Title I Design Report date March 1986 wherein energy related issues are discussed pertaining to building envelope and orientation as well as electrical systems design.

  7. Concept of ground facilities and the analyses of the factors for cost estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. Y.; Choi, H. J.; Choi, J. W.; Kim, S. K.; Cho, D. K

    2007-09-15

    The geologic disposal of spent fuels generated from the nuclear power plants is the only way to protect the human beings and the surrounding environments present and future. The direct disposal of the spent fuels from the nuclear power plants is considered, and a Korean Reference HLW disposal System(KRS) suitable for our representative geological conditions have been developed. In this study, the concept of the spent fuel encapsulation process as a key of the above ground facilities for deep geological disposal was established. To do this, the design requirements, such as the functions and the spent fuel accumulations, were reviewed. Also, the design principles and the bases were established. Based on the requirements and the bases, the encapsulation process of the spent fuel from receiving spent fuel of nuclear power plants to transferring canister into the underground repository was established. Simulation for the above-ground facility in graphic circumstances through KRS design concept and disposal scenarios for spent nuclear fuel showed that an appropriate process was performed based on facility design concept and required for more improvement on construction facility by actual demonstration test. And, based on the concept of the above ground facilities for the Korean Reference HLW disposal System, the analyses of the factors for the cost estimation was carried out.

  8. Preliminary studies of tunnel interface response modeling using test data from underground storage facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Bartel, Lewis Clark

    2010-11-01

    correctly image the tunnel. This report represents a preliminary step in the development of a methodology to convert numerical predictions of rock properties to an estimation of the extent of rock damage around an underground facility and its corresponding seismic velocity, and the corresponding application to design a testing methodology for tunnel detection.

  9. Preliminary Analysis of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) with PROTEUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaway, H. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lee, C. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-11-30

    The neutron transport code PROTEUS has been used to perform preliminary simulations of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). TREAT is an experimental reactor designed for the testing of nuclear fuels and other materials under transient conditions. It operated from 1959 to 1994, when it was placed on non-operational standby. The restart of TREAT to support the U.S. Department of Energy’s resumption of transient testing is currently underway. Both single assembly and assembly-homogenized full core models have been evaluated. Simulations were performed using a historic set of WIMS-ANL-generated cross-sections as well as a new set of Serpent-generated cross-sections. To support this work, further analyses were also performed using additional codes in order to investigate particular aspects of TREAT modeling. DIF3D and the Monte-Carlo codes MCNP and Serpent were utilized in these studies. MCNP and Serpent were used to evaluate the effect of geometry homogenization on the simulation results and to support code-to-code comparisons. New meshes for the PROTEUS simulations were created using the CUBIT toolkit, with additional meshes generated via conversion of selected DIF3D models to support code-to-code verifications. All current analyses have focused on code-to-code verifications, with additional verification and validation studies planned. The analysis of TREAT with PROTEUS-SN is an ongoing project. This report documents the studies that have been performed thus far, and highlights key challenges to address in future work.

  10. Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility No. 3, Installation 13307, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia. Installation Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolpa, R.; Smith, K.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard property located on Hunter Army Airfield (HAA) near Savannah, Georgia, known as Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) No. 3. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the AASF No. 3 property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the area now occupied by AASF No. 3. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of HAA completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on AASF No. 3 for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of HAA.

  11. Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility No. 3, Installation 13307, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia. Installation Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolpa, R.; Smith, K.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard property located on Hunter Army Airfield (HAA) near Savannah, Georgia, known as Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) No. 3. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the AASF No. 3 property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the area now occupied by AASF No. 3. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of HAA completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on AASF No. 3 for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of HAA.

  12. Efficiency and cost advantages of an advanced-technology nuclear electrolytic hydrogen-energy production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, T. D.; Escher, W. J. D.; Gregory, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of an advanced-technology (viz., 1985 technology) nuclear-electrolytic water electrolysis facility was assessed for hydrogen production cost and efficiency expectations. The facility integrates (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) operating a binary work cycle, (2) direct-current (d-c) electricity generation via acyclic generators, and (3) high-current-density, high-pressure electrolyzers using a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced for hydrogen production alone (i.e., without separate production of electrical power). Pipeline-pressure hydrogen and oxygen are produced at 6900 kPa (1000 psi). We found that this advanced facility would produce hydrogen at costs that were approximately half those associated with contemporary-technology nuclear electrolysis: $5.36 versus $10.86/million Btu, respectively. The nuclear-heat-to-hydrogen-energy conversion efficiency for the advanced system was estimated as 43%, versus 25% for the contemporary system.

  13. Preliminary investigations of Monte Carlo Simulations of neutron energy and LET spectra for fast neutron therapy facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Kroc, T K

    2012-01-01

    No fast neutron therapy facility has been built with optimized beam quality based on a thorough understanding of the neutron spectrum and its resulting biological effectiveness. A study has been initiated to provide the information necessary for such an optimization. Monte Carlo studies will be used to simulate neutron energy spectra and LET spectra. These studies will be bench-marked with data taken at existing fast neutron therapy facilities. Results will also be compared with radiobiological studies to further support beam quality optimization. These simulations, anchored by this data, will then be used to determine what parameters might be optimized to take full advantage of the unique LET properties of fast neutron beams. This paper will present preliminary work in generating energy and LET spectra for the Fermilab fast neutron therapy facility.

  14. Waste Management Facilities Cost Information report for Greater-Than-Class C and DOE equivalent special case waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

    1993-07-01

    This Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) report for Greater-Than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW) and DOE equivalent special case waste contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities needed for management of GTCC LLW and DOE equivalent waste. The report contains information on 16 facilities (referred to as cost modules). These facilities are treatment facility front-end and back-end support functions (administration support, and receiving, preparation, and shipping cost modules); seven treatment concepts (incineration, metal melting, shredding/compaction, solidification, vitrification, metal sizing and decontamination, and wet/air oxidation cost modules); two storage concepts (enclosed vault and silo); disposal facility front-end functions (disposal receiving and inspection cost module); and four disposal concepts (shallow-land, engineered shallow-land, intermediate depth, and deep geological cost modules). Data in this report allow the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also included in this report.

  15. Performance of a low-cost methane sensor for ambient concentration measurements in preliminary studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugster, W.; Kling, G. W.

    2012-08-01

    Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after CO2 and contributes to global warming. Its sources are not uniformly distributed across terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and most of the methane flux is expected to stem from hotspots which often occupy a very small fraction of the total landscape area. Continuous time-series measurements of CH4 concentrations can help identify and locate these methane hotspots. Newer, low-cost trace gas sensors such as the Figaro TGS 2600 can detect CH4 even at ambient concentrations. Hence, in this paper we tested this sensor under real-world conditions over Toolik Lake, Alaska, to determine its suitability for preliminary studies before placing more expensive and service-intensive equipment at a given locality. A reasonably good agreement with parallel measurements made using a Los Gatos Research FMA 100 methane analyzer was found after removal of the strong sensitivities for temperature and relative humidity. Correcting for this sensitivity increased the absolute accuracy required for in-depth studies, and the reproducibility between two TGS 2600 sensors run in parallel is very good. We conclude that the relative CH4 concentrations derived from such sensors are sufficient for preliminary investigations in the search of potential methane hotspots.

  16. Optimized SU-8 Processing for Low-Cost Microstructures Fabrication without Cleanroom Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia C. Pinto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The study and optimization of epoxy-based negative photoresist (SU-8 microstructures through a low-cost process and without the need for cleanroom facility is presented in this paper. It is demonstrated that the Ultraviolet Rays (UV exposure equipment, commonly used in the Printed Circuit Board (PCB industry, can replace the more expensive and less available equipment, as the Mask Aligner that has been used in the last 15 years for SU-8 patterning. Moreover, high transparency masks, printed in a photomask, are used, instead of expensive chromium masks. The fabrication of well-defined SU-8 microstructures with aspect ratios more than 20 is successfully demonstrated with those facilities. The viability of using the gray-scale technology in the photomasks for the fabrication of 3D microstructures is also reported. Moreover, SU-8 microstructures for different applications are shown throughout the paper.

  17. First-dollar cost-sharing for skilled nursing facility care in medicare advantage plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Laura M; Grebla, Regina C; Rahman, Momotazur; Mukamel, Dana B; Lee, Yoojin; Mor, Vincent; Trivedi, Amal

    2017-08-29

    The initial days of a Medicare-covered skilled nursing facility (SNF) stay may have no cost-sharing or daily copayments depending on beneficiaries' enrollment in traditional Medicare or Medicare Advantage. Some policymakers have advocated imposing first-dollar cost-sharing to reduce post-acute expenditures. We examined the relationship between first-dollar cost-sharing for a SNF stay and use of inpatient and SNF services. We identified seven Medicare Advantage plans that introduced daily SNF copayments of $25-$150 in 2009 or 2010. Copays began on the first day of a SNF admission. We matched these plans to seven matched control plans that did not introduce first-dollar cost-sharing. In a difference-in-differences analysis, we compared changes in SNF and inpatient utilization for the 172,958 members of intervention and control plans. In intervention plans the mean annual number of SNF days per 100 continuously enrolled inpatients decreased from 768.3 to 750.6 days when cost-sharing changes took effect. Control plans experienced a concurrent increase: 721.7 to 808.1 SNF days per 100 inpatients (adjusted difference-in-differences: -87.0 days [95% CI (-112.1,-61.9)]). In intervention plans, we observed no significant changes in the probability of any SNF service use or the number of inpatient days per hospitalized member relative to concurrent trends among control plans. Among several strategies Medicare Advantage plans can employ to moderate SNF use, first-dollar SNF cost-sharing may be one influential factor. Not applicable.

  18. Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risø National Laboratory. Descriptions and cost assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, K.

    2001-01-01

    The report is the result of a project initiated by Risø National Laboratory in June 2000 on request from the Minister of Research and Information Technology. It describes the nuclear facilities at Risø National Laboratory to be decommissioned and gives anassessment of the work to be done and the ......The report is the result of a project initiated by Risø National Laboratory in June 2000 on request from the Minister of Research and Information Technology. It describes the nuclear facilities at Risø National Laboratory to be decommissioned and gives anassessment of the work to be done...... and the costs incurred. Three decommissioning scenarios were considered with decay times of 10, 25 and 40 years for the DR 3 reactor. The assessments conclude, however, that there will not be much to gain by allowing forthe longer decay periods; some operations still will need to be performed remotely....... Furthermore, the report describes some of the legal and licensing framework for the decommissioning and gives an assessment of the amounts of radioactive waste to betransferred to a Danish repository. For a revision of the cost estimate for the decommissioning of the research Reactor DR 3 please consult...

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS - PHASE I. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN, PRELIMINARY COST, AND EVALUATION STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses Phase I (a conceptual design, preliminary cost, and evaluation study) of a program to demonstrate the recovery of energy from waste methane produced by anaerobic digestion of waste water treatment sludge. The fuel cell is being used for this application becau...

  20. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS - PHASE I. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN, PRELIMINARY COST, AND EVALUATION STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses Phase I (a conceptual design, preliminary cost, and evaluation study) of a program to demonstrate the recovery of energy from waste methane produced by anaerobic digestion of waste water treatment sludge. The fuel cell is being used for this application becau...

  1. Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

    2010-09-01

    The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50–100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

  2. Preliminary Educational Specifications for the First Facility Fort Lincoln New Town Education System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Learning Corp., Washington, DC.

    These specifications are planned as guidelines for architects to design an educational facility that will be relevant to the needs of the Fort Lincoln community. It is important to understand that this document and architectural plans for the facility do coexist, and that the criteria presented here has played an important role in the actual…

  3. Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory. Descriptions and cost assessment[Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauridsen, Kurt [ed.

    2001-02-01

    The report is the result of a project initiated by Risoe National Laboratory in June 2000 on request from the Minister of Research and Information Technology. It describes the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory to be decommissioned and gives an assessment of the work to be done and the costs incurred. Three decommissioning scenarios were considered with decay times of 10, 25 and 40 years for the DR 3 reactor. The assessments conclude, however, that there will not be much to gain by allowing for the longer decay periods; some operations still will need to be performed remotely. Furthermore, the report describes some of the legal and licensing framework for the decommissioning and gives an assessment of the amounts of radioactive waste to be transferred to a Danish repository. (au)

  4. Fuel-cycle facilities: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume VII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the mining and milling of uranium and thorium; uranium hexafluoride conversion; enrichment; fuel fabrication; reprocessing; storage options; waste disposal options; transportation; heavy-water-production facilities; and international fuel service centers.

  5. Mixed Waste Management Facility Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Chapters 1 to 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This document provides information on waste management practices, occupational safety, and a site characterization of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A facility description, safety engineering analysis, mixed waste processing techniques, and auxiliary support systems are included.

  6. Preliminary technical data summary No. 3 for the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landon, L.F. (comp.)

    1980-05-01

    This document presents an update on the best information presently available for the purpose of establishing the basis for the design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility. Objective of this project is to provide a facility to fix the radionuclides present in Savannah River Plant (SRP) high-level liquid waste in a high-integrity form (glass). Flowsheets and material balances reflect the alternate CAB case including the incorporation of low-level supernate in concrete. (DLC)

  7. Compendium of Low-Cost Pacific Salmon and Steelhead Trout Production Facilities and Practices in the Pacific Northwest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senn, Harry G.

    1984-09-01

    The purpose was to research low capital cost salmon and steelhead trout production facilities and identify those that conform with management goals for the Columbia Basin. The species considered were chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), sockeye salmon (O. nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This report provides a comprehensive listing of the facilities, techniques, and equipment used in artificial production in the Pacific Northwest. (ACR)

  8. MRS/IS facility co-located with a repository: preconceptual design and life-cycle cost estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.I.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    A program is described to examine the various alternatives for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and interim storage (IS) of spent nuclear fuel, solidified high-level waste (HLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste until appropriate geologic repository/repositories are available. The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop a preconceptual design for an MRS/IS facility that would become the principal surface facility for a deep geologic repository when the repository is opened, (2) to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facility, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such a facility, and (3) to estimate the life cycle costs of the facility when operated in response to a set of scenarios which define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, which generally span the years from 1990 until 2016. The life cycle costs estimated in this study include: the capital expenditures for structures, casks and/or drywells, storage areas and pads, and transfer equipment; the cost of staff labor, supplies, and services; and the incremental cost of transporting the waste materials from the site of origin to the MRS/IS facility. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life cycle costs of the MRS/IS facility. In the first scenario, HLW canisters are stored, starting in 1990, until the co-located repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at various intervals. In the second scenario, spent fuel is stored, starting in 1990, because the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but no HLW is stored because the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, HLW is stored, starting in 1990, because the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

  9. Reduced cost design of liquid lithium target for international fusion material irradiation facility (IFMIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi [Department of Fussion Engineering Research, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Yutani, Toshiaki [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is being jointly planned to provide an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source to produce intense high energy neutrons (2 MW/m{sup 2}) up to 200 dpa and a sufficient irradiation volume (500 cm{sup 3}) for testing the candidate materials and components up to about a full lifetime of their anticipated use in ITER and DEMO. To realize such a condition, 40 MeV deuteron beam with a current of 250 mA is injected into high speed liquid lithium flow with a speed of 20 m/s. Following Conceptual Design Activity (1995-1998), a design study with focus on cost reduction without changing its original mission has been done in 1999. The following major changes to the CAD target design have been considered in the study and included in the new design: i) number of the Li target has been changed from 2 to 1, ii) spare of impurity traps of the Li loop was removed although the spare will be stored in a laboratory for quick exchange, iii) building volume was reduced via design changes in lithium loop length. This paper describes the reduced cost design of the lithium target system and recent status of Key Element Technology activities. (author)

  10. Integrated, long term, sustainable, cost effective biosolids management at a large Canadian wastewater treatment facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBlance, R.J.; Allain, C.J.; Laughton, P.J.; Henry, J.G.

    2003-07-01

    The Greater Moncton Sewerage Commission's 115 000 m{sup 3}/d advanced, chemically assisted primary wastewater treatment facility located in New Brunswick, Canada, has developed an integrated, long term, sustainable, cost effective programme for the management and beneficial utilization of biosolids from lime stabilized raw sludge. The paper overviews biosolids production, lime stabilization, conveyance, and odour control followed by an indepth discussion of the wastewater sludge as a resource programme, namely: composting, mine site reclamation, landfill cover, land application for agricultural use, tree farming, sod farm base as a soil enrichment, topsoil manufacturing. The paper also addresses the issues of metals, pathogens, organic compounds, the quality control program along with the regulatory requirements. Biosolids capital and operating costs are presented. Research results on removal of metals from primary sludge using a unique biological process known as BIOSOL as developed by the University of Toronto, Canada to remove metals and destroy pathogens are presented. The paper also discusses an ongoing cooperative research project with the Universite de Moncton where various mixtures of plant biosolids are composted with low quality soil. Integration, approach to sustainability and ''cumulative effects'' as part of the overall biosolids management strategy is also discussed. (author)

  11. Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

    2010-02-01

    The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

  12. A preliminary analysis of floating production storage and offloading facilities with gas liquefaction processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Carranza-Sánchez, Yamid Alberto; Junior, Silvio de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Floating, production, storage and offloading (FPSO) plants are facilities used in upstream petroleum processing. They have gained interest because they are more flexible than conventional plants and can be used for producing oil and gas in deep-water fields. In general, gas export is challenging...... because of the lack of infrastructure in remote locations. The present work investigates the possibility of integrating liquefaction processes on such facilities, considering two mixed-refrigerant and two expansion-based processes suitable for offshore applications. Two FPSO configurations are considered...

  13. High Temperature Test Facility Preliminary RELAP5-3D Input Model Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-12-01

    A RELAP5-3D input model is being developed for the High Temperature Test Facility at Oregon State University. The current model is described in detail. Further refinements will be made to the model as final as-built drawings are released and when system characterization data are available for benchmarking the input model.

  14. Preliminary estimate of the manufacturing cost for lithium/metal sulfide cells for stationary and mobile applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chilenskas, A. A.; Schaefer, J. C.; Towle, W. L.; Barney, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary estimate has been made of the manufacturing cost for lithium/iron sulfide cells for stationary energy-storage and electric-vehicle applications. This preliminary cost analysis indicated that the manufacturing cost (in 1979 dollars) is $24 to 41/kW-h for stationary energy-storage cells and $31 to 55/kW-h for electric-vehicle cells. The materials cost was found to contribute between 52 and 65% of this manufacturing cost. The most expensive materials and components were lithium (metal and compounds), $4.61 to $14.26/kW-h; BN felt, $4.00 to 8.50/kW-h; feed-through components, $2.40/kW-h; positive current collectors, $1.48 to 2.20/kW-h; and aluminum, $1.43 to 1.66/kW-h. The projected lithium requirements were determined for use in lithium/iron sulfide batteries and conventional uses to the year 2006. The results showed that the lithium requirements were about 275,000 short tons by 2006, which is equivalent to about 51% of presently known US resources. Of this amount, about 33% would be used in battery production and 67% consumed in conventional uses. It is expected that the lithium used in battery production would be recycled.

  15. Preliminary diagnosis of areal density in the deuterium fuel capsule by proton measurement at SG-III facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Luo, Xing; Zheng, Jianhua; Chen, Zhongjing; Yan, Ji; Pu, Yudong; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Tianxuan; Yang, Zhenghua; Yang, Pin; Tang, Qi; Song, Zifeng; Jiang, Shao'en; Liu, Shenye; Yang, Jiamin; Wang, Feng

    2017-05-01

    Areal density (ρR) is one of the crucial parameters in the inertial confinement fusion. Measurement of the fusion products is a more feasible method to diagnose ρR than other methods, such as X-ray. In the capsules filled with D2 fuel or D-3He fuel, proton is an ideal probe to diagnose the implosion ρR in different emission times and directions by measurements of the proton yields and spectra. By D-D reaction protons and D-3He reaction protons, the diagnostics of the total and fuel ρR, ρR evolution, implosion asymmetry and mix effect have been demonstrated at OMEGA and NIF facilities. Also some advanced proton diagnostics instruments are developed with a high level capability. Preliminary diagnosis of ρR in the deuterium involved fuel capsules by measurement of protons at SG-III facility was implemented. A fusion product emission and transport code by Monte-Carlo method was developed. The primary and secondary protons emission and transport in the fuel and shell plasmas were able to be simulated. The relations of the proton energy loss and the secondary proton yields with the areal density were inspected. Several proton spectrometers have been built up at SG-III facility, such as a step ranged filter (SRF) proton spectrometer and a wedged range filter (WRF) proton spectrometer. Some proton response simulation codes and the codes for proton spectra reconstruction were also developed. The demonstrations of ρR diagnostics at SG-III facility by D-D reaction and D-3He reaction proton spectra measurements are presented.

  16. How School Facilities Managers and Business Officials Are Reducing Operating Costs and Saving Money. Energy-Smart Building Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    This guide addresses contributions that school facility administrators and business officials can make in an effort to reduce operating costs and free up money for capital improvements. The guide explores opportunities available to utilize energy-saving strategies at any stage in a building's life, from its initial design phase through renovation.…

  17. Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OSCAR,DEBBY S.; WALKER,SHARON ANN; HUNTER,REGINA LEE; WALKER,CHERYL A.

    1999-12-01

    The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2.

  18. Facile and cost-effective fabrication of patternable superhydrophobic surfaces via salt dissolution assisted etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dongwhi; Yoo, Jaewon; Park, Sang Min; Kim, Dong Sung

    2017-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with extremely low wettability have attracted attention globally along with their remarkable characteristics such as anti-icing, anti-sticking, and self-cleaning. In this study, a facile and cost-effective approach of fabricating patternable superhydrophobic surfaces, which can be applied on various substrates (including large area and 3D curvilinear substrates), is proposed with a salt-dissolution-assisted etching process. This novel proposal is environmentally benign (entirely water-based and fluorine-free process). The only required ingredients to realize superhydrophobic surfaces are commercially available salt particles, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and water. No expensive equipment or complex process control is needed. The fabricated superhydrophobic surface shows high static contact angle (∼151°) and a low sliding angle (∼6°), which correspond to the standards of superhydrophobicity. This surface also shows corrosive liquids (acid/alkali)-resistant characteristics. Moreover, the self-cleaning ability of the fabricated surfaces is explored. As a proof-of-concept application of the present approach, the spatially controllable superhydrophobic patterns on flat/curvilinear substrates are directly drawn with a minimum feature size of 500 μm without the use of expensive tooling, dies, or lithographic masks.

  19. Economic analysis of electronic waste recycling: modeling the cost and revenue of a materials recovery facility in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hai-Yong; Schoenung, Julie M

    2006-03-01

    The objectives of this study are to identify the various techniques used for treating electronic waste (e-waste) at material recovery facilities (MRFs) in the state of California and to investigate the costs and revenue drivers for these techniques. The economics of a representative e-waste MRF are evaluated by using technical cost modeling (TCM). MRFs are a critical element in the infrastructure being developed within the e-waste recycling industry. At an MRF, collected e-waste can become marketable output products including resalable systems/components and recyclable materials such as plastics, metals, and glass. TCM has two main constituents, inputs and outputs. Inputs are process-related and economic variables, which are directly specified in each model. Inputs can be divided into two parts: inputs for cost estimation and for revenue estimation. Outputs are the results of modeling and consist of costs and revenues, distributed by unit operation, cost element, and revenue source. The results of the present analysis indicate that the largest cost driver for the operation of the defined California e-waste MRF is the materials cost (37% of total cost), which includes the cost to outsource the recycling of the cathode ray tubes (CRTs) (dollar 0.33/kg); the second largest cost driver is labor cost (28% of total cost without accounting for overhead). The other cost drivers are transportation, building, and equipment costs. The most costly unit operation is cathode ray tube glass recycling, and the next are sorting, collecting, and dismantling. The largest revenue source is the fee charged to the customer; metal recovery is the second largest revenue source.

  20. Implementation Costs for Educational Technology Systems. Issue Trak: A CEFPI Brief on Educational Facility Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Glenn E.; Fisher, Ricki; Loveless, Warren

    Personnel involved in planning or developing schools lack the costing tools that will enable them to determine educational technology costs. This report presents an overview of the technology costing process and the general costs used in estimating educational technology systems on a macro-budget basis, along with simple cost estimates for…

  1. Computerized physician order entry with clinical decision support in long-term care facilities: costs and benefits to stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Sujha; Hoover, Sonja; Gilman, Boyd; Field, Terry S; Mutter, Ryan; Gurwitz, Jerry H

    2007-09-01

    Nursing homes are the setting of care for growing numbers of our nation's older people, and adverse drug events are an increasingly recognized safety and quality concern in this population. Health information technology, including computerized physician/provider order entry (CPOE) with clinical decision support (CDS), has been proposed as an important systems-based approach for reducing medication errors and preventable drug-related injuries. This article describes the costs and benefits of CPOE with CDS for the various stakeholders involved in long-term care (LTC), including nurses, physicians, the pharmacy, the laboratory, the payer (e.g., the insurer), nursing home residents, and the LTC facility. Critical barriers to adoption of these systems are discussed, primarily from an economic perspective. The analysis suggests that multiple stakeholders will incur the costs related to implementation of CPOE with CDS in the LTC setting, but the costs incurred by each may not be aligned with the benefits, which may present a major barrier to broad adoption. Physicians and LTC facilities are likely to bear a large burden of the costs, whereas residents and payers will enjoy a large portion of the benefits. Consideration of these costs and benefits suggests that financial incentives to physicians and facilities may be necessary to encourage and accelerate widespread use of these systems in the LTC setting.

  2. Preliminary Studies on Bioconcentration of Heavy Metals in Nile Tilapia from Tono Irrigation Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apori Ntiforo Sam-Quarcoo Dotse

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study has identified and measured the concentrations of heavy metals in the body tissue of Nile Tilapia from the Tono Irrigation facility located in the Kassena-Nankana East District of the Upper East Region of Ghana. Using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA, Arsenic, Cadmium, Chromium, Copper, Iron, Manganese, Nickel, Vanadium and Zinc were identified and their mean concentrations were 0.23, 0.02, 0.2, 1.03, 45.95, 19, 0.21, 0.27 and 12.76 :g/g, respectively. The order of mean concentration of heavy metals in fish samples was Cd

  3. Preliminary CFD Assessment of an Experimental Test Facility Operating with Heavy Liquid Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Lizzoli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The CFD analysis of a Venturi nozzle operating in LBE (key component of the CIRCE facility, owned by ENEA is presented in this paper. CIRCE is a facility developed to investigate in detail the fluid-dynamic behavior of ADS and/or LFR reactor plants. The initial CFD simulations have been developed hand in hand with the comparison with experimental data: the test results were used to confirm the reliability of the CFD model, which, in turn, was used to improve the interpretation of the experimental data. The Venturi nozzle is modeled with a 3D CFD code (STAR-CCM+. Later on, the CFD model has been used to assess the performance of the component in conditions different from the ones tested in CIRCE: the performance of the Venturi is presented, in terms of pressure drops, for various operating conditions. Finally, the CFD analysis has been focused on the evaluation of the effects of the injection of an inert gas in the flow of the liquid coolant on the performance of the Venturi nozzle.

  4. Economic costs of Oxford House inpatient treatment and incarceration: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Bradley D; Viola, Judah; Jason, Leonard A; Davis, Margaret I; Ferrari, Joseph R; Rabin-Belyaev, Olga

    2006-01-01

    The Oxford House model for substance abuse recovery has potential economic advantages associated with the low cost of opening up and maintaining the settings. In the present study, annual program costs per person were estimated for Oxford House based on federal loan information and data collected from Oxford House Inc. In addition, annual treatment and incarceration costs were approximated based on participant data prior to Oxford House residence in conjunction with normative costs for these settings. Societal costs associated with the Oxford House program were relatively low, whereas estimated costs associated with inpatient and incarceration history were high. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-15

    The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

  6. Preliminary assessment of radiological doses in alternative waste management systems without an MRS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Pelto, P.J.; Daling, P.M.; Lavender, J.C.; Fecht, B.A.

    1986-06-01

    This report presents generic analyses of radiological dose impacts of nine hypothetical changes in the operation of a waste management system without a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The waste management activities examined in this study include those for handling commercial spent fuel at nuclear power reactors and at the surface facilities of a deep geologic repository, and the transportation of spent fuel by rail and truck between the reactors and the repository. In the reference study system, the radiological doses to the public and to the occupational workers are low, about 170 person-rem/1000 metric ton of uranium (MTU) handled with 70% of the fuel transported by rail and 30% by truck. The radiological doses to the public are almost entirely from transportation, whereas the doses to the occupational workers are highest at the reactors and the repository. Operating alternatives examined included using larger transportation casks, marshaling rail cars into multicar dedicated trains, consolidating spent fuel at the reactors, and wet or dry transfer options of spent fuel from dry storage casks. The largest contribution to radiological doses per unit of spent fuel for both the public and occupational workers would result from use of truck transportation casks, which are smaller than rail casks. Thus, reducing the number of shipments by increasing cask sizes and capacities (which also would reduce the number of casks to be handled at the terminals) would reduce the radiological doses in all cases. Consolidating spent fuel at the reactors would reduce the radiological doses to the public but would increase the doses to the occupational workers at the reactors.

  7. Digital Avionics Information System Preliminary Life-Cycle-Cost Analysis. Final Report (November 1974-May 1975).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Gary K.; Dieterly, Duncan L.

    The results of a study to evaluate the potential life-cycle costs and cost savings that could be realized by applying the Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS) concept to future avionic systems were presented. The tasks evaluated included selection of program elements for costing, selection of DAIS installation potential, definition of a…

  8. The effect of location and facility demand on the marginal cost of delivered wood chips from energy crops: A case study of the state of Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.L.; Liu, W.; Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Biofuels Feedstock Development Program; Noon, C.; Daly, M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Management Science Program; Moore, A. [Dept. of Trade and Industry, Harwell (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Support Unit

    1995-12-31

    Cost-supply curves for delivered wood chips from short rotation woody crops were calculated for 21 regularly-spaced locations spanning the state of Tennessee. These curves were used to systematically evaluate the combined effects of location and facility demand on wood chip feedstock costs in Tennessee. The cost-supply curves were developed using BRAVO, a GIS-based decision support system which calculates marginal cost of delivering wood chips to a specific location given road network maps and maps of farmgate prices and supplies of woody chips from short rotation energy crops. Marginal costs of delivered chips varied by both facility location in the state and facility demand. Marginal costs were lowest in central Tennessee unless the facility demand was greater than 2.7 million dry Mg per year (3 million dry tons per year) in which case west Tennessee was the lowest cost region. Marginal costs rose rapidly with increasing facility demand in the mountainous eastern portion of the state. Transportation costs accounted for 18 to 29% of the delivered cost and ranged between $8 and $18/dry Mg ($7 and $16/dry ton). Reducing the expected farmer participation rate from 100% to 50% or 25% dramatically raised the marginal costs of feedstock supply in the east and central regions of the state. The analysis demonstrates the need to use geographically-specific information when projecting the potential costs and supplies of biomass feedstock.

  9. Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Power Burst Facility (PER-620) Final End State and PBF Vessel Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. C. Culp

    2007-05-01

    Preparation of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, (DOE and EPA 1995) which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental, Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time critical removal action process as an approach for decommissioning. The scope of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is to evaluate alternatives and recommend a preferred alternative for the final end state of the PBF and the final disposal location for the PBF vessel.

  10. Integrated geology and preliminary cross section along the north ramp of the exploratory studies facility, Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buesch, D.C. [Geological Survey, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Dickerson, R.P.; Drake, R.M. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States); Spengler, R.W. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Exploratory Studies Facility is a major part of the site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and the north ramp is the first phase of construction. The N61W trending north ramp will transect the Bow Ridge and Drill Hole Wash faults and numerous minor faults, and traverses two thick welded tuffs and several nonwelded tuff units. A preliminary cross section along the north ramp was created by integration of geologic map relations, lithostratigraphic data from core collected from boreholes, and surface and borehole geophysical data. The Bow Ridge fault is a west-dipping normal fault with about 410 feet of dip-slip separation. East-dipping strata in the hanging wall adjacent to the fault is contrary to early structural interpretations. West of the Bow Ridge fault the ramp might traverse about 220 {+-} 65 feet of nonlithified tuffaceous material. Geometry of the Drill Hole Wash fault is not known, but is modeled in part as two strands that juxtapose different thicknesses and facies of formations with a complex sense of movement.

  11. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho and Component Development and Integration Facility, Butte, Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF), conducted September 14 through October 2, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the INEL and CDIF. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations' carried on at the INEL and the CDIF, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the S A results will be incorporated into the INEL/CDIF Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 90 refs., 95 figs., 77 tabs.

  12. Subsidizing artemisinin-based combination therapies: a preliminary investigation of the Affordable Medicines Facility – malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bate R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Roger Bate,1,2 Kimberly Hess,2 Richard Tren,2 Lorraine Mooney,3 Franklin Cudjoe,4 Thompson Ayodele,5 Amir Attaran61American Enterprise Institute, Washington, DC, USA; 2Africa Fighting Malaria, Washington, DC, USA; 3Africa Fighting Malaria, Cambridge, United Kingdom; 4IMANI Center for Policy and Education, Accra, Ghana; 5Initiative for Public Policy Analysis, Lagos, Nigeria; 6University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, CanadaBackground: The Affordable Medicines Facility – malaria (AMFm is a subsidy mechanism to lower the price of, and hence increase access to, the best antimalarial medicines, artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs. While the AMFm stipulates that only quality-approved products are eligible for subsidy, it is not known whether those products, when actually supplied, are of good quality and comport with established pharmacopeial guidance on formulation and content of active ingredients. This study aimed to assess price and quality of AMFm ACTs, to compare AMFm ACTs with non-AMFm ACTs and artemisinin monotherapies, and to assess whether AMFm ACTs have been pilfered and diverted to a nearby country.Methods: In all, 140 artemisinin-based antimalarial drugs were acquired from 37 pharmacies in Lagos, Nigeria, and Accra, Ghana. An additional ten samples of AMFm ACTs were collected from Lomé, Togo (not participating in the AMFm. Samples were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography.Results: The AMFm ACTs were lower in price than many of the other drugs collected, but by less than anticipated or stipulated by the participating governments of Nigeria and Ghana. The quality of the AMFm ACTs was not universally good: overall, 7.7% had too little active pharmaceutical ingredient (API and none had too much – these results are not likely to be as a result of random chance. AMFm ACTs were also found to have been diverted, both to pharmacies in Lagos not participating in the AMFm and to a foreign city (Lomé where the AMFm is not

  13. Preconception care: preliminary estimates of costs and effects of smoking cessation and folic acid supplementation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerd, S. de; Polder, J.J.; Cohen-Overbeek, T.E.; Zimmermann, L.J.; Steegers, E.A.P.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess costs and effectiveness of preconception counseling for all women planning pregnancy in The Netherlands with regard to folic acid supplementation and smoking cessation counseling. STUDY DESIGN: Costs and effects were estimated based on 200,000 women approached yearly and uptake

  14. Identifying the Costs and Benefits of Educational Psychology: A Preliminary Exploration in Two Local Authorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Simon; Papps, Ivy

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an account of a small-scale pilot study of the cost and perceived benefits of the educational psychology services in two comparably small local authorities in England. This study is preparatory to a more detailed examination of the costs and likely benefits of state provision of educational psychology services in England. The…

  15. Evaluation of a Low-Cost Salmon Production Facility; 1988 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, James M.; Olson, Todd

    1989-05-01

    This fiscal year 1988 study sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration evaluates an existing, small-scale salmon production facility operated and maintained by the Clatsop County Economic Development Committee's Fisheries Project.

  16. Preliminary evaluation of the lifecycle costs and market barriers of reflective pavements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, M.; Koomey, J.G.; Pomerantz, M.

    2001-11-21

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the life cycle costs and market barriers associated with using reflective paving materials in streets and parking lots as a way to reduce the urban heat island effect. We calculated and compared the life cycle costs of conventional asphalt concrete (AC) pavements to those of other existing pavement technologies with higher reflectivity-portland cement concrete (PCC), porous pavements, resin pavements, AC pavements using light-colored chip seals, and AC pavements using light-colored asphalt emulsion additives. We found that for streets and parking lots, PCC can provide a cost-effective alternative to conventional AC when severely damaged pavements must be completely reconstructed. We also found that rehabilitating damaged AC streets and intersections with thin overlays of PCC (ultra-thin white topping) can often provide a cost-effective alternative to standard rehabilitation techniques using conventional AC. Chip sealing is a common maintenance treatment for low-volume streets which, when applied using light-colored chips, could provide a reflective pavement surface. If the incremental cost of using light-colored chips is low, this chip sealing method could also be cost-effective, but the incremental costs of light-colored chips are as of yet uncertain and expected to vary. Porous pavements were found to have higher life cycle costs than conventional AC in parking lots, but several cost-saving features of porous pavements fell outside the boundaries of this study. Resin pavements were found to be only slightly more expensive than conventional AC, but the uncertainties in the cost and performance data were large. The use of light-colored additives in asphalt emulsion seal coats for parking lot pavements was found to be significantly more expensive than conventional AC, reflecting its current niche market of decorative applications. We also proposed two additional approaches to increasing the reflectivity of conventional AC

  17. Preliminary evaluation of the gaseous effluent sampling and monitoring systems at the 291-Z-1 and 296-Z-3 stacks. Plutonium finishing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwendiman, L.C.; Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    The 291-Z-1 and 296-Z-3 stack effluent particulate sampling and monitoring systems are being evaluated for compliance with Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company`s Interim Criteria for such systems. This evaluation is part of a study by Battelle-Northwest of gaseous effluent sampling systems in ARHCO facilities. This letter report presents a preliminary evaluation of the mentioned facilities and the indicated improvements needed to meet the Interim Criteria so that conceptual design work for improved systems can be initiated. There is currently underway a detailed study at the two stacks including a series of sampling experiments, the findings of which will not be included in this report. The gaseous effluent sampling system at the 291-Z-1 and 296-Z-3 stacks are very dissimilar and will be treated in separate sections of this report. The discussions for each sampling system will include a brief description and a preliminary evaluation of the systems.

  18. Application of Boosting Regression Trees to Preliminary Cost Estimation in Building Construction Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Yoonseok Shin

    2015-01-01

    Among the recent data mining techniques available, the boosting approach has attracted a great deal of attention because of its effective learning algorithm and strong boundaries in terms of its generalization performance. However, the boosting approach has yet to be used in regression problems within the construction domain, including cost estimations, but has been actively utilized in other domains. Therefore, a boosting regression tree (BRT) is applied to cost estimations at the early stag...

  19. A Preliminary Study of Reducing the Cost of Blast Shelter for Critical Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    23 2.1.6 Luscher Study ..... ................. .... 28 2.1.7 Krupka Study ..... ................. .... 29 2.1.9 Haaland Study...a more reasonable cost/space number had been reported. 2.1.6 Ulrich Luscher - Behavior of Flexible Underground Cylinders, 1965 This study ( Luscher ...information about the utilization of corrugated culverts as blast shelters and modes of hardening. No cost analyses were discussed by Luscher . 2.1.7 R. A

  20. Waste Management Facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing mixed low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

  1. Re-export Intensity and Trade Costs: Port Facilities and Services

    OpenAIRE

    Belaid Rettab; Azzeddine Azzam

    2008-01-01

    With falling tariff and non-tariff barriers, lowering other trade costs related to the logistics of moving goods through ports is key to further facilitation of world trade. Such costs are now part of the language of several GATT articles of importance to WTO negotiations. This paper estimates the effect of various port costs on re-export intensity in six major Asian ports: Dubai, Manama, Mumbai, Bandar Abbas, Damman, and Hong Kong. What we find is that the cost of transportation and logistic...

  2. The difference between energy consumption and energy cost: Modelling energy tariff structures for water resource recovery facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymerich, I; Rieger, L; Sobhani, R; Rosso, D; Corominas, Ll

    2015-09-15

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of incorporating more realistic energy cost models (based on current energy tariff structures) into existing water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs) process models when evaluating technologies and cost-saving control strategies. In this paper, we first introduce a systematic framework to model energy usage at WRRFs and a generalized structure to describe energy tariffs including the most common billing terms. Secondly, this paper introduces a detailed energy cost model based on a Spanish energy tariff structure coupled with a WRRF process model to evaluate several control strategies and provide insights into the selection of the contracted power structure. The results for a 1-year evaluation on a 115,000 population-equivalent WRRF showed monthly cost differences ranging from 7 to 30% when comparing the detailed energy cost model to an average energy price. The evaluation of different aeration control strategies also showed that using average energy prices and neglecting energy tariff structures may lead to biased conclusions when selecting operating strategies or comparing technologies or equipment. The proposed framework demonstrated that for cost minimization, control strategies should be paired with a specific optimal contracted power. Hence, the design of operational and control strategies must take into account the local energy tariff.

  3. Cost Allocation Plan for Interest Expense on Higher Education Facilities Bonds, Fiscal Year 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This document supports the Cost Allocation Plan for state costs incurred on behalf of, and in benefit to, the public higher education institutions of Ohio. Tables report a summary of recalled/refunded debt and initial adjustment of Fiscal Year 2006 interest payments fore refunded debt. Attached schedules calculate the allocable interest for each…

  4. Cost Allocation Plan for Interest Expense on Higher Education Facilities Bonds, Fiscal Year 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This document supports the Cost Allocation Plan for state costs incurred on behalf of, and in benefit to, the public higher education institutions of Ohio. Tables report a summary of recalled/refunded debt and initial adjustment of Fiscal Year 2005 interest payments for refunded debt. Attached schedules calculate the allocable interest for each…

  5. Marginal-cost contracting in the NHS: results of a preliminary survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddow, A J; Cohen, D R

    2001-05-01

    Market disciplines and incentives were expected to improve efficiency in the UK National Health Service following the introduction of an 'internal market' in 1991. An exploratory survey of all Health Authorities and Trusts in the UK was undertaken to investigate whether players in the NHS managed market are behaving as economic theory predicts they should. The focus was on how and to what extent marginal costing has been used in the contracting process and on whether in some instances an inappropriate use of marginal costing may be resulting in inappropriate investment decisions. Twenty of 29 responding Health Authorities (69%) and 16 of 39 Trusts (41%) stated that they had considered purchasing/providing services on a marginal-cost basis and all of these led to contracts. Marginal-cost contracting appears to be fairly commonplace and the process does not appear to be causing insurmountable conflicts between players. Most marginal-cost contracts were specifically to meet waiting-list initiative targets. Overall results suggest that economic principles are not being particularly adhered to, with expansion in output rarely being related to available capacity. As increased responsibility for commissioning passes to primary care teams and local health groups, there are lessons for those involved in this more disaggregated approach to service shaping and service delivery.

  6. Low Cost Propulsion Technology Testing at the Stennis Space Center: Propulsion Test Article and the Horizontal Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Mark F.; King, Richard F.; Chenevert, Donald J.

    1998-01-01

    The need for low cost access to space has initiated the development of low cost liquid rocket engine and propulsion system hardware at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This hardware will be tested at the Stennis Space Center's B-2 test stand. This stand has been reactivated for the testing of the Marshall designed Fastrac engine and the Propulsion Test Article. The RP-1 and LOX engine is a turbopump fed gas generator rocket with an ablative nozzle which has a thrust of 60,000 lbf. The Propulsion Test Article (PTA) is a test bed for low cost propulsion system hardware including a composite RP-I tank, flight feedlines and pressurization system, stacked in a booster configuration. The PTA is located near the center line of the B-2 test stand, firing vertically into the water cooled flame deflector. A new second position on the B-2 test stand has been designed and built for the horizontal testing of the Fastrac engine in direct support of the X-34 launch vehicle. The design and integration of these test facilities as well as the coordination which was required between the two Centers is described and lessons learned are provided. The construction of the horizontal test position is discussed in detail. The activation of these facilities is examined and the major test milestones are described.

  7. On tentative decommissioning cost analysis with specific authentic cost calculations with the application of the Omega code on a case linked to the Intermediate storage facility for spent fuel in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasko, Marek; Daniska, Vladimir; Ondra, Frantisek; Bezak, Peter; Kristofova, Kristina; Tatransky, Peter; Zachar, Matej [DECOM Slovakia, spol. s.r.o., J. Bottu 2, SK-917 01 Trnava (Slovakia); Lindskog, Staffan [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    The presented report is focused on tentative calculations of basic decommissioning parameters such as costs, manpower and exposure of personnel for activities of older nuclear facility decommissioning in Sweden represented by Intermediate storage facility for spent fuel in Studsvik, by means of calculation code OMEGA. This report continuously follows up two previous projects, which described methodology of cost estimates of decommissioning with an emphasis to derive cost functions for alpha contaminated material and implementation of the advanced decommissioning costing methodology for Intermediate Storage facility for Spent Fuel in Studsvik. The main purpose of the presented study is to demonstrate the trial application of the advanced costing methodology using OMEGA code for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel in Studsvik. Basic work packages presented in report are as follows: 1. Analysis and validation input data on Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel and assemble a database suitable for standardised decommissioning cost calculations including radiological parameters, 2. Proposal of range of decommissioning calculations and define an extent of decommissioning activities, 3. Defining waste management scenarios for particular material waste streams from Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel, 4. Developing standardised cost calculation structure applied for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel decommissioning calculation and 5. Performing tentative decommissioning calculations for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel by OMEGA code. Calculated parameters of decommissioning are presented in structure according to Proposed Standardized List of Items for Costing Purposes. All parameters are documented and summed up in both table and graphic forms in text and Annexes. The presented report documents availability and applicability of methodology for evaluation of costs and other parameters of decommissioning in a form implemented

  8. Added value, decreased cost: the evolving role of the cytotechnologist for preliminary screening and triage of thyroid aspirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotruba, Angelean L; Stewart, Jimmie; Scheberl, Thomas; Selvaggi, Suzanne M

    2011-12-01

    Immediate adequacy assessment for thyroid fine-needle aspirations (FNAs) is standard practice in many cytopathology laboratories. A pathologist is usually present for these time consuming assessments. The purpose of this 5 month study (January 2008-May 2008) was to show that cytotechnologists can accurately provide the majority of immediate adequacy assessments for thyroid FNAs, saving both time and money for pathologists, clinicians, and patients. The study consisted of 167 thyroid nodule FNAs performed in twice weekly thyroid FNA clinics. A comparison was made of the immediate assessments by five participating cytotechnologists and the preliminary and final diagnoses by three pathologists. The cytotechnologist prepared the slides, assessed the air-dried Hema-Diff™ stained slides for adequacy, and the pathologist viewed the slides remotely via real-time video streaming. Results were recorded in an Excel spreadsheet. There was a discordance rate of 1.2% when comparing the cytotechnologist's adequacy interpretation and the pathologist's preliminary diagnosis; both clinically insignificant. By cytotechnologist assessment, 79.0% of the cases were benign and 6.6% were nondiagnostic. 14.4% of the cases were assessed as cellular nodule or neoplastic lesion; all requiring pathologist's preliminary diagnosis. Utilizing a cytotechnologist to provide adequacy, instead of a pathologist, saved $464.10/case (2.38 passes/case) based on current gross technical and professional charges. On the basis of our findings, cytotechnologists can accurately provide immediate onsite adequacy assessments for thyroid nodule FNAs. Affording cytotechnologists the opportunity to preliminarily assess FNAs for adequacy also creates a new role in the laboratory. Furthermore, cost-savings are realized for patients and the health care system.

  9. The Long Duration Exposure Facility - A shuttle transported low cost technology experiment carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibattista, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is a passive spacecraft capable of remaining in space for extended periods. Its primary role is to accommodate advanced spacecraft technology experiments. The LDEF is space-shuttle delivered and retrieved. With retrieval, it offers unique opportunities to study, in ground-based laboratories, results from a wide variety of experiments after exposure in space.

  10. Cost Reduction Ability by Electricity Tariff Selection for Construction Facilities Located in Non-price Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makasheva Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available State of the art in the tariff type selection in the retail and the wholesale electricity market for construction or reconstruction facilities located at Far East are considered. As a management solution the electricity tariff’s selection for enterprises at stage of construction or reconstruction is accented.

  11. The Long Duration Exposure Facility - A shuttle transported low cost technology experiment carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibattista, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is a passive spacecraft capable of remaining in space for extended periods. Its primary role is to accommodate advanced spacecraft technology experiments. The LDEF is space-shuttle delivered and retrieved. With retrieval, it offers unique opportunities to study, in ground-based laboratories, results from a wide variety of experiments after exposure in space.

  12. Clearing of invasive alien plants in South Africa: a preliminary assessment of costs and progress

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Marais, R

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides estimates of the costs of clearing important species of invasive alien plants, as well as of progress made with clearing, based on data from a recently developed GIS-based project information system. Before the deployment...

  13. Posiva's application for a decision in principle concerning a disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel. STUK's statement and preliminary safety appraisal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruokola, E. [ed.

    2000-03-01

    In May 1999, Posiva Ltd submitted to the Government an application, pursuant to the Nuclear Energy Act, for a Decision in Principle on a disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel from the Finnish nuclear power plants. The Ministry of Trade and Industry requested the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) to draw up a preliminary safety appraisal concerning the proposed disposal facility. In the beginning of this report, STUK's statement to the Ministry and Industry concerning the proposed disposal facility is given. In that statement, STUK concludes that the Decision in Principle is currently justified from the standpoint of safety. The statement is followed by a safety appraisal, where STUK deems, how the proposed disposal concept, site and facility comply with the safety requirements included in the Government's Decision (478/1999). STUK's preliminary safety appraisal was supported by contributions from a number of outside experts. A collective opinion by an international group of ten distinguished experts is appended to this report. (orig.)

  14. European collider's success provides a blueprint for mega-science projects 35 countries contribute labor and money to build a physics facility too costly for any one nation

    CERN Multimedia

    MacDonald, K

    1999-01-01

    Many scientists believe the construction of the LHC could become the blueprint for future international collaborations on large-scale scientific facilities and projects too large and costly for individual countries to fund alone (2 pages).

  15. Joint U.S./Russian Study on the Development of a Preliminary Cost Estimate of the SAFSTOR Decommissioning Alternative for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant Unit #1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SM Garrett

    1998-09-28

    The objectives of the two joint Russian/U.S. Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit #1 studies were the development of a safe, technically feasible, economically acceptable decom missioning strategy, and the preliminary cost evaluation of the developed strategy. The first study, resulting in the decommissioning strategy, was performed in 1996 and 1997. The preliminary cost estimation study, described in this report, was performed in 1997 and 1998. The decommissioning strategy study included the analyses of three basic RBM.K decommission- ing alternatives, refined for the Leningrad NPP Unit #1. The analyses included analysis of the requirements for the planning and preparation as well as the decommissioning phases.

  16. The costs and potential savings of telemedicine for acute care neonatal consultation: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armfield, Nigel R; Donovan, Tim; Bensink, Mark E; Smith, Anthony C

    2012-12-01

    Telemedicine was used as a substitute for the telephone (usual care) for some acute care consultations from nurseries at four peripheral hospitals in Queensland. Over a 12-month study period, there were 19 cases of neonatal teleconsultation. Five (26%) cases of avoided infant transport were confirmed by independent assessment, four of which were avoided helicopter retrievals. We conducted two analyses. In the first, the actual costs of providing telemedicine at the study sites were compared with the actual savings associated with confirmed avoided infant transport and nursery costs. There was a net saving to the health system of 54,400 Australian Dollars (AUD) associated with the use of telemedicine over the 12-month period. In the second analysis, we estimated the potential savings that might have been achieved if telemedicine had been used for all retrieval consultations from the study sites. The total projected costs were AUD 64,969 while the projected savings were AUD 271,042, i.e. a projected net saving to the health system of AUD 206,073 through the use of telemedicine. A sensitivity analysis suggested that the threshold proportion of retrievals needed to generate telemedicine-related savings under the study conditions was 5%. The findings suggest that from the health-service perspective, the use of telemedicine for acute care neonatal consultation has substantial economic benefits.

  17. Cost estimates and economic evaluations for conceptual LLRW disposal facility designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, R.D.; Chau, N. [Rogers & Associates Engineering Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Breeds, C.D. [SubTerra, Inc., Redmond, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Total life-cycle costs were estimated in support of the New York LLRW Siting Commission`s project to select a disposal method from four near-surface LLRW disposal methods (namely, uncovered above-grade vaults, covered above-grade vaults, below-grade vaults, and augered holes) and two mined methods (namely, vertical shaft mines and drift mines). Conceptual designs for the disposal methods were prepared and used as the basis for the cost estimates. Typical economic performance of each disposal method was assessed. Life-cycle costs expressed in 1994 dollars ranged from $ 1,100 million (for below-grade vaults and both mined disposal methods) to $2,000 million (for augered holes). Present values ranged from $620 million (for below-grade vaults) to $ 1,100 million (for augered holes).

  18. Cost-Sharing Rates Increase During Deep Recession: Preliminary Data From Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouvalas, Athanasios; Igoumenidis, Michael; Theodorou, Mamas; Athanasakis, Kostas

    2016-05-28

    Measures taken over the past four years in Greece to reduce pharmaceutical expenditure have led to significant price reductions for medicines, but have also changed patient cost-sharing rates for prescription drugs. This study attempts to capture the resulting increase in patients' out-of-pocket (OOP) expenses for prescription drugs during the 2011-2014 period. The authors conducted a retrospective review of financial data derived from 39 883 prescriptions, dispensed at three randomly chosen pharmacies located in Lamia, central Greece. The study recorded an average contribution rate per prescription as follows: 11.28% for 2011 (95% CI: 10.76-11.80), 14.10% for 2012, 19.97% for 2013, and 29.08% for 2014. Correspondingly, the mean patient charge per prescription for 2011 was €6.58 (95% CI: 6.22-6.94), €8.28 for 2012, €8.35 for 2013, and €10.87 for 2014. During the 2011-2014 period, mean percentage rate of patient contribution increased by 157.75%, while average patient charge per prescription in current prices increased by 65.22%. The use of a newly introduced internal reference price (IRP) system increased the level of prescription charge at a rate of 2.41% for 2012 (100% surcharge on patients), 26.24% for 2013 (49.95% on patients and 50.04% on the appropriate health insurance funds), and 47.72% for 2014 (85.06% on patients and 14.94% on funds). Increased cost-sharing rates for prescription drugs can reduce public pharmaceutical expenditure, but international experience shows that rising OOP expenses can compromise patients' ability to pay, particularly when it comes to chronic diseases and vulnerable populations. Various suggestions could be effective in refining the cost-sharing approach by giving greater consideration to chronic patients, and to the poor and elderly.

  19. Organisation and management of research and development facilities - from cost to profit focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens-van Drongelen, I.C.; Pearson, Alan; Nixon, Bill

    2003-01-01

    In this publication, we present the main findings of a research project into differences in organisation, management and activities between R&D cost centres, semi-profit centres, profit centres, and independent R&D businesses. First, a theoretical framework is presented and then the empirical

  20. Performance, cost and environmental assessment of gasification-based electricity in India: A preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Abha; Singh, Udayan; Jayant; Singh, Ajay K.; Sankar Mahapatra, Siba

    2017-07-01

    Coal gasification processes are crucial to decarbonisation in the power sector. While underground coal gasification (UCG) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) are different in terms of the site of gasification, they have considerable similarities in terms of the types of gasifiers used. Of course, UCG offers some additional advantages such as reduction of the fugitive methane emissions accompanying the coal mining process. Nevertheless, simulation of IGCC plants involving surface coal gasification is likely to give reasonable indication of the 3E (efficiency, economics and emissions) prospects of the gasification pathway towards electricity. This paper will aim at Estimating 3E impacts (efficiency, environment, economics) of gasification processes using simulation carried out in the Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) software framework. Key plant level controls which will be studied in this paper will be based on Indian financial regulations and operating costs which are specific to the country. Also, impacts of CO2 capture and storage (CCS) in these plants will be studied. The various parameters that can be studied are plant load factor, impact of coal quality and price, type of CO2 capture process, capital costs etc. It is hoped that relevant insights into electricity generation from gasification may be obtained with this paper.

  1. Preliminary experimental results using the thermal-hydraulic integral test facility (VISTA) for the pilot plant of the system integrated modular advanced reactor, SMART-P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ki Yong; Pak, Hyun Sik; Cho, Seok; Pak, Choon Kyung; Lee, Sung Jae; Song, Chul Hwa; Chung, Moon Ki [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Preliminary experimental tests were carried out using the thermal-hydraulic integral test facility, VISTA (Experimental Verification by Integral Simulation of Transients and Accidents), which has been constructed to simulate the SMART-P. The VISTA facility is an integral test facility including the primary and secondary systems as well as safety-related Passive Residual heat removal (PRHR) systems. Its scaled ratio with respect to the SMART-P is 1/1 in height and 1/96 in volume and heater power. So far, several steady states and transient tests have been carried out to verify the overall thermal hydraulic primary and secondary characteristics in a range of 10% to 100% power operation. As results of preliminary results, the steady state conditions were found to coincide with the expected design values of the SMART-P. But the major thermal hydraulic parameters are greatly affected by the initial water level and the nitrogen pressure in the reactor upper annular cavity. In the PRHR transient tests, the steam inlet temperature of the PRHR system is found to drop suddenly from a superheated condition to a saturated condition at the end period of PRHR operation.

  2. A Preliminary Investigation of Wastewater Treatment Efficiency and Economic Cost of Subsurface Flow Oyster-Shell-Bedded Constructed Wetland Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chuan Hsu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a preliminary investigation of wastewater treatment efficiency and economic cost of the oyster-shell-bedded constructed wetlands (CWs compared to the conventional gravel-bedded CW based on field monitoring data of water quality and numerical modeling. Four study subsurface (SSF CWs were built to receive wastewater from Taipei, Taiwan. Among these sites, two are vertical wetlands, filled with bagged- (VA and scattered- (VB oyster shells, and the other two horizontal wetlands were filled with scattered-oyster shells (HA and gravels (HB. The BOD, NO3−, DO and SS treatment efficiency of VA and VB were higher than HA and HB. However, VA was determined as the best option of CW design due to its highest cost-effectiveness in term of BOD removal (only 6.56 US$/kg as compared to VB, HA and HB (10.88–25.01 US$/kg. The results confirmed that oyster shells were an effective adsorption medium in CWs. Hydraulic design and arrangement of oyster shells could be important in determining their treatment efficiency and cost-effectiveness. A dynamic model was developed to simulate substance transmissions in different treatment processes in the CWS using AQUASIM 2.1 based on the water quality data. Feasible ranges of biomedical parameters involved were determined for characterizing the importance of different biochemical treatment processes in SSF CWs. Future work will involve extending the experimental period to confirm the treatment efficiency of the oyster-shell-bedded CW systems in long-term operation and provide more field data for the simulated model instead of the literature values.

  3. Design Strategies and Preliminary Prototype for a Low-Cost Arsenic Removal System for Rural Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Qazi, Shefah; Agogino, Alice M.

    2009-09-14

    Researchers have invented a material called ARUBA -- Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash -- that effectively and affordably removes arsenic from Bangladesh groundwater. Through analysis of studies across a range of disciplines, observations, and informal interviews conducted over three trips to Bangladesh, we have applied mechanical engineering design methodology to develop eight key design strategies, which were used in the development of a low-cost, community-scale water treatment system that uses ARUBA to removearsenic from drinking water. We have constructed, tested, and analysed a scale version of the system. Experiments have shown that the system is capable of reducing high levels of arsenic (nearly 600 ppb) to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb, while remaining affordable to people living on less than US$2/day. The system could be sustainably implemented as a public-private partnership in rural Bangladesh.

  4. Cost-Sharing Rates Increase During Deep Recession: Preliminary Data From Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Gouvalas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Measures taken over the past four years in Greece to reduce pharmaceutical expenditure have led to significant price reductions for medicines, but have also changed patient cost-sharing rates for prescription drugs. This study attempts to capture the resulting increase in patients’ out-of-pocket (OOP expenses for prescription drugs during the 2011-2014 period. Methods The authors conducted a retrospective review of financial data derived from 39 883 prescriptions, dispensed at three randomly chosen pharmacies located in Lamia, central Greece. Results The study recorded an average contribution rate per prescription as follows: 11.28% for 2011 (95% CI: 10.76-11.80, 14.10% for 2012, 19.97% for 2013, and 29.08% for 2014. Correspondingly, the mean patient charge per prescription for 2011 was €6.58 (95% CI: 6.22-6.94, €8.28 for 2012, €8.35 for 2013, and €10.87 for 2014. During the 2011-2014 period, mean percentage rate of patient contribution increased by 157.75%, while average patient charge per prescription in current prices increased by 65.22%. The use of a newly introduced internal reference price (IRP system increased the level of prescription charge at a rate of 2.41% for 2012 (100% surcharge on patients, 26.24% for 2013 (49.95% on patients and 50.04% on the appropriate health insurance funds, and 47.72% for 2014 (85.06% on patients and 14.94% on funds. Conclusion Increased cost-sharing rates for prescription drugs can reduce public pharmaceutical expenditure, but international experience shows that rising OOP expenses can compromise patients’ ability to pay, particularly when it comes to chronic diseases and vulnerable populations. Various suggestions could be effective in refining the costsharing approach by giving greater consideration to chronic patients, and to the poor and elderly.

  5. Coverage versus Supply Cost in Facility Location: Physics of Frustrated Spin Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yeung, Chi Ho; Li, Bo

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive coverage is crucial for communication, supply and transportation networks, yet it is limited by the requirement of extensive infrastructure and heavy energy consumption. Here we draw an analogy between spins in antiferromagnet and outlets in supply networks, and apply techniques from the studies of disordered systems to elucidate the effects of balancing the coverage and supply costs on the network behavior. A readily applicable, coverage optimization algorithm is derived. Simulation results show that magnetized and antiferromagnetic domains emerge and coexist to balance the need for coverage and energy saving. The scaling of parameters with system size agrees with the continuum approximation in two dimensions and the tree approximation in random graphs. Due to frustration caused by the competition between coverage and supply cost, a transition between easy and hard computation regimes is observed. We further suggest a local expansion approach to greatly simplify the message updates which shed...

  6. Coverage versus supply cost in facility location: Physics of frustrated spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Chi Ho; Wong, K. Y. Michael; Li, Bo

    2014-06-01

    A comprehensive coverage is crucial for communication, supply, and transportation networks, yet it is limited by the requirement of extensive infrastructure and heavy energy consumption. Here, we draw an analogy between spins in antiferromagnet and outlets in supply networks, and apply techniques from the studies of disordered systems to elucidate the effects of balancing the coverage and supply costs on the network behavior. A readily applicable, coverage optimization algorithm is derived. Simulation results show that magnetized and antiferromagnetic domains emerge and coexist to balance the need for coverage and energy saving. The scaling of parameters with system size agrees with the continuum approximation in two dimensions and the tree approximation in random graphs. Due to frustration caused by the competition between coverage and supply cost, a transition between easy and hard computation regimes is observed. We further suggest a local expansion approach to greatly simplify the message updates which shed light on simplifications in other problems.

  7. System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-05-01

    This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the

  8. [Estimation of cost-saving for reducing radioactive waste from nuclear medicine facilities by implementing decay in storage (DIS) in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Tetsuo; Hiraki, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Ichirou; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    DIS has not yet been implemented in Japan as of 2011. Therefore, even if risk was negligible, medical institutions have to entrust radioactive temporal waste disposal to Japan Radio Isotopes Association (JRIA) in the current situation. To decide whether DIS should be implemented in Japan or not, cost-saving effect of DIS was estimated by comparing the cost that nuclear medical facilities pay. By implementing DIS, the total annual cost for all nuclear medical facilities in Japan is estimated to be decreased to 30 million yen or less from 710 million yen. DIS would save 680 million yen (96%) per year.

  9. An Earthquake Shake Map Routine with Low Cost Accelerometers: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcik, H. A.; Tanircan, G.; Kaya, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Vast amounts of high quality strong motion data are indispensable inputs of the analyses in the field of geotechnical and earthquake engineering however, high cost of installation of the strong motion systems constitutes the biggest obstacle for worldwide dissemination. In recent years, MEMS based (micro-electro-mechanical systems) accelerometers have been used in seismological research-oriented studies as well as earthquake engineering oriented projects basically due to precision obtained in downsized instruments. In this research our primary goal is to ensure the usage of these low-cost instruments in the creation of shake-maps immediately after a strong earthquake. Second goal is to develop software that will automatically process the real-time data coming from the rapid response network and create shake-map. For those purposes, four MEMS sensors have been set up to deliver real-time data. Data transmission is done through 3G modems. A subroutine was coded in assembler language and embedded into the operating system of each instrument to create MiniSEED files with packages of 1-second instead of 512-byte packages.The Matlab-based software calculates the strong motion (SM) parameters at every second, and they are compared with the user-defined thresholds. A voting system embedded in the software captures the event if the total vote exceeds the threshold. The user interface of the software enables users to monitor the calculated SM parameters either in a table or in a graph (Figure 1). A small scale and affordable rapid response network is created using four MEMS sensors, and the functionality of the software has been tested and validated using shake table tests. The entire system is tested together with a reference sensor under real strong ground motion recordings as well as series of sine waves with varying amplitude and frequency. The successful realization of this software allowed us to set up a test network at Tekirdağ Province, the closest coastal point to

  10. Properties of Compressed Stabilized Earth Blocks (CSEB For Low-Cost Housing Construction: A Preliminary Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baba Shehu Waziri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Materials used for the construction of walls are normally required to possess adequate strength and erosion resistance. The study investigates the suitability of stabilized laterite soils for the production of compressed earth blocks for low-cost housing construction.  Soil samples for the experiment were obtained at two different locations. Sample I was obtained at a borrow pit along Gujba road in Damaturu Yobe state while Sample II was taken at a borrow pit near lake Alau in Borno sate, Nigeria. The results of the study revealed that the specific gravity, bulk density, moisture content and plasticity index of both samples showed satisfactory performance. Different cement stabilization levels of 0%, 2.5%, 5% and 7.5% were used to prepare the specimens for testing. The blocks were moulded using hand operated CINVA-Ram machine. The maximum compressive strength of 2.48N/mm2 was obtained with stabilization level of 7.5% with sample I at 28 days curing.  The strength of the specimens increases with increasing cement content with an average value of 0.35N/mm2. For higher strength requirements different stabilization options can be considered.

  11. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH IMPACTS OF SEDIMENT DECONTAMINATION FACILITIES FOR NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROWE,M.D.; KLEIN,R.C.; JONES,K.W.

    1999-07-31

    Sediment is accumulating in New York/New Jersey Harbor, and shipping channels are rapidly becoming too shallow for large ships. The Port Authority of New York/New Jersey has determined that dredging of the ship channels is essential to keep them navigable. About five million cubic yards of sediment must be removed per year to keep the channels open. Without dredging, the channels will soon become unusable, and the shoreside shipping and warehousing businesses that depend on them will fade away. The economic loss to the area would be devastating. But the deeper layers of sediment in the Harbor contain a broad range of pollutants that are hazardous to humans and the environment-a legacy of past discharges that are no longer permitted. These include heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins. As a result, there are several million cubic yards of sediments to be dredged per year that do not meet applicable criteria for ocean disposal and must be dealt with in some other way. A possible solution to the problem is to treat the dredged material to immobilize or destroy the contaminants and make the treated sediments suitable for disposal in the ocean or on land at acceptable cost. A variety of technologies can be used to achieve this goal. The simplest approach is to make manufactured soil from untreated sediment. The most complex approaches involve high-temperature destruction of organic contaminants and immobilization of inorganic contaminants. When any of these technologies are used, there is potential for risks to human health from process wastes and from the treated materials themselves. Also, disposal or beneficial use of treated materials may generate other risks to human health or the environment. A description of some of the technologies considered is given in Table 1. Success in removing or immobilizing the contaminants, which varies significantly among technologies, is reported

  12. A facile low-cost enzymatic paper-based assay for the determination of urine creatinine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talalak, Kwanrutai; Noiphung, Julaluk; Songjaroen, Temsiri; Chailapakul, Orawon; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida

    2015-11-01

    Creatinine is one of many markers used to investigate kidney function. This paper describes a low-cost enzymatic paper-based analytical device (enz-PAD) for determining urine creatinine. The disposable dead volumes of creatinine enzyme reagents from an automatic analyser cassette were utilised. Whatman No. 3 paper was cut into long rectangular shapes (4×40 mm(2)) on which the enzyme reagents, R1 and R2, were adsorbed in two consecutive regions. The assay was performed by immersing test strips into urine samples contained in microwells to allow creatinine in the sample to react with immobilised active ingredients and, then, traverse via capillary action to the detection area where chromogen products accumulated. The method is based on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) formation via creatinine conversion using creatininase, creatinase, and sarcosine oxidase. The liberated H2O2 reacts with 4-aminophenazone and 2,4,6-triiodo-3-hydroxybenzoic acid to form quinoneimine with a pink-red colour at the detection zone. The linear range of the creatinine assay was 2.5-25 mg dL(-1) (r(2)=0.983), and the detection limit was 2.0 mg dL(-1). The colorimetric enz-PAD for the creatinine assay was highly correlated with a conventional alkaline picrate method when real urine samples were evaluated (r(2)=0.977; n=40). This simple and nearly zero-cost paper-based device provides a novel alternative method for screening urinary creatinine and will be highly beneficial for developing countries.

  13. Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I: preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost, commercial plant cost and performance. CDRL item 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-06-01

    Cost estimates are presented for the Solar Pilot Plant by cost breakdown structure element, with a commitment schedule and an expenditure schedule. Cost estimates are given for a Commercial Plant, including several point costs for plants with various solar multiples and storage times. Specific questions (ERDA) pertaining to commercial plant design and performance data are addressed. The cost estimates are supplemented by two books of vendor and subcontractor cost data.

  14. The Cost-Optimal Distribution of Wind and Solar Generation Facilities in a Simplified Highly Renewable European Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kies, Alexander; von Bremen, Lüder; Schyska, Bruno; Chattopadhyay, Kabitri; Lorenz, Elke; Heinemann, Detlev

    2016-04-01

    The transition of the European power system from fossil generation towards renewable sources is driven by different reasons like decarbonisation and sustainability. Renewable power sources like wind and solar have, due to their weather dependency, fluctuating feed-in profiles, which make their system integration a difficult task. To overcome this issue, several solutions have been investigated in the past like the optimal mix of wind and PV [1], the extension of the transmission grid or storages [2]. In this work, the optimal distribution of wind turbines and solar modules in Europe is investigated. For this purpose, feed-in data with an hourly temporal resolution and a spatial resolution of 7 km covering Europe for the renewable sources wind, photovoltaics and hydro was used. Together with historical load data and a transmission model , a simplified pan-European power power system was simulated. Under cost assumptions of [3] the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for this simplified system consisting of generation, consumption, transmission and backup units is calculated. With respect to the LCOE, the optimal distribution of generation facilities in Europe is derived. It is shown, that by optimal placement of renewable generation facilities the LCOE can be reduced by more than 10% compared to a meta study scenario [4] and a self-sufficient scenario (every country produces on average as much from renewable sources as it consumes). This is mainly caused by a shift of generation facilities towards highly suitable locations, reduced backup and increased transmission need. The results of the optimization will be shown and implications for the extension of renewable shares in the European power mix will be discussed. The work is part of the RESTORE 2050 project (Wuppertal Institute, Next Energy, University of Oldenburg), that is financed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF, Fkz. 03SFF0439A). [1] Kies, A. et al.: Kies, Alexander, et al

  15. Title I preliminary engineering for: A. S. E. F. solid waste to methane gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-01-01

    An assignment to provide preliminary engineering of an Advanced System Experimental Facility for production of methane gas from urban solid waste by anaerobic digestion is documented. The experimental facility will be constructed on a now-existing solid waste shredding and landfill facility in Pompano Beach, Florida. Information is included on: general description of the project; justification of basic need; process design; preliminary drawings; outline specifications; preliminary estimate of cost; and time schedules for design and construction of accomplishment of design and construction. The preliminary cost estimate for the design and construction phases of the experimental program is $2,960,000, based on Dec. 1975 and Jan. 1976 costs. A time schedule of eight months to complete the Detailed Design, Equipment Procurement and the Award of Subcontracts is given.

  16. Preliminary results of a femto-second electron bunch facility%飞秒电子束装置的初步实验结果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾强; 陈永中; 戴志敏; 李德明; 赵振堂

    2008-01-01

    上海应用物理研究所建造并调试了一台飞秒电子束装置.这台装置主要由一把S波段热阴极微波电子枪、一台alpha磁铁和一根SLAC型加速管组成.这台装置可以产生能量为 20~30 MeV,峰值电流为100 A,微束团长度为250 fs的电子束.这篇文章报道了这台装置的调试和电子束团参数的测量.%A femto-second electron bunch facility has been constructed and commissioned at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics(SINAP).The linac of this facility consists of an S-band thermionic cathode RF-gun,an alpha magnet and a SLAC-type accelerating tube to generate a beam,then compress the micro-bunches,and finally accelerate the beam to 20~30 MeV.Preliminary experimental result shows that the length of the micro-bunches is about 250 fs.The measured beam parameters of this facility are presented in this paper.

  17. Preliminary evaluation of 30 potential granitic rock sites for a radioactive waste storage facility in southern Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boardman, C.R.; Knutson, C.F.

    1978-02-15

    Results of preliminary study are presented which was performed under subtask 2.7 of the NTS Terminal Waste Storage Program Plan for 1978. Subtask 2.7 examines the feasibility of locating a nuclear waste repository in a granitic stock or pluton in southern Nevada near the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is assumed for the purposes of this study that such a repository cannot be located at NTS. This assumption may or may not be correct. This preliminary report does not identify a particular site as being a suitable location for a repository. Nor does it absolutely eliminate a particular site from further consideration. It does, however, answer the basic question of probable suitability of some of the sites and present a systematic method for site evaluation. Since the findings of this initial study have been favorable, it will be followed by more exhaustive and detailed studies of the original 30 sites and perhaps others. In future studies some of the evaluation criteria used in the preliminary study may be modified or eliminated, and new criteria may be introduced.

  18. School Operations and Maintenance: Best Practices For Controlling Energy Costs. A Guidebook for K-12 School System Business Officers and Facilities Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Energy, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Operations and maintenance (O&M) offers not only strategies for maintaining facilities, but also opportunities for reducing energy costs and increasing energy efficiency at existing schools, regardless of age. This Guidebook provides detailed and practical guidance on how K-12 school districts can plan and implement enhancements to their current…

  19. Contracting for communal sports facilities - strategies for climate protection and cost reduction guidelines; Contracting fuer kommunale Sportstaetten - Strategien zu Klimaschutz und Kostensenkung. Leitfaden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, V.; Cames, M.; Bruene, F.

    2002-07-01

    The report demonstrates the potentials for energy savings and cost reduction in sports facilities and explains the possibilities of the realisation through contracting process. High investment costs often impede the development of these potentials, which could be a significant contribution to climate protection. The potentials of a win-win situation for both parties could be realized by a contracting agreement between the public authorities respectively the owner of the sports facilities and the contractor. The procedure of the contracting projects is explained in detail. In addition, the report includes practical references and resources for the realisation, as well as 50 realised examples. The report wants to give an incentive for the implementation of the contracting process to the players in sports facilities and provide a source of information. (orig.)

  20. Cost-effectiveness analysis of introducing RDTs for malaria diagnosis as compared to microscopy and presumptive diagnosis in central and peripheral public health facilities in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansah, Evelyn K; Epokor, Michael; Whitty, Christopher J M

    2013-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness information on where malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) should be introduced is limited. We developed incremental cost-effectiveness analyses with data from rural health facilities in Ghana with and without microscopy. In the latter, where diagnosis had been presumptive......, the introduction of RDTs increased the proportion of patients who were correctly treated in relation to treatment with antimalarials, from 42% to 65% at an incremental societal cost of Ghana cedis (GHS)12.2 (US$8.3) per additional correctly treated patients. In the "microscopy setting" there was no advantage...

  1. Facile, Low-Cost, UV-Curing Approach to Prepare Highly Conductive Composites for Flexible Electronics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fucheng; Chen, Shilong; Wei, Yong; Liu, Konghua; Lin, Yong; Liu, Lan

    2016-07-01

    We present a facile approach to prepare high-performance ultraviolet (UV)-curable polyurethane-acrylate-based flexible electrical conductive adhesive (PUA-FECA) for flexible electronics applications. PUA is employed as the polymer matrix so that the ECA is flexible and UV-curable at room temperature in just a few minutes. The effects of the PUA-FECA formulation and curing procedure on the electrical properties have been studied. Very low volume resistivity (5.08 × 10-4 Ω cm) is obtained by incorporating 70 wt.% microsized Ag-coated Cu flakes. Moreover, by simply standing the PUA-FECA paste for 4 h before exposure to UV light, the bulk resistivity of the PUA-FECA is dramatically decreased to 3.62 × 10-4 Ω cm. This can be attributed to rearrangement of Ag-coated Cu flakes in the matrix while standing. PUA-FECA also presents stable electrical conductivity during rolling and compression, excellent adhesion, and good processability, making it easily scalable to large-scale fabrication and enabling screen-printing on various low-cost flexible substrates such as office paper and polyethylene terephthalate film.

  2. Preliminary design of a biological treatment facility for trench water from a low-level radioactive waste disposal area at West Valley, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosten, R.; Malkumus, D. [Pacific Nuclear, Inc. (United States); Sonntag, T. [New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, NY (United States); Sundquist, J. [Ecology and Environment, Inc. (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) owns and manages a State-Licensed Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Area (SDA) at West Valley, New York. Water has migrated into the burial trenches at the SDA and collected there, becoming contaminated with radionuclides and organic compounds. The US Environmental Protection Agency issued an order to NYSERDA to reduce the levels of water in the trenches. A treatability study of the contaminated trench water (leachate) was performed and determined the best available technology to treat the leachate and discharge the effluent. This paper describes the preliminary design of the treatment facility that incorporates the bases developed in the leachate treatability study.

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a low-cost bubble CPAP device in providing ventilatory support for neonates in Malawi - a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ariel; Deshmukh, Ashish A; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Kawaza, Kondwani; Cantor, Scott B

    2014-11-25

    A low-cost bubble continuous positive airway pressure (bCPAP) device has been shown to be an excellent clinical alternative to nasal oxygen for the care of neonates with respiratory difficulty. However, the delivery of bCPAP requires more resources than the current routine care using nasal oxygen. We performed an economic evaluation to determine the cost-effectiveness of a low-cost bCPAP device in providing ventilatory support for neonates in Malawi. We used patient-level clinical data from a previously published non-randomized controlled study. Economic data were based on the purchase price of supplies and equipment, adjusted for shelf life, as well as hospital cost data from the World Health Organization. Costs and benefits were discounted at 3%. The outcomes were measured in terms of cost, discounted life expectancy, cost/life year gained and net benefits of using bCPAP or nasal oxygen. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio and incremental net benefits determined the value of one intervention compared to the other. Subgroup analysis on several parameters (birth weight categories, diagnosis of respiratory distress syndrome, and comorbidity of sepsis) was conducted to evaluate the effect of these parameters on the cost-effectiveness. Nasal oxygen therapy was less costly (US$29.29) than the low-cost bCPAP device ($57.78). Incremental effectiveness associated with bCPAP was 6.78 life years (LYs). In the base case analysis, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for bCPAP relative to nasal oxygen therapy was determined to be $4.20 (95% confidence interval, US$2.29-US$16.67) per LY gained. The results were highly sensitive for all tested subgroups, particularly for neonates with birth weight 1- cost effective. The bCPAP is a highly cost-effective strategy in providing ventilatory support for neonates in Malawi.

  4. Preliminary assessment report for Bee Caves Armory (former Nike BG-80 Fire Control Facility), Installation 48055, Austin, Texas. Installation Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, C.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard (ARNG) property in Austin, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing, preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining, site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Bee Caves Armory property, the requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. Of concern is the potential for hazardous waste to be present on the property as a result of the former Nike Missile Base operations or in the form of original construction materials. Environmentally sensitive operations associated with the property from that period include (1) underground fuel storage, (2) hazardous materials storage/use, (3) disposal of hazardous waste and (4) release of hazardous waste water.

  5. Preliminary Feasibility, Design, and Hazard Analysis of a Boiling Water Test Loop Within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas M. Gerstner

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A Boiling Water Test Loop (BWTL) is being designed for one of the irradiation test positions within the. The objective of the new loop will be to simulate boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions to support clad corrosion and related reactor material testing. Further it will accommodate power ramping tests of candidate high burn-up fuels and fuel pins/rods for the commercial BWR utilities. The BWTL will be much like the pressurized water loops already in service in 5 of the 9 “flux traps” (region of enhanced neutron flux) in the ATR. The loop coolant will be isolated from the primary coolant system so that the loop’s temperature, pressure, flow rate, and water chemistry can be independently controlled. This paper presents the proposed general design of the in-core and auxiliary BWTL systems; the preliminary results of the neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses; and the preliminary hazard analysis for safe normal and transient BWTL and ATR operation.

  6. Preliminary assessment of the aquatic impacts of a proposed defense waste processing facility at the Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the literature indicates that a significant body of descriptive information exists concerning the aquatic ecology of Upper Three Runs Creek and Four Mile Creek of the Savannah River Plant south of Aiken, South Carolina. This information is adequate for preparation of an environmental document evaluating these streams. These streams will be impacted by construction and operation of a proposed Defense Waste Processing Facility for solidification of high level defense waste. Potential impacts include (1) construction runoff, erosion, and siltation, (2) effluents from a chemical and industrial waste treatment facility, and (3) radionuclide releases. In order to better evaluate potential impacts, recommend mitigation methods, and comply with NEPA requirements, additional quantitative biological information should be obtained through implementation of an aquatic baseline program.

  7. Preliminary engineering report waste area grouping 5, Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks content removal project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA is January 1, 1992. One objective of the FFA is to ensure that liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that are removed from service are evaluated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Five inactive LLLW tanks, designated T-1, T-2, T-3, T-4, and T-9, located at the Old Hydrofracture (OHF) Facility in the Melton Valley area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been evaluated and are now entering the remediation phase. As a precursor to final remediation, this project will remove the current liquid and sludge contents of each of the five tanks (System Requirements Document, Appendix A). It was concluded in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis [EE/CA] for the Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks (DOE 1996) that sluicing and pumping the contaminated liquid and sludge from the five OHF tanks was the preferred removal action. Evaluation indicated that this alternative meets the removal action objective and can be effective, implementable, and cost-effective. Sluicing and removing the tank contents was selected because this action uses (1) applicable experience, (2) the latest information about technologies and techniques for removing the wastes from the tanks, and (3) activities that are currently acceptable for storage of transuranic (TRU) mixed waste.

  8. Experience that much work produces many reinforcers makes the sunk cost fallacy in pigeons: A preliminary test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun eFujimaki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The sunk cost fallacy is one of the irrational choice behaviors robustly observed in humans. This fallacy can be defined as a preference for a higher-cost alternative to a lower-cost one after previous investment in a higher-cost alternative. The present study examined this irrational choice by exposing pigeons to several types of trials with differently illuminated colors. We prepared three types of nonchoice trials for experiencing different outcomes after presenting same or different colors as alternatives and three types of choice trials for testing whether pigeons demonstrated irrational choice. In nonchoice trials, animals experienced either of the following: (1 no reinforcement after the presentation of an unrelated colored stimulus to the alternatives used in the choice situation, (2 no reinforcement after investment in the lower-cost alternative, or (3 reinforcement or no reinforcement after investment in the higher-cost alternative. In choice trials, animals were required to choose in the following three situations: (A higher-cost vs. lower-cost alternatives, (B higher-cost vs. lower-cost ones after some investment in the higher-cost alternative, and (C higher-cost vs. lower-cost alternatives after the presentation of an unrelated colored stimulus. From the definition of the sunk cost fallacy, we assumed that animals would exhibit this fallacy if they

  9. Development of a Bunch Frequency Monitor for the Preliminary Phase of the CLIC Test Facility CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Ferrari, A; Rinolfi, Louis; Royer, P; Rydberg, A; Tecker, F A

    2003-01-01

    In the framework of the CLIC RF power source studies, the feasibility of the electron bunch train combination by injection with RF deflectors into an isochronous ring has been successfully demonstrated in the preliminary phase of CTF3. A new method, based on beam frequency spectrum analysis, was experimented to monitor this scheme. A coaxial pick-up and its read-out electronics were designed and mounted in the CTF3 ring to allow comparison of the amplitudes of five harmonics of the fundamental beam frequency (3 GHz) while combining the bunch trains. The commissioning of the monitor was a successful proof of principle for this new method, despite the short length of the bunch trains and the presence of parasitic signals associated to high-order waveguide modes propagating with the beam inside the pipe.

  10. Preliminary report of the comparison of multiple non-destructive assay techniques on LANL Plutonium Facility waste drums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonner, C.; Schanfein, M.; Estep, R. [and others

    1999-03-01

    Prior to disposal, nuclear waste must be accurately characterized to identify and quantify the radioactive content. The DOE Complex faces the daunting task of measuring nuclear material with both a wide range of masses and matrices. Similarly daunting can be the selection of a non-destructive assay (NDA) technique(s) to efficiently perform the quantitative assay over the entire waste population. In fulfilling its role of a DOE Defense Programs nuclear User Facility/Technology Development Center, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility recently tested three commercially built and owned, mobile nondestructive assay (NDA) systems with special nuclear materials (SNM). Two independent commercial companies financed the testing of their three mobile NDA systems at the site. Contained within a single trailer is Canberra Industries segmented gamma scanner/waste assay system (SGS/WAS) and neutron waste drum assay system (WDAS). The third system is a BNFL Instruments Inc. (formerly known as Pajarito Scientific Corporation) differential die-away imaging passive/active neutron (IPAN) counter. In an effort to increase the value of this comparison, additional NDA techniques at LANL were also used to measure these same drums. These are comprised of three tomographic gamma scanners (one mobile unit and two stationary) and one developmental differential die-away system. Although not certified standards, the authors hope that such a comparison will provide valuable data for those considering these different NDA techniques to measure their waste as well as the developers of the techniques.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of Cranberry Capsules to Prevent Urinary Tract Infection in Long-Term Care Facilities: Economic Evaluation with a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hout, Wilbert B; Caljouw, Monique A A; Putter, Hein; Cools, Herman J M; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether the preventive use of cranberry capsules in long-term care facility (LTCF) residents is cost-effective depending on urinary tract infection (UTI) risk. Design Economic evaluation with a randomized controlled trial. Setting Long-term care facilities. Participants LTCF residents (N = 928, 703 female, median age 84), stratified according to UTI risk. Measurements UTI incidence (clinically or strictly defined), survival, quality of life, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and costs. Results In the weeks after a clinical UTI, participants showed a significant but moderate deterioration in quality of life, survival, care dependency, and costs. In high-UTI-risk participants, cranberry costs were estimated at €439 per year (1.00 euro = 1.37 U.S. dollar), which is €3,800 per prevented clinically defined UTI (95% confidence interval = €1,300–infinity). Using the strict UTI definition, the use of cranberry increased costs without preventing UTIs. Taking cranberry capsules had a 22% probability of being cost-effective compared with placebo (at a willingness to pay of €40,000 per QALY). In low-UTI-risk participants, use of cranberry capsules was only 3% likely to be cost-effective. Conclusion In high-UTI-risk residents, taking cranberry capsules may be effective in preventing UTIs but is not likely to be cost-effective in the investigated dosage, frequency, and setting. In low-UTI-risk LTCF residents, taking cranberry capsules twice daily is neither effective nor cost-effective. PMID:25180379

  12. 33 CFR 127.315 - Preliminary transfer inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Operations § 127.315 Preliminary...

  13. Light ion facility projects in Europe: methodological aspects for the calculation of the treatment cost per protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, Pascal; Zucca, Luciano; Näslund, Ingemar; Auberger, Thomas; Combs, Stephanie E; François, Guy; Heeren, Germaine; Rochat, Joël; Perrier, Lionel

    2004-12-01

    In the framework of the European Network for Research in Light Ion Hadron Therapy (ENLIGHT), the health economics group develops a methodology for assessing important investment and operating costs of this innovative treatment against its expected benefits. The main task is to estimate the cost per treated patient. The cost analysis is restricted to the therapeutic phase from the hospital point of view. An original methodology for cost assessment per treatment protocol is developed based on standard costs. Costs related to direct medical activity are based on the production process analysis, whereas indirect and non direct medical costs are allocated to each protocol using relevant cost-drivers. The resulting cost model will take into account the specificities of each therapeutic protocol as well as the particularities of each of the European projects.

  14. Preliminary identification of potentially disruptive scenarios at the Greater Confinement Disposal Facility, Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzowski, R.V. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newman, G. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The Greater Confinement Disposal location is being evaluated to determine whether defense-generated transuranic waste buried at this location complies with the Containment Requirements established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. One step in determining compliance is to identify those combinations of events and processes (scenarios) that define possible future states of the disposal system for which performance assessments must be performed. An established scenario-development procedure was used to identify a comprehensive set of mutually exclusive scenarios. To assure completeness, 761 features, events, processes, and other listings (FEPS) were compiled from 11 references. This number was reduced to 205 primarily through the elimination of duplications. The 205 FEPs were screened based on site-specific, goal-specific, and regulatory criteria. Four events survived screening and were used in preliminary scenario development: (1) exploratory drilling penetrates a GCD borehole, (2) drilling of a withdrawal/injection well penetrates a GCD borehole, (3) subsidence occurs at the RWMS, and (4) irrigation occurs at the RWMS. A logic diagram was used to develop 16 scenarios from the four events. No screening of these scenarios was attempted at this time. Additional screening of the currently retained events and processes will be based on additional data and information from site-characterization activities. When screening of the events and processes is completed, a final set of scenarios will be developed and screened based on consequence and probability of occurrence.

  15. In Search of the Economic Sustainability of Hadron Therapy: The Real Cost of Setting Up and Operating a Hadron Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanderstraeten, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.vanderstraeten@uzgent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Gent (Belgium); Verstraete, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); De Croock, Roger [Belgian Hadron Therapy Center Foundation, Brussels (Belgium); De Neve, Wilfried; Lievens, Yolande [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Gent (Belgium)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the treatment cost and required reimbursement for a new hadron therapy facility, considering different technical solutions and financing methods. Methods and Materials: The 3 technical solutions analyzed are a carbon only (COC), proton only (POC), and combined (CC) center, each operating 2 treatment rooms and assumed to function at full capacity. A business model defines the required reimbursement and analyzes the financial implications of setting up a facility over time; activity-based costing (ABC) calculates the treatment costs per type of patient for a center in a steady state of operation. Both models compare a private, full-cost approach with public sponsoring, only taking into account operational costs. Results: Yearly operational costs range between €10.0M (M = million) for a publicly sponsored POC to €24.8M for a CC with private financing. Disregarding inflation, the average treatment cost calculated with ABC (COC: €29,450; POC: €46,342; CC: €46,443 for private financing; respectively €16,059, €28,296, and €23,956 for public sponsoring) is slightly lower than the required reimbursement based on the business model (between €51,200 in a privately funded POC and €18,400 in COC with public sponsoring). Reimbursement for privately financed centers is very sensitive to a delay in commissioning and to the interest rate. Higher throughput and hypofractionation have a positive impact on the treatment costs. Conclusions: Both calculation methods are valid and complementary. The financially most attractive option of a publicly sponsored COC should be balanced to the clinical necessities and the sociopolitical context.

  16. A cost and returns evaluation of alternative dairy products to determine capital investment and operational feasibility of a small-scale dairy processing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, K M; Parsons, R L; Kolodinsky, J; Matiru, G N

    2007-05-01

    This study examines the economic feasibility of 50- and 500-cow dairy processing facilities for fluid milk, yogurt, and cheese. Net present value and internal rate of return calculations for projected costs and returns over a 10-yr period indicate that larger yogurt and cheese processing plants offer the most profitable prospects, whereas a smaller yogurt plant would break even. A smaller cheese plant would have insufficient returns to cover the cost of capital, and fluid milk processing at either scale is economically infeasible. Economic success in processing is greatly contingent upon individual business, financial management, and marketing skills.

  17. An exploration of the socio-economic profile of women and costs of receiving abortion services at public health facilities of Madhya Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sushanta K; Kumar, Rakesh; Warvadekar, Janardan; Manning, Vinoj; Andersen, Kathryn Louise

    2017-03-21

    Maternal mortality, which primarily burdens developing countries, reflects the greatest health divide between rich and poor. This is especially pronounced for access to safe abortion services which alone avert 1 of every 10 maternal deaths in India. Primarily due to confidentiality concerns, poor women in India prefer private services which are often offered by untrained providers and may be expensive. In 2006 the state government of Madhya Pradesh (population 73 million) began a concerted effort to ensure access to safe abortion services at public health facilities to both rural and urban poor women. This study aims to understand the socio-economic profile of women seeking abortion services in public health facilities across this state and out of pocket cost accessing abortion services. In particular, we examine the level of access that poor women have to safe abortion services in Madhya Pradesh. This study consisted of a cross-sectional client follow-up design. A total of 19 facilities were selected using two-stage random sampling and 1036 women presenting to chosen facilities with abortion and post-abortion complications were interviewed between May and December 2014. A structured data collection tool was developed. A composite wealth index computed using principal component analysis derived weights from consumer durables and asset holding and classified women into three categories, poor, moderate, and rich. Findings highlight that overall 57% of women who received abortion care at public health facilities were poor, followed by 21% moderate and 22% rich. More poor women sought care at primary level facilities (58%) than secondary level facilities and among women presenting for postabortion complications (67%) than induced abortion. Women reported spending no money to access abortion services as abortion services are free of cost at public facilities. However, poor women spend INR 64 (1 USD) while visiting primary level facilities and INR 256 (USD 4) while

  18. Preliminary Assessment of the Nuclide Migration from the Activation Zone Around the Proposed Spallation Neutron Source Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dole, L.R.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential impacts of migrating radionuclides from the activation zone around the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Using conservatively high estimates of the potential inventory of radioactive activation products that could form in the proposed compacted-soil shield berm around an SNS facility on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a conservative, simplified transport model was used to estimate the potential worst-case concentrations of the 12 long-lived isotopes in the groundwater under a site with the hydrologic characteristics of the ORR. Of the 12, only 3 isotopes showed any potential to exceed the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 20 Drinking Water Limits (DWLs). These isotopes were 14C, 22Na, and 54Mn. The latter two activation products have very short half-lives of 2.6 years and 0.854 year, respectively. Therefore, these will decay before reaching an off-site receptor, and they cannot pose off-site hazards. However, for this extremely conservative model, which overestimates the mobility of the contaminant, 14C, which has a 5,730-year half-life, was shown to represent a potential concern in the context of this study's conservative assumptions. This study examines alternative modifications to the SNS shield berm and makes recommendations.

  19. An Applied Study of Implementation of the Advanced Decommissioning Costing Methodology for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel in Studsvik, Sweden with special emphasis to the application of the Omega code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristofova, Kristina; Vasko, Marek; Daniska, Vladimir; Ondra, Frantisek; Bezak, Peter [DECOM Slovakia, spol. s.r.o., J. Bottu 2, SK-917 01 Trnava (Slovakia); Lindskog, Staffan [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    The presented study is focused on an analysis of decommissioning costs for the Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel (FA) facility in Studsvik prepared by SVAFO and a proposal of the advanced decommissioning costing methodology application. Therefore, this applied study concentrates particularly in the following areas: 1. Analysis of FA facility cost estimates prepared by SVAFO including description of FA facility in Studsvik, summarised input data, applied cost estimates methodology and summarised results from SVAFO study. 2. Discussion of results of the SVAFO analysis, proposals for enhanced cost estimating methodology and upgraded structure of inputs/outputs for decommissioning study for FA facility. 3. Review of costing methodologies with the special emphasis on the advanced costing methodology and cost calculation code OMEGA. 4. Discussion on implementation of the advanced costing methodology for FA facility in Studsvik together with: - identification of areas of implementation; - analyses of local decommissioning infrastructure; - adaptation of the data for the calculation database; - inventory database; and - implementation of the style of work with the computer code OMEGA.

  20. An oral health and function screening tool for nursing personnel of long-term care facilities to identify the need for dentist referral without preliminary training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Shigemi; Ito, Kayoko; Stegaroiu, Roxana; Shibata, Satoko; Ohuchi, Akitsugu

    2017-06-01

    To develop and evaluate, with a dentist as gold standard, an oral health screening tool, the Oral Health Screening Tool for Nursing Personnel (OHSTNP), that assists long-term care facility nursing staff without preliminary training in identifying resident need for dentist referral. Using an OHSTNP adapted from previous screening tools (Chalmers, J Gerontol Nurs, 2004, 30, 5; Tsukada, J Jpn Soc Dent Hyg, 2012, 7, 43), one of four nurses, one of eight caregivers and a dentist with 15 years' experience screened the oral health/function of 57 long-term care facility residents. The OHSTNP included a question on the need and reasons for dentist referral. Tool reliability and validity were evaluated by determining inter-rater agreement (Cohen's kappa), sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. For dentist-nurse and dentist-caregiver pairs, kappa was statistically significant and sensitivity was high (≥0.67, nurses; ≥0.71, caregivers) for natural teeth, dentures and oral function-related categories. Specificity for all categories was ≥0.69. Screening by nurses and caregivers for need for referral had low sensitivity (0.05, 0.23), accuracy (0.25, 0.39) and kappa (-0.01, 0.08). However, if nursing staff had been instructed to request a dentist referral in case of alterations in natural teeth/dentures or severe alterations in any other category, the estimated values increased to a sensitivity of 0.86 and 0.91, an accuracy of 0.75 and 0.82 and a kappa of 0.26 and 0.47. OHSTNP was reliable and valid for screening natural teeth, denture conditions and oral functions. Supplementary guidelines improved estimates of OHSTNP sensitivity, accuracy and reliability for nurse/caregiver assessment of resident need for dentist referral. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Compressed air energy storage: Preliminary design and site development program in an aquifer. Task 1: Establish facility design criteria and utility benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    Compressed air energy storage (CAES) stores mechanical energy in the form of compressed air during off-peak hours, using power supplied by a large, high efficiency baseload power plant. At times of high electrical demand, the compressed air is drawn from storage and is heated in a combustor by the burning of fuel oil, after which the air is expanded in a turbine. Essentially all of the turbine output can be applied to the generation of electricity, unlike a conventional gas turbine which expends approximately two-thirds of the turbine shaft power in driving the air compressor. The separation of the compression and generation modes in the system results in increased net generation and greater premium fuel economy. Work performed in establishing facility design criteria for a CAES system with aquifer storage includes: determination of initial design bases; preliminary analysis of the CAES system; development of data for site-specific analysis of the CAES system; detailed analysis of the CAES system for three selected heat cycles; CAES power plant design; and an economic analysis of CAES.

  2. Compressed air energy storage: preliminary design and site development program in an aquifer. Final draft, Task 1: establish facility design criteria and utility benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    Compressed air energy storage (CAES) has been identified as one of the principal new energy storage technologies worthy of further research and development. The CAES system stores mechanical energy in the form of compressed air during off-peak hours, using power supplied by a large, high-efficiency baseload power plant. At times of high electrical demand, the compressed air is drawn from storage and is heated in a combustor by the burning of fuel oil, after which the air is expanded in a turbine. In this manner, essentially all of the turbine output can be applied to the generation of electricity, unlike a conventional gas turbine which expends approximately two-thirds of the turbine shaft power in driving the air compressor. The separation of the compression and generation modes in the CAES system results in increased net generation and greater premium fuel economy. The use of CAES systems to meet the utilities' high electrical demand requirements is particularly attractive in view of the reduced availability of premium fuels such as oil and natural gas. This volume documents the Task 1 work performed in establishing facility design criteria for a CAES system with aquifer storage. Information is included on: determination of initial design bases; preliminary analysis of the CAES system; development of data for site-specific analysis of the CAES system; detailed analysis of the CAES system for three selected heat cycles; CAES power plant design; and an economic analysis of CAES.

  3. 建设工程项目工程造价前期控制%Preliminary Control of the Project Cost of Construction Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    昝文枭

    2016-01-01

    The engineering cost is the cost in the process of project construction. Engineering construction mainly includes investment decision-making stage, design stage, construction project contract stage and construction project implementation stage. The atages before the project implementation are considered to be the early stage of the project. In the cost control of the project investment, people often only pay attention to the construction stage, but neglecte the preliminary control, it causes serious mistakes in cost management. So this paper analyzes the cost control of project decision-making and design stages to provide the reference for relevant personnel in the project cost.%工程造价是工程项目建设过程中的全部费用.工程建设主要包括投资决策阶段、设计阶段、建设项目发包阶段和建设实施阶段,工程实施之前均视为工程项目的前期阶段.在工程造价的投资控制中,人们往往只注重于施工阶段,却忽视了前期控制,造成造价管理上的重大失误.所以本文就针对项目决策和设计阶段造价控制予以分析,为有关人员在工程造价中提供借鉴.

  4. Empirical Analysis of the Typical Breeding Pattern of Clam in Hongdao Town and the Preliminary Estimates of Costs and Benefits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xijuan; YANG; Shijun; ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    Based on the survey data about clam breeding farmers in Hongdao Town in August 2011,this paper analyzes the production and operation of typical clam breeding pattern,and estimates the costs and benefits. Through the analysis of operation conditions and economic conditions of Hongdao clam breeding,this paper aims to explore a more reasonable and effective breeding pattern so as to reduce breeding costs and market risks,and increase breeding farmers’ income.

  5. A preliminary design and BOP cost analysis of M-C Power`s MCFC commerical unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.P. [Bechtel Corp, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    M-C Power Corporation plans to introduce its molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) market entry unit in the year 2000 for distributed and on-site power generation. Extensive efforts have been made to analyze the cell stack manufacturing costs. The major objective of this study is to conduct a detailed analysis of BOP costs based on an initial design of the market entry unit.

  6. Programme level implementation of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs use: outcomes and cost of training health workers at lower level health care facilities in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyabayinze Daniel J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The training of health workers in the use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs is an important component of a wider strategy to improve parasite-based malaria diagnosis at lower level health care facilities (LLHFs where microscopy is not readily available for all patients with suspected malaria. This study describes the process and cost of training to attain competence of lower level health workers to perform malaria RDTs in a public health system setting in eastern Uganda. Methods Health workers from 21 health facilities in Uganda were given a one-day central training on the use of RDTs in malaria case management, including practical skills on how to perform read and interpret the test results. Successful trainees subsequently integrated the use of RDTs into their routine care for febrile patients at their LLHFs and transferred their acquired skills to colleagues (cascade training model. A cross-sectional evaluation of the health workers’ competence in performing RDTs was conducted six weeks following the training, incorporating observation, in-depth interviews with health workers and the review of health facility records relating to tests offered and antimalarial drug (AMD prescriptions pre and post training. The direct costs relating to the training processes were also documented. Results Overall, 135 health workers were trained including 63 (47% nursing assistants, a group of care providers without formal medical training. All trainees passed the post-training concordance test with ≥ 80% except 12 that required re-training. Six weeks after the one-day training, 51/64 (80% of the health workers accurately performed the critical steps in performing the RDT. The performance was similar among the 10 (16% participants who were peer-trained by their trained colleagues. Only 9 (14% did not draw the appropriate amount of blood using pipette. The average cost of the one-day training was US$ 101 (range $92-$112, with the

  7. Multi-objective Mixed Integer Programming approach for facility layout design by considering closeness ratings, material handling, and re-layout cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnomo, Muhammad Ridwan Andi; Satrio Wiwoho, Yoga

    2016-01-01

    Facility layout becomes one of production system factor that should be managed well, as it is designated for the location of production. In managing the layout, designing the layout by considering the optimal layout condition that supports the work condition is essential. One of the method for facility layout optimization is Mixed Integer Programming (MIP). In this study, the MIP is solved using Lingo 9.0 software and considering quantitative and qualitative objectives to be achieved simultaneously: minimizing material handling cost, maximizing closeness rating, and minimizing re-layout cost. The research took place in Rekayasa Wangdi as a make to order company, focusing on the making of concrete brick dough stirring machine with 10 departments involved. The result shows an improvement in the new layout for 333,72 points of objective value compared with the initial layout. As the conclusion, the proposed MIP is proven to be used to model facility layout problem under multi objective consideration for a more realistic look.

  8. Potential cost to Western Australia of proposed patient co-payments according to healthcare organisational structure: A preliminary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, J Alasdair; Millar, Robyn C

    2014-01-01

    The Australian federal government has proposed an AUD $7 patient co-payment for a general practitioner (GP) consultation. One effect of the co-payment may be that patients will seek assistance at public hospital emergency departments (EDs), where currently there is no user charge. We studied the possible financial impact of patient diversion on the Western Australia (WA) health budget. We constructed a spreadsheet model of changes in annual cash flows including the co-payment, GP fees for service, and rates of diversion to emergency departments with additional marginal costs for ED attendance. Changes in WA cash flows are the aggregate of marginal ED costs of treating diverted patients and added expenditure in fees paid to rural doctors who also man local emergency centres. The estimated costs to WA are AUD $6.3 million, $35.9 million and $87.4 million at 1, 5, and 10 per cent diversion, respectively. Commonwealth receipts increase and expenditure on Medicare benefits declines. A diversion of patients from GP surgeries to ED in WA caused by the co-payment will result in increased costs to the state, which may be substantial, and will reduce net costs to the Commonwealth.

  9. 2016 TRI Preliminary Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    The TRI preliminary dataset includes the most current TRI data available and reflects toxic chemical releases and pollution prevention activities that occurred at TRI facilities during the 2016 calendar year.

  10. Report: Close-Out of Hotline Complaint on Unreasonable Cost Increase to the Wastewater Treatment Facility Improvements, Perkins, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #12-X-0161, December 29, 2011. We have closed a hotline complaint that project costs increased unreasonably due to American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) requirements because we found no evidence to support the complaint.

  11. Preliminary measurement results of biotinylated BSA detection of a low cost optical cavity based biosensor using differential detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, Peter; Joy, Cody; Bujana, Antonio; Rho, DongGee; Kim, Seunghyun

    2016-03-01

    We report an optical cavity based biosensor using a novel differential detection method for point-of-care applications. Two laser diodes allow for multiplexing capability along with the ability to enhance the responsivity using differential detection. The laser wavelengths are chosen so that the optical intensities of two lasers change monotonically with opposite slopes upon the adsorption of desired biomarkers. The cavity width, PMMA thickness, and silver thickness have been optimized to achieve a large change in scaled differential value. We chose biotinylated BSA detection with Avidin as a receptor molecule to demonstrate the proposed design. Avidin is attached directly to the PMMA layer by physisorption. Then, biotinylated BSA is introduced to the sample and the intensities of the laser diodes are measured by a sCMOS camera. A change in the scaled differential value will correlate to the binding of biotinylated BSA. In this presentation, we will discuss simulation results, fabrication procedures, and preliminary measurement results.

  12. Cost-benefit analysis for sheltered employment service programs for people with disabilities in Taiwan - a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-Tung; Lin, Yi-Jiun; Shu, Ching-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to do a cost-benefit analysis with monetary and non-monetary benefits for sheltered employment service programs and try to provide more evidence-based information for policy makers and practitioners to understand the outcomes of sheltered employment services. This study analyzed 3 sheltered employment service programs for people with disabilities (2006-2007) implemented by Sunshine Social Welfare Foundation in Taiwan using cost-benefit analysis (including non-monetary benefits). Three groups were analyzed, including participants in the programs, taxpayers, and society (participants and taxpayers). This study found that the net social monetary benefit was $NT29,432.07 per participant per year and the benefit cost ratio was 1.43. (In 2006-2007, $US1 = $NT32.5 averagely around.) The net monetary benefit for the participants was between $NT7,890.86 and $NT91,890.86 per participant per year. On the non-monetary benefit side, the physical health (raised 7.49%), social relationship (raised 3.36%) domains, and general quality of life (raised 2.53%) improved. However, the psychological (decreased 1.51%) and working/environment (decreased 3.85%) domains backslided. In addition, the differences between pre-test and post-test average scores of all domains were not statistically significant. This study is the first to use monetary and non-monetary cost-benefit analysis methods to analyze sheltered employment service programs for people with disabilities in Taiwan. The findings indicated that sheltered employment service programs for people with disabilities could be efficient and beneficial for the whole society and sheltered employees/clients, and also helpful for raising their quality of lives.

  13. Preliminary Study on Cost-Effective L-Tryptophan Production from Indole and L-Serine by E. coli Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghiyan-Rizi, Tahereh; Fooladi, Jamshid; Sadrai, Sima

    2016-01-01

    Background: L-tryptophan is used widespread in the pharmaceutical industry. The majority of L-Trp production depends on microbial processes that produce L-tryptophan from indole and L-serine. These processes are very costly due to the costs of precursors, especially L-serine. Use of inexpensive substitutions as the L-serine source of L-tryptophan production enables us to reach a cost-effective process. In this paper, effect of Triton X-100 on L-Trp production and the ability to use Iranian cane molasses as inexpensive L-serine source was investigated. Methods: Escherichia coli (E. coli) ATCC 11303 cells were grown in 10-L fermenter containing minimal medium supplemented with beet molasses as an inexpensive carbon source and indole as tryptophan synthase inducer. Whole cells of stationary phase were used as biocatalyst for L-Trp production. Triton X-100 addition to the production medium as indole reservoir was investigated. Then, cane molasses was used as L-Ser source in L-Trp production medium. Amount of L-Tryptophan and theoretical yield of L-Trp production was determined by HPLC and by a colorimetrically method on the basis of remaining indole assay, respectively. Results: As a result, triton X-100 increased L-Trp production three times. Also, the result showed that 0.68 mM L-Tryptophan was produced in the presence of cane molasses at 37°C for 8 hr. Conclusion: This result showed that cane molasses of Qazvin sugar factory includes significant amounts of L-Ser that makes it a suitable substitution for L-Ser in L-Trp production. Therefore, it has the potential to be used for cost-effective L-Trp production in industrial scale. PMID:27920887

  14. Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

    1980-05-01

    Detailed cost and performance data for the proposed tower focus pilot plant and commercial plant are given. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) an external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360/sup 0/ array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes. (WHK)

  15. Quantitative wound healing studies using a portable, low cost, handheld near-infrared optical scanner: preliminary sensitivity and specificity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jiali; Rodriguez, Suset; Jayachandran, Maanasa; Solis, Elizabeth; Gonzalez, Stephanie; Perez-Clavijo, Francesco; Wigley, Stephen; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2016-03-01

    Lower extremity ulcers are devastating complications that are still un-recognized. To date, clinicians employ visual inspection of the wound site during its standard 4-week of healing process via monitoring of surface granulation. A novel ultra-portable near-infrared optical scanner (NIROS) has been developed at the Optical Imaging Laboratory that can perform non-contact 2D area imaging of the wound site. From preliminary studies it was observed that the nonhealing wounds had a greater absorption contrast with respect to the normal site, unlike in the healing wounds. Currently, non-contact near-infrared (NIR) imaging studies were carried out on 22 lower extremity wounds at two podiatric clinics, and the sensitivity and specificity of the scanner evaluated. A quantitative optical biometric was developed that differentiates healing from non-healing wounds, based on the threshold values obtained during ROC analysis. In addition, optical images of the wound obtained from weekly imaging studies are also assessed to determine the ability of the device to predict wound healing consistently on a periodic basis. This can potentially impact early intervention in the treatment of lower extremity ulcers when an objective and quantitative wound healing approach is developed. Lastly, the incorporation of MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) to automate the process of image acquisition, image processing and image analysis realizes the potential of NIROS to perform non-contact and real-time imaging on lower extremity wounds.

  16. Preliminary report on a cost-utility analysis of revascularization by percutaneous coronary intervention for ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takura, Tomoyuki; Tachibana, Kouichi; Isshiki, Takaaki; Sumitsuji, Satoru; Kuroda, Tadashi; Mizote, Isamu; Ide, Seiko; Nanto, Shinsuke

    2017-04-01

    Few socioeconomic studies have so far reported on revascularization for stable ischemic heart disease in Japan. This study aimed to validate the sensitivity of the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) scale for determining the pathology and medical technology to be used and to validate the application of a cost-utility analysis model. We studied 32 patients who had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (mean age 67.9 ± 7.3 years). For HRQOL, utility and quality of life (QOL) were examined using the EuroQol 5 Dimension (EQ-5D) and EuroQol Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-VAS), respectively. The changes in the utility index before and after PCI were compared between the PCI and coronary angiography (CAG) groups to determine the sensitivity of the EQ-5D that was used to calculate quality-adjusted life years (QALY). Additionally, to estimate the cost-utility of PCI 120 months after the procedure, we analyzed our study results and the results of previous reports using the Markov chain model. The utility index was found to improve in the PCI group (0.08 ± 0.15), whereas it decreased in the CAG group (-0.02 ± 0.11) (p = 0.049). The estimated result of the cost-utility analysis as the increase in utility above baseline level was the expected value, that is, 70,000 US$/QALY. Our findings suggest that QALY may be valid as a utility index in the clinical and economic evaluation of PCI in Japan.

  17. Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO{sub 2} Capture Process: Preliminary Cost Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Brice; Kniep, Jay; Pingjiao, Hao; Baker, Richard; Rochelle, Gary; Chen, Eric; Frailie, Peter; Ding, Junyuan; Zhang, Yue

    2014-03-31

    This report describes a study of capture costs for a hybrid membrane-absorption capture system based on Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR)’s low-pressure membrane contactors and the University of Texas at Austin’s 5 m piperazine (PZ) Advanced Flash Stripper (AFS; 5 m PZ AFS) based CO2 capture system. The report is submitted for NETL review, and may be superseded by a final topical report on this topic that will be submitted to satisfy the Task 2 report requirement of the current project (DE-FE0013118).

  18. The effect of transfers between health care facilities on costs and length of stay for pediatric burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, John; Smith, Michael; Woods, Charles; Espinosa, Claudia; Lehna, Carlee

    2015-01-01

    Hospitals vary widely in the services they offer to care for pediatric burn patients. When a hospital does not have the ability or capacity to handle a pediatric burn, the decision often is made to transfer the patient to another short-term hospital. Transfers may be based on available specialty coverage for children; which adult and non-teaching hospitals may not have available. The effect these transfers have on costs and length of stay (LOS) has on pediatric burn patients is not well established and is warranted given the prominent view that pediatric hospitals are inefficient or more costly. The authors examined inpatient admissions for pediatric burn patients in 2003, 2006, and 2009 using the Kids' Inpatient Database, which is part of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. ICD-9-CM codes 940 to 947 were used to define burn injury. The authors tested if transfer status was associated with LOS and total charges for pediatric burn patients, while adjusting for traditional risk factors (eg, age, TBSA, insurance status, type of hospital [pediatric vs adult; teaching vs nonteaching]) by using generalized linear mixed-effects modeling. A total of n = 28,777 children had a burn injury. Transfer status (P hospital were not associated with LOS. Similarly, transfer status (P hospital were not associated with total charges. In addition, the data suggest that the more severe pediatric burn patients are being transferred from adult and non-teaching hospitals to pediatric and teaching hospitals, which may explain the increased costs and LOS seen at pediatric hospitals. Larger more severe burns are being transferred to pediatric hospitals with the ability or capacity to handle these conditions in the pediatric population, which has a dramatic impact on costs and LOS. As a result, unadjusted, pediatric hospitals are seen as being inefficient in treating pediatric burns. However, since pediatric hospitals see more severe cases, after adjustment, type of hospital did not

  19. Tracking Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Even though there's been a slight reprieve in energy costs, the reality is that the cost of non-renewable energy is increasing, and state education budgets are shrinking. One way to keep energy and operations costs from overshadowing education budgets is to develop a 10-year energy audit plan to eliminate waste. First, facility managers should…

  20. A case study of agricultural residue availability and cost for a cellulosic ethanol conversion facility in the Henan province of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Erin [ORNL; Wu, Yun [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    A preliminary analysis of the availability and cost of corn stover and wheat straw for the area surrounding a demonstration biorefinery in the Henan Province of China was performed as a case study of potential cooperative analyses of bioenergy feedstocks between researchers and industry in the US and China. Though limited in scope, the purpose of this analysis is to provide insight into some of the issues and challenges of estimating feedstock availability in China and how this relates to analyses of feedstocks in the U.S. Completing this analysis also highlighted the importance of improving communication between U.S. researchers and Chinese collaborators. Understanding the units and terms used in the data provided by Tianguan proved to be a significant challenge. This was further complicated by language barriers between collaborators in the U.S. and China. The Tianguan demonstration biorefinery has a current capacity of 3k tons (1 million gallons) of cellulosic ethanol per year with plans to scale up to 10k tons (3.34 million gallons) per year. Using data provided by Tianguan staff in summer of 2011, the costs and availability of corn stover and wheat straw were estimated. Currently, there are sufficient volumes of wheat straw and corn stover that are considered 'waste' and would likely be available for bioenergy in the 20-km (12-mile) region surrounding the demonstration biorefinery at a low cost. However, as the industry grows, competition for feedstock will grow and prices are likely to rise as producers demand additional compensation to fully recover costs.

  1. Power wheelchair prescription, utilization, satisfaction, and cost for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: preliminary data for evidence-based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Amber L; Sanjak, Mohammed; Duffy, Kerry; Bravver, Elena; Williams, Nicole; Nichols, Mindy; Brooks, Benjamin Rix

    2010-02-01

    To determine the features most frequently selected in a power wheelchair (PWC), level of satisfaction with the selections, and how often the PWC features are used by patients diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)/motor neuron disease (MND). Internally generated questionnaire. An ALS/Muscular Dystrophy Association center. Convenience sample of current patients (N=45) of our clinic with ALS/MND who are PWC users (men, n=27; women, n=18; age range, 27-85 y). Self-administered survey. Thirty-two patients completed a 31-question survey investigating patients' patterns of selection, satisfaction, and frequency of PWC use; technical and psychometric influences; and other aspects of decision-making processes that patients experience before, during, and after acquiring a PWC. Ninety percent of respondents received their evaluations at a multidisciplinary ALS clinic, 1 via the Department of Veterans Affairs, and 1 was unknown. Sixty-six percent of patients thought the chair evaluation was timed correctly, and 19% wished they had started sooner. Forty-five percent of people were able to walk a few steps, and 55% were able to stand when their chairs arrived. When they first received the chair, 79% were satisfied with the overall comfort of the chair, and 86% were satisfied with the ease of use; currently, 69% are satisfied with the overall comfort, and 72% are satisfied with ease of use. There was a statistically significant difference in how patients used their wheelchair features initially and currently in terms of seat elevate and attendant control, but not tilt, recline, and elevating leg rests. The average cost for the power chairs was $26,404 (range, $19,376-$34,311), and the average cost a month is $917. Overall, 88% of respondents said they would get the same type of chair with the same features again, and 81% felt that the chair was a good value for the cost. We obtained first-hand knowledge from 32 patients with ALS/MND who are current PWC users on their

  2. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture Preliminary Techno-Economic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hance, Dan; Chen, Wei; Kehmna, Mark; McDuffie, Dwayne

    2014-03-31

    This report presents system and economic analysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO{sub 2} capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. For comparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO2 as compared to $60.25/ton of CO{sub 2} when MEA is used. The aminosilicone-based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higher thermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lower vapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lower heat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages over conventional systems using MEA.

  3. Biomass removal, retention, and costs associated with biomass harvesting in the partial harvest systems of Ontario's Great Lakes-Saint Lawrence forest region : preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, D. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Faculty of Forestry

    2010-07-01

    Recent bioenergy policy developments in Ontario have increased interest in forest biomass supply research. Biomass harvested from clearcut and partial harvest system in the Great Lakes-Saint Lawrence (GLSL) region can be used to supply centralized pellet plants or directly to forest mill-based conversion facilities for electricity generation. Preliminary results from a biomass harvesting trial conducted in the GLSL have confirmed that whole-tree harvesting (WTH) and the removal of skid trail results in increased biomass removal and improved operational productivity relative to conventional cut-to-length methods. Biomass removals can be increased through the imposition of smaller minimum topping diameters and the harvesting of unmerchantable trees. The results of a study conducted to evaluate the difference between conventional and biomass harvesting in a shelterwood and selection system in the GLSL has indicated that increases in the amount of firewood and small, irregular blocks of wood recovered from biomass harvests are negligible compared with conventional harvesting practices. Biomass harvesting trials are currently being conducted to determine biomass removal and operational productivity calculations for determining the overall economic feasibility of biomass harvesting for energy in the region.

  4. Design aspects of the Alpha Repository. I. Preliminary results of facility layout, room stability, and equipment selection efforts. Summary progress report RSI-0024

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnirk, P.F.; Grams, W.H.; Zeller, T.J.; Ellis, D.B.; Pariseau, W.G.; Fossum, A.F.; Ratigan, J.L.; Hansen, F.D.

    1975-04-14

    Results of preliminary analysis of the stability of mines in salt formations underlying Eddy and Lea Counties in New Mexico are presented. Methods and equipment for drilling canister emplacement holes in these formations were evaluated along with methods for excavating storage areas and transport of the excavated salt. Progress during the period is reported in chapters on geological and rock properties at the repository site, preliminary mine layout, basic requirements for repository usage, excavation geometries, drill selection, excavation systems, and safety requirements. (JRD)

  5. Facile and low cost oxidative conversion of MoS2 in α-MoO3: Synthesis, characterization and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoti, Andressa Antunes; Gavanski, Amanda de Freitas; Velazquez, Yegraf Reyna; Galli, Andressa; de Castro, Eryza Guimarães

    2017-08-01

    This study describes a facile low cost route to synthesize the α-MoO3 through a conversion of the precursor MoS2 in oxidant media. The structure and morphology of the α-MoO3 were studied by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that α-MoO3 was obtained with reduced size, high purity, strongly-preferred orientation and structural defects, which ensures versatility and multifunctionality to this sample. For the purpose of applications, α-MoO3 was successfully employed in inverted organic solar cells devices as a possible alternative to the PEDOT:PSS in the hole transportation layer.

  6. Extremely fast dark adsorption rate of carbon and nitrogen co-doped TiO2 prepared by a relatively fast, facile and low-cost microwave method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chun; Zhou, Jiangshan; Li, Fangzhou; Li, Wei; Wang, Yinzhen; He, Qinyu

    2016-07-01

    A facile and low-cost microwave method was used to prepare C and N co-doped TiO2 in just 8 min. The prepared samples were thoroughly characterized and were found to have favourable features such as surface adsorption of pollutants and photocatalysis. The rapid decomposition of CH5N3HCl under microwave irradiation led to mesopores and surface roughness in the as-prepared particles, resulting in large surface adsorption of pollutant and good photodegradation. The best sample is the one with the ratio of TiO2/CH2N3HCl at 3:1, which adsorbed 86.3 % of a methylene orange (MO) solution (20 mg L-1) in 10 min.

  7. A Facile and Low-Cost Route to Heteroatom Doped Porous Carbon Derived from Broussonetia Papyrifera Bark with Excellent Supercapacitance and CO2 Capture Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tongye; Zhang, Qi; Wei, Xiaolin; Gao, Yong; Li, Huaming

    2016-03-03

    In this work, we present a facile and low-cost approach to synthesize heteroatom doped porous carbon via hydrothermal treatment of stem bark of broussonetia papyrifera (BP) as the biomass precursor in diluted sulfuric acid, and following thermal activation by KOH at 800 °C. The morphology, structure and textural property of the prepared porous carbon (PC) are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, N2 sorption isotherms, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The porous carbon possesses a high BET surface area of 1759 m(2) g(-1) and an average pore size of 3.11 nm as well as hetero-oxygen (9.09%) and nitrogen (1.7%) doping. Such porous carbon shows outstanding capacitive performances of 416 F g(-1) and 300 F g(-1) in three and two-electrode systems, respectively. As a solid-state adsorbent, the obtained porous carbon has an excellent CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient pressures of up to 6.71 and 4.45 mmol g(-1) at 0 and 25 °C, respectively. The results present one novel precursor-synthesis route for facile large-scale production of high performance porous carbon for a variety of great applications including energy storage and CO2 capture.

  8. Low-cost and facile fabrication of a paper-based capillary electrophoresis microdevice for pathogen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Won; Lee, Dohwan; Kim, Yong Tae; Lee, Eun Yeol; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2017-05-15

    This paper describes the development of a novel paper-based capillary electrophoresis (pCE) microdevice using mineral paper, which is durable, oil and tear resistant, and waterproof. The pCE device is inexpensive (~$1.6 per device for materials), simple to fabricate, lightweight, and disposable, so it is more adequate for point-of-care (POC) pathogen diagnostics than a conventional CE device made of glass, quartz, silicon or polymer. In addition, the entire fabrication process can be completed within 1h without using expensive clean room facilities and cumbersome photolithography procedures. A simple cross-designed pCE device was patterned on the mineral paper by using a plotter, and assembled with an OHP film via a double-sided adhesive film. After filling the microchannel with polyacrylamide gel, the injection, backbiasing, and separation steps were sequentially operated to differentiate single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with 4 bp resolution in a 2.9cm-long CE separation channel. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated the identification of the PCR amplicons of two target genes of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (rrsH gene, 121 bp) and Staphylococcus aureus (glnA gene, 225 bp). For accurate assignment of the peaks in the electropherogram, two bracket ladders (80 bp for the shortest and 326 bp for the longest) were employed, so the two amplicons of the pathogens were precisely identified on a pCE chip within 3min using the relative migration time ratio without effect of the CE environments. Thus, we believe that the pCE microdevice could be very useful for the separation of nucleic acids, amino acids, and ions as an analytical tool for use in the medical applications in the resource-limited environments as well as fundamental research fields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A Low-Cost Point-of-Care Testing System for Psychomotor Symptoms of Depression Affecting Standing Balance: A Preliminary Study in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Dutta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization estimated that major depression is the fourth most significant cause of disability worldwide for people aged 65 and older, where depressed older adults reported decreased independence, poor health, poor quality of life, functional decline, disability, and increased chronic medical problems. Therefore, the objectives of this study were (1 to develop a low-cost point-of-care testing system for psychomotor symptoms of depression and (2 to evaluate the system in community dwelling elderly in India. The preliminary results from the cross-sectional study showed a significant negative linear correlation between balance and depression. Here, monitoring quantitative electroencephalography along with the center of pressure for cued response time during functional reach tasks may provide insights into the psychomotor symptoms of depression where average slope of the Theta-Alpha power ratio versus average slope of baseline-normalized response time may be a candidate biomarker, which remains to be evaluated in our future clinical studies. Once validated, the biomarker can be used for monitoring the outcome of a comprehensive therapy program in conjunction with pharmacological interventions. Furthermore, the frequency of falls can be monitored with a mobile phone-based application where the propensity of falls during the periods of psychomotor symptoms of depression can be investigated further.

  10. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in the United States. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    This report is one of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United States and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. This report describes laws and regulatory programs in the United States. Subsequent reports will (1) describe public utility rate regulatory procedures and practices as they might affect an ICES, (2) analyze each of the aforementioned regulatory programs to identify impediments to the development of ICES, and (3) recommend potential changes in legislation and regulatory practices and procedures to overcome such impediments.

  11. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in the United States. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    This report is a summary of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United states and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). A brief summary of public utility regulatory programs, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority is presented in this report to identify how such programs and authority may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. Subsequent reports will (1) describe public utility rate regulatory procedures and practices as they might affect an ICES, (2) analyze each of the aforementioned regulatory programs to identify impediments to the development of ICES, and (3) recommend potential changes in legislation and regulatory practices and procedures to overcome such impediments.

  12. A Low Cost and Facile Preparation of Hydrophobic Silica Films and Powders by a Solution-based Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Tian; Tao Haizheng; XIAO Jing; XU Xinyi; An Jiming

    2015-01-01

    Super-hydrophobic surfaces with water contact angle (WCA) higher than 150° generated a lot of interests both in academic and in industry because of their self-cleaning functionality. Emphasis was given to the effect of pH value on the hydrophobic behavior of the obtainedfi lms or powders. Atfi rst, SiO2sols were prepared by diluted ammonia. We found that following the increase of pH value of sol from 8 to 9, WCAs of the obtainedfi lms increased from 121.8° to 131.8°. Following the continued increase of the pH value of sol, precipitates began to appear and smoothfi lm could not be obtained. The WCAs of the obtained powders could reach 121.7°, and through modifying by TMCS could further increase to as high as 165° and the water sliding angle (WSA) was 2°. The results of SEM indicate that the hydrophobic properties of the powders without modifying by TMCS should be originated from the formation of nano/micron binary structure,i e, a micron-scale diameter and a nano-scale surface roughness. In this work we provide a better solution to fabricate super-hydrophobic silica coating surface with a simple method at low cost.

  13. A Facile and Low-Cost Method to Enhance the Internal Quantum Yield and External Light-Extraction Efficiency for Flexible Light-Emitting Carbon-Dot Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z. C.; Lin, T. N.; Lin, H. T.; Talite, M. J.; Tzeng, T. T.; Hsu, C. L.; Chiu, K. P.; Lin, C. A. J.; Shen, J. L.; Yuan, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed, non-toxic carbon dots (CDs) have attracted much attention due to their unique photoluminescence (PL) properties. They are promising emissive layers for flexible light-emitting devices. To this end, the CDs in pristine aqueous solutions need to be transferred to form solid-state thin films without sacrificing their original PL characteristics. Unfortunately, solid-state PL quenching induced by extra non-radiative (NR) energy transfer among CDs would significantly hinder their practical applications in optoelectronics. Here, a facile, low-cost and effective method has been utilized to fabricate high-performance CD/polymer light-emitting flexible films with submicron-structured patterns. The patterned polymers can serve as a solid matrix to disperse and passivate CDs, thus achieving high internal quantum yields of 61%. In addition, they can act as an out-coupler to mitigate the waveguide-mode losses, approximately doubling the external light-extraction efficiency. Such CD/polymer composites also exhibit good photo-stability, and thus can be used as eco-friendly, low-cost phosphors for solid-state lighting.

  14. MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM-PRELIMINARY REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

    2010-08-18

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that comes in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter offgas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of

  15. MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM - PRELIMINARY REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

    2009-03-25

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that come in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter off-gas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of

  16. 成本与半径优化的设施选址问题%Facility Location Problem with Cost and Radius Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁克瑞; 杨超

    2012-01-01

    The facility location problem with cost and radius optimization (FLCRO) has a wide range of applications in emergency response, logistics, maintenance service as well as express delivery. By considering the relationship of response time, service benefits and service costs, the problem seeks a decision on whether the distant customers are brought into the range of service radius or not. Both service cost and service radius are taken into consideration in the model. We construct a mixed 0 — 1 integer programming model for the problem and present a 7. 853 + e-approximation algorithm for FLCRO on a plane. We also provided a heuristic algorithm based on benders' decomposition which is very effective in solving FLCRO.%成本与半径优化的服务设施选址问题(CROFL)广泛应用于应急服务、快递、维修网络等领域,其特点是考虑了响应速度与服务价格、成本之间的关系,根据净收益最大化或者成本最小化的原则自动判断是否将偏远的“需求点”纳入服务半径之内,实现服务成本与服务半径的双重优化.建立了CROFL的混合整数规划模型,构造了求解平面CROFL的7.853+ε-近似算法,并提供了求解一般CROFL的Benders’分解算法,计算实验显示,Benders’分解算法具有非常高的求解效率与求解质量.

  17. SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility. Status report. Preliminary data on the performance of a rotary parallel-passage silica-gel dehumidifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, K.J.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility. The facility can test bench-scale rotary dehumidifiers over a wide range of controlled conditions. We constructed and installed in the test loop a prototype parallel-passage rotary dehumidifier that has spirally wound polyester tape coated with silica gel. The initial tests gave satisfactory results indicating that approximately 90% of the silica gel was active and the overall Lewis number of the wheel was near unity. The facility has several minor difficulties including an inability to control humidity satisfactorily and nonuniform and highly turbulent inlet velocities. To completely validate the facility requires a range of dehumidifier designs. Several choices are available including constructing a second parallel-passage dehumidifier with the passage spacing more uniform.

  18. Greenfield Alternative Study LEU-Mo Fuel Fabrication Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Division of URS

    2008-07-01

    This report provides the initial “first look” of the design of the Greenfield Alternative of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC); a facility to be built at a Greenfield DOE National Laboratory site. The FFC is designed to fabricate LEU-Mo monolithic fuel for the 5 US High Performance Research Reactors (HPRRs). This report provides a pre-conceptual design of the site, facility, process and equipment systems of the FFC; along with a preliminary hazards evaluation, risk assessment as well as the ROM cost and schedule estimate.

  19. Facility for a Low Power Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalker, R. G.

    1949-09-14

    Preliminary investigation indicates that a reactor facility with ample research provisions for use by University or other interested groups, featuring safety in design, can be economically constructed in the Los Angeles area. The complete installation, including an underground gas-tight reactor building, with associated storage and experiment assembly building, administration offices, two general laboratory buildings, hot latoratory and lodge, can be constructed for approxinately $1,500,000. This does not include the cost of the reactor itself or of its auxiliary equipment,

  20. A facile and low-cost length sorting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by precipitation and applications for thin-film transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Hui; Chen, Haitian; Khripin, Constantine Y; Liu, Bilu; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Zhou, Chongwu; Zheng, Ming

    2016-02-14

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with long lengths are highly desirable for many applications such as thin-film transistors and circuits. Previously reported length sorting techniques usually require sophisticated instrumentation and are hard to scale up. In this paper, we report for the first time a general phenomenon of a length-dependent precipitation of surfactant-dispersed carbon nanotubes by polymers, salts, and their combinations. Polyelectrolytes such as polymethacrylate (PMAA) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) are found to be especially effective on cholate and deoxycholate dispersed SWCNTs. By adding PMAA to these nanotube dispersions in a stepwise fashion, we have achieved nanotube precipitation in a length-dependent order: first nanotubes with an average length of 650 nm, and then successively of 450 nm, 350 nm, and 250 nm. A similar effect of nanotube length sorting has also been observed for PSS. To demonstrate the utility of the length fractionation, the 650 nm-long nanotube fraction was subjected to an aqueous two-phase separation to obtain semiconducting enriched nanotubes. Thin-film transistors fabricated with the resulting semiconducting SWCNTs showed a carrier mobility up to 18 cm(2) (V s)(-1) and an on/off ratio up to 10(7). Our result sheds new light on the phase behavior of aqueous nanotube dispersions under high concentrations of polymers and salts, and offers a facile, low-cost, and scalable method to produce length sorted semiconducting nanotubes for macroelectronics applications.

  1. The Mechanical Design and Preliminary Testing Results of Beam Position Monitors for the LANSCE Isotope Production Facility and Switchyard Kicker Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, J. F.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Ledford, J. E.; Shurter, R. B.; Roybal, R. J.; Bentley, B. E.

    2002-12-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE-1) Beam Diagnostic Team is providing Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) to the LANSCE Facility for use in two on-going projects: The Isotope Production Facility (IPF) and The Switchyard Kicker Upgrade (SYK). The BPM designs for both projects are very similar. The BPMs are classic, four, micro-stripline units having one end terminated in a 50-ohm load. This paper will discuss the position measurement requirements, mechanical design, fabrication, and alignment issues encountered for both sets of BPMs, as well as report the results obtained from the initial taught wire testing of the IPF BPMs.

  2. Energy solutions for sports facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, Paola; Santiangeli, Adriano [CIRPS: Inter-University Research Centre for Sustainable Development, Sapienza University of Rome, Via Eudossiana, 18, Rome (Italy)

    2008-06-15

    The sports facilities are characterized by special energy needs different from any other user and they are characterized by high heat and electricity loads. For this reason, the aim of this work has been to propose a tool to provide a preliminary estimation of the power and energy required by the sports centres. In addition, the possibility to make the building self-energy sufficient has been considered, thanks to the exploitation of renewable energy sources (RES). The overall work has been performed following three steps: energy needs analysis; local RES availability analysis; energy balance of Sport Centres. Considering that each sport facility is characterized by different energy needs depending on the sport typology itself, the analysis started from the features established by the CONI (National Italian Olympic Committee) standardization. For calculations a program in LabVIEW has been developed to evaluate the energy requirements of the sports centre considering as inputs the sport halls, the playgrounds and the supporting rooms, the level of the sport activity (e.g. agonistic) and the climatic conditions of the area where the facilities are located. The locally available RES are evaluated in order to decide which one can be exploited to feed the Sport Centre. The proposed solution for the energy production refers to a combination of different and innovative technologies which involve, in particular, hydrogen technologies. The energy and costs analysis has been finally carried out for an application case in Dubai. (author)

  3. Design and construction of a spectrometer facility and experiment for intermediate energy proton scattering on helium. [Wave functions, preliminary experimental techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolfe, R.M.

    1976-12-01

    The goal of the research was to investigate proton scattering on nuclei at intermediate energies and in particular to investigate proton scattering on helium. A theoretical investigation of the helium nucleus and the nature of the intermediate energy interaction, design and optimization of an energy-loss spectrometer facility for proton-nucleus scattering, and the unique superfluid helium target and experimental design are discussed.

  4. 游乐设施红外热像特征%A Preliminary Study on Infrared Thermal Imaging Characteristics of Recreation Facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶超; 沈功田; 张万岭; 俞跃

    2012-01-01

    游乐设施中的大量机械和电气部件在工作中常有较明显的温升,如果温升异常说明设备运行可能存在故障,严重时会引起安全事故。文章首先分析了游乐设施运行过程中关键部件温度升高的原因,并通过采集及分析运行中游乐设施的液压系统、车轮、减速机和电机的红外热像图,初步得到其红外热像特征。由此证明红外热成像检测技术是适用于游乐设施运行状态监测和故障诊断的一种潜在方法。%Many mechanical and electrical components of recreation facility often have apparent temperature rise during operation, and the abnormal temperature indicates that the equipment operation may have fault which can cause accidents in severe cases. This paper first analyzed the reason why the temperature of key components rose when the recreation facility was run, then by collecting and analyzing the infrared thermography of hydraulic system, wheels, reducer, motor of recreation facility in the work, infrared thermal imaging characteristics of these parts were preliminarily obtained. It proved that infrared thermal imaging detection technology was a potential method applicable to recreation facility ride operating state and diagnosing malfunctions.

  5. Facility Safeguardability Analysis In Support of Safeguards-by-Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip Casey Durst; Roald Wigeland; Robert Bari; Trond Bjornard; John Hockert; Michael Zentner

    2010-07-01

    The following report proposes the use of Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) to: i) compare and evaluate nuclear safeguards measures, ii) optimize the prospective facility safeguards approach, iii) objectively and analytically evaluate nuclear facility safeguardability, and iv) evaluate and optimize barriers within the facility and process design to minimize the risk of diversion and theft of nuclear material. As proposed by the authors, Facility Safeguardability Analysis would be used by the Facility Designer and/or Project Design Team during the design and construction of the nuclear facility to evaluate and optimize the facility safeguards approach and design of the safeguards system. Through a process of “Safeguards-by-Design” (SBD), this would be done at the earliest stages of project conceptual design and would involve domestic and international nuclear regulators and authorities, including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The benefits of the Safeguards-by-Design approach is that it would clarify at a very early stage the international and domestic safeguards requirements for the Construction Project Team, and the best design and operating practices for meeting these requirements. It would also minimize the risk to the construction project, in terms of cost overruns or delays, which might otherwise occur if the nuclear safeguards measures are not incorporated into the facility design at an early stage. Incorporating nuclear safeguards measures is straight forward for nuclear facilities of existing design, but becomes more challenging with new designs and more complex nuclear facilities. For this reason, the facility designer and Project Design Team require an analytical tool for comparing safeguards measures, options, and approaches, and for evaluating the “safeguardability” of the facility. The report explains how preliminary diversion path analysis and the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PRPP) evaluation

  6. Grid-connected integrated community energy system. Phase II, Stage 2, final report. Preliminary design pyrolysis facility. [Andco-Torrax system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-22

    The University of Minnesota is studying and planning a grid connected integrated community energy system to include disposal of wastes from health centers and utilizing the heat generated. The University of Minnesota has purchased the so called Southeast Generating Station from the Northern States Power Company. This plant contains two coal-fired boilers that will be retrofitted to burn low-sulfur Montana coal. Building modifications and additions will be made to support the components of the Andco-Torrax system and integrate the system with the rest of the plant. The Andco-Torrax system is a new high-temperature refuse-conversion process known technically as slagging pyrolysis. Although the pyrolysis of solid waste is a relatively new innovation, pyrolysis processes have been used for years by industry. This report covers the preliminary design and operation of the system. (MCW)

  7. Diagnostics improvement in the ABC facility and preliminary tests on laser interaction with light-atom clusters and p+{sup 11}B targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consoli, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.consoli@enea.it [Associazione Euratom - ENEA sulla Fusione, via E. Fermi 45, CP 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); De Angelis, Riccardo; Andreoli, Pierluigi; Cristofari, Giuseppe; Di Giorgio, Giorgio [Associazione Euratom - ENEA sulla Fusione, via E. Fermi 45, CP 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Bonasera, Aldo [INFN - LNS, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX, 77843 (United States); Barbui, Marina [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX, 77843 (United States); Mazzocco, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica G. Galilei, Università degli Studi di Padova, via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bang, Woosuk; Dyer, Gilliss; Quevedo, Hernan [Texas Center for High Intensity Laser Science, University of Texas at Austin, Austin 78712, TX (United States); Hagel, Kris; Schmidt, Katarzyna [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX, 77843 (United States); Gaul, Erhard; Borger, Ted; Bernstein, Aaron; Martinez, Mikael; Donovan, Michael [Texas Center for High Intensity Laser Science, University of Texas at Austin, Austin 78712, TX (United States); Barbarino, Matteo [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX, 77843 (United States); Kimura, Sachie [INFN - LNS, via S. Sofia 62, I-95123 Catania (Italy); and others

    2013-08-21

    The diagnostics of particle flows in Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments is a delicate issue, due to the fast timescales and to the strong radiative electromagnetic contributions. This makes the discrimination of the different particles produced by the laser–plasma interaction not trivial, and requires the use of several diagnostic techniques. We describe here the diagnostics improvement in the ABC facility. They will provide more detailed analysis of microwave fields and particles originating from the interaction of laser with targets foreseen for future experiments.

  8. Preliminary energy-filtering neutron imaging with time-of-flight method on PKUNIFTY: A compact accelerator based neutron imaging facility at Peking University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Zou, Yubin; Wen, Weiwei; Lu, Yuanrong; Guo, Zhiyu

    2016-07-01

    Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility (PKUNIFTY) works on an accelerator-based neutron source with a repetition period of 10 ms and pulse duration of 0.4 ms, which has a rather low Cd ratio. To improve the effective Cd ratio and thus improve the detection capability of the facility, energy-filtering neutron imaging was realized with the intensified CCD camera and time-of-flight (TOF) method. Time structure of the pulsed neutron source was firstly simulated with Geant4, and the simulation result was evaluated with experiment. Both simulation and experiment results indicated that fast neutrons and epithermal neutrons were concentrated in the first 0.8 ms of each pulse period; meanwhile in the period of 0.8-2.0 ms only thermal neutrons existed. Based on this result, neutron images with and without energy filtering were acquired respectively, and it showed that detection capability of PKUNIFTY was improved with setting the exposure interval as 0.8-2.0 ms, especially for materials with strong moderating capability.

  9. Preliminary energy-filtering neutron imaging with time-of-flight method on PKUNIFTY: A compact accelerator based neutron imaging facility at Peking University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hu; Zou, Yubin, E-mail: zouyubin@pku.edu.cn; Wen, Weiwei; Lu, Yuanrong; Guo, Zhiyu

    2016-07-01

    Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility (PKUNIFTY) works on an accelerator–based neutron source with a repetition period of 10 ms and pulse duration of 0.4 ms, which has a rather low Cd ratio. To improve the effective Cd ratio and thus improve the detection capability of the facility, energy-filtering neutron imaging was realized with the intensified CCD camera and time-of-flight (TOF) method. Time structure of the pulsed neutron source was firstly simulated with Geant4, and the simulation result was evaluated with experiment. Both simulation and experiment results indicated that fast neutrons and epithermal neutrons were concentrated in the first 0.8 ms of each pulse period; meanwhile in the period of 0.8–2.0 ms only thermal neutrons existed. Based on this result, neutron images with and without energy filtering were acquired respectively, and it showed that detection capability of PKUNIFTY was improved with setting the exposure interval as 0.8–2.0 ms, especially for materials with strong moderating capability.

  10. Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory. Descriptions and cost assessment. Danish summary[Denmark]; Dekommissionering af Risoes nukleare anlaeg - vurdering af opgaver og omkostninger. Dansk sammenfatning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauridsen, Kurt

    2001-02-01

    The report gives a brief description of relevant aspects of the decommissioning of all nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory, including the necessary operations to be performed and the associated costs. Together with a more detailed report, written in English, this report is the result of a project initiated by Risoe in the summer of 2000. The English report has undergone an international review, the results of which are summarised in the present report. (au)

  11. 欧盟港口接收设施收费制度研究%Preliminary analysis on the fee system of port reception facilities in EU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张硕慧

    2013-01-01

      船舶在正常的营运过程中会产生废弃物和货物残余物,这些大部分又是污染物。为了防止船舶造成海洋污染,MARPOL在对船舶结构、设备以及操作提出要求的同时,对港口提出了提供接收设施的要求。但由于多种原因,港口提供接收设施的履约存在许多问题,其中收费制度是影响港口提供充分适用的接收设施的主要问题之一。为了成员国履行MARPOL以及保护海洋环境,欧盟制定了接收设施指令(Directive 2000/59/EC)。在该指令的框架下,欧盟内成员国建立了不同的港口接收设施收费制度。本文初步探讨了欧盟成员国港口接收设施主要的收费制度,为我国主管机关对港口接收设施管理制度的完善提供参考。%Most of ship-generated wastes and cargo residues from ship operation are environment pollutants. To prevent them from polluting the sea, providing port reception facilities are required under MARPOL, which also formulates the structure, equipments and operation of the ships. However, there are some problems in the enforcement of provisions of port reception facilities, and the defect in the fee system is one of the reasons for that. EU has developed Directive 2000/59/EC on Port Reception Facilities for Ship-generated Waste and Cargo Residues to ensure the enforcement of MARPOL in EU countries. Under the directive, different fee systems are established. The paper discusses the fee systems of different ports in EU, aiming to provide reference for Chinese administration.

  12. Electricity prices in a competitive environment: Marginal cost pricing of generation services and financial status of electric utilities. A preliminary analysis through 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    The emergence of competitive markets for electricity generation services is changing the way that electricity is and will be priced in the United States. This report presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated {open_quotes}cost-of-service{close_quotes} pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers? This study is not intended to be a cost-benefit analysis of wholesale or retail competition, nor does this report include an analysis of the macroeconomic impacts of competitive electricity prices.

  13. Noise from high speed maglev systems: Noise sources, noise criteria, preliminary design guidelines for noise control, and recommendations for acoustical test facility for maglev research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, C. E.; Abbot, P.; Dyer, I.

    1993-01-01

    Noise levels from magnetically-levitated trains (maglev) at very high speed may be high enough to cause environmental noise impact in residential areas. Aeroacoustic sources dominate the sound at high speeds and guideway vibrations generate noticeable sound at low speed. In addition to high noise levels, the startle effect as a result of sudden onset of sound from a rapidly moving nearby maglev vehicle may lead to increased annoyance to neighbors of a maglev system. The report provides a base for determining the noise consequences and potential mitigation for a high speed maglev system in populated areas of the United States. Four areas are included in the study: (1) definition of noise sources; (2) development of noise criteria; (3) development of design guidelines; and (4) recommendations for a noise testing facility.

  14. Skilled Nursing Facility PPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 4432(a) of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 modified how payment is made for Medicare skilled nursing facility (SNF) services. Effective with cost...

  15. Preliminary project for the 'Satz' drinking-water hydropower facility in Soerenberg, Switzerland - Appendix; Vorprojekt Trinkwasser-Kraftwerksatz, Soerenberg. Programm Kleinwasserkraftwerke. Anhaenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruff, H.; Widmer, P. [RuffEngineering, Zuerich (Switzerland); Schubert, T. [Praktikant CKW, Luzern (Switzerland); Wobmann, P. [Kost und Partner AG, Sursee (Switzerland)

    2007-03-15

    This comprehensive appendix to a final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) deals with a project concerning the realisation of a small hydro-power installation using a drinking-water supply system in the UNESCO Biosphere Reserve in Entlebuch, Switzerland. Technical details of the variants for the realisation of the hydro-power installation are presented. These include schematics of the variants proposed, weighting factors for the various factors involved, topographical details of the conduits necessary, management of the reservoirs involved, factors influencing the Pelton turbines used and an overview of spring-water quantities involved. Economic aspects and costs of the variants that were examined are presented.

  16. Methods and preliminary findings of a cost-effectiveness study of glass-ionomer-based and composite resin sealant materials after 2 yr

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldman, A.S.; Chen, X.; Fan, M.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of glass-carbomer, conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer cement (HVGIC) [without or with heat (light-emitting diode (LED) thermocuring) application], and composite resin sealants were compared after 2 yr in function. Estimated net costs per sealant were obtained from data

  17. Risk assessment of CST-7 proposed waste treatment and storage facilities Volume I: Limited-scope probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of proposed CST-7 waste treatment & storage facilities. Volume II: Preliminary hazards analysis of proposed CST-7 waste storage & treatment facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasser, K.

    1994-06-01

    In FY 1993, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Group [CST-7 (formerly EM-7)] requested the Probabilistic Risk and Hazards Analysis Group [TSA-11 (formerly N-6)] to conduct a study of the hazards associated with several CST-7 facilities. Among these facilities are the Hazardous Waste Treatment Facility (HWTF), the HWTF Drum Storage Building (DSB), and the Mixed Waste Receiving and Storage Facility (MWRSF), which are proposed for construction beginning in 1996. These facilities are needed to upgrade the Laboratory`s storage capability for hazardous and mixed wastes and to provide treatment capabilities for wastes in cases where offsite treatment is not available or desirable. These facilities will assist Los Alamos in complying with federal and state requlations.

  18. Study Cost Control in Logistics Facilities Construction Projects Based on VE%基于价值工程的物流设施项目成本控制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文杰

    2013-01-01

    利用价值工程理论从技术、经济两个角度对物流设施项目成本控制进行了研究.通过计算成本系数、功能系数和价值系数,从而确定最优成本策略,为进一步推进物流设施项目成本控制和科学决策提供了一种新方法.%In this paper,using the value engineering theory,we studied the cost control of logistics facilities construction projects from a technical and economic perspectives and by calculating the cost,functional and value coefficients,determined the optimal cost strategy.

  19. Transaction Cost Analysis of In-Clinic Versus Telehealth Consultations for Chronic Pain: Preliminary Evidence for Rapid and Affordable Access to Interdisciplinary Collaborative Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Brian R.; Whittington, Jan; Towle, Cara; Tauben, David J.; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara; Cahana, Alex; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives With ever increasing mandates to reduce costs and increase the quality of pain management, health care institutions are faced with the challenge of adopting innovative technologies and shifting workflows to provide value-based care. Transaction cost economic analysis can provide comparative evaluation of the consequences of these changes in the delivery of care. The aim of this study was to establish proof-of-concept using transaction cost analysis to examine chronic pain management in-clinic and through telehealth. Methods Participating health care providers were asked to identify and describe two comparable completed transactions for patients with chronic pain: one consultation between patient and specialist in-clinic and the other a telehealth presentation of a patient’s case by the primary care provider to a team of pain medicine specialists. Each provider completed two on-site interviews. Focus was on the time, value of time, and labor costs per transaction. Number of steps, time, and costs for providers and patients were identified. Results Forty-six discrete steps were taken for the in-clinic transaction, and 27 steps were taken for the telehealth transaction. Although similar in costs per patient ($332.89 in-clinic vs. $376.48 telehealth), the costs accrued over 153 business days in-clinic and 4 business days for telehealth. Time elapsed between referral and completion of initial consultation was 72 days in-clinic, 4 days for telehealth. Conclusions U.S. health care is moving toward the use of more technologies and practices, and the information provided by transaction cost analyses of care delivery for pain management will be important to determine actual cost savings and benefits. PMID:25616057

  20. Transaction cost analysis of in-clinic versus telehealth consultations for chronic pain: preliminary evidence for rapid and affordable access to interdisciplinary collaborative consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Brian R; Whittington, Jan; Towle, Cara; Tauben, David J; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara; Cahana, Alex; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-06-01

    With ever increasing mandates to reduce costs and increase the quality of pain management, health care institutions are faced with the challenge of adopting innovative technologies and shifting workflows to provide value-based care. Transaction cost economic analysis can provide comparative evaluation of the consequences of these changes in the delivery of care. The aim of this study was to establish proof-of-concept using transaction cost analysis to examine chronic pain management in-clinic and through telehealth. Participating health care providers were asked to identify and describe two comparable completed transactions for patients with chronic pain: one consultation between patient and specialist in-clinic and the other a telehealth presentation of a patient's case by the primary care provider to a team of pain medicine specialists. Each provider completed two on-site interviews. Focus was on the time, value of time, and labor costs per transaction. Number of steps, time, and costs for providers and patients were identified. Forty-six discrete steps were taken for the in-clinic transaction, and 27 steps were taken for the telehealth transaction. Although similar in costs per patient ($332.89 in-clinic vs. $376.48 telehealth), the costs accrued over 153 business days in-clinic and 4 business days for telehealth. Time elapsed between referral and completion of initial consultation was 72 days in-clinic, 4 days for telehealth. U.S. health care is moving toward the use of more technologies and practices, and the information provided by transaction cost analyses of care delivery for pain management will be important to determine actual cost savings and benefits. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Cost of the medical management and prescription pattern for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in Ghana–a retrospective cross-sectional study from three referral facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Ocansey, Stephen; Kyei, Samuel; Diafo, Ama; Darfor, Kwabena Nkansah; Boadi-Kusi, Samuel Bert; Aglobitse, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness globally, and treatment involves considerable cost to stakeholders in healthcare. However, there is infrequent availability of cost information and patterns of management, especially in developing countries. This study determined the cost of the medical management of POAG, adherence, and pattern of medication prescription in Ghana. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study involving 891 Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) c...

  2. Process-based costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert H; Bott, Marjorie J; Forbes, Sarah; Redford, Linda; Swagerty, Daniel L; Taunton, Roma Lee

    2003-01-01

    Understanding how quality improvement affects costs is important. Unfortunately, low-cost, reliable ways of measuring direct costs are scarce. This article builds on the principles of process improvement to develop a costing strategy that meets both criteria. Process-based costing has 4 steps: developing a flowchart, estimating resource use, valuing resources, and calculating direct costs. To illustrate the technique, this article uses it to cost the care planning process in 3 long-term care facilities. We conclude that process-based costing is easy to implement; generates reliable, valid data; and allows nursing managers to assess the costs of new or modified processes.

  3. Heber Ethanol Fuel Facility, Imperial Valley, California. Quarterly report No. 2, March 1981-May 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-08-01

    The purposed project is a commercial-scale ethanol-fuel facility with a capacity of twenty million gallons per year of fuel-grade ethanol. In addition, 70,000 tons per year of distillers dried grains will be produced. The following tasks and issues are addressed: process engineering - process descriptions, plant layout, and design; economics and finance - overview of capital and operating costs; environmental analysis - preliminary project description; and permit processing and legal issues. (MHR)

  4. Metabolic cost of level-ground walking with a robotic transtibial prosthesis combining push-off power and nonlinear damping behaviors: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanggang Feng; Jinying Zhu; Qining Wang

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in robotic technology are facilitating the development of robotic prostheses. Our previous studies proposed a lightweight robotic transtibial prosthesis with a damping control strategy. To improve the performance of power assistance, in this paper, we redesign the prosthesis and improve the control strategy by supplying extra push-off power. A male transtibial amputee subject volunteered to participate in the study. Preliminary experimental results show that the proposed prosthesis with push-off control improves energy expenditure by a percentage ranged from 9.72 % to 14.99 % for level-ground walking compared with the one using non-push-off control.

  5. Cost - utility analysis of parenteral antibiotics prescribed in medical wards in a tertiary care health facility in southern province of Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukshmy Menik Hettihewa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Parenteral antibiotic (PA prescription pattern in a hospital will directly influence the annual budget allocation, development of bacterial resistance and occurrence of unnecessary adverse drug reactions if it is done with poor adherence to the standard guidelines of prescription. As specialist in the field we understand the need of conducting economic studies in relation to the cost and utility of PA prescription pattern. It will be helpful to predict the drug procurement plan for the next year and also to prevent unnecessary complications mentioned above. Objective: Our main objective was to analyze the cost/utility relationship of PA drugs which were used in medical wards in this hospital according to the top ten of the cost (TTTC and the top ten of the consumption (TTCS. Materials and method : Aggregate data from the pharmacy record books were collected for year 2010 from indoor pharmacy. Unit prize was obtained from medical supplies division. Total quantity consumed by each medical ward was considered for analysis of the cost /utility relationship. Two top ten lists were prepared according to the cost and the consumption respectively for medical wards and the correlation was analyzed using non parametric testing with spearman test. Results: Regarding PA drugs used in this hospital, 7/10 PA drugs in TTTC are not included in the TTCS. Out of the total cost for TTTC, 82.6% of the cost had been spent for the PA drugs which are not in the TTCS and 17.5% of the cost of TTTC was used to purchase only three drugs from the TTCS. But these three drugs had contributed only 28% of top ten consumption. 72% of the PA drugs in TTCS were not costly drugs and highly consumed in medical wards. Correlation was significantly positive between cost and utility of PA drugs. ( r=-0.91,p<0.001 Conclusion: Majority of the consumed PA drugs are non-costly and it indicates the prescriptions had been done according to the rational guidelines including

  6. Cost-effectiveness of noninvasive ventilation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-related respiratory failure in Indian hospitals without ICU facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shraddha P Patel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The majority of Indian hospitals do not provide intensive care unit (ICU care or ward-based noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV. Because no mechanical ventilation or NIV is available in these hospitals, the majority of patients suffering from respiratory failure die. Objective: To perform a cost-effective analysis of two strategies (ward-based NIV with concurrent standard treatment vs standard treatment alone in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD respiratory failure patients treated in Indian hospitals without ICU care. Materials and Methods: A decision-analytical model was created to compare the cost-effectiveness for the two strategies. Estimates from the literature were used for parameters in the model. Future costs were discounted at 3%. All costs were reported in USD (2012. One-way, two-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analysis were performed. The time horizon was lifetime and perspective was societal. Results: The NIV strategy resulted in 17.7% more survival and was slightly more costly (increased cost of $101 (USD 2012 but resulted in increased quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs (1.67 QALY. The cost-effectiveness (2012 USD/QALY in the standard and NIV groups was $78/QALY ($535.02/6.82 and $75/QALY ($636.33/8.49, respectively. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER was only $61 USD/QALY. This was substantially lower than the gross domestic product (GDP per capita for India (1489 USD, suggesting the NIV strategy was very cost effective. Using a 5% discount rate resulted in only minimally different results. Probabilistic analysis suggests that NIV strategy was preferred 100% of the time when willingness to pay was >$250 2012 USD. Conclusion: Ward-based NIV treatment is cost-effective in India, and may increase survival of patients with COPD respiratory failure when ICU is not available.

  7. Bates solar industrial process-steam application: preliminary design review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-07

    The design is analyzed for a parabolic trough solar process heat system for a cardboard corrugation fabrication facility in Texas. The program is briefly reviewed, including an analysis of the plant and process. The performance modeling for the system is discussed, and the solar system structural design, collector subsystem, heat transport and distribution subsystem are analyzed. The selection of the heat transfer fluid, and ullage and fluid maintenance are discussed, and the master control system and data acquisition system are described. Testing of environmental degradation of materials is briefly discussed. A brief preliminary cost analysis is included. (LEW)

  8. Avaliação preliminar dos custos de resfriamento de laranja in natura Preliminary evaluation of cooling cost of fresh orange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BÁRBARA TERUEL

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta um estudo para determinar os custos do resfriamento de laranja Valência (Citrus Sinensis Osbeck num sistema com ar forçado (Ta=1ºC e UR=88,4±2,0% e numa câmara convencional. Os frutos foram resfriados condicionados em dois tipos de embalagens, com área efetiva de abertura de 3,5% e 40%. O custo total anual foi determinado com o cálculo dos custos fixos e variáveis da instalação, e o custo total de resfriamento, baseado na quantidade de frutos que podem ser resfriados em cada sistema, num mesmo período. Comprovou-se que o custo de resfriamento chega a ser de 20% a 40% menor quando os frutos são resfriados no sistema com ar forçado, se comparado com o custo quando os frutos foram resfriados no sistema convencional.This paper presents study of the cooling cost of Valencia orange in a forced-air system and room cooling (Ta=1ºC and RH = 88,4±2,0%.The fruits was conditioned in two package with 3,5% and 40% of opening effective area. The annual total cost was determined with the fixed and variable costs of the installation and the cooling total costs with the quantity of cooling products in the each system for the same period. The cooling total cost is the 40 to 20% smaller, if compared with the cost when the fruits cooling in the conventional room.

  9. Record of controlling hydroponic solution temperature by using heat pumps in water culture facilities (for onions and tomatoes) and the cost thereof; Suiko saibai shisetsu (negi, tomato) no heat pump ni yoru yoeki ondo seigyo no jisseki oyobi sono cost ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonezawa, K. [Chugoku Electric Power Co. Inc., Hiroshima (Japan)

    1997-03-21

    This paper summarizes operation record of heat pumps used in controlling temperatures of hydroponic solution in onion and tomato hydroponic culture facilities. The facilities are of greenhouse structure constructed by glass, and their environmental temperatures are controlled by heaters, heat insulating curtains, and light shielding curtains. The hydroponic solution temperatures are controlled by heat pumps, with target temperatures set to 22-24{degree}C in summer and 13-18{degree}C in winter for onion, and 22-23{degree}C in summer and 18-20{degree}C in winter for tomato. The hydroponic solution temperatures for onion and tomato were maintained at the targeted temperatures even if the outside temperature has varied from maximum to minimum. The hydroponic solution controlling cost as calculated from the heat pump facility cost and annual onion harvest amounted to 51 yen/kg, which corresponds to about 6% of the shipment price of the onion. In the case of tomato, the hydroponic solution temperature having fallen below 15{degree}C causes delay in growth and Mg depletion. Temperatures higher than that develop reduction in physiological function of roots, and the root rot disease. Controlling the hydroponic solution should have resulted in stabilized harvest. The solution controlling cost for tomato is 15 yen/kg, which is about 5% of the shipment price. 3 refs., 15 figs.

  10. The use of a low cost 3D scanning and printing tool in the manufacture of custom-made foot orthoses: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Custom foot orthoses are currently recognized as the gold standard for treatment of foot and lower limb pathology. While foam and plaster casting methods are most widely used in clinical practice, technology has emerged, permitting the use of 3D scanning, computer aided design (CAD) and computer aided manufacturing (CAM) for fabrication of foot molds and custom foot orthotic components. Adoption of 3D printing, as a form of CAM, requires further investigation for use as a clinical tool. This study provides a preliminary description of a new method to manufacture foot orthoses using a novel 3D scanner and printer and compare gait kinematic outputs from shod and traditional plaster casted orthotics. Findings One participant (male, 25 years) was included with no lower extremity injuries. Foot molds were created from both plaster casting and 3D scanning/printing methods. Custom foot orthoses were then fabricated from each mold. Lower body plug-in-gait with the Oxford Foot Model on the right foot was collected for both orthotic and control (shod) conditions. The medial longitudinal arch was measured using arch height index (AHI) where a decrease in AHI represented a drop in arch height. The lowest AHI was 21.2 mm in the running shoes, followed by 21.4 mm wearing the orthoses made using 3D scanning and printing, with the highest AHI of 22.0 mm while the participant wore the plaster casted orthoses. Conclusion This preliminary study demonstrated a small increase in AHI with the 3D printing orthotic compared to the shod condition. A larger sample size may demonstrate significant patterns for the tested conditions. PMID:25015013

  11. The National Ignition Facility project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paisner, J.A.; Boyes, J.D.; Kumpan, S.A.; Sorem, M.

    1996-06-01

    The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in January 1993 as part of a Key Decision Zero (KD0), justification of Mission Need. Motivated by the progress to date by the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program in meeting the Nova Technical Contract goals established by the National Academy of Sciences in 1989, the Secretary requested a design using a solid-state laser driver operating at the third harmonic (0.35 {mu}m) of neodymium (Nd) glass. The participating ICF laboratories signed a Memorandum of Agreement in August 1993, and established a Project organization, including a technical team from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Since then, the authors completed the NIF conceptual design, based on standard construction at a generic DOE Defense Program`s site, and issued a 7,000-page, 27-volume CDR in May 1994. Over the course of the conceptual design study, several other key documents were generated, including a Facilities Requirements Document, a Conceptual Design Scope and Plan, a Target Physics Design Document, a Laser Design Cost Basis Document, a Functional Requirements Document, an Experimental Plan for Indirect Drive Ignition, and a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) Document. DOE used the PHA to categorize the NIF as a low-hazard, non-nuclear facility. This article presents an overview of the NIF project.

  12. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  13. Preliminary site characterization summary and engineering evaluation/cost analysis for Site 2, New Fuel Farm, Naval Air Station Fallon, Fallon, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronk, T.A.; Smuin, D.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schlosser, R.M. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States)

    1991-09-01

    This report addresses subsurface contamination associated with Site 2, the New Fuel Farm at Naval Air Station Fallon (NAS Fallon), Nevada and is an integral part of Phase 2 of the Installation Restoration Program (IR Program) currently underway at the facility. This report: (1) reviews and assesses environmental information characterizing Site 2; (2) determine if site-characterization information is sufficient to design and evaluate removal actions; and, (3) investigates, develops, and describes any removal actions deemed feasible. Previous environmental investigations at Site 2 indicate the presence of floating product (primarily JP-5, jet fuel) on the water table underlying the facility. While the extent of floating-produce plumes has been characterized, the degree of associated soil and groundwater contamination remains uncertain. A comprehensive characterization of soil and groundwater contamination will be completed as the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study progresses. Corrective actions are recommended at this time to remove free-phase floating product. Implementing these removal actions will also provide additional information which will be used to direct further investigations of the extent, mobility, and potential environmental threat from soil and groundwater contaminants at this side.

  14. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  15. Development and optimisation of cost effective thermal energy storage systems for solar space heating by means of a microprocessor controlled test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, R.R.; Manley, B.J.W.; Bell, M.A.; Wood, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the results of three years research into thermal energy stores for active solar space heating. The project had three major aims: 1. Experimental research and development on thermally effective, low cost TES technologies. As a result, the thermal performance of stores under a very wide range of operating conditions is known. 2. Computer modelling of complete solar space heating systems to evaluate the potential improvements in annual solar fraction brought about by specific designs of store, the models being validated by the experimental work. 3. Cost optimisation of solar space heating systems, incorporating annual simulations, to compare the cost effectiveness of specific designs of store over the systems' lifetime and to determine the overall economic viability of active solar space heating.

  16. Work plan for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP), commissioned by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program, is to place four primary high-risk surplus facilities with 28 associated ancillary facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition as rapidly and economically as possible. The facilities will be deactivated and left in a condition suitable for an extended period of minimized surveillance and maintenance (S and M) prior to decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D). These four facilities include two reactor facilities containing spent fuel. One of these reactor facilities also contains 55 tons of sodium with approximately 34 tons containing activated sodium-22, 2.5 tons of lithium hydride, approximately 100 tons of potentially contaminated lead, and several other hazardous materials as well as bulk quantities of contaminated scrap metals. The other two facilities to be transferred include a facility with a bank of hot cells containing high levels of transferable contamination and also a facility containing significant quantities of uranyl nitrate and quantities of transferable contamination. This work plan documents the objectives, technical requirements, and detailed work plans--including preliminary schedules, milestones, and conceptual FY 1996 cost estimates--for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan has been developed by the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO).

  17. Medicação de alto custo para portador de sofrimento psíquico: um estudo preliminar dos custos = High Cost Drugs for carrier of psychic suffering: a preliminary study of costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Correa Barbosa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo identificar os valores dosmedicamentos de alto custo utilizados por portadores de Esquizofrenia Refratária atendidos em unidade ambulatorial. O estudo foi realizado através de uma análise de documentos em um Centro de Apoio Psicossocial, no período de junho de 2005 a maio de 2006, com 33usuários que faziam uso da medicação. A análise dos dados revelou que os medicamentos mais utilizados para os portadores de Esquizofrenia Refratária foram: clozapina de 100 mg e risperidona de 2 mg. Observou-se que o tratamento com o medicamento olanzapina 10 mg tem um custo mais alto e com o medicamento risperidona de 2 mg apresenta um custo mais baixo. Verificou-se que é necessário o monitoramento do consumo e dos custos dos medicamentos de alto custo, uma vez que fornece subsídios para melhor gerenciamento dos gastos e novos investimentos no serviço. Além disso, identificou-se também a necessidade de mais estudos na área para contribuir com o controle de custos.The present work aims to raise the costs of high-cost drugs used to treat patients of Refractory Schizophrenia in ambulatory unit. The study was carried out in the Psychosocial Support Center, which treated 33 patients with these medications, during the period of June, 2005 to May, 2006. Data analysis disclosed that the mostly used drugs to treat the carriers of Refractory Schizophrenia were: clozapina and risperidona. It was observed that the treatment with olanzapina is more expensive than that with risperidona. The study concluded that the analysis of the consumption and costs of drugs of high cost is necessary to subside better management of the expenses and new investments in the service. Moreover, the necessity of more studies in the area was also identified to contribute with the control of costs.

  18. Facile and cost effective synthesis of mesoporous spinel NiCo2O4 as an anode for high lithium storage capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Harsharaj S.; Kalubarme, Ramchandra S.; Park, Choong-Nyeon; Kim, Jaekook; Park, Chan-Jin

    2014-08-01

    To fulfill the high power and high energy density demands for Li-ion batteries (LIBs) new anode materials need to be explored to replace conventional graphite. Herein, we report the urea assisted facile co-precipitation synthesis of spinel NiCo2O4 and its application as an anode material for LIBs. The synthesized NiCo2O4 exhibited an urchin-like microstructure and polycrystalline and mesoporous nature. In addition, the mesoporous NiCo2O4 electrode exhibited an initial discharge capacity of 1095 mA h g-1 and maintained a reversible capacity of 1000 mA h g-1 for 400 cycles at 0.5 C-rate. The reversible capacity of NiCo2O4 could still be maintained at 718 mA h g-1, even at 10 C. The mesoporous NiCo2O4 exhibits great potential as an anode material for LIBs with the advantages of unique performance and facile preparation.To fulfill the high power and high energy density demands for Li-ion batteries (LIBs) new anode materials need to be explored to replace conventional graphite. Herein, we report the urea assisted facile co-precipitation synthesis of spinel NiCo2O4 and its application as an anode material for LIBs. The synthesized NiCo2O4 exhibited an urchin-like microstructure and polycrystalline and mesoporous nature. In addition, the mesoporous NiCo2O4 electrode exhibited an initial discharge capacity of 1095 mA h g-1 and maintained a reversible capacity of 1000 mA h g-1 for 400 cycles at 0.5 C-rate. The reversible capacity of NiCo2O4 could still be maintained at 718 mA h g-1, even at 10 C. The mesoporous NiCo2O4 exhibits great potential as an anode material for LIBs with the advantages of unique performance and facile preparation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and additional experimental results. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02183e

  19. Exploiting Performance of Different Low-Cost Sensors for Small Amplitude Oscillatory Motion Monitoring: Preliminary Comparisons in View of Possible Integration

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Benedetti; Roberta Ravanelli; Monica Moroni; Andrea Nascetti; Mattia Crespi

    2016-01-01

    We address the problem of low amplitude oscillatory motion detection through different low-cost sensors: a LIS3LV02DQ MEMS accelerometer, a Microsoft Kinect v2 range camera, and a uBlox 6 GPS receiver. Several tests were performed using a one-direction vibrating table with different oscillation frequencies (in the range 1.5–3 Hz) and small challenging amplitudes (0.02 m and 0.03 m). A Mikrotron EoSens high-resolution camera was used to give reference data. A dedicated software tool was develo...

  20. Wind Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurie, Carol

    2017-02-01

    This book takes readers inside the places where daily discoveries shape the next generation of wind power systems. Energy Department laboratory facilities span the United States and offer wind research capabilities to meet industry needs. The facilities described in this book make it possible for industry players to increase reliability, improve efficiency, and reduce the cost of wind energy -- one discovery at a time. Whether you require blade testing or resource characterization, grid integration or high-performance computing, Department of Energy laboratory facilities offer a variety of capabilities to meet your wind research needs.

  1. Wind Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    2017-02-01

    This book takes readers inside the places where daily discoveries shape the next generation of wind power systems. Energy Department laboratory facilities span the United States and offer wind research capabilities to meet industry needs. The facilities described in this book make it possible for industry players to increase reliability, improve efficiency, and reduce the cost of wind energy -- one discovery at a time. Whether you require blade testing or resource characterization, grid integration or high-performance computing, Department of Energy laboratory facilities offer a variety of capabilities to meet your wind research needs.

  2. A new approach to obtain metric data from video surveillance: Preliminary evaluation of a low-cost stereo-photogrammetric system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Paolo; Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela; Pellegrinelli, Alberto; Balboni, Juri; Furini, Alessio

    2017-02-01

    Using an interdisciplinary approach the authors demonstrate the possibility to obtain reliable anthropometric data of a subject by means of a new video surveillance system. In general the use of current video surveillance systems provides law enforcement with useful data to solve many crimes. Unfortunately the quality of the images and the way in which they are taken often makes it very difficult to judge the compatibility between suspect and perpetrator. In this paper, the authors present the results obtained with a low-cost photogrammetric video surveillance system based on a pair of common surveillance cameras synchronized with each other. The innovative aspect of the system is that it allows estimation with considerable accuracy not only of body height (error 0.1-3.1cm, SD 1.8-4.5cm) but also of other anthropometric characters of the subject, consequently with better determination of the biological profile and greatly increased effectiveness of the judgment of compatibility.

  3. A Low-Cost GPS GSM/GPRS Telemetry System: Performance in Stationary Field Tests and Preliminary Data on Wild Otters (Lutra lutra)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaglietta, Lorenzo; Martins, Bruno Herlander; de Jongh, Addy; Mira, António; Boitani, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing worldwide use of global positioning system (GPS) telemetry in wildlife research, it has never been tested on any freshwater diving animal or in the peculiar conditions of the riparian habitat, despite this latter being one of the most important habitat types for many animal taxa. Moreover, in most cases, the GPS devices used have been commercial and expensive, limiting their use in low-budget projects. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed a low-cost, easily constructed GPS GSM/GPRS (Global System for Mobile Communications/General Packet Radio Service) and examined its performance in stationary tests, by assessing the influence of different habitat types, including the riparian, as well as water submersion and certain climatic and environmental variables on GPS fix-success rate and accuracy. We then tested the GPS on wild diving animals, applying it, for the first time, to an otter species (Lutra lutra). The rate of locations acquired during the stationary tests reached 63.2%, with an average location error of 8.94 m (SD = 8.55). GPS performance in riparian habitats was principally affected by water submersion and secondarily by GPS inclination and position within the riverbed. Temporal and spatial correlations of location estimates accounted for some variation in the data sets. GPS-tagged otters also provided accurate locations and an even higher GPS fix-success rate (68.2%). Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that GPS telemetry is reliably applicable to riparian and even diving freshwater animals. They also highlight the need, in GPS wildlife studies, for performing site-specific pilot studies on GPS functioning as well as for taking into account eventual spatial and temporal correlation of location estimates. The limited price, small dimensions, and high performance of the device presented here make it a useful and cost-effective tool for studies on otters and other aquatic or terrestrial medium

  4. A low-cost GPS GSM/GPRS telemetry system: performance in stationary field tests and preliminary data on wild otters (Lutra lutra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Quaglietta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the increasing worldwide use of global positioning system (GPS telemetry in wildlife research, it has never been tested on any freshwater diving animal or in the peculiar conditions of the riparian habitat, despite this latter being one of the most important habitat types for many animal taxa. Moreover, in most cases, the GPS devices used have been commercial and expensive, limiting their use in low-budget projects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed a low-cost, easily constructed GPS GSM/GPRS (Global System for Mobile Communications/General Packet Radio Service and examined its performance in stationary tests, by assessing the influence of different habitat types, including the riparian, as well as water submersion and certain climatic and environmental variables on GPS fix-success rate and accuracy. We then tested the GPS on wild diving animals, applying it, for the first time, to an otter species (Lutra lutra. The rate of locations acquired during the stationary tests reached 63.2%, with an average location error of 8.94 m (SD = 8.55. GPS performance in riparian habitats was principally affected by water submersion and secondarily by GPS inclination and position within the riverbed. Temporal and spatial correlations of location estimates accounted for some variation in the data sets. GPS-tagged otters also provided accurate locations and an even higher GPS fix-success rate (68.2%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that GPS telemetry is reliably applicable to riparian and even diving freshwater animals. They also highlight the need, in GPS wildlife studies, for performing site-specific pilot studies on GPS functioning as well as for taking into account eventual spatial and temporal correlation of location estimates. The limited price, small dimensions, and high performance of the device presented here make it a useful and cost-effective tool for studies on otters and other aquatic or

  5. A compact low cost “master–slave” double crystal monochromator for x-ray cameras calibration of the Laser MégaJoule Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, S., E-mail: sebastien.hubert@cea.fr; Prévot, V.

    2014-12-21

    The Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA-CESTA, France) built a specific double crystal monochromator (DCM) to perform calibration of x-ray cameras (CCD, streak and gated cameras) by means of a multiple anode diode type x-ray source for the MégaJoule Laser Facility. This DCM, based on pantograph geometry, was specifically modeled to respond to relevant engineering constraints and requirements. The major benefits are mechanical drive of the second crystal on the first one, through a single drive motor, as well as compactness of the entire device. Designed for flat beryl or Ge crystals, this DCM covers the 0.9–10 keV range of our High Energy X-ray Source. In this paper we present the mechanical design of the DCM, its features quantitatively measured and its calibration to finally provide monochromatized spectra displaying spectral purities better than 98%.

  6. Preliminary designs: passive solar manufactured housing. Technical status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-12

    The criteria established to guide the development of the preliminary designs are listed. Three preliminary designs incorporating direct gain and/or sunspace are presented. Costs, drawings, and supporting calculations are included. (MHR)

  7. Exploiting Performance of Different Low-Cost Sensors for Small Amplitude Oscillatory Motion Monitoring: Preliminary Comparisons in View of Possible Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Benedetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the problem of low amplitude oscillatory motion detection through different low-cost sensors: a LIS3LV02DQ MEMS accelerometer, a Microsoft Kinect v2 range camera, and a uBlox 6 GPS receiver. Several tests were performed using a one-direction vibrating table with different oscillation frequencies (in the range 1.5–3 Hz and small challenging amplitudes (0.02 m and 0.03 m. A Mikrotron EoSens high-resolution camera was used to give reference data. A dedicated software tool was developed to retrieve Kinect v2 results. The capabilities of the VADASE algorithm were employed to process uBlox 6 GPS receiver observations. In the investigated time interval (in the order of tens of seconds the results obtained indicate that displacements were detected with the resolution of fractions of millimeters with MEMS accelerometer and Kinect v2 and few millimeters with uBlox 6. MEMS accelerometer displays the lowest noise but a significant bias, whereas Kinect v2 and uBlox 6 appear more stable. The results suggest the possibility of sensor integration both for indoor (MEMS accelerometer + Kinect v2 and for outdoor (MEMS accelerometer + uBlox 6 applications and seem promising for structural monitoring applications.

  8. Soft-Etching Copper and Silver Electrodes for Significant Device Performance Improvement toward Facile, Cost-Effective, Bottom-Contacted, Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zongrui; Dong, Huanli; Zou, Ye; Zhao, Qiang; Tan, Jiahui; Liu, Jie; Lu, Xiuqiang; Xiao, Jinchong; Zhang, Qichun; Hu, Wenping

    2016-03-01

    Poor charge injection and transport at the electrode/semiconductor contacts has been so far a severe performance hurdle for bottom-contact bottom-gate (BCBG) organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). Here, we have developed a simple, economic, and effective method to improve the carrier injection efficiency and obtained high-performance devices with low cost and widely used source/drain (S/D) electrodes (Ag/Cu). Through the simple electrode etching process, the work function of the electrodes is more aligned with the semiconductors, which reduces the energy barrier and facilitates the charge injection. Besides, the formation of the thinned electrode edge with desirable micro/nanostructures not only leads to the enlarged contact side area beneficial for the carrier injection but also is in favor of the molecular self-organization for continuous crystal growth at the contact/active channel interface, which is better for the charge injection and transport. These effects give rise to the great reduction of contact resistance and the amazing improvement of the low-cost bottom-contact configuration OFETs performance.

  9. Dramatic property enhancement in polyetherimide using low-cost commercially functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes via a facile solution processing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Li, Bin; Caceres, Santiago; Maguire, Russ G.; Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2009-11-01

    Polyetherimide (PEI) has excellent mechanical and thermal properties, and exceptional fire resistance. Developing even broader multi-functionality in PEI/carbon nanotube (CNT) composites for industrial applications is an alluring but challenging goal, due to processing difficulties related to the high pressure and temperature needed to achieve effective flow for this polymer, and costly and complex treatments of the CNTs. Here we report the fabrication of PEI nanocomposite films using low-cost commercially functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), and a simple and innovative process, achieving exceptional properties with only 0.5 wt% of MWNTs, including an increase in electrical conductivity of 12 orders of magnitude, accompanied by an unprecedented increase of 86 °C in thermal decomposition temperature (higher service temperature). Field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed a high degree of uniform dispersion among the MWNTs, superb polymer-MWNT interaction and formation of a spatially homogeneous nanotube network within the matrix. The enhancement in these properties suggests great potential use for this developed processing approach and the resulting nanocomposites for multi-functional coating or interfacing materials in aerospace and electronic industries.

  10. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  11. Removal performance of elemental mercury by low-cost adsorbents prepared through facile methods of carbonisation and activation of coconut husk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Khairiraihanna; Alias, Afidatul Shazwani; Saman, Norasikin; Song, Shiow Tien; Mat, Hanapi

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of chars and activated carbon as low-cost elemental mercury adsorbents was carried out through the carbonisation of coconut husk (pith and fibre) and the activation of chars with potassium hydroxide (KOH), respectively. The synthesised adsorbents were characterised by using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. The elemental mercury removal performance was measured using a conventional flow type packed-bed adsorber. The physical and chemical properties of the adsorbents changed as a result of the carbonisation and activation process, hence affecting on the extent of elemental mercury adsorption. The highest elemental mercury (Hg°) adsorption capacity was obtained for the CP-CHAR (3142.57 µg g(-1)), which significantly outperformed the pristine and activated carbon adsorbents, as well as higher than some adsorbents reported in the literature.

  12. Facility Microgrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  13. Preliminary hazards analysis -- vitrification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coordes, D.; Ruggieri, M.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for mixed waste vitrification by joule heating. The purpose of performing a PHA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PHA is then followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title 1 and 2 design. The PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during the facility`s construction and testing. It should be completed before routine operation of the facility commences. This PHA addresses the first four chapters of the safety analysis process, in accordance with the requirements of DOE Safety Guidelines in SG 830.110. The hazards associated with vitrification processes are evaluated using standard safety analysis methods which include: identification of credible potential hazardous energy sources; identification of preventative features of the facility or system; identification of mitigative features; and analyses of credible hazards. Maximal facility inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials are postulated to evaluate worst case accident consequences. These inventories were based on DOE-STD-1027-92 guidance and the surrogate waste streams defined by Mayberry, et al. Radiological assessments indicate that a facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous materials assessment indicates that a Mixed Waste Vitrification facility will be a Low Hazard facility having minimal impacts to offsite personnel and the environment.

  14. Variable gravity research facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Sean; Ancheta, Stan; Beine, Donna; Cink, Brian; Eagon, Mark; Eckstein, Brett; Luhman, Dan; Mccowan, Daniel; Nations, James; Nordtvedt, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Spin and despin requirements; sequence of activities required to assemble the Variable Gravity Research Facility (VGRF); power systems technology; life support; thermal control systems; emergencies; communication systems; space station applications; experimental activities; computer modeling and simulation of tether vibration; cost analysis; configuration of the crew compartments; and tether lengths and rotation speeds are discussed.

  15. A low cost Mobile Network System for monitoring climate and air quality of urban areas at high resolution: a preliminary application in Florence (IT) metropolitan area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibari, Camilla; Moriondo, Marco; Matese, Alessandro; Sabatini, Francesco; Trombi, Giacomo; Zaldei, Alessandro; Bindi, Marco

    2013-04-01

    The combination of the "Heat island effect" coupled with higher frequencies of extreme events (e.g. heat waves) due to climate change is of great concern for human health in urban areas. Anomalies of summer 2003, mentioned as possible typical climate for the near future summers (Schär et al., 2004), caused about 7,000 deaths in Italy and over 35,000 in the whole Europe. Furthermore, more than 50% of world's population is living in urban areas and, given the unprecedented urbanization rate that is expected in the next future, cities will likely be exposed to a growing environmental pressure in the following decades. Accordingly, climate monitoring of urban areas is gradually becoming a key element of planning that cannot be disregarded for an efficient public health management and for the development of a city scale Heat Waves Warning System tool, which is based on meteorological forecast of both air temperatures and humidity at a synoptic scale (Pascal et al., 2006). Building on these premises, a low cost Mobile Weather Station (MWS), to be placed on urban public transport, has been assembled. This mobile station logs every minute both meteorological variables (i.e. temperature and air humidity) and air quality parameters (i.e. atmospheric CO2 concentration and noise detection); the geographical position of each MWS's measurement is also recorded thanks to the built-in GPS antenna. The system, equipped with a data logger for data storage based on the open-source hardware platform Arduino, can also transmit data in real time via GPRS. The quality of meteorological and environmental data acquired by MWS was evaluated both on pre-existing steady meteorological stations of the metropolitan area of Florence (Petralli et al., 2010), and on professional research-grade data logger (Campbell CR800), logging air temperature in a non-aspirated shield by means of sensors at fast (thermocouple) and slower (digital) time response. Two prototypes of stations were thus designed

  16. Estimating costs of low-level radioactive waste disposal alternatives for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This report was prepared for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, National Low-Level Waste Management Program. It presents planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for four sizes of in-state low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal facilities. These PLCC estimates include preoperational and operational expenditures, all support facilities, materials, labor, closure costs, and long-term institutional care and monitoring costs. It is intended that this report bc used as a broad decision making tool for evaluating one of the several complex factors that must be examined when deciding between various LLRW management options -- relative costs. Because the underlying assumptions of these analyses will change as the Board decides how it will manage Massachusett`s waste and the specific characteristics any disposal facility will have, the results of this study are not absolute and should only be used to compare the relative costs of the options presented. The disposal technology selected for this analysis is aboveground earth-mounded vaults. These vaults are reinforced concrete structures where low-level waste is emplaced and later covered with a multi-layered earthen cap. The ``base case`` PLCC estimate was derived from a preliminary feasibility design developed for the Illinois Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility. This PLCC report describes facility operations and details the procedure used to develop the base case PLCC estimate for each facility component and size. Sensitivity analyses were performed on the base case PLCC estimate by varying several factors to determine their influences upon the unit disposal costs. The report presents the results of the sensitivity analyses for the five most significant cost factors.

  17. Preliminary design study of underground pumped hydro and compressed-air energy storage in hard rock. Volume 8: Design approaches. UPH. Appendix E: Lower reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Operational, construction, and geotechnical requirements were examined. Overriding considerations including operating range, volume, construction methods, cavern cross section and reservoir layout were studied within the context of minimizing facility costs and optimizing the plant layout. The study led to a preliminary arrangement of fourteen parallel caverns, each 60 ft wide by 85 ft high in cross section and 3610 ft in length. The requirements for and preliminary design of the intermediate reservoir in the case of a two step UPH facility is also described. The design and the cost estimates presented are based on the requirements for a 2000 MW plant providing 20,000 MWh of storage at a nominal head of 4600 ft.

  18. Future proton and mixed-field irradiation facilities with slow extraction for LHC operation phase and for LHC upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, Ralph Wolfgang; Brugger, Markus; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Feldbaumer, Eduard; Garrido, Mar Capeans; Glaser, Maurice; Kramer, Daniel; Linssen, Lucie; Losito, Roberto; Moll, Michael; Rembser, Christoph; Silari, Marco; Thurel, Yves; Tsesmelis, Emmanuel; Vincke, Helmut; CERN. Geneva. The LHC experiments Committee; LHCC

    2010-01-01

    In the present proposal we present the need for improved proton and mixed-field irradiation facilities with slow beam extraction at CERN. Strong needs are expressed by both the detector and accelerator communities and concern the LHC operation era as well as the upgrades of machine and experiments. The current facilities and test areas have a number of limitations and drawbacks. Preliminary studies indicate that there are possibilities for a coherent and cost-effective approach towards improved facilities for the future. The aim of this document is to inform the LHCC and seek its recognition for the need of such facilities. In addition we would appreciate the support of the LHCC for pursuing further implementation studies at a PS East Hall location.

  19. WIPP conceptual design report. Addendum C. Cost worksheets for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-04-01

    The cost worksheets for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented. A summary cost estimate, cost estimate for surface facilities, and cost estimate for shafts and underground facilities are included. (DC)

  20. Informal proposal for an Atomic Physics Facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Meron, M.

    1986-01-01

    An Atomic Physics Facility (APF) for experiments that will use radiation from a superconducting wiggler on the NSLS X-13 port is described. The scientific justification for the APF is given and the elements of the facility are discussed. It is shown that it will be possible to conduct a uniquely varied set of experiments that can probe most aspects of atomic physics. A major component of the proposal is a heavy-ion storage ring capable of containing ions with energies of about 10 MeV/nucleon. The ring can be filled with heavy ions produced at the BNL MP Tandem Laboratory or from independent ion-source systems. A preliminary cost estimate for the facility is presented.

  1. 世界黄金协会新成本计算标准的初步解读%Preliminary interpretation of new guidance on cost metrics of World Gold Council

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡雪琳

    2014-01-01

    世界黄金协会于2013年6月底发布了《世界黄金协会总维持成本和总成本指引(非一般公认会计原则)》,提出了“总维持成本”的新概念和“总成本”的新计算标准。“总维持成本”指维持目前在产矿山产能的所有支出;“总成本”包含总维持成本和总非维持成本。新成本计算标准将资本支出一次性费用化,计入发生当年的损益;而目前国内黄金矿企的成本核算对于资本支出则是先予以资本化,然后每年通过折旧计入损益。本文通过分析新成本计算标准的特点,以及比较国内黄金矿业企业目前的成本核算与新成本计算标准存在的差异,认为二者之间最大的差异在于对资本支出的处理不同,从而得出不建议国内黄金矿业企业采纳该指引的初步结论。%At the end of June 2013 ,the World Gold Council published a Guidance Note on “all-in sustaining costs” and “all-in costs” metrics ,which develops a new concept of “all-in sustaining costs” and the new metric of “all-in costs” .“All-in sustaining costs” refer to all sustaining costs related to existing operations .“All-in costs” include all-in sustaining costs and all-in non-sustaining costs .The new metric includes the capital expenditure (“capex”) in profits & losses one-off when occurs ,whereas the cost accounting of Chinese gold mining companies capitalizes the capex when occurs and charges the related depreciation into profits & losses annually .The article analyses the new metric ,compares it with current cost accounting of Chinese gold mining companies and concludes that the major difference is the different treatment of capex .The preliminary opinion is that Chinese gold mining companies had better not adopt the new Guidance Note .

  2. National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). Project definition study: Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagunas-Solar, M.C.

    1995-02-15

    This report describes a five-year plan for the construction and commissioning of a reliable and versatile NBTF facility for the production of high-quality, high-yield radioisotopes for research, biomedical, and industrial applications. The report is organized in nine sections providing, in consecutive order, responses to the nine questions posed by the U.S. Department of Energy in its solicitation for the NBTF Project Definition Study. In order to preserve direct correspondence (e.g., Sec. 3 = 3rd item), this Introduction is numbered {open_quotes}0.{close_quotes} Accelerator and facility designs are covered in Section 1 (Accelerator Design) and Section 2 (Facility Design). Preliminary estimates of capital costs are detailed in Section 3 (Design and Construction Costs). Full licensing requirements, including federal, state, and local ordinances, are discussed in Section 4 (Permits). A plan for the management of hazardous materials to be generated by NBTF is presented in Section 5 (Waste Management). An evaluation of NBTF`s economic viability and its potential market impact is detailed in Section 6(Business Plan), and is complemented by the plans in Section 7 (Operating Plan) and Section 8 (Radioisotope Plan). Finally, a plan for NBTF`s research, education, and outreach programs is presented in Section 9 (Research and Education Programs).

  3. On Constrained Facility Location Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Lin Li; Peng Zhang; Da-Ming Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Given m facilities each with an opening cost, n demands, and distance between every demand and facility,the Facility Location problem finds a solution which opens some facilities to connect every demand to an opened facility such that the total cost of the solution is minimized. The k-Facility Location problem further requires that the number of opened facilities is at most k, where k is a parameter given in the instance of the problem. We consider the Facility Location problems satisfying that for every demand the ratio of the longest distance to facilities and the shortest distance to facilities is at most w, where w is a predefined constant. Using the local search approach with scaling technique and error control technique, for any arbitrarily small constant ∈ > 0, we give a polynomial-time approximation algorithm for the ω-constrained Facility Location problem with approximation ratio 1 + √ω + 1 + ∈, which significantly improves the previous best known ratio (ω + 1)/α for some 1 ≤α≤ 2, and a polynomial-time approximation algorithm for the ω-constrained κ-Facility Location problem with approximation ratio ω + 1 + ∈. On the aspect of approximation hardness, we prove that unless NP (C) DTIME(nO(loglogn)), the ω-constrained Facility Location problem cannot be approximated within 1 + √ω-1,which slightly improves the previous best known hardness result 1.243 + 0.316 ln(ω - 1). The experimental results on the standard test instances of Facility Location problem show that our algorithm also has good performance in practice.

  4. The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, andImproving Symptoms:Transforming Institutional Care approach: preliminary data from the implementation of a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services nursing facility demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Nazir, Arif; Holtz, Laura R; Maurer, Helen; Miller, Ellen; Hickman, Susan E; La Mantia, Michael A; Bennett, Merih; Arling, Greg; Sachs, Greg A

    2015-01-01

    The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, and Improving Symptoms: Transforming Institutional Care (OPTIMISTIC) project aims to reduce avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay residents enrolled in 19 central Indiana nursing facilities. This clinical demonstration project, funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovations Center, places a registered nurse in each nursing facility to implement an evidence-based quality improvement program with clinical support from nurse practitioners. A description of the model is presented, and early implementation experiences during the first year of the project are reported. Important elements include better medical care through implementation of Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers tools and chronic care management, enhanced transitional care, and better palliative care with a focus on systematic advance care planning. There were 4,035 long-stay residents in 19 facilities enrolled in OPTIMISTIC between February 2013 and January 2014. Root-cause analyses were performed for all 910 acute transfers of these long stay residents. Of these transfers, the project RN evaluated 29% as avoidable (57% were not avoidable and 15% were missing), and opportunities for quality improvement were identified in 54% of transfers. Lessons learned in early implementation included defining new clinical roles, integrating into nursing facility culture, managing competing facility priorities, communicating with multiple stakeholders, and developing a system for collecting and managing data. The success of the overall initiative will be measured primarily according to reduction in avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay nursing facility residents.

  5. Dry Well Storage Facility conceptual design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-01

    The Dry Well Storage Facility described is assumed to be located adjacent to or near a Spent Fuel Receiving and Packaging Facility and/or a Packaged Fuel Transfer Facility. Performance requirements, quality levels and codes and standards, schedule and methods of performance, special requirements, quality assurance program, and cost estimate are discussed. Appendices on major mechanical equipment and electric power requirements are included.

  6. 18 CFR 154.307 - Joint facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint facilities. 154... Changes § 154.307 Joint facilities. The Statements required by § 154.312 must show all costs (investment... in the subject rate change and are associated with joint facilities. The methods used in making such...

  7. 24 CFR 1710.214 - Recreational facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recreational facilities. 1710.214... § 1710.214 Recreational facilities. (a) Submit a synopsis of the proposed plans and estimated cost of any proposed or partially constructed recreational facility disclosed in § 1710.114. This item should...

  8. Grid-Connected Integrated Community Energy System. Phase II: detailed feasibility analysis and preliminary design. Final report, Stage 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the economic and environmental feasibility of a Grid-Connected Integrated Community Energy System (ICES) based on a multifuel (gas, oil, treated solid wastes, and coal) design with which to serve any or all the institutions within the Louisiana Medical Complex in cooperation with the Health Education Authority of Louisiana (HEAL). In this context, a preliminary design is presented which consists of ICES plant description and engineering analyses. This demonstration system is capable of meeting 1982 system demands by providing 10,000 tons of air conditioning and, from a boiler plant with a high-pressure steam capacity of 200,000 lb/h, approximately 125,000 lb/h of 185 psig steam to the HEAL institutions, and at the same time generating up to 7600 kW of electrical power as byproduct energy. The plant will consist of multiple-fuel steam boilers, turbine generator, turbine driven chillers and necessary auxiliaries and ancillary systems. The preliminary design for these systems and for the building to house the central plant systems are presented along with equipment and instrumentation schedules and outline specifications for major components. Costs were updated to reflect revised data. The final preliminary cost estimate includes allowances for contingencies and escalation, as well as cost for the plant site and professional fees. This design is for a facility specifically with coal burning capability, recognizing that it is more capital-intensive than a gas/oil facility. In the opinion of the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR), the relatively modest allocations made for scrubbing and ash removal involve less than is implied in standard industry (EPRI) cost increments of over 30% for these duties. The preliminary environmental assessment is included. (LCL)

  9. Innovative Coatings Potentially Lower Facility Maintenance Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Through extensive testing at Stennis Space Center, Nanocepts Inc. of Lexington, Kentucky, received key validation of the effectiveness of its photocatalytic coatings. Now a NASA Dual Use Technology partner, the company s commercial coatings offer unique environmental and medical benefits, and their self-cleaning properties help limit grime buildup on buildings.

  10. Proton beam therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  11. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  12. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  13. Canyon Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  14. Report of study group 3.1 ''technological and economical developments for cost reduction of LNG facilities''; Rapport du groupe d'etude 3.1 ''developpements economiques et technologiques pour la reduction des couts dans les installations de GNL''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapallini, R.

    2000-07-01

    The design, engineering and operation of LNG base load liquefaction and re-gasification facilities is now considered a mature technology. However, process efficiency at these plants is limited by fundamental thermodynamic principles and no radical technology breakthroughs are expected in the near future. Three important aspects affecting the cost of production are the molecular weight of the gas, the amount of nitrogen in the feed and the acid gas composition. Variations in composition will also affect the design of the facilities and production rate. Previous projects have optimised economies of scale, using processes based on large industrial gas turbines, to achieve the minimum unit cost for LNG production. LNG producers have continued to focus on larger train designs to further capitalize on economies of scale as well as continued expansion of existing facilities. The latest plant designs expect the optimum integration with existing facilities to be a major factor in optimising specific capital costs. Whilst design codes and standards have not been discussed in many papers on LNG cost reduction, it is generally accepted that project specifications can significantly impact the project cost. The cost of equipment can be significantly inflated by onerous specifications with non standard requirements that vendors have trouble meeting. The possibility of developing gas projects will mainly be determined by the requirements of power generation and/or the industrial sector. As far as power generation is concerned, expansion will rely greatly on combined cycle plants. The competitiveness of LNG as regards power generation can be further improved by adopting integrated solutions. As in all other industrial projects, one of the first concerns for the investor when he envisages building an LNG liquefaction or re-gasification terminal is the selection of the site where the terminal will be located. (author)

  15. Solar Stirling power generation - Systems analysis and preliminary tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, M. K.; Wu, Y.-C.; Moynihan, P. I.; Day, F. D., III

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of an electric power generation system utilizing a sun-tracking parabolic concentrator and a Stirling engine/linear alternator is being evaluated. Performance predictions and cost analysis of a proposed large distributed system are discussed. Design details and preliminary test results are presented for a 9.5 ft diameter parabolic dish at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Caltech) Table Mountain Test Facility. Low temperature calorimetric measurements were conducted to evaluate the concentrator performance, and a helium flow system is being used to test the solar receiver at anticipated working fluid temperatures (up to 650 or 1200 C) to evaluate the receiver thermal performance. The receiver body is designed to adapt to a free-piston Stirling engine which powers a linear alternator assembly for direct electric power generation. During the next phase of the program, experiments with an engine and receiver integrated into the concentrator assembly are planned.

  16. Avoidable waste management costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

  17. NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierker, S.

    2007-11-01

    Following the CD0 approval of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) during August 2005, Brookhaven National Laboratory prepared a conceptual design for a worldclass user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. DOE SC review of the preliminary baseline in December 2006 led to the subsequent CD1 approval (approval of alternative selection and cost range). This report is the documentation of the preliminary design work for the NSLS-II facility. The preliminary design of the Accelerator Systems (Part 1) was developed mostly based of the Conceptual Design Report, except for the Booster design, which was changed from in-storage-ring tunnel configuration to in external- tunnel configuration. The design of beamlines (Part 2) is based on designs developed by engineering firms in accordance with the specification provided by the Project. The conventional facility design (Part 3) is the Title 1 preliminary design by the AE firm that met the NSLS-II requirements. Last and very important, Part 4 documents the ES&H design and considerations related to this preliminary design. The NSLS-II performance goals are motivated by the recognition that major advances in many important technology problems will require scientific breakthroughs in developing new materials with advanced properties. Achieving this will require the development of new tools that will enable the characterization of the atomic and electronic structure, chemical composition, and magnetic properties of materials, at nanoscale resolution. These tools must be nondestructive, to image and characterize buried structures and interfaces, and they must operate in a wide range of temperatures and harsh environments. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility

  18. NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierker, S.

    2007-11-01

    Following the CD0 approval of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) during August 2005, Brookhaven National Laboratory prepared a conceptual design for a worldclass user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. DOE SC review of the preliminary baseline in December 2006 led to the subsequent CD1 approval (approval of alternative selection and cost range). This report is the documentation of the preliminary design work for the NSLS-II facility. The preliminary design of the Accelerator Systems (Part 1) was developed mostly based of the Conceptual Design Report, except for the Booster design, which was changed from in-storage-ring tunnel configuration to in external- tunnel configuration. The design of beamlines (Part 2) is based on designs developed by engineering firms in accordance with the specification provided by the Project. The conventional facility design (Part 3) is the Title 1 preliminary design by the AE firm that met the NSLS-II requirements. Last and very important, Part 4 documents the ES&H design and considerations related to this preliminary design. The NSLS-II performance goals are motivated by the recognition that major advances in many important technology problems will require scientific breakthroughs in developing new materials with advanced properties. Achieving this will require the development of new tools that will enable the characterization of the atomic and electronic structure, chemical composition, and magnetic properties of materials, at nanoscale resolution. These tools must be nondestructive, to image and characterize buried structures and interfaces, and they must operate in a wide range of temperatures and harsh environments. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility

  19. Preliminary Design Report for the Yakima/Klickitat Production Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    US Bonneville Power Administration

    1990-04-01

    A master plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Production Project (YKPP) was developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) on October 15, 1987, as a reasonable basis upon which the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) could proceed to fund predesign work on the project. The Council approved the predesign work on the condition that eight preliminary tasks were completed. These tasks are: Task 1. Agreement on a refined statement of project goals. Task 2. Completion of a technical analysis of water supplies. Task 3. Completion of an experimental design plan. Task 4. Development of a harvest management plan. Task 5. Assessment of potential genetic risks. Task 6. Project coordination with all other affected parties. Task 7. Submission of a preliminary design report to the Council. Task 8. Develop a project management structure. The preliminary design report summarizes the work completed on these tasks. It provides a description of the preliminary design, engineering, and construction phases of project development, and gives an estimate of project costs. Also included is a description of other studies that were conducted to support YKPP planning. The results of studies conducted during the last 30 months indicate that hatchery facilities can be built in the Yakima and Klickitat subbasins to provide harvest benefits and to supplement natural production. Planning for the Yakima subbasin is at a more advanced stage of development than for the Klickitat subbasin because of greater availability of basic resource information. The information needed to proceed with final design and construction for the Klickitat subbasin will be available by 1992, as ongoing predesign work continues. This schedule is consistent with the anticipated phased completion of the YKPP by 1997.

  20. Industrial cogeneration optimization program. Volume II. Appendix A. Conceptual designs and preliminary equipment specifications. Appendix B. Characterization of cogeneration systems (near-term technology). Appendix C. Optimized cogeneration systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This appendix to a report which evaluates the technical, economic, and institutional aspects of industrial cogeneration for conserving energy in the food, chemical, textile, paper, and petroleum industries contains data, descriptions, and diagrams on conceptual designs and preliminary equipment specifications for cogeneration facilities; characterization of cogeneration systems in terms of fuel utilization, performance, air pollution control, thermal energy storage systems, and capital equipment costs; and optimized cogeneration systems for specific industrial plants. (LCL)

  1. Design of modern nanofabrication facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswick, Sarah; Smith, Andrew; Morrish, Dru; Day, Daniel J.; Juodkazis, Saulius; Gu, Min

    2011-12-01

    We present a set of practical rules critical for designing and building a modern nanotechnology laboratory, focused on photonic applications in a cleanroom environment. We show the impacts on time, cost and quality of early design decisions and its importance on achieving the final fully functional laboratory. Best practice examples are presented for setting up a modern laboratory/facility, following analysis of the time, cost and quality constraints. The case study presented is the engineering and architectural solution of the nanofabrication cleanroom facility in the Advanced Technology Centre at Swinburne University of Technology, Australia. Set of practical rules is established for the cost and time efficient set up of the nanotechnology facilities for the research and development.

  2. The Generic Data Capture Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Edward B.; Barnes, William P.; Stallings, William H.

    The Generic Data Capture Facility, which can provide data capture support for a variety of different types of spacecraft while enabling operations costs to be carefully controlled, is discussed. The data capture functions, data protection, isolation of users from data acquisition problems, data reconstruction, and quality and accounting are addressed. The TDM and packet data formats utilized by the system are described, and the development of generic facilities is considered.

  3. Purdue University National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition phase. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.A.

    1995-02-15

    The proposed National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) will house a high-current accelerator dedicated to production of short-lived radionuclides for biomedical and scientific research. The NBTF will play a vital role in repairing and maintaining the United States` research infrastructure for generation of essential accelerator-based radioisotopes. If properly designed and managed, the NBTF should also achieve international recognition as a Center-of-Excellence for research on radioisotope production methods and for associated education and training. The current report documents the results of a DOE-funded NBTF Project Definition Phase study carried out to better define the technical feasibility and projected costs of establishing and operating the NBTF. This report provides an overview of recommended Facility Design and Specifications, including Accelerator Design, Building Design, and the associated Construction Cost Estimates and Schedule. It is recommended that the NBTF be established as an integrated, comprehensive facility for meeting the diverse production, research, and educational missions set forth in previous documents. Based on an analysis of the projected production demands that will be placed on the NBTF, it appears that a 70 MeV, 1 mA, negative ion cyclotron will offer a good balance between production capabilities and the costs of accelerator purchase and operation. A preliminary architectural plan is presented for a facility designed specifically to fulfill the functions of the NBTF in a cost-effective manner. This report also presents a detailed analysis of the Required Federal State, and Local Permits that may be needed to establish the NBTF, along with schedules and cost estimates for obtaining these permits. The Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive Waste will pose some significant challenges in the operation of the NBTF, but at this stage of planning the associated problems do not appear to be prohibitive.

  4. Normanskill Hydroelectric Facility Feasibility Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besha, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of installing a hydroelectric generating facility at an existing dam of the Normanskill Reservoir in NY. Evaluation of the hydrologic, technical, economic, legal, instrumental and environmental factors led to the conclusion that the project is feasible and advantageous. The proposed project has a present worth net cost of $3,099,800. The benefit cost ratio is 2.36. It is estimated that the proposed hydroelectric generating facility at the French's Mills site, City of Watervliet Reservoir will replace approximately 6,000 barrels of foreign oil per year. (LCL)

  5. Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

    2011-05-01

    This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

  6. Asian Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahata, M.

    2011-04-01

    Asian underground facilities are reviewed. The YangYang underground Laboratory in Korea and the Kamioka observatory in Japan are operational and several astrophysical experiments are running. Indian Neutrino Observatory(INO) and China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL) are under construction and underground experiments are being prepared. Current activities and future prospects at those underground sites are described.

  7. Cost Recovery Through Depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Robert T.; Wesolowski, Leonard V.

    1983-01-01

    The approach of adopting depreciation rather than use allowance in order to recover more accurately the cost of college buildings and equipment used on federal projects is considered. It is suggested that depreciation will offer most colleges and universities a higher annual recovery rate, and an opportunity for better facilities planning. For…

  8. Environmental Factors in Suicide in Long Term-Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osgood, Nancy J.

    1992-01-01

    Explored environmental factors related to suicide in 463 long-term care facilities. Staff turnover, size, auspices, and per diem cost related to suicidal behavior and deaths from suicide. More suicides occurred in larger facilities and facilities with higher staff turnover. Religious or "other" facilities experienced more suicidal deaths than…

  9. Grid-connected ICES: preliminary feasibility analysis and evaluation. Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-30

    The HEAL Complex in New Orleans will serve as a Demonstration Community for which the ICES Demonstration System will be designed. The complex is a group of hospitals, clinics, research facilities, and medical educational facilities. The five tasks reported on are: preliminary energy analysis; preliminary institutional assessment; conceptual design; firming-up of commitments; and detailed work management plan.

  10. A Preliminary Study on the Radiation dose Distribution in the Pyroprocess Hot Cell Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chankyu; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Giyoon; Lee, Eunjoong; Lee, Jeong Tae; Cho, Gyuseong [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seongkyu; Park, Sehwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Pyroprocessing is the promising technology for treatment of spent fuels. Because it is based on the collective recovery of TRU, it has an advantage in proliferation resistance compared to conventional aqueous processes. Development of pyroprocessing has positive effects to the public through reduction of the high-level radioactive waste and the effective use of energy resources. In Korea, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has researched pyroprocessing since 1997. The engineering scale integrated inactive pyroprocess facility (PRIDE) was constructed and test operation has been performed. A study on the preliminary conceptual design and cost estimation for a larger-scale model facility is in progress. The safeguards are essential in the pyroprocessing facility for proliferation resistance. To establish the reliable safeguards, the preliminary studies on radiation resistance requirements, assessment of the safeguards system applicability, and shielding of the safeguards equipment are required. Therefore, first of all, the radiation flux and dose distribution in hot cell environment have to be studied. The previous studies focused on the neutron flux at the pyroprocessing however they are limited to the individual unit process. In this study, the flux and dose distribution of neutron and gamma-ray in the hot cell environment of the pilot pyroprocessing facility are investigated. Based on the simplified material flow of pyroprocess, the material distribution model is established. In this study, the radiation flux and dose distribution in the hot cell environment of the pilot-scale pyroprocessing facility model is investigated preliminarily by the MCNP6 simulation. Based on the established material flow model, the material composition at each stage is calculated and used for the simulation. The simple hot cell structure and process batch size were assumed based on the previous studies.

  11. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, P. [Smith (P.A.) Concepts and Designs (United States)

    1995-05-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

  12. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Rhode Island. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Rhode Island statutes vest in the Public Utility Commission and the Division of Public Utilities the exclusive power and authority to regulate public utility companies in that state. Both bodies have been established within the Department of Business Regulation but are independent of the Department's director and are not under his jurisdiction. The jurisdiction to regulate utilities is shared by the Commission and the Division. The Commission serves as a quasi-judicial tribunal with jurisdiction, powers, and duties to hold investigations and hearings involving rates, sufficiency and resonableness of facilities, gas, electric, water, and pipeline public utilities. The administrator, who is chief executive officer of the Division, is responsible for exercising the jurisdiction, supervision, powers, and duties not specifically assigned to the Commission. By virtue of his office, the chairman of the Commission serves also as the administrator and he supervises and directs the execution of all laws relating to public utilities and carriers and all regulations and orders of the Commission governing the conduct and charges of public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  13. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Oregon. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Public Utility Commissioner of Oregon. The Commissioner is appointed by the governor, subject to confirmation by the senate, for a term of four years. He must be free of any pecuniary or employment interest in any business subject to the jurisdiction of the Commissioner. While the Commissioner is primarily responsible for regulating public utilities, local governments do retain some control over utility operations within municipal boundaries. A local government may determine by contract or prescribe by ordinance the quality and character of service furnished by a public utility and may control the use of streets and other public property by public utilities. Municipalities may require public utilities to make any modifications, additions, or extensions to facilities as are necessary to the public interest. In addition, local governments may fix, by contract or ordinance, the rates to be charged by public utilities furnishing service within a municipality. The Commissioner, however, has the power to review any of the above-described local actions. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  14. 小议成本性态分析在生产经营中的运用%A Preliminary Discussion on How Cost Behavior Analysis is Used in Business Operations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴礼杰

    2001-01-01

    Cost behavior of a product is reasonably defined in this paper. The author also discuesses how cost behavior analysis is adopted in business policy making and cost management. Variable cost ac- counting is presented in the paper.%阐述了产品成本性态的合理划分,及成本性态分析在生产决策和成本管理中的运用,并对 变动成本法核算进行了讨论。

  15. Cost overruns will hit research at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Weiss, G

    2002-01-01

    To try and offset cost overruns on the LHC, CERN managers have drafted a preliminary plan that would delay start-up of the accelerator until 2007 and drastically reduces spending on longterm research programmes (1 page).

  16. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  17. 24 CFR 1710.114 - Recreational facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... referenced to the appropriate facility listed on the chart by use of an asterisk or other appropriate symbol... asterisk or other appropriate symbol and include the cost information in a paragraph below the chart....

  18. Activity-based costing saves on supply distribution costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Activity-based costing is coming, but is your organization ready? A few pioneering hospitals are already reaping the operational and economic benefits of activity-based costing in their materials management, and now the VHA purchasing alliance is offering this costing option to its 1,200 hospital members. The concept is simple, so why aren't there more takers? Here are the details on this pragmatic pricing approach that could save your facility plenty.

  19. Preliminary research suggests that the overall UK cost of autism is about £34 billion each year. There needs to be a further evaluation of the economic case for early intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Knapp, Martin

    2012-01-01

    New research by Martin Knapp and colleagues estimates the average lifetime cost of someone with autism, as well as the total economic impact nationally in a single year. Their tentative research results indicates the costs for the UK and the next phase will look to see if there is an economic case for early intervention.\\ud \\ud

  20. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Florida. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Florida Public Service Commission. The Commission is comprised of five members appointed by the governor with the approval of the senate. The governor must choose his appointees from a list of persons recommended by the nine-person Florida Public Service Commission Nominating Council. Commissioners serve either three- or four-year terms. They must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests in any utility subject to the jurisdiction of the Commission. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supersedes that of local governments. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  1. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in New Hampshire. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    Public utilities in New Hampshire are regulated by the Public Utilities Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed for six-year terms by the Governor with the advice and consent of the council. Members of the Commission must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests in any public utility. The Commission is charged with the general regulation and supervision of public utilities. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supercedes that of local government. The Commission may suspend the operation of local zoning laws. Local governments do retain the right to license the use of public ways by utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  2. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Vermont. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Vermont Public Service Board (PSC). The PSB is comprised of three members appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. PSB members serve six year terms. Members must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests in any company subject to the supervision of the PSB. Local governments retain little regulatory authority over public utilities. Local governments are responsible for regulating the use of streets and other public property, but any person aggrieved by a local decision may appeal to the PSB within thirty days. The PSB is to review the local action at a public hearing and its decision is final. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  3. Systems analysis of a potential space manufacturing facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driggers, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Results of a preliminary design study of the system elements comprising a manufacturing facility in earth orbit are presented. The elements discussed include cis-Lunar transportation, Lunar base, materials transport, factory, living facilities, construction support and energy supply. An evolutionary path of development, production and deployment is presented and step-wise interrelationships discussed.

  4. Students with Disabilities in Correctional Facilities. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Mary M.; Rutherford, Robert B., Jr.; Leone, Peter E.

    This digest presents the major findings of a national survey of public and private facilities and state agencies on the prevalence of youth with disabilities in juvenile and adult correctional facilities in the United States and the educational and related services offered to them. Findings include: (1) a preliminary estimate of the prevalence of…

  5. APPLICATION OF LINEAR PROGRAMMING TO FACILITY MAINTENANCE PROBLEMS IN THE NAVY SHORE ESTABLISHMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LINEAR PROGRAMMING ), (*NAVAL SHORE FACILITIES, MAINTENANCE), (*MAINTENANCE, COSTS, MATHEMATICAL MODELS, MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND CONTROL, MANPOWER, FEASIBILITY STUDIES, OPTIMIZATION, MANAGEMENT ENGINEERING.

  6. Capital and operating cost estimates. Volume I. Preliminary design and assessment of a 12,500 BPD coal-to-methanol-to-gasoline plant. [Grace C-M-G Plant, Henderson County, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-08-01

    This Deliverable No. 18b - Capital and Operating Cost Estimates includes a detailed presentation of the 12,500 BPD coal-to-methanol-to-gasoline plant from the standpoint of capital, preoperations, start-up and operations cost estimation. The base capital cost estimate in June 1982 dollars was prepared by the Ralph M. Parsons Company under the direction of Grace. The escalated capital cost estimate as well as separate estimates for preoperations, startup and operations activities were developed by Grace. The deliverable consists of four volumes. Volume I contains details of methodology used in developing the capital cost estimate, summary information on a base June 1982 capital cost, details of the escalated capital cost estimate and separate sections devoted to preoperations, start-up, and operations cost. The base estimate is supported by detailed information in Volumes II, III and IV. The degree of detail for some units was constrained due to proprietary data. Attempts have been made to exhibit the estimating methodology by including data on individual equipment pricing. Proprietary details are available for inspection upon execution of nondisclosure and/or secrecy agreements with the licensors to whom the data is proprietary. Details of factoring certain pieces of equipment and/or entire modules or units from the 50,000 BPD capital estimate are also included. In the case of the escalated capital estimate, Grace has chosen to include a sensitivity analysis which allows for ready assessment of impacts of escalation rates (inflation), contingency allowances and the construction interest financing rates on the escalated capital cost. Each of the estimates associated with bringing the plant to commercial production rates has as a basis the schedule and engineering documentation found in Deliverable No. 14b - Process Engineering and Mechanical Design Report, No. 28b - Staffing Plans, No. 31b - Construction Plan, and No. 33b - Startup and Operation Plan.

  7. Geothermal energy conversion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutscher, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    With the termination of favorable electricity generation pricing policies, the geothermal industry is exploring ways to improve the efficiency of existing plants and make them more cost-competitive with natural gas. The Geothermal Energy Conversion Facility (GECF) at NREL will allow researchers to study various means for increasing the thermodynamic efficiency of binary cycle geothermal plants. This work has received considerable support from the US geothermal industry and will be done in collaboration with industry members and utilities. The GECF is being constructed on NREL property at the top of South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado. As shown in Figure 1, it consists of an electrically heated hot water loop that provides heating to a heater/vaporizer in which the working fluid vaporizes at supercritical or subcritical pressures as high as 700 psia. Both an air-cooled and water-cooled condenser will be available for condensing the working fluid. In order to minimize construction costs, available equipment from the similar INEL Heat Cycle Research Facility is being utilized.

  8. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other facilities...

  9. Theme: Laboratory Facilities Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Glen M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Laboratory Facilities Improvement" (Miller); "Remodeling Laboratories for Agriscience Instruction" (Newman, Johnson); "Planning for Change" (Mulcahy); "Laboratory Facilities Improvement for Technology Transfer" (Harper); "Facilities for Agriscience Instruction" (Agnew et al.); "Laboratory Facility Improvement" (Boren, Dwyer); and…

  10. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart I of... - Allowance for Facilities Planning and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... allowance under § 35.2025 for facilities planning and design. The Step 2+3, Step 3 and Step 7 grant... reimburse the grantee for costs actually incurred for facilities planning or design. Rather, the allowance... for Facilities Planning and Design Building cost Allowance as a percentage of building cost* $100,000...

  11. 一种高效低成本的工业合成LiFePO4优化方法%A Facile and Low-Cost Industrial Method to Optimize LiFePO4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何伟东; 梁亚春; 刘净纳; 谈超; 饶高峰

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, nano-FePO4 was synthesized using industrial iron waste water, (NH4)2HPO4, and citric acid as chelating agent. The size and morphology of FePO4were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), indicating that the FePO4 nanoparticles were well dispersed. LiFePO4was prepared by a carbothermal reduction method utilizing the FePO4nanoparticles and the structure was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), demonstrating the LiFePO4was of high purity and owns an olivine structure. The electrochemical performance of LiFePO4 was investigated by galvanostatic charge/discjharge. The LiFePO4 synthesized by FePO4 modified by citric acid showed a high discharge capacity of 141 mAh.g−1at the 0.1 C rate. The cycle performance of LiFePO4 was good at different rate test of 0.1 C, 0.2 C, 0.5 C and 1 C. This favored electrochemical performance was attributed to the size-reduced LiFePO4particles and uniform carbon coating layer. The low-cost starting material and facile synthetic method are promising for practical applications.%该文以废铁水为铁源,(NH4)2HPO4为磷源,柠檬酸为螯合剂合成FePO4。通过电子扫描显微镜(SEM)观察到与没有加入柠檬酸改性的FePO4相比,可以明显减小FePO4颗粒的尺寸(纳米级),减少团聚,增强分散性。以自制的纳米级FePO4、Li2CO3、C12H22O11为原料,利用碳热还原法合成LiFePO4。通过X射线衍射(XRD)分析材料的结构,表明合成的材料为橄榄石结构且结晶度好。并组装成扣式电池研究前驱体FePO4的尺寸形貌对正极材料电化学性能的影响。研究了利用柠檬酸修饰的FePO4合成的LiFePO4,在0.1 C倍率下放电比容量为141 mAh.g−1。经过倍率循环测试表明,材料仍具有很好的循环稳定性能。这些性能的改善都源自于合成LiFePO4材料尺寸的减小及均匀的碳包覆。该文提供的合成方法不但原料廉价,而且工艺简单,还具有十分重要的实际应用价值。

  12. The Distributed Wind Cost Taxonomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, Trudy; Jimenez, Tony [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Preus, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tegan, Suzanne [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Baring-Gould, Ian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-03-28

    To date, there has been no standard method or tool to analyze the installed and operational costs for distributed wind turbine systems. This report describes the development of a classification system, or taxonomy, for distributed wind turbine project costs. The taxonomy establishes a framework to help collect, sort, and compare distributed wind cost data that mirrors how the industry categorizes information. The taxonomy organizes costs so they can be aggregated from installers, developers, vendors, and other sources without losing cost details. Developing a peer-reviewed taxonomy is valuable to industry stakeholders because a common understanding the details of distributed wind turbine costs and balance of station costs is a first step to identifying potential high-value cost reduction opportunities. Addressing cost reduction potential can help increase distributed wind's competitiveness and propel the U.S. distributed wind industry forward. The taxonomy can also be used to perform cost comparisons between technologies and track trends for distributed wind industry costs in the future. As an initial application and piloting of the taxonomy, preliminary cost data were collected for projects of different sizes and from different regions across the contiguous United States. Following the methods described in this report, these data are placed into the established cost categories.

  13. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Maryland. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities in Maryland is vested in the Public Service Commission under the authority of the Public Service Commission Law. The Commission consists of five commissioners who are appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the Senate. Commissioners must be or become citizens of Maryland, at least three are to serve full time, and one of the commissioners is to be nominated as chairman. The tenure of each commissioner is six years and their terms are on a staggered schedule. Commissioners are eligible for reappointment. The Public Service Commission Law provides that the Commission's powers an jurisdiction shall extend to the full extent permitted by the Constitution and laws of the United States. Local governments in Maryland are not given regulatory power over public service companies. The only power that local governments have over the operations of utilities is the power to grant franchises. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  14. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in North Carolina. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    Under the Public Utilities Act of 1965, utilities in North Carolina are regulated by the State's Utility Commission. The Commission consists of seven members who are appointed by the governor, subject to confirmation by the General Assembly sitting in joint session. The Commissioners serve eight year terms and the governor designates one of the commissioners as chairman. The Commission has an office of the executive director, who is appointed to a six year term by the governor subject to confirmaion by the General Assembly. The executive director heads the Commission's public staff. The public staff's duties include reviewing, investigating, and making recommendations on utility rates and services and intervention on behalf of the public in proceedings affecting consumer rates and generating plant certification. The Commission has the same power to regulate the operation of privately-owned public utilities within municipalities as it has to control those ouside. The only power over privately-owned utilities reserved to the municipalities is the power to grant franchises. A municipality may maintain its own utility systems, and such systems are not subject to the control and jurisdiction of the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  15. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Pennsylvania. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is generally vested in the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission. The Commission is comprised of five members appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of two-thirds of the senate. Commission members are appointed for 10 year terms. They must be free from any employment which is incompatible with the duties of the Commission, and are subject to a statutory code of ethics. The Commission is charged with responsibility for enforcing the Public Utility Law. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supersedes that of local governments. The Commission, for example, may grant exemptions from local zoning requirements, and has approving authority over privileges or franchises granted by municipalities to public utilities. The Commission, however, has no authority over municipally owned utilities operating within municipal boundaries. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  16. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Maine. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Maine Supreme Court holds that the regulation of the operations of public utilities is an exercise of the police powers of the state. The legislature has delegated such regulatory authority to the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The statutes provide no role for local government in the regulation of public utilities. The PUC consists of three full time members, appointed by the Governor subject to review by the Joint Standing Committee on Public Utilities and to confirmation by the Legislature. They each serve seven year terms. One member is designated by the Governor as chairman. The Commission appoints a secretary, assistant secretary, director of transportation, and, with the approval of the Attorney General, a general counsel. A member of the PUC cannot have any official or professional connection or relation with or hold any stock or securities in any public utility. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  17. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Iowa. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Iowa State Commerce Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor with the approval of two-thirds of the senate. Commissioners are appointed for six-year terms. They must be free from employment or pecuniary interests in any public utility. Although the right to grant franchises is specifically reserved for municipalities, local governments exercise no regulatory authority over the provision of utility services by public utilities. Municipally-owned utilities, however, are specifically excepted from rate regulation by the Commission. The regulation of rates charged by municipally-owned utilities is the responsibility of local governments. The Commission is given no authority to review decisions of local governments with respect to rates. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  18. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Michigan. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Michigan Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of three members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Commission members are appointed for six-year terms. They must be free from pecuniary and employment interests incompatible with the duties of the Commission. The Commission is vested with complete power and jurisdiction to regulate all public utilities in the state except any municipally-owned utility. The Commission may not change any rates fixed in or regulated by a franchise granted by a municipality. Upon submission to the Commission by the municipality and the public utility operating in the municipality, the Commission may investigate and fix rates and establish rules and conditions of service. The jurisdiction of the Commission extends to all public utilities except municipally-owned utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  19. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in South Carolina. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    Pursuant to constitutional South Carolina mandate the General Assembly has created the Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of seven members elected to four year terms by the General Assembly. One commissioner is elected from each of seven districts corresponding to the congressional districts as they existed as of January 1, 1930. The commissioners elect one of their members as chairman. The South Carolina statutes contain separate chapters dealing with the regulation of public utilities and electric utilities. Public utility includes the furnishing of gas or heat (other than by means of electricity) to the public. While the Commission is granted general supervisory and regulatory powers over public utilities and electric utilities, total governments retain some control over electrical utilities. All municipality's have the power to grant exclusive franchises to such utilities for the furnishing of light to the municipality and its inhabitants. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  20. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in South Dakota. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The South Dakota Public Utilities Commission is authorized by statute to regulate gas and electric utilities. The Commission consists of three elected commissioners each of whom serves for a six year term. The Commissioners are elected by district and each must, at the time of election, be a resident of the district from which he has been elected. Each Commissioner must reside in the state capital and devote his entire time to the duties of his office. The Commission is part of the Department of Commerce and Consumer Protection. Municipal power to regulate privately owned electric and gas public utilities was terminated in 1975. A municipally-owned electric utility has the authority to regulate the sale, use, and rates of electric power and energy which it provides. The Commission has no authority to regulate steam, heat, and refrigeration systems; that power resides in cities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  1. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in California. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Constitution of the State of California grants to the Legislature control over persons and private corporations that own or operate a line, plant, or system for the production, generation, or transmission of heat, light, water, or power to be furnished either directly or indirectly to or for the public. The Constitution establishes the Public Utilities Commission and grants certain specific powers to the PUC, including the power to fix rates, establish rules and prescribe a uniform system of accounts. The Constitution also recognizes that the Legislature has plenary power to confer additional authority and jurisdiction upon the PUC. The Constitution prohibits regulation by a city, county, or other municipal body of matters over which the Legislature has granted regulatory power to the PUC. This provision does not, however, impair the right of any city to grant franchises for public utilities. The California legislature has enacted the California Public Utilities Code and has designated the PUC as the agency to implement the regulatory provisions of the Code. The Public Utilities Commission consists of five members appointed by the governor and approved by the senate, a majority of the membership concurring, for staggered 6-year terms. Certain limited powers over the conduct of public utilities may still be exercised by municipalities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  2. Cost Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kira

    The objective of this dissertation is to investigate determinants and consequences of asymmetric cost behavior. Asymmetric cost behavior arises if the change in costs is different for increases in activity compared to equivalent decreases in activity. In this case, costs are termed “sticky......” if the change is less when activity falls than when activity rises, whereas costs are termed “anti-sticky” if the change is more when activity falls than when activity rises. Understanding such cost behavior is especially relevant for decision-makers and financial analysts that rely on accurate cost information...

  3. Cost Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kira

    The objective of this dissertation is to investigate determinants and consequences of asymmetric cost behavior. Asymmetric cost behavior arises if the change in costs is different for increases in activity compared to equivalent decreases in activity. In this case, costs are termed “sticky......” if the change is less when activity falls than when activity rises, whereas costs are termed “anti-sticky” if the change is more when activity falls than when activity rises. Understanding such cost behavior is especially relevant for decision-makers and financial analysts that rely on accurate cost information...

  4. Preliminary Monthly Climatological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Preliminary Local Climatological Data, recorded since 1970 on Weather Burean Form 1030 and then National Weather Service Form F-6. The preliminary climate data pages...

  5. Evaluation methods for hospital facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronczek-Munter, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    Initial position & background: There are various methods and tools for evaluating facilities. The focus is usually on the technical building performance, function/usability or form/beauty. Examples are: Post-Occupancy Evaluation (POE) and Usability Appraisal. Nevertheless, evaluations of buildings...... according to focus areas and proposes which evaluation methods to use in different building phases of healthcare facilities. Hospital evaluations with experts and users are also considered; their subjective view on space, function, technology, usability and aesthetics. Results & solutions: This paper...... of creating buildings with enhanced usability. Additionally various evaluation methods used in hospital cases in Denmark and Norway are presented. Involvement of users is proposed, not just in defining requirements but also in co-creation/design and evaluation of solutions. The theories and preliminary...

  6. Santa Monica Children's Centers, Santa Monica, California: Low-Cost Day Care Facilities for Children of Working Mothers Made Available Through the Cooperation of the California State Government and Local School District. Model Programs--Childhood Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    Two of the four Santa Monica Children's Centers are nursery schools for children aged 3 to 5; the other two centers serve as extended care facilities for children of school age. All centers are concerned with meeting the physical, intellectual, and emotional needs of children on a long-term basis and stress a program offering a variety of play…

  7. A Decision Model for Locating Controversial Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumphrey, Anthony J.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Locating controversial public facilities, such as highways or airports, that generate significant public opposition requires a more sophisticated methodology than the traditional least cost" procedures for minimizing physical costs. Two models--a short-run political placation" model and a long-run welfare distribution" model--evaluate the…

  8. Electron accelerator facilities for food processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boaler, V.J.

    1984-01-01

    The basic characteristics of electron and X-ray processing and the main types of accelerator used together with features of facilities for food processing are reviewed. Capital and operating costs are given, with throughput and unit cost calculations for typical examples.

  9. 38 CFR 18.422 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (e) have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2900-0414) ..., transportation costs shall not exceed costs to and from recipients' programs or activities. (d) Time period. A... facilities accessible; (3) Specify the schedule for taking the steps necessary to achieve full...

  10. 谈建设项目在设计阶段的工程造价控制%Preliminary discussion on the engineering cost control of construction project at design phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐江欣

    2011-01-01

    This thesis discusses engineering cost controlling points and existing problems at design phase,introduces engineering cost controlling countermeasures at design phase from four aspects of rationed design,value engineering,standard design and establishing corresponding regulations,which has significant meaning for correctly determine engineering cost and improving investment efficiency.%论述了设计阶段是工程造价控制的重点和存在的问题,从运用限额设计、价值工程、采用标准设计、建立相应制度四方面介绍了设计阶段控制工程造价的对策,对准确确定工程造价,提高投资效率具有重要意义。

  11. Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

  12. 40 CFR 261.142 - Cost estimate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost estimate. 261.142 Section 261.142... Materials § 261.142 Cost estimate. (a) The owner or operator must have a detailed written estimate, in... facility. (1) The estimate must equal the cost of conducting the activities described in paragraph (a)...

  13. 18 CFR 292.306 - Interconnection costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interconnection costs... § 292.306 Interconnection costs. (a) Obligation to pay. Each qualifying facility shall be obligated to pay any interconnection costs which the State regulatory authority (with respect to any...

  14. Concept design theory and model for multi-use space facilities: Analysis of key system design parameters through variance of mission requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynerson, Charles Martin

    This research has been performed to create concept design and economic feasibility data for space business parks. A space business park is a commercially run multi-use space station facility designed for use by a wide variety of customers. Both space hardware and crew are considered as revenue producing payloads. Examples of commercial markets may include biological and materials research, processing, and production, space tourism habitats, and satellite maintenance and resupply depots. This research develops a design methodology and an analytical tool to create feasible preliminary design information for space business parks. The design tool is validated against a number of real facility designs. Appropriate model variables are adjusted to ensure that statistical approximations are valid for subsequent analyses. The tool is used to analyze the effect of various payload requirements on the size, weight and power of the facility. The approach for the analytical tool was to input potential payloads as simple requirements, such as volume, weight, power, crew size, and endurance. In creating the theory, basic principles are used and combined with parametric estimation of data when necessary. Key system parameters are identified for overall system design. Typical ranges for these key parameters are identified based on real human spaceflight systems. To connect the economics to design, a life-cycle cost model is created based upon facility mass. This rough cost model estimates potential return on investments, initial investment requirements and number of years to return on the initial investment. Example cases are analyzed for both performance and cost driven requirements for space hotels, microgravity processing facilities, and multi-use facilities. In combining both engineering and economic models, a design-to-cost methodology is created for more accurately estimating the commercial viability for multiple space business park markets.

  15. Cost Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kira

    The objective of this dissertation is to investigate determinants and consequences of asymmetric cost behavior. Asymmetric cost behavior arises if the change in costs is different for increases in activity compared to equivalent decreases in activity. In this case, costs are termed “sticky......” if the change is less when activity falls than when activity rises, whereas costs are termed “anti-sticky” if the change is more when activity falls than when activity rises. Understanding such cost behavior is especially relevant for decision-makers and financial analysts that rely on accurate cost information...... to facilitate resource planning and earnings forecasting. As such, this dissertation relates to the topic of firm profitability and the interpretation of cost variability. The dissertation consists of three parts that are written in the form of separate academic papers. The following section briefly summarizes...

  16. The Eurisol report. A feasibility study for a European isotope-separation-on-line radioactive ion beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-12-01

    The Eurisol project aims at a preliminary design study of the next-generation European isotope separation on-line (ISOL) radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility. In this document, the scientific case of high-intensity RIBs using the ISOL method is first summarised, more details being given in appendix A. It includes: 1) the study of atomic nuclei under extreme and so-far unexplored conditions of composition (i.e. as a function of the numbers of protons and neutrons, or the so-called isospin), rotational angular velocity (or spin), density and temperature, 2) the investigation of the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in the Universe, an important part of nuclear astrophysics, 3) a study of the properties of the fundamental interactions which govern the properties of the universe, and in particular of the violation of some of their symmetries, 4) potential applications of RIBs in solid-state physics and in nuclear medicine, for example, where completely new fields could be opened up by the availability of high-intensity RIBs produced by the ISOL method. The proposed Eurisol facility is then presented, with particular emphasis on its main components: the driver accelerator, the target/ion-source assembly, the mass-selection system and post-accelerator, and the required scientific instrumentation. Special details of these components are given in appendices B to E, respectively. The estimates of the costs of the Eurisol, construction and running costs, have been performed in as much details as is presently possible. The total capital cost (installation manpower cost included) of the project is estimated to be of the order of 630 million Euros within 20%. In general, experience has shown that operational costs per annum for large accelerator facilities are about 10% of the capital cost. (A.C.)

  17. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  18. Fumigation success for California facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Robert

    2010-02-01

    As Robert Hacker, at the time director of facilities management at the St John's Regional Medical Center in Oxnard, California, explains, the hospital, one of the area's largest, recently successfully utilised a new technology to eliminate mould, selecting a cost and time-saving fumigation process in place of the traditional "rip and tear" method. Although hospital managers knew the technology had been used extremely effectively in other US buildings, this was reportedly among the first ever healthcare applications.

  19. Facility management in German hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudat, H

    2000-04-01

    Facility management and optimum building management offer for hospitals a chance to reduce costs and to increase quality, process sequences, employee motivation and customer satisfaction. Some years ago simple services such as cleaning, catering or laundry were outsourced. Now, German hospitals progress to more complex fields such as building and medical technology, clinical support processes such as pharmacy, central laboratory and sterilization, goods and logistics services.

  20. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  1. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  2. 340 Facility secondary containment and leak detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendixsen, R.B.

    1995-01-31

    This document presents a preliminary safety evaluation for the 340 Facility Secondary Containment and Leak Containment system, Project W-302. Project W-302 will construct Building 340-C which has been designed to replace the current 340 Building and vault tank system for collection of liquid wastes from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory buildings in the 300 Area. This new nuclear facility is Hazard Category 3. The vault tank and related monitoring and control equipment are Safety Class 2 with the remainder of the structure, systems and components as Safety Class 3 or 4.

  3. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Facility Registry Service (FRS) provides an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities across EPA,...

  4. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  5. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  6. Aperture area measurement facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST has established an absolute aperture area measurement facility for circular and near-circular apertures use in radiometric instruments. The facility consists of...

  7. Environmental Toxicology Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Fully-equipped facilities for environmental toxicology research The Environmental Toxicology Research Facility (ETRF) located in Vicksburg, MS provides over 8,200 ft...

  8. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  9. Multi-year Content Analysis of User Facility Related Publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, Robert M [ORNL; Stahl, Christopher G [ORNL; Hines, Jayson [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL; Wells, Jack C [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Scientific user facilities provide resources and support that enable scientists to conduct experiments or simulations pertinent to their respective research. Consequently, it is critical to have an informed understanding of the impact and contributions that these facilities have on scientific discoveries. Leveraging insight into scientific publications that acknowledge the use of these facilities enables more informed decisions by facility management and sponsors in regard to policy, resource allocation, and influencing the direction of science as well as more effectively understand the impact of a scientific user facility. This work discusses preliminary results of mining scientific publications that utilized resources at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These results show promise in identifying and leveraging multi-year trends and providing a higher resolution view of the impact that a scientific user facility may have on scientific discoveries.

  10. Guide to research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  11. Preliminary feasibility study on production of cobalt-60 source for industrial irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Po Kook; Park, Kyung Bae; Ahn, Yun Soo; Lee, Jong Tai; Kim, Hark Rho

    1999-05-01

    As there is a high possible demand of industrial Co-60 source in the world market, feasibility study of a project was performed to produce and to export Co-60 sources, utilizing KEPCO's Wolsung NPP for irradiation of cobalt and KAERI's hot-cells for fabrication of cobalt sources. Main concerns of the study were to understand irradiation and fabrication (encapsulation) processes and to examine related technologies, required facilities and equipment. In particular, it was examined intensively if it would be possible to modify facilities around the reactor vessel of Wolsung NPP tp substantiate the related licensing in order to irradiate cobalt in the reactor. It is expected that once, if cooperation scheme with MDS Nordion of Canada is established, main issues such as modification of facilities, related licensing, raw material procurement and technology transfer for high quality product will be solved. In order to review overall feasibility of the project, present status and prospect of the world market was surveyed and various usages of cobalt sources were reviewed with emphasis on possible demand increase per usage. Food poisoning accidents are prevailing worldwide and food irradiation with cobalt sources is considered as a promising measure to prevent them and may bring forth high increase of cobalt sources demand in the world market. Preliminary economic feasibility was studied in conservation, evaluating roughly the investment and the operating cost based on materials from various information sources. (author)

  12. OSU TOMF Program Site Selection and Preliminary Concept Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spadling, Steve [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2012-05-10

    The purpose of this report is to confirm the programmatic requirements for the new facilities, identify the most appropriate project site, and develop preliminary site and building concepts that successfully address the overall project goals and site issues. These new facilities will be designed to accommodate the staff, drivers and maintenance requirements for the future mixed fleet of passenger vehicles, Transit Style Buses and School Buses.

  13. Preliminary Design Report for the Yakima/Klickitat Production Project; Executive Summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    US Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-03-01

    A master plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Production Project (YKPP) was developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) on October 15, 1987, as a reasonable basis upon which the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) could proceed to fund predesign work on the project. The Council approved the predesign work on the condition that eight preliminary tasks were completed. These tasks are: Agreement on a refined statement of project goals. Completion of a technical analysis of water supplies. Completion of an experimental design plan. Development of a harvest management plan. Assessment of potential genetic risks. Project coordination with all other affected parties. Submission of a preliminary design report to the Council. Develop a project management structure. The preliminary design report summarizes the work completed on these tasks. It provides a description of the preliminary design, engineering, and construction phases of project development, and gives an estimate of project costs. Also included is a description of other studies that were conducted to support YKPP planning. The results of studies conducted during the last 30 months indicate that hatchery facilities can be built in the Yakima and Klickitat subbasins to provide harvest benefits and to supplement natural production. Planning for the Yakima subbasin is at a more advanced stage of development than for the Klickitat subbasin because of greater availability of basic resource information. The information needed to proceed with final design and construction for the Klickitat subbasin will be available by 1992, as ongoing predesign work continues. This schedule is consistent with the anticipated phased completion of the YKPP by 1997.

  14. 26 CFR 1.132-7 - Employer-operated eating facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... facility that bears the same proportion to such total labor cost as time spent on the premises bears to total time spent performing services relating to the facility is included in direct operating costs. For... of meals provided to employees at an employer-operated eating facility for employees is excludable...

  15. The influence of facility design and human resource management on health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadatsafavi, Hessam; Walewski, John; Shepley, Mardelle M

    2015-01-01

    Cost control of health care services is a strategic concern for organizations. To lower costs, some organizations reduce staffing levels. However, this may not be worth the trade-off, as the quality of services will likely be reduced, morale among health care providers tends to suffer, and patient satisfaction is likely to decline. The potential synergy between human resource management and facility design and operation was investigated to achieve the goal of providing cost containment strategies without sacrificing the quality of services and the commitment of employees. About 700 health care professionals from 10 acute-care hospitals participated in this cross-sectional study. The authors used structural equation modeling to test whether employees' evaluations of their physical work environment and human resource practices were significantly associated with lower job-related anxiety, higher job satisfaction, and higher organizational commitment. The analysis found that employees' evaluations of their physical work environment and human resource practices influenced their job-related feelings and attitudes. Perceived organizational support mediated this relationship. The study also found a small but positive interaction effect between the physical work environment and human resource practices. The influence of physical work environment was small, mainly because of the high predictive value of human resource practices and strong confounding variables included in the analysis. This study specifically showed the role of facility design in reducing job-related anxiety among caregivers. Preliminary evidence is provided that facility design can be used as a managerial tool for improving job-related attitudes and feelings of employees and earning their commitment. Providing a healthy and safe work environment can be perceived by employees as an indication that the organization respects them and cares about their well-being, which might be reciprocated with higher levels

  16. Decommissioning the UHTREX Reactor Facility at Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, M.; Elder, J.

    1992-08-01

    The Ultra-High Temperature Reactor Experiment (UHTREX) facility was constructed in the late 1960s to advance high-temperature and gas-cooled reactor technology. The 3-MW reactor was graphite moderated and helium cooled and used 93% enriched uranium as its fuel. The reactor was run for approximately one year and was shut down in February 1970. The decommissioning of the facility involved removing the reactor and its associated components. This document details planning for the decommissioning operations which included characterizing the facility, estimating the costs of decommissioning, preparing environmental documentation, establishing a system to track costs and work progress, and preplanning to correct health and safety concerns in the facility. Work to decommission the facility began in 1988 and was completed in September 1990 at a cost of $2.9 million. The facility was released to Department of Energy for other uses in its Los Alamos program.

  17. Cost comparisons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    How much does the LHC cost? And how much does this represent in other currencies? Below we present a table showing some comparisons with the cost of other projects. Looking at the figures, you will see that the cost of the LHC can be likened to that of three skyscrapers, or two seasons of Formula 1 racing! One year's budget of a single large F1 team is comparable to the entire materials cost of the ATLAS or CMS experiments.   Please note that all the figures are rounded for ease of reading.    CHF € $   LHC 4.6 billions 3 billions  4 billions   Space Shuttle Endeavour (NASA) 1.9 billion 1.3 billion 1.7 billion   Hubble Space Telescope (cost at launch – NASA/...

  18. Preliminary results on the control of Aedes spp. in a remote Guatemalan community vulnerable to dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus: community participation and use of low-cost ecological ovillantas for mosquito control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulibarri, Gerard; Betanzos, Angel; Betanzos, Mireya; Rojas, Juan Jacobo

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the effectiveness of an integrated intervention of health worker training, a low-cost ecological mosquito ovitrap, and community engagement on Aedes spp. mosquito control over 10 months in 2015 in an urban remote community in Guatemala at risk of dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus transmission. Methods: We implemented a three-component integrated intervention consisting of: web-based training of local health personnel in vector control, cluster-randomized assignment of an ecological modified ovitrap (ovillantas: ovi=egg, llanta=tire) or standard ovitraps to capture Aedes spp. mosquito eggs (no efforts have been taken to determine the exact Aedes species at this moment), and community engagement to promote participation of community members and health personnel in the understanding and maintenance of ovitraps for mosquito control. The intervention was implemented in local collaboration with Guatemala’s  Ministry of Health’s Vector Control Programme, and in international collaboration with the National Institute of Public Health in Mexico. Findings: Eighty percent of the 25 local health personnel enrolled in the training programme received accreditation of their improved knowledge of vector control. When ovillantas were used in a cluster of ovitraps (several in proximity), significantly more eggs were trapped by  ecological ovillantas than standard ovitraps over the 10 month (42 week) study period (t=5.2577; pZika. The combination of training of health workers, cluster use of low-cost ecological ovillanta to destroy the second generation of mosquitoes, and community engagement ensured the project met local needs and fostered collaboration and participation of the community, which can help improve sustainability. The ovillanta intervention and methodology may be modified to target other species such as Culex, should it be established that such mosquitoes carry Zika virus in addition to Aedes. PMID:28105304

  19. Greenridge Multi-Pollutant Control Project Preliminary Public Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connell, Daniel P

    2009-01-12

    the commercial readiness of an emissions control system that is specifically designed to meet the environmental compliance requirements of these smaller coal-fired EGUs. The multi-pollutant control system is being installed and tested on the AES Greenidge Unit 4 (Boiler 6) by a team including CONSOL Energy Inc. as prime contractor, AES Greenidge LLC as host site owner, and Babcock Power Environmental Inc. as engineering, procurement, and construction contractor. All funding for the project is being provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, through its National Energy Technology Laboratory, and by AES Greenidge. AES Greenidge Unit 4 is a 107 MW{sub e} (net), 1950s vintage, tangentially-fired, reheat unit that is representative of many of the 440 smaller coal-fired units identified above. Following design and construction, the multi-pollutant control system will be demonstrated over an approximately 20-month period while the unit fires 2-4% sulfur eastern U.S. bituminous coal and co-fires up to 10% biomass. This Preliminary Public Design Report is the first in a series of two reports describing the design of the multi-pollutant control facility that is being demonstrated at AES Greenidge. Its purpose is to consolidate for public use all available nonproprietary design information on the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project. As such, the report includes a discussion of the process concept, design objectives, design considerations, and uncertainties associated with the multi-pollutant control system and also summarizes the design of major process components and balance of plant considerations for the AES Greenidge Unit 4 installation. The Final Public Design Report, the second report in the series, will update this Preliminary Public Design Report to reflect the final, as-built design of the facility and to incorporate data on capital costs and projected operating costs.

  20. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed.

  1. Challenging the Service Cost Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Most healthcare organizations are looking to find more efficient and cost-effective ways of delivering service as they are challenged to assume more risk in order to provide timely and cost effective care. Alternative service with an independent service organization or third party may be an easy and rewarding solution. Serious consideration should be given purchase/service cycle and into a lower cost service paradigm designed to provide excellent service tailored to a facility's specific needs. In this article, an evaluation of all service model options is provided, as well as examples including a CT acquisition, pro formas, and program development.

  2. Charging for computer usage with average cost pricing

    CERN Document Server

    Landau, K

    1973-01-01

    This preliminary report, which is mainly directed to commercial computer centres, gives an introduction to the application of average cost pricing when charging for using computer resources. A description of the cost structure of a computer installation shows advantages and disadvantages of average cost pricing. This is completed by a discussion of the different charging-rates which are possible. (10 refs).

  3. Preliminary Cluster Size and Efficiencies results of CMS RPC at GIF++

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez Blanco Gonzalez, Genoveva

    2016-01-01

    A brief description and first preliminary results of the Efficiencies and Cluster Size measurements of the CMS Resistive Plate Chambers, will be presented inside the Gamma Irradiation Facility GIF++ at CERN. Preliminary studies that sets the base performance measurements of CMS RPC for starting aging studies.

  4. ISS Additive Manufacturing Facility for On-Demand Fabrication in Space Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Made in Space has completed a preliminary design review of the Additive Manufacturing Facility. During the first half of Phase 1, the design went through conceptual...

  5. An investigation of the feasibility of building a harbor on the West coast of South America using explosive power of nuclear weapons, a preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zodtner, H. H.

    1971-12-31

    There is an interest in discovering the various peace time uses of nuclear explosives. One of the proposals is the building of harbors. There are several ports along the west coast of South America where lighterage is necessary. This implies a need for expanded harbor facilities. The problem is to find a good location for creating a harbor, and the feasibility of accomplishing this with the use of nuclear force. Feasibility includes blast effects, radiation hazards, the number of weapons needed, and economic considerations. Economic considerations include the cost of treating a harbor of sufficient depth and area, the building of harbor facilities, and the estimated savings and advantages of the new harbor. Several meetings were held with naval personnel of the Military Liaison group at UCRL to discuss the general problems of harbors. Thirty-three different ports were given a preliminary investigation.

  6. Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosure at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Revision 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosure Preliminary Safety Analysis Report was completed as required by DOE Order 5480.23. The purpose of this document is to construct a safety basis that supports the design and permits construction of the facility. The facility has been designed to the requirements of a Radioactive Solid Waste Facility presented in DOE Order 6430.1A.

  7. Preliminary results on the control of Aedes spp. in a remote Guatemalan community vulnerable to dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus: community participation and use of low-cost ecological ovillantas for mosquito control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulibarri, Gerard; Betanzos, Angel; Betanzos, Mireya; Rojas, Juan Jacobo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the effectiveness of an integrated intervention of health worker training, a low-cost ecological mosquito ovitrap, and community engagement on Aedes spp. mosquito control over 10 months in 2015 in an urban remote community in Guatemala at risk of dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus transmission. Methods: We implemented a three-component integrated intervention consisting of: web-based training of local health personnel in vector control, cluster-randomized assignment of an ecological modified ovitrap (ovillantas: ovi=egg, llanta=tire) or standard ovitraps to capture Aedes spp. mosquito eggs (no efforts have been taken to determine the exact Aedes species at this moment), and community engagement to promote participation of community members and health personnel in the understanding and maintenance of ovitraps for mosquito control. The intervention was implemented in local collaboration with Guatemala's  Ministry of Health's Vector Control Programme, and in international collaboration with the National Institute of Public Health in Mexico. Findings: Eighty percent of the 25 local health personnel enrolled in the training programme received accreditation of their improved knowledge of vector control. When ovillantas were used in a cluster of ovitraps (several in proximity), significantly more eggs were trapped by  ecological ovillantas than standard ovitraps over the 10 month (42 week) study period (t=5.2577; p<0.05). Repetitive filtering and recycling of the attractant solution (or water) kept the ovillanta clean, free from algae growth. Among both community members and health workers, the levels of knowledge, interest, and participation in community mosquito control and trapping increased. Recommendations for enhancing and sustaining community mosquito control were identified. Conclusion: Our three-component integrated intervention proved beneficial to this remote community at risk of mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue, chikungunya, and

  8. Economics of electron beam accelerator facilities: Concept vs actual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minbiole, Paul R.

    1995-02-01

    Electron beam accelerator facilities continue to demonstrate their ability to "add value" to a wide range of industrial products. The power, energy, and reliability of commercially available accelerators have increased steadily over the past several decades. The high throughput potential of modern electron beam facilities, together with the broad spectrum of commercial applications, result in the concept that an electron beam facility is an effective tool for adding economic value to industrial products. However, the high capital costs of such a facility (including hidden costs), together with practical limitations to high throughput (including several layers of inefficiencies), result in profit-and-loss economics which are more tenuous than expected after first analysis.

  9. Preliminary Analysis of Helicopter Options to Support Tunisian Counterterrorism Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-27

    results of the current analysis and in Mouton et al., 2015, is the relative cost -effectiveness between the CH-47D and the Mi-17v5. In the previous...helicopters from Sikorsky to fulfill a number of roles in counterterrorism operations. Rising costs and delays in delivery raised the question of...whether other cost -effective options exist to meet Tunisia’s helicopter requirement. Approach Our team conducted a preliminary assessment of

  10. 48 CFR 31.205-10 - Cost of money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Refers to— (i) Facilities capital cost of money (48 CFR 9904.414); and (ii) Cost of money as an element of the cost of capital assets under construction (48 CFR 9904.417). (b) Cost of money is allowable, provided— (1) It is measured, assigned, and allocated to contracts in accordance with 48 CFR 9904.414...

  11. A preliminary evaluation of alternatives for disposal of INEL low-level waste and low-level mixed waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.H.; Roesener, W.S.; Jorgenson-Waters, M.J.

    1993-07-01

    The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility (MLLWDF) project was established in 1992 by the US Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office to provide enhanced disposal capabilities for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level mixed waste and low-level waste. This Preliminary Evaluation of Alternatives for Disposal of INEL Low-Level Waste and Low-Level Mixed Waste identifies and evaluates-on a preliminary, overview basis-the alternatives for disposal of that waste. Five disposal alternatives, ranging from of no-action`` to constructing and operating the MLLWDF, are identified and evaluated. Several subalternatives are formulated within the MLLWDF alternative. The subalternatives involve various disposal technologies as well as various scenarios related to the waste volumes and waste forms to be received for disposal. The evaluations include qualitative comparisons of the projected isolation performance for each alternative, and facility, health and safety, environmental, institutional, schedule, and rough order-of-magnitude life-cycle cost comparisons. The performance of each alternative is evaluated against lists of ``musts`` and ``wants.`` Also included is a discussion of other key considerations for decisionmaking. The analysis of results indicated further study is necessary to obtain the best estimate of long-term future waste volume and characteristics from the INEL Environmental Restoration activities and the expanded INEL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program.

  12. Facility Location Modeling in Multi-Echelon Distribution System: A Case Study of Indonesian Liquefied Petroleum Gas Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyas Masudin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents model of Indonesian LPG supply chain by opening new facilities (new echelon taking into account the current facilities. The objective is to investigate the relation between distribution costs such as transportation, inventory cost and facility location in Indonesian multi-echelon LPG supply chain. Fixed-charged capacitated facility location problem is used to determine the optimal solution of the proposed model. In the sensitivity analysis, it is reported that the trade-offs between facility locations and distribution costs are exist. Results report that as the number of facility increases, total transportation and inventory cost also increase.

  13. CO{sub 2} Reuse in Petrochemical Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason Trembly; Brian Turk; Maruthi Pavani; Jon McCarty; Chris Boggs; Aqil Jamal; Raghubir Gupta

    2010-12-31

    -3) that demonstrated equal or better performance than that of commercial methanation catalysts. The Cat-1 and Cat-3 formulations were successfully scaled up using commercial manufacturing equipment at the Sud-Chemie Inc. pilot-plant facility in Louisville, KY. Pilot transport reactor testing with RTI's Cat-1 formulation at Kellog Brown & Root's Technology Center demonstrated the ability of the process to achieve high single-pass CO{sub 2} conversion. Using information acquired from bench- and pilot-scale testing, a basic engineering design package was prepared for a 4-ton/day CO{sub 2} pilot demonstration unit, including process and instrumentation diagrams, equipment list, control philosophy, and preliminary cost estimate.

  14. International team releases design, cost for next great particle smasher

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "An internationl team has released a preliminary design and cost estimate for the International Linear Collider (ILC), the hoped-for straight-shot particle smasher that many researchers say is the future of their field."

  15. Heliostat cost reduction study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

    2007-06-01

    Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

  16. Preliminary assessment of off-season fuels for electricity generation at Indian sugar mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlack, R.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ranney, J.W. [Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-11-07

    This report on off-season fuels is part of a preliminary feasibility assessment to retrofit Indian sugar mills to cogenerate heat and power with sales of excess electricity to the local grid. To justify the high capital costs of retrofitting existing facilities, sugar mill operators must attempt to maximize the amount of power they sell to the local grid. This fact means that sugar mills must operate and sell power well-beyond the milling season, which typically lasts about 200 days. The purpose of this report is to assess and determine whether low cost and reliable sources of off-season fuels can be secured for two sugar mills (Simbhaoli and Daurala) within their respective sugar growing districts, located in western Uttar Pradesh. Off-season fuels under consideration include excess bagasse that is stored for off-season use, agricultural field residues (e.g., wheat straw), forest residues (e.g., bark and small limbs), and dedicated energy crops (short-rotation woody crops and herbaceous energy crops). Results of the pre-feasibility indicate that bagasse and some agricultural residues are available in sufficient quantity and may be available at reasonable cost.

  17. Class Size and Cost in ADN Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehret, Alice C.; Larowe, Ann

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses the cost-effective use of faculty and facilities in associate degree nursing programs, as a large number of programs with small classes is uneconomical. Appraisal of admissions to reach an enrollment level sufficient to justify program cost is suggested. (MF)

  18. Developing a cost effective environmental solution for produced water and creating a ''new'' water resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doran, Glenn; Leong, Lawrence Y.C.

    2000-05-01

    The project goal is to convert a currently usable by-product of oil production, produced water, into a valuable drinking water resource. The project was located at the Placate Oil Field in Santa Clarita, California, approximately 25 miles north of Los Angeles. The project included a literature review of treatment technologies; preliminary bench-scale studies to refine a planning level cost estimate; and a 10-100 gpm pilot study to develop the conceptual design and cost estimate for a 44,000 bpd treatment facility. A reverse osmosis system was constructed, pilot tested, and the data used to develop a conceptual design and operation of four operational scenarios, two industrial waters levels and two irrigation/potable water.

  19. Minimizing Costs Can Be Costly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Rasmussen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A quite common practice, even in academic literature, is to simplify a decision problem and model it as a cost-minimizing problem. In fact, some type of models has been standardized to minimization problems, like Quadratic Assignment Problems (QAPs, where a maximization formulation would be treated as a “generalized” QAP and not solvable by many of the specially designed softwares for QAP. Ignoring revenues when modeling a decision problem works only if costs can be separated from the decisions influencing revenues. More often than we think this is not the case, and minimizing costs will not lead to maximized profit. This will be demonstrated using spreadsheets to solve a small example. The example is also used to demonstrate other pitfalls in network models: the inability to generally balance the problem or allocate costs in advance, and the tendency to anticipate a specific type of solution and thereby make constraints too limiting when formulating the problem.

  20. Standard cost elements for technology programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Carisa B.; Wagenfuehrer, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The suitable structure for an effective and accurate cost estimate for general purposes is discussed in the context of a NASA technology program. Cost elements are defined for research, management, and facility-construction portions of technology programs. Attention is given to the mechanisms for insuring the viability of spending programs, and the need for program managers is established for effecting timely fund disbursement. Formal, structures, and intuitive techniques are discussed for cost-estimate development, and cost-estimate defensibility can be improved with increased documentation. NASA policies for cash management are examined to demonstrate the importance of the ability to obligate funds and the ability to cost contracted funds. The NASA approach to consistent cost justification is set forth with a list of standard cost-element definitions. The cost elements reflect the three primary concerns of cost estimates: the identification of major assumptions, the specification of secondary analytic assumptions, and the status of program factors.

  1. An outdoor test facility for the Cherenkov Telescope Array mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Medina, M C; Maya, J; Mancilla, A; Larrarte, J J; Rasztocky, E; Benitez, M; Dipold, J; Platino, M

    2013-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescopes Array (CTA) is planned to be an Observatory for very high energy gamma ray astronomy and will consist of several tens of telescopes which account for a reflective surface of more than 10000 m$^2$. The mirrors of these telescopes will be formed by a set of facets. Different technological solutions, for a fast and cost efficient production of light-weight mirror facets are under test inside the CTA Consortium. Most of them involve composite structures whose behavior under real observing conditions is not yet fully tested. An outdoor test facility has been built in one of the candidate sites for CTA, in Argentina (San Antonio de los Cobres [SAC], 3600m a.s.l) in order to monitor the optical and mechanical properties of these facets exposed to the local atmospheric conditions for a given period of time. In this work we present the preliminary results of the first Middle Size Telescope (MST) mirror-monitoring campaign, started in 2013.

  2. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  3. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  4. Dialysis Facility Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dialysis Facility Compare helps you find detailed information about Medicare-certified dialysis facilities. You can compare the services and the quality of care that...

  5. Explosive Components Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  6. Materiel Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CRREL's Materiel Evaluation Facility (MEF) is a large cold-room facility that can be set up at temperatures ranging from −20°F to 120°F with a temperature change...

  7. Armament Technology Facility (ATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Armament Technology Facility is a 52,000 square foot, secure and environmentally-safe, integrated small arms and cannon caliber design and evaluation facility....

  8. Integrated Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the center of the 586-square-mile Hanford Site is the Integrated Disposal Facility, also known as the IDF.This facility is a landfill similar in concept...

  9. Facilities for US Radioastronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaddeus, Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Discusses major developments in radioastronomy since 1945. Topics include proposed facilities, very-long-baseline interferometric array, millimeter-wave telescope, submillimeter-wave telescope, and funding for radioastronomy facilities and projects. (JN)

  10. Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Individual permits for municipal, industrial, and semi-public wastewater treatment facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)...

  11. Facility Response Plan (FRP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A Facility Response Plan (FRP) demonstrates a facility's preparedness to respond to a worst case oil discharge. Under the Clean Water Act, as amended by the Oil...

  12. Financing Professional Sports Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Baade, Robert A.; Victor A. Matheson

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines public financing of professional sports facilities with a focus on both early and recent developments in taxpayer subsidization of spectator sports. The paper explores both the magnitude and the sources of public funding for professional sports facilities.

  13. FDA Certified Mammography Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Consumer Information (MQSA) Search for a Certified Facility Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Email Print This list of FDA Certified Mammography Facilities is updated weekly. If you click on Search ...

  14. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  15. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  16. Environmental Toxicology Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Fully-equipped facilities for environmental toxicology researchThe Environmental Toxicology Research Facility (ETRF) located in Vicksburg, MS provides over 8,200 ft...

  17. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to: Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  18. Projectile Demilitarization Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Projectile Wash Out Facility is US Army Ammunition Peculiar Equipment (APE 1300). It is a pilot scale wash out facility that uses high pressure water and steam...

  19. Grid connected integrated community energy system. Phase II: final state 2 report. Preliminary design waste management and institutional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-22

    The Preliminary Design of a Regional, Centralized Solid Waste Management System for the Twin Cities Metropolitan Region in Minnesota is presented. The concept has been developed for the sound environmental and safe disposal of solid waste generated from its health care industry, although some additional waste supplements are included as economic assistance in order to approach a competitive alternative to current health care solid waste disposal costs. The system design focuses on a 132 tons per day high-temperature, slagging pyrolysis system manufactured by Andco Incorporated, Andco-Torrax Division Design criteria are given. A Collection and Transportation System (CTS) has been planned for the movements of solid waste (General and Special) from the generating HHC facilities within a 10-mile waste-shed zone, for municipal solid waste from a local transfer station currently processing municipal solid waste, and for pyrolysis residue to final disposal. Each of these facilities is now considered as service contract operations. Approximately 15 vehicle trips per day are estimated as vehicle traffic delivering the refuse to the pyrolysis facility. Cost estimates for the CTS have been determined in conjunction with current municipal refuse haulers in the TCMR, and valued at the following: HHC General Solid Waste (HHC/GSW) at 6.00 $/T; HHC Special Solid Waste (HHC/SSW) at 20.00 $/T; Municipal Transfer at 4.00 to be paid the pyrolysis system as a drop charge. Special box-bag containers are to be required in handling the HHC/SSW at a cost of 30.19 $/T estimate. The total operating cost for the pyrolysis system has been estimated to be 13.73 $/T, with a steam credit of 11.70 $/T, to yield a net cost of 2.03 $/T. Capital cost has been estimated to be 7,700,800 dollars, 1978. A back-up facility capital investment of $163,000 dollars, 1978 has been estimated, which should be applied to the existing University of Minnesota incinerator.

  20. Medicação de alto custo para portador de sofrimento psíquico: um estudo preliminar dos custos - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v29i1.118 Cost Drugs for carrier of psychic suffering: a preliminary study of costs- DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v29i1.118

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilza Carla Spiri

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo identificar os valores dos medicamentos de alto custo utilizados por portadores de Esquizofrenia Refratária atendidos em unidade ambulatorial. O estudo foi realizado através de uma análise de documentos em um Centro de Apoio Psicossocial, no período de junho de 2005 a maio de 2006, com 33 usuários que faziam uso da medicação. A análise dos dados revelou que os medicamentos mais utilizados para os portadores de Esquizofrenia Refratária foram: clozapina de 100 mg e risperidona de 2 mg. Observou-se que o tratamento com o medicamento olanzapina 10 mg tem um custo mais alto e com o medicamento risperidona de 2 mg apresenta um custo mais baixo. Verificou-se que é necessário o monitoramento do consumo e dos custos dos medicamentos de alto custo, uma vez que fornece subsídios para melhor gerenciamento dos gastos e novos investimentos no serviço. Além disso, identificou-se também a necessidade de mais estudos na área para contribuir com o controle de custos.The present work aims to raise the costs of high-cost drugs used to treat patients of Refractory Schizophrenia in ambulatory unit. The study was carried out in the Psychosocial Support Center, which treated 33 patients with these medications, during the period of June, 2005 to May, 2006. Data analysis disclosed that the mostly used drugs to treat the carriers of Refractory Schizophrenia were: clozapina and risperidona. It was observed that the treatment with olanzapina is more expensive than that with risperidona. The study concluded that the analysis of the consumption and costs of drugs of high cost is necessary to subside better management of the expenses and new investments in the service. Moreover, the necessity of more studies in the area was also identified to contribute with the control of costs.

  1. Optimal control of hydroelectric facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guangzhi

    This thesis considers a simple yet realistic model of pump-assisted hydroelectric facilities operating in a market with time-varying but deterministic power prices. Both deterministic and stochastic water inflows are considered. The fluid mechanical and engineering details of the facility are described by a model containing several parameters. We present a dynamic programming algorithm for optimizing either the total energy produced or the total cash generated by these plants. The algorithm allows us to give the optimal control strategy as a function of time and to see how this strategy, and the associated plant value, varies with water inflow and electricity price. We investigate various cases. For a single pumped storage facility experiencing deterministic power prices and water inflows, we investigate the varying behaviour for an oversimplified constant turbine- and pump-efficiency model with simple reservoir geometries. We then generalize this simple model to include more realistic turbine efficiencies, situations with more complicated reservoir geometry, and the introduction of dissipative switching costs between various control states. We find many results which reinforce our physical intuition about this complicated system as well as results which initially challenge, though later deepen, this intuition. One major lesson of this work is that the optimal control strategy does not differ much between two differing objectives of maximizing energy production and maximizing its cash value. We then turn our attention to the case of stochastic water inflows. We present a stochastic dynamic programming algorithm which can find an on-average optimal control in the face of this randomness. As the operator of a facility must be more cautious when inflows are random, the randomness destroys facility value. Following this insight we quantify exactly how much a perfect hydrological inflow forecast would be worth to a dam operator. In our final chapter we discuss the

  2. Cost projections for Redox Energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, K.; Hall, G.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary design and system cost analysis was performed for the redox energy storage system. A conceptual design and cost estimate was prepared for each of two energy applications: (1) electric utility 100-MWh requirement (10-MW for ten hours) for energy storage for utility load leveling application, and (2) a 500-kWh requirement (10-kW for 50 hours) for use with a variety of residential or commercial applications, including stand alone solar photovoltaic systems. The conceptual designs were based on cell performance levels, system design parameters, and special material costs. These data were combined with estimated thermodynamic and hydraulic analysis to provide preliminary system designs. Results indicate that the redox cell stack to be amenable to mass production techniques with a relatively low material cost.

  3. Effective strategies for development of thermal heavy oil field facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Ken; Lehnert-Thiel, Gunter [IMV Projects (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In thermal heavy oil, a significant part of the capital has to be invested in field facilities and therefore strategies have to be implemented to optimize these costs. Field facilities consist of pipelines, earthworks and production pads whose purpose is to connect an oilsands reservoir to a central processing facility. This paper, presented by IMV Projects, a leading company in the thermal heavy oil field, highlights strategies to manage field facility lifecycle cost. Upfront planning should be done and the development of field facilities should be thought of as a long term infrastructure program rather than a stand-alone project. In addition, templates should be developed to save money and repeatability should be implemented to obtain a better prediction of the program's costs. The strategies presented herein allow major savings over the program's life by implementing an improved schedule and allowing refinements all along the program's course.

  4. The 1997 IDA Cost Research Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Indices IDA-26 Evaluation of Uniformed Services Treatment Facilities IDA-27 Evaluation of TRICARE Program Costs IDA-28 Financial Databases of...update the database. The financial databases for the original contractors will be updated and extended to include most recent data available. These data... financial databases for the shipyards initiated in last year’s study will be extended to most aspects of cost distribution and allocations in cost

  5. Detectors and experiments at future neutrino facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Dydak, Friedrich

    2003-01-01

    Starting from the experimental opportunities at a neutrino factory, possibilities at other facilities which might become available well before the neutrino factory, will be discussed. Ideas abound on neutrino super-beams, beta-beams, and the use of conventional neutrino beams in off-axis mode. Nevertheless the costs and time- scales for realization will be decisive. (22 refs).

  6. Managing Inventory At A Transitional Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Henry A.

    1993-01-01

    Kennedy Inventory Management System, KIMS, geared to needs of facility in transition from research and development to manufacturing. Operated jointly by several contractors at Kennedy Space Center, KIMS designed to reduce cost and increase efficiency of fabrication and maintenance of spaceflight hardware.

  7. 15 CFR 8b.17 - Existing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Management and Budget under control number 0605-0006) ... accessible at no additional cost to the handicapped. (d) Time period. A recipient shall comply with the... methods that will be used to make the facilities accessible; (3) Specify the schedule for taking the...

  8. Facilities Performance Indicators Report, 2006-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazner, Steve, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The "Facilities Performance Indicators Survey" ("FPI") supersedes and builds upon the two major surveys APPA conducted in the past: the Comparative Costs and Staffing (CCAS) survey and the Strategic Assessment Model (SAM). The "FPI" covers all the materials collected in CCAS and SAM, along with some select new data points and improved survey…

  9. Test facility of thermal storage equipment for space power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T.; Nakagawa, M.; Mochida, Y.; Ohtomo, F.; Shimizu, K.; Tanaka, K.; Abe, Y.; Nomura, O.; Kamimoto, M.

    A thermal storage equipment test facility has been built in connection with developing solar dynamic power systems (SDPSs). The test facility consists of a recuperative closed Brayton cycle system (CBC), with a mixture of helium and xenon with a molecular weight of 39.9 serving as the working fluid. CBC has been shown to be the most attractive power generation system among several types of SDPSs because of its ability to meet the required high power demand and its thermal efficiency, about 30 percent. The authors present a description of this test facility and give results of the preliminary test and the first-stage test with heat storage equipment.

  10. Quality of drug prescription in primary health care facilities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR Marwa

    1Ilemela District Hospital, P.O. Box 735, Mwanza, Tanzania. 2Catholic ... prolonged hospital stay and consequently an increased cost of disease management in patients ... WHO/INRUD primary health facility prescribing indicators that monitor ...

  11. 47 CFR 32.2410 - Cable and wire facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2410 Cable and wire facilities. This account shall be used by Class B companies to record the original cost...

  12. Preliminary results from a new spin spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J.G.; Bedrossian, P.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Cummins, T.R. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics] [and others

    1998-12-31

    The first preliminary results from a novel spectrometer for elementally-specific measurements of magnetic surfaces and ultrathin films are presented here. The key measurements are based upon spin-resolving and photon-dichroic photoelectron spectroscopy. True spin-resolution is achieved by the use of a Mini-Mott detection scheme. The photon-dichroic measurements include the variant magnetic x-ray linear dichroism (MXLD). Both a multi-channel, energy dispersive collection scheme as well as the spin-detecting Mini-Mott apparatus are used in data collection. The Spin Spectrometer is based at the Spectromicroscopy Facility (Beamline 7) at the Advanced Light Source.

  13. Do provisions to advance chemical facility safety also advance chemical facility security? An analysis of possible synergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2012-01-01

    The European Commission has launched a study on the applicability of existing chemical industry safety provisions to enhancing security of chemical facilities covering the situation in 18 EU Member States. This paper reports some preliminary analytical findings regarding the extent to which exist...

  14. Pressurized burner test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.J.; Norton, T.S.; Hadley, M.A. [Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is currently fabricating a high-pressure burner test facility. The facility was designed to support the development of gas turbine combustion systems fired on natural gas and coal-derived gaseous fuels containing fuel-bound nitrogen. Upon completion of fabrication and shake-down testing in October 1993, the facility will be available for use by industrial and university partners through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) or through other cooperative arrangements. This paper describes the burner test facility and associated operating parameter ranges and informs interested parties of the availability of the facility.

  15. The Effects of Ionising Radiation on MEMS Silicon Strain Gauges: Preliminary Background and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Technology Organisation ( ANSTO ). Preliminary proton irradiations have been performed to define the methodology for the exposures in the ANSTO facility. This...Science and Technology Organisation ( ANSTO ). The Radiological Exposure Lab has a High-Intensity Gamma Calibrator facility that can be used to expose the...available for neutron exposures within the Lab. ANSTO runs a dedicated particle accelerator facility – STAR, Small Tandem for Applied Research – for

  16. Life cycle costs for disposal and assured isolation of low-level radioactive waste in Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, B.; Sutherland, A.A.; Baird, R.D.

    1998-03-01

    This document presents life cycle costs for a low-level radioactive disposal facility and a comparable assured isolation facility. Cost projections were based on general plans and assumptions, including volume projections and operating life, provided by the Connecticut Hazardous Waste Management Service, for a facility designed to meet the State`s needs. Life cycle costs include the costs of pre-construction activities, construction, operations, closure, and post-closure institutional control. In order to provide a better basis for understanding the relative magnitude of near-term costs and future costs, the results of present value analysis of ut-year costs are provided.

  17. Guidelines for Management Information Systems in Canadian Health Care Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Larry E.

    1987-01-01

    The MIS Guidelines are a comprehensive set of standards for health care facilities for the recording of staffing, financial, workload, patient care and other management information. The Guidelines enable health care facilities to develop management information systems which identify resources, costs and products to more effectively forecast and control costs and utilize resources to their maximum potential as well as provide improved comparability of operations.

  18. Service quality for facilities management in hospitals

    CERN Document Server

    Sui Pheng, Low

    2016-01-01

    This book examines the Facilities Management (FM) of hospitals and healthcare facilities, which are among the most complex, costly and challenging kind of buildings to manage. It presents and evaluates the FM service quality standards in Singapore’s hospitals from the patient’s perspective, and provides recommendations on how to successfully improve FM service quality and achieve higher patient satisfaction. The book also features valuable supplementary materials, including a checklist of 32 key factors for successful facilities management and another checklist of 24 service attributes for hospitals to achieve desirable service quality in connection with facilities management. The book adopts a unique approach of combining service quality and quality theory to provide a more holistic view of how FM service quality can be achieved in hospitals. It also integrates three instruments, namely the SERVQUAL model, the Kano model and the QFD model to yield empirical results from surveys for implementation in hosp...

  19. Cost-Benefit Analysis of the 2006 Air Force Materiel Command Test and Evaluation Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    129 C.4. HELLFIRE Test Facility ( HTF )—Detail...specific additional program costs for only two of these facilities: the BISS, at $50 million nonrecurring, and the HTF , at $5.12 million over the FYDP...2011) following closure is $85.44 million. If we subtract the already considered BISS and HTF facilities, the additional costs total $30.32 million

  20. The Benefits of Guided Facility Self-Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Keith

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of educational institutions have discovered that a guided self-assessment solution helps them to consistently and cost-effectively obtain facility condition information and make better-informed capital planning decisions. Facility self-assessment employs a consistent, repeatable process for internal staff to quickly assess assets…