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Sample records for prehospital cardiac arrest

  1. Response interval is important for survival until admission after prehospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Hien Quoc; Nielsen, Søren Loumann; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2010-01-01

    An increasing distance to the nearest hospital must be expected as a result of centralization of acute care at a small number of hospitals. This may have important consequences in emergency situations, such as prehospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) where the aim is to obtain return...

  2. Patients with cardiac arrest are ventilated two times faster than guidelines recommend : An observational prehospital study using tracheal pressure measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maertens, Vicky L.; De Smedt, Lieven E. G.; Lemoyne, Sabine; Huybrechts, Sofie A. M.; Wouters, Kristien; Kalmar, Alain F.; Monsieurs, Koenraad G.

    Aim: To measure ventilation rate using tracheal airway pressures in prehospitally intubated patients with and without cardiac arrest. Methods: Prospective observational study. In 98 patients (57 with and 41 without cardiac arrest) an air-filled catheter was inserted into the endotracheal tube and

  3. Patients with cardiac arrest are ventilated two times faster than guidelines recommend : An observational prehospital study using tracheal pressure measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maertens, Vicky L.; De Smedt, Lieven E. G.; Lemoyne, Sabine; Huybrechts, Sofie A. M.; Wouters, Kristien; Kalmar, Alain F.; Monsieurs, Koenraad G.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To measure ventilation rate using tracheal airway pressures in prehospitally intubated patients with and without cardiac arrest. Methods: Prospective observational study. In 98 patients (57 with and 41 without cardiac arrest) an air-filled catheter was inserted into the endotracheal tube and co

  4. Response interval is important for survival until admission after prehospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Hien Quoc; Nielsen, Søren Loumann; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2010-01-01

    An increasing distance to the nearest hospital must be expected as a result of centralization of acute care at a small number of hospitals. This may have important consequences in emergency situations, such as prehospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) where the aim is to obtain return...... of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), i.e. successful resuscitation. The aim of this study was to describe the impact of response interval on sustained ROSC, i.e. ROSC at hospital admission, after OHCA with presumed cardiac aetiology....

  5. Association between prehospital physician involvement and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton, Annika; Steinmetz, Jacob; Wissenberg, Mads

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Sudden out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is an important public health problem. While several interventions are known to improve survival, the impact of physician-delivered advanced cardiac life support for OHCA is unclear. We aimed to assess the association between prehospital physician...... involvement and 30-day survival. METHODS: Observational study including persons registered with first-time OHCA of any cause in the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry during 2005-2012. We used logistic regression analysis to assess the association between 30-day survival and involvement of a physician at any time...... before arrival at the hospital. Secondary outcomes were 1-year survival and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) before arrival at the hospital. The associations were explored in three multivariable models: a model with simple adjustment, a model with multiple imputation of missing variables...

  6. Evaluation of intensified prehospital treatment in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, F; Nielsen, J R; Gram, L;

    1991-01-01

    with doctors collaborating (advanced EMS) were used, and 11 (13%) patients were discharged. The intermediate EMS system was used in another area with 45,000 inhabitants/population density of 340/km2, and in this area 20 (18%) patients were discharged. Among the survivors a psychological assessment in form...... of a test for dementia was assessed in long-term survivors (n = 30) together with 28 patients surviving acute myocardial infarction and 11 control persons. The results of the investigation demonstrate that the more intensive the prehospital treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, the more patients...... survive and the more patients survive with good cerebral function. However, the ambulances with specially trained paramedics were only effective in the area with 340 inhabitants/km2....

  7. Effect of prehospital advanced airway management for pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Fukuda, Tatsuma; Doi, Kent; Morimura, Naoto

    2017-05-01

    Respiratory care may be important in pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) due to the asphyxial nature of the majority of events. However, evidence of the effect of prehospital advanced airway management (AAM) for pediatric OHCA is scarce. This was a nationwide population-based study of pediatric OHCA in Japan from 2011 to 2012 based on data from the All-Japan Utstein Registry. We included pediatric OHCA patients aged between 1 and 17 years old. The primary outcome was one-month neurologically favorable survival defined as a Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance category (CPC) score of 1-2 (corresponding to a Pediatric CPC score of 1-3). A total of 2157 patients were included in the final cohort; 365 received AAM and 1792 received bag-valve-mask (BVM) ventilation only. Among the 2157 patients, 213 (9.9%) survived with favorable neurological outcomes (CPC of 1-2) one month after OHCA. There were no significant differences in neurologically favorable survival between the AAM and BVM groups after adjusting for potential confounders, although there was a tendency favoring BVM ventilation: propensity score matching, OR 0.74 (95%CI 0.35-1.59), and multivariable logistic regression modeling, ORadjusted 0.55 (95%CI 0.24-1.14). Subgroup analyses demonstrated that there were no subgroups in which AAM was associated with neurologically favorable survival, including the non-cardiac (primarily asphyxial) etiology group. In pediatric OHCA, prehospital AAM was not associated with an increased chance of neurologically favorable survival compared with BVM-only ventilation. However, careful consideration is required to interpret the findings, as there may be unmeasured residual confounders and selection bias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Prehospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac arrest (PaRAMeDIC) trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    McCabe Chris; Lamb Sarah E; Lall Ranjit; Horton Jessica; Deakin Charles; Cooke Matthew W; Woollard Malcolm; Perkins Gavin D; Quinn Tom; Slowther Anne; Gates Simon

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is closely linked to the quality of CPR, but in real life, resuscitation during prehospital care and ambulance transport is often suboptimal. Mechanical chest compression devices deliver consistent chest compressions, are not prone to fatigue and could potentially overcome some of the limitations of manual chest compression. However, there is no high-quality evidence that they improve clinical outcomes, or that they are cost ef...

  9. Prehospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac arrest (PaRAMeDIC) trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Gavin D; Woollard, Malcolm; Cooke, Matthew W; Deakin, Charles; Horton, Jessica; Lall, Ranjit; Lamb, Sarah E; McCabe, Chris; Quinn, Tom; Slowther, Anne; Gates, Simon

    2010-11-05

    Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is closely linked to the quality of CPR, but in real life, resuscitation during prehospital care and ambulance transport is often suboptimal. Mechanical chest compression devices deliver consistent chest compressions, are not prone to fatigue and could potentially overcome some of the limitations of manual chest compression. However, there is no high-quality evidence that they improve clinical outcomes, or that they are cost effective. The Prehospital Randomised Assessment of a Mechanical Compression Device In Cardiac Arrest (PARAMEDIC) trial is a pragmatic cluster randomised study of the LUCAS-2 device in adult patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The primary objective of this trial is to evaluate the effect of chest compression using LUCAS-2 on mortality at 30 days post out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, compared with manual chest compression. Secondary objectives of the study are to evaluate the effects of LUCAS-2 on survival to 12 months, cognitive and quality of life outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Ambulance service vehicles will be randomised to either manual compression (control) or LUCAS arms. Adult patients in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, attended by a trial vehicle will be eligible for inclusion. Patients with traumatic cardiac arrest or who are pregnant will be excluded. The trial will recruit approximately 4000 patients from England, Wales and Scotland. A waiver of initial consent has been approved by the Research Ethics Committees. Consent will be sought from survivors for participation in the follow-up phase. The trial will assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the LUCAS-2 mechanical chest compression device. The trial is registered on the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Registry (ISRCTN08233942).

  10. Prehospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac arrest (PaRAMeDIC trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCabe Chris

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is closely linked to the quality of CPR, but in real life, resuscitation during prehospital care and ambulance transport is often suboptimal. Mechanical chest compression devices deliver consistent chest compressions, are not prone to fatigue and could potentially overcome some of the limitations of manual chest compression. However, there is no high-quality evidence that they improve clinical outcomes, or that they are cost effective. The Prehospital Randomised Assessment of a Mechanical Compression Device In Cardiac Arrest (PARAMEDIC trial is a pragmatic cluster randomised study of the LUCAS-2 device in adult patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods/design The primary objective of this trial is to evaluate the effect of chest compression using LUCAS-2 on mortality at 30 days post out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, compared with manual chest compression. Secondary objectives of the study are to evaluate the effects of LUCAS-2 on survival to 12 months, cognitive and quality of life outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Methods: Ambulance service vehicles will be randomised to either manual compression (control or LUCAS arms. Adult patients in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, attended by a trial vehicle will be eligible for inclusion. Patients with traumatic cardiac arrest or who are pregnant will be excluded. The trial will recruit approximately 4000 patients from England, Wales and Scotland. A waiver of initial consent has been approved by the Research Ethics Committees. Consent will be sought from survivors for participation in the follow-up phase. Conclusion The trial will assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the LUCAS-2 mechanical chest compression device. Trial Registration: The trial is registered on the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Registry (ISRCTN08233942.

  11. Long-term prognosis after out-of-hospital resuscitation of cardiac arrest in trauma patients: prehospital trauma-associated cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchateau, François-Xavier; Hamada, Sophie; Raux, Mathieu; Gay, Matthieu; Mantz, Jean; Paugam Burtz, Catherine; Gauss, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Although prehospital cardiac arrest (CA) remains associated with poor long-term outcome, recent studies show an improvement in the survival rate after prehospital trauma associated CA (TCA). However, data on the long-term neurological outcome of TCA, particularly from physician-staffed Emergency Medical Service (EMS), are scarce, and results reported have been inconsistent. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of patients admitted to several trauma centres after a TCA. This study is a retrospective database review of all patients from a multicentre prospective registry that experienced a TCA and had undergone successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) prior their admission at the trauma centre. The primary end point was neurological outcome at 6 months among patients who survived to hospital discharge. 88 victims of TCA underwent successful CPR and were admitted to the hospital, 90% of whom were victims of blunt trauma. Of these 88 patients, 10 patients (11%; CI 95% 6% to 19%) survived to discharge: on discharge, 9 patients displayed a GCS of 15 and Cerebral Performance Categories (CPC) 1-2 and one patient had a GCS 7 and CPC of 3. Hypoxia was the most frequent cause of CA among survivors. 6-month follow-up was achieved for 9 patients of the 10 surviving patients. The 9 patients with a good outcome on hospital discharge had a CPC of 1 or 2 6 months post discharge. All returned to their premorbid family and social settings. Among patients admitted to hospital after successful CPR from TCA, hypoxia as the likely aetiology of arrest carried a more favourable prognosis. Most of the patients successfully resuscitated from TCA and surviving to hospital discharge had a good neurological outcome, suggesting that prehospital resuscitation may not be futile. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Article.jsp. Accessed June 16, 2014. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Approach to cardiac arrest and life-threatening ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 63. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Cardiac arrest and audden aardiac death. In: ...

  13. Effect of pre-hospital advanced airway management for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest caused by respiratory disease: a propensity score-matched study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi-Fukuda, N; Fukuda, T; Yahagi, N

    2017-05-01

    Optimal pre-hospital care for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) caused by respiratory disease may differ from that for OHCA associated with other aetiologies, especially with respect to respiratory management. We aimed to investigate whether pre-hospital advanced airway management (AAM) was associated with favourable outcomes after OHCA caused by intrinsic respiratory disease. This nationwide, population-based, propensity score-matched study of adult patients in Japan with OHCA due to respiratory disease from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2012 compared patients with and without pre-hospital AAM. The primary outcome was neurologically favourable survival at one month after the OHCA. Of 49,534 eligible patients, 20,458 received pre-hospital AAM and 29,076 did not. In a propensity score-matched cohort (18,483 versus 18,483 patients), the odds of neurologically favourable survival were significantly lower for patients receiving pre-hospital AAM (0.6% versus 1.5%; odds ratio [OR] 0.42 [95% confidence interval {CI} 0.34 to 0.52]). The results from multivariable logistic regression analysis also showed that pre-hospital AAM was significantly associated with a decreased chance of neurologically favourable survival (adjusted OR 0.43 [95% CI 0.35 to 0.52]). Similar findings were observed for one-month survival and pre-hospital return of spontaneous circulation. In subgroup analyses, pre-hospital AAM was associated with poor neurological outcomes, regardless of the type of airway device used (laryngeal mask airway, adjusted OR 0.35 [95% CI 0.19 to 0.57]; oesophageal obturator airway, adjusted OR 0.44 [95% CI 0.35 to 0.55]; and endotracheal tube, adjusted OR 0.47 [95% CI 0.30 to 0.69]). In conclusion, pre-hospital AAM was associated with poor neurological outcome among patients with OHCA caused by intrinsic respiratory disease.

  14. Duration of Prehospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Favorable Neurological Outcomes for Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests: A Nationwide, Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yoshikazu; Funada, Akira; Goto, Yumiko

    2016-12-20

    The appropriate duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains unclear and may differ based on initial rhythm. We aimed to determine the relationship between the duration of prehospital CPR by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel and post-OHCA outcomes. We analyzed the records of 12 877 pediatric patients who experienced OHCAs (CPR duration was defined as the time from CPR initiation by EMS personnel to prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or to hospital arrival when prehospital ROSC was not achieved during prehospital CPR efforts. The rates of 30-day survival and 30-day CPC 1 to 2 were 9.1% (n=1167) and 2.5% (n=325), respectively. Prehospital EMS-initiated CPR duration was significantly and inversely associated with 30-day outcomes (adjusted odds ratio for 1-minute increments: 0.94, 95% confidence interval: 0.93-0.95 for survival; adjusted odds ratio: 0.90, 95% confidence interval: 0.88-0.92 for CPC 1-2). The duration of prehospital EMS-initiated CPR, beyond which the chance for favorable outcomes diminished to CPR durations beyond which the chance for 30-day survival with CPC 1 to 2 diminished to CPR, the prehospital CPR duration, beyond which the chance for favorable outcome diminished to CPR duration for pediatric OHCAs was independently and inversely associated with 30-day favorable outcomes. The duration of prehospital EMS-initiated CPR, beyond which the chance for 30-day favorable outcomes diminished to CPR duration to achieve this proportion of outcomes differed based on initial rhythm. Further research is required to elucidate appropriate CPR duration for pediatric OHCAs, including in-hospital CPR time. URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02432196. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Association of prehospital advanced airway management with neurologic outcome and survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Hiraide, Atsushi; Chang, Yuchiao; Brown, David F M

    2013-01-16

    It is unclear whether advanced airway management such as endotracheal intubation or use of supraglottic airway devices in the prehospital setting improves outcomes following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) compared with conventional bag-valve-mask ventilation. To test the hypothesis that prehospital advanced airway management is associated with favorable outcome after adult OHCA. Prospective, nationwide, population-based study (All-Japan Utstein Registry) involving 649,654 consecutive adult patients in Japan who had an OHCA and in whom resuscitation was attempted by emergency responders with subsequent transport to medical institutions from January 2005 through December 2010. Favorable neurological outcome 1 month after an OHCA, defined as cerebral performance category 1 or 2. Of the eligible 649,359 patients with OHCA, 367,837 (57%) underwent bag-valve-mask ventilation and 281,522 (43%) advanced airway management, including 41,972 (6%) with endotracheal intubation and 239,550 (37%) with use of supraglottic airways. In the full cohort, the advanced airway group incurred a lower rate of favorable neurological outcome compared with the bag-valve-mask group (1.1% vs 2.9%; odds ratio [OR], 0.38; 95% CI, 0.36-0.39). In multivariable logistic regression, advanced airway management had an OR for favorable neurological outcome of 0.38 (95% CI, 0.37-0.40) after adjusting for age, sex, etiology of arrest, first documented rhythm, witnessed status, type of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of public access automated external defibrillator, epinephrine administration, and time intervals. Similarly, the odds of neurologically favorable survival were significantly lower both for endotracheal intubation (adjusted OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.37-0.45) and for supraglottic airways (adjusted OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.36-0.40). In a propensity score-matched cohort (357,228 patients), the adjusted odds of neurologically favorable survival were significantly lower both for

  16. Developing quality indicators for the appropriateness of resuscitation in prehospital atraumatic cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudzen, Corita R; Liddicoat, Rebecca; Hoffman, Jerome R; Koenig, William; Lorenz, Karl A; Asch, Steven M

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims do not survive or suffer severe neurological impairment. We sought to develop a set of straightforward clinical indicators that paramedics could use to better match resuscitation attempts to those most likely to benefit. In partnership with the Los Angeles County Emergency Medical Services, we used the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method of quantifying expert opinion regarding the risks and benefits of medical procedures. We presented available scientific evidence related to potential indicators of the quality of resuscitative care to stakeholder-nominated experts. Forty-one candidate indicators incorporated key variables, including initial rhythm, patient preferences, presence of witnesses, and place of arrest. Nine panelists, including palliative care and emergency medical specialists, rated the appropriateness of paramedic use of each indicator by using a 1-9 scale. An indicator was considered appropriate if the potential benefits outweighed the potential harm to the patient or their family. Indicators were retained if median score was >/=7. The expert panel voted to retain 28 quality indicators. Three addressed signs of irreversible death (e.g., dependent lividity), 8 addressed patient preferences (e.g., inquiring about DNR status), and the remainder addressed combinations of initial rhythm and other prognostic signs (e.g., "If initial rhythm is asystole and patient is known by apparent surrogate decision maker to have a terminal illness, then forgo resuscitation."). Our experts recommended a series of much more liberal criteria for forgoing resuscitation than is currently practiced. This includes ascertaining and honoring patient preferences, either through written documents or family members, and combinations of clinical criteria that predict poor neurological outcome, such as asystole, terminal illness, age greater than 70, and response time greater than 15 minutes. These quality indicators expand on

  17. Cardiac arrest in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tress Erika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners.

  18. Association between Prehospital CPR Quality and End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide Levels in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ryan A; Bobrow, Bentley J; Spaite, Daniel W; Hu, Chengcheng; McDannold, Robyn; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler F

    2016-01-01

    International Guidelines recommend measurement of end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) to enhance cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality and optimize blood flow during CPR. Numerous factors impact EtCO2 (e.g., ventilation, metabolism, cardiac output), yet few clinical studies have correlated CPR quality and EtCO2 during actual out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitations. The purpose of this study was to describe the association between EtCO2 and CPR quality variables during OHCA. This is an observational study of prospectively collected CPR quality and capnography data from two EMS agencies participating in a statewide resuscitation quality improvement program. CPR quality and capnography data from adult (≥18 years) cardiac resuscitation attempts (10/2008-06/2013) were collected and analyzed on a minute-by-minute basis using RescueNet™ Code Review. Linear mixed effect models were used to evaluate the association between (log-transformed) EtCO2 level and CPR variables: chest compression (CC) depth, CC rate, CC release velocity (CCRV), ventilation rate. Among the 1217 adult OHCA cases of presumed cardiac etiology, 925 (76.0%) had a monitor-defibrillator file with CPR quality data, of which 296 (32.0%) cases had >1 minute of capnography data during CPR. After capnography quality review, 66 of these cases (22.3%) were excluded due to uninterpretable capnography, resulting in a final study sample of 230 subjects (mean age 68 years; 69.1% male), with a total of 1581 minutes of data. After adjustment for other CPR variables, a 10 mm increase in CC depth was associated with a 4.0% increase in EtCO2 (p < 0.0001), a 10 compression/minute increase in CC rate with a 1.7% increase in EtCO2 (p = 0.02), a 10 mm/second increase in CCRV with a 2.8% increase in EtCO2 (p = 0.03), and a 10 breath/minute increase in ventilation rate with a 17.4% decrease in EtCO2 (p < 0.0001). When controlling for known CPR quality variables, increases in CC depth, CC rate and CCRV

  19. Reduced pre-hospital and in-hospital survival rates after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus : An observational prospective community-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hoeijen, Daniel A.; Blom, Marieke T.; Bardai, Abdennasser; Souverein, Patrick C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/243074948; De Boer, Anthonius|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075097346; Tan, Hanno L.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains a major cause of death. We aimed to determine whether type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with reduced pre-hospital and in-hospital survival rates after OHCA. Methods and results An observational community-based cohort study was performed

  20. Is the pre-hospital ECG after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest accurate for the diagnosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salam, Idrees; Hassager, Christian; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig

    2016-01-01

    -hospital ROSC-ECG in predicting ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). METHOD: ROSC-ECGs of 145 comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, randomly assigned in the Target Temperature Management trial, were classified according to the current STEMI ECG criteria (third universal definition...... of myocardial infarction). RESULTS: STEs were present in the pre-hospital ROSC-ECG of 78 (54%) patients. A final diagnosis revealed that 69 (48%) patients had STEMI, 31 (21%) patients had non-STEMI and 45 (31%) patients had no myocardial infarction. STE in ROSC-ECGs had a sensitivity of 74% (95% confidence...... intervention was successful in 68% versus 36% (PECG is a suboptimal diagnostic tool to predict STEMI...

  1. The role of prehospital advanced airway management on outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seungmin; Ahn, Ki Ok; Shin, Sang Do

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to compare the benefits of prehospital advanced airway management (AAM) and basic airway management (BAM) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Two investigators performed a systematic review of PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database to identify all peer-reviewed articles relevant to this meta-analysis. We included all articles describing emergency medical system-treated nontraumatic OHCAs; specifically, all articles that described intervention of the prehospital AAM type were considered. The primary outcome was survival to discharge, whereas the secondary outcome was neurologic recovery after an OHCA event. For subgroup analysis, we compared the clinical outcome of endotracheal intubation (ETI), a specific type of AAM, vs BAM. We reviewed 1452 studies, 10 of which satisfied all the inclusion criteria and involved 17 380 patients subjected to AAM and 67 525 subjected to BAM. Based on the full random effects model, patients who received AAM had lower odds of survival (odds ratio [OR], 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.90) compared with BAM. Subgroup analysis for ETI vs BAM showed no significant association with respect to survival (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.16-1.23). There were no significant differences in the odds of neurologic recovery between AAM and BAM (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.03-1.37). Our results reveal decreased survival odds for OHCA patients treated with AAM by emergency medical service personnel compared with BAM. However, the role of prehospital AAM, especially ETI, on achieving neurologic recovery remains unclear. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of supraglottic airway versus endotracheal intubation for the pre-hospital treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Both supraglottic airway devices (SGA) and endotracheal intubation (ETI) have been used by emergency life-saving technicians (ELST) in Japan to treat out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs). Despite traditional emphasis on airway management during cardiac arrest, its impact on survival from OHCA and time dependent effectiveness remains unclear. Methods All adults with witnessed, non-traumatic OHCA, from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2008, treated by the emergency medical services (EMS) with an advanced airway in Osaka, Japan were studied in a prospective Utstein-style population cohort database. The primary outcome measure was one-month survival with neurologically favorable outcome. The association between type of advanced airway (ETI/SGA), timing of device placement and neurological outcome was assessed by multiple logistic regression. Results Of 7,517 witnessed non-traumatic OHCAs, 5,377 cases were treated with advanced airways. Of these, 1,679 were ETI while 3,698 were SGA. Favorable neurological outcome was similar between ETI and SGA (3.6% versus 3.6%, P = 0.95). The time interval from collapse to ETI placement was significantly longer than for SGA (17.2 minutes versus 15.8 minutes, P predictor (AOR 0.71, 95% CI 0.39 to 1.30) but the presence of an ETI certified ELST (AOR, 1.86, 95% CI 1.04 to 3.34) was a significant predictor for favorable neurological outcome. Conclusions There was no difference in neurologically favorable outcome from witnessed OHCA for ETI versus SGA. Early airway management with advanced airway regardless of type and rhythm was associated with improved outcomes. PMID:21985431

  3. Variation of current protocols for managing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in prehospital settings among Asian countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hao Lin

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: International variation in practices and polices related to OHCAs do exist. Concerns regarding prehospital TOR rules include medical evidence, legal considerations, EMS manpower, public perception, medical oversight, education, EMS characteristics, and cost-effectiveness analysis. Further research is needed to achieve consensus regarding management protocols, especially for EMS that perform resuscitation during transportation of OHCA patients.

  4. Cardiac arrest: comparison of paramedic and conventional ambulance services.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    A prospective study conducted in the Greater Vancouver area compared survival rates in prehospital cardiac arrest managed by an advanced life support (paramedic) service with those in cardiac arrest managed by conventional ambulance service. Management by the paramedic service was associated with higher survival rates for patients found in cardiac arrest but not for patients who suffered the arrest while the ambulance was present. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation by bystanders was associated wit...

  5. Does Pre-hospital Endotracheal Intubation Improve Survival in Adults with Non-traumatic Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Tiah

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Endotracheal intubation (ETI is currently considered superior to supraglottic airway devices (SGA for survival and other outcomes among adults with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. We aimed to determine if the research supports this conclusion by conducting a systematic review. Methods: We searched the MEDLINE, Scopus and CINAHL databases for studies published between January 1, 1980, and 30 April 30, 2013, which compared pre-hospital use of ETI with SGA for outcomes of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC; survival to hospital admission; survival to hospital discharge; and favorable neurological or functional status. We selected studies using pre-specified criteria. Included studies were independently screened for quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. We did not pool results because of study variability. Study outcomes were extracted and results presented as summed odds ratios with 95% CI. Results: We identified five eligible studies: one quasi-randomized controlled trial and four cohort studies, involving 303,348 patients in total. Only three of the five studies reported a higher proportion of ROSC with ETI versus SGA with no difference reported in the remaining two. None found significant differences between ETI and SGA for survival to hospital admission or discharge. One study reported better functional status at discharge for ETI versus SGA. Two studies reported no significant difference for favorable neurological status between ETI and SGA. Conclusion: Current evidence does not conclusively support the superiority of ETI over SGA for multiple outcomes among adults with OHCA. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  6. Cardiac arrest - cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basri Lenjani; Besnik Elshani; Nehat Baftiu; Kelmend Pallaska; Kadir Hyseni; Njazi Gashi; Nexhbedin Karemani; Ilaz Bunjaku; Taxhidin Zaimi; Arianit Jakupi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) measures within the golden minutes inEurope.Methods:The material was taken from theUniversityClinical Center ofKosovo -EmergencyCentre inPristina, during the two(2) year period(2010-2011).The collected date belong to the patients with cardiac arrest have been recorded in the patients' log book protocol at the emergency clinic.Results:During the2010 to2011 in the emergency center of theCUCK inPristina have been treated a total of269 patients with cardiac arrest, of whom159 or59.1% have been treated in2010, and110 patients or40.9% in2011.Of the269 patients treated in the emergency centre,93 or34.6% have exited lethally in the emergency centre, and176 or 65.4% have been transferred to other clinics.In the total number of patients with cardiac arrest, males have dominated with186 cases, or69.1%.The average age of patients included in the survey was56.7 year oldSD±16.0 years.Of the269 patients with cardiac arrest, defibrillation has been applied for93 or34.6% of patients.In the outpatient settings defibrillation has been applied for3 or3.2% of patients.Patients were defibrillated with application of one to four shocks. Of27 cases with who have survived cardiac arrest, none of them have suffered cardiac arrest at home,3 or11.1% of them have suffered cardiac arrest on the street, and24 or88.9% of them have suffered cardiac arrest in the hospital.5 out of27 patients survived have ended with neurological impairment.Cardiac arrest cases were present during all days of the week, but frequently most reported cases have been onMonday with32.0% of cases, and onFriday with24.5% of cases. Conclusions:All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care(with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care) the rate of survival is higher.

  7. Prehospital thoracostomy in patients with traumatic circulatory arrest: results from a physician-staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.H.; Ketelaars, R.; Wageningen, B. van; Biert, J.; Hoogerwerf, N.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Until recently, traumatic cardiac arrest (tCA) was believed to be associated with high mortality and low survival rates. New data suggest better outcomes. The most common error in tCA management is failing to treat a tension pneumothorax (TP). In the prehospital setting, we prefer thoraco

  8. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  9. Characteristic analysis of pre-hospital treatment of 247 patients with cardiac arrest%院前救治247例心脏骤停患者特点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志刚; 吴敏; 邱晨; 何斌

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the characteristics of cardiac arrest of Zhenjiang area. Methods:Datas of pre-hospital treat-ment of patients with cardiac arrest were retrospectively analysed from January 1,2013 to December 31,2013 of Zhenjiang Emer-gency Medical Center. Results:There were 247 cases , including 174 male and 73 female(male:female=2.38:1). The ages were from 1to 106 years , male age 63.14 ± 20.02,women age 69.82±17.63(P<0.05);median number(four points bit spacing)age [M (Qr)]=69(53,80). At home 175 cases, other areas 72 cases. Scene rescued and transported to hospital 180 cases, and no transport-ed 67 cases. Emergency reaction shortest time was 1 minutes,longest was 36 minutes,median(four points bit spacing)time [M (Qr)]=9(6,12)min, over 12 min was 60 cases (24.29%). Scene CPR was 16 cases(6.48%),including at home 6 cases, bystander 4 cases and medican 6 cases .And there were 3 cases achieved pre-hospital ROSC(1.21%). In December the cardiac arrest patients number was highest , 36 patients(14.57%);and the numbers in Feb、Mar、Nov were all beyond 10%. Patients with ages over 21 years had the highest arrest rates during 8AM to 4PM. 31 cases had no obvious medical history, while 166(67.21%)had, in which 113(45.75%)with a primary disease, 53 (21.46%) with two or more primary diseases. Conclusion:Sudden out-hospital cardiac ar-rest in Zhenjiang area occurred easily in winter, and most patients were older people with cardiac and brain vascular primary diseas-es. As well as doing well the prevention works , dual network should be strengthened in the construction of community first aid and pre-hospital rescue, and prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation.%目的:分析江苏镇江地区院外心脏骤停患者特点。方法:采用回顾性分析方法,对江苏镇江市急救中心2013年1月1日—12月31日院前救治心脏骤停患者的资料进行统计与分析。结果:247例心脏骤停患者,男性174例,女性73例(男:女=2.38:1

  10. 56例急性心肌梗死心脏骤停患者的院前急救分析%Analysis of Emergency Treatment of 56 Cases of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction in Prehospital Cardiac Arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕吉

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the acute myocardial infarction heart sudden pain in patients with pre-hospital emergency measures, the success rate of rescue analysis various factors influence, improve pre-hospital rescue success rate. Methods a retrospective analysis of 120 emergency center of our hospital in the past 5 years were 56 cases of acute myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest patients pre-hospital data, analysis of the emergency procedure, first aid success rate and influence factors. Results among the 56 cases, 36 cases had died on the scene, but died in the hospital 8 cases of persistent rescue specialist treatment, 12 cases after successful rescue, rescue success rate was 21.4%;the death group and the successful group, no significant dif erence in gender and previous history of heart disease, but in the age, electric hammer time to defibril ation, the implementation of CPR time and there are no significant dif erences in terms of tracheal intubation. Conclusion perfect emergency network, ef icient salvage process, standardized emergency measures can ef ectively improve the acute myocardial infarction cardiac arrest patients rescue success rate.%目的探讨急性心肌梗死心脏骤疼患者的院前急救措施,分析影响抢救成功率的各种因素,提高院前抢救成功率。方法回顾性分析我院120急救中心于过去5年内接诊的56例急性心肌梗死并心脏骤停患者的院前急救资料,分析急救流程,急救成功率和影响因素。结果本组共56例,现场死亡36例,有8例持续抢救但于院内死亡,12例抢救成功后转专科治疗,抢救成功率为21.4%;死亡组与成功组相比,在性别和既往心脏病史等方面无明显差异,但在年龄、电击除颤时间、实施CPR时间和有无气管插管方面有明显差异。结论完善的急救网络、高效的抢救流程、规范化的急救措施能有效提高急性心肌梗死心脏骤停患者的急救成功率。

  11. ECPR for Refractory Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-17

    Cardiac Arrest; Heart Arrest; Sudden Cardiac Arrest; Cardiopulmonary Arrest; Death, Sudden, Cardiac; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation; CPR; Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation; Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

  12. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  13. An airline cardiac arrest program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Rourke, M F; Donaldson, E; Geddes, J S

    1997-01-01

    ...) available for use on airline passengers with cardiac arrest. AEDs were installed on international Qantas aircraft and at major terminals, selected crew were trained in their use, and all crew members were trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation...

  14. Direct Transport to a Percutaneous Cardiac Intervention Center and Outcomes in Patients With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristian Dahl Kragholm; Malta Hansen, Carolina; Dupre, Matthew E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Practice guidelines recommend regional systems of care for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, whether emergency medical services should bypass nonpercutaneous cardiac intervention (non-PCI) facilities and transport out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients directly to PCI centers...... despite longer transport time remains unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival with geocoding of arrest location, we identified out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with prehospital return of spontaneous circulation and evaluated the association between direct...... transport to a PCI center and outcomes in North Carolina during 2012 to 2014. Destination hospital was classified according to PCI center status (catheterization laboratory immediately accessible 24/7). Inverse probability-weighted logistic regression accounting for age, sex, emergency medical services...

  15. Neurologic management following cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, N G

    1989-10-01

    Optimal neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest requires careful attention to the details of both intracranial and extracranial homeostasis. A high index of suspicion regarding the potential causes and complications of cardiac arrest facilitates discovery and treatment of problems before they adversely affect neurologic outcome. The future is bright for resuscitation research: Our fundamental understanding of cerebral ischemia and its consequences has dramatically improved, and this knowledge can hopefully be transferred to clinical useful modes of therapy. However, the transition from a promising, therapeutically effective intervention in animals to the demonstration that treatment is effective following cardiac arrest in humans is an important and difficult step. The patient population is heterogeneous before the insult, the duration and severity of the insult are variable, and the effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation varies among institutions. Therefore, the only means of demonstrating clinical efficacy is the performance of a large clinical trial. The Resuscitation Research Center at the University of Pittsburgh has developed and coordinated a multicenter, multinational team of investigators who have completed one definitive trial of postarrest barbiturate therapy and are currently completing a similar trial using a calcium entry blocker. Despite the formidable obstacles posed by such comprehensive efforts, they provide the mechanism for determining whether the cost of a new treatment modality is justified by the likelihood of improved mortality or morbidity.

  16. Cognitive impairment after sudden cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Jaszke-Psonka, Magdalena; Piegza, Magdalena; Ścisło, Piotr; Pudlo, Robert; Piegza, Jacek; Badura-Brzoza, Karina; Leksowska, Aleksandra; Hese, Robert T.; Gorczyca, Piotr W.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the incidence and severity of the impairment of selected cognitive functions in patients after sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in comparison to patients after myocardial infarction without SCA and healthy subjects and to analyze the influence of sociodemographic and clinical parameters and the duration of cardiac arrest on the presence and severity of the described disorders. Material and methods The study group comprised 30 cardiac arrest survivors, the reference group comprised ...

  17. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in an urban/rural area during 1991 and 1996 : have emergency medical service changes improved outcome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Absalom, AR; Bradley, P; Soar, J

    1999-01-01

    Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is influenced by pre-hospital emergency medical care. This study compares outcome of cardiac arrest victims presenting to an emergency department serving a mixed urban/rural area (Norfolk, UK) in 1991 with 1996. Between these years the regional emergency

  18. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in cardiac arrest following trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidel, B A; Kanz, K-G

    2016-11-01

    For decades, survival rates of cardiac arrest following trauma were reported between 0 and 2 %. Since 2005, survival rates have increased with a wide range up to 39 % and good neurological recovery in every second person injured for unknown reasons. Especially in children, high survival rates with good neurologic outcomes are published. Resuscitation following traumatic cardiac arrest differs significantly from nontraumatic causes. Paramount is treatment of reversible causes, which include massive bleeding, hypoxia, tension pneumothorax, and pericardial tamponade. Treatment of reversible causes should be simultaneous. Chest compression is inferior following traumatic cardiac arrest and should never delay treatment of reversible causes of the traumatic cardiac arrest. In massive bleeding, bleeding control has priority. Damage control resuscitation with permissive hypotension, aggressive coagulation therapy, and damage control surgery represent the pillars of initial treatment. Cardiac arrest due to hypoxia should be resolved by airway management and ventilation. Tension pneumothorax should be decompressed by finger thoracostomy, pericardial tamponade by resuscitative thoracotomy. In addition, resuscitative thoracotomy allows direct and indirect bleeding control. Untreated impact brain apnea may rapidly lead to cardiac arrest and requires quick opening of the airway and effective oxygenation. Established algorithms for treatment of cardiac arrest following trauma enable a safe, structured, and effective management.

  19. Cardiac Arrest: Obstetric CPR/ACLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Benjamin; Lipman, Steven

    2017-01-10

    In contrast with other high-resource countries, maternal mortality has seen an increase in the United States. Caring for pregnant women in cardiac arrest may prove uniquely challenging given the rarity of the event coupled by the physiological changes of pregnancy. Optimization of resuscitative efforts warrants special attention as described in the 2015 American Heart Association's "Scientific Statement on Maternal Cardiac Arrest." Current recommendations address a variety of topics ranging from the basic components of chest compressions and airway management to some of the logistical complexities and operational challenges involved in maternal cardiac arrest.

  20. The obesity paradox in cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkias, Athanasios; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-02-01

    Evidence from clinical cohorts indicates an obesity paradox in overweight and obese patients who seem to have a more favorable short-term and long-term prognosis than leaner patients. Although obese cardiac arrest victims are theoretically more difficult to be resuscitated due to difficulties in providing adequate chest compressions, ventilation, and oxygenation, research so far has shown that there is an obesity paradox in cardiac arrest.

  1. Surface Electrocardiogram Predictors of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghani, Samy A.; Rosenthal, Todd M.; Morin, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is a major cause of death in industrialized nations, with approximately 50% of these deaths attributable to sudden cardiac arrest. If patients at high risk for sudden cardiac arrest can be identified, their odds of surviving fatal arrhythmias can be significantly improved through prophylactic implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement. This review summarizes the current knowledge pertaining to surface electrocardiogram (ECG) predictors of sudden cardiac arrest. Methods: We conducted a literature review focused on methods of predicting sudden cardiac arrest through noninvasive electrocardiographic testing. Results: Several electrocardiographic-based methods of risk stratification of sudden cardiac arrest have been studied, including QT prolongation, QRS duration, fragmented QRS complexes, early repolarization, Holter monitoring, heart rate variability, heart rate turbulence, signal-averaged ECG, T wave alternans, and T-peak to T-end. These ECG findings have shown variable effectiveness as screening tools. Conclusion: At this time, no individual ECG finding has been found to be able to adequately stratify patients with regard to risk for sudden cardiac arrest. However, one or more of these candidate surface ECG parameters may become useful components of future multifactorial risk stratification calculators. PMID:27660578

  2. Cardiac catheterization is underutilized after in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Raina M; Abella, Benjamin S; Khan, Monica; Huang, Kuang-Ning; Beiser, David G; Neumar, Robert W; Carr, Brendan G; Becker, Lance B; Vanden Hoek, Terry L

    2008-12-01

    Indications for immediate cardiac catheterization in cardiac arrest survivors without ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are uncertain as electrocardiographic and clinical criteria may be challenging to interpret in this population. We sought to evaluate rates of early catheterization after in-hospital ventricular fibrillation (VF) arrest and the association with survival. Using a billing database we retrospectively identified cases with an ICD-9 code of cardiac arrest (427.5) or VF (427.41). Discharge summaries were reviewed to identify in-hospital VF arrests. Rates of catheterization on the day of arrest were determined by identifying billing charges. Unadjusted analyses were performed using Chi-square, and adjusted analyses were performed using logistic regression. One hundred and ten in-hospital VF arrest survivors were included in the analysis. Cardiac catheterization was performed immediately or within 1 day of arrest in 27% (30/110) of patients and of these patients, 57% (17/30) successfully received percutaneous coronary intervention. Of those who received cardiac catheterization the indication for the procedure was STEMI or new left bundle branch block (LBBB) in 43% (13/30). Therefore, in the absence of standard ECG data suggesting acute myocardial infarction, 57% (17/30) received angiography. Patients receiving cardiac catheterization were more likely to survive than those who did not receive catheterization (80% vs. 54%, psurvival. Future recommendations need to be established to guide clinicians on which arrest survivors might benefit from immediate catheterization.

  3. To survive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a search for meaning and coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Anders; Dahlberg, Karin; Sandman, Lars

    2009-03-01

    The primary responsibility of prehospital emergency personnel at out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) is to provide lifesaving care. Ethical considerations, decisions, and actions should be based in the patient's beliefs about health and well-being. In this article, we describe patients' experiences of surviving OHCA. By using a phenomenological approach, we focus on how OHCA influences patients' well-being over time. Nine survivors were interviewed. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is described as a sudden and elusive threat, an awakening in perplexity, and the memory gap as a loss of coherence. Survival means a search for coherence with distressing and joyful understanding, as well as existential insecurity exposed by feelings of vulnerability. Well-being is found through a sense of coherence and meaning in life. The study findings show survivors' emotional needs and a potential for prehospital emergency personnel to support them as they try to make sense of what has happened to them.

  4. History and current use of mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Jiří; Alan, David; Vejvoda, Jiri; Honek, Jakub; Veselka, Josef

    2016-10-01

    In spite of many years of development and implementation of pre-hospital advanced life support programmes, the survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) used to be very poor. Neurologic injury from cerebral hypoxia is the most common cause of death in patients with OHCA. In the past two decades, post-resuscitation care has developed many new concepts aimed at improving the neurological outcome and survival rate of patients after cardiac arrest. Systematic post-cardiac arrest care after the return of spontaneous circulation, including induced mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in selected patients, is aimed at significantly improving rates of long-term neurologically intact survival. This review summarises the history and current knowledge in the field of mild TH after OHCA.

  5. Cardiac arrest leadership: in need of resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip S; Shall, Emma; Rakhit, Roby

    2016-12-01

    Leadership skills directly correlate with the quality of technical performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and clinical outcomes. Despite an improved focus on non-technical skills in CPR training, the leadership of cardiac arrests is often variable. To assess the perceptions of leadership and team working among members of a cardiac arrest team and to evaluate future training needs. Cross-sectional survey of 102 members of a cardiac arrest team at an Acute Hospital Trust in the UK with 892 inpatient beds. Responses sought from doctors, nurses and healthcare assistants to 12 rated statements and 4 dichotomous questions. Of 102 responses, 81 (79%) were from doctors and 21 (21%) from nurses. Among specialist registrars 90% agreed or strongly agreed that there was clear leadership at all arrests compared with between 28% and 49% of nurses and junior doctors respectively. Routine omission of key leadership tasks was reported by as many as 80% of junior doctors and 50% of nurses. Almost half of respondents reported non-adherence with Advanced Life Support (ALS) guidelines. Among junior members of the team, 36% felt confident to lead an arrest and 75% would welcome further dedicated cardiac arrest leadership training. Leadership training is integrated into the ALS (Resus Council, UK) qualification. However, this paper found that in spite of this training; standards of leadership are variable. The findings suggest a pressing need for further dedicated cardiac arrest leadership training with a focus on improving key leadership tasks such as role assignment, team briefing and debriefing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Variation in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Jones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate variation in airway management strategies in one suburban emergency medical services system treating patients experiencing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. Method. Retrospective chart review of all adult OHCA resuscitation during a 13-month period, specifically comparing airway management decisions. Results. Paramedics demonstrated considerable variation in their approaches to airway management. Approximately half of all OHCA patients received more than one airway management attempt (38/77 [49%], and one-quarter underwent three or more attempts (25/77 [25%]. One-third of patients arrived at the emergency department with a different airway device than initially selected (25/77 [32%]. Conclusion. This study confirmed our hypothesis that paramedics’ selection of ventilation strategies in cardiac arrest varies considerably. This observation raises concern because airway management diverts time and energy from interventions known to improve outcomes in OHCA management, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation. More research is needed to identify more focused airway management strategies for prehospital care providers.

  7. Mechanical versus manual chest compression for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (PARAMEDIC): a pragmatic, cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins, Gavin D; Lall, Ranjit; Quinn, Tom; Deakin, Charles D; Cooke, Matthew W; Horton, Jessica; Lamb, Sarah E; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Woollard, Malcolm; Carson, Andy; Smyth, Mike; Whitfield, Richard; Williams, Amanda; Pocock, Helen; Black, John J. M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanical chest compression devices have the potential to help maintain high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but despite their increasing use, little evidence exists for their effectiveness. We aimed to study whether the introduction of LUCAS-2 mechanical CPR into front-line emergency response vehicles would improve survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS: The pre-hospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac...

  8. Predictors for outcome among cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibrandt-Johansen, Ida Maria; Norsted, Kristine; Schmidt, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundIn the past decade, early treatment of cardiac arrest (CA) victims has been improved in several ways, leading to more optimistic over all prognoses. However, the global survival rate after out-of-hospital CA (OHCA) is still not more than 5-10%. With a better knowledge of the predictors...... circulation (ROSC).ResultsThe overall mortality was 44% and a favorable neurological outcome was seen among 52%. Strong predictors for survival and favorable neurological outcome were ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) as initial rhythm, cardiac etiology and time to ROSC¿... rhythm of VT/VF and a cardiac etiology were the strongest....

  9. Modes of induced cardiac arrest: hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia - Literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Marcos Aurélio Barboza de; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseini; Cortez, José Luis Lasso; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    The entry of sodium and calcium play a key effect on myocyte subjected to cardiac arrest by hyperkalemia. They cause cell swelling, acidosis, consumption of adenosine triphosphate and trigger programmed cell death. Cardiac arrest caused by hypocalcemia maintains intracellular adenosine triphosphate levels, improves diastolic performance and reduces oxygen consumption, which can be translated into better protection to myocyte injury induced by cardiac arrest.

  10. Use of Automated External Defibrillators in Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    maximize the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the program in the management of cardiac arrest. Search engines included MEDLINE, EMBASE, EconLit and Web sites of other agencies that assess health technologies. Any study that reported results of an AED program in an out-of-hospital setting was included. Studies that did not use AEDs, had a physician-assisted emergency response plan, did not have a program for the use of AEDs, or did not include cardiac arrest as an outcome were excluded. Summary of Findings A total of 133 articles were identified; 62 were excluded after reviewing titles and abstracts. Of the 71 articles reviewed, 8 reported findings of 2 large studies, the Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) study and the Public Access Defibrillation (PAD) trial. These studies examined the effect of a community program to respond to cardiac arrest with and without the use of AEDs. Their authors had reported a significant reduction in overall mortality from cardiac arrest with the use of AEDs. Factors That Improve the Effectiveness of an AED Program The PAD trial investigators reported a significant improvement in survival (P = .03) after providing AEDs in public access areas and training volunteers in CPR compared with training volunteers in CPR only. The OPALS study investigators reported odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for significant predictors of survival, which were age (OR [age per 10 year], 0.8; CI, 0.8–0.9), arrest witnessed by bystander (OR, 3.9; CI, 2.7–5.5), CPR initiated by bystander (OR, 3.7; CI, 2.6–5.1), CPR initiated by first responder (OR, 1.6; CI, 1.1–2.3), and emergency medical service response within 8 minutes (OR, 3.0; CI, 1.8–5.1). The last 3 variables are modifiable and thus may improve the effectiveness of an AED program. For example, the rate of bystander-initiated CPR was only 14% in the OPALS study, but it was 100% in the PAD trial. This was because PAD trial investigators trained community

  11. Determinants of unfavorable prognosis for out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest in Bielsko-Biala district

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jolanta U.; Krzych, Łukasz J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prognosis in out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains unfavorable and depends on a number of demographic and clinical variables, the reversibility of its causes and its mechanisms. Aim To investigate the risk factors of prehospital death in patients with OHCA in Bielsko County. Material and methods The study analyzed all dispatch cards of the National Emergency Medical Services (EMS) teams in Bielsko-Biala for the year 2013 (n = 23 400). Only the cards related to sudden cardiac arrest in adults were ultimately included in the study (n = 272; 190 men, 82 women; median age: 71 years). Results Sixty-seven victims (45 men, 22 women) were pronounced dead upon the arrival of the EMS team, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was not undertaken. In the remaining group of 205 subjects, CPR was commenced but was ineffective in 141 patients (97 male, 44 female). Although univariate analysis indicated 6 predictors of prehospital death, including OHCA without the presence of witnesses (odds ratio (OR) = 4.2), OHCA occurring in a public place (OR = 3.1), no bystander CPR (OR = 9.7), no bystander cardiac massage (OR = 13.1), initial diagnosis of non-shockable cardiac rhythm (OR = 7.0), and the amount of drugs used for CPR (OR = 0.4), logistic regression confirmed that only the lack of bystander cardiac massage (OR = 6.5) and non-shockable rhythm (OR = 4.6) were independent determinants of prehospital death (area under ROC curve = 0.801). Conclusions Non-shockable rhythm of cardiac arrest and lack of bystander cardiac massage are independent determinants of prehospital death in Bielsko-Biala inhabitants suffering from OHCA.

  12. Out-of-Hospital Perimortem Cesarean Section as Resuscitative Hysterotomy in Maternal Posttraumatic Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Gatti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal treatment of a severe hemodynamic instability from shock to cardiac arrest in late term pregnant women is subject to ongoing studies. However, there is an increasing evidence that early “separation” between the mother and the foetus may increase the restoration of the hemodynamic status and, in the cardiac arrest setting, it may raise the likelihood of a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC in the mother. This treatment, called Perimortem Cesarean Section (PMCS, is now termed as Resuscitative Hysterotomy (RH to better address the issue of an early Cesarean section (C-section. This strategy is in contrast with the traditional treatment of cardiac arrest characterized by the maintenance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR maneuvers without any emergent surgical intervention. We report the case of a prehospital perimortem delivery by Caesarean (C section of a foetus at 36 weeks of gestation after the mother’s traumatic cardiac arrest. Despite the negative outcome of the mother, the choice of performing a RH seems to represent up to date the most appropriate intervention to improve the outcome in both mother and foetus.

  13. Postoperative cardiac arrest in children with congenital heart abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The exact survival rates and markers of survival after postoperative cardiac arrest in children with congenital heart abnormalities are unknown. METHODS In this one-year study, we identified children younger than seven years of age with postoperative cardiac arrest in our pediatric cardiac intensive care unit database. Parameters from perioperative, pre-arrest, and resuscitation periods were analyzed for these patients. Comparisons were made between survivors and non-survivors afte...

  14. A case of thyroid storm with cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakashima Y

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Yutaka Nakashima,1 Tsuneaki Kenzaka,2 Masanobu Okayama,3 Eiji Kajii31Department for Support of Rural Medicine, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, 2Division of General Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, Japan; 3Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, JapanAbstract: A 23-year-old man became unconscious while jogging. He immediately received basic life support from a bystander and was transported to our hospital. On arrival, his spontaneous circulation had returned from a state of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity. Following admission, hyperthyroidism led to a suspicion of thyroid storm, which was then diagnosed as a possible cause of the cardiac arrest. Although hyperthyroidism-induced cardiac arrest including ventricular fibrillation is rare, it should be considered when diagnosing the cause of treatable cardiac arrest.Keywords: hyperthyroidism, ventricular fibrillation, treatable cardiac arrest, cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary arrest

  15. Resuscitation, prolonged cardiac arrest, and an automated chest compression device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Martin; Jørgensen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2010-01-01

    The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest.......The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest....

  16. Teenage cardiac arrest following abuse of synthetic cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C; Boddington, D

    2015-10-01

    The cardiac effects of many illegal substances (cocaine, methadone) have previously been well described [1,2]. However the association between synthetic cannabis and cardiac arrest is less well documented. Here we describe an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a previously healthy 16-year-old female associated with the use of inhaled synthetic cannabis. An electronic systematic search of online databases PubMed and Embase was performed using keywords, "synthetic cannabis death" and "cardiac arrest". In this case study a previously healthy 16-year-old had a cardiac arrest after synthetic cannabis use. Despite extensive investigations no other cause for her arrest was found. To the best of our knowledge there has been one previous case report of cardiac arrest following synthetic cannabis use in a 56-year-old man [3]. This case report augments the relationship between synthetic cannabis and cardiac arrest in the medical community. More awareness surrounding the risk of synthetic cannabinoids is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg Jørgensen, Mads

    challenges, due to the victim’s physical location, which brings an inherent risk of delay (or altogether absence) of recognition and treatment of cardiac arrest. A low frequency of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and low 30-day survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were identified nearly ten......BACK COVER TEXT Cardiac arrest is an emergency medical condition characterized by the cessation of cardiac mechanical activity; without immediate and decisive treatment, a victim’s chances of survival are minimal. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a particular arrest subgroup that poses additional...... years ago in Denmark. These findings led to several national initiatives to strengthen bystander resuscitation attempts and advance care. Despite these nationwide efforts, it was unknown prior to this project whether these efforts resulted in changes in resuscitation attempts by bystanders and changes...

  18. Sublingual Microcirculation is Impaired in Post-cardiac Arrest Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Omar, Yasser; Massey, Michael; Wiuff Andersen, Lars;

    2013-01-01

    AIM: We hypothesized that microcirculatory dysfunction, similar to that seen in sepsis, occurs in post-cardiac arrest patients and that better microcirculatory flow will be associated with improved outcome. We also assessed the association between microcirculatory dysfunction and inflammatory...... markers in the post-cardiac arrest state. METHODS: We prospectively evaluated the sublingual microcirculation in post-cardiac arrest patients, severe sepsis/septic shock patients, and healthy control patients using Sidestream Darkfield microscopy. Microcirculatory flow was assessed using...... the microcirculation flow index (MFI) at 6 and 24h in the cardiac arrest patients, and within 6h of emergency department admission in the sepsis and control patients. RESULTS: We evaluated 30 post-cardiac arrest patients, 16 severe sepsis/septic shock patients, and 9 healthy control patients. Sublingual...

  19. Laryngeal tube use in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by paramedics in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunde Geir A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although there are numerous supraglottic airway alternatives to endotracheal intubation, it remains unclear which airway technique is optimal for use in prehospital cardiac arrests. We evaluated the use of the laryngeal tube (LT as an airway management tool among adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA patients treated by our ambulance services in the Haukeland and Innlandet hospital districts. Methods Post-resuscitation forms and data concerning airway management in 347 adult OHCA victims were retrospectively assessed with regard to LT insertion success rates, ease and speed of insertion and insertion-related problems. Results A total of 402 insertions were performed on 347 OHCA patients. Overall, LT insertion was successful in 85.3% of the patients, with a 74.4% first-attempt success rate. In the minority of patients (n = 46, 13.3%, the LT insertion time exceeded 30 seconds. Insertion-related problems were recorded in 52.7% of the patients. Lack of respiratory sounds on auscultation (n = 100, 28.8%, problematic initial tube positioning (n = 85, 24.5%, air leakage (n = 61, 17.6%, vomitus/aspiration (n = 44, 12.7%, and tube dislocation (n = 17, 4.9% were the most common problems reported. Insertion difficulty was graded and documented for 95.4% of the patients, with the majority of insertions assessed as being “Easy” (62.5% or “Intermediate” (24.8%. Only 8.1% of the insertions were considered to be “Difficult”. Conclusions We found a high number of insertion related problems, indicating that supraglottic airway devices offering promising results in manikin studies may be less reliable in real-life resuscitations. Still, we consider the laryngeal tube to be an important alternative for airway management in prehospital cardiac arrest victims.

  20. Association of National Initiatives to Improve Cardiac Arrest Management With Rates of Bystander Intervention and Patient Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Lippert, Freddy K; Folke, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    resuscitation was attempted were identified between 2001 and 2010 in the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Of 29 111 patients with cardiac arrest, we excluded those with presumed noncardiac cause of arrest (n = 7390) and those with cardiac arrests witnessed by emergency medical services personnel (n...

  1. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation for cardiac arrest: the importance of uninterrupted chest compressions in cardiac arrest resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Lee M; Mattu, Amal; O'Connor, Robert E; Brady, William J

    2012-10-01

    Over the last decade, the importance of delivering high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for cardiac arrest patients has become increasingly emphasized. Many experts are in agreement concerning the appropriate compression rate, depth, and amount of chest recoil necessary for high-quality CPR. In addition to these factors, there is a growing body of evidence supporting continuous or uninterrupted chest compressions as an equally important aspect of high-quality CPR. An innovative resuscitation protocol, called cardiocerebral resuscitation, emphasizes uninterrupted chest compressions and has been associated with superior rates of survival when compared with traditional CPR with standard advanced life support. Interruptions in chest compressions during CPR can negatively impact outcome in cardiac arrest; these interruptions occur for a range of reasons, including pulse determinations, cardiac rhythm analysis, electrical defibrillation, airway management, and vascular access. In addition to comparing cardiocerebral resuscitation to CPR, this review article also discusses possibilities to reduce interruptions in chest compressions without sacrificing the benefit of these interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chest Pain of Suspected Cardiac Origin: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Brian Savino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of chest pain of suspected cardiac origin and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods: We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of chest pain and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the chest pain protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were use of supplemental oxygen, aspirin, nitrates, opiates, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG, ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI regionalization systems, prehospital fibrinolysis and β-blockers. Results: The protocols varied widely in terms of medication and dosing choices, as well as listed contraindications to treatments. Every agency uses oxygen with 54% recommending titrated dosing. All agencies use aspirin (64% recommending 325mg, 24% recommending 162mg and 15% recommending either, as well as nitroglycerin and opiates (58% choosing morphine. Prehospital 12- Lead ECGs are used in 97% of agencies, and all but one agency has some form of regionalized care for their STEMI patients. No agency is currently employing prehospital fibrinolysis or β-blocker use. Conclusion: Protocols for chest pain of suspected cardiac origin vary widely across California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols.

  3. The outcome of anaesthesia related cardiac arrest in a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.O. Adekola

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Anaesthesia related cardiac arrest and mortality were linked to cardiovascular depression from halothane overdose in our institution. The burden can be reduced by improving on establishing standard monitoring in the perioperative period, and a team approach to patients care.

  4. Cardiac arrest due to lymphocytic colitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groth Kristian A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a case of cardiac arrest due to hypokalemia caused by lymphocytic colitis. Case presentation A 69-year-old Caucasian man presented four months prior to a cardiac arrest with watery diarrhea and was diagnosed with lymphocytic colitis. Our patient experienced a witnessed cardiac arrest at his general practitioner's surgery. Two physicians and the emergency medical services resuscitated our patient for one hour and four minutes before arriving at our university hospital. Our patient was defibrillated 16 times due to the recurrence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias. An arterial blood sample revealed a potassium level of 2.0 mmol/L (reference range: 3.5 to 4.6 mmol/L and pH 6.86 (reference range: pH 7.37 to 7.45. As the potassium level was corrected, the propensity for ventricular tachyarrhythmias ceased. Our patient recovered from his cardiac arrest without any neurological deficit. Further tests and examinations revealed no other reason for the cardiac arrest. Conclusion Diarrhea can cause life-threatening situations due to the excretion of potassium, ultimately causing cardiac arrest due to hypokalemia. Physicians treating patients with severe diarrhea should consider monitoring their electrolyte levels.

  5. Sudden Cardiac Death and Post Cardiac Arrest Syndrome. An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zima Endre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A satisfactory neurologic outcome is the key factor for survival in patients with sudden cardiac death (SCD, however this is highly dependent on the haemodynamic status. Short term cardiopulmonary resuscitation and regained consciousness on the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC is indicative of a better prognosis. The evaluation and treatment of SCD triggering factors and of underlying acute and chronic diseases will facilitate prevention and lower the risk of cardiac arrest. Long term CPR and a prolonged unconscious status after ROSC, in the Intensive Care Units or Coronary Care Units, indicates the need for specific treatment and supportive therapy including efforts to prevent hyperthermia. The prognosis of these patients is unpredictable within the first seventy two hours, due to unknown responses to therapeutic management and the lack of specific prognostic factors. Patients in these circumstances require the highest level of intensive care and aetiology driven treatment without any delay, independently of their coma state. Current guidelines sugest the use of multiple procedures in arriving at a diagnosis and prognosis of these critical cases.

  6. [Perioperative cardiac arrest: an evolutionary analysis of the intra-operative cardiac arrest incidence in tertiary centers in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vane, Matheus Fachini; do Prado Nuzzi, Rafael Ximenes; Aranha, Gustavo Fabio; da Luz, Vinicius Fernando; Sá Malbouisson, Luiz Marcelo; Gonzalez, Maria Margarita Castro; Auler, José Otávio Costa; Carmona, Maria José Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Great changes in medicine have taken place over the last 25 years worldwide. These changes in technologies, patient risks, patient profile, and laws regulating the medicine have impacted the incidence of cardiac arrest. It has been postulated that the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest has decreased over the years, especially in developed countries. The authors hypothesized that, as in the rest of the world, the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest is decreasing in Brazil, a developing country. The aim of this study was to search the literature to evaluate the publications that relate the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest in Brazil and analyze the trend in the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest. There were 4 articles that met our inclusion criteria, resulting in 204,072 patients undergoing regional or general anesthesia in two tertiary and academic hospitals, totalizing 627 cases of intraoperative cardiac arrest. The mean intraoperative cardiac arrest incidence for the 25 years period was 30.72:10,000 anesthesias. There was a decrease from 39:10,000 anesthesias to 13:10,000 anesthesias in the analyzed period, with the related lethality from 48.3% to 30.8%. Also, the main causes of anesthesia-related cause of mortality changed from machine malfunction and drug overdose to hypovolemia and respiratory causes. There was a clear reduction in the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest in the last 25 years in Brazil. This reduction is seen worldwide and might be a result of multiple factors, including new laws regulating the medicine in Brazil, incorporation of technologies, better human development level of the country, and better patient care. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Perioperative cardiac arrest: an evolutionary analysis of the intra-operative cardiac arrest incidence in tertiary centers in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vane, Matheus Fachini; do Prado Nuzzi, Rafael Ximenes; Aranha, Gustavo Fabio; da Luz, Vinicius Fernando; Sá Malbouisson, Luiz Marcelo; Gonzalez, Maria Margarita Castro; Auler, José Otávio Costa; Carmona, Maria José Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Great changes in medicine have taken place over the last 25 years worldwide. These changes in technologies, patient risks, patient profile, and laws regulating the medicine have impacted the incidence of cardiac arrest. It has been postulated that the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest has decreased over the years, especially in developed countries. The authors hypothesized that, as in the rest of the world, the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest is decreasing in Brazil, a developing country. The aim of this study was to search the literature to evaluate the publications that relate the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest in Brazil and analyze the trend in the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest. There were 4 articles that met our inclusion criteria, resulting in 204,072 patients undergoing regional or general anesthesia in two tertiary and academic hospitals, totalizing 627 cases of intraoperative cardiac arrest. The mean intraoperative cardiac arrest incidence for the 25 years period was 30.72:10,000 anesthesias. There was a decrease from 39:10,000 anesthesias to 13:10,000 anesthesias in the analyzed period, with the related lethality from 48.3% to 30.8%. Also, the main causes of anesthesia-related cause of mortality changed from machine malfunction and drug overdose to hypovolemia and respiratory causes. There was a clear reduction in the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest in the last 25 years in Brazil. This reduction is seen worldwide and might be a result of multiple factors, including new laws regulating the medicine in Brazil, incorporation of technologies, better human development level of the country, and better patient care. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. CPR variability during ground ambulance transport of patients in cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosa, Jason R; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler F; Dommer, Paul B; Panchal, Ashish R; Venuti, Mark; Smith, Gary; Silver, Annemarie; Mullins, Margaret; Spaite, Daniel; Bobrow, Bentley J

    2013-05-01

    High-quality CPR is associated with improved outcomes from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The purpose of this investigation was to compare the quality of CPR provided at the prehospital scene, during ambulance transport, and during the early minutes in the emergency department (ED). A prospective observational review of consecutive adult patients with non-traumatic OHCA was conducted between September 2008 and February 2010. Patients with initiation of prehospital CPR were included as part of a statewide cardiac resuscitation quality improvement program. A monitor-defibrillator with accelerometer-based CPR measurement capability (E-series, ZOLL Medical) was utilized. CPR quality measures included variability in chest compression (CC) depth and rate, mean depth and rate, and the CC fraction. Variability of CC was defined as the mean of minute-to-minute standard deviation in CC depth or rate. CC fraction was defined as the percent of time that CPR was being performed when appropriate throughout resuscitation. Fifty-seven adult patients with OHCA had electronic CPR data recorded at the scene, in the ambulance, and upon arrival in the ED. Across time periods, there was increased variability in CC depth (scene: 0.20 in.; transport: 0.26 in.; ED: 0.31 in., P<0.01) and rate (scene: 18.2 CC min(-1); transport: 26.1 CC min(-1); ED: 26.3 CC min(-1), P<0.01). The mean CC depth, rate, and the CC fraction did not differ significantly between groups. There was increased CC variability from the prehospital scene to the ED though there was no difference in mean CC depth, rate, or in CC fraction. The clinical significance of CC variability remains to be determined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of mitochondrial injury after cardiac arrest (COMICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnino, Michael W; Liu, Xiaowen; Andersen, Lars W; Rittenberger, Jon C; Abella, Benjamin S; Gaieski, David F; Ornato, Joseph P; Gazmuri, Raúl J; Grossestreuer, Anne V; Cocchi, Michael N; Abbate, Antonio; Uber, Amy; Clore, John; Peberdy, Mary Anne; Callaway, Clifton W

    2017-04-01

    Mitochondrial injury post-cardiac arrest has been described in pre-clinical settings but the extent to which this injury occurs in humans remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that increased levels of mitochondrial biomarkers would be associated with mortality and neurological morbidity in post-cardiac arrest subjects. We performed a prospective multicenter study of post-cardiac arrest subjects. Inclusion criteria were comatose adults who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Mitochondrial biomarkers were measured at 0, 12, 24, 36 and 48h after return of spontaneous circulation as well as in healthy controls. Out of 111 subjects enrolled, 102 had evaluable samples at 0h. Cardiac arrest subjects had higher baseline cytochrome c levels compared to controls (2.18ng/mL [0.74, 7.74] vs. 0.16ng/mL [0.03, 0.91], p<0.001), and subjects who died had higher 0h cytochrome c levels compared to survivors (3.66ng/mL [1.40, 14.9] vs. 1.27ng/mL [0.16, 2.37], p<0.001). There were significantly higher Ribonuclease P (RNaseP) (3.3 [1.2, 5.7] vs. 1.2 [0.8, 1.2], p<0.001) and Beta-2microglobulin (B2M) (12.0 [1.0, 22.9], vs. 0.6 [0.6, 1.3], p<0.001) levels in cardiac arrest subjects at baseline compared to the control subjects. There were no differences between survivors and non-survivors for mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, or cell free DNA. Cytochrome c was increased in post- cardiac arrest subjects compared to controls, and in post-cardiac arrest non-survivors compared to survivors. Nuclear DNA and cell free DNA was increased in plasma of post-cardiac arrest subjects. There were no differences in mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, or cell free DNA between survivors and non-survivors. Mitochondrial injury markers showed mixed results in the post-cardiac arrest period. Future research needs to investigate these differences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lipid emulsion improves recovery from bupivacaine-induced cardiac arrest, but not from ropivacaine- or mepivacaine-induced cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zausig, York A; Zink, Wolfgang; Keil, Meike; Sinner, Barbara; Barwing, Juergen; Wiese, Christoph H R; Graf, Bernhard M

    2009-10-01

    Cardiac toxicity significantly correlates with the lipophilicity of local anesthetics (LAs). Recently, the infusion of lipid emulsions has been shown to be a promising approach to treat LA-induced cardiac arrest. As the postulated mechanism of action, the so-called "lipid sink" effect may depend on the lipophilicity of LAs. In this study, we investigated whether lipid effects differ with regard to the administered LAs. In the isolated rat heart, cardiac arrest was induced by administration of equipotent doses of bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine, respectively, followed by cardiac perfusion with or without lipid emulsion (0.25 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)). Subsequently, the times from the start of perfusion to return of first heart activity and to recovery of heart rate and rate-pressure product (to 90% of baseline values) were assessed. In all groups, lipid infusion had no effects on the time to the return of any cardiac activity. However, recovery times of heart rate and rate-pressure product (to 90% of baseline values) were significantly shorter with the administration of lipids in bupivacaine-induced cardiac toxicity, but not in ropivacaine- or mepivacaine-induced cardiac toxicity. These data show that the effects of lipid infusion on LA-induced cardiac arrest are strongly dependent on the administered LAs itself. We conclude that lipophilicity of LAs has a marked impact on the efficacy of lipid infusions to treat cardiac arrest induced by these drugs.

  11. Prehospital ACLS--does it work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Alok; Mehrotra, Avanti; Gupta, Anoop K; Thakur, Ranjan K

    2002-11-01

    Cardiac disease is the most common cause of death in the United States, and sudden cardiac arrest frequently claims the lives of men and women during their most productive years. It is believed that much better survival rates can be achieved for victims of cardiac arrest through optimizing the "chain of survival" as described by the American Heart Association. The relative and incremental benefit of full prehospital ACLS over basic life support and defibrillation is unproven, however. This is an important issue in this era of cost containment. Some of the ongoing studies including the OPALS study may clarify the cost effectiveness and relative efficacy of rapid defibrillation and full ACLS programs for victims of prehospital cardiac arrest [6].

  12. Optimizing Survival Outcomes For Adult Patients With Nontraumatic Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julianna

    2016-10-01

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed.

  13. Mechanical chest compressions in an avalanche victim with cardiac arrest: an option for extreme mountain rescue operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Urs; Lischke, Volker; Pietsch, Christine; Kopp, Karl-Heinz

    2014-06-01

    Mountain rescue operations often present helicopter emergency medical service crews with unique challenges. One of the most challenging problems is the prehospital care of cardiac arrest patients during evacuation and transport. In this paper we outline a case in which we successfully performed a cardiopulmonary resuscitation of an avalanche victim. A mechanical chest-compression device proved to be a good way of minimizing hands-off time and providing high-quality chest compressions while the patient was evacuated from the site of the accident.

  14. Survival and Neurologic Outcome After Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest. Results of the Andalusian Out-of-hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell Ortiz, Fernando; Mellado Vergel, Francisco; López Messa, Juan Bautista; Fernández Valle, Patricia; Ruiz Montero, María M; Martínez Lara, Manuela; Vergara Pérez, Santiago; Vivar Díaz, Itziar; Caballero García, Auxiliadora; García Alcántara, Ángel; García Del Águila, Javier

    2016-05-01

    There is a paucity of data on prehospital cardiac arrest in Spain. Our aim was to describe the incidence, patient characteristics, and outcomes of out-of-hospital emergency care for this event. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a prospective registry of cardiopulmonary arrest handled by an out-of-hospital emergency service between January 2008 and December 2012. The registry included all patients considered to have a cardiac etiology as the cause of arrest, with a descriptive analysis performed of general patient characteristics and factors associated with good neurologic outcome at hospital discharge. A total of 4072 patients were included, with an estimated incidence of 14.6 events per 100000 inhabitants and year; 72.6% were men. The mean age was 62.0 ± 15.8 years, 58.6% of cases occurred in the home, 25% of patients had initial defibrillable rhythm, 28.8% of patients arrived with a pulse at the hospital (58.3% of the group with defibrillable rhythm), and 10.2% were discharged with good neurologic outcome. The variables associated with this recovery were: witnessed arrest (P=.04), arrest witnessed by emergency team (P=.005), previous life support (P=.04), initial defibrillable rhythm (P=.0001), and performance of a coronary interventional procedure (P=.0001). More than half the cases of sudden cardiac arrest occur at home, and the population was found to be relatively young. Although recovery was satisfactory in 1 out of every 10 patients, there is a need for improvement in the phase prior to emergency team arrival. Coronary interventional procedures had an impact on patient prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Prediction of cardiac arrest recurrence using ensemble classifiers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NACHIKET TAPAS; TUSHAR LONE; DAMODAR REDDY; VENKATANARESH KUPPILI

    2017-07-01

    Inability of a heart to contract effectually or its failure to contract prevents blood from circulating efficiently, causing circulatory arrest or cardiac arrest or cardiopulmonary arrest. The unexpected cardiac arrest is medically referred to as sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Poor survival rate of patients with SCA is one of themost ubiquitous health care problems today. Recent studies show that heart-rate-derived features can act as early predictors of SCA. Addition of angiographic and electrophysiological features can increase the robustness of the prediction system. Early warning has the capability of saving many lives. Risk of recurrent terminal cardiac arrest is high for out-of-hospital survivors. Foregoing studies indicate that recurrent cardiac events are time dependent and, while in clinical follow-up, are highly probable, predominantly in early phase. In this paper, we observe the changing risk of and changing influence of various clinical, angiographic and electrophysiological parameters on subsequent cardiac arrest recurrence with time. Various medical and synthetic datasets such as ECG dataset from PhysioNet, Pima Indian Diabetes dataset from UCI Machine Learning Repository and gene expression dataset from GEO are used, which are unique as compared with related works. Various classifiers such as LogitBoost with simple regression function, random forest and multilayer perceptron are used for recurrence risk prediction. Collection of these classifiers together forms the ensemble classifiers. Classifiers are compared based on various measures like accuracy and precision. Based on the classification, risk scores are calculated using logistic regression with backward elimination. The proposed method is used for final risk estimation. The same datasets are used for risk score calculation model development. Experimental results are found to be encouraging.

  16. Current Pharmacological Advances in the Treatment of Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andry Papastylianou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest is defined as the sudden cessation of spontaneous ventilation and circulation. Within 15 seconds of cardiac arrest, the patient loses consciousness, electroencephalogram becomes flat after 30 seconds, pupils dilate fully after 60 seconds, and cerebral damage takes place within 90–300 seconds. It is essential to act immediately as irreversible damage can occur in a short time. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is an attempt to restore spontaneous circulation through a broad range of interventions which are early defibrillation, high-quality and uninterrupted chest compressions, advanced airway interventions, and pharmacological interventions. Drugs should be considered only after initial shocks have been delivered (when indicated and chest compressions and ventilation have been started. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, no specific drug therapy has been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge after cardiac arrest, and only few drugs have a proven benefit for short-term survival. This paper reviews current pharmacological treatment of cardiac arrest. There are three groups of drugs relevant to the management of cardiac arrest: vasopressors, antiarrhythmics, and other drugs such as sodium bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, atropine, fibrinolytic drugs, and corticosteroids.

  17. Cardiac arrest following ventilator fire: A rare cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Nazeer Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Operating room fires are rare events, but when occur they result in serious and sometimes fatal consequences. Anaesthesia ventilator fire leading to cardiac arrest is a rare incident and has not been reported. We report a near catastrophic ventilator fire leading to cardiac arrest in a patient undergoing subtotal thyroidectomy. In the present case sparks due to friction or electrical short circuit within the ventilator might have acted as source of ignition leading to fire and explosion in the oxygen rich environment. The patient was successfully resuscitated and revived with uneventful recovery and no adverse sequelae. The cardiac arrest was possibly due to severe hypoxia resulting from inhalation of smoke containing high concentrations of carbon monoxide and other noxious gases.

  18. Oxygenation, Ventilation, and Airway Management in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Henlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently published evidence has challenged some protocols related to oxygenation, ventilation, and airway management for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Interrupting chest compressions to attempt airway intervention in the early stages of OHCA in adults may worsen patient outcomes. The change of BLS algorithms from ABC to CAB was recommended by the AHA in 2010. Passive insufflation of oxygen into a patent airway may provide oxygenation in the early stages of cardiac arrest. Various alternatives to tracheal intubation or bag-mask ventilation have been trialled for prehospital airway management. Simple methods of airway management are associated with similar outcomes as tracheal intubation in patients with OHCA. The insertion of a laryngeal mask airway is probably associated with worse neurologically intact survival rates in comparison with other methods of airway management. Hyperoxemia following OHCA may have a deleterious effect on the neurological recovery of patients. Extracorporeal oxygenation techniques have been utilized by specialized centers, though their use in OHCA remains controversial. Chest hyperinflation and positive airway pressure may have a negative impact on hemodynamics during resuscitation and should be avoided. Dyscarbia in the postresuscitation period is relatively common, mainly in association with therapeutic hypothermia, and may worsen neurological outcome.

  19. Oxygenation, ventilation, and airway management in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henlin, Tomas; Michalek, Pavel; Tyll, Tomas; Hinds, John D; Dobias, Milos

    2014-01-01

    Recently published evidence has challenged some protocols related to oxygenation, ventilation, and airway management for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Interrupting chest compressions to attempt airway intervention in the early stages of OHCA in adults may worsen patient outcomes. The change of BLS algorithms from ABC to CAB was recommended by the AHA in 2010. Passive insufflation of oxygen into a patent airway may provide oxygenation in the early stages of cardiac arrest. Various alternatives to tracheal intubation or bag-mask ventilation have been trialled for prehospital airway management. Simple methods of airway management are associated with similar outcomes as tracheal intubation in patients with OHCA. The insertion of a laryngeal mask airway is probably associated with worse neurologically intact survival rates in comparison with other methods of airway management. Hyperoxemia following OHCA may have a deleterious effect on the neurological recovery of patients. Extracorporeal oxygenation techniques have been utilized by specialized centers, though their use in OHCA remains controversial. Chest hyperinflation and positive airway pressure may have a negative impact on hemodynamics during resuscitation and should be avoided. Dyscarbia in the postresuscitation period is relatively common, mainly in association with therapeutic hypothermia, and may worsen neurological outcome.

  20. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westhall, Erik; Rossetti, Andrea O; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. METHODS: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists...... patients. EEGs were recorded in 103 patients at a median 77 hours after cardiac arrest; 37% had a highly malignant EEG and all had a poor outcome (specificity 100%, sensitivity 50%). Any malignant EEG feature had a low specificity to predict poor prognosis (48%) but if 2 malignant EEG features were present...

  1. Increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest in obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam Jacoba; Blom, Marieke Tabo; Bardai, Abdennasser

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine whether (1) patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (OPD) have an increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) due to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT/VF), and (2) the SCA risk is mediated by cardiovascular risk-profile and/or respiratory drug use....... METHODS: A community-based case-control study was performed, with 1310 cases of SCA of the ARREST study and 5793 age, sex and SCA-date matched non-SCA controls from the PHARMO database. Only incident SCA cases, age older than 40 years, that resulted from unequivocal cardiac causes...

  2. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westhall, Erik; Rossetti, Andrea O; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. METHODS: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists...... patients. EEGs were recorded in 103 patients at a median 77 hours after cardiac arrest; 37% had a highly malignant EEG and all had a poor outcome (specificity 100%, sensitivity 50%). Any malignant EEG feature had a low specificity to predict poor prognosis (48%) but if 2 malignant EEG features were present...

  3. Fewer U.S. Dollars Spent on Cardiac Arrest Research: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... true of cardiac arrest. It relies heavily on government funding, the study authors explained. Lead author Ryan Coute, a medical student at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, added that "funding of cardiac arrest research is ...

  4. Cardiac Arrest after Local Anaesthetic Toxicity in a Paediatric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Maria Torres de Araújo Azi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a paediatric patient undergoing urological procedure in which a possible inadvertent intravascular or intraosseous injection of bupivacaine with adrenaline in usual doses caused subsequent cardiac arrest, completely reversed after administration of 20% intravenous lipid emulsion. Early diagnosis of local anaesthetics toxicity and adequate cardiovascular resuscitation manoeuvres contribute to the favourable outcome.

  5. Compulsive carnival song whistling following cardiac arrest: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, A Rosaura; van der Paardt, Jasper W; Figee, Martijn; Vulink, Nienke; de Koning, Pelle; Olff, Miranda; Denys, Damiaan

    2012-07-03

    Compulsivity is the repetitive, irresistible urge to perform a behavior, the experience of loss of voluntary control over this intense urge and the tendency to perform repetitive acts in a habitual or stereotyped manner. Compulsivity is part of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but may occasionally occur as stand-alone symptom following brain damage induced by cardiac arrest. In this case report, we describe a patient who developed compulsivity following cardiac arrest. We review diagnostic options, underlying mechanisms and possible treatments. A 65-year-old man presented at our clinic with continuous compulsive whistling following cardiac arrest. Neither obsessive-compulsive symptoms, nor other psychiatric complaints were present prior to the hypoxic incident. An EEG showed diffuse hypofunction, mainly in baso-temporal areas. Treatment with clomipramine resulted in a decrease of whistling. This case report illustrates de novo manifestation of compulsivity following cardiac arrest and subsequent brain damage and gives additional information on diagnostic options, mechanisms and treatment options. Differential diagnosis between stereotypies, punding, or OCD is difficult. Compulsivity following brain damage may benefit from treatment with serotonin reuptake inhibitors. This finding enhances our knowledge of treatments in similar cases.

  6. Anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest caused by thiamine infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Jacob; Pareek, Manan; Langfrits, Christian Sigvald

    2013-01-01

    intoxication and developed cardiac arrest due to anaphylactic shock following intravenous thiamine infusion. The patient was successfully resuscitated after 15 min and repeated epinephrine administrations. He was discharged in good health after 14 days. This case report emphasises both the importance...

  7. Cardiac arrest caused by multiple recurrent pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannig, Kjartan Eskjaer; Husted, Steen Elkjaer; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common condition with a high mortality. We describe a previously healthy 68-year-old male who suffered three pulmonary embolisms during a short period of time, including two embolisms while on anticoagulant treatment. This paper illustrates three important points. (1) The ...... and may be life-saving in patients with cardiac arrest suspected to be caused by pulmonary embolism....

  8. Outcomes After Cardiac Arrest in an Adult Burn Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-07

    Outcomes after cardiac arrest in an adult burn center§,§§ Jonathan C. Wilton, Mark O. Hardin , John D. Ritchie, Kevin K. Chung, James K. Aden...PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Wilton J. C., Hardin M. O., Ritchie J. D., Chung K. K., Aden J. K., Cancio L. C., Wolf S. E., White C. E., 5d

  9. Hemodynamics and vasopressor support in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Søholm, Helle;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Inducing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) can be challenging due to its impact on central hemodynamics and vasopressors are frequently used to maintain adequate organ perfusion. The aim of this study was to assess the association between level of vasopres...

  10. Therapeutic Hypothermia after In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moler, Frank W; Silverstein, Faye S; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S; Christensen, James R; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Meert, Kathleen L; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L; Page, Kent; Gildea, Marianne R; Scholefield, Barnaby R; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S; Berger, John T; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Newth, Christopher J L; Topjian, Alexis; Bennett, Kimberly S; Koch, Joshua D; Pham, Nga; Chanani, Nikhil K; Pineda, Jose A; Harrison, Rick; Dalton, Heidi J; Alten, Jeffrey; Schleien, Charles L; Goodman, Denise M; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Bhalala, Utpal S; Schwarz, Adam J; Porter, Melissa B; Shah, Samir; Fink, Ericka L; McQuillen, Patrick; Wu, Theodore; Skellett, Sophie; Thomas, Neal J; Nowak, Jeffrey E; Baines, Paul B; Pappachan, John; Mathur, Mudit; Lloyd, Eric; van der Jagt, Elise W; Dobyns, Emily L; Meyer, Michael T; Sanders, Ronald C; Clark, Amy E; Dean, J Michael

    2017-01-26

    Targeted temperature management is recommended for comatose adults and children after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; however, data on temperature management after in-hospital cardiac arrest are limited. In a trial conducted at 37 children's hospitals, we compared two temperature interventions in children who had had in-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose children older than 48 hours and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a score of 70 or higher on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II, on which scores range from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients who had had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before the cardiac arrest. The trial was terminated because of futility after 329 patients had undergone randomization. Among the 257 patients who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest and who could be evaluated, the rate of the primary efficacy outcome did not differ significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (36% [48 of 133 patients] and 39% [48 of 124 patients], respectively; relative risk, 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67 to 1.27; P=0.63). Among 317 patients who could be evaluated for change in neurobehavioral function, the change in VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months did not differ significantly between the groups (P=0.70). Among 327 patients who could be evaluated for 1-year survival, the rate of 1-year survival did not differ significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (49% [81 of 166 patients] and 46% [74 of 161 patients], respectively; relative risk, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.34; P=0.56). The incidences of blood-product use, infection, and serious adverse

  11. Mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in in-hospital cardiac arrest : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lameijer, Heleen; Immink, Rosa S.; Broekema, Josien J.; Ter Maaten, Jan C.

    2015-01-01

    With increasing rates of in-hospital cardiac arrest, improving resuscitation outcomes is essential. Mechanical chest compressors seem to be related to improved outcome in out-of hospital cardiac arrest; however, the literature on its use in in-hospital cardiac arrest is scarce. We used the Medline p

  12. Mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in in-hospital cardiac arrest : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lameijer, Heleen; Immink, Rosa S.; Broekema, Josien J.; Ter Maaten, Jan C.

    2015-01-01

    With increasing rates of in-hospital cardiac arrest, improving resuscitation outcomes is essential. Mechanical chest compressors seem to be related to improved outcome in out-of hospital cardiac arrest; however, the literature on its use in in-hospital cardiac arrest is scarce. We used the Medline p

  13. Modes of induced cardiac arrest: hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia--literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza de; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; Santos, Carlos Alberto dos; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseini; Cortez, José Luis Lasso; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    The entry of sodium and calcium play a key effect on myocyte subjected to cardiac arrest by hyperkalemia. They cause cell swelling, acidosis, consumption of adenosine triphosphate and trigger programmed cell death. Cardiac arrest caused by hypocalcemia maintains intracellular adenosine triphosphate levels, improves diastolic performance and reduces oxygen consumption, which can be translated into better protection to myocyte injury induced by cardiac arrest.

  14. Predictive Value of Brain Arrest Neurological Outcome Scale (BrANOS) on Mortality and Morbidity After Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahutoğlu, Cengiz; Uyar, Mehmet; Demirağ, Kubilay; İsayev, Hasan; Moral, Ali Reşat

    2016-01-01

    Objective There are several prediction scales and parameters for prognosis after a cardiac arrest. One of these scales is the brain arrest neurological outcome scale (BrANOS), which consists of duration of cardiac arrest, Glasgow Coma Scale score and Hounsfield unit measured on cranial computed tomography (CT) scan. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of BrANOS on predicting the mortality and disability after a cardiac arrest. Methods We retrospectively investigated cardiac arrest patients who were hospitalized in our intensive care unit (ICU) within a 3-year period. Inclusion criteria were age over 18 years old, survival of more than 24 hours after cardiac arrest and availability of cranial CT. We recorded the age, sex, diagnosis, duration of cardiac arrest and hospital stay, mortality, Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) and BrANOS score. The primary endpoint of the study was to establish the relationship between mortality and BrANOS score in patients who survived for more than 24 hours after a cardiac arrest. The secondary endpoint of the study was to determine the 2-year life expectancy and GOS after cardiac arrest. Results The mean age of the patients was 57±17 years (33 females, 67 males). ICU mortality rate was 57%. The BrANOS mean score was 10.3±3.2. There was a significant difference between survivors and non-survivors in terms of the BrANOS score (8.8±3.2 vs. 11.6±2.7; p14 predicted death with 100% accuracy. All the patients without disability had a BrANOS score of <10. The BrANOS score also correlated well with GOS (p<0.001). The 2-year life expectancy rate was 31% in patients who survived more than 24 hours after a cardiac arrest. Conclusion In this study, we demonstrated that BrANOS provided reliable data for prognostic evaluation after a cardiac arrest. PMID:28058140

  15. No difference in mortality between men and women after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Wanscher, Michael

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Comparing the outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in men and women and to determine whether sex modifies the effect of targeted temperature management (TTM) at 33 or 36°C. METHODS: The TTM trial randomized 950 patients to TTM at 33 or 36°C for 24h. This predefined sub......-study of the TTM trial assessed survival and neurological outcome defined as Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) using female sex as main predictor of outcome, in relation to level of TTM and other confounding factors. RESULTS: Compared to men, women more often had OHCA at home, p=0...... in univariate analysis, hazard ratio (HR)=1.29, CI=1.04-1.61, p=0.02 compared to men. Adjusting for demographic factors (age and comorbidity), arrest circumstances, pre-hospital findings, inclusion sites, treatments and status at admission reduced this: HR=1.11, CI=0. 87-1.41, p=0.42, and sex was no longer...

  16. Advanced airway management does not improve outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, M Arslan; Kaji, Amy H; Niemann, James T

    2010-09-01

    The goal of out-of-hospital endotracheal intubation (ETI) is to reduce mortality and morbidity for patients with airway and ventilatory compromise. Yet several studies, mostly involving trauma patients, have demonstrated similar or worse neurologic outcomes and survival-to-hospital discharge rates after out-of-hospital ETI. To date, there is no study comparing out-of-hospital ETI to bag-valve-mask (BVM) ventilation for the outcome of survival to hospital discharge among nontraumatic adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA) patients. The objective was to compare survival to hospital discharge among adult OOHCA patients receiving ETI to those managed with BVM. In this retrospective cohort study, the records of all OOHCA patients presenting to a municipal teaching hospital from November 1, 1994, through June 30, 2008, were reviewed. The type of field airway provided, age, sex, race, rhythm on paramedic arrival, presence of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), whether the arrest was witnessed, site of arrest, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival to hospital admission, comorbid illnesses, and survival to hospital discharge were noted. A univariate odds ratio (OR) was first computed to describe the association between the type of airway and survival to hospital discharge. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed, adjusting for rhythm, bystander CPR, and whether the arrest was witnessed. A cohort of 1,294 arrests was evaluated. A total of 1,027 (79.4%) received ETI, while 131 (10.1%) had BVM, 131 (10.1%) had either a Combitube or an esophageal obturator airway, and five (0.4%) had incomplete prehospital records. Fifty-five of 1,294 (4.3%) survived to hospital discharge; there were no survivors in the Combitube/esophageal obturator airway cohort. Even after multivariable adjustment for age, sex, site of arrest, bystander CPR, witnessed arrest, and rhythm on paramedic arrival, the OR for survival to hospital discharge for BVM

  17. Use of automated external defibrillators in cardiac arrest: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    cardiac arrest. Search engines included MEDLINE, EMBASE, EconLit and Web sites of other agencies that assess health technologies. Any study that reported results of an AED program in an out-of-hospital setting was included. Studies that did not use AEDs, had a physician-assisted emergency response plan, did not have a program for the use of AEDs, or did not include cardiac arrest as an outcome were excluded. A total of 133 articles were identified; 62 were excluded after reviewing titles and abstracts. Of the 71 articles reviewed, 8 reported findings of 2 large studies, the Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) study and the Public Access Defibrillation (PAD) trial. These studies examined the effect of a community program to respond to cardiac arrest with and without the use of AEDs. Their authors had reported a significant reduction in overall mortality from cardiac arrest with the use of AEDs. Factors That Improve the Effectiveness of an AED Program The PAD trial investigators reported a significant improvement in survival (P = .03) after providing AEDs in public access areas and training volunteers in CPR compared with training volunteers in CPR only. The OPALS study investigators reported odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for significant predictors of survival, which were age (OR [age per 10 year], 0.8; CI, 0.8-0.9), arrest witnessed by bystander (OR, 3.9; CI, 2.7-5.5), CPR initiated by bystander (OR, 3.7; CI, 2.6-5.1), CPR initiated by first responder (OR, 1.6; CI, 1.1-2.3), and emergency medical service response within 8 minutes (OR, 3.0; CI, 1.8-5.1). The last 3 variables are modifiable and thus may improve the effectiveness of an AED program. For example, the rate of bystander-initiated CPR was only 14% in the OPALS study, but it was 100% in the PAD trial. This was because PAD trial investigators trained community volunteers whereas the OPALS study investigators did not. Cost-Effectiveness A systematic review of the literature

  18. A Unique Case of Cardiac Arrest following K2 Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD accounts for up to 450,000 deaths every year in the United States (Zipes et al. (2006. Most cases of sudden cardiac death occur in subjects with no prior history of heart disease (Myerburg et al. (1998. The incidence of sudden death in a general population has been shown to increase contemporaneously with substance abuse (Phillips et al. (1999. The causative association of sudden death with cocaine, methadone, and volatile agents is well established (Adgey et al. (1995 and Isner et al. (1986. We describe a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest temporally related to abuse of the synthetic cannabinoid street drug known as K2. To our knowledge, there are no previously documented cases of sudden cardiac death associated with synthetic cannabinoids although they have been linked to myocardial infarction in teenagers despite normal coronary angiography (Mir et al. (2011.

  19. Interrater variability of EEG interpretation in comatose cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westhall, Erik; Rosén, Ingmar; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: EEG is widely used to predict outcome in comatose cardiac arrest patients, but its value has been limited by lack of a uniform classification. We used the EEG terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) to assess interrater variability in a cohort...... who were blinded for patient outcome. Percent agreement and kappa (κ) for the categories in the ACNS EEG terminology and for prespecified malignant EEG-patterns were calculated. RESULTS: There was substantial interrater agreement (κ 0.71) for highly malignant patterns and moderate agreement (κ 0.......42) for malignant patterns. Substantial agreement was found for malignant periodic or rhythmic patterns (κ 0.72) while agreement for identifying an unreactive EEG was fair (κ 0.26). CONCLUSIONS: The ACNS EEG terminology can be used to identify highly malignant EEG-patterns in post cardiac arrest patients...

  20. The inflammatory marker suPAR after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rundgren, Malin; Lyngbaek, Stig; Fisker, Helle

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is released in response to inflammatory stimuli, and plasma levels are associated with long-term outcomes. The ischemia/reperfusion injury caused by cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation triggers an inflammatory response...... analysis shoved an AUC of 0.76 at 6 hours. In the subgroup of CA of cardiac cause, the AUC was 0.84. CONCLUSION: suPAR levels at 6 and 36 hours after CA were significantly higher in nonsurviving patients compared with survivors; however, the overlap in suPAR levels between the outcome groups...

  1. Anaphylaxis with Latrodectus Antivenin Resulting in Cardiac Arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Christine M.; Hong, Jeannie J.; Beuhler, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Latrodectus mactans antivenin is a safe and effective therapy for severe black widow spider envenomations when given to most patients. We report a case of a 37-year-old male with a history of asthma that was given L. mactans antivenin for symptoms related to a black widow envenomation and developed a severe anaphylactic reaction resulting in cardiac arrest. When traditional therapies failed, the patient was given methylene blue for anaphylactic shock resulting in a 30-h period of hemodynamic ...

  2. Current practice in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Dobreanu, Dan; Pison, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: The purpose of this EP wire is to examine clinical practice in the field of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) management, with special focus on in-hospital diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. METHODS AND RESULTS: Fifty-three European centres, all members of the EHRA-EP Research network...... management strategy, including coronary angiography/PCI and implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy, while therapeutic hypothermia appears to be underused....

  3. Out-of-hospital therapeutic hypothermia in cardiac arrest victims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holzer Michael

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite many years of research, outcome after cardiac arrest is dismal. Since 2005, the European Resuscitation Council recommends in its guidelines the use of mild therapeutic hypothermia (32-34° for 12 to 24 hours in patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest. The benefit of resuscitative mild hypothermia (induced after resuscitation is well established, while the benefit of preservative mild to moderate hypothermia (induced during cardiac arrest needs further investigation before recommending it for clinical routine. Animal data and limited human data suggest that early and fast cooling might be essential for the beneficial effect of resuscitative mild hypothermia. Out-of-hospital cooling has been shown to be feasible and safe by means of intravenous infusion with cold fluids or non-invasively with cooling pads. A combination of these cooling methods might further improve cooling efficacy. If out-of-hospital cooling will further improve functional outcome as compared with in-hospital cooling needs to be determined in a prospective, randomised, sufficiently powered clinical trial.

  4. Mechanical CPR devices compared to manual CPR during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and ambulance transport: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong Marcus

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of the published literature to address the question: “In pre-hospital adult cardiac arrest (asystole, pulseless electrical activity, pulseless Ventricular Tachycardia and Ventricular Fibrillation, does the use of mechanical Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR devices compared to manual CPR during Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and ambulance transport, improve outcomes (e.g. Quality of CPR, Return Of Spontaneous Circulation, Survival”. Methods Databases including PubMed, Cochrane Library (including Cochrane database for systematic reviews and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, and AHA EndNote Master Library were systematically searched. Further references were gathered from cross-references from articles and reviews as well as forward search using SCOPUS and Google scholar. The inclusion criteria for this review included manikin and human studies of adult cardiac arrest and anti-arrhythmic agents, peer-review. Excluded were review articles, case series and case reports. Results Out of 88 articles identified, only 10 studies met the inclusion criteria for further review. Of these 10 articles, 1 was Level of Evidence (LOE 1, 4 LOE 2, 3 LOE 3, 0 LOE 4, 2 LOE 5. 4 studies evaluated the quality of CPR in terms of compression adequacy while the remaining six studies evaluated on clinical outcomes in terms of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, survival to hospital admission, survival to discharge and Cerebral Performance Categories (CPC. 7 studies were supporting the clinical question, 1 neutral and 2 opposing. Conclusion In this review, we found insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of mechanical CPR devices in settings of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and during ambulance transport. While there is some low quality evidence suggesting that mechanical CPR can improve consistency and reduce interruptions in chest compressions, there is no

  5. Effects of subdiaphragmatic cardiac compression on cardiac arrest during liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-xiang; JI Zhi-xin; LIU Ya-hua; ZHOU Man-hong; SHI Hong-zhi; GUO Xiao-dong; SUN Kun; MA Li-zhi; CHEN Xin-guo; SHEN Zhong-yang

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac arrest during upper abdominal surgery such as liver transplantation is a rare but very severe complication.Traditional external cardiac compression has been the mainstay of basic life support in general circumstances.Subdiaphragmatic cardiac compression (SDCC),with no incision in the diaphragm,may be a more effective measure.This maneuver can provide more effective and timely cardiac compression via the already open abdomen in surgery and not add extra trauma.This method can provide a quicker and more effective means of circulation support for intraoperative cardiac arrest patients without adding new injuries.Five cases are reported and all the patients had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC).This is the first report of the SDCC method.

  6. Airway management and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest outcome in the CARES registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, Jason; Gerecht, Ryan; Bonomo, Jordan; Robb, Rachel; McNally, Bryan; Donnelly, John; Wang, Henry E

    2014-05-01

    Optimal out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) airway management strategies remain unclear. We compared OHCA outcomes between patients receiving endotracheal intubation (ETI) versus supraglottic airway (SGA), and between patients receiving [ETI or SGA] and those receiving no advanced airway. We studied adult OHCA in the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES). Primary exposures were ETI, SGA, or no advanced prehospital airway placed. Primary outcomes were sustained ROSC, survival to hospital admission, survival to hospital discharge, and neurologically-intact survival to hospital discharge (cerebral performance category 1-2). Propensity scores characterized the probability of receiving ETI, SGA, or no advanced airway. We adjusted for Utstein confounders. Multivariable random effects regression accounted for clustering by EMS agency. We compared outcomes between (1) ETI vs. SGA, and (2) [no advanced airway] vs. [ETI or SGA]. Of 10,691 OHCA, 5591 received ETI, 3110 SGA, and 1929 had no advanced airway. Unadjusted neurologically-intact survival was: ETI 5.4%, SGA 5.2%, no advanced airway 18.6%. Compared with SGA, ETI achieved higher sustained ROSC (OR 1.35; 95%CI 1.19-1.54), survival to hospital admission (1.36; 1.19-1.55), hospital survival (1.41; 1.14-1.76) and hospital discharge with good neurologic outcome (1.44; 1.10-1.88). Compared with [ETI or SGA], patients receiving no advanced airway attained higher survival to hospital admission (1.31; 1.16-1.49), hospital survival (2.96; 2.50-3.51) and hospital discharge with good neurologic outcome (4.24; 3.46-5.20). In CARES, survival was higher among OHCA receiving ETI than those receiving SGA, and for patients who received no advanced airway than those receiving ETI or SGA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Exercise-related cardiac cardiac rehabilitation arrest In

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... its possible risks. This study attempted to establish the safety of cardiac ... Patients at risk of CA during exercise were essentially not identifiable, since they .... Patient 2 had had a belO\\~-knee amputation as a consequence of a motor vehicle.

  8. A Case of Cardiac Arrest Due to Late Diaphragm Hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Mergan Ižliklerden

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic diaphragm hernias are seen in 0.5-6% of blunt traumas and early diagnosis of these cases is difficult. Traumatic diaphragm hernias can produce symptoms and be diagnosed in weeks, months, and sometimes in years. A 20-year-old male patient had a history of a fall from a tree eight years prior. He had complaints of postprandial pain in the epigastrium continuing for several years. Over the previous two weeks, the patient%u2019s complaints of chest pain and difficulty in breathing increased. On PA chest graphy, increased air fluid levels were seen in left lower zone. The patient that hospitalized for examination had a mediastinal shift suddenly and caused cardiac arrest on the second day. By performing anterolateral thoracotomy, the patient received cardiac by manual cardiac massage. Following a response to resuscitation, during exploration of the patient, it was observed that the stomach was perforated towards the thorax. The stomach and the diaphragm were primary repaired and he was discharged on the postoperative seventh day. It is difficult to diagnose diaphragm ruptures in early periods following trauma and thus causes a delay in treatment. This study presents a case that was diagnosed eight years after blunt trauma and had cardiac arrest due to mediastinal shift preoperatively.

  9. Cardiac arrests in patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy: A retrospective analysis of 73,029 procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavana Goudra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Airway difficulties leading to cardiac arrest are frequently encountered during propofol sedation in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI endoscopy. With a noticeable increase in the use of propofol for endoscopic sedation, we decided to examine the incidence and outcome of cardiac arrests in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI endoscopy with sedation. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, cardiac arrest data obtained from the clinical quality improvement and local registry over 5 years was analyzed. The information of patients who sustained cardiac arrest attributable to sedation was studied in detail. Analysis included comparison of cardiac arrests due to all causes until discharge (or death versus the cardiac arrests and death occurring during the procedure and in the recovery area. Results: The incidence of cardiac arrest and death (all causes, until discharge was 6.07 and 4.28 per 10,000 in patients sedated with propofol, compared with non–propofol-based sedation (0.67 and 0.44. The incidence of cardiac arrest during and immediately after the procedure (recovery area for all endoscopies was 3.92 per 10,000; of which, 72% were airway management related. About 90.0% of all peri-procedural cardiac arrests occurred in patients who received propofol. Conclusions: The incidence of cardiac arrest and death is about 10 times higher in patients receiving propofol-based sedation compared with those receiving midazolam–fentanyl sedation. More than two thirds of these events occur during EGD and ERCP.

  10. The benefits of youth are lost on the young cardiac arrest patient [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Griffith

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Children and young adults tend to have reduced mortality and disability after acquired brain injuries such as trauma or stroke and across other disease processes seen in critical care medicine. However, after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA, outcomes are remarkably similar across age groups. The consistent lack of witnessed arrests and a high incidence of asphyxial or respiratory etiology arrests among pediatric and young adult patients with OHCA account for a substantial portion of the difference in outcomes. Additionally, in younger children, differences in pre-hospital response and the activation of developmental apoptosis may explain more severe outcomes after OHCA. These require us to consider whether present practices are in line with the science. The present recommendations for compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation in young adults, normothermia as opposed to hypothermia (33°C after asphyxial arrests, and paramedic training are considered within this review in light of existing evidence. Modifications in present standards of care may help restore the benefits of youth after brain injury to the young survivor of OHCA.

  11. Prognostic Value of Brain Diffusion Weighted Imaging After Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijman, Christine A.C.; Mlynash, Michael; Caulfield, Anna Finley; Hsia, Amie W.; Eyngorn, Irina; Bammer, Roland; Fischbein, Nancy; Albers, Gregory W.; Moseley, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objective Outcome prediction is challenging in comatose post-cardiac arrest survivors. We assessed the feasibility and prognostic utility of brain diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) during the first week. Methods Consecutive comatose post-cardiac arrest patients were prospectively enrolled. MRI data of patients who met predefined specific prognostic criteria were used to determine distinguishing ADC thresholds. Group 1: death at 6 months and absent motor response or absent pupillary reflexes or bilateral absent cortical responses at 72 hours, or vegetative at 1 month. Group 2A: Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) score of 4 or 5 at 6 months. Group 2B: GOS of 3 at 6 months. The percentage of voxels below different apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) thresholds was calculated at 50 × 10−6 mm2/sec intervals. Results Overall, 86% of patients underwent MR imaging. Fifty-one patients with 62 brain MRIs were included in the analyses. Forty patients met the specific prognostic criteria. The percentage of brain volume with an ADC value below 650–700 × 10−6 mm2/sec best differentiated between group 1 and groups 2A and 2B combined (p<0.001), while the 400–450 × 10−6 mm2/sec threshold best differentiated between groups 2A and 2B (p=0.003). The ideal time window for prognostication using DWI was between 49 to 108 hours after the arrest. When comparing MRI in this time window with the 72 hour neurological examination MRI improved the sensitivity for predicting poor outcome by 38% while maintaining 100% specificity (p=0.021). Interpretation Quantitative DWI in comatose post-cardiac arrest survivors holds great promise as a prognostic adjunct. PMID:19399889

  12. Cardiac Arrest in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Incidence, Predisposing Factors, and Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joundi, Raed A; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Nikneshan, Davar; Tu, Jack V; Fang, Jiming; Holloway, Robert; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac arrest is a devastating complication of acute ischemic stroke, but little is known about its incidence and characteristics. We studied a large ischemic stroke inpatient population and compared patients with and without cardiac arrest. We studied consecutive patients from the Ontario Stroke Registry who had an ischemic stroke between July 2003 and June 2008 at 11 tertiary care stroke centers in Ontario. Multivariable analyses were used to determine independent predictors of cardiac arrest and associated outcomes. Adjusted survival curves were computed, and hazard ratios for mortality at 30 days and 1 year were determined for cardiac arrest and other major outcomes. Among the 9019 patients with acute ischemic stroke, 352 had cardiac arrest, for an overall incidence of 3.9%. In a sensitivity analysis with palliative patients removed, the incidence of cardiac arrest was 2.5%. Independent predictors of cardiac arrest were as follows: older age, greater stroke severity, preadmission dependence, and a history of diabetes, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. Systemic complications associated with cardiac arrest were as follows: myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, sepsis, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and pneumonia. Patients with cardiac arrest had higher disability at discharge, and a markedly increased 30-day mortality of 82.1% compared with 9.3% without cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest had a high incidence and was associated with poor outcomes after ischemic stroke, including multiple medical complications and very high mortality. Predictors of cardiac arrest identified in this study could help risk stratify ischemic stroke patients for cardiac investigations and prolonged cardiac monitoring. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Roles of simple external cardiac massage in the prehospital sudden death patients%单纯胸外心脏按压在院前猝死患者中的作用和意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍德生; 白志云; 吴晓飞; 马义芳

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To discuss the roles of simple external cardiac massage in the prehospital sudden death patients. Methods:Among three hundred and ten patients with cardiac arrest, eighty seven cases accepted external cardiac massage before the emergency ambulance arrived, while the two hundred and twenty-three cases didn't. The effects of cardiac resuscitation in above cases were analyzed with thirty two sudden death patients in hospital during the same period. Results:The rates of cardiopulmonary resuscitation had significant difference between the group of which accepted cardiac massage and the group of which didn't accept cardiac massage before the emergency ambulance arrived(P<0.05 ). The rates of cardiopulmonary resuscitation had no significant difference between above 87 prehospital patients and 32 hospital patients ( P> 0.05 ). Conclusions: The simple external cardiac massage has great significance on the recovery rates of cardiopulnonary resuscitation and increasing survival in the prehospital sudden death patients.%目的:探讨单纯胸外心脏按压在院前猝死患者中的作用和意义.方法:院前心搏骤停310例患者中,接受旁观目击者在救护车到达之前即实施胸外心脏按压87例(按压组),未按压223例(未按压组),同期院内猝死32例(对照组),比较3组复苏效果.结果:按压组复苏成功率和未按压组相比差异有统计学意义(P0.05).结论:单纯胸外心脏按压对复苏成功率和患者生存率的提高都有重要意义.

  14. [Factors affecting the survival of transplants from donors after prehospital cardiac death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos Rodríguez, Alonso Antonio; Andrés Belmonte, Amado; Del Río Gallegos, Francisco; Coll, Elisabeth

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate factors that influence the survival of transplanted organs from donors after prehospital cardiac death. Retrospective observational study of data collected from hospital emergency service records. Information included prehospital cardiac deaths evaluated as donors as well as patients who received transplants. Two hundred cases from 2008 through 2011 were studied. Sixty-nine potential donors (34.5%) were rejected. Three hundred organs were extracted from the remaining 131 donor cases, to yield a mean (SD) of 2.32 (0.83) transplanted organs/donor or 1.52 (1.29) organs/potential donor. One hundred fifty-two potential donors (76%) were treated with mechanical cardiopumps during transport. We detected no significant differences between cases transported with manual chest compressions and cases treated with cardiopumps regarding age (40.1 vs 43.5 years, P=.06), responder arrival times (13 min 54 s vs 12 min 54 s, P=.45), or transport times (1 h 27 min vs 1 h 32 min). However, case transported with manual chest compressions yielded significantly more kidneys (mean, 1.96/potential donor) than those transported with cardiopump compressions (mean, 1.38/potential donor) (P=.008). Eleven of the 229 kidneys harvested (4%) were not transplanted. The median (interquartile range) serum creatinine concentrations after kidney transplants at 6 and 12 months, respectively, were 1.37 (1.10-1.58) mg/dL and 1.43 (1.11-1.80) mg/dL. Our findings suggest that the use of a cardiopump reduces donor recruitment. Long-term creatinine levels are similar after transplantation of kidneys from donors transported with a cardiopump or with manual compressions.

  15. Heat, heat waves, and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Si-Hyuck; Oh, Il-Young; Heo, Jongbae; Lee, Hyewon; Kim, Jungeun; Lim, Woo-Hyun; Cho, Youngjin; Choi, Eue-Keun; Yi, Seung-Muk; Sang, Do Shin; Kim, Ho; Youn, Tae-Jin; Chae, In-Ho; Oh, Seil

    2016-10-15

    Cardiac arrest is one of the common presentations of cardiovascular disorders and a leading cause of death. There are limited data on the relationship between out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and ambient temperatures, specifically extreme heat. This study investigated how heat and heat waves affect the occurrence of OHCA. Seven major cities in Korea with more than 1 million residents were included in this study. A heat wave was defined as a daily mean temperature above the 98th percentile of the yearly distribution for at least two consecutive days. A total of 50,318 OHCAs of presumed cardiac origin were identified from the nationwide emergency medical service database between 2006 and 2013. Ambient temperature and OHCA had a J-shaped relationship with a trough at 28°C. Heat waves were shown to be associated with a 14-% increase in the risk of OHCA. Adverse effects were apparent from the beginning of each heat wave period and slightly increased during its continuation. Excess OHCA events during heat waves occurred between 3PM and 5PM. Subgroup analysis showed that those 65years or older were significantly more susceptible to heat waves. Ambient temperature and OHCA had a J-shaped relationship. The risk of OHCA was significantly increased with heat waves. Excess OHCA events primarily occurred during the afternoon when the temperature was high. We found that the elderly were more susceptible to the deleterious effects of heat waves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cardiac Arrest in a Pregnant Patient Diagnosed with Bochdalek Hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Karabacak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bochdalek hernia is thought to be the result of a defect of the pleuroperitoneal fold and the septum transversum fusion in the 8th week of gestation. The majority of these patients present with respiratory distress after delivery; asymptomatic progress until adulthood is an extremely rare clinical occurrence. The adult form of a Bochdalek hernia accompanying pregnancy is a rare entity. A 39-year-old, 24-week pregnant patient applied to Emergency service with epigastric pain and vomiting. Abdominal ultrasonography was planned due to the abdominal pain; sudden cardiopulmonary arrest occurred during the procedure. In this case report, congenital diaphragmatic hernia in a young pregnant woman who underwent cardiac arrest is presented.

  17. Experiencing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: significant others' lifeworld perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Anders; Dahlberg, Karin; Sandman, Lars

    2009-10-01

    When patients suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA), significant others find themselves with no choice about being there. After the event they are often left with unanswered questions about the life-threatening circumstances, or the patient's death, or emergency treatment and future needs. When it is unclear how the care and the event itself will affect significant others' well-being, prehospital emergency personnel face ethical decisions. In this article we describe the experiences of significant others present at OHCA, focusing on ethical aspects and values. Using a lifeworld phenomenological approach, 7 significant others were interviewed. The essence of the phenomenon of OHCA can be stated as unreality in the reality, which is characterized by overwhelming responsibility. The significant others experience inadequacy and limitation, they move between hope and hopelessness, and they struggle with ethical considerations and an insecurity about the future.The study findings show how significant others' sense of an OHCA situation, when life is trembling, can threaten values deemed important for a good life.

  18. Cardiac arrest secondary to type 2 Kounis syndrome resulting from urticaria and angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Suzy; Child, Nick; Burdon-Jones, David; Connor, Andrew

    2010-07-01

    A 43-year-old man with no cardiac history presented with chest pain followed by cardiac arrest. He was successfully defibrillated and underwent primary percutaneous coronary angioplasty to a culprit coronary artery lesion. He later re-presented with a diffuse urticarial rash and lip swelling, reporting that these symptoms had been present for 4 weeks before his cardiac arrest and voicing concern that a further cardiac arrest may be imminent. A diagnosis of post-viral or idiopathic autoimmune urticaria and angioedema was made. Given the absence of cardiac symptoms before the development of the rash, it was hypothesised that coronary artery spasm precipitated by histamine release due to his dermatological condition contributed to his myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest. The final diagnosis was therefore cardiac arrest secondary to type II Kounis syndrome, resulting from idiopathic autoimmune or post-viral urticaria and angioedema.

  19. Mechanisms linking advanced airway management and cardiac arrest outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Justin L; Prince, David K; Wang, Henry E

    2015-08-01

    Advanced airway management--such as endotracheal intubation (ETI) or supraglottic airway (SGA) insertion--is one of the most prominent interventions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation. While randomized controlled trials are currently in progress to identify the best advanced airway technique in OHCA, the mechanisms by which airway management may influence OHCA outcomes remain unknown. We provide a conceptual model describing potential mechanisms linking advanced airway management with OHCA outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Management and outcome of mechanically ventilated patients after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherasan, Yuda; Peñuelas, Oscar; Muriel, Alfonso; Vargas, Maria; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Brunetti, Iole; Raymondos, Konstantinos; D'Antini, Davide; Nielsen, Niklas; Ferguson, Niall D; Böttiger, Bernd W; Thille, Arnaud W; Davies, Andrew R; Hurtado, Javier; Rios, Fernando; Apezteguía, Carlos; Violi, Damian A; Cakar, Nahit; González, Marco; Du, Bin; Kuiper, Michael A; Soares, Marco Antonio; Koh, Younsuck; Moreno, Rui P; Amin, Pravin; Tomicic, Vinko; Soto, Luis; Bülow, Hans-Henrik; Anzueto, Antonio; Esteban, Andrés; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-05-08

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the changes in ventilator management and complications over time, as well as variables associated with 28-day hospital mortality in patients receiving mechanical ventilation (MV) after cardiac arrest. We performed a secondary analysis of three prospective, observational multicenter studies conducted in 1998, 2004 and 2010 in 927 ICUs from 40 countries. We screened 18,302 patients receiving MV for more than 12 hours during a one-month-period. We included 812 patients receiving MV after cardiac arrest. We collected data on demographics, daily ventilator settings, complications during ventilation and outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios, determining which variables within 24 hours of hospital admission were associated with 28-day hospital mortality and occurrence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pneumonia acquired during ICU stay at 48 hours after admission. Among 812 patients, 100 were included from 1998, 239 from 2004 and 473 from 2010. Ventilatory management changed over time, with decreased tidal volumes (VT) (1998: mean 8.9 (standard deviation (SD) 2) ml/kg actual body weight (ABW), 2010: 6.7 (SD 2) ml/kg ABW; 2004: 9 (SD 2.3) ml/kg predicted body weight (PBW), 2010: 7.95 (SD 1.7) ml/kg PBW) and increased positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (1998: mean 3.5 (SD 3), 2010: 6.5 (SD 3); P <0.001). Patients included from 2010 had more sepsis, cardiovascular dysfunction and neurological failure, but 28-day hospital mortality was similar over time (52% in 1998, 57% in 2004 and 52% in 2010). Variables independently associated with 28-day hospital mortality were: older age, PaO2 <60 mmHg, cardiovascular dysfunction and less use of sedative agents. Higher VT, and plateau pressure with lower PEEP were associated with occurrence of ARDS and pneumonia acquired during ICU stay. Protective mechanical ventilation with lower VT and higher PEEP is more

  1. [Cardiac arrest in newborn of mother treated with labetalol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, X; Monsalve, C; Comas, C; Botet, F; Nalda, M A

    1993-01-01

    The use of beta-adrenergic antagonists for the control of high blood pressure associated to pregnancy is frequent. Their use is related with the appearance of undesirable effects of the fetus. The case of neonatal cardiac arrest attributed, to the administration of labetalol to the mother is presented. The high transplacentary passage, the different pharmacokinetics of the drug in the newborn and the clinical evolution of the patient suggests its involvement. It is concluded that labetalol may cause severe undesirable effects in newborns and fetal heart rate of the mother and neonate should be monitored upon use of this drug.

  2. Genetic deletion of NOS3 increases lethal cardiac dysfunction following mouse cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiser, David G; Orbelyan, Gerasim A; Inouye, Brendan T; Costakis, James G; Hamann, Kimm J; McNally, Elizabeth M; Vanden Hoek, Terry L

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac arrest mortality is significantly affected by failure to obtain return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) despite cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Severe myocardial dysfunction and cardiovascular collapse further affects mortality within hours of initial ROSC. Recent work suggests that enhancement of nitric oxide (NO) signaling within minutes of CPR can improve myocardial function and survival. We studied the role of NO signaling on cardiovascular outcomes following cardiac arrest and resuscitation using endothelial NO synthase knockout (NOS3(-/-)) mice. Adult female wild-type (WT) and NOS3(-/-) mice were anesthetized, intubated, and instrumented with left-ventricular pressure-volume catheters. Cardiac arrest was induced with intravenous potassium chloride. CPR was performed after 8min of untreated arrest. ROSC rate, cardiac function, whole-blood nitrosylhemoglobin (HbNO) concentrations, heart NOS3 content and phosphorylation (p-NOS3), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), and phospho-troponin I (p-TnI) were measured. Despite equal quality CPR, NOS3(-/-) mice displayed lower rates of ROSC compared to WT (47.6% [10/21] vs. 82.4% [14/17], pNOS3(-/-) vs. WT mice exhibited increased left-ventricular dysfunction and 120min mortality. Prior to ROSC, myocardial effectors of NO signaling including cGMP and p-TnI were decreased in NOS3(-/-) vs. WT mice (pNOS3-dependent increases in circulating HbNO were seen by 120min. Significant increases in cardiac p-NOS3 occurred between end-arrest and 15min post-ROSC, while total NOS3 content was increased by 120min post-ROSC (pNOS3 decreases ROSC rate and worsens post-ROSC left-ventricular function. Poor cardiovascular outcomes are associated with differences in NOS3-dependent myocardial cGMP signaling and circulating NO metabolites. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Rates of organ donation in a UK tertiary cardiac arrest centre following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheetham, Olivia V; Thomas, Matthew J C; Hadfield, John; O'Higgins, Fran; Mitchell, Claire; Rooney, Kieron D

    2016-04-01

    To ascertain the rate of successful organ donation (OD) within patients who sustained an out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with initial return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survival to hospital admission, but whom subsequently do not survive to hospital discharge. A retrospective audit of ambulance service and hospital databases from January 2010 to January 2015 was undertaken in a United Kingdom tertiary-referral regional cardiac arrest centre. Crude denominator data for cardiac arrests was obtained from the regional ambulance service; the ICU database was interrogated for OHCA patient admissions and outcomes. Patients who died were cross-referenced against the local Organ Donation service database. Five hundred and fourteen {514} patients were admitted to ICU following OHCA over this five year period. Two hundred and forty-one {241} patients (47%) survived to hospital discharge and 273 (53%) died of whom 106 (39%) were referred to a Specialist Nurse for Organ Donation (SNOD). The conversion rate after the family was approached was 64%. Twenty-eight {28} patients proceeded to donation and 25 patients (24%) successfully donated at least one organ. On average, a patient proceeding to donation provided 1.9 organs. A proactive, systematic approach to OD in OHCA patients can provide a good conversion rate and substantial number of donors. Most donations occur after death from circulatory criteria. There is a positive socio-economic benefit with nearly £4m in savings to the health service within the next 5 years potentially being realised during this period by liberating patients from dialysis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Sudden cardiac arrest in a child with nemaline myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marseglia, Lucia; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Manti, Sara; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Arrigo, Teresa; Cavallari, Vittorio; Gitto, Eloisa

    2015-03-21

    Nemaline myopathy is a rare, non progressive congenital skeletal muscle disorder defined by the presence of inclusions known as nemaline rods in muscle fibers. Several clinical subtypes have been described, according to degree of muscle weakness, severity and age at onset. The course of nemaline myopathy is very slowly progressive, and death is usually due to respiratory failure. Cardiac involvement is rare and generally considered to be the result of ACTA1 mutations. We report the case of a 6 year old boy with typical congenital nemaline myopathy. Nemaline myopathy was confirmed at 3 years of age by muscle biopsy. No mutation of ACTA1, TPM2 and TNNT1 genes was detected. The child died suddenly of cardiac arrest and associated hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, in absence of acute respiratory failure or swallowing difficulties. Nemaline cardiomyopathy was suspected, but post mortem cardiac biopsy did not show findings consistent with nemaline myopathy. Congenital typical nemaline myopathy is not necessarily a static or very slowly progressive disorder and acute cardiac deterioration can lead to early death.

  5. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Andrea O.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Wesenberg Kjaer, Troels; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Rosén, Ingmar; Åneman, Anders; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P.; Cronberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. Methods: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists, blinded to outcome, evaluated prospectively recorded EEGs in the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM trial) that randomized patients to 33°C vs 36°C. Routine EEG was performed in patients still comatose after rewarming. EEGs were classified into highly malignant (suppression, suppression with periodic discharges, burst-suppression), malignant (periodic or rhythmic patterns, pathological or nonreactive background), and benign EEG (absence of malignant features). Poor outcome was defined as best Cerebral Performance Category score 3–5 until 180 days. Results: Eight TTM sites randomized 202 patients. EEGs were recorded in 103 patients at a median 77 hours after cardiac arrest; 37% had a highly malignant EEG and all had a poor outcome (specificity 100%, sensitivity 50%). Any malignant EEG feature had a low specificity to predict poor prognosis (48%) but if 2 malignant EEG features were present specificity increased to 96% (p EEG was found in 1% of the patients with a poor outcome. Conclusions: Highly malignant EEG after rewarming reliably predicted poor outcome in half of patients without false predictions. An isolated finding of a single malignant feature did not predict poor outcome whereas a benign EEG was highly predictive of a good outcome. PMID:26865516

  6. An Unusual Cause of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Recorded on a Heartrate Monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Peter T; Ng, Arnold C T; Gould, Paul A; Wang, William Y S

    2016-10-01

    Coronary vasospasm is an uncommon, but perhaps under-recognised, cause of cardiac arrest. We present a novel case of an exercise-induced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to coronary vasospasm, captured on a heartrate monitor, and discuss the management options for this condition. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Epidemiology and outcomes of cardiac arrest among children with Down Syndrome: a multicenter analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padiyath, Asif; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna; Gossett, Jeffrey M; Tadphale, Sachin D; Garcia, Xiomara; Seib, Paul M; Gupta, Punkaj

    2017-06-01

    With the increasing prevalence of Down Syndrome, it is unknown if children with Down Syndrome are associated with increased incidence of cardiac arrest and poor outcomes after cardiac arrest. The objective of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology of cardiac arrest and mortality after cardiac arrest among critically ill children with and without Down Syndrome. Patients ≤18 years admitted at a Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS) participating Intensive Care Unit were included (2004-2014). Multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to evaluate association of Down Syndrome with study outcomes after adjusting for patient and center characteristics. A total of 849,250 patients from 44 centers were included. Of the 25,143 patients with Down Syndrome, cardiac arrest was noted among 568 (2.3%) patients with an associated mortality at hospital discharge of 248 (43.6%) patients. In contrast, of the 824,107 patients without Down Syndrome, cardiac arrest was noted among 15,822 (1.9%) patients with an associated mortality at hospital discharge of 7775 (49.1%) patients. In adjusted models, patients with Down Syndrome had a higher likelihood of having cardiac arrest as compared to patients without Down Syndrome (with vs. without Down, OR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.03-1.25, P=0.01). Despite having a higher likelihood of cardiac arrest, patients with Down Syndrome were associated with a lower mortality after cardiac arrest (OR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.63-0.96, P=0.02). Both incidence of cardiac arrest, and mortality at hospital discharge in those with cardiac arrest vary substantially in children with and without Down Syndrome.

  8. Minimally interrupted cardiac resuscitation by emergency medical services for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrow, Bentley J; Clark, Lani L; Ewy, Gordon A; Chikani, Vatsal; Sanders, Arthur B; Berg, Robert A; Richman, Peter B; Kern, Karl B

    2008-03-12

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a major public health problem. To investigate whether the survival of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest would improve with minimally interrupted cardiac resuscitation (MICR), an alternate emergency medical services (EMS) protocol. A prospective study of survival-to-hospital discharge between January 1, 2005, and November 22, 2007. Patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in 2 metropolitan cities in Arizona before and after MICR training of fire department emergency medical personnel were assessed. In a second analysis of protocol compliance, patients from the 2 metropolitan cities and 60 additional fire departments in Arizona who actually received MICR were compared with patients who did not receive MICR but received standard advanced life support. Instruction for EMS personnel in MICR, an approach that includes an initial series of 200 uninterrupted chest compressions, rhythm analysis with a single shock, 200 immediate postshock chest compressions before pulse check or rhythm reanalysis, early administration of epinephrine, and delayed endotracheal intubation. Survival-to-hospital discharge. Among the 886 patients in the 2 metropolitan cities, survival-to-hospital discharge increased from 1.8% (4/218) before MICR training to 5.4% (36/668) after MICR training (odds ratio [OR], 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-8.9). In the subgroup of 174 patients with witnessed cardiac arrest and ventricular fibrillation, survival increased from 4.7% (2/43) before MICR training to 17.6% (23/131) after MICR training (OR, 8.6; 95% CI, 1.8-42.0). In the analysis of MICR protocol compliance involving 2460 patients with cardiac arrest, survival was significantly better among patients who received MICR than those who did not (9.1% [60/661] vs 3.8% [69/1799]; OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.9-4.1), as well as patients with witnessed ventricular fibrillation (28.4% [40/141] vs 11.9% [46/387]; OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.0-5.8). Survival

  9. Association between dental caries and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of cardiac origin in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Yasunori; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Zhang, Bo; Uehara, Yoshinari; Ogawa, Masahiro; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nonogi, Hiroshi; Nagao, Ken; Kimura, Takeshi; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-04-01

    Oral infection contributes to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. We hypothesized that dental caries may be associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) of cardiac origin, but not non-cardiac origin. We compared the age-adjusted incidence of OHCA (785,591 cases of OHCA: 55.4% of cardiac origin and 44.6% of non-cardiac origin) to the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries between 2005 and 2011 in the 47 prefectures of Japan. In both the total population and males over 65 years, the number of cases of dental caries was significantly associated with the number of OHCA of total and cardiac origin from 2005 to 2011, but not those of non-cardiac origin. In the total population, the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries was not significantly associated with the age-adjusted incidence of OHCA (total OHCA: r correlation coefficient=0.22, p=0.14; OHCA of cardiac origin: r=0.25, p=0.09; OHCA of non-cardiac origin: r=-0.002, p=0.99). Among male patients over 65 years, the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries was significantly associated with OHCA of total and cardiac origin, but not non-cardiac origin (total OHCA: r=0.47, p<0.001; OHCA of cardiac origin: r=0.37, p=0.01; OHCA of non-cardiac origin: r=0.28, p=0.054). While oral hygiene is important in all age groups, it may be particularly associated with OHCAs of cardiac origin in males over 65 years. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Cardiac arrest during gamete release in chum salmon regulated by the parasympathetic nerve system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Makiguchi

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest caused by startling stimuli, such as visual and vibration stimuli, has been reported in some animals and could be considered as an extraordinary case of bradycardia and defined as reversible missed heart beats. Variability of the heart rate is established as a balance between an autonomic system, namely cholinergic vagus inhibition, and excitatory adrenergic stimulation of neural and hormonal action in teleost. However, the cardiac arrest and its regulating nervous mechanism remain poorly understood. We show, by using electrocardiogram (ECG data loggers, that cardiac arrest occurs in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta at the moment of gamete release for 7.39+/-1.61 s in females and for 5.20+/-0.97 s in males. The increase in heart rate during spawning behavior relative to the background rate during the resting period suggests that cardiac arrest is a characteristic physiological phenomenon of the extraordinarily high heart rate during spawning behavior. The ECG morphological analysis showed a peaked and tall T-wave adjacent to the cardiac arrest, indicating an increase in potassium permeability in cardiac muscle cells, which would function to retard the cardiac action potential. Pharmacological studies showed that the cardiac arrest was abolished by injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, revealing that the cardiac arrest is a reflex response of the parasympathetic nerve system, although injection of sotalol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, did not affect the cardiac arrest. We conclude that cardiac arrest during gamete release in spawning release in spawning chum salmon is a physiological reflex response controlled by the parasympathetic nervous system. This cardiac arrest represents a response to the gaping behavior that occurs at the moment of gamete release.

  11. CPR Induced Consciousness During Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Case Report on an Emerging Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Joshua; Verbeek, P Richard; Cheskes, Sheldon

    2017-01-01

    High quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has produced a relatively new phenomenon of consciousness in patients with vital signs absent. Further research is necessary to produce a viable treatment strategy during and post resuscitation. To provide a case study done by paramedics in the field illustrating the need for sedation in a patient whose presentation was consistent with CPR induced consciousness. Resuscitative challenges are provided as well as potential future treatment options to minimize harm to both patients and prehospital providers. A 52-year-old male presented as a witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). During CPR the patient began to exhibit signs of life including severe agitation and thrashing of his limbs while CPR was ongoing for ventricular fibrillation prior to defibrillation. Resuscitation became considerably more complicated due to the violent and counterintuitive motions done by the patient during their own resuscitation. Despite the atypical presentation of cardiac arrest the patient was successfully resuscitated employing high quality CPR, standard advanced life support (ALS) care as well as two double sequential external defibrillation shocks. The patient underwent emergency percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for a 100% occlusion of his left anterior descending artery (LAD). The patient returned home 3 days later fully recovered with a Cerebral Performance Score of 1. CPR induced consciousness is emerging as a new phenomenon challenging providers of high quality CPR during cardiac arrest resuscitation. Our case report describes the manifestations of CPR induced consciousness as well as the resuscitative challenges which occur during resuscitation. Further research is required to determine the true frequency of this condition as well as treatment algorithms that would allow for appropriate and safe management for both the patient and EMS providers.

  12. Hospital discharge diagnoses of ventricular arrhythmias and cardiac arrest were useful for epidemiologic research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, M L; van Hemel, N M; Leufkens, H G M

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the validity of hospital discharge diagnosis regarding ventricular arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. METHODS: We identified patients whose record in the PHARMO record linkage system database showed a code for ventricular or unspecified cardiac arrhythmias according to codes...... through manual review of hospital clinical records. The positive predictive value (PPV) was calculated, and differences between characteristics of true and false positives were evaluated. RESULTS: The PPV of ICD codes for ventricular arrhythmias and cardiac arrest was 82% (95% confidence interval CI = 72......-92). True positive results were associated with male gender (P = .09) and younger age (P = .05). Of the unspecified cardiac arrhythmias 10% (95% CI = 2-18) were identified as ventricular arrhythmias or cardiac arrest. CONCLUSION: Hospitalizations for ventricular cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac arrest (coded...

  13. Combined Application of Circulatory Assist Devices Following Cardiac Arrest in Patients after Cardiac Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Huanlei; Xiao Xuejun; Wu Ruobin; Ruixin; Cheng Anheng; Zhang Xiaohua; Luo Zhengxiang

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To evaluateretrospectively the potential benefits of combined utilization of various assisted circulation devices in cardiac arrest patients who did not respond to conventional cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation (CPCR). Methods Assisted circulation devices,including emergency cardiopulmonary bypass (ECPB), intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP), and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), were applied to 16 adult patients who had cardiac arrest 82 min~56 h after open heart surgery and did not respond to 20 min or longer conventional CPCR. ECPB was applied to 2 patients, ECPB plus IABP to 8 patients, ECPB plus IABP and LVAD to 6 patients. Results One patient recovered fully and one patient died. Of the other 14 patients, 13 resumed spontaneous cardiac rhythm and one did not; none of them could be weaned from ECPB.Further treatment of the 14 patients with combinations of assisted circulation devices enabled 6 patients to recover. One of the 7 recovered patients died of reoccurring cardiac arrest after 11 days; the other 6 were discharged in good condition and were followed up for 3~49 months (mean =22 months). Of the 6 discharged patients one suffered cerebral embolism during LVAD treatment, resulting in mild limitation of mobility of the right limbs; the other 5 never manifested any central nervous system complications. There was no late deaths giving a 37.5% (6/16) long-term survival rate. Conclusions ECPB could effectively reestablish blood circulation and oxygen supply, rectify acidosis,and improve internal milieu. The combined utilization of ECPB, IABP, and LVAD reduces the duration of ECPB, improves the incidence of recovery, and offers beneficial alternatives to refractory cardiac arrest patients.

  14. Temporal differences in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest incidence and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagai, Akshay; McNally, Bryan F.; Al-Khatib, Sana M.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding temporal differences in the incidence and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has important implications for developing preventative strategies and optimizing systems for OHCA care.......Understanding temporal differences in the incidence and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has important implications for developing preventative strategies and optimizing systems for OHCA care....

  15. Cognitive impairments and subjective cognitive complaints after survival of cardiac arrest : a prospective longitudinal cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinbusch, Catherine V M; van Heugten, Caroline M; Rasquin, Sascha M.C.; Verbunt, Jeanine A; Moulaert, Véronique R M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac arrest can lead to hypoxic brain injury, which can affect cognitive functioning. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the course of objective and subjective cognitive functioning and their association during the first year after cardiac arrest. METHODS: A multi-centre prospective longitudin

  16. Helium ventilation for treatment of post-cardiac arrest syndrome : A safety and feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brevoord, Daniel; Beurskens, Charlotte J. P.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Lagrand, Wim K.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Preckel, Benedikt; Horn, Janneke

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Besides supportive care, the only recommended treatment for comatose patients after cardiac arrest is target temperature management. Helium reduces ischaemic injury in animal models, and might ameliorate neurological injury in patients after cardiac arrest. As no studies exist on the use of hel

  17. Dexmedetomidine Related Bradycardia Leading to Cardiac Arrest in a Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Y. Chen2, K-S. Chen1,2, K. M. Chang2, W. M. Lee1,2, S. C. Chang1,2 and H. C. Wang1,2

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A 2-year-old, mixed breed female dog (16 kg underwent an exploratory laparotomy following ultrasonographic diagnosis of foreign body and a segment of small intestine intussusceptions. The patient was classified as an ASA II. Ketamine (1mg/kg, IV, and dexmedetomidine (2.5 µg/kg, IV, and morphine (0.6 mg/kg, SC were given as anesthetic premedication. Propofol (0.1 mg/kg, IV titrated to a total amount of 4 ml (2.5 mg/ kg was given for intubation. Asystole was occurred. Cardiac resuscitation was then conducted immediately. Atipamezole (0.1 ml was injected, but showed no response on ECG. Atropine (0.02 mg/kg was then injected, and a second dosage was given. Two-three mins later, the heart rate at 84 beats/min. The NIBP showed 203/132 with MAP 153 mmHg, and the SpO2 showed 95% after the cardiac function was regained. Dexmedetomidine related bradycardia leading to cardiac arrest has been suggested in this case.

  18. Near death experiences, cognitive function and psychological outcomes of surviving cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnia, S; Spearpoint, K; Fenwick, P B

    2007-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is associated with a number of cognitive processes as well as long term psychological outcomes. Recent studies have indicated that approximately 10-20% of cardiac arrest survivors report cognitive processes, including the ability to recall specific details of their resuscitation from the period of cardiac arrest. In addition it has been demonstrated that these cognitive processes are consistent with the previously described near death experience and that those who have these experiences are left with long term positive life enhancing effects. There have also been numerous studies that have indicated that although the quality of life for cardiac arrest survivors is generally good, some are left with long term cognitive impairments as well as psychological sequelae such as post-traumatic stress disorder. This paper will review near death experiences, cognitive function and psychological outcomes in survivors of cardiac arrest.

  19. An infant with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest secondary to enteroviral myocarditis surviving up to cardiac transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Eimear; Ryan, Ethel; McMahon, Colin J

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 13-day-old infant with enteroviral myocarditis surviving an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. She underwent orthotopic cardiac transplantation three months later. A year after the transplantation, she is alive and well. Enteroviral infection is common in neonates with high mortality in cases of enteroviral myocarditis. Cardiac transplantation is a treatment option for infants who fail to recover and remain dependent on inotropic support. This is the first report of an infant with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest secondary to enteroviral myocarditis surviving up to cardiac transplantation.

  20. Opiate withdrawal complicated by tetany and cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugasia, Irfanali R; Shabarek, Nehad

    2014-01-01

    Patients with symptoms of opiate withdrawal, after the administration of opiate antagonist by paramedics, are a common presentation in the emergency department of hospitals. Though most of opiate withdrawal symptoms are benign, rarely they can become life threatening. This case highlights how a benign opiate withdrawal symptom of hyperventilation led to severe respiratory alkalosis that degenerated into tetany and cardiac arrest. Though this patient was successfully resuscitated, it is imperative that severe withdrawal symptoms are timely identified and immediate steps are taken to prevent catastrophes. An easier way to reverse the severe opiate withdrawal symptom would be with either low dose methadone or partial opiate agonists like buprenorphine. However, if severe acid-base disorder is identified, it would be safer to electively intubate these patients for better control of their respiratory and acid-base status.

  1. Opiate Withdrawal Complicated by Tetany and Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfanali R. Kugasia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with symptoms of opiate withdrawal, after the administration of opiate antagonist by paramedics, are a common presentation in the emergency department of hospitals. Though most of opiate withdrawal symptoms are benign, rarely they can become life threatening. This case highlights how a benign opiate withdrawal symptom of hyperventilation led to severe respiratory alkalosis that degenerated into tetany and cardiac arrest. Though this patient was successfully resuscitated, it is imperative that severe withdrawal symptoms are timely identified and immediate steps are taken to prevent catastrophes. An easier way to reverse the severe opiate withdrawal symptom would be with either low dose methadone or partial opiate agonists like buprenorphine. However, if severe acid-base disorder is identified, it would be safer to electively intubate these patients for better control of their respiratory and acid-base status.

  2. Endothelial Dysfunction in Resuscitated Cardiac Arrest (ENDO-RCA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anna Sina P; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Kjærgaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    /DESIGN: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind investigator-initiated pilot trial in 40 out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest (OHCA) patients will be conducted. Patients will be randomly assigned to either the active treatment group (48 hours of active study drug (iloprost, 1 ng/kg/min) or to the control group...... [placebo (saline) infusion]. Target mean blood pressure levels will be allocated 1:1 to 65 mmHg or approximately 75 mmHg, which gives four different permutations, namely: (i) iloprost/65 mHg, (ii) iloprost/75 mmHg, (iii) placebo/65 mmHg, and (iv) placebo/75 mmHg. All randomized patients will be treated...

  3. Complement Inhibition as a Proposed Neuroprotective Strategy following Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad E. Zacharia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA is a devastating disease process with neurological injury accounting for a disproportionate amount of the morbidity and mortality following return of spontaneous circulation. A dearth of effective treatment strategies exists for global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (GCI/R injury following successful resuscitation from OHCA. Emerging preclinical as well as recent human clinical evidence suggests that activation of the complement cascade plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of GCI/R injury following OHCA. In addition, it is well established that complement inhibition improves outcome in both global and focal models of brain ischemia. Due to the profound impact of GCI/R injury following OHCA, and the relative lack of effective neuroprotective strategies for this pathologic process, complement inhibition provides an exciting opportunity to augment existing treatments to improve patient outcomes. To this end, this paper will explore the pathophysiology of complement-mediated GCI/R injury following OHCA.

  4. Anaphylaxis with Latrodectus antivenin resulting in cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Christine M; Hong, Jeannie J; Beuhler, Michael C

    2011-12-01

    Latrodectus mactans antivenin is a safe and effective therapy for severe black widow spider envenomations when given to most patients. We report a case of a 37-year-old male with a history of asthma that was given L. mactans antivenin for symptoms related to a black widow envenomation and developed a severe anaphylactic reaction resulting in cardiac arrest. When traditional therapies failed, the patient was given methylene blue for anaphylactic shock resulting in a 30-h period of hemodynamic stability. Despite initial resuscitation, the patient ultimately died 40 h after presentation. Under the right circumstances, L. mactans antivenin remains a safe and effective therapy for severe black widow envenomations. However, anaphylaxis is a risk for those receiving this therapy, even when the antivenin is diluted and given as an infusion. We report the first death related to diluted L. mactans antivenin given as an infusion.

  5. In-hospital Cardiac Arrest at Cork University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, E; Deasy, C

    2016-01-01

    We describe the incidence and outcomes of in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) at Cork University Hospital over a one year time period (2011), prior to the implementation of national early warning scoring (NEWS) systems. There were 43 217 coded CUH admissions, in 2011, to 518 in-patient beds. The Hospital In-Patient Enquiry Database was used to identify adults (>/= 18 years) who sustained IHCA. Available Utstein variables were collected. Fifty-two patients were found to be incorrectly coded IHCA. 17 of 63 (27.0%) IHCA survived to discharge. IHCA with shockable rhythm had significantly higher survival. IHCA survival was significantly lower on wards versus any other hospital location. Median days of stay prior to arrest were significantly different between survivors and non-survivors. All survivors (n = 17) had intact neurological outcome post-event. Our outcomes from IHCA are poorest on hospital wards when compared to other areas of the hospital. Those that survive have excellent function and one-year survival.

  6. 53. Improved outcome of cardio-pulmonary arrest in post-operative cardiac children resuscitated in critical care setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussam Hamadah

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: The current outcome of cardio-pulmonary arrest in post-operative cardiac children has improved. Majority of cardiac arrest were successfully resuscitated with ROSC and 80% survived to discharge. The current result reflects significant improvement in the reported outcome of children who had cardio-pulmonary arrest in post-operative cardiac children in PCICU setup.

  7. Multimodal Imaging after Sudden Cardiac Arrest in an 18-Year-Old Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Mobeen Ur; Atalay, Michael K.; Broderick, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a previously healthy 18-year-old male athlete who twice presented with sudden cardiac arrest. Our use of electrocardiography, echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, coronary angiography, coronary computed tomographic angiography, and nuclear stress testing enabled the diagnoses of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and anomalous origin of the right coronary artery. We discuss the patient's treatment and note the useful role of multiple cardiovascular imaging methods in cases of sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:26664308

  8. Agonal gasps of cardiac arrest victim can aid in confirming tracheal intubation using Umesh's intubation detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh, Goneppanavar; Magazine, Rahul

    2013-09-01

    Several patients of cardiac arrest may be found in a state of agonal gasps that are of insufficient tidal volume and are not considered as a sign of life. However, this volume is sufficient enough to cause appreciable inflation and deflation of the reservoir bag of Umesh's intubation detector (UID) as evidenced in all 12 victims of cardiac arrest with gasping efforts in this study. Therefore, we conclude that the agonal gasps during cardiac arrest can reliably be used to confirm tracheal intubation using the UID device. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Survival in patients without acute ST elevation after cardiac arrest and association with early coronary angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dankiewicz, J; Nielsen, N; Annborn, M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether early coronary angiography (CAG) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of a presumed cardiac cause is associated with improved outcomes in patients without acute ST elevation. METHODS: The target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (TTM) trial...... the first 6 h after arrest. Primary outcome was mortality at the end of trial. A Cox proportional hazard model was created to estimate hazard of death, adjusting for covariates. In addition, a propensity score matched analysis was performed. RESULTS: A total of 252 patients (46 %) received early CAG...

  10. Errors in the management of cardiac arrests: an observational study of patient safety incidents in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Ignatowicz, Agnieszka M; Donaldson, Liam J

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this qualitative study is to better understand the types of error occurring during the management of cardiac arrests that led to a death. All patient safety incidents involving management of cardiac arrests and resulting in death which were reported to a national patient safety database over a 17-month period were analysed. Structured data from each report were extracted and these together with the free text, were subjected to content analysis which was inductive, with the coding scheme emerged from continuous reading and re-reading of incidents. There were 30 patient safety incidents involving management of cardiac arrests and resulting in death. The reviewers identified a main shortfall in the management of each cardiac arrest and this resulted in 12 different factors being documented. These were grouped into four themes that highlighted systemic weaknesses: miscommunication involving crash number (4/30, 13%), shortfalls in staff attending the arrest (4/30, 13%), equipment deficits (11/30, 36%), and poor application of knowledge and skills (11/30, 37%). The factors identified represent serious shortfalls in the quality of response to cardiac arrests resulting in death in hospital. No firm conclusion can be drawn about how many deaths in the study population would have been averted if the emergency had been managed to a high standard. The effective management of cardiac arrests should be considered as one of the markers of safe care within a healthcare organisation.

  11. [Anesthesia-related cardiac arrest in children. Data from a tertiary referral hospital registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria-Carretero, P; Ochoa-Osorio, C; Martín-Vega, A; Lahoz-Ramón, A; Rodríguez-Pérez, E; Reinoso-Barbero, F; Goldman-Tarlovsky, L

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the cardiac arrests related to anesthesia in a tertiary children's hospital, in order to identify risk factors that would lead to opportunities for improvement. A 5-year retrospective study was conducted on anesthesia related cardiac arrest occurring in pediatric patients. All urgent and elective anesthetic procedures performed by anesthesiologists were included. Data collected included patient characteristics, the procedure, the probable cause, and outcome of the cardiac arrest. Odds ratio was calculated by univariate analysis to determine the clinical factors associated with cardiac arrest and mortality. There were a total of 15 cardiac arrests related to anesthesia in 43,391 anesthetic procedures (3.4 per 10,000), with an incidence in children with ASA I-II versus ASA≥III of 0.28 and 19.27 per 10,000, respectively. The main risk factors were children ASA≥III (P<.001), less than one month old (P<.001), less than one year old (P<.001), emergency procedures (P<.01), cardiac procedures (P<.001) and procedures performed in the catheterization laboratory (P<.05). The main causes of cardiac arrest were cardiovascular (53.3%), mainly due to hypovolemia, and cardiovascular depression associated with induction of anesthesia, followed by respiratory causes (20%), and medication causes (20%). The incidence of mortality and neurological injury within the first 24h after the cardiac arrest was 0.92 and 1.38 per 10,000, respectively. The mortality in the first 3 months was 1.6 per 10,000. The main causes of death were ASA≥III, age under one year, pulmonary arterial hypertension, cardiac arrest in areas remote from the surgery area, a duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation over 20min, and when hypothermia was not applied after cardiac arrest. The main risk factors for cardiac arrest were ASA≥III, age under one year, emergency procedures, cardiology procedures and procedures performed in the catheterization laboratory. The main

  12. Prehospital administration of P2Y12 inhibitors and early coronary reperfusion in primary PCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Ratcovich, Hanna; Biasco, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    to prehospital loading with clopidogrel in a real-world ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) setting. Over a 70-month period, 3497 patients with on-going STEMI of less than 6 hours and without cardiac arrest or cardiogenic shock underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) at our centre...

  13. Therapeutic Hypothermia and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in a Child with Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Spurkeland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurologic outcomes following pediatric cardiac arrest are consistently poor. Early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to have positive effects on both survival to hospital discharge, and improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Additionally, the use of therapeutic hypothermia may improve survival in pediatric cardiac arrest patients admitted to the intensive care unit. We report a child with congenital hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, in whom the early initiation of effective prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and subsequent administration of therapeutic hypothermia contributed to a positive outcome with no gross neurologic sequelae. Continuing efforts should be made to promote and employ high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which likely contributed to the positive outcome of this case. Further research will be necessary to develop and solidify national guidelines for the implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in selected subpopulations of children with OHCA.

  14. Transfusion Associated Hyperkalemia and Cardiac Arrest in an Infant after Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Wan Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest associated with hyperkalemia during red blood cell transfusion is a rare but fatal complication. Herein, we report a case of transfusion-associated cardiac arrest following the initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in a 9-month old infant. Her serum potassium level was increased to 9.0 mEq/L, soon after the newly primed circuit with pre-stored red blood cell (RBC was started and followed by sudden cardiac arrest. Eventually, circulation was restored and the potassium level decreased to 5.1 mEq/L after 5 min. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO priming is a relatively massive transfusion into a pediatric patient. Thus, to prevent cardiac arrest during blood-primed ECMO in neonates and infants, freshly irradiated and washed RBCs should be used when priming the ECMO circuit, to minimize the potassium concentration. Also, physicians should be aware of all possible complications associated with transfusions during ECMO.

  15. GLP-1 analogues for neuroprotection after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Hassager, Christian; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig

    2016-01-01

    Background: Attenuating the neurological damage occurring after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is an ongoing research effort. This dual-centre study investigates the neuroprotective effects of the glucagon-like-peptide-1 analogue Exenatide administered within 4 hours from the return of spontaneous...... circulation to comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods/design: This pilot study will randomize a total of 120 unconscious patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest undergoing targeted temperature management in a blinded...... one-to-one fashion to a 6-hour and 15-minute infusion of either Exenatide or placebo. Patients are eligible for inclusion if resuscitated from cardiac arrest with randomization from 20 minutes to 240 minutes after return of spontaneous circulation. The co-primary endpoint is feasibility, defined...

  16. Influence of mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest on hospital mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Greetje; Brinkman, Sylvia; Bisschops, Laurens L. A.; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W.; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.; de Lange, Dylan W.; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; Pickkers, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Following two randomized controlled trials that demonstrated reduced mortality and better neurological outcome in cardiac arrest patients, mild therapeutic hypothermia was implemented in many intensive care units. Up to now, no large observational studies have confirmed the beneficial eff

  17. Bystander Efforts and 1-Year Outcomes in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristian Dahl Kragholm; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke N

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of bystander interventions on long-term functional outcomes among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has not been extensively studied. METHODS: We linked nationwide data on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Denmark to functional outcome data and reported the 1-year...... risks of anoxic brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause among patients who survived to day 30 after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We analyzed risks according to whether bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or defibrillation was performed and evaluated temporal...... changes in bystander interventions and outcomes. RESULTS: Among the 2855 patients who were 30-day survivors of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during the period from 2001 through 2012, a total of 10.5% had brain damage or were admitted to a nursing home and 9.7% died during the 1-year follow-up period...

  18. The Association Between Arterial Oxygen Tension and Neurological Outcome After Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas J; Dodampahala, Kalani; Rosselot, Babette; Perman, Sarah M; Mikkelsen, Mark E; Goyal, Munish; Gaieski, David F; Grossestreuer, Anne V

    2017-03-01

    A number of observational studies have evaluated the association between arterial oxygen tensions and outcome after cardiac arrest with variable results. The objective of this study is to determine the association between arterial oxygen tension and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. A retrospective cohort analysis was performed using the Penn Alliance for Therapeutic Hypothermia registry. Adult patients who experienced return of spontaneous circulation after in-hospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and had a partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) recorded within 48 hours were included. Our primary exposure of interest was PaO2. Hyperoxemia was defined as PaO2 > 300 mmHg, hypoxemia as PaO2 arterial oxygen tension measured within the first 48 hours after cardiac arrest and neurological outcome.

  19. Near-death experiences in cardiac arrest survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Christopher C

    2005-01-01

    Near-death experiences (NDEs) have become the focus of much interest in the last 30 years or so. Such experiences can occur both when individuals are objectively near to death and also when they simply believe themselves to be. The experience typically involves a number of different components including a feeling of peace and well-being, out-of-body experiences (OBEs), entering a region of darkness, seeing a brilliant light, and entering another realm. NDEs are known to have long-lasting transformational effects upon those who experience them. An overview is presented of the various theoretical approaches that have been adopted in attempts to account for the NDE. Spiritual theories assume that consciousness can become detached from the neural substrate of the brain and that the NDE may provide a glimpse of an afterlife. Psychological theories include the proposal that the NDE is a dissociative defense mechanism that occurs in times of extreme danger or, less plausibly, that the NDE reflects memories of being born. Finally, a wide range of organic theories of the NDE has been put forward including those based upon cerebral hypoxia, anoxia, and hypercarbia; endorphins and other neurotransmitters; and abnormal activity in the temporal lobes. Finally, the results of studies of NDEs in cardiac arrest survivors are reviewed and the implications of these results for our understanding of mind-brain relationships are discussed.

  20. Postoperative Cardiac Arrest after Heart Surgery: Does Extracorporeal Perfusion Support a Paradigm Change in Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Gologorsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Early institution of extracorporeal perfusion support (ECPS may improve survival after cardiac arrest. Two patients sustained unexpected cardiac arrest in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU following cardiac interventions. ECPS was initiated due to failure to restore hemodynamics after prolonged (over 60 minutes advanced cardiac life support (ACLS protocol-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Despite relatively late institution of ECPS, both patients survived with preserved neurological function. This communication focuses on the utility of ECPS in the ICU as a part of resuscitative efforts.

  1. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation of adults with in-hospital cardiac arrest using the Utstein style

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rose Mary Ferreira Lisboa; Silva, Bruna Adriene Gomes de Lima e; Silva, Fábio Junior Modesto e; Amaral, Carlos Faria Santos

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical profile of patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest using the Utstein style. Methods This study is an observational, prospective, longitudinal study of patients with cardiac arrest treated in intensive care units over a period of 1 year. Results The study included 89 patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers. The cohort was 51.6% male with a mean age 59.0 years. The episodes occurred during the daytime in 64.6% of cases. Asystole/bradyarrhythmia was the most frequent initial rhythm (42.7%). Most patients who exhibited a spontaneous return of circulation experienced recurrent cardiac arrest, especially within the first 24 hours (61.4%). The mean time elapsed between hospital admission and the occurrence of cardiac arrest was 10.3 days, the mean time between cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 0.68 min, the mean time between cardiac arrest and defibrillation was 7.1 min, and the mean duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 16.3 min. Associations between gender and the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (19.2 min in women versus 13.5 min in men, p = 0.02), the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the return of spontaneous circulation (10.8 min versus 30.7 min, p < 0.001) and heart disease and age (60.6 years versus 53.6, p < 0.001) were identified. The immediate survival rates after cardiac arrest, until hospital discharge and 6 months after discharge were 71%, 9% and 6%, respectively. Conclusions The main initial rhythm detected was asystole/bradyarrhythmia; the interval between cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was short, but defibrillation was delayed. Women received cardiopulmonary resuscitation for longer periods than men. The in-hospital survival rate was low. PMID:28099640

  2. Sudden cardiac arrest in a patient with epilepsy induced by chronic inflammation on the cerebral surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuxi Liu; Weicheng Hao; Xiaoming Yang; Yimin Wang; Yu Su

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyzed a patient with epilepsy due to chronic inflammation on the cerebral surface underwent sudden cardiac arrest. Paradoxical brain discharge, which occurred prior to epileptic seizures, induced a sudden cardiac arrest. However, when the focal brain pressure was relieved, cardiac arrest disappeared. A 27-year-old male patient underwent pre-surgical video-electroencephalogram monitoring for 160 hours. During monitoring, secondary tonic-clonic seizures occurred five times. A burst of paradoxical brain discharges occurred at 2-19 seconds (mean 8 seconds) prior to epileptic seizures. After 2-3 seconds, sudden cardiac arrest occurred and lasted for 12-22 seconds (average 16 seconds). The heart rate subsequently returned to a normal rate. Results revealed arachnoid pachymenia and adhesions, as well as mucus on the focal cerebral surface, combined with poor circulation and increased pressure. Intracranial electrodes were placed using surgical methods. Following removal of the arachnoid adhesions and mucus on the local cerebral surface, paradoxical brain discharge and epileptic seizures occurred three times, but sudden cardiac arrest was not recorded during 150-hour monitoring. Post-surgical histological examination indicated meningitis. Experimental findings suggested that paradoxical brain discharge led to cardiac arrest instead of epileptic seizures; the insult was associated with chronic inflammation on the cerebral surface, which subsequently led to hypertension and poor blood circulation in focal cerebral areas.

  3. Contemporary approach to neurologic prognostication of coma after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hamouda, Nawfel; Taccone, Fabio S; Rossetti, Andrea O; Oddo, Mauro

    2014-11-01

    Coma after cardiac arrest (CA) is an important cause of admission to the ICU. Prognosis of post-CA coma has significantly improved over the past decade, particularly because of aggressive postresuscitation care and the use of therapeutic targeted temperature management (TTM). TTM and sedatives used to maintain controlled cooling might delay neurologic reflexes and reduce the accuracy of clinical examination. In the early ICU phase, patients' good recovery may often be indistinguishable (based on neurologic examination alone) from patients who eventually will have a poor prognosis. Prognostication of post-CA coma, therefore, has evolved toward a multimodal approach that combines neurologic examination with EEG and evoked potentials. Blood biomarkers (eg, neuron-specific enolase [NSE] and soluble 100-β protein) are useful complements for coma prognostication; however, results vary among commercial laboratory assays, and applying one single cutoff level (eg, > 33 μg/L for NSE) for poor prognostication is not recommended. Neuroimaging, mainly diffusion MRI, is emerging as a promising tool for prognostication, but its precise role needs further study before it can be widely used. This multimodal approach might reduce false-positive rates of poor prognosis, thereby providing optimal prognostication of comatose CA survivors. The aim of this review is to summarize studies and the principal tools presently available for outcome prediction and to describe a practical approach to the multimodal prognostication of coma after CA, with a particular focus on neuromonitoring tools. We also propose an algorithm for the optimal use of such multimodal tools during the early ICU phase of post-CA coma.

  4. Sudden cardiac arrest in people with epilepsy in the community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, Robert J.; Blom, Marieke T.; Wassenaar, Merel; Bardai, Abdennasser; Leijten, Frans S.; de Haan, Gerrit-Jan; Sander, Josemir W.; Thijs, Roland D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain whether characteristics of ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (VT/VF) differed between people with epilepsy and those without and which individuals with epilepsy were at highest risk. Methods: We ascertained 18 people with active epilepsy identified in a community-based registry of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) with ECG-confirmed VT/VF (cases). We compared them with 470 individuals with VT/VF without epilepsy (VT/VF controls) and 54 individuals with epilepsy without VT/VF (epilepsy controls). Data on comorbidity, epilepsy severity, and medication use were collected and entered into (conditional) logistic regression models to identify determinants of VT/VF in epilepsy. Results: In most cases, there was an obvious (10/18) or presumed cardiovascular cause (5/18) in view of preexisting heart disease. In 2 of the 3 remaining events, near–sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) was established after successful resuscitation. Cases had a higher prevalence of congenital/inherited heart disease (17% vs 1%, p = 0.002), and experienced VT/VF at younger age (57 vs 64 years, p = 0.023) than VT/VF controls. VT/VF in cases occurred more frequently at/near home (89% vs 58%, p = 0.009), and was less frequently witnessed (72% vs 89%, p = 0.048) than in VT/VF controls. Cases more frequently had clinically relevant heart disease (50% vs 15%, p = 0.005) and intellectual disability (28% vs 1%, p epilepsy controls. Conclusion: Cardiovascular disease rather than epilepsy characteristics is the main determinant of VT/VF in people with epilepsy in the community. SCA and SUDEP are partially overlapping disease entities. PMID:26092917

  5. Optimizing Neurologically Intact Survival from Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Call to Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Goodloe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. national out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest survival rates, although improving recently, have remained suboptimal despite the collective efforts of individuals, communities, and professional societies. Only until very recently, and still with inconsistency, has focus been placed specifically on survival with pre-arrest neurologic function. The reality of current approaches to sudden cardiac arrest is that they are often lacking an integrative, multi-disciplinary approach, and without deserved funding and outcome analysis. In this manuscript, a multidisciplinary group of authors propose practice, process, technology, and policy initiatives to improve cardiac arrest survival with a focus on neurologic function. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  6. Sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of Brugada syndrome unmasked by thyroid storm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, Anna K M; Derde, Lennie; van Wijk, Jeroen; Tjan, David H

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old man suffered a sudden cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation and was successfully resuscitated. He had neither a medical nor family history of cardiac disease/sudden death, but was known to have Graves' disease, for which he was treated with radioactive iodine. Recently, block-a

  7. Sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of Brugada syndrome unmasked by thyroid storm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, Anna K M; Derde, Lennie; van Wijk, Jeroen; Tjan, David H

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old man suffered a sudden cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation and was successfully resuscitated. He had neither a medical nor family history of cardiac disease/sudden death, but was known to have Graves' disease, for which he was treated with radioactive iodine. Recently,

  8. Clinical experience and skills of physicians in hospital cardiac arrest teams in Denmark: a nationwide study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauridsen, Kasper G; Schmidt, Anders S; Caap, Philip; Aagaard, Rasmus; Løfgren, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Background The quality of in-hospital resuscitation is poor and may be affected by the clinical experience and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training. This study aimed to investigate the clinical experience, self-perceived skills, CPR training and knowledge of the guidelines on when to abandon resuscitation among physicians of cardiac arrest teams. Methods We performed a nationwide cross-sectional study in Denmark. Telephone interviews were conducted with physicians in the cardiac arrest teams in public somatic hospitals using a structured questionnaire. Results In total, 93 physicians (53% male) from 45 hospitals participated in the study. Median age was 34 (interquartile range: 30–39) years. Respondents were medical students working as locum physicians (5%), physicians in training (79%) and consultants (16%), and the median postgraduate clinical experience was 48 (19–87) months. Most respondents (92%) felt confident in treating a cardiac arrest, while fewer respondents felt confident in performing intubation (41%) and focused cardiac ultrasound (39%) during cardiac arrest. Median time since last CPR training was 4 (2–10) months, and 48% had attended a European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Advanced Life Support course. The majority (84%) felt confident in terminating resuscitation; however, only 9% were able to state the ERC guidelines on when to abandon resuscitation. Conclusion Physicians of Danish cardiac arrest teams are often inexperienced and do not feel competent performing important clinical skills during resuscitation. Less than half have attended an ERC Advanced Life Support course, and only very few physicians know the ERC guidelines on when to abandon resuscitation.

  9. A novel program focused on women survivors who were enrolled in a cardiac arrest pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Eyal; Tamis, Jacqueline; Aziz, Emad F; Shapiro, Janet M

    2013-03-01

    The number of cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is estimated to be 300,000/year in the United States. Two landmark studies published in 2002 demonstrated that therapeutic hypothermia decreased mortality and improved neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Our institutional pathway for the management of survivors of cardiac arrest stresses teamwork involving multiple disciplines, including cardiology, critical care, nursing, neurology, infectious diseases, physical therapy, social work, and pastoral care. Involvement of the patients' families is critical in the understanding of the process and in the decision making and goals of care when neurological prognosis is poor. In a unique approach, we have included the survivors in the process. Our approach to quality improvement includes a yearly conference incorporating the voices of survivors and families. This conference serves as a means to review our experience, educate clinicians, involve all healthcare providers in the outcome, and provide a model of communication and professionalism to trainees. During review of our experience, we noted the small number of women undergoing therapeutic hypothermia, accounting for only 21% of all patients undergoing this therapy after cardiac arrest. This led to a conference that focused on cardiac disease and cardiac arrest in women.

  10. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to sex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Crude survival has increased following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to study sex-related differences in patient characteristics and survival during a 10-year study period. METHODS: Patients≥12 years old with OHCA of a presumed cardiac cause, and in whom resuscitation...... was attempted, were identified through the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry 2001-2010. A total of 19,372 patients were included. RESULTS: One-third were female, with a median age of 75 years (IQR 65-83). Compared to females, males were five years younger; and less likely to have severe comorbidities, e...

  11. Recovery of brain function after cardiac arrest, case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekoui, A; Tresierra, del Carmen Escalante; Abdolmohammadi, S; Charbonneau, S; Blaise, G

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia during cardiac arrest is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in survival victims. To reduce cerebral damage, studies focus on finding effective treatments during the resuscitation period. Our report focuses on a 36-year-old police officer who had had two cardiac arrests (one at home and one at the hospital). After acute treatment, his cardiac and brain functions recovered impressively. Neuropsychological results were normal except for mild anomia. He also reported some retrograde memory loss. Surprisingly, he also reported an improvement in a very specific capacity, his episodic memory. We here review the possible causes and mechanisms that may have affected his memory abilities.

  12. The Right Ventricle Is Dilated During Resuscitation From Cardiac Arrest Caused by Hypovolemia: A Porcine Ultrasound Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Rasmus; Granfeldt, Asger; Bøtker, Morten T; Mygind-Klausen, Troels; Kirkegaard, Hans; Løfgren, Bo

    2017-09-01

    Dilation of the right ventricle during cardiac arrest and resuscitation may be inherent to cardiac arrest rather than being associated with certain causes of arrest such as pulmonary embolism. This study aimed to compare right ventricle diameter during resuscitation from cardiac arrest caused by hypovolemia, hyperkalemia, or primary arrhythmia (i.e., ventricular fibrillation). Thirty pigs were anesthetized and then randomized to cardiac arrest induced by three diffrent methods. Seven minutes of untreated arrest was followed by resuscitation. Cardiac ultrasonographic images were obtained during induction of cardiac arrest, untreated cardiac arrest, and resuscitation. The right ventricle diameter was measured. Primary endpoint was the right ventricular diameter at the third rhythm analysis. University hospital animal laboratory. Female crossbred Landrace/Yorkshire/Duroc pigs (27-32 kg). Pigs were randomly assigned to cardiac arrest caused by either hypovolemia, hyperkalemia, or primary arrhythmia. At the third rhythm analysis during resuscitation, the right ventricle diameter was 32 mm (95% CI, 29-35) in the hypovolemia group, 29 mm (95% CI, 26-32) in the hyperkalemia group, and 25 mm (95% CI, 22-28) in the primary arrhythmia group. This was larger than baseline for all groups (p = 0.03). When comparing groups at the third rhythm analysis, the right ventricle was larger for hypovolemia than for primary arrhythmia (p right ventricle was dilated during resuscitation from cardiac arrest caused by hypovolemia, hyperkalemia, and primary arrhythmia. These findings indicate that right ventricle dilation may be inherent to cardiac arrest, rather than being associated with certain causes of arrest. This contradicts a widespread clinical assumption that in hypovolemic cardiac arrest, the ventricles are collapsed rather than dilated.

  13. Temporal Trends in Coverage of Historical Cardiac Arrests Using a Volunteer-Based Network of Automated External Defibrillators Accessible to Laypersons and Emergency Dispatch Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carolina Malta; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Wissenberg, Mads

    2014-01-01

    public cardiac arrest coverage in high- and low-risk areas. METHODS AND RESULTS: All public cardiac arrests (1994-2011) and all registered AEDs (2007-2011) in Copenhagen, Denmark, were identified and geocoded. AED coverage of cardiac arrests was defined as historical arrests ≤100 m from an AED. High...

  14. Electronic registration of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Dahl, Michael; Gade, John;

    2007-01-01

    is uncertain. As the first region in the country, North Denmark Region has introduced a prehospital electronic healthcare record (designated amPHI™) in all of its 50 emergency ambulances. We used data from amPHI™ to examine the incidence of OHCA in the region.   Methods: We extracted patient data from the am...... %) had ventricular fibrillation, 32 (10 %) had other arrhythmias, 21 (7 %) had sinus rhythm and a single patient (0.3 %) had ventricular tachycardia.   Conclusions: We have shown amPHI™ to be a valuable tool for accessing information about OHCA. By a stringent electronic registration we found...

  15. Electronic registration of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Dahl, Michael; Gade, John

    2007-01-01

    is uncertain. As the first region in the country, North Denmark Region has introduced a prehospital electronic healthcare record (designated amPHI™) in all of its 50 emergency ambulances. We used data from amPHI™ to examine the incidence of OHCA in the region.   Methods: We extracted patient data from the am...... %) had ventricular fibrillation, 32 (10 %) had other arrhythmias, 21 (7 %) had sinus rhythm and a single patient (0.3 %) had ventricular tachycardia.   Conclusions: We have shown amPHI™ to be a valuable tool for accessing information about OHCA. By a stringent electronic registration we found...

  16. Outcomes of Cardiac Arrest in Residential Care Homes for the Elderly in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kit Ling; Leung, Ling Pong

    2017-05-03

    Studies done in the 1990's suggested nursing home residents with cardiac arrest had minimal chance of survival and resuscitation was not recommended. More recent studies showed opposing results. In Hong Kong, the proportion of elderly living in the residential care homes for the elderly is increasing. There is no study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest outcomes in this population. This study aimed at evaluating the prognosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest occurring in the residential care homes for the elderly. It is hoped that the findings may inform the local emergency medical service concerning the issue of futility of resuscitating the residents with cardiac arrest in the residential care homes. This study was a retrospective analysis of a database of all patients aged 65 years or above with atraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and who were attended by the emergency medical service in a 12-month period. Data in the database were prospectively collected by the emergency medical service. The characteristics of patients and cardiac arrests, timeliness of the emergency medical service, and survival were analyzed. Comparison was made between elderly living in and not living in the residential care homes. Predictors of survival were evaluated with logistic regression. 3919 patients aged ≥ 65 years were analyzed. There were 1506 cases of cardiac arrest occurring in the residential care homes for the elderly. Resuscitation was discontinued at the emergency department in over 70% of these cases. The survival to hospital admission rate and the 30-day survival rate were 9.6% and 0.3% respectively. Both were lower than patients not residing in the residential care homes. Younger age, witnessed arrest, bystander defibrillation, and shorter call to ED interval were associated with higher chance of surviving to hospital admission. Elderly suffering from cardiac arrest in residential care homes had a poor chance of survival. Except age, witnessed arrest, bystander

  17. Acute right ventricular myocardial injury and sudden cardiac arrest in a patient with persistent spontaneous coronary vasospasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hung Ming-Yow; Li Ju-Chi; Hao Wen-Rui; Wu Cheng-Hsueh; Hung Ming-Jui

    2011-01-01

    Coronary vasospasm is a rare diagnosis resulting in sudden arrhythmic cardiac arrest. We report a case of a healthy,non-smoking elderly woman resuscitated from arrhythmic cardiac arrest. She had persistent spontaneous coronaxy vasospasm, leading to right ventricular myocardial injury and failure, and shock. She responded quickly to intravenous normal saline bolus infusion, but had irreversible neurological sequelae. Additionally, she had atrial fibrillation preceding ischemic ventricular fibrillation, a rare finding in coronary vasospasm-related cardiac arrest. We suggest immediate coronary angiography of patients in sudden arrhythmic cardiac arrest with acute right ventricular failure for a prompt,accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of the coronary vasospasm.

  18. [Chronobiology of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Galicia with semi-automatic external defibrillators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Araujo, L; Costa-Parcero, M; López-Campos, M; Sánchez-Santos, L; Iglesias-Vázquez, J A; Rodríguez-Núñez, A

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the chronobiological variations of out-hospital cardiac arrest in which an automated external defibrillator was used in Galicia. Descriptive retrospective study of the cardiac arrest attended by the Emergency Medical Service in which an automated external defibrillator was in use during a period of 5 years (2007-2011). An Utstein style database was used. The sex, age, date and hour of the event, location, cardiac arrest attended, beginning of resuscitation by the professional, first monitored rhythm, emergency team activation time and care, endotracheal intubation, and recovery of spontaneous circulation were studied as independent variables. A total of 2,005 cases (0.14/1,000 population-year) was recorded. Time slot with more frequency of cardiac arrest: between 09-11 hrs (18.4%). Months with more cases: January (10.4%) and December (9.8%). It was significantly more probable that the cardiac arrest occurred in the home between 00-08 hrs, and in the street between 08-16 hrs. Asystole was more frequent in the night period (00-08 hrs), whereas the shockable rhythm was in the evening (16-00 hrs). There is more probability of death after cardiac arrest between 00-08 hrs, with recovery of spontaneous circulation being more probable between 16-00 hrs. The time between the emergency team activation and time care was longer in night schedule. In Galicia, cardiac arrest is more frequent in the winter months and in morning schedule. There is a circadian distribution of the cardiac arrest and the rhythm detected at the time of the first assistance, with asystole being more common in night schedule and the shockable rhythm in the evening. The chronobiology of the cardiac arrest should be taken into account in order to organize the distribution and the schedule of the healthcare resources. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Intraoperative cardiac arrest during anesthesia:a retrospective study of 218 274 anesthetics undergoing non-cardiac surgery in a US teaching hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Jian-xiong; Li-Ming Zhang; Erin A.Sullivan; GUO Qu-lian; John P.Williams

    2011-01-01

    Background Patient safety has been gained much more attention in recent years.The authors reviewed patients who had cardiac arrest in the operating rooms undergoing noncardiac surgery between January 1989 and December 2001 at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center,USA.The main objectives of the study were to determine the incidence of intraoperative cardiac arrest,to identify possible causes of cardiac arrest and to explore amenable modifications.Methods With approval by the University of Pittsburgh Institutional Review Board,patients experienced cardiac arrest during surgery were retrieved from medical records,surgical operation and anesthesia records and pathological reports by searching the Medical Archival Retrieval System (MARS),a hospital electronic searching system.Cases of cardiac arrest were collected over a period of thirteen years from the Pre byteria University Hospital (PUH),USA.Results We found 23 cases of intraoperative cardiac arrests occurred in 218 274 anesthesia cases (1.1 per 10 000).Fourteen patients (60.8%) died in the operating room,leading to a mortality rate from all causes of 0.64 per 10 000 anesthetics.Immediate overall survival rate after arrest was 39% (9/23).Half of the patients (12/23) were emergency cases with 41% survival rate (5/12).One fourth of the arrests were trauma patients (6/23).Most arrest patients (87%,20/23) were American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status (ASA PS) Ⅳ and Ⅴ,while only three patients were ASA PS-Ⅰ,Ⅱ and Ⅲ,respectively.One case was attributable to an anesthesia-related cardiac arrest and recovered after successful resuscitation.Conclusions Most intraoperative cardiac arrests were not due to anesthesia-related causes.Anesthesia-related cardiac arrests might have a higher survival rate when compared to other possible causes of cardiac arrest in the operating room.

  20. Main Complications of Mild Induced Hypothermia after Cardiac Arrest: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Soleimanpour

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to assess the complications of mild induced hypothermia (MIH in patients with cardiac arrest. Presently, based on the guidelines of the American heart Association, MIH following successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in unconscious adult patients due to ventricular fibrillation (VF with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA is essential and required. However, MIH could be associated with complications in Patients with cardiac arrest. Studies conducted on the precautions and care following cardiac arrest and MIH were included. Valid scientific data bases were used for data collection. The obtained results from different studies revealed that mild MIH could be associated with numerous complications and the knowledge and awareness of the medical staff from the complications is required to guarantee successful therapeutic approaches in MIH following cardiac arrest which is a novel medical facility with different styles and complications. Overall, further future studies are required to improve the quality of MIH, to increase survival and to decrease complications rates.

  1. Exercise related cardiac arrest in amateur athletes on the tennis court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratil, Peter; Sterz, Fritz; Haugk, Moritz; Wallmüller, Christian; Schober, Andreas; Hörburger, David; Weiser, Christoph; Stöckl, Matthias; Testori, Christoph; Krizanac, Danica; Havel, Christof

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to study exercise-related cardiac arrests on the tennis court and investigate the impact of early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation on survival rate and outcome. This study was based on the cardiac arrest registry of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the General Hospital Vienna in Austria. Between February 1993 and April 2010 non-professional athletes were identified, who experienced exercise-related cardiac arrest on the tennis court. The analysis was accomplished using descriptive statistics. Results are presented as mean±standard-deviation or median and interquartile range (IQR). The subjects (n=27) were predominantly male (96%) with a median age of 58 years; 52% of all patients had underlying cardiovascular risk factors. All cardiac arrests were witnessed. Bystander CPR was documented in 17 cases (63%). Median time from collapse to initiation of CPR was 1(IQR 0-2) minute. Ventricular fibrillation was the initial rhythm in 25 patients (93%) and in 3 an automated external defibrillator was used by bystanders. Twenty-four patients (89%) had return of spontaneous circulation before admission to the hospital and four (15%) followed verbal commands thereafter. The survival rate at 6 months was 82% with 20 patients (74%) having favourable neurologic outcome. Cardiac arrest on the tennis court is a predominantly witnessed event with a respectively high rate of bystander CPR, which reflects in a high successful survival rate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Predictors of survival and favorable functional outcomes after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in patients systematically brought to a dedicated heart attack center (from the Harefield Cardiac Arrest Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, M Bilal; Al-Hussaini, Abtehale; Rosser, Gareth; Salehi, Saleem; Phylactou, Maria; Rajakulasingham, Ramyah; Patel, Jayna; Elliott, Katharine; Mohan, Poornima; Green, Rebecca; Whitbread, Mark; Smith, Robert; Ilsley, Charles

    2015-03-15

    Despite advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), survival remains low after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA). Acute coronary ischemia is the predominating precipitant, and prompt delivery of patients to dedicated facilities may improve outcomes. Since 2011, all patients experiencing OOHCA in London, where a cardiac etiology is suspected, are systematically brought to heart attack centers (HACs). We determined the predictors for survival and favorable functional outcomes in this setting. We analyzed 174 consecutive patients experiencing OOHCA from 2011 to 2013 brought to Harefield Hospital-a designated HAC in London. We analyzed (1) all-cause mortality and (2) functional status using a modified Rankin scale (mRS 0 to 6, where mRS0-3(+) = favorable functional status). The overall survival rates were 66.7% (30 days) and 62.1% (1 year); and 54.5% had mRS0-3(+) at discharge. Patients with mRS0-3(+) had reduced mortality compared to mRS0-3(-): 30 days (1.2% vs 72.2%, p <0.001) and 1 year (5.3% vs 77.2%, p <0.001). Multivariate analyses identified lower patient comorbidity, absence of cardiogenic shock, bystander CPR, ventricular tachycardia/ventricullar fibrillation as initial rhythm, shorter duration of resuscitation, prehospital advanced airway, absence of adrenaline and inotrope use, and intra-aortic balloon pump use as predictors of mRS0-3(+). Consistent predictors of increased mortality were the presence of cardiogenic shock, advanced airway use, increased duration of resuscitation, and absence of therapeutic hypothermia. A streamlined delivery of patients experiencing OOHCA to dedicated facilities is associated with improved functional status and survival. Our study supports the standardization of care for such patients with the widespread adoption of HACs.

  3. Physician presence in an ambulance car is associated with increased survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective cohort analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihito Hagihara

    Full Text Available The presence of a physician seems to be beneficial for pre-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, the effectiveness of a physician's presence during CPR before hospital arrival has not been established. We conducted a prospective, non-randomized, observational study using national data from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests between 2005 and 2010 in Japan. We performed a propensity analysis and examined the association between a physician's presence during an ambulance car ride and short- and long-term survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Specifically, a full non-parsimonious logistic regression model was fitted with the physician presence in the ambulance as the dependent variable; the independent variables included all study variables except for endpoint variables plus dummy variables for the 47 prefectures in Japan (i.e., 46 variables. In total, 619,928 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases that met the inclusion criteria were analyzed. Among propensity-matched patients, a positive association was observed between a physician's presence during an ambulance car ride and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC before hospital arrival, 1-month survival, and 1-month survival with minimal neurological or physical impairment (ROSC: OR = 1.84, 95% CI 1.63-2.07, p = 0.00 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates; 1-month survival: OR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.61, p = 0.02 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates; cerebral performance category (1 or 2: OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.03-2.29, p = 0.04 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates; and overall performance category (1 or 2: OR = 1.50, 95% CI 1.01-2.24, p = 0.05 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates. A prospective observational study using national data from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests shows that a physician's presence during an ambulance car ride was independently associated with

  4. Ventricular fibrillation-induced cardiac arrest in the rat as a model of global cerebral ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Dave, Kunjan R.; DELLA-MORTE, DAVID; Saul, Isabel; Prado, Ricardo; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest remains one of the leading causes of death and disability in Western countries. Although ventricular fibrillation (VF) models in rodents mimic the “square wave” type of insult (rapid loss of pulse and pressure) commonly observed in adult humans at the onset of cardiac arrest (CA), they are not popular because of the complicated animal procedure, poor animal survival and thermal injury. Here we present a modified, simple, reliable, ventricular fibrillation-induced rat mo...

  5. Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation for Cardiac Arrest from Trauma (EPR CAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-07-1-0682 TITLE: Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation for Cardiac Arrest from Trauma (EPR-CAT) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Arrest 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER From Trauma 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0682 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Patrick...for the trauma surgeons involved in the project has been completed. The Shock Trauma Center of the University of Maryland Medical Center is now open

  6. Infectious complications after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest - a comparison between two target temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dankiewicz, Josef; Nielsen, Niklas; Linder, Adam;

    2017-01-01

    temperature groups (sub-distribution hazard ratio [SHR] 0.88; 95%CI 0.75-1.03; p=0.12). PCT and CRP were significantly higher for patients with infections at all times (pshock after OHCA might......BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that target temperature management (TTM) increases the probability of infectious complications after cardiac arrest. We aimed to compare the incidence of pneumonia, severe sepsis and septic shock after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in patients with two...... complications were recorded daily during the ICU-stay. Pneumonia, severe sepsis and septic shock were considered infectious complications. Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive-protein (CRP) levels were measured at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h after cardiac arrest. RESULTS: There were 939 patients in the modified intention...

  7. Cardiac Arrest Secondary to Lightning Strike: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotariu, Elena L; Manole, Mioara D

    2017-08-01

    Lightning strike injuries, although less common than electrical injuries, have a higher morbidity rate because of critical alterations of the circulatory system, respiratory system, and central nervous system. Most lightning-related deaths occur immediately after injury because of arrhythmia or respiratory failure. We describe the case of a pediatric patient who experienced cardiorespiratory arrest secondary to a lightning strike, where the Advanced Cardiac Life Support and Basic Life Support chain of survival was well executed, leading to return of spontaneous circulation and intact neurological survival. We review the pathophysiology of lightning injuries, prognostic factors of favorable outcome after cardiac arrest, including bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, shockable rhythm, and automatic external defibrillator use, and the importance of temperature management after cardiac arrest.

  8. Sudden Cardiac Arrest due to Brugada Syndrome: a Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Soleimanirad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Brugada Syndrome is a rare cause of sudden cardiac arrest and has a unique ECG pattern. In fact, with ST-segment elevation down sloping in the right precordial leads (v1-v3, RBBB pattern in lateral leads and J-point elevation is revealed. We must notice and avoid trigger factors of this syndrome during general anesthesia. Patient is a 39 old man who attended to emergency department with sudden cardiac arrest and resuscitate. He was transferred to ICU for management of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Complementary studies concluded the diagnosis of Brugada syndrome. We must consider Brugada syndrome within patients with family history of sudden cardiac arrest. Moreover, we must avoid trigger factors of this syndrome such as fever, bradicardia and electrolyte abnormality (specialy Na, Ca abnormalities during general anesthesia and if they appear, we should treat them.

  9. Evaluation of intensified prehospital treatment in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, F; Nielsen, J R; Gram, L

    1991-01-01

    by personnel on basic, intermediate, or advanced care training. When ordinary ambulances (basic EMS) were used, 8 (5%) patients were discharged alive. When ambulances with specially trained paramedics (intermediate EMS) were used, 2 (1%) patients were discharged. Finally medically staffed ambulances...... with doctors collaborating (advanced EMS) were used, and 11 (13%) patients were discharged. The intermediate EMS system was used in another area with 45,000 inhabitants/population density of 340/km2, and in this area 20 (18%) patients were discharged. Among the survivors a psychological assessment in form...

  10. Prehospital behaviour of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome or witnessed cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Michael Mundt; Dixen, Ulrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian;

    2003-01-01

    were studied: contact the emergency medical service (centre); contact the general practitioner from the emergency service or the general practitioner during working hours; self-transportation to the emergency department; or as the first action to call the emergency medical service. RESULTS: Forty...... hundred and thirteen patients (45%) knew of thrombolytic therapy. Twenty-seven of 75 patients with knowledge of the benefit of prompt treatment with thrombolysis, acted in accordance with this awareness. CONCLUSION: Patients misinterpret symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and are misguided when calling...

  11. Impedance Threshold Device Combined With High-Quality Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Improves Survival With Favorable Neurological Function After Witnessed Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Atsushi; Duval, Sue; Nakamura, Yuji; Yoshihara, Katsunori; Yannopoulos, Demetris

    2016-09-23

    The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been recently shown to affect clinical outcome. The Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) Prehospital Resuscitation Impedance Valve and Early Versus Delayed Analysis (PRIMED) trial showed no differences in outcomes with an active vs. sham impedance threshold device (ITD), a CPR adjunct that enhances circulation. It was hypothesized the active ITD would improve survival with favorable neurological outcomes in witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients when used with high-quality CPR. Using the publicly accessible ROC PRIMED database, a post-hoc analysis was performed on all witnessed subjects with both compression rate and depth data (n=1,808) who received CPR within the study protocol definition of adequate CPR quality (compression rate 80-120/min and depth 4-6 cm; n=929). Demographics were similar between sham and active ITD groups. In witnessed subjects who received quality CPR, survival with favorable neurological function was 11.9% for the active ITD subjects (56/470) vs. 7.4% for the sham (34/459) (odds ratio 1.69 [95% confidence interval 1.08, 2.64]). There were no statistically significant differences for this primary outcome when CPR was performed outside the boundaries of the definition of adequate CPR quality. Multivariable models did not change these associations. An active ITD combined with adequate-quality conventional CPR has the potential to significantly improve survival after witnessed cardiac arrest. (Circ J 2016; 80: 2124-2132).

  12. Ventricular ectopic burden in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated with targeted temperature management at 33°C and 36°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Graff, Claus; Pehrson, Steen; Erlinge, David; Wanscher, Michael; Køber, Lars; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Søholm, Helle; Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Hassager, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Life threatening arrhythmias are increasingly frequent with lower body temperature. While targeted temperature management (TTM) with mild hypothermia following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is generally considered safe and has been suggested as a potential antiarrhythmic add-on therapy, it is unknown whether the level of TTM affects the burden of ventricular ectopic activity. We sought to assess the ventricular ectopic burden between patients treated with TTM at 33°C or 36°C for 24h. Continuous 12-lead digital Holter electrocardiograms performed during the intervention were analyzed blinded to treatment allocation in 115 comatose OHCA-survivors from a single center of the TTM-trial. The main study showed no difference with regards to mortality. Fifty-eight patients were randomized to 33°C and 57 to 36°C. Cardiac arrest characteristics were similar between the groups. The number of isolated ventricular ectopic beats (VEB) per hour was similar at the beginning of the maintenance phase of TTM and decreased over time in both groups (both ptimeectopic activity in the 36°C-group (pinteractionectopic activity (pectopic activity was reduced in comatose OHCA-survivors treated with TTM at 36°C compared to 33°C. Higher numbers of pre-hospital defibrillations were associated with higher incidence of ventricular ectopic activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Temporal variation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in an equatorial climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus EH Ong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Marcus EH Ong1, Faith SP Ng2, Susan Yap1, Kok Leong Yong1, Mary A Peberdy3, Joseph P Ornato41Department of Emergency Medicine, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore; 2Clinical Trials and Epidemiology Research Unit (now known as Singapore Clinical Research Institute, Singapore; 3Division of Cardiology, Virginia Commonwealth University – Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA, USA; 4Department of Emergency Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University – Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA, USAObjective: We aimed to determine whether there is a seasonal variation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA in an equatorial climate, which does not experience seasonal environmental change.Methods: We conducted an observational prospective study looking at the occurrence of OHCA in Singapore. Included were all patients with OHCA presented to Emergency Departments across the country. We examined the monthly, daily, and hourly number of cases over a threeyear period. Data was analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA.Results: From October, 1st 2001 to October, 14th 2004, 2428 patients were enrolled in the study. Mean age for cardiac arrests was 60.6 years with 68.0% male. Ethnic distribution was 69.5% Chinese, 15.0% Malay, 11.0% Indian, and 4.4% Others. There was no significant seasonal variation (spring/summer/fall/winter of events (ANOVA P = 0.71, monthly variation (P = 0.88 or yearly variation (P = 0.26. We did find weekly peaks on Mondays and a circadian pattern with daily peaks from 9–10 am.Conclusions: We did not find any discernable seasonal pattern of cardiac arrests. This contrasts with findings from temperate countries and suggests a climatic influence on cardiac arrest occurrence. We also found that sudden cardiac arrests follow a circadian pattern.Keywords: cardiopulmonary resuscitation, cardiac arrest, seasonal pattern, circadian pattern

  14. Surviving Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Pilot Qualitative Survey Study of Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Kelly N; Brown, Frances; Christensen, Roxanne; Damino, Colleen; Newman, Mary M; Kurz, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    Research describing survivors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) has centered on quantifying functional ability, perceived quality of life, and neurocognitive assessment. Many gaps remain, however, regarding survivors' psychosocial perceptions of life in the aftermath of cardiac arrest. An important influence upon those perceptions is the presence of support and its role in a survivor's life. An Internet-based pilot survey study was conducted to gather data from SCA survivors and friends and/or family members (FFMs) representing their support system. The survey was distributed to members of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation (SCAF) via the Internet by SCAF leadership. Questions included both discrete multiple-choice and open-ended formats. Inductive thematic analyses were completed by three independent researchers trained in qualitative research methodology to identify primary themes consistent among study participants until thematic saturation was achieved. No statistical inferences were made. A total of 205 surveys were returned over the 5-month study period (July to November 2013); nine were received blank, leaving 196 surveys available for review. Major themes identified for survivors (N = 157) include the significance of and desire to share experiences with others; subculture identification (unique experience from those suffering a heart attack); and the need to seek a new normal, both personally and inter-personally. Major themes identified for FFMs (N = 39) include recognition of loved one's memory loss; a lack of information at discharge, including expectations after discharge; and concern for the patient experiencing another cardiac arrest. This pilot, qualitative survey study suggests several common themes important to survivors, and FFMs, of cardiac arrest. These themes may serve as a basis for future patient-centered focus groups and the development of patient-centered guidelines for patients and support persons of those surviving cardiac arrest.

  15. Time series analysis as input for clinical predictive modeling: Modeling cardiac arrest in a pediatric ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Curtis E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thousands of children experience cardiac arrest events every year in pediatric intensive care units. Most of these children die. Cardiac arrest prediction tools are used as part of medical emergency team evaluations to identify patients in standard hospital beds that are at high risk for cardiac arrest. There are no models to predict cardiac arrest in pediatric intensive care units though, where the risk of an arrest is 10 times higher than for standard hospital beds. Current tools are based on a multivariable approach that does not characterize deterioration, which often precedes cardiac arrests. Characterizing deterioration requires a time series approach. The purpose of this study is to propose a method that will allow for time series data to be used in clinical prediction models. Successful implementation of these methods has the potential to bring arrest prediction to the pediatric intensive care environment, possibly allowing for interventions that can save lives and prevent disabilities. Methods We reviewed prediction models from nonclinical domains that employ time series data, and identified the steps that are necessary for building predictive models using time series clinical data. We illustrate the method by applying it to the specific case of building a predictive model for cardiac arrest in a pediatric intensive care unit. Results Time course analysis studies from genomic analysis provided a modeling template that was compatible with the steps required to develop a model from clinical time series data. The steps include: 1 selecting candidate variables; 2 specifying measurement parameters; 3 defining data format; 4 defining time window duration and resolution; 5 calculating latent variables for candidate variables not directly measured; 6 calculating time series features as latent variables; 7 creating data subsets to measure model performance effects attributable to various classes of candidate variables; 8

  16. Systematic review of quality of life and other patient-centred outcomes after cardiac arrest survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Vanessa J; Rodgers, David L; Brett, Stephen J

    2011-03-01

    In cardiac arrest patients (in hospital and pre hospital) does resuscitation produce a good Quality of Life (QoL) for survivors after discharge from the hospital? Embase, Medline, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Academic Search Premier, the Central Database of Controlled Trials and the American Heart Association (AHA) Resuscitation Endnote Library were searched using the terms ('Cardiac Arrest' (Mesh) OR 'Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation' (Mesh) OR 'Heart Arrest' (Mesh)) AND ('Outcomes' OR 'Quality of Life' OR 'Depression' OR 'Post-traumatic Stress Disorder' OR 'Anxiety OR 'Cognitive Function' OR 'Participation' OR 'Social Function' OR 'Health Utilities Index' OR 'SF-36' OR 'EQ-5D' as text term. There were 9 inception (prospective) cohort studies (LOE P1), 3 follow up of untreated control groups in randomised control trials (LOE P2), 11 retrospective cohort studies (LOE P3) and 47 case series (LOE P4). 46 of the studies were supportive with respect to the search question, 17 neutral and 7 negative. The majority of studies concluded that QoL after cardiac arrest is good. This review demonstrated a remarkable heterogeneity of methodology amongst studies assessing QoL in cardiac arrest survivors. There is a requirement for consensus development with regard to quality of life and patient centred outcome assessment in this population. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiac arrest in intensive care unit: Case report and future recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Initiation of hemofiltration in a patient in septic shock can cause hemodynamic compromise potentially leading to cardiac arrest. We propose that the standard ′4Hs and 4Ts′ approach to the differential diagnosis of a cardiac arrest should be supplemented in critically ill patients with anaphylaxis and human and technical errors involving drug administration (the 5 th H and T. To illustrate the point, we report a case where norepinephrine infused through a central venous catheter (CVC was being removed by the central venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH catheter causing the hemodynamic instability. CVVH has this potential of interfering with the systemic availability of drugs infused via a closely located CVC.

  18. Death and Cardiac Arrest in U.S. Triathlon Participants, 1985 to 2016: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kevin M; Creswell, Lawrence L; Haas, Tammy S; Thomas, Taylor; Tung, Monica; Isaacson, Erin; Garberich, Ross F; Maron, Barry J

    2017-09-19

    Reports of race-related triathlon fatalities have raised questions regarding athlete safety. To describe death and cardiac arrest among triathlon participants. Case series. United States. Participants in U.S. triathlon races from 1985 to 2016. Data on deaths and cardiac arrests were assembled from such sources as the U.S. National Registry of Sudden Death in Athletes (which uses news media, Internet searches, LexisNexis archival databases, and news clipping services) and USA Triathlon (USAT) records. Incidence of death or cardiac arrest in USAT-sanctioned races from 2006 to 2016 was calculated. A total of 135 sudden deaths, resuscitated cardiac arrests, and trauma-related deaths were compiled; mean age of victims was 46.7 ± 12.4 years, and 85% were male. Most sudden deaths and cardiac arrests occurred in the swim segment (n = 90); the others occurred during bicycling (n = 7), running (n = 15), and postrace recovery (n = 8). Fifteen trauma-related deaths occurred during the bike segment. Incidence of death or cardiac arrest among USAT participants (n = 4 776 443) was 1.74 per 100 000 (2.40 in men and 0.74 in women per 100 000; P < 0.001). In men, risk increased substantially with age and was much greater for those aged 60 years and older (18.6 per 100 000 participants). Death or cardiac arrest risk was similar for short, intermediate, and long races (1.61 vs. 1.41 vs. 1.92 per 100 000 participants). At autopsy, 27 of 61 decedents (44%) had clinically relevant cardiovascular abnormalities, most frequently atherosclerotic coronary disease or cardiomyopathy. Case identification may be incomplete and may underestimate events, particularly in the early study period. In addition, prerace medical history is unknown in most cases. Deaths and cardiac arrests during the triathlon are not rare; most have occurred in middle-aged and older men. Most sudden deaths in triathletes happened during the swim segment, and clinically silent cardiovascular disease was

  19. Pharmacotherapy and hospital admissions before out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2010-01-01

    For out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) to be predicted and prevented, it is imperative the healthcare system has access to those vulnerable before the event occurs. We aimed to determine the extent of contact to the healthcare system before OHCA.......For out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) to be predicted and prevented, it is imperative the healthcare system has access to those vulnerable before the event occurs. We aimed to determine the extent of contact to the healthcare system before OHCA....

  20. Unanticipated cardiac arrest under spinal anesthesia: An unavoidable mystery with review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Anita; Gupta, Ruchi; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Singh, Amrinder

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest during anesthesia and perioperative period is a matter of grave concern for any anesthesiologist. But such mishaps have been reported for one reason or the other in the literary sciences. We are reporting the occurrence of unanticipated delayed cardiac arrest following spinal anesthesia in two young and healthy patients. Fortunately, these patients were successfully resuscitated with timely and appropriate cardiopulmonary resuscitative measures. Occurrence of such cases needs timely reporting and exploring all the possible causes of these unusual and possibly avoidable events. The present case reports are an important addition to a series of recently published mishaps that occurred during spinal anesthesia in young and healthy patients.

  1. Endothelial activation/injury and associations with severity of post-cardiac arrest syndrome and mortality after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Johansson, Pär I; Hassager, Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS) is characterized by whole-body ischemia triggering systemic inflammation and damage of the endothelium. This study investigated the relationship between systemic inflammation, endothelial damage and severity of PCAS and the association between endot...... compared to 33°C after OHCA was associated with lower endothelial activation, but not endothelial damage. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01020916. Unique identifier: NCT01020916....

  2. Location of cardiac arrest in a city center: strategic placement of automated external defibrillators in public locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy; Nielsen, Søren Loumann

    2009-01-01

    . Areas with major train stations (1.8 arrests every 5 years per area), large public squares, and pedestrianized areas (0.6 arrests every 5 years per area) were main predictors of frequent cardiac arrests. CONCLUSIONS: To achieve wide AED coverage, AEDs need to be more widely distributed than recommended...

  3. POST-OPERATIVE VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA LEADING TO CARDIAC ARREST IN AN ASAG- I PATIENT OF CHOLECYSTECTOMY: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We here present our experience with ventricular tachycardia (VT leading to cardiac arrest in a patient with American Society of Anesthesiologists grade-I (ASA-I 11 hours after cholecystectomy. Excessive fluid overload and hypoxemia due to lung congestion may lead to cardiac arrest in this case. Immediate diagnosis and appropriate intervention saved the life of the patient.

  4. Automated external defibrillators inaccessible to more than half of nearby cardiac arrests in public locations during evening, nighttime, and weekends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carolina Malta; Wissenberg, Mads; Weeke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    . Of 552 registered AEDs, 9.1% (n=50) were accessible at all hours, and 96.4% (n=532) were accessible during the daytime on all weekdays. Regardless of AED accessibility, 28.8% (537 of 1864) of all cardiac arrests were covered by an AED. Limited AED accessibility decreased coverage of cardiac arrests by 4...

  5. Efficacy analysis of intravenous thrombolysis after cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patients with acute myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓丽

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of intravenous thrombolysis in the treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction(AMI)and cardiac arrest after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.Methods 120 patients with AMI and cardiac arrest admitted in our hospital from Mar2009 to Mar 2013 were divided into thrombolytic group(n=50)and control group(n=70)according to the

  6. Cardiac arrest during treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia with intravenous pentamidine isethionate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, U; Berild, D; Nielsen, T L

    1992-01-01

    A 27-year-old man, HIV-positive for 4 years, developed ventricular fibrillation and cardiac arrest during treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia with intravenous pentamidine isethionate. The dosage was 4 mg/kg/day for 18 days. Nephrotoxicity occurred and raised serum potassium. The plasma...... concentration of pentamidine was 580 nmol/l. Careful monitoring of renal and cardiac functions is recommended during intravenous therapy with pentamidine isethionate....

  7. Therapeutic Hypothermia Reduces Oxidative Damage and Alters Antioxidant Defenses after Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenhaar, Fernanda S.; Medeiros, Tássia M.; Heemann, Fernanda M.; Behling, Camile S.; Putti, Jordana S.; Mahl, Camila D.; Verona, Cleber; da Silva, Ana Carolina A.; Guerra, Maria C.; Gonçalves, Carlos A. S.; Oliveira, Vanessa M.; Riveiro, Diego F. M.; Vieira, Silvia R. R.

    2017-01-01

    After cardiac arrest, organ damage consequent to ischemia-reperfusion has been attributed to oxidative stress. Mild therapeutic hypothermia has been applied to reduce this damage, and it may reduce oxidative damage as well. This study aimed to compare oxidative damage and antioxidant defenses in patients treated with controlled normothermia versus mild therapeutic hypothermia during postcardiac arrest syndrome. The sample consisted of 31 patients under controlled normothermia (36°C) and 11 patients treated with 24 h mild therapeutic hypothermia (33°C), victims of in- or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Parameters were assessed at 6, 12, 36, and 72 h after cardiac arrest in the central venous blood samples. Hypothermic and normothermic patients had similar S100B levels, a biomarker of brain injury. Xanthine oxidase activity is similar between hypothermic and normothermic patients; however, it decreases posthypothermia treatment. Xanthine oxidase activity is positively correlated with lactate and S100B and inversely correlated with pH, calcium, and sodium levels. Hypothermia reduces malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, markers of oxidative damage. Concomitantly, hypothermia increases the activity of erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione S-transferase while decreasing the activity of serum paraoxonase-1. These findings suggest that mild therapeutic hypothermia reduces oxidative damage and alters antioxidant defenses in postcardiac arrest patients. PMID:28553435

  8. Distinct properties and metabolic mechanisms of postresuscitation myocardial injuries in ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest versus asphyxiation cardiac arrest in a porcine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Caijun; Li Chunsheng; Zhang Yi; Yang Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background The two most prevalent causes of sudden cardiac death are ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VFCA) and asphyxiation cardiac arrest (ACA).Profound postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction has been demonstrated in both VFCA and ACA animal models.Our study aimed to characterize the two porcine models of cardiac arrest and postresuscitation myocardial metabolism dysfunction.Methods Thirty-two pigs were randomized into two groups.The VFCA group (n=16) were subject to programmed electrical stimulation and the ACA group (n=16) underwent endotracheal tube clamping to induce cardiac arrest (CA).Once induced,CA remained untreated for a period of 8 minutes.Two minutes following initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR),defibrillation was attempted until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved or animals died.To assess myocardial metabolism,18F-FluoroDeoxyGlucose Positron Emission Tomography was performed at baseline and 4 hours after ROSC.Results ROSC was 100% successful in VFCA and 50% successful in ACA.VFCA had better mean arterial pressure and cardiac output after ROSC than ACA.Arterial blood gas analysis indicated more detrimental metabolic disturbances in ACA compared with VFCA after ROSC (ROSC 0.5 hours,pH:7.01±0.06 vs.7.21±0.03,P<0.01; HCO3-:(15.83±2.31 vs.20.11±1.83) mmol/L,P<0.01; lactate:(16.22±1.76 vs.5.84±1.44) mmol/L,P<0.01).Myocardial metabolism imaging using Positron Emission Tomography demonstrated that myocardial injuries after ACA were more severe and widespread than after VFCA at 4 hours after ROSC (the maximum standardized uptake value of the whole left ventricular:1.00±0.17 vs.1.93±0.27,P<0.01).Lower contents of myocardial energy metabolism enzymes (Na+-K+-ATPase enzyme activity,Ca2+-ATPase enzyme activity,superoxide dismutase and phosphodiesterase) were found in ACA relative to VFCA.Conclusions Compared with VFCA,ACA causes more severe myocardium injury and metabolism hindrance,therefore they

  9. Common variation in fatty acid metabolic genes and risk of incident sudden cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.N. Lemaitre (Rozenn ); C.O. Johnson (Catherine); S. Hesselson (Stephanie); N. Sotoodhenia (Nona); B. McKnight (Barbara); C.M. Sitlani (Colleen); D. Rea (Dan); I.B. King (Irena); P.-Y. Kwok (Pui-Yan); A. Mak (Angel); G. Li (Guo); J. Brody (Jennifer); E.B. Larson (Eric); D. Mozaffarian (Dariush); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); A. Huertas-Vazquez (Adriana); J.-C. Tardif (Jean-Claude); C.M. Albert (Christine); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); D.E. Arking (Dan); S. Kääb (Stefan); H.V. Huikuri (Heikki); B.P. Krijthe (Bouwe); M. Eijgelsheim (Mark); Y.A. Wang (Ying); K. Reinier (Kyndaron); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); S.L. Pulit (Sara); R. Brugada (Ramon); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher); P.J. Karhunen (Pekka); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); P. Goyette (Philippe); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); S.S. Chugh (Sumeet); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); X. Jouven (Xavier); D.S. Siscovick (David)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground There is limited information on genetic factors associated with sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Objective To assess the association of common variation in genes in fatty acid pathways with SCA risk. Methods We selected 85 candidate genes and 1155 single nucleotide polymorphisms (

  10. Acute Esophageal Necrosis in an Alcoholic after Successful Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amish Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We present a patient who presented to the ICU after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest who was subsequently diagnosed with AEN. Case Presentation. A 66-year-old female presented after cardiac arrest in which return of spontaneous circulation was achieved within 7 minutes after the initiation of CPR. She was intubated on the scene and found to have coffee ground emesis in her bathroom when found unresponsive. Due to the hemodynamically significant GI bleed, patient was started on IV proton pump inhibitor, octreotide, and levophed. Subsequent endoscopy showed diffuse severe mucosal changes characterized by blackness, erythema, friability, granularity, inflammation, and decreased vascular pattern in the middle third of the esophagus and in the lower third of the esophagus. Discussion. AEN is a rare syndrome with a prevalence ranging from 0.001 to 0.2% of EGD. This patient is especially rare as this patient was female and had AEN in the middle esophagus along with lower esophagus. The pathophysiology in this patient is hypothesized that she had cardiac arrest secondary to acute upper GI hemorrhage. Subsequent low-flow state (cardiac arrest in addition to being in the setting of severe alcohol abuse led to esophageal necrosis.

  11. [Relationship between previous severity of illness and outcome of in-hospital cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, M; Rodríguez, J; Espejo, A; del Olmo, R; Llanos, S; Del Castillo, J; López-Herce, J

    2014-07-01

    To analyze the relationship between previous severity of illness, lactic acid, creatinine and inotropic index with mortality of in-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) in children, and the value of a prognostic index designed for adults. The study included total of 44 children aged from 1 month to 18 years old who suffered a cardiac arrest while in hospital. The relationship between previous severity of illness scores (PRIMS and PELOD), lactic acid, creatinine, treatment with vasoactive drugs, inotropic index with return of spontaneous circulation and survival at hospital discharge was analyzed. The large majority (90.3%) of patients had a return of spontaneous circulation, and 59% survived at hospital discharge. More than two-thirds (68.2%) were treated with inotropic drugs at the time of the CA. The patients who died had a higher lactic acid before the CA (3.4 mmol/L) than survivors (1.4 mmol/L), P=.04. There were no significant differences in PRIMS, PELOD, creatinine, inotropic drugs, and inotropic index before CA between patients who died and survivors. A high lactic acid previous to cardiac arrest could be a prognostic factor of in-hospital cardiac arrest in children. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Identifying non-technical skills and barriers for improvement of teamwork in cardiac arrest teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.O.; Jensen, Michael Kammer; Lippert, A.

    2010-01-01

    2006 to November 2006. Interviews were focussed on barriers and recommendations for teamwork in the cardiac arrest team, optimal policy for improvement of resuscitation training and clinical practice, use of cognitive aids and adoption of European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines 2005. Interviews...

  13. An Exploratory Study of Functional Status in Post Cardiac Arrest Survivors Discharged To Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    arrest. The physical functioning (PF) and mental health (MH) scales were relatively wholesome, being specific to medical or psychiatric disorders ...cardiac rehabilitation post myocardial infarction. Exclusion criteria for this sample included 1. The existence of cognitive inability, delusional ...illness, and monitor response to treatment. The MMSE has also been used as a research tool to screen for cognitive disorders in epidemiological studies

  14. Long-term prognosis after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsted, Tina I; Rasmussen, Lars S; Meyhoff, Christian S

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study we aimed to report survival beyond 6 months, including quality of life, for patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with a physician-based EMS in an urban area. METHODS: We collected data related to OHCA prospectively during a 2-year period. Long-term survival...

  15. Reperfusion therapy in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: current insights.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuper, W.; Dieker, H.J.; Brouwer, M.A.; Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Although early care in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has been improved over the past decades, survival remains poor and neurological performance after survival is often impaired. Consequently, new therapies are needed to improve outcome. As thrombotic processes such as acute myocardial infarction o

  16. EMuRgency: Addressing cardiac arrest with socio-technical innovation in a smart learning region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Klerkx, Joris; Parra, Gonzalo; Haberstroh, Max; Elsner, Jesko; Ternier, Stefaan; Schilberg, Daniel; Jeschke, Sabina; Duval, Erik; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Kalz, M., Klerx, J., Parra, G., Haberstroh, M., Elsner, J., Ternier, S., Schilberg, D., Jeschke, S., Duval, E., & Specht, M. (2013). EMuRgency: Addressing cardiac arrest with socio-technical innovation in a smart learning region. Interaction Design and Architectures Journal. Summer 2013 (17), 77-91.

  17. Willingness to Perform Chest Compression Only in Witnessed Cardiac Arrest Victims versus Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesreen Yaghmour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Performing immediate bystander Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR is the most important factor that determines survival from cardiac arrest. Recommended mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver during CPR has led to lower rate of CPR performance in the population. Objectives: The present survey aimed to evaluate the willingness of nurses at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences for performing CPR versus chest-compression-only CPR. Patients and Methods: During a CPR course, we performed a survey on 25 nurses from Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. This survey included age and gender of the participants. In the first question, they were asked about their willingness to perform CPR with mouth to mouth breathing for witnessed cardiac arrest victims. In the second question, they were asked about their willingness to perform chest compression only for cardiac arrest victims. Results: Among the participating nurses, 96% were female with a mean age of 31 years. Only 40% were willing to perform CPR that requires mouth to mouth ventilation. On the other hand, 92% were willing to perform chest compression only without mouth to mouth ventilation. The mean age of the nurses who would do CPR was lower compared to those who would not. Conclusions: In this survey, we demonstrated that eliminating mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver could lead to markedly higher willingness to perform CPR for witnessed cardiac arrest victims in CPR trained nursing personnel. Our study is in agreement with other studies advocating that chest-compression-only CPR could lead to higher bystander resuscitation efforts.

  18. Preserved metabolic coupling and cerebrovascular reactivity during mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschops, L.L.A.; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.; Simons, K.S.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although mild hypothermia improves outcome in patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, the cardiodepressive effects of hypothermia may lead to secondary brain damage. This study was performed to assess the cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen extraction, and cerebrovascular reactivi

  19. Cardiac arrest in a young man following excess consumption of caffeinated "energy drinks".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Adam J; Alford, Kevin

    2009-01-05

    An otherwise healthy 28-year-old man had a cardiac arrest after a day of motocross racing. He had consumed excessive amounts of a caffeinated "energy drink" throughout the day. We postulate that a combination of excessive ingestion of caffeine- and taurine-containing energy drinks and strenuous physical activity can produce myocardial ischaemia by inducing coronary vasospasm.

  20. The impact of therapeutic hypothermia on neurological function and quality of life after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Horsted, Tina I;

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the impact of therapeutic hypothermia on cognitive function and quality of life in comatose survivors of out of Hospital Cardiac arrest (OHCA). METHODS: We prospectively studied comatose survivors of OHCA consecutively admitted in a 4-year period. Therapeutic hypothermia was imple...

  1. Epinephrine in cardiac arrest: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Cané, Ignacio; Valverde-León, María Del Rocío; Rodríguez-Borrego, María Aurora

    2016-12-08

    evaluate the effectiveness of epinephrine used during cardiac arrest and its effect on the survival rates and neurological condition. systematic review of scientific literature with meta-analysis, using a random effects model. The following databases were used to research clinical trials and observational studies: Medline, Embase and Cochrane, from 2005 to 2015. when the Return of Spontaneous Circulation (ROSC) with administration of epinephrine was compared with ROSC without administration, increased rates were found with administration (OR 2.02. 95% CI 1.49 to 2.75; I2 = 95%). Meta-analysis showed an increase in survival to discharge or 30 days after administration of epinephrine (OR 1.23; 95% IC 1.05-1.44; I2=83%). Stratification by shockable and non-shockable rhythms showed an increase in survival for non-shockable rhythm (OR 1.52; 95% IC 1.29-1.78; I2=42%). When compared with delayed administration, the administration of epinephrine within 10 minutes showed an increased survival rate (OR 2.03; 95% IC 1.77-2.32; I2=0%). administration of epinephrine appears to increase the rate of ROSC, but when compared with other therapies, no positive effect was found on survival rates of patients with favorable neurological status. avaliar a efetividade da adrenalina na parada cardíaca e seu efeito na sobrevivência e no estado neurológico. revisão sistemática da literatura científica com meta-análise utilizando um modelo de efeitos aleatórios. Revisão em Medline, Embase e Cochrane, desde 2005 até 2015 de ensaios clínicos e estudos observacionais. observou-se aumento nas taxas de retorno de circulação espontânea com a administração de adrenalina (OR 2,02; 95% IC 1,49-2,75; I2=95%) comparadas com a não administração de adrenalina. A meta-análise mostrou um aumento da sobrevivência na alta ou depois de 30 dias da administração de adrenalina (OR 1,23; 95% IC 1,05-1,44; I2=83%). Quando estratificados por ritmos desfibrilháveis e não desfibrilh

  2. Activation of mitochondrial STAT-3 and reduced mitochondria damage during hypothermia treatment for post-cardiac arrest myocardial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chiang, Chih-Yen; Su, Yu-Jen; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chen, Huei-Wen; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2015-11-01

    While therapeutic hypothermia improves the outcomes of individuals in cardiac arrest, the hemodynamic responses and mechanisms which underlie hypothermia-induced cardioprotection are not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism by which induced hypothermia preserves cardiac function and protects against mitochondrial damage following cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest was induced in adult male Wistar rats by asphyxiation for 8.5 min. Following resuscitation, the animals were randomly assigned to a hypothermia (32 °C) or normothermia (37 °C) group. Monitoring results showed that cardiac output at the fourth hour after resuscitation was significantly better in rats treated with hypothermia when compared to rats treated with normothermia (P mitochondrial permeability transition pores occurred less frequently in the hypothermic group. While complex I/III activity in the electron transport reaction was damaged after cardiac arrest and resuscitation, the degree of injury was ameliorated by hypothermia treatment (P mitochondrial integrity and electron transport activity.

  3. Anxiety and depression among out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilja, G; Nilsson, G; Nielsen, N

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) may experience psychological distress but the actual prevalence is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate anxiety and depression within a large cohort of OHCA-survivors. METHODS: OHCA-survivors randomized to targeted temperature....... Subjective cognitive problems were associated with an increased risk for psychological distress. Since psychological distress affects long-term prognosis of cardiac patients in general it should be addressed during follow-up of survivors with OHCA due to a cardiac cause. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01020916/NCT...

  4. Hospital Variation in Survival Trends for In‐hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotra, Saket; Cram, Peter; Spertus, John A.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Li, Yan; Jones, Philip G.; Chan, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Background During the past decade, survival after in‐hospital cardiac arrest has improved markedly. It remains unknown whether the improvement in survival has occurred uniformly at all hospitals or was driven by large improvements at only a few hospitals. Methods and Results We identified 93 342 adults with an in‐hospital cardiac arrest at 231 hospitals in the Get With The Guidelines®‐Resuscitation registry during 2000–2010. Using hierarchical regression models, we evaluated hospital‐level trends in survival to discharge. Mean age was 66 years, 59% were men, and 21% were black. Between 2000 and 2010, there was a significant decrease in age, prevalence of heart failure and myocardial infarction, and cardiac arrests due to shockable rhythms (Phospital rates of in‐hospital cardiac arrest survival improved by 7% per year (odds ratio [OR] 1.07, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.08, Phospital quartile to 11% in the top hospital quartile. Compared with minor teaching hospitals (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.06), hospital rate of survival improvement was greater at major teaching (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.10) and nonteaching hospitals (OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.09, P value for interaction=0.03). Conclusion Although in‐hospital cardiac arrest survival has improved during the past decade, the magnitude of improvement varied across hospitals. Future studies are needed to identify hospital processes that have led to the largest improvement in survival. PMID:24922627

  5. Paramedic Intubation Experience Is Associated With Successful Tube Placement but Not Cardiac Arrest Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Kylie; Bray, Janet E; Smith, Karen; Bernard, Stephen; Straney, Lahn; Nair, Resmi; Finn, Judith

    2017-09-01

    Paramedic experience with intubation may be an important factor in skill performance and patient outcomes. Our objective is to examine the association between previous intubation experience and successful intubation. In a subcohort of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases, we also measure the association between patient survival and previous paramedic intubation experience. We analyzed data from Ambulance Victoria electronic patient care records and the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry for January 1, 2008, to September 26, 2014. For each patient case, we defined intubation experience as the number of intubations attempted by each paramedic in the previous 3 years. Using logistic regression, we estimated the association between intubation experience and (1) successful intubation and (2) first-pass success. In the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cohort, we determined the association between previous intubation experience and patient survival. During the 6.7-year study period, 769 paramedics attempted intubation in 14,857 patients. Paramedics typically performed 3 intubations per year (interquartile range 1 to 6). Most intubations were successful (95%), including 80% on the first attempt. Previous intubation experience was associated with intubation success (odds ratio 1.04; 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.05) and intubation first-pass success (odds ratio 1.02; 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.03). In the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest subcohort (n=9,751), paramedic intubation experience was not associated with patient survival. Paramedics in this Australian cohort performed few intubations. Previous experience was associated with successful intubation. Among out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients for whom intubation was attempted, previous paramedic intubation experience was not associated with patient survival. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sudden cardiac arrest in sports - need for uniform registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solberg, E E; Borjesson, M; Sharma, S

    2016-01-01

    preparticipation screening and cardiac safety at sport facilities requires increased data quality concerning incidence, aetiology and management of SCA/SCD in sports. Uniform standard registration of SCA/SCD in athletes and leisure sportsmen would be a first step towards this goal......., the importance of gender, ethnicity and age of the athlete, as well as the type and level of sporting activity. A precise instruction for autopsy practice in the case of a SCD of athletes is given, including the role of molecular samples and evaluation of possible doping. Rational decisions about cardiac...

  7. Hospital admissions and pharmacotherapy before out-of-hospital cardiac arrest according to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar H;

    2012-01-01

    were identified in the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Register and Copenhagen Medical Emergency Care Unit (2001-2006). We matched every OHCA patients with 10 controls on sex and age. Healthcare contacts were evaluated 30 days before event by individual-level-linkage of nationwide registers. RESULTS......BACKGROUND: The underlying etiology of sudden cardiac death varies with age and is likely to be reflected in type and number of healthcare contacts. We aimed to determine the specific type of healthcare contact shortly before out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) across ages. METHODS: OHCA patients......: We identified 16,924 OHCA patients, median age 70.0 years (Q1-Q3: 59-80). OHCA patients had a higher number of hospitalizations and received more pharmacotherapy compared to the control population across all ages (p for difference 89) were...

  8. Mutations in the Kv1.5 channel gene KCNA5 in cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nathalie H; Winkel, Bo G; Kanters, Jørgen K

    2007-01-01

    identified the point mutations P91L and E33V in the KCNA5 gene encoding the Kv1.5 potassium channel that has not previously been associated with arrhythmia. We functionally characterized the mutations in HEK293 cells. The mutated channels behaved similarly to the wild-type with respect to biophysical......Mutations in one of the ion channels shaping the cardiac action potential can lead to action potential prolongation. However, only in a minority of cardiac arrest cases mutations in the known arrhythmia-related genes can be identified. In two patients with arrhythmia and cardiac arrest, we...... characteristics and drug sensitivity. Both patients also carried a D85N polymorphism in KCNE1, which was neither found to influence the Kv1.5 nor the Kv7.1 channel activity. We conclude that although the two N-terminal Kv1.5 mutations did not show any apparent electrophysiological phenotype, it is possible...

  9. Sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of Brugada syndrome unmasked by thyroid storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Anna K M; Derde, Lennie; van Wijk, Jeroen; Tjan, David H

    2015-12-30

    An 18-year-old man suffered a sudden cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation and was successfully resuscitated. He had neither a medical nor family history of cardiac disease/sudden death, but was known to have Graves' disease, for which he was treated with radioactive iodine. Recently, block-and-replacement therapy had been discontinued to evaluate thyroid functioning. On admission, thyroid hormone levels were markedly elevated, suggesting thyroid storm due to residual Graves' disease. The patient was treated with propylthiouracil, hydrocortisone and Lugol solution. ECG showed repolarisation patterns suggestive of an underlying type 1 Brugada syndrome (BS). These findings were confirmed by an additional ajmaline test. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator was implanted to prevent future arrhythmias. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy 9 months later and recovered completely. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of BS unmasked by thyroid storm. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Hydroxocobalamin and epinephrine both improve survival in a swine model of cyanide-induced cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Pitotti, Rebecca L; Dixon, Patricia S; Valtier, Sandra; Esquivel, Luis; Bush, Anneke; Little, Charles M

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether hydroxocobalamin will improve survival compared with epinephrine and saline solution controls in a model of cyanide-induced cardiac arrest. Forty-five swine (38 to 42 kg) were tracheally intubated, anesthetized, and central venous and arterial continuous cardiovascular monitoring catheters were inserted. Potassium cyanide was infused until cardiac arrest developed, defined as mean arterial pressure less than 30 mm Hg. Animals were treated with standardized mechanical chest compressions and were randomly assigned to receive one of 3 intravenous bolus therapies: hydroxocobalamin, epinephrine, or saline solution (control). All animals were monitored for 60 minutes after cardiac arrest. Additional epinephrine infusions were used in all arms of the study after return of spontaneous circulation for systolic blood pressure less than 90 mm Hg. A sample size of 15 animals per group was determined according to a power of 80%, a survival difference of 0.5, and an α of 0.05. Repeated-measure ANOVA was used to determine statistically significant changes between groups over time. Baseline weight, time to arrest, and cyanide dose at cardiac arrest were similar in the 3 groups. Coronary perfusion pressures with chest compressions were greater than 15 mm Hg in both treatment groups indicating sufficient compression depth. Zero of 15 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0% to 25%) animals in the control group, 11 of 15 (73%; 95% CI 48% to 90%) in the hydroxocobalamin group, and 11 of 15 (73%; 95% CI 48% to 90%) in the epinephrine group survived to the conclusion of the study (Pcyanide levels in the hydroxocobalamin group were also lower than that of the epinephrine group from cardiac arrest through the conclusion of the study. Intravenous hydroxocobalamin and epinephrine both independently improved survival compared with saline solution control in our swine model of cyanide-induced cardiac arrest. Hydroxocobalamin improved mean arterial pressure and pH, decreased

  11. Positive trend in survival to hospital discharge after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a quantitative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savastano, Simone; Klersy, Catherine; Raimondi, Maurizio; Langord, Karen; Vanni, Vincenzo; Rordorf, Roberto; Vicentini, Alessandro; Petracci, Barbara; Landolina, Maurizio; Visconti, Luigi Oltrona

    2014-08-01

    Seven editions of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care guidelines have been published with many changes, in particular, about CPR. The aim of our study was to evaluate the temporal trend of survival to hospital discharge after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) as a possible effect of guidelines changes. We searched PubMed for observational studies on 'survival to hospital discharge after OHCA'. Survival to discharge was the primary outcome; prehospital return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital admission were our secondary endpoints. All data were analyzed according to the year of inclusion: group 1 before 2000; group 2 between 2000 and 2005; and group 3 after 2005. Mortality rates were compared between groups by means of a group frequency-weighted log-linear model. We considered 38 of 201 studies for a total of 156 301 patients. Survival to hospital discharge rate was 5.0% [95% confidence interval (CI) 4.9-5.2) in group 1; 6.1% (95% CI 5.9-6.4) in group 2; and 9.1% (95% CI 8.9-9.4) in group 3 (P < 0.001). A statistically significant decrease in risk of mortality in group 2 vs. group 1 (risk ratio 0.988, 95% CI 0. 985-0.0.992, P < 0.001) and in group 3 vs. group 2 (risk ratio 0.967, 95% CI 0.964-0.971, P < 0.001) was observed. Similar trends were observed for return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital admission. Survival to hospital discharge after OHCA has significantly improved. Many aspects may influence survival, but surely, the reduction of time and an early and good quality CPR have positively influenced the outcome.

  12. Clinical Trials in Cardiac Arrest and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Lessons from the Past and Ideas for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Frontera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Elevated intracranial pressure that occurs at the time of cerebral aneurysm rupture can lead to inadequate cerebral blood flow, which may mimic the brain injury cascade that occurs after cardiac arrest. Insights from clinical trials in cardiac arrest may provide direction for future early brain injury research after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Methods. A search of PubMed from 1980 to 2012 and clinicaltrials.gov was conducted to identify published and ongoing randomized clinical trials in aneurysmal SAH and cardiac arrest patients. Only English, adult, human studies with primary or secondary mortality or neurological outcomes were included. Results. A total of 142 trials (82 SAH, 60 cardiac arrest met the review criteria (103 published, 39 ongoing. The majority of both published and ongoing SAH trials focus on delayed secondary insults after SAH (70%, while 100% of cardiac arrest trials tested interventions within the first few hours of ictus. No SAH trials addressing treatment of early brain injury were identified. Twenty-nine percent of SAH and 13% of cardiac arrest trials showed outcome benefit, though there is no overlap mechanistically. Conclusions. Clinical trials in SAH assessing acute brain injury are warranted and successful interventions identified by the cardiac arrest literature may be reasonable targets of the study.

  13. Return to Work in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kristian Dahl Kragholm; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke Normark

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on long-term function of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors are sparse. We examined return to work as a proxy of preserved function without major neurologic deficits in survivors. METHODS AND RESULTS: In Denmark, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests have been systematically...... reported to the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register since 2001. During 2001-2011, we identified 4354 patients employed before arrest among 12 332 working-age patients (18-65 years), of whom 796 survived to day 30. Among 796 survivors (median age, 53 years [quartile 1-3, 46-59 years]; 81.5% men), 610 (76.......6%) returned to work in a median time of 4 months [quartile 1-3, 1-19 months], with a median time of 3 years spent back at work. A total of 74.6% (N=455) remained employed without using sick leave during the first 6 months after returning to work. This latter proportion of survivors returning to work increased...

  14. Return to Work in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragholm, K.; Wissenberg, M.; Mortensen, R. N.

    2015-01-01

    Background-Data on long-term function of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors are sparse. We examined return to work as a proxy of preserved function without major neurologic deficits in survivors. Methods and Results-In Denmark, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests have been systematically reported...... to the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register since 2001. During 2001-2011, we identified 4354 patients employed before arrest among 12 332 working-age patients (18-65 years), of whom 796 survived to day 30. Among 796 survivors (median age, 53 years [quartile 1-3, 46-59 years]; 81.5% men), 610 (76.6%) returned to work...... in a median time of 4 months [quartile 1-3, 1-19 months], with a median time of 3 years spent back at work. A total of 74.6% (N=455) remained employed without using sick leave during the first 6 months after returning to work. This latter proportion of survivors returning to work increased over time (66...

  15. Temporal and spatial profile of brain diffusion-weighted MRI after cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynash, M.; Campbell, D.M.; Leproust, E.M.; Fischbein, N.J.; Bammer, R.; Eyngorn, I.; Hsia, A.W.; Moseley, M.; Wijman, C.A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) of the brain is a promising technique to help predict functional outcome in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. We aimed to evaluate prospectively the temporal-spatial profile of brain apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) changes in comatose survivors during the first 8 days after cardiac arrest. Methods ADC values were measured by two independent and blinded investigators in predefined brain regions in 18 good and 15 poor outcome patients with 38 brain MRIs, and compared with 14 normal controls. The same brain regions were also assessed qualitatively by two other independent and blinded investigators. Results In poor outcome patients, cortical structures, in particular the occipital and temporal lobes, and the putamen exhibited the most profound ADC reductions, which were noted as early as 1.5 days and reached nadir between 3 to 5 days after the arrest. Conversely, when compared to normal controls, good outcome patients exhibited increased diffusivity, in particular in the hippocampus, temporal and occipital lobes, and corona radiata. By the qualitative MRI readings, one or more cortical gray matter structures were read as moderately-to-severely abnormal in all poor outcome patients imaged beyond 54 hours after the arrest, but not in the three patients imaged earlier. Conclusions Brain DWI changes in comatose post-cardiac arrest survivors in the first week after the arrest are region- and time-dependent and differ between good and poor outcome patients. With the increasing use of MRI in this context, it is important to be aware of these relationships. PMID:20595666

  16. Sudden cardiac arrest in a child with nemaline myopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Marseglia, Lucia; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Manti, Sara; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Arrigo, Teresa; Cavallari, Vittorio; Gitto, Eloisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Nemaline myopathy is a rare, non progressive congenital skeletal muscle disorder defined by the presence of inclusions known as nemaline rods in muscle fibers. Several clinical subtypes have been described, according to degree of muscle weakness, severity and age at onset. The course of nemaline myopathy is very slowly progressive, and death is usually due to respiratory failure. Cardiac involvement is rare and generally considered to be the result of ACTA1 mutations. Patient We re...

  17. Concordance of Brain and Core Temperature in Comatose Patients After Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppler, Patrick J; Marill, Keith A; Okonkwo, David O; Shutter, Lori A; Dezfulian, Cameron; Rittenberger, Jon C; Callaway, Clifton W; Elmer, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    Comatose patients after cardiac arrest should receive active targeted temperature management (TTM), with a goal core temperature of 32-36°C for at least 24 hours. Small variations in brain temperature may confer or mitigate a substantial degree of neuroprotection, which may be lost at temperatures near 37°C. The purpose of this study was to define the relationship between brain and core temperature after cardiac arrest through direct, simultaneous measurement of both. We placed intracranial monitors in a series of consecutive patients hospitalized for cardiac arrest at a single tertiary care facility within 12 hours of return of spontaneous circulation to guide postcardiac arrest care. We compared the absolute difference between brain and core (esophageal or rectal) temperature measurements every hour for the duration of intracranial monitoring and tested for a lag between brain and core temperature using the average square difference method. Overall, 11 patients underwent simultaneous brain and core temperature monitoring for a total of 906 hours of data (Median 95; IQR: 15-118 hours per subject). On average, brain temperature was 0.34C° (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.31-0.37) higher than core temperature. In 7% of observations, brain temperature exceeded the measured core temperature ≥1°C. Brain temperature lagged behind core temperature by 0.45 hours (95% CI = -0.27-1.27 hours). Brain temperature averages 0.34°C higher than core temperature after cardiac arrest, and is more than 1°C higher than core temperature 7% of the time. This phenomenon must be considered when carrying out TTM to a goal core temperature of <36°C.

  18. Clinical predictors of shockable versus non-shockable rhythms in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granfeldt, Asger; Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Steen Møller

    2016-01-01

    Aim To identify factors associated with a non-shockable rhythm as first recorded heart rhythm. Methods Patients ≥18 years old suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between 2001 and 2012 were identified in the population-based Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Danish administrative registries were...... used to identify chronic diseases (within 10 years) and drug prescriptions (within 180 days). A multivariable logistic regression model, including patient related and cardiac arrest related characteristics, was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) for factors associated with non-shockable rhythm. Results...

  19. Resuscitating the heart but losing the brain: brain atrophy in the aftermath of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, A; Frisch, S; Jentzsch, R T; Müller, K; Villringer, A; Schroeter, M L

    2010-01-26

    Many survivors of cardiac arrest are left with considerable long-term impairments due to a transient ischemic state of the brain. Neuropsychologists identified a wide range of neuropsychological deficits in these patients besides the well-known amnesic syndrome. To date, there is no complete and unbiased documentation of the affected brain areas in vivo. We aimed to identify the brain tissue atrophy underlying the observed neuropsychological deficits in a case-control study. We measured gray matter loss by voxel-based morphometry of 3-T structural magnetic resonance images in a sample of 12 patients who had had cardiac arrest with successful subsequent resuscitation in comparison with 12 individually age- and sex-matched control subjects. Such data are rare because many of these patients wear cardiac pacemakers. We found extensive reductions of gray matter volumes in the anterior, medial, and posterior cingulate cortex, the precuneus, the insular cortex, the posterior hippocampus, and the dorsomedial thalamus in tight correlation with neuropsychological impairments, namely, amnestic deficits and apathy. The identified neuroanatomical pattern of brain tissue loss substantiates the reports of wide-ranging neuropsychological impairments in patients after cardiac arrest.

  20. August 2014 Tucson critical care journal club: bacteremia in cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hypes C

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA is an uncommon, but important, condition encountered in the emergency department (ED. While cardiac arrest represents the final common pathway of multiple conditions, early evaluation often focuses on cardiac abnormalities. However, observed associations between infection, particularly pneumonia, and in-hospital cardiac arrest led Coba et al. (1 to investigate the incidence of bacteremia among OHCA patients. The study prospectively investigated 250 adult patients who presented to an academic ED with OHCA between 2007 and 2009. Two blood culture samples were drawn during resuscitation or shortly after return of spontaneous circulation through vascular devices placed for clinical purposes. Children, pregnant women, victims of trauma were excluded. To minimize false positive results, patients were classified as bacteremic if one sample was positive for a typical pathogen or both samples were positive for the same skin colonizing organism. Patients in whom only 1 sample was positive for suspected skin contaminant ...

  1. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: determinant factors for immediate survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Daniela Aparecida; Carvalho, Daclé Vilma; Correa, Allana dos Reis

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze determinant factors for the immediate survival of persons who receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation from the advanced support units of the Mobile Emergency Medical Services (SAMU) of Belo Horizonte. METHOD: this is a retrospective, epidemiological study which analyzed 1,165 assistance forms, from the period 2008 - 2010. The collected data followed the Utstein style, being submitted to descriptive and analytical statistics with tests with levels of significance of 5%. RESULTS: the majority were male, the median age was 64 years, and the ambulance response time, nine minutes. Immediate survival was observed in 239 persons. An association was ascertained of this outcome with "cardiac arrest witnessed by persons trained in basic life support" (OR=3.49; p<0.05; CI 95%), "cardiac arrest witnessed by Mobile Emergency Medical Services teams" (OR=2.99; p<0.05; CI95%), "only the carry out of basic life support" (OR=0.142; p<0.05; CI95%), and "initial cardiac rhythm of asystole" (OR=0.33; p<0.05; CI 95%). CONCLUSION: early access to cardiopulmonary resuscitation was related to a favorable outcome, and the non-undertaking of advanced support, and asystole, were associated with worse outcomes. Basic and advanced life support techniques can alter survival in the event of cardiac arrest. PMID:25296138

  2. Cardiac Arrest as a Consequence of Air Embolism: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia Ur Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Air embolism is an infrequent but potentially catastrophic complication. It could be a complication of invasive procedures including surgery, central line placement, positive pressure ventilation, trauma, hemodialysis, pacemaker placement, cardiac ablation, and decompression sickness. Usually, it does not cause any hemodynamic complication. In rare cases, it could lodge in the heart and cause cardiac arrest. We present a case of an 82-year-old white female who underwent computed tomography (CT guided biopsy of right lung pulmonary nodule. When she was turned over after the lung biopsy, she became unresponsive and developed cardiopulmonary arrest. She underwent successful resuscitation and ultimately was intubated. CT chest was performed immediately after resuscitation which showed frothy air dense material in the left atrium and one of the right pulmonary veins suggesting a Broncho venous fistula with air embolism. Although very rare, air embolism could be catastrophic resulting in cardiac arrest. Supportive care including mechanical ventilation, vasopressors, volume resuscitation, and supplemental oxygen is the initial management. Patients with cardiac, neurological, or respiratory complications benefit from hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

  3. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: determinant factors for immediate survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Aparecida Morais

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze determinant factors for the immediate survival of persons who receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation from the advanced support units of the Mobile Emergency Medical Services (SAMU of Belo Horizonte.METHOD: this is a retrospective, epidemiological study which analyzed 1,165 assistance forms, from the period 2008 - 2010. The collected data followed the Utstein style, being submitted to descriptive and analytical statistics with tests with levels of significance of 5%.RESULTS: the majority were male, the median age was 64 years, and the ambulance response time, nine minutes. Immediate survival was observed in 239 persons. An association was ascertained of this outcome with "cardiac arrest witnessed by persons trained in basic life support" (OR=3.49; p<0.05; CI 95%, "cardiac arrest witnessed by Mobile Emergency Medical Services teams" (OR=2.99; p<0.05; CI95%, "only the carry out of basic life support" (OR=0.142; p<0.05; CI95%, and "initial cardiac rhythm of asystole" (OR=0.33; p<0.05; CI 95%.CONCLUSION: early access to cardiopulmonary resuscitation was related to a favorable outcome, and the non-undertaking of advanced support, and asystole, were associated with worse outcomes. Basic and advanced life support techniques can alter survival in the event of cardiac arrest.

  4. Cardiac ryanodine receptor gene (hRyR2) mutation underlying catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in a Chinese adolescent presenting with sudden cardiac arrest and cardiac syncope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ngai-Shing Mok; Ching-Wan Lam; Nai-Chung Fong; Yim-Wo Hui; Yuen-Choi Choi; Kwok-Yin Chan

    2006-01-01

    @@ Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in children and adolescents is uncommon and yet it is devastating for both victim's family and the society.Recently, it was increasingly recognized that SCD in young patients with structurally normal heart may be caused by inheritable primary electrical diseases due to the malfunction of cardiac ion channels, a disease entity known as the ion channelopathies.Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a specific form of ion channelopathy which can cause cardiac syncope or SCD in young patients by producing catecholamine-induced bi-directional ventricular tachycardia (BiVT), polymorphic VT and ventricular fibrillation (VF) during physical exertion or emotion.1-7 We reported here an index case of CPVT caused by cardiac ryanodine receptor gene (hRyR2)mutation which presented as cardiac syncope and sudden cardiac arrest in a Chinese adolescent female.

  5. Bystander Defibrillation for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Public vs Residential Locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Steen Møller; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik; Rajan, Shahzleen; Kragholm, Kristian; Ejlskov, Linda; Gislason, Gunnar; Køber, Lars; Gerds, Thomas A; Hjortshøj, Søren; Lippert, Freddy; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Wissenberg, Mads

    2017-05-01

    Bystander-delivered defibrillation (hereinafter referred to as bystander defibrillation) of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains limited despite the widespread dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). To examine calendar changes in bystander defibrillation and subsequent survival according to a public or a residential location of the cardiac arrest after nationwide initiatives in Denmark to facilitate bystander-mediated resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation. This nationwide study identified 18 688 patients in Denmark with first-time OHCA from June 1, 2001, to December 31, 2012, using the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Patients had a presumed cardiac cause of arrest that was not witnessed by emergency medical services personnel. Data were analyzed from April 1, 2015, to December 10, 2016. Nationwide initiatives to facilitate bystander resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation, consisted of resuscitation training of Danish citizens, dissemination of on-site AEDs, foundation of an AED registry linked to emergency medical dispatch centers, and dispatcher-assisted guidance of bystander resuscitation efforts. The proportion of patients who received bystander defibrillation according to the location of the cardiac arrest and their subsequent 30-day survival. Of the 18 688 patients with OHCAs (67.8% men and 32.2% women; median [interquartile range] age, 72 [62-80] years), 4783 (25.6%) had a cardiac arrest in a public location and 13 905 (74.4%) in a residential location. The number of registered AEDs increased from 141 in 2007 to 7800 in 2012. The distribution of AED location was consistently skewed in favor of public locations. Bystander defibrillation increased in public locations from 3 of 245 (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.4%-3.5%) in 2001 to 78 of 510 (15.3%; 95% CI, 12.4%-18.7%) in 2012 (P bystander defibrillation increased in public locations from 8.3% (95% CI, 1.5%-35.4%) in 2001/2002 to 57

  6. Therapeutic hypothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moler, Frank W; Silverstein, Faye S; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S; Christensen, James R; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Meert, Kathleen L; Clark, Amy E; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L; Page, Kent; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S; Newth, Christopher J L; Bennett, Kimberly S; Berger, John T; Topjian, Alexis; Pineda, Jose A; Koch, Joshua D; Schleien, Charles L; Dalton, Heidi J; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Goodman, Denise M; Fink, Ericka L; McQuillen, Patrick; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Thomas, Neal J; van der Jagt, Elise W; Porter, Melissa B; Meyer, Michael T; Harrison, Rick; Pham, Nga; Schwarz, Adam J; Nowak, Jeffrey E; Alten, Jeffrey; Wheeler, Derek S; Bhalala, Utpal S; Lidsky, Karen; Lloyd, Eric; Mathur, Mudit; Shah, Samir; Wu, Theodore; Theodorou, Andreas A; Sanders, Ronald C; Dean, J Michael

    2015-05-14

    Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended for comatose adults after witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but data about this intervention in children are limited. We conducted this trial of two targeted temperature interventions at 38 children's hospitals involving children who remained unconscious after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose patients who were older than 2 days and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II), score of 70 or higher (on a scale from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients with a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest. A total of 295 patients underwent randomization. Among the 260 patients with data that could be evaluated and who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest, there was no significant difference in the primary outcome between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (20% vs. 12%; relative likelihood, 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 2.76; P=0.14). Among all the patients with data that could be evaluated, the change in the VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months was not significantly different (P=0.13) and 1-year survival was similar (38% in the hypothermia group vs. 29% in the normothermia group; relative likelihood, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.79; P=0.13). The groups had similar incidences of infection and serious arrhythmias, as well as similar use of blood products and 28-day mortality. In comatose children who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, therapeutic hypothermia, as compared with therapeutic normothermia, did not confer a significant benefit in survival with a good functional outcome at 1 year. (Funded by

  7. Locating AED Enabled Medical Drones to Enhance Cardiac Arrest Response Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulver, Aaron; Wei, Ran; Mann, Clay

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA) is prevalent in the United States. Each year between 180,000 and 400,000 people die due to cardiac arrest. The automated external defibrillator (AED) has greatly enhanced survival rates for OOHCA. However, one of the important components of successful cardiac arrest treatment is emergency medical services (EMS) response time (i.e., the time from EMS "wheels rolling" until arrival at the OOHCA scene). Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have regularly been used for remote sensing and aerial imagery collection, but there are new opportunities to use drones for medical emergencies. The purpose of this study is to develop a geographic approach to the placement of a network of medical drones, equipped with an automated external defibrillator, designed to minimize travel time to victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Our goal was to have one drone on scene within one minute for at least 90% of demand for AED shock therapy, while minimizing implementation costs. In our study, the current estimated travel times were evaluated in Salt Lake County using geographical information systems (GIS) and compared to the estimated travel times of a network of AED enabled medical drones. We employed a location model, the Maximum Coverage Location Problem (MCLP), to determine the best configuration of drones to increase service coverage within one minute. We found that, using traditional vehicles, only 4.3% of the demand can be reached (travel time) within one minute utilizing current EMS agency locations, while 96.4% of demand can be reached within five minutes using current EMS vehicles and facility locations. Analyses show that using existing EMS stations to launch drones resulted in 80.1% of cardiac arrest demand being reached within one minute Allowing new sites to launch drones resulted in 90.3% of demand being reached within one minute. Finally, using existing EMS and new sites resulted in 90.3% of demand being reached while greatly reducing

  8. Temperature Management After Cardiac Arrest: An Advisory Statement by the Advanced Life Support Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnino, Michael W; Andersen, Lars W; Berg, Katherine M; Reynolds, Joshua C; Nolan, Jerry P; Morley, Peter T; Lang, Eddy; Cocchi, Michael N; Xanthos, Theodoros; Callaway, Clifton W; Soar, Jasmeet

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, mild induced hypothermia (32 °C-34 °C) has been standard of care for patients remaining comatose after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm, and this has been extrapolated to survivors of cardiac arrest with initially nonshockable rhythms and to patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. Two randomized trials published in 2002 reported a survival and neurological benefit with mild induced hypothermia. One recent randomized trial reported similar outcomes in patients treated with targeted temperature management at either 33 °C or 36 °C. In response to these new data, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation Advanced Life Support Task Force performed a systematic review to evaluate 3 key questions: (1) Should mild induced hypothermia (or some form of targeted temperature management) be used in comatose post-cardiac arrest patients? (2) If used, what is the ideal timing of the intervention? (3) If used, what is the ideal duration of the intervention? The task force used Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology to assess and summarize the evidence and to provide a consensus on science statement and treatment recommendations. The task force recommends targeted temperature management for adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm at a constant temperature between 32 °C and 36 °C for at least 24 hours. Similar suggestions are made for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with a nonshockable rhythm and in-hospital cardiac arrest. The task force recommends against prehospital cooling with rapid infusion of large volumes of cold intravenous fluid. Additional and specific recommendations are provided in the document.

  9. Dyspnea is a dangerous symptom in the pre-hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtker, Morten Thingemann; Kirkegaard, Hans; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht

    ABSTRACT: Background Electrocardiogram (ECG) based telemedicine is a cornerstone in pre-hospital triage of patients with suspected ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). An ECG transmitted from the ambulance is reviewed by a cardiologist on-call in case of ongoing or recent chest pain......, resuscitation from cardiac arrest, acute dyspnea of unknown origin and other suspicion of STEMI. We hypothesize that unresolved dyspnea is an independent predictor of mortality in this prehospital setting and that the mortality is higher in patients with acute dyspnea of unknown origin than in patients......,204 (70%) of the patients, acute dyspnea of unknown origin in 1,461 (8 %), resuscitated from cardiac arrest in 163 (1%) and other suspicion of STEMI in 3,533 (20%). When adjusting for age, sex, systolic blood pressure and Charlson Comorbidity Index (p

  10. [Drowning versus cardiac ischemia: Cardiac arrest of an 11-year-old boy at a swimming lake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Födinger, A; Wöss, C; Semsroth, S; Stadlbauer, K H; Wenzel, V

    2015-11-01

    This report describes a case of sudden cardiac arrest and subsequent attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation of an 11-year-old child on the shores of a swimming lake. Reports of eyewitnesses excluded the obviously suspected diagnosis of a drowning accident. The result of the autopsy was sudden cardiac death due to a congenital coronary anomaly (abnormal left coronary artery, ALCA). Favored by vigorous physical activity, this anomaly can lead to malignant arrhythmias because the ectopic coronary artery with its intramural course through the aortic wall is compressed during every systole. This pathology was not known to the boy or his family; in fact he liked sports but had suffered of a syncope once which was not followed up. Without a strong suspicion it is difficult to diagnose a coronary artery anomaly and it is often missed even in college athletes. Tragically, sudden cardiac arrest may be the first symptom of an undiagnosed abnormal coronary artery. Following syncope or chest pain during exercise with a normal electrocardiogram (ECG) cardiac imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) or angiography should be initiated in order to enable surgical repair of an abnormal coronary artery.

  11. Double-valve Libman-Sacks endocarditis causing ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanawuttiwat, Tanyanan; Dia, Muhyaldeen; Hanif, Tabassum; Mihailescu, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    Libman-Sacks endocarditis is a well-known and rather common cardiac manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiography are the definitive imaging methods used to evaluate cardiac valvular involvement in this disease. Valvular masses (vegetations) and valvular thickening are 2 common morphologic echocardiographic patterns. Libman-Sacks lesions are typically characterized by single-valve involvement and their small size of 1 to 4 mm.Herein, we present the unusual case of a 22-year-old woman with newly diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus who had large, sterile vegetations of Libman-Sacks endocarditis that involved the mitral and aortic valves. This compromised coronary blood flow and resulted in ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest. The vegetations were surgically excised, and the patient's cardiac function recovered. We discuss the treatment of the patient and that of Libman-Sacks endocarditis.

  12. Scandinavian clinical practice guidelines for therapeutic hypothermia and post-resuscitation care after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrén, M; Silfvast, T; Rubertsson, S

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Sudden cardiac arrest survivors suffer from ischaemic brain injury that may lead to poor neurological outcome and death. The reperfusion injury that occurs is associated with damaging biochemical reactions, which are suppressed by mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH). In several...... studies MTH has been proven to be safe, with few complications and improved survival, and is recommended by the International Liaison of Committee on Resuscitation. The aim of this paper is to recommend clinical practice guidelines for MTH treatment after cardiac arrest from the Scandinavian Society...... of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (SSAI). METHODS: Relevant studies were identified after two consensus meetings of the SSAI Task Force on Therapeutic Hypothermia (SSAITFTH) and via literature search of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Medline. Evidence was assessed and consensus...

  13. Cardiac Arrest after Connecting Negative Pressure to the Subgaleal Drain during Craniotomy Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monu Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A one-year-old child operated on for arachnoid cyst in right frontoparietotemporal region had sudden bradycardia followed by cardiac arrest leading to death after connecting negative pressure to the subgaleal drain during craniotomy closure. The surgical procedure was uneventful. It is a common practice to place epidural or subgaleal drains connected to a vacuum system towards the end of craniotomy to prevent accumulation of intracranial and extracranial blood. The phenomenon of bradycardia with hypotension is known to occur following negative pressure application to the epidural, epicranial, or subgaleal space after craniotomy closure. However cardiac arrest as a complication of negative pressure suction drain in neurosurgical patients is not described in the literature.

  14. Sinus bradycardia during hypothermia in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bradycardia is a common finding in patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia (TH) following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), presumably as a normal physiological response to low body temperature. We hypothesized that a normal physiological response with sinus bradycardia (SB......) indicates less neurological damage and therefore would be associated with lower mortality. METHODS: We studied 234 consecutive comatose survivors of OHCA with presumed cardiac etiology and shockable primary rhythm, who underwent a full 24-h TH-protocol (33°C) at a tertiary heart center (years: 2004......-2010). Primary endpoint was 180-day mortality; secondary endpoint was favorable neurological outcome (180-day cerebral performance category: 1-2). RESULTS: SB, defined as sinus rhythm arrest...

  15. Bystander Defibrillation for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Public vs Residential Locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Møller; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Bystander-delivered defibrillation (hereinafter referred to as bystander defibrillation) of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains limited despite the widespread dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). Objective: To examine calendar changes...... in bystander defibrillation and subsequent survival according to a public or a residential location of the cardiac arrest after nationwide initiatives in Denmark to facilitate bystander-mediated resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation. Design, Setting, and Participants: This nationwide study......, 2016. Exposures: Nationwide initiatives to facilitate bystander resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation, consisted of resuscitation training of Danish citizens, dissemination of on-site AEDs, foundation of an AED registry linked to emergency medical dispatch centers, and dispatcher...

  16. Advantages of a cohort study on cardiac arrest conducted by nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Regina Vancini Campanharo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVEIdentifying factors associated to survival after cardiac arrest.METHODAn experience report of a cohort study conducted in a university hospital, with a consecutive sample comprised of 285 patients. Data were collected for a year by trained nurses. The training strategy was conducted through an expository dialogue lecture. Collection monitoring was carried out by nurses via telephone calls, visits to the emergency room and by medical record searches. The neurological status of survivors was evaluated at discharge, after six months and one year.RESULTSOf the 285 patients, 16 survived until hospital discharge, and 13 remained alive after one year, making possible to identify factors associated with survival. There were no losses in the process.CONCLUSIONCohort studies help identify risks and disease outcomes. Considering cardiac arrest, they can subsidize public policies, encourage future studies and training programs for CPR, thereby improving the prognosis of patients.

  17. Sheehan's syndrome with cardiac arrest: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lijun; Lu, Zhonghua; Zheng, Yao

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of unconsciousness and hypoglycaemia. She had a history of weakness and fatigue after postpartum haemorrhage in 1983. Unfortunately, she was not diagnosed with Sheehan's syndrome and did not receive sufficient professional treatment due to the limited medical resources in her hometown. A laboratory examination at the local hospital revealed severe hypoglycaemia (1.8 mmol/L) with relatively low serum potassium (2.9 mmol/L). The woman appeared twice in the hospital with cardiac arrest, and her medical history, and the later laboratory investigations were consistent with Sheehan's syndrome. Empty sella was also found by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We conclude that Sheehan's syndrome may lead to cardiac arrest with the complication of hypokalaemia and deserves the vigilance of clinicians.

  18. Antipsychotics and associated risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Jensen, Aksel; Folke, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs have been associated with sudden cardiac death, but differences in the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) associated with different antipsychotic drug classes are not clear. We identified all OHCA in Denmark (2001-2010). Risk of OHCA associated with antipsychotic drug...... use was evaluated by conditional logistic regression analysis in case-time-control models. In total, 2,205 (7.6%) of 28,947 OHCA patients received treatment with an antipsychotic drug at the time of event. Overall treatment with any antipsychotic was associated with OHCA (odds ratio [OR]= 1.53, 95...

  19. Antidepressant Use and Risk of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, P; Jensen, Aksel Karl Georg; Folke, F

    2012-01-01

    Treatment with some types of antidepressants has been associated with sudden cardiac death. It is unknown whether the increased risk is due to a class effect or related to specific antidepressants within drug classes. All patients in Denmark with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) were...... identified (2001-2007). Association between treatment with specific antidepressants and OHCA was examined by conditional logistic regression in case-time-control models. We identified 19,110 patients with an OHCA; 2,913 (15.2%) were receiving antidepressant treatment at the time of OHCA, with citalopram...

  20. Cardiac arrest after anesthetic management in a patient with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergül Yakup

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV is a rare disorder with an autosomal recessive transmission and characterized by self-mutilation due to a lack in pain and heat sensation. Recurrent hyperpyrexia and anhydrosis are seen in patients as a result of a lack of sweat gland innervation. Self-mutilation and insensitivity to pain result in orthopedic complications and patients undergone recurrent surgical interventions with anesthesia. However, these patients are prone to perioperative complications such as hyperthermia, hypothermia, and cardiac complications like bradycardia and hypotension. We report a 5-year-old boy with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV, developing hyperpyrexia and cardiac arrest after anesthesia.

  1. A case of Ventricular Tachycardia and Cardiac Arrest Associated with Sertraline and Mirtazapine Combination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murad Atmaca

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old male suffering from depressive symptomatology was admitted to the inpatient clinic at Firat University School of Medicine; and his psychiatric evaluation revealed major depressive episode according to DSM-IV. He developed chest discomfort, chest pain and shortness of breath of acute onset accompanying pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT leading to cardiac arrest following sertraline and mirtazapine combination treatment. He died after two days in the Intensive Care Unit. The present case suggests that psychiatrists should be aware of unexpected cardiac events, especially when they use combination treatments.

  2. Association of Circulating MicroRNA-124-3p Levels With Outcomes After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devaux, Yvan; Dankiewicz, Josef; Salgado-Somoza, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    cohort of comatose patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This substudy of the Target Temperature Management After Cardiac Arrest (TTM) trial, a multicenter randomized, parallel-group, assessor-blinded clinical trial, compared the 6-month neurologic outcomes......IMPORTANCE: The value of microRNAs (miRNAs) as biomarkers has been investigated in various clinical contexts. Initial small-scale studies suggested that miRNAs might be useful indicators of outcome after cardiac arrest. OBJECTIVE: To address the prognostic value of circulating miRNAs in a large...... and survival of patients with cardiac arrest after targeted temperature management at 33°C or 36°C. Five hundred seventy-nine patients who survived the first 24 hours after the return of spontaneous circulation and who had blood samples available for miRNA assessment were enrolled from 29 intensive care units...

  3. Outcome after resuscitation beyond 30 minutes in drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia : Dutch nationwide retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J. K.; Verkade, H. J.; Burgerhof, J. G.; Bierens, J. J.; van Rheenen, P. F.; Kneyber, M. C.; Albers, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the outcome of drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia, and to determine distinct criteria for termination of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in drowned children with hypothermia and absence of spontaneous circulation. DESIGN Nationwide retrospective cohort study.

  4. Differences between out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in residential and public locations and implications for public-access defibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar H; Lippert, Freddy

    2010-01-01

    The majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occur in residential locations, but knowledge about strategic placement of automated external defibrillators in residential areas is lacking. We examined whether residential OHCA areas suitable for placement of automated external...

  5. Outcome after resuscitation beyond 30 minutes in drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia : Dutch nationwide retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J. K.; Verkade, H. J.; Burgerhof, J. G.; Bierens, J. J.; van Rheenen, P. F.; Kneyber, M. C.; Albers, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the outcome of drowned children with cardiac arrest and hypothermia, and to determine distinct criteria for termination of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in drowned children with hypothermia and absence of spontaneous circulation. DESIGN Nationwide retrospective cohort study. S

  6. Successful resuscitation of a patient who developed cardiac arrest from pulsed saline bacitracin lavage during thoracic laminectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Steven B; Deshur, Mark; Khavkin, Yevgeniy; Karaikovic, Elden; Vender, Jeffery

    2008-06-01

    A patient with a history of T12 burst fracture caused by a fall, and with progressive weakness and sensory loss in the left leg, survived a cardiac arrest after pulsed saline bacitracin lavage irrigation during a posterior spinal fusion.

  7. [Multiple organ failure after spontaneous return of circulation in cardiac arrest in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbayo, Tania; de la Mata, Alba; Sánchez, Marina; López-Herce, Jesús; Del Castillo, Jimena; Carrillo, Angel

    2017-07-01

    To assess the frequency of the multiple organ failure and the prognostic value of multiple organ failure scores in children who have recovered from an in-hospital cardiac arrest. A single centre, observational, and retrospective study was conducted on children between 1 month and 16 years old who suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and achieved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). In the first 24-48hours and between the fifth and the seventh day after ROSC, a record was made of the scores on paediatric severity (PRISM and PIM II) and multiple organ failure scales (PELOD and P-MODS), along with the clinical and analytical data, and including monitoring and treatment, mortality and cause of death. Of the total of 41 children studied, 70.7% male were male, and the median age was 38 months. The overall mortality during admission was 41.5%, with 14.6% dying in the first 48hours, and 7.6% in the following 3 to 5 days. In the first 48hours, clinical severity and multiple organ failure scores were higher in the patients that died than in survivors (PRISM 29 vs. 21) P=.125, PIM II (26.8% vs. 9.2%) P=.02, PELOD (21 vs. 12) P=.005, and P-MODS (9 vs. 6) P=.001. Between the fifth and seventh day, the scores on the four scales were also higher in patients who died, but only those of the PELOD (20.5 vs. 11) p=.002 and P-MODS (6.5 vs. 3) P=.003 reached statistical significance. Mortality in children after return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest is high. The multiple organ failure after return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest in children is associated with increased mortality. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Pediatric cardiac arrest due to drowning and other respiratory etiologies: Neurobehavioral outcomes in initially comatose children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomine, Beth S; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Christensen, James R; Silverstein, Faye S; Telford, Russell; Topjian, Alexis; Koch, Joshua D; Sweney, Jill; Fink, Ericka L; Mathur, Mudit; Holubkov, Richard; Dean, J Michael; Moler, Frank W

    2017-06-01

    To describe the 1-year neurobehavioral outcome of survivors of cardiac arrest secondary to drowning, compared with other respiratory etiologies, in children enrolled in the Therapeutic Hypothermia after Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Out-of-Hospital (THAPCA-OH) trial. Exploratory analysis of survivors (ages 1-18 years) who received chest compressions for ≥2min, were comatose, and required mechanical ventilation after return of circulation (ROC). Participants recruited from 27 pediatric intensive care units in North America received targeted temperature management [therapeutic hypothermia (33°C) or therapeutic normothermia (36.8°C)] within 6h of ROC. Neurobehavioral outcomes included 1-year Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition (VABS-II) total and domain scores and age-appropriate cognitive performance measures (Mullen Scales of Early Learning or Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence). Sixty-six children with a respiratory etiology of cardiac arrest survived for 1-year; 60/66 had broadly normal premorbid functioning (VABS-II≥70). Follow up was obtained on 59/60 (30 with drowning etiology). VABS-II composite and domain scores declined significantly from premorbid scores in drowning and non-drowning groups (pVABS-II composite scores. Demographic variables and treatment with hypothermia did not influence neurobehavioral outcomes. Risks for poor neurobehavioral outcomes were high for children who were comatose after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to respiratory etiologies; survivors of drowning had better outcomes than those with other respiratory etiologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prolonged closed cardiac massage using LUCAS device in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with prolonged transport time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Matevossian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Edouard Matevossian1, Dietrich Doll4, Jakob Säckl1, Inga Sinicina5, Jürgen Schneider2, Gerhard Simon3, Norbert Hüser11Department of Surgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive-Care Medicine; 3Department of Radiology, Technische Universität of Munich, Germany; 4Department of Visceral, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery, Philips University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany; 5Institute of Clinical Forensic Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich, Munich, GermanyAbstract: Saving more human lives through more effective reanimation measures is the goal of the new international guidelines on cardiopulmonary resuscitation as the decisive aspect for survival after cardiovascular arrest is that basic resuscitation should start immediately. According to the updated guidelines, the greatest efficacy in cardiac massage is only achieved when the right compression point, an adequate compression depth, vertical pressure, the correct frequency, and equally long phases of compression and decompression are achieved. The very highest priority is placed on restoring continuous circulation. Against this background, standardized continuous chest compression with active decompression has contributed to a favorable outcome in this case. The hydraulically operated and variably adjustable automatic Lund University Cardiac Arrest System (LUCAS device (Jolife, Lund, Sweden undoubtedly meets these requirements. This case report describes a 44-year-old patient who – approximately 15 min after the onset of clinical death due to apparent ventricular fibrillation – received cardiopulmonary resuscitation, initially by laypersons and then by the emergency medical team (manual chest compressions followed by situation-adjusted LUCAS compressions. Sinus rhythm was restored after more than 90 min of continuous resuscitation, with seven defibrillations. Interventional diagnostic workup did not reveal a causal morphological correlate for the condition on coronary

  10. Prediction of the potential clinical outcomes for post-resuscitated patients after cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungmin; Kwon, Bojun; Yun, Il Dong; Lee, Sang Uk; Kim, Kyuseok; Kim, Joonghee

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral injuries after cardiac arrest are serious causes for morbidity. Many previous researches in the medical society have been proposed to prognosticate the functional recoveries of post-resuscitated patients after cardiac arrest, but the validity of suggested features and the automation of prognostication have not been made yet. This paper presents the automatic classification method which predicts the potential clinical outcomes of post-resuscitated patients who suffered from cardiac arrest. The global features and the local features are adapted from the researches from the medical society. The global features, which are consisted of the percentage of the partial volume under the uniformly increasing thresholds, represent the global tendency of apparent diffusion coefficient value in a DWI. The local features are localized and measured on the refined local apparent diffusion coefficient minimal points. The local features represent the ischemic change of small areas in a brain. The features are trained and classified by the random forest method, which have been widely used in the machine learning society for classification. The validity of features is automatically evaluated during the classification process. The proposed method achieved the 0.129 false-positive rate while maintaining the perfect true-positive rate. The area-under-curve of the proposed method was 0.9516, which showed the feasibility and the robustness of the proposed method.

  11. Massive pulmonary embolism leading to cardiac arrest: one pathology, two different ECMO modes to assist patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Raphaël; Banfi, Carlo; Siegenthaler, Nils; Bendjelid, Karim

    2016-12-01

    Massive acute pulmonary embolism (MAPE) represents a significant risk for morbidity and mortality. The potential for sudden and fatal deterioration highlights the need for a prompt diagnosis and appropriate intervention. Using two cases reports, we describe two different modes of successful ECMO implantation (VA-ECMO vs. VV-ECMO) for MAPE leading to cardiac arrest. A 27-year-old patient with a severe trauma presented with a MAPE leading to cardiac arrest. In this case, which had absolute contraindications of thrombolysis, a VA-ECMO was successfully implanted. Additionally, a 56-year-old patient presented with a MAPE leading to cardiac arrest. Although intravenous thrombolysis allowed for hemodynamic stabilization, the patient remained severely hypoxemic with RV dilation. A VV-ECMO was successfully implemented, leading to a rapid improvement in both oxygenation and RV function. ECMO can provide lifesaving hemodynamic and respiratory support in critically ill patients with a MAPE who are too unstable to tolerate other interventions or have failed other therapies. An important determinant of success in the use of ECMO for MAPE is the return of adequate RV function, which allows physicians to appropriately identify which type of ECMO to implant.

  12. Cardiac arrest due to hyperkalemia following irradiated packed red cells transfusion

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    Miyazawa, Kazuharu [Yamamoto-kumiai General Hospital, Noshiro, Akita (Japan); Ohta, Sukejuurou; Kojima, Yukiko; Mizunuma, Takahide; Nishikawa, Toshiaki

    1998-11-01

    We describe two cases of cardiac arrest due to hyperkalemia following transfusion of irradiated packed red cells. Case 1: Because sudden, rapid and massive hemorrage occurred in a 69-year-old male patient undergoing the left lobectomy of the liver, 8 units of irradiated packed red cells were rapidly transfused, the patient developed cardiac arrest. Serum kalium concentration after transfusion was 7.6 mEq/l. Case 2: A 7-month-old girl scheduled for closure of a ventricular septal defect, developed cardiac arrest due to hyperkalemia at the start of cardiopulmonary bypass. The extracorporeal circuit was primed with 6 units of irradiated packed red blood cells. Serum kalium concentration immediately after the start of cardiopulmonary bypass was 10.6 mEq/l. Analysis of kalium concentration in the pilot tubes of the same packs revealed 56-61 mEq/l. These case reports suggest that fresh irradiated packed red cells should be transfused during massive bleeding and for pediatric patients to prevent severe hyperkalemia. (author)

  13. Intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality in trauma patients. A 14-yr survey from a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital.

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    Marcelo T O Carlucci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little information on the factors influencing intraoperative cardiac arrest and its outcomes in trauma patients is available. This survey evaluated the associated factors and outcomes of intraoperative cardiac arrest in trauma patients in a Brazilian teaching hospital between 1996 and 2009. METHODS: Cardiac arrest during anesthesia in trauma patients was identified from an anesthesia database. The data collected included patient demographics, ASA physical status classification, anesthesia provider information, type of surgery, surgical areas and outcome. All intraoperative cardiac arrests and deaths in trauma patients were reviewed and grouped by associated factors and also analyzed as totally anesthesia-related, partially anesthesia-related, totally surgery-related or totally trauma patient condition-related. FINDINGS: Fifty-one cardiac arrests and 42 deaths occurred during anesthesia in trauma patients. They were associated with male patients (P<0.001 and young adults (18-35 years (P=0.04 with ASA physical status IV or V (P<0.001 undergoing gastroenterological or multiclinical surgeries (P<0.001. Motor vehicle crashes and violence were the main causes of trauma (P<0.001. Uncontrolled hemorrhage or head injury were the most significant associated factors of intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality (P<0.001. All cardiac arrests and deaths reported were totally related to trauma patient condition. CONCLUSIONS: Intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality incidence was highest in male trauma patients at a younger age with poor clinical condition, mainly related to uncontrolled hemorrhage and head injury, resulted from motor vehicle accidents and violence.

  14. Emergency coronary angiography in comatose cardiac arrest patients:do real-life experiences support the guidelines?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Wanscher, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    To describe the use of emergency coronary angiography (CAG) and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and the association with short- and long-term survival in consecutive comatose survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA).......To describe the use of emergency coronary angiography (CAG) and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and the association with short- and long-term survival in consecutive comatose survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA)....

  15. Does Glucagon Improve Survival in a Porcine (Sus Scrofa) of Adult Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest in Addition to Standard Epinephrine Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    UDIIILI: oa. I..UN I ItA!.. I NUMDI:It Does Glucagon improve survival in a porcine (Sus Scrofa ) of adult asphyxial cardiac arrest in addition to...EXPIRATION DATE: 25 Mar 13 PROTOCOL TITLE: Does Glucagon Improve Survival in a Porcine (Sus scrofa ) Model of Adult Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest in Addition...Additions: Deletions: 2 Protocol No: A-2007-03 Protocol Title: Does Glucagon Improve Survival in a Porcine (Sus scrofa ) Model of Adult Asphyxial

  16. A comprehensive regional clinical and educational ECPR protocol decreases time to ECMO in patients with refractory out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunau, Brian; Carrier, Sarah; Bashir, Jamil; Dick, William; Harris, Luke; Boone, Robert; Kalla, Dan; Scheuermeyer, Frank; Twaites, Brian; Straight, Ron; Abel, James; McDonald, Ken; MacRedmond, Ruth; Agulnik, David; Finkler, Joe; MacLeod, Jeanne; Christenson, Jim; Cheung, Anson

    2017-08-16

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation within CPR (ECPR) may improve survival for refractory out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We developed a prehospital, emergency department (ED), and hospital-based clinical and educational protocol to improve the key variable of time-to-ECPR (TTE). In a single urban health region we involved key prehospital, clinical, and administrative stakeholders over a 2-year period, to develop a regional ECPR program with destination to a single urban tertiary care hospital. We developed clear and reproducible inclusion criteria and processes, including measures of program efficiency. We conducted seminars and teaching modules to paramedics and hospital-based clinicians including monthly simulator sessions, and performed detailed reviews of each treated case in the form of report cards. In this before-and-after study we compared patients with ECPR attempted prior to, and after, protocol implementation. The primary outcome was TTE, defined as the time of initial professional CPR to establishment of extracorporeal circulation. We compared the median TTE for patients in the two groups using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Four patients were identified prior to the protocol and managed in an ad hoc basis; for nine patients the protocol was utilized. Overall favourable neurological outcomes among ECPR-treated patients were 27%. The median TTE was 136 minutes (IQR 98 - 196) in the pre-protocol group, and 60 minutes (IQR 49 - 81) minutes in the protocol group (p=0.0165). An organized clinical and educational protocol to initiate ECPR for patients with OHCA is feasible and significantly reduces the key benchmark of time-to-ECPR flows.

  17. Saving the On-Scene Time for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients: The Registered Nurses' Role and Performance in Emergency Medical Service Teams

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    Lin, Ming-Wei; Wu, Che-Yu; Pan, Chih-Long; Tian, Zhong; Wen, Jyh-Horng

    2017-01-01

    For out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients, every second is vital for their life. Shortening the prehospital time is a challenge to emergency medical service (EMS) experts. This study focuses on the on-scene time evaluation of the registered nurses (RNs) participating in already existing EMS teams, in order to explore their role and performance in different EMS cases. In total, 1247 cases were separated into trauma and nontrauma cases. The nontrauma cases were subcategorized into OHCA (NT-O), critical (NT-C), and noncritical (NT-NC) cases, whereas the trauma cases were subcategorized into collar-and-spinal board fixation (T-CS), fracture fixation (T-F), and general trauma (T-G) cases. The average on-scene time of RN-attended cases showed a decrease of 21.05% in NT-O, 3.28% in NT-C, 0% in NT-NC, 18.44% in T-CS, 13.56% in T-F, and 3.46% in T-G compared to non-RN-attended. In NT-O and T-CS cases, the RNs' attendance can notably save the on-scene time with a statistical significance (P = .016 and .017, resp.). Furthermore, the return of spontaneous circulation within two hours (ROSC2 h) rate in the NT-O cases was increased by 12.86%. Based on the findings, the role of RNs in the EMTs could save the golden time in the prehospital medical care in Taiwan. PMID:28280734

  18. Saving the On-Scene Time for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients: The Registered Nurses’ Role and Performance in Emergency Medical Service Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA patients, every second is vital for their life. Shortening the prehospital time is a challenge to emergency medical service (EMS experts. This study focuses on the on-scene time evaluation of the registered nurses (RNs participating in already existing EMS teams, in order to explore their role and performance in different EMS cases. In total, 1247 cases were separated into trauma and nontrauma cases. The nontrauma cases were subcategorized into OHCA (NT-O, critical (NT-C, and noncritical (NT-NC cases, whereas the trauma cases were subcategorized into collar-and-spinal board fixation (T-CS, fracture fixation (T-F, and general trauma (T-G cases. The average on-scene time of RN-attended cases showed a decrease of 21.05% in NT-O, 3.28% in NT-C, 0% in NT-NC, 18.44% in T-CS, 13.56% in T-F, and 3.46% in T-G compared to non-RN-attended. In NT-O and T-CS cases, the RNs’ attendance can notably save the on-scene time with a statistical significance (P=.016 and .017, resp.. Furthermore, the return of spontaneous circulation within two hours (ROSC2 h rate in the NT-O cases was increased by 12.86%. Based on the findings, the role of RNs in the EMTs could save the golden time in the prehospital medical care in Taiwan.

  19. Serial measurement of neuron specific enolase improves prognostication in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storm Christian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuron specific enolase (NSE has repeatedly been evaluated for neurological prognostication in patients after cardiac arrest. However, it is unclear whether current guidelines for NSE cutoff levels also apply to cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Thus, we investigated the prognostic significance of absolute NSE levels and NSE kinetics in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Methods In a prospective study of 35 patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest, NSE was measured daily for four days following admission. Outcome was assessed at ICU discharge using the CPC score. All patients received hypothermia treatment for 24 hours at 33°C with a surface cooling device according to current guidelines. Results The cutoff for absolute NSE levels in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 72 hours after cardiac arrest was 57 μg/l with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.82 (sensitivity 47%, specificity 100%. The cutoff level for NSE kinetics in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 was an absolute increase of 7.9 μg/l (AUC 0.78, sensitivity 63%, specificity 100% and a relative increase of 33.1% (AUC 0.803, sensitivity 67%, specificity 100% at 48 hours compared to admission. Conclusion In cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia, prognostication of unfavourable outcome by NSE kinetics between admission and 48 hours after resuscitation may be superior to prognostication by absolute NSE levels.

  20. 1H NMR-metabolomics: can they be a useful tool in our understanding of cardiac arrest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkias, Athanasios; Fanos, Vassilios; Noto, Antonio; Castrén, Maaret; Gulati, Anil; Svavarsdóttir, Hildigunnur; Iacovidou, Nicoletta; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-05-01

    This review focuses on the presentation of the emerging technology of metabolomics, a promising tool for the detection of identifying the unrevealed biological pathways that lead to cardiac arrest. The electronic bases of PubMed, Scopus, and EMBASE were searched. Research terms were identified using the MESH database and were combined thereafter. Initial search terms were "cardiac arrest", "cardiopulmonary resuscitation", "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" combined with "metabolomics". Metabolomics allow the monitoring of hundreds of metabolites from tissues or body fluids and already influence research in the field of cardiac metabolism. This approach has elucidated several pathophysiological mechanisms and identified profiles of metabolic changes that can be used to follow the disease processes occurring in the peri-arrest period. This can be achieved through leveraging the strengths of unbiased metabolome-wide scans, which include thousands of final downstream products of gene transcription, enzyme activity and metabolic products of extraneously administered substances, in order to identify a metabolomic fingerprint associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrest. Although this technology is still under development, metabolomics is a promising tool for elucidating biological pathways and discovering clinical biomarkers, strengthening the efforts for optimizing both the prevention and treatment of cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy Outcome Selection in the Therapeutic Hypothermia After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest (THAPCA) trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubkov, Richard; Clark, Amy E.; Moler, Frank W.; Slomine, Beth S.; Christensen, James R.; Silverstein, Faye S.; Meert, Kathleen L.; Pollack, Murray M.; Dean, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The THAPCA trials will determine if therapeutic hypothermia improves survival with good neurobehavioral outcome, as assessed by the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales Second Edition (VABS-II), in children resuscitated after cardiac arrest in the in-hospital and out-of-hospital settings. We describe the innovative efficacy outcome selection process during THAPCA protocol development. Design Consensus assessment of potential outcomes and evaluation timepoints. Methods We evaluated practical and technical advantages of several follow-up timepoints and continuous/categorical outcome variants. Simulations estimated power assuming varying hypothermia benefit on mortality and on neurobehavioral function among survivors. Results Twelve months post-arrest was selected as the optimal assessment timepoint for pragmatic and clinical reasons. Change in VABS-II from pre-arrest level, measured as quasi-continuous with death and vegetative status being worst possible levels, yielded optimal statistical power. However, clinicians preferred simpler multicategorical or binary outcomes due to easier interpretability, and favored outcomes based solely on post-arrest status, due to concerns about accurate parental assessment of pre-arrest status and differing clinical impact of a given VABS-II change depending on pre-arrest status. Simulations found only modest power loss from categorizing or dichotomizing quasi-continuous outcomes, due to high expected mortality. The primary outcome selected was survival with 12-month VABS-II no less than two standard deviations below a reference population mean (70 points), necessarily evaluated only among children with pre-arrest VABS-II ≥ 70. Two secondary efficacy outcomes, twelve-month survival and quasi-continuous VABS-II change from pre-arrest level, will be evaluated among all randomized children including those with compromised function pre-arrest. Conclusions Extensive discussion of optimal efficacy assessment timing, and of the

  2. Bystander Efforts and 1-Year Outcomes in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke N; Hansen, Steen M; Malta Hansen, Carolina; Thorsteinsson, Kristinn; Rajan, Shahzleen; Lippert, Freddy; Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar; Køber, Lars; Fonager, Kirsten; Jensen, Svend E; Gerds, Thomas A; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Rasmussen, Bodil S

    2017-05-04

    The effect of bystander interventions on long-term functional outcomes among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has not been extensively studied. We linked nationwide data on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Denmark to functional outcome data and reported the 1-year risks of anoxic brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause among patients who survived to day 30 after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We analyzed risks according to whether bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or defibrillation was performed and evaluated temporal changes in bystander interventions and outcomes. Among the 2855 patients who were 30-day survivors of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during the period from 2001 through 2012, a total of 10.5% had brain damage or were admitted to a nursing home and 9.7% died during the 1-year follow-up period. During the study period, among the 2084 patients who had cardiac arrests that were not witnessed by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, the rate of bystander CPR increased from 66.7% to 80.6% (Pbystander defibrillation increased from 2.1% to 16.8% (Pbystander CPR was associated with a risk of brain damage or nursing home admission that was significantly lower than that associated with no bystander resuscitation (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47 to 0.82), as well as a lower risk of death from any cause (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.99) and a lower risk of the composite end point of brain damage, nursing home admission, or death (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.84). The risks of these outcomes were even lower among patients who received bystander defibrillation as compared with no bystander resuscitation. In our study, we found that bystander CPR and defibrillation were associated with risks of brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause that were significantly lower than those associated with no bystander resuscitation. (Funded by Tryg

  3. [Prehospital cardiac resuscitation in Queretaro, Mexico. Report of 3 cases. Importance of an integral emergency medical care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga-Sastrías, Juan Manuel; Aguilera-Campos, Andrea; Barinagarrementería-Aldatz, Fernando; Ortíz-Mondragón, Claudio; Asensio-Lafuente, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a health problem that represents 33,000 to 150,000 or more deaths per year. The few existent reports show mortality as high as 100% in contrast to some international reports that show higher survival rates. In Queretaro, during the last 5 years there were no successful resuscitation cases. However, in 2012 some patients were reported to have return of spontaneous circulation. We report in this article 3 cases with return of spontaneous circulation and pulse at arrival to the hospital. Two of the patients were discharged alive, one of them with poor cerebral performance category. Community cardiopulmonary resuscitation, early defibrillation and better emergency medical system response times, are related with survival. This poorly explored health problem in Queretaro could be increased with quality and good public education, bystander assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, police involvement in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation, public access defibrillation programs and measurement of indicators and feedback for better results.

  4. Behandlung der myokardialen Dysfunktion nach kardiopulmonaler Reanimation // Treatment of Post-Cardiac Arrest Syndrome

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    Metzler B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction is a frequent complication after cardiac arrest. The systolic and diastolic dysfunction is usually reversible within 48–72 h. At least transiently positive inotropic support with dobutamine, levosimendan or milrinone is often required. Coronary heart disease is a common cause of cardiac arrest and should be ruled out with an invasive approach with cardiac catheterization and if necessary treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. The non-invasive strategies for detecting a myocardial ischemia remain suboptimal in this scenario because of the associated time-delay which would lead to an irreversible myocardial necrosis. With modern therapies myocardial dysfunction, even in the case of a myocardial ischemia, can be treated well. The prognosis of the patients with cardiac arrest is determined essentially by the neurological status. p bKurzfassung: /bEine myokardiale Dysfunktion tritt nach kardiopulmonaler Reanimation häufig auf. Diese sowohl systolische als auch diastolische Dysfunktion ist meist nach ca. 48–72 h reversibel. Vorübergehend ist zur hämodynamischen Stabilisierung der Einsatz von positiv inotropen Medikamenten, wie Dobutamin, Levosimendan oder Milrinon, oft unerlässlich. Eine allenfalls dem Herzstillstand zugrundeliegende ischämische Ursache im Sinne eines akuten Koronarsyndroms sollte mittels Herzkatheteruntersuchung abgeklärt und gegebenenfalls mittels primärer perkutaner Intervention behandelt werden. Die nicht-invasiven Möglichkeiten zum Nachweis eines Koronararterienverschlusses sind in diesem Setting meist nicht geeignet, da aufgrund der damit verbundenen Zeitspanne die Myokardschädigung irreversibel fortschreiten würde. Durch moderne Therapiemöglichkeiten kann die myokardiale Dysfunktion, auch bei vorliegender koronarer Ursache, gut behandelt werden. Die Prognose der reanimierten Patienten ist trotzdem wesentlich durch die neurologische Erholung definiert.

  5. Clinical evaluation of unselected cardiac arrest survivors in a tertiary center over a 1-year period (the LAZARUZ study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, Peter; Corell, Pernille; Henriksen, Finn Lund

    2016-01-01

    %), cardiomyopathies (14%), miscellaneous (e.g. drug induced arrhythmias, coronary spasms) (12%) and channelopathies (5%). Family history of cardiac disease - even inheritable conditions - was not indicative of etiology in cardiac arrest survivors. Supplemental ECGs were abnormal in 10 of 43 patients; in the majority...

  6. Effect of cardiac arrest on cognitive impairment and hippocampal plasticity in middle-aged rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles H Cohan

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary arrest is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States that usually occurs in the aged population. Cardiac arrest (CA induces global ischemia, disrupting global cerebral circulation that results in ischemic brain injury and leads to cognitive impairments in survivors. Ischemia-induced neuronal damage in the hippocampus following CA can result in the impairment of cognitive function including spatial memory. In the present study, we used a model of asphyxial CA (ACA in nine month old male Fischer 344 rats to investigate cognitive and synaptic deficits following mild global cerebral ischemia. These experiments were performed with the goals of 1 establishing a model of CA in nine month old middle-aged rats; and 2 to test the hypothesis that learning and memory deficits develop following mild global cerebral ischemia in middle-aged rats. To test this hypothesis, spatial memory assays (Barnes circular platform maze and contextual fear conditioning and field recordings (long-term potentiation and paired-pulse facilitation were performed. We show that following ACA in nine month old middle-aged rats, there is significant impairment in spatial memory formation, paired-pulse facilitation n dysfunction, and a reduction in the number of non-compromised hippocampal Cornu Ammonis 1 and subiculum neurons. In conclusion, nine month old animals undergoing cardiac arrest have impaired survival, deficits in spatial memory formation, and synaptic dysfunction.

  7. A comparison of Selective Aortic Arch Perfusion and Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta for the management of hemorrhage-induced traumatic cardiac arrest: A translational model in large swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed B G Barnard

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Survival rates remain low after hemorrhage-induced traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA. Noncompressible torso hemorrhage (NCTH is a major cause of potentially survivable trauma death. Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA at the thoracic aorta (Zone 1 can limit subdiaphragmatic blood loss and allow for IV fluid resuscitation when intrinsic cardiac activity is still present. Selective Aortic Arch Perfusion (SAAP combines thoracic aortic balloon hemorrhage control with intra-aortic oxygenated perfusion to achieve return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC when cardiac arrest has occurred.Male Yorkshire Landrace cross swine (80.0 ± 6.0 kg underwent anesthesia, instrumentation for monitoring, and splenectomy. TCA was induced by laparoscopic liver lobe resection combined with arterial catheter blood withdrawal to achieve a sustained systolic blood pressure <10 mmHg, cardiac arrest. After 3 min of arrest, swine were allocated to one of three interventions: (1 REBOA plus 4 units of IV fresh whole blood (FWB, (2 SAAP with oxygenated lactated Ringer's (LR, 1,600 mL/2 min, or (3 SAAP with oxygenated FWB 1,600 mL/2 min. Primary endpoint was survival to the end of 60 min of resuscitation, a simulated prehospital phase. Thirty animals were allocated to 3 groups (10 per group-5 protocol exclusions resulted in a total of 35 animals being used. Baseline measurements and time to cardiac arrest were not different amongst groups. ROSC was achieved in 0/10 (0%, 95% CI 0.00-30.9 REBOA, 6/10 (60%, 95% CI 26.2-87.8 SAAP-LR and 10/10 (100%, 95% CI 69.2-100.0 SAAP-FWB animals, p < 0.001. Survival to end of simulated 60-minute prehospital resuscitation was 0/10 (0%, 95% CI 0.00-30.9 for REBOA, 1/10 (10%, 95% CI 0.25-44.5 for SAAP-LR and 9/10 (90%, 95% CI 55.5-99.7 for SAAP-FWB, p < 0.001. Total FWB infusion volume was similar for REBOA (2,452 ± 0 mL and SAAP-FWB (2,250 ± 594 mL. This study was undertaken in laboratory conditions, and as such may have

  8. Incidence and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the eastern part of Yamaguchi prefecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, Teruo; Osawa, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Masatoki; Takahashi, Natsuki; Takeuchi, Kazufumi; Tanakaya, Machiko; Kohno, Kunihisa; Saito, Daiji

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the factors related to poor prognosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in one local area of Japan. From May 1, 2002 to April 30, 2008, a total of 442 patients with cardiopulmonary arrest were transferred for resuscitation to the National Hospital Organization, Iwakuni Clinical Center. Of 325 patients with cardiopulmonary arrest of cardiac etiology, 126 patients were witnessed by a bystander. However, only 37 received bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 13 had shockable cardiac rhythm, 3 survived 1 month, and 2 had a good neurological discharge. Multivariate analysis of overall cardiac arrest showed that 1-month survival and neurologically favorable discharge were associated with bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (P=0.049 and 0.013) and initial shockable cardiac rhythm (P=0.001 and 0.007). In this region, the survival rate for patients with cardiopulmonary arrest was lower than that reported in other areas, probably because fewer patients received bystander CPR or had shockable cardiac rhythm. This may result from CPR being less popularized in this region than in other areas, suggesting that raising the awareness of CPR would improve the survival rate.

  9. Study regarding the survival of patients suffering a traumatic cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, V; Tudorache, O; Nicolau, M; Strambu, V

    2015-01-01

    Severe trauma is the most frequent cause of death in young people, in civilized countries with major social and vital costs. The speed of diagnostic decision making and the precocity of treatment approaches are both essential and depend on the specialists' colaboration. The present study aims to emphasize the actual situation of medical interventions in case of cardiorespiratory arrest due to trauma. 1387 patients who suffered a cardio respiratory arrest both traumatic and non-traumatic were included in order to point out the place of traumatic arrest. Resuscitation of such patients is considered useless and resource consumer by many trauma practitioners who are reporting survival rates of 0%-3.5%. As the determinant of lesions, trauma etiology was as it follows car accidents - 43%, high falls - 30%, suicidal attempts - 3%, domestic violence - 3%, other causes - 21%. Hypovolemia remains the major cause of cardiac arrest and death and that is why the efforts of emergency providers (trauma team) must be oriented towards "hidden death" in order to avoid it. This condition could be revealed and solved easier with minimal diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers in the emergency department.

  10. Cardiac arrest upon induction of anesthesia in children with cardiomyopathy: an analysis of incidence and risk factors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Johanne

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: It is thought that patients with cardiomyopathy have an increased risk of cardiac arrest on induction of anesthesia, but there is little available data. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and potential risk factors for cardiac arrest upon induction of anesthesia in children with cardiomyopathy in our institution. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed. Eligible patients included patients admitted between 1998 and 2008 with the International Statistical Classification of Disease code for cardiomyopathy (ICD-9 code 425) who underwent airway intervention for sedation or general anesthesia in the operating room, cardiac diagnostic and interventional unit (CDIU) or intensive care unit. Patients undergoing emergency airway intervention following cardiovascular collapse were excluded. For each patient, we recorded patient demographics, disease severity, anesthesia location, and anesthetic technique. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-nine patients with cardiomyopathy underwent a total of 236 anesthetic events, and four cardiac arrests were identified. One was related to bradycardia (HR<60), two were attributed to bradycardia in association with severe hypotension (systolic blood pressure<45), and the fourth arrest was related to isolated severe hypotension. Two occurred in the operating suite and two in the CDIU. There was no resulting mortality. One patient progressed to heart transplantation. Multiple combinations of anesthetic drugs were used for induction of anesthesia. CONCLUSION: We performed a review of the last 10 years of anesthesia events in children with cardiomyopathy. We report four cardiac arrests in two patients and 236 anesthetic events (1.7%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest review of these patients to date but is limited by its retrospective nature. The low cardiac arrest incidence prevents the identification of risk factors and the development of a cardiac arrest risk predictive clinical

  11. In-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, Marie L; Langendijk, Pim N J; Koopmans, Richard P

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: QTc interval-prolonging drugs have been linked to cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac arrest and sudden death. In this study we aimed to quantify the risk of cardiac arrest associated with the use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs in an academic hospital setting. METHODS: We performed...... a case-control study in which patients, for whom intervention of the advanced life support resuscitation team was requested for cardiac arrest between 1995 and 2003 in the Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, were compared with controls regarding current use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs......-prolonging drugs (42/140). The risk was more pronounced in patients receiving doses > 1 defined daily dose (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1, 5.9), patients taking > 1 QTc-prolonging drug simultaneously (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.6, 14) and patients taking pharmacokinetic interacting drugs concomitantly (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.2, 13...

  12. 心脏创伤患者院前急救的护理配合%Nursing cooperation of prehospital first-aid for patients with cardiac trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈丽卿; 徐小莉; 杨燕娇

    2009-01-01

    目的 总结对心脏外伤患者实施院前急救的护理体会,以提高护士院前抢救配合能力.方法 回顾性分析33例心脏外伤患者的院前急救护理配合要点.结果 33例患者中24例抢救成功后均痊愈出院,随访无后遗症发生.4例合并有严重多发伤,到医院后死亡,3例多发伤患者死于并发症,2例胸主动脉损伤患者术中死亡.结论 伤后患者及早接受急救,早期做出伤情判断可为院内抢救提供宝贵的机会.%Objective To summarize the nursing experience in prehospital first-aid of patients with cardiac traumas in order to improve the cooperation capability of prehospital first-aid. Methods The nursing cooperation of prehospital first-aid of 33 patients with cardiac trauma was analyzed retrospec-tively. Results 24 cases of them were rescued successfully, and were completely recovered without se-quelas. 4 cases complicated with severe multiple trauma, died after arriving at hospital, and 3 cases com-plicated with multiple trauma died of complications, while 2 cases with injury of thoracic aorta died during the surgery. Conclusions Early emergency treatment and judgment of traumatic condition could pro-vide valuable chance for inhospital first-aid.

  13. Development of a theoretical guide for nursing care in cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliandra Bittencourt da Silva

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the knowledge on cardiorespiratory arrest among nurses in a hospital of Vale do Paraíba, São Paulo, Brazil, and develop a theoretical guide for care of this emergency. We prepared an instrument of data collection based on relevant literature and the 2010 AHA Guidelines for CPR, from August to October 2012. The sample consisted of 41 nurses who deliver care activities in various units of the hospital. The study showed that professional participants said they were able to act in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, however, there were limitations of knowledge about the theme. Given the above, we developed a theoretical guide for cardiac arrest care based on scientific literature and covering questions submitted by nurses.

  14. How effectively do you function in a cardiac arrest? A creative program approach to code skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, T M; Gabriel, S

    1995-01-01

    Novice and experienced nurses are consistently concerned about their knowledge, skills and abilities to function appropriately in arrest situations. The clinical teachers at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto have established an innovative, creative, practical and cost-effective workshop that addresses nurses' code skills. The 500 evaluations received from nurses who have attended the workshops show the program is a resounding success. The 4-hour workshop concentrates on the nurses' role during cardiac arrests in four key areas: leadership, drug administration, suctioning, and airway management. The program is complete with goals and objectives, props, specific evaluation forms, and a take-home examination. The hands-on component of the workshop allows the application of new information under close observation and supervision of knowledgeable and skilled clinical teachers.

  15. Echocardiography integrated ACLS protocol versus conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mojtaba Chardoli; Farhad Heidari; Helaleh Rabiee; Mahdi Sharif-Alhoseini; Hamid Shokoohi; Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the utility of bedside echocardiography in detecting the reversible causes of pulseless electrical activity (PEA) cardiac arrest and predicting the resuscitation outcomes.Methods: In this prospective interventional study,patients presenting with PEA cardiac arrest were randomized into two groups.In Group A,ultrasound trained emergency physicians performed echocardiography evaluating cardiac activity,right ventricle dilation,left ventricle function,pericardial effusion/tamponade and ⅣC size along with the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) protocol.Patients in Group B solely underwent ACLS protocol without applying echocardiography.The presence or absence of mechanical ventricular activity (MVA) and evidences of PEA reversible causes were recorded.The return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and death were evaluated in both groups.Results: One hundred patients with the mean age of (58±6.1) years were enrolled in this study.Fifty patients (Group A) had echocardiography detected in parallel with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).Among them,7 patients (14%) had pericardial effusion,11 (22%) had hypovolemia,and 39 (78%) were revealed the presence of MVA.In the pseudo PEA subgroup (presence of MVA),43% had ROSC (positive predictive value) and in the true PEA subgroup with cardiac standstill (absence of MVA),there was no recorded ROSC (negative predictive value).Among patients in Group B,no reversible etiology was detected.There was no significant difference in resuscitation results between Groups A and B observed (P=0.52).Conclusion: Bedside echocardiography can identify some reversible causes of PEA.However,there are no significant changes in survival outcome between the echo group and those with traditional CPR.

  16. The relationship between survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and process measures for emergency medical service ambulance team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsung-Tai; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Chen, Fen-Ju; Hu, Fu-Chang; Lu, Yu-Cheng; Chiang, Wen-Chu; Ko, Patrick Chow-In

    2015-12-01

    International institutes have developed their own clinical performance indicators for ambulance services. It is unknown whether these process measures are related to survival of patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to determine whether Emergency Medical Service (EMS)-related ambulance team process measures correlate with patient survival. Four years of observational data were collected from an urban EMS OHCA registry. The two process measures were achieving an EMS response time ≤4 min and prehospital ROSC (return of spontaneous circulation). The outcome measure was survival to discharge. We used the GLMM (generalised linear mixed model) with stepwise selection to examine this process-outcome link at the patient and EMS team levels, respectively. We analyzed 3856 OHCA patients distributed across forty-three EMS ambulance teams. Survival to discharge was observed in 193 (5%) patients. The two EMS team process measures were positively associated with an improvement in survival at the patient level after case-mix adjustment. However, they were not associated with improvement in the risk-adjusted survival rate. The EMS team-level process measures proposed by international institutes may not predict the risk-adjusted survival rate. Using these measures to motivate EMS teams to improve their quality performance would be questionable. Increased efforts should be devoted to constructing more pivotal EMS team-level process measures that are tightly linked to survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of Chest Compressions on Circulation during the Peri-Cardiac Arrest Period in Porcine Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Xu

    Full Text Available Starting chest compressions immediately after a defibrillation shock might be harmful, if the victim already had a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and yet was still being subjected to external compressions at the same time. The objective of this study was to study the influence of chest compressions on circulation during the peri-cardiac arrest period.Prospective, randomized controlled study.Animal experimental center in Peking Union Medical Collage Hospital, Beijing, China.Healthy 3-month-old male domestic pigs.44 pigs (28±2 kg were randomly assigned to three groups: Group I (non-arrested with compressions (n = 12; Group II (arrested with compressions only (n = 12; Group III (ROSC after compressions and defibrillation (n = 20. In Groups I and II, compressions were performed to a depth of 5cm (Ia and IIa, n = 6 or a depth of 3cm (Ib and IIb, n = 6 respectively, while in Group III, the animals which had just achieved ROSC (n = 18 were compressed to a depth of 5cm (IIIa, n = 6, a depth of 3cm (IIIb, n = 6, or had no compressions (IIIc, n = 6. Hemodynamic parameters were collected and analyzed.Hemodynamics were statistically different between Groups Ia and Ib when different depths of compressions were performed (p < 0.05. In Group II, compressions were beneficial and hemodynamics correlated with the depth of compressions (p < 0.05. In Group III, compressions that continued after ROSC produced a reduction in arterial pressure (p < 0.05.Chest compressions might be detrimental to hemodynamics in the early post-ROSC stage. The deeper the compressions were, the better the effect on hemodynamics during cardiac arrest, but the worse the effect on hemodynamics after ROSC.

  18. Protective and biogenesis effects of sodium hydrosulfide on brain mitochondria after cardiac arrest and resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hao; Xie, Xuemeng; Chen, Di; Zhang, Jincheng; Zhou, Yaguang; Yang, Guangtian

    2014-10-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in brain injury after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Recent studies demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donor compounds preserve mitochondrial morphology and function during ischemia-reperfusion injury. In this study, we sought to explore the effects of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) on brain mitochondria 24h after cardiac arrest and resuscitation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 6min cardiac arrest and then resuscitated successfully. Rats received NaHS (0.5mg/kg) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl, 1.67ml/kg) 1min before the start of CPR intravenously, followed by a continuous infusion of NaHS (1.5mg/kg/h) or vehicle (5ml/kg/h) for 3h. Neurological deficit was evaluated 24h after resuscitation and then cortex was collected for assessments. As a result, we found that rats treated with NaHS revealed an improved neurological outcome and cortex mitochondrial morphology 24h after resuscitation. We also observed that NaHS therapy reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and calcium overload, inhibited mitochondrial permeability transition pores, preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, elevated ATP level and ameliorated the cytochrome c abnormal distribution. Further studies indicated that NaHS administration increased mitochondrial biogenesis in cortex at the same time. Our findings suggested that administration of NaHS 1min prior CPR and followed by a continuous infusion ameliorated neurological dysfunction 24h after resuscitation, possibly through mitochondria preservation as well as by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis.

  19. Pulmonary embolism as a cause of cardiac arrest: Hypothermia in post-resuscitation period (cooling therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niković Vuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pulmonary embolism as a possible cause of acute heart failure is a potentially fatal condition that can cause death in all age groups. Patients successfully resuscitated after cardiac arrest have a high risk of increased mortality and their poor long­term outcome is often associated with severe neurological complications. Case Outline. This is a case report of a 67­year­old man after a successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR which was followed by therapeutic hypothermia (TH. The patient visited the dermatological outpatients’ department with clinical presentation of pain and swelling of the right leg, shortness of breath and chest pain. During examination the patient lost consciousness, stopped breathing and had cardiac arrest. ECG was done which registered asystole. We began CPR. After 59 minutes of resuscitation return of heartbeat was achieved. The patient was transported to the Emergency Department. On admission, after computerized tomography (CT of the chest confirmed massive pulmonary embolism (PE, the patient was administered thrombolytic therapy with Metalyse (tenecteplase and anti­coagulation therapy (heparin. After stabilization, therapeutic hypothermia was applied. Combination of EMCOOLSpad on the chest and abdomen and cold Ringer lactate 500 ml at 4°C was flushed. Temperature was decreased to 33°C and kept stabile for 24 hours. After eight days the patient was conscious with a minimal neurological deficit. Conclusion. As shown in this case report, and according to the rich experience elsewhere, cooling therapy after out­of­hospital cardiac arrest and successful CRP may be useful in preventing neurological complications.

  20. Prognostic Factors for Outcomes of In-Flight Sudden Cardiac Arrest on Commercial Airlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Paulo M; DeJohn, Charles A; Ricaurte, Eduard M; Mills, William D

    In-flight cardiac arrest (IFCA) is a relatively rare but challenging event. Outcomes and prognostic factors are not entirely understood for victims of IFCAs in commercial aviation. This was a retrospective cohort study of airline passengers who experienced IFCA. Demographic and operational variables were studied to identify association in a multivariate logistic regression model with the outcome of survival-to-hospital. In-flight medical emergencies were processed by a ground-based medical center. Subsequent comparisons were made between reported shockable-rhythm (RSR) and reported non-shockable-rhythm (RNSR) groups. Logistic regression was also used to identify predictors for shock advised and flight diversions using a case control study design. Significant predictors for survival-to-hospital were RSR and remaining flight time to destination. The percentage of RSR cases was 24.6%. The survival to hospital admission was 22.7% (22/97) for passengers in RSR compared with 2.4% (7/297) in the RNSR group. The adjusted odds ratio for survival-to-hospital for the RSR group compared to the RNSR group was 13.6 (5.5-33.5). The model showed odds for survival to hospital decreased with longer scheduled remaining flight duration with adjusted OR = 0.701 (0.535-0.920) per hour increase. No correlation between diversions and survival for RSR cases was found. Survival-to-hospital from IFCAs is best when an RSR is present. The percentage of RSR cases was lower than in other out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) settings, which suggests delayed discovery. Flight diversions did not significantly affect resuscitation outcome. We emphasize good quality cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and early defibrillation as key factors for IFCA survival. Alves PM, DeJohn CA, Ricaurte EM, Mills WD. Prognostic factors for outcomes of in-flight sudden cardiac arrest on commercial airlines. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(10):862-868.

  1. A randomized trial on elderly laypersons' CPR performance in a realistic cardiac arrest simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neset, A; Birkenes, T S; Furunes, T; Myklebust, He; Mykletun, R J; Odegaard, S; Olasveengen, T M; Kramer-Johansen, J

    2012-01-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is important for survival after cardiac arrest. We hypothesized that elderly laypersons would perform CPR poorer in a realistic cardiac arrest simulation, compared to a traditional test. Sixty-four lay rescuers aged 50-75 were randomized to realistic or traditional test, both with ten minutes of telephone assisted CPR. Realistic simulation started suddenly without warning, leaving the test subject alone in a confined and noisy apartment. Traditional test was conducted in a spacious and calm classroom with a researcher present. CPR performance was recorded with a manikin with human like chest properties. Heart rate and self-reported exhaustion were registered. CPR quality was not different in the two groups: compression depth, 43 mm ± 7 versus 43 ± 4, P = 0.72; compressions rate, 97 min(-1) ± 11 versus 93 ± 15, P = 0.26; ventilation rate, 2.4 min(-1) ± 1.7 versus 2.8 ± 1.1, P = 0.35; and hands-off time 273 s ± 50 versus 270 ± 66, P = 0.82; in realistic (n = 31) and traditional (n = 33) groups, respectively. No fatigue was evident in the repeated measures analysis of variance. Work load was not different between the groups; attained percentage of age predicted maximum heart rate, 73% ± 9 and 76 ± 11, P = 0.37, reported exhaustion 43 ± 21 (scale: 0 to 100) and 37 ± 19, P = 0.24. Elderly lay people are capable of performing chest compressions with acceptable quality for ten minutes in a realistic cardiac arrest simulation. Ventilation quality and hands-off time were not adequate in either group. © 2011 The Authors Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2011 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  2. Genetic, clinical and pharmacological determinants of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, M T; van Hoeijen, D A; Bardai, A

    2014-01-01

    victims since June 2005, we prospectively collect medical history (through hospital and general practitioner), and current and previous medication use (through community pharmacy). In addition, we include DNA samples from OHCA victims with documented ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation during......INTRODUCTION: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major public health problem. Recognising the complexity of the underlying causes of OHCA in the community, we aimed to establish the clinical, pharmacological, environmental and genetic factors and their interactions that may cause OHCA...

  3. Resuscitation of patients suffering from sudden cardiac arrests in nursing homes is not futile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Lippert, Freddy K

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has increased in recent years, and new data are therefore needed to avoid unsubstantiated statements when debating futility of resuscitation attempts following OHCA in nursing home (NH)-residents. We aimed to investigate the outcome...... to OHCA in non-nursing homes (non-NH). Overall 30-day survival rate was 9% in NH and 18% in non-NH, p...% for non-NH-patients, phome residents resuscitated from OHCA and admitted to hospital have similar...

  4. EMuRgency: Addressing cardiac arrest with socio-technical innovation in a smart learning region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Jeschke

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the EMuRgency project. The project has the goal to increase awareness and competences regarding the problem of cardiac arrest in the Euregio Meuse-Rhine (EMR and to use socio-technical innovations to transfer it into a smart learning region. Based on the conscious competence framework solutions for stakeholders on different levels of the framework are introduced, namely a public display network, mobile learning apps and a volunteer notification system. Finally, a future research outlook is given.

  5. Interposed Abdominal Compression CPR for an Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Victim Failing Traditional CPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian D. McClung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Interposed abdominal compression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (IAC-CPR is an alternative technique to traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR that can improve perfusion and lead to restoration of circulation in patients with chest wall deformity either acquired through vigorous CPR or co-morbidity such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest where IAC-CPR allowed for restoration of spontaneous circulation and eventual full neurologic recovery when traditional CPR was failing to generate adequate pulses with chest compression alone.

  6. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival in rural Northwest Ireland: 17 years' experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Masterson, Siobhán

    2011-05-01

    SAVES, the name used to describe a register of survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), was established in rural Northwest Ireland in 1992. From 1992 to 2008, 80 survivors were identified (population 239,000 (2006)). Most incidents were witnessed (69\\/70) and all were in shockable rhythm at the time of first rhythm analysis (66\\/66). Of 66 patients who could be traced, 46 were alive in December 2008. Average survival rates appeared to increase over the lifetime of the database. SAVES has also contributed to the development of a national OHCA register.

  7. Risk factor paradox in the occurrence of cardiac arrest in acute coronary syndrome patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Silvia Aguiar; Timóteo, Ana Teresa; Nogueira, Marta Afonso; Belo, Adriana; Ferreira, Rui Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare patients without previously diagnosed cardiovascular risk factors) and patients with one or more risk factors admitted with acute coronary syndrome. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of patients admitted with first episode of acute coronary syndrome without previous heart disease, who were included in a national acute coronary syndrome registry. The patients were divided according to the number of risk factors, as follows: 0 risk factor (G0), 1 or 2 risk factors (G1 - 2) and 3 or more risk factors (G ≥ 3). Comparative analysis was performed between the three groups, and independent predictors of cardiac arrest and death were studied. Results A total of 5,518 patients were studied, of which 72.2% were male and the mean age was 64 ± 14 years. G0 had a greater incidence of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, with the left anterior descending artery being the most frequently involved vessel, and a lower prevalence of multivessel disease. Even though G0 had a lower Killip class (96% in Killip I; p < 0.001) and higher ejection fraction (G0 56 ± 10% versus G1 - 2 and G ≥ 3 53 ± 12%; p = 0.024) on admission, there was a significant higher incidence of cardiac arrest. Multivariate analysis identified the absence of risk factors as an independent predictor of cardiac arrest (OR 2.78; p = 0.019). Hospital mortality was slightly higher in G0, although this difference was not significant. By Cox regression analysis, the number of risk factors was found not to be associated with mortality. Predictors of death at 1 year follow up included age (OR 1.05; p < 0.001), ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (OR 1.94; p = 0.003) and ejection fraction < 50% (OR 2.34; p < 0.001). Conclusion Even though the group without risk factors was composed of younger patients with fewer comorbidities, better left ventricular function and less extensive coronary disease, the absence of risk factors was an independent predictor of cardiac arrest. PMID

  8. Long-term survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Nana G; Mantoni, Teit; Nielsen, Søren L;

    2007-01-01

    from the Danish Causes of Death Registry and the Danish Civil Registration System. We conducted a search to find out whether patients were still alive on 31 January 2005. RESULTS: Resuscitation was indicated and attempted in 1095 cases and 95 patients (8.7%) survived to discharge. Of these 75% had...... an initial rhythm of VF, 13% had asystole, 10% had PEA and 2% were unknown. Survival was 87% after one year and survival after 10 years was 46% with a significantly lower survival for patients over 60 years. CONCLUSION: Long-term survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a physician-staffed emergency...

  9. Successful emergency splenectomy during cardiac arrest due to cytomegalovirus-induced atraumatic splenic rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glesner, Matilde Kanstrup; Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Nielsen, Jesper Meng Rahn

    2015-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with fever and a petechial rash on suspicion of meningitis. Shortly after arriving she developed cardiac arrest. Blood work up showed severe lactate acidosis, anaemia and thrombocytopenia. A focused assessment with sonography in trauma...... for 14 days with ganciclovir and meropenem and discharged on recovery. Atraumatic splenic rupture caused by viral infection is a rare condition although well described. In the case of our patient, thrombocytopenia added to the severity of the splenic rupture. A multidisciplinary team approach...

  10. Emergency cricothyrotomy for trismus caused by instantaneous rigor in cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hee; Jung, Koo Young

    2012-07-01

    Instantaneous rigor as muscle stiffening occurring in the moment of death (or cardiac arrest) can be confused with rigor mortis. If trismus is caused by instantaneous rigor, orotracheal intubation is impossible and a surgical airway should be secured. Here, we report 2 patients who had emergency cricothyrotomy for trismus caused by instantaneous rigor. This case report aims to help physicians understand instantaneous rigor and to emphasize the importance of securing a surgical airway quickly on the occurrence of trismus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: the teaching of experience at the SAMU of Lyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueugniaud, P Y; Vaudelin, T; Gaussorgues, P; Petit, P

    1989-01-01

    Because of the improvement resuscitation techniques have shown since the 1960s and because of the development of the out-of-hospital medical care, a cardiac arrest is no longer synonymous with death in every case. However the cardiac arrest resuscitation is only relevant if its adverse consequences can be limited. That is mainly the neurological after-effects and the cellular anoxia. Therefore, the "Service d'Aide Medicale Urgente" (SAMU) of Lyon has been concentrating its research aiming at: (a) Shortening the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation to limit the cerebral anoxia. (b) Analysing and treating some of the causes responsible for the aggravation of anoxia. On the basis of several studies in Lyon, here are some suggestions: (1) The use of high doses of epinephrine that unables a better percentage of primary recoveries (47.5% vs. 39%) (P less than 0.05) and secondary recoveries (21.3% vs. 14.8%) (P less than 0.01) without modifying the qualitative survival at long term. (On the basis of: 5 mg intravenous bolus repeated every 3 min in case of asystole instead of 1 mg every 5 min as it is usually recommended). (2) The choice of a peripheral intravenous line instead of a central intravenous line each time it is possible for the administration of drugs since it is as efficient as the second one. (40.7% vs. 33.4%) (P:NS). (3) The alkalinisation of the prolonged cardiac arrest in order to keep the acid-base balance. Most of the survivors show a pH equal or superior to the normal standard. (On the basis of 1 mmol/kg of sodium bicarbonate if the cardiac arrest lasts for more than 10 min). (4) The abolition of the dextrose solution as maintaining infusion the patients who are in a "coma depasse" (brain death) after the resuscitation have an average glycemia superior to the survivors without after-effects. (19.7 vs. 14.8 mmol/l) (P less than 0.05). (5) The monitoring at once at the hospital of the intra-cranial pressure. It reveals the frequency of high pression

  12. Proportion of out-of-hospital adult non-traumatic cardiac or respiratory arrest among calls for seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dami, Fabrice; Rossetti, Andrea O; Fuchs, Vincent; Yersin, Bertrand; Hugli, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    To measure the proportion of adult non-traumatic cardiac or respiratory arrest among calls for seizure to an emergency medical dispatch centre and to record whether known epileptic patients present cardiac or respiratory arrest together with seizure. This 2-year prospective observational investigation involved the collection of tape recordings of all incoming calls to the emergency medical dispatch centre, in which an out-of-hospital non-traumatic seizure was the chief complaint in patients >18 years, in addition to the paramedics' records of all patients who presented with respiratory or cardiac arrest. The authors also recorded whether the bystander spontaneously mentioned to the dispatcher that the victim was known to have epilepsy. During the 24-month period, the call centre received 561 incoming calls for an out-of-hospital non-traumatic seizure in an adult. Twelve cases were classified as cardiac or respiratory arrest by paramedics. In one case, the caller spontaneously mentioned that the victim had a history of epilepsy. The proportion of cardiac or respiratory arrest among calls for seizure was 2.1%. Although these cases are rare, dispatchers should closely monitor seizure patients with the help of bystanders to exclude an out-of-hospital cardiac or respiratory arrest, in which case the dispatcher can offer telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation advice until the paramedics arrive. Whenever the activity of the centre allows it and no new incoming call is on hold, this can be achieved by staying on the line with the caller or by calling back. A history of epilepsy should not modify the type of monitoring performed by the dispatcher as those patients may also have an arrest together with seizure.

  13. Development of a Web GIS Application for Visualizing and Analyzing Community Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Hugh; Qin, Han; Sasson, Comilla

    2013-01-01

    Improving survival rates at the neighborhood level is increasingly seen as a priority for reducing overall rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in the United States. Since wide disparities exist in OHCA rates at the neighborhood level, it is important for public health officials and residents to be able to quickly locate neighborhoods where people are at elevated risk for cardiac arrest and to target these areas for educational outreach and other mitigation strategies. This paper describes an OHCA web mapping application that was developed to provide users with interactive maps and data for them to quickly visualize and analyze the geographic pattern of cardiac arrest rates, bystander CPR rates, and survival rates at the neighborhood level in different U.S. cities. The data comes from the CARES Registry and is provided over a period spanning several years so users can visualize trends in neighborhood out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patterns. Users can also visualize areas that are statistical hot and cold spots for cardiac arrest and compare OHCA and bystander CPR rates in the hot and cold spots. Although not designed as a public participation GIS (PPGIS), this application seeks to provide a forum around which data and maps about local patterns of OHCA can be shared, analyzed and discussed with a view of empowering local communities to take action to address the high rates of OHCA in their vicinity. PMID:23923097

  14. Interns' perceptions of performance and confidence in participating in and managing simulated and real cardiac arrest situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Gerard; Haughton, Andrew; Flanagan, Brendan

    2001-07-01

    This study attempts to describe the effects of a computerized patient simulator education program on interns' perceptions of their own performance and confidence in managing and/or participating in a cardiac arrest incident during simulated and real events. The study design was qualitative using thematic analysis of debriefing sessions and individual interviews. The setting for the research was an education program for interns working at Southern Health, Victoria, Australia utilising a high-fidelity patient simulator. The participants were junior doctors (n = 30) in the first three-month rotation of their first postgraduate year (interns). The results describe the interns' self-reported experiences and perceptions relating to: (1) cardiac arrest experiences prior to the simulation scenario; (2) a simulated cardiac arrest scenario; (3) real-life cardiac arrest experiences after the simulation scenario. The interns expressed perceptions of improved self-confidence in: managing this particular critical situation; their own decision making during a critical incident; their ability to prioritize tasks. They also reported improved awareness and understanding with regards to: the need for leadership and effective teamwork; and the need for effective communication with senior staff during a critical incident. The interns considered that they had improved their ability to effectively handle a cardiac arrest situation as a result of the simulator program. The interns interviewed expressed decreased levels of anxiety and improved confidence in their decision making and their ability to prioritize tasks during a similar real-world situation as a result of the simulator program.

  15. Development of a Web GIS Application for Visualizing and Analyzing Community Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Hugh; Qin, Han; Sasson, Comilla

    2013-01-01

    Improving survival rates at the neighborhood level is increasingly seen as a priority for reducing overall rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in the United States. Since wide disparities exist in OHCA rates at the neighborhood level, it is important for public health officials and residents to be able to quickly locate neighborhoods where people are at elevated risk for cardiac arrest and to target these areas for educational outreach and other mitigation strategies. This paper describes an OHCA web mapping application that was developed to provide users with interactive maps and data for them to quickly visualize and analyze the geographic pattern of cardiac arrest rates, bystander CPR rates, and survival rates at the neighborhood level in different U.S. cities. The data comes from the CARES Registry and is provided over a period spanning several years so users can visualize trends in neighborhood out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patterns. Users can also visualize areas that are statistical hot and cold spots for cardiac arrest and compare OHCA and bystander CPR rates in the hot and cold spots. Although not designed as a public participation GIS (PPGIS), this application seeks to provide a forum around which data and maps about local patterns of OHCA can be shared, analyzed and discussed with a view of empowering local communities to take action to address the high rates of OHCA in their vicinity.

  16. Critical incidents related to cardiac arrests reported to the Danish Patient Safety Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Oluf; Maaløe, Rikke; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2010-01-01

    Background Critical incident reports can identify areas for improvement in resuscitation practice. The Danish Patient Safety Database is a mandatory reporting system and receives critical incident reports submitted by hospital personnel. The aim of this study is to identify, analyse and categorize...... critical incidents related to cardiac arrests reported to the Danish Patient Safety Database. Methods The search terms “cardiac arrest” and “resuscitation” were used to identify reports in the Danish Patient Safety Database. Identified critical incidents were then classified into categories. Results One...... hundred and seven reports describing 122 separate incidents were identified and classified into incidents related to: alerting the resuscitation team (n = 32; 26%), human performance (n = 22; 18%), equipment failure (n = 19; 16%), resuscitation equipment not available (n = 13; 11%), physical environment...

  17. Clinical characteristics and vital and functional prognosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors admitted to five cardiac intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Aboal, Jaime; Sanz, Maria; Caballero, Ángel; Vila, Montserrat; Lorente, Victoria; Sánchez-Salado, José Carlos; Sionis, Alessandro; Curós, Antoni; Lidón, Rosa-Maria

    2013-08-01

    Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest constitute an increasing patient population in cardiac intensive care units. Our aim was to characterize these patients and determine their vital and functional prognosis in accordance with the latest evidence. A multicenter, prospective register was constructed with information from patients admitted to 5 cardiac intensive care units from January 2010 through January 2012 with a diagnosis of resuscitated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The information included clinical status, cardiac arrest characteristics, in-hospital course, and vital and neurologic status at discharge and at 6 months. A total of 204 patients were included. In 64% of cases, a first shockable rhythm was identified. The time to return of spontaneous circulation was 29 (18) min. An etiologic diagnosis was made in 86% of patients; 44% were discharged with no neurologic sequelae; 40% died in the hospital. At 6 months, 79% of survivors at discharge were still alive and neurologically intact with minimal sequelae. Short resuscitation time, first recorded rhythm, pH on admission >7.1, absence of shock, and use of hypothermia were the independent variables associated with a good neurologic prognosis. Half the patients who recovered from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest had good neurologic prognosis at discharge, and 79% of survivors were alive and neurologically intact after 6 months of follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiac arrest associated with epileptic seizures: A case report with simultaneous EEG and ECG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Mehvari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ictal asystole is a rare, probably underestimated manifestation of epileptic seizures whose pathophysiology is still debated. This report describes two patients who had cardiac asystole at the end of their seizure. The first patient was a 13-year-old boy with complex partial seizures.. His MRI showed symmetrical signal abnormality in the bilateral parietooccipital lobe accompanied by mild gliosis and volume loss. During a 3-day long-term video-EEG monitoring, he had cardiac arrest at the end of one of his seizures that was secondarily generalized. The second one was a 42-year-old veteran with penetrating head trauma in the left frontal lobe due to shell injury. During long-term video-EEG monitoring, he had one generalized tonic–clonic seizure accompanied by bradycardia and cardiac asystole. Asystoles could have a role in the incidence of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP, meaning that the presence of ictal bradycardia is a risk factor for SUDEP. In cases of epileptic cardiac dysrhythmia, prolonged simultaneous EEG/ECG monitoring may be required. Cardiological investigation should be included in epilepsy management.

  19. Factors Associated With Successful Resuscitation After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Temporal Trends in Survival and Comorbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Hassager, Christian; Lippert, Freddy;

    2015-01-01

    (multivariate odds ratio [OR]=3.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.1 to 5.0), witnessed arrest (multivariate OR=3.5; 95% CI 2.7 to 4.6), and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a public area (multivariate OR=2.1; 95% CI 1.6 to 2.8), whereas no comorbidity (multivariate OR=1.1; 95% CI 0.8 to 1.45), sex...

  20. ANESTHETIC MANAGEMENT OF ATONIC POST - PARTUM HEMORRHAGE WITH HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK AND IMPENDING CARDIAC ARREST FOR EMERGENCY PERIPARTUM HYSTERECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravishankar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Post - partum hemorrhagic complication is a critical situation for an anesthesiologist, which requires timely and skillful anesthetic management. A massive post - partum bleeding leading to severe hypovolemic shock may result in life threatening cardio - pulmonary arrest. Here is a case report of 25 year old with atonic post - partum hemorrhage resulting in hypovolemic shock & impending cardiac arrest and successful anesthetic management for emergency peripartum hysterectomy to save the life of the patient.

  1. Association of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival according to ambulance response-times after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) increases patient survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but it is unknown to what degree bystander CPR remains positively associated with survival with increasing time to potential defibrillation. The main objective...... was to examine the association of bystander CPR with survival as time to advanced treatment increases. METHODS: We studied 7623 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients between 2005 and 2011, identified through the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used...... to examine the association between time from 911 call to emergency medical service arrival (response time) and survival according to whether bystander CPR was provided (yes or no). Reported are 30-day survival chances with 95% bootstrap confidence intervals. RESULTS: With increasing response times, adjusted...

  2. Hypothermia ameliorates gastrointestinal ischemic injury sustained in a porcine cardiac arrest model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yi; WANG Shuo; LI Chun-sheng

    2012-01-01

    Background During cardiac arrest,the gastrointestinal tract is sensitive to ischemia.Protection of the gastrointestinal tract is a critical factor in determining prognosis following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).This study seeks to determine the extent of gastrointestinal tract injury and the potential protective effect of inducing hypothermia following a porcine cardiac arrest model and CPR.Methods Ventricular fibrillation was induced by programmed electrical stimulation in 16 male domestic pigs (n=8 per group).Four minutes after ventricular fibrillation,CPR was performed.Pigs that successfully restored spontaneous circulation then received intravenous infusions of saline at either 4C or room temperature to produce hypothermic and control conditions respectively.Serum diamine oxidase and gastrointestinal adenosine triphosphate enzyme activity were determined and histopathology of the gastrointestinal tract was performed by light microscopy and electron microscopy.Results Significant injury of the gastrointestinal tract after CPR was found.Na+-K+ and Ca2+ adenosine triphosphate enzyme activity in the gastric tissue were significantly high in animals receiving hypothermia treatment compared to controls.Hypothermia also significantly reduced serum diamine oxidase after CPR compared to the control group.Moreover,severe injury sustained by the gastrointestinal tissue was significantly ameliorated under hypothermic conditions compared to controls.Conclusions Gastrointestinal injury and abnormal energy metabolism are strikingly evident following CPR.Hypothermia,which is induced by an infusion of 4C saline,can rapidly reduce internal body temperature,improve energy metabolism,and ameliorate injury to the gastrointestinal mucosa after CPR.

  3. [Cardiac arrest after epidural anesthesia for a esthetic plastic surgery: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Larissa Cardoso; Carmona, Bruno Mendes; de Nazareth Chaves Fascio, Mário; de Souza, Iris Santos; de Azevedo, Rui Antonio Aquino; Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó

    Cardiac arrest during neuraxial anesthesia is a serious adverse event, which may lead to significant neurological damage and death if not treated promptly. The associated mechanisms are neglected respiratory failure, extensive sympathetic block, local anaesthetic toxicity, total spinal block, in addition to the growing awareness of the vagal predominance as a predisposing factor. In the case reported, the patient was 25 years old, ASA I, scheduled for aesthetic lipoplasty. After sedation with midazolam and fentany, epidural anesthesia in interspaces T12-L1 and T2-T3 and catheter insertion into inferior puncture were performed. The patient remained in the supine position for 10minutes. Then, she was placed in the prone position, developing asystolic cardiac arrest 20minutes after the completion of neuraxial blockade. The medical team immediately placed the patient in the supine position and began cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Spontaneous circulation was achieved after twenty minutes of resuscitation. We discuss in this report the exacerbated vagal response as the main event mechanism. The patient's successful outcome emphasizes the importance of anaesthetic monitoring by anesthesiologists, prompt recognition and treatment of rhythm changes on the electrocardiogram. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Improvements in logistics could increase survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömsöe, A; Afzelius, S; Axelsson, C; Södersved Källestedt, M L; Enlund, M; Svensson, L; Herlitz, J

    2013-06-01

    In a review based on estimations and assumptions, to report the estimated number of survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was started and to speculate about possible future improvements in Sweden. An observational study. All ambulance organisations in Sweden. Patients included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry who suffered an OHCA between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2010. Approximately 80% of OHCA cases in Sweden in which CPR was started are included. None In 11 005 patients, the 1-month survival rate was 9.4%. There are approximately 5000 OHCA cases annually in which CPR is started and 30-day survival is achieved in up to 500 patients yearly (6 per 100 000 inhabitants). Based on findings on survival in relation to the time to calling for the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) and the start of CPR and defibrillation, it was estimated that, if the delay from collapse to (i) calling EMS, (ii) the start of CPR, and (iii) the time to defibrillation were reduced to <2 min, <2 min, and <8 min, respectively, 300-400 additional lives could be saved. Based on findings relating to the delay to calling for the EMS and the start of CPR and defibrillation, we speculate that 300-400 additional OHCA patients yearly (4 per 100 000 inhabitants) could be saved in Sweden. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  5. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and outdoor air pollution exposure in Copenhagen, Denmark.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Wichmann

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death globally and air pollution can be a contributing cause. Acute myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest are frequent manifestations of coronary heart disease. The objectives of the study were to investigate the association between 4 657 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA and hourly and daily outdoor levels of PM(10, PM(2.5, coarse fraction of PM (PM(10-2.5, ultrafine particle proxies, NO(x, NO(2, O(3 and CO in Copenhagen, Denmark, for the period 2000-2010. Susceptible groups by age and sex was also investigated. A case-crossover design was applied. None of the hourly lags of any of the pollutants were significantly associated with OHCA events. The strongest association with OHCA events was observed for the daily lag4 of PM(2.5, lag3 of PM(10, lag3 of PM(10-2.5, lag3 of NO(x and lag4 of CO. An IQR increase of PM(2.5 and PM(10 was associated with a significant increase of 4% (95% CI: 0%; 9% and 5% (95% CI: 1%; 9% in OHCA events with 3 days lag, respectively. None of the other daily lags or other pollutants was significantly associated with OHCA events. Adjustment for O(3 slightly increased the association between OHCA and PM(2.5 and PM(10. No susceptible groups were identified.

  6. Association of Bystander Interventions With Neurologically Intact Survival Among Patients With Bystander-Witnessed Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Shinji; Tomio, Jun; Ichikawa, Masao; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Nishida, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideto; Morimura, Naoto; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2015-07-21

    Neurologically intact survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has been increasing in Japan. However, associations between increased prehospital care, including bystander interventions and increases in survival, have not been well estimated. To estimate the associations between bystander interventions and changes in neurologically intact survival among patients with OHCA in Japan. Retrospective descriptive study using data from Japan's nationwide OHCA registry, which started in January 2005. The registry includes all patients with OHCA transported to the hospital by emergency medical services (EMS) and recorded patients' characteristics, prehospital interventions, and outcomes. Participants were 167,912 patients with bystander-witnessed OHCA of presumed cardiac origin in the registry between January 2005 and December 2012. Prehospital interventions by bystander, including defibrillation using public-access automated external defibrillators and chest compression. Neurologically intact survival was defined as Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance category score 1 or 2 and overall performance category scores 1 or 2 at 1 month or at discharge. The association between the interventions and neurologically intact survival was evaluated. From 2005 to 2012, the number of bystander-witnessed OHCAs of presumed cardiac origin increased from 17,882 (14.0 per 100,000 persons [95% CI, 13.8-14.2]) to 23,797 (18.7 per 100,000 persons [95% CI, 18.4-18.9]), and neurologically intact survival increased from 587 cases (age-adjusted proportion, 3.3% [95% CI, 3.0%-3.5%]) to 1710 cases (8.2% [95% CI, 7.8%-8.6%]). The rates of bystander chest compression increased from 38.6% to 50.9%, bystander-only defibrillation increased from 0.1% to 2.3%, bystander defibrillation combined with EMS defibrillation increased from 0.1% to 1.4%, and EMS-only defibrillation decreased from 26.6% to 23.5%. Performance of bystander chest compression, compared with no bystander chest compression

  7. Evaluation of coronary blood flow velocity during cardiac arrest with circulation maintained through mechanical chest compressions in a porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Henrik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical chest compressions (CCs have been shown capable of maintaining circulation in humans suffering cardiac arrest for extensive periods of time. Reports have documented a visually normalized coronary blood flow during angiography in such cases (TIMI III flow, but it has never been actually measured. Only indirect measurements of the coronary circulation during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs have been performed previously through measurement of the coronary perfusion pressure (CPP. In this study our aim was to correlate average peak coronary flow velocity (APV to CPP during mechanical CCs. Methods In a closed chest porcine model, cardiac arrest was established through electrically induced ventricular fibrillation (VF in eleven pigs. After one minute, mechanical chest compressions were initiated and then maintained for 10 minutes upon which the pigs were defibrillated. Measurements of coronary blood flow in the left anterior descending artery were made at baseline and during VF with a catheter based Doppler flow fire measuring APV. Furthermore measurements of central (thoracic venous and arterial pressures were also made in order to calculate the theoretical CPP. Results Average peak coronary flow velocity was significantly higher compared to baseline during mechanical chests compressions and this was observed during the entire period of mechanical chest compressions (12 - 39% above baseline. The APV slowly declined during the 10 min period of mechanical chest compressions, but was still higher than baseline at the end of mechanical chest compressions. CPP was simultaneously maintained at > 20 mmHg during the 10 minute episode of cardiac arrest. Conclusion Our study showed good correlation between CPP and APV which was highly significant, during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs in a closed chest porcine model. In addition APV was even higher during mechanical CCs compared to baseline. Mechanical

  8. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use is associated with increased risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, Kathrine B; Weeke, Peter; Wissenberg, Mads

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used and have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Nonetheless, it remains unknown whether use of NSAIDs is associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). METHODS AND RESULTS: From the nationwide Danish Cardiac...... Arrest Registry, all persons with OHCA during 2001-2010 were identified. NSAID use 30 days before OHCA was categorized as follows: diclofenac, naproxen, ibuprofen, rofecoxib, celecoxib, and other. Risk of OHCA associated with use of NSAIDs was analyzed by conditional logistic regression in case...

  9. Recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by medical dispatchers in emergency medical dispatch centres in two countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Andréll, Cecilia; Viereck, Søren

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains low. Early recognition by emergency medical dispatchers is essential for an effective chain of actions, leading to early cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of an automated external defibrillator and rapid dispatching...... of the emergency medical services. AIM: To analyse and compare the accuracy of OHCA recognition by medical dispatchers in two countries. METHOD: An observational register-based study collecting data from national cardiac arrest registers in Denmark and Sweden during a six-month period in 2013. Data were analysed...

  10. Accessory papillary muscles and papillary muscle hypertrophy are associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jae-Sun; Youn, Jong-Chan; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Park, Junbeom; Park, Jin-Kyu; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Joung, Boyoung; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2015-10-15

    The present study was performed for elucidating the associations between the morphology of the papillary muscles (PMs) and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). We retrospectively reviewed history, laboratory data, electrocardiography, echocardiography, coronary angiography, and cardiac CT/MRI for 190 patients with SCA. The prevalence of accessory PMs and PM hypertrophy in patients with SCA of unknown cause was compared with that in patients with SCA of known causes and 98 age- and sex-matched patients without SCA. An accessory PM was defined as a PM with origins separated from the anterolateral and posteromedial PMs, or a PM that branched into two or three bellies at the base of the anterolateral or posteromedial PM. PM hypertrophy was defined as at least one of the two PMs having a diameter of ≥1.1cm. In 49 patients (age 49.9±15.9years; 38 men) the cause of SCA was unknown, whereas 141 (age 54.2±16.6years; 121 men) had a known cause. The prevalence of accessory PMs was significantly higher in the unknown-cause group than in the known-cause group (24.5% and 7.8%, respectively; p=0.002) or the no-SCA group (7.1%, p=0.003). The same was true for PM hypertrophy (unknown-cause 12.2%, known-cause 2.1%, p=0.010; no SCA group 1.0%, p=0.006). By logistic regression, accessory PM and PM hypertrophy were independently associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause. An accessory PM and PM hypertrophy are associated with SCA of unknown cause. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark H; Habig, Karel; Wright, Christopher; Hughes, Amy; Davies, Gareth; Imray, Chirstopher H E

    2015-12-19

    Pre-hospital care is emergency medical care given to patients before arrival in hospital after activation of emergency medical services. It traditionally incorporated a breadth of care from bystander resuscitation to statutory emergency medical services treatment and transfer. New concepts of care including community paramedicine, novel roles such as emergency care practitioners, and physician delivered pre-hospital emergency medicine are re-defining the scope of pre-hospital care. For severely ill or injured patients, acting quickly in the pre-hospital period is crucial with decisions and interventions greatly affecting outcomes. The transfer of skills and procedures from hospital care to pre-hospital medicine enables early advanced care across a range of disciplines. The variety of possible pathologies, challenges of environmental factors, and hazardous situations requires management that is tailored to the patient's clinical need and setting. Pre-hospital clinicians should be generalists with a broad understanding of medical, surgical, and trauma pathologies, who will often work from locally developed standard operating procedures, but who are able to revert to core principles. Pre-hospital emergency medicine consists of not only clinical care, but also logistics, rescue competencies, and scene management skills (especially in major incidents, which have their own set of management principles). Traditionally, research into the hyper-acute phase (the first hour) of disease has been difficult, largely because physicians are rarely present and issues of consent, transport expediency, and resourcing of research. However, the pre-hospital phase is acknowledged as a crucial period, when irreversible pathology and secondary injury to neuronal and cardiac tissue can be prevented. The development of pre-hospital emergency medicine into a sub-specialty in its own right should bring focus to this period of care.

  12. Incidence of and factors associated with perioperative cardiac arrest within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriphuwanun, Visith; Punjasawadwong, Yodying; Lapisatepun, Worawut; Charuluxananan, Somrat; Uerpairojkit, Ketchada

    2014-01-01

    To determine the incidence of and factors associated with perioperative cardiac arrest within 24 hours of receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery. This retrospective cohort study was approved by the ethical committee of Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital, Thailand. We reviewed the data of 44,339 patients receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery during the period from January 1, 2003 to March 31, 2011. The data included patient characteristics, surgical procedures, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification, anesthesia information, location of anesthesia performed, and outcomes. Data of patients who had received topical anesthesia or monitoring anesthesia care were excluded. Factors associated with cardiac arrest were identified by univariate analyses. Multiple regressions for the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to determine the strength of factors associated with cardiac arrest. A forward stepwise algorithm was chosen at a P-value cardiac arrest in patients receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery was 163 per 10,000. Factors associated with 24-hour perioperative cardiac arrest in emergency surgery were age of 2 years or younger (RR =1.46, CI =1.03-2.08, P=0.036), ASA physical status classification of 3-4 (RR =5.84, CI =4.20-8.12, Psurgery (upper intra-abdominal, RR =2.67, CI =2.14-3.33, Pcardiac, RR =3.61, CI =2.60-4.99, Pcardiac arrest within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery was high and associated with multiple factors such as young age (≤2 years old), cardiovascular and respiratory comorbidities, increasing ASA physical status classification, preoperative shock, and surgery site. Perioperative care providers, including surgeons, anesthesiologists, and nurses, should be prepared to manage promptly this high risk group of surgical patients.

  13. Targeted Temperature Management After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Due To Drowning: Outcomes and Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moler, Frank W.; Hutchison, Jamie S.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Silverstein, Faye S.; Meert, Kathleen L.; Holubkov, Richard; Page, Kent; Slomine, Beth S.; Christensen, James R.; Dean, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe outcomes and complications in the drowning subgroup from the Therapeutic Hypothermia After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Out-of-Hospital (THAPCA-OH) Trial. Design Exploratory post hoc cohort analysis Setting Twenty-four PICUs Patients Pediatric drowning cases Interventions Therapeutic hypothermia versus therapeutic normothermia Measurements and Main Results An exploratory study of pediatric drowning from the THAPCA-OH Trial was conducted. Comatose patients >2 days and VABS-II) score ≥70, 1-year survival rate, change in VABS-II score pre-arrest to 12-months, and select safety measures. Seventy-four drowning cases were randomized. In patients with pre-arrest VABS-II ≥70 (n=65), there was no difference in 12-month survival with VABS-II score ≥70 between hypothermia and normothermia groups [29% vs. 17%; relative risk (RR) 1.74; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61 to 4.95; p=0.27]. Among all evaluable patients (n=68), the VABS-II score change from baseline to 12-months did not differ (p=0.46) and one-year survival was similar (49%, hypothermia vs. 42%, normothermia; RR 1.16; 95% CI 0.68 to 1.99; p=0.58). Hypothermia was associated with a higher incidence of positive bacterial culture (any blood, urine or respiratory sample) (67% vs. 43%; p=0.04), however, the rate per 100 days at risk did not differ (11.1 vs. 8.4; p=0.46). Cumulative incidence of blood product use, serious arrhythmias and 28-day mortality were not different. Among patients with CPR durations >30 minutes or epinephrine doses >4, none had favorable Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category (PCPC) outcomes (≤3). Conclusions In comatose survivors of out-of-hospital pediatric cardiac arrest due to drowning, hypothermia did not result in a statistically significant benefit in survival with good functional outcome or mortality at one year, as compared with normothermia. High-risk of culture-proven bacterial infection was observed in both groups. PMID:27362855

  14. Pre-hospital management of patients with chest pain and/or dyspnoea of cardiac origin. A position paper of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACCA) of the ESC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beygui, Farzin; Castren, Maaret; Brunetti, Natale Daniele; Rosell-Ortiz, Fernando; Christ, Michael; Zeymer, Uwe; Huber, Kurt; Folke, Fredrik; Svensson, Leif; Bueno, Hector; Van't Hof, Arnoud; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Nibbe, Lutz; Charpentier, Sandrine; Swahn, Eva; Tubaro, Marco; Goldstein, Patrick

    2015-08-27

    Chest pain and acute dyspnoea are frequent causes of emergency medical services activation. The pre-hospital management of these conditions is heterogeneous across different regions of the world and Europe, as a consequence of the variety of emergency medical services and absence of specific practical guidelines. This position paper focuses on the practical aspects of the pre-hospital treatment on board and transfer of patients taken in charge by emergency medical services for chest pain and dyspnoea of suspected cardiac aetiology after the initial assessment and diagnostic work-up. The objective of the paper is to provide guidance, based on evidence, where available, or on experts' opinions, for all emergency medical services' health providers involved in the pre-hospital management of acute cardiovascular care. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  15. The utility of the prehospital electrocardiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew T; Dukelow, Adam; McLeod, Shelley; Rodriguez, Severo; Lewell, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) can capture valuable information in the prehospital setting. By the time patients are assessed by an emergency department (ED) physician, their symptoms and any ECG changes may have resolved. We sought to determine whether the prehospital electrocardiogram (pECG) could influence ED management and how often the pECG was available to and reviewed by the ED physician. A retrospective medical record review was conducted on a random sample of patients ≥ 18 years who had a prehospital 12-lead ECG and were transported to one of two tertiary care centres. Data were recorded onto a standardized data extraction tool. Three investigators independently compared the pECG to the first ECG obtained in the ED after patient arrival at the hospital. Any abnormalities not present on the ED ECG were adjudicated to ascertain whether they had the potential to change ED management. Of 115 ambulance runs selected, 47 had no pECG attached to the ambulance call record (ACR) and another 5 were excluded (one ST elevation myocardial infarction, one cardiac arrest, three ACR missing). Of the 63 pECGs reviewed, 16 (25%) showed changes not apparent on the initial ED ECG (κ  =  0.83; 95% CI 0.74-0.93), of which 12 had differences that might influence ED management (κ  =  0.76; 95% CI 0.72-0.82). Only one hospital record contained a copy of the pECG, despite the current protocol that paramedics print two copies of the pECG on arrival in the ED (one copy for the ACR and one to be handed to the medical personnel). None of 110 ED charts documented that the pECG was reviewed by the ED physician. The pECG has the potential to influence ED management. Improvement in paramedic and physician documentation and a formal pECG handover process appear necessary.

  16. Automated external cardioversion defibrillation monitoring in cardiac arrest: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norvel Robert

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In-hospital cardiac arrest has a poor prognosis despite active electrocardiography monitoring. The initial rhythm of approximately 25% of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR events is pulseless ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF. Early defibrillation is an independent predictor of survival in CPR events caused by VT/VF. The automated external cardioverter defibrillator (AECD is a device attached by pads to the chest wall that monitors, detects, and within seconds, automatically delivers electric countershock to an appropriate tachyarrhythmia. Study Objectives • To evaluate safety of AECD monitoring in hospitalized patients. • To evaluate whether AECDs provide earlier defibrillation than hospital code teams. Methods The study is a prospective trial randomizing patients admitted to the telemetry ward to standard CPR (code team or standard CPR plus AECD monitoring (PowerHeart CRM. The AECD is programmed to deliver one 150 J biphasic shock to patients in sustained VT/VF. Data is collected using the Utstein criteria for cardiac arrest. The primary endpoint is time-to-defibrillation; secondary outcomes include neurological status and survival to discharge, with 3-year follow-up. Results To date, 192 patients have been recruited in the time period between 10/10/2006 to 7/20/2007. A total of 3,655 hours of telemetry data have been analyzed in the AECD arm. The AECD has monitored ambulatory telemetry patients in sinus rhythm, sinus tachycardia, supraventricular tachycardia, atrial flutter or fibrillation, with premature ventricular complexes and non-sustained VT without delivery of inappropriate shocks. One patient experienced sustained VT during AECD monitoring, who was successfully defibrillated (17 seconds after meeting programmed criteria. There are no events to report in the control arm. The patient survived the event without neurological complications. During the same time period, mean time to

  17. Targeted Temperature Management After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Due To Drowning: Outcomes and Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moler, Frank W; Hutchison, Jamie S; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Silverstein, Faye S; Meert, Kathleen L; Holubkov, Richard; Page, Kent; Slomine, Beth S; Christensen, James R; Dean, J Michael

    2016-08-01

    To describe outcomes and complications in the drowning subgroup from the Therapeutic Hypothermia After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Out-of-Hospital trial. Exploratory post hoc cohort analysis. Twenty-four PICUs. Pediatric drowning cases. Therapeutic hypothermia versus therapeutic normothermia. An exploratory study of pediatric drowning from the Therapeutic Hypothermia After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Out-of-Hospital trial was conducted. Comatose patients aged more than 2 days and less than 18 years were randomized up to 6 hours following return-of-circulation to hypothermia (n = 46) or normothermia (n = 28). Outcomes assessed included 12-month survival with a Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale score of greater than or equal to 70, 1-year survival rate, change in Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale-II score from prearrest to 12 months, and select safety measures. Seventy-four drowning cases were randomized. In patients with prearrest Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale-II greater than or equal to 70 (n = 65), there was no difference in 12-month survival with Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale-II score of greater than or equal to 70 between hypothermia and normothermia groups (29% vs 17%; relative risk, 1.74; 95% CI, 0.61-4.95; p = 0.27). Among all evaluable patients (n = 68), the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale-II score change from baseline to 12 months did not differ (p = 0.46), and 1-year survival was similar (49% hypothermia vs 42%, normothermia; relative risk, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.68-1.99; p = 0.58). Hypothermia was associated with a higher prevalence of positive bacterial culture (any blood, urine, or respiratory sample; 67% vs 43%; p = 0.04); however, the rate per 100 days at risk did not differ (11.1 vs 8.4; p = 0.46). Cumulative incidence of blood product use, serious arrhythmias, and 28-day mortality were not different. Among patients with cardiopulmonary resuscitation durations more than 30 minutes or epinephrine doses greater than 4, none had favorable Pediatric Cerebral

  18. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to acute myocardial infarction in Denmark in the years 2001-2012, a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Lassen, Jens F

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to describe the implantation of implantable cardioverter defibrillator after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest caused by myocardial infarction in Denmark 2001-2012 and subsequent survival. METHODS: The Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry was used to identify patients ⩾18...... years surviving to discharge without prior implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Information on cardioverter defibrillator implantation was obtained from the National Patient Registry. RESULTS: We identified 974 myocardial infarction-out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients surviving to hospital...... discharge, 130 of these patients (13%) had a cardioverter defibrillator implanted early (⩽40 days post-out-of-hospital cardiac arrest), 58 patients (6%) had late implantable cardioverter defibrillator (41-365 days post-out-of-hospital cardiac arrest). Odds of implantable cardioverter defibrillator...

  19. Brain stem death as the vital determinant for resumption of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest in rats.

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    Alice Y W Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spontaneous circulation returns to less than half of adult cardiac arrest victims who received in-hospital resuscitation. One clue for this disheartening outcome arises from the prognosis that asystole invariably takes place, after a time lag, on diagnosis of brain stem death. The designation of brain stem death as the point of no return further suggests that permanent impairment of the brain stem cardiovascular regulatory machinery precedes death. It follows that a crucial determinant for successful revival of an arrested heart is that spontaneous circulation must resume before brain stem death commences. Here, we evaluated the hypothesis that maintained functional integrity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, a neural substrate that is intimately related to brain stem death and central circulatory regulation, holds the key to the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An animal model of brain stem death employing the pesticide mevinphos as the experimental insult in Sprague-Dawley rats was used. Intravenous administration of lethal doses of mevinphos elicited an abrupt cardiac arrest, accompanied by elevated systemic arterial pressure and anoxia, augmented neuronal excitability and enhanced microvascular perfusion in RVLM. This period represents the vital time-window between cardiac arrest and resumption of spontaneous circulation in our experimental model. Animals with restored spontaneous circulation exhibited maintained neuronal functionality in RVLM beyond this critical time-window, alongside resumption of baseline tissue oxygen and enhancement of local blood flow. Intriguingly, animals that subsequently died manifested sustained anoxia, diminished local blood flow, depressed mitochondrial electron transport activities and reduced ATP production, leading to necrotic cell death in RVLM. That amelioration of mitochondrial dysfunction and

  20. Asystolic Cardiac Arrest of Unknown Duration in Profound Hypothermia and Polysubstance Overdose: A Case Report of Complete Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubana, Sandeep Singh; Genin, Dennis Iilya; Singh, Navdeep; De La Cruz, Angel

    2015-06-08

    Opioid addiction and overdose is a serious problem worldwide. Fatal overdoses from opioids are responsible for numerous deaths and are increasing, especially if taken in combination with other psychoactive substances. Combined with environmental exposure, opioid overdose can cause profound hypothermia. Opioid abuse and other drugs of abuse impair thermoregulation, leading to severe hypothermia. Both drug overdose and severe hypothermia can cause cardiac arrest. We report a case of 20-year-old man with history of polysubstance abuse presenting with severe hypothermia and asystole of unknown duration with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) achieved after 28 minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Urine toxicology was positive for cocaine, heroin, and benzodiazepine, along with positive blood alcohol level. The patient was rewarmed using non-invasive techniques. Hospital course was complicated by acute renal failure (ARF), severe rhabdomyolysis, severe hyperkalemia, ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), shock liver, coagulopathy, and aspiration pneumonia. Survival with full cardiovascular and neurologic recovery after a cardiac arrest caused by drug overdose in the setting of severe hypothermia is still possible, even if the cardiac arrest is of unknown or prolonged duration. Patients with severe hypothermia experiencing cardiac arrest/hemodynamic instability can be rewarmed using non-invasive methods and may not necessarily need invasive rewarming techniques.

  1. Systematic downloading and analysis of data from automated external defibrillators used in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marco Bo; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Valuable information can be retrieved from automated external defibrillators (AEDs) used in victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We describe our experience with systematic downloading of data from deployed AEDs. The primary aim was to compare the proportion of shockable...... to be witnessed (92% vs. 34%, p

  2. Global incidences of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and survival rates: Systematic review of 67 prospective studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Berdowski; R.A. Berg; J.G.P. Tijssen; R.W. Koster

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this investigation was to estimate and contrast the global incidence and outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) to provide a better understanding of the variability in risk and survival of OHCA. Methods: We conducted a review of published English-language articles about inc

  3. Quality of evidence in studies evaluating neuroimaging for neurologic prognostication in adult patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, David K; Geocadin, Romergryko G; Greer, David M

    2014-02-01

    Neuroimaging has been proposed as a predictor of neurologic outcome in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. We reviewed the quality and level of evidence of the current neuroimaging literature for predicting neurologic outcome in cardiac arrest patients treated with or without therapeutic hypothermia (TH). Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane Databases were searched using the terms "cardiac arrest," "cardiopulmonary resuscitation," "brain hypoxia," "brain anoxia," "brain hypoxia-ischaemia," "neuroimaging," and "prognosis." Eligible studies were reviewed and classified by level of evidence and methodological quality as defined by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). 928 studies were identified, 84 of which met inclusion criteria: 74 were supportive of neuroimaging to predict outcome, eight unsupportive, and two equivocal. Several studies investigated more than one imaging modality: 27 investigated computed tomography (CT), 46 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 18 alternate imaging modalities, including positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. No randomized controlled trials were identified. Seven cohort and case control studies were identified, only one of which was graded "good" quality, two were "fair" and four were "poor." Neuroimaging is an evolving modality as a prognostic parameter in cardiac arrest survivors. However, the quality of the available literature is not robust, highlighting the need for higher quality studies before neuroimaging can be supported as a standard tool for prognostication in the patient population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls - a systematic review of observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Rothman, Josephine Philip

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The medical dispatcher plays an essential role as part of the first link in the Chain of Survival, by recognising the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) during the emergency call, dispatching the appropriate first responder or emergency medical services response, performing...

  5. Improved survival after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest using new guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, Jacob; Barnung, S.; Nielsen, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a poor prognosis. We hypothesized that the implementations of 2005 European Resuscitation Council resuscitation guidelines were associated with improved 30-day survival after OHCA. METHODS: We prospectively recorded data on all...... that 30-day survival increased after the implementation from 31/372 (8.3%) to 67/419 (16%), P=0.001. ROSC at hospital admission, as well as survival to hospital discharge, were obtained in a significantly higher proportion from 23.4% to 39.1%, P.... Treatment after implementation was confirmed as a significant predictor of better 30-day survival in a logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSION: The implementation of new resuscitation guidelines was associated with improved 30-day survival after OHCA Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8...

  6. Prolonged cardiac arrest complicating a massive ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction associated with marijuana consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Orsini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recreational substance use and misuse constitute a major public health issue. The annual rate of recreational drug overdose-related deaths is increasing exponentially, making unintentional overdose as the leading cause of injury-related deaths in the United States. Marijuana is the most widely used recreational illicit drug, with approximately 200 million users worldwide. Although it is generally regarded as having low acute toxicity, heavy marijuana usage has been associated with life-threatening consequences. Marijuana is increasingly becoming legal in the United States for both medical and recreational use. Although the most commonly seen adverse effects resulting from its consumption are typically associated with neurobehavioral and gastrointestinal symptoms, cases of severe toxicity involving the cardiovascular system have been reported. In this report, the authors describe a case of cannabis-associated ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction leading to a prolonged cardiac arrest.

  7. Identifying non-technical skills and barriers for improvement of teamwork in cardiac arrest teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.O.; Jensen, Michael Kammer; Lippert, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The application of non-technical skills (NTSs) in health care has previously been described in other health-care educational programmes. NTSs are behavioural principles such as leadership, task distribution and communication. The aim of this study was to identify NTSs suitable...... and data analysis were supported by a template describing 25 NTSs derived from other educational programmes in health care. Results: A framework with five categories relating to NTSs was identified: leadership, communication, mutual performance monitoring, maintenance of standards and guidelines and task...... management. Important barriers that were identified were inexperienced team leaders, task overload and hierarchic structure in the teams' inability to maintain focus on chest compressions. Conclusion: Interview participants pointed out that NTSs of teams could improve the treatment of cardiac arrest...

  8. Prolonged cardiac arrest complicating a massive ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction associated with marijuana consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Jose; Blaak, Christa; Rajayer, Salil; Gurung, Vikash; Tam, Eric; Morante, Joaquin; Shamian, Ben; Malik, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Recreational substance use and misuse constitute a major public health issue. The annual rate of recreational drug overdose-related deaths is increasing exponentially, making unintentional overdose as the leading cause of injury-related deaths in the United States. Marijuana is the most widely used recreational illicit drug, with approximately 200 million users worldwide. Although it is generally regarded as having low acute toxicity, heavy marijuana usage has been associated with life-threatening consequences. Marijuana is increasingly becoming legal in the United States for both medical and recreational use. Although the most commonly seen adverse effects resulting from its consumption are typically associated with neurobehavioral and gastrointestinal symptoms, cases of severe toxicity involving the cardiovascular system have been reported. In this report, the authors describe a case of cannabis-associated ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction leading to a prolonged cardiac arrest. PMID:27609717

  9. Recognising out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls increases bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Initiation of early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) depends on bystanders' or medical dispatchers' recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The primary aim of our study was to investigate if OHCA recognition during the emergency call was associated...... with bystander CPR, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and 30-day survival. Our secondary aim was to identify patient-, setting-, and dispatcher-related predictors of OHCA recognition. METHODS: We performed an observational study of all OHCA patients' emergency calls in the Capital Region of Denmark from...... the association between OHCA recognition and bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of OHCA recognition. RESULTS: We included 779 emergency calls in the analyses. During the emergency calls, 70.1% (n=534) of OHCAs were recognised...

  10. Long range correlations in the heart rate variability following the injury of cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shanbao; Jiang, Dineng; Wang, Ziming; Zhu, Yisheng; Geocadin, Romeryko G.; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2007-07-01

    Cardiovascular and neurological recovery following cardiac arrest (CA) largely influence the morbidity and mortality of the patients. Monitoring the cardiovascular system has been an important clinical issue in intensive care unit (ICU). On the other hand, the rhythms of the heart rate variability following CA are still not fully understood, and there are limited number of literatures reporting the cardiovascular function recovery following CA. In this paper, we studied the scaling properties of heart rate variability (HRV) after CA by centered-moving-average-based detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Our results showed that the scaling factor of the baseline HRV is close to that of Brownian motion, and after a CA event it shifts to a 1/f noise-like rhythm. DFA could be a promising tool in evaluating the cardiovascular long term recovery following CA injury.

  11. How to develop a clinic for sudden cardiac arrest survivors and families of non-survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Dominic J

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of the aetiology of sudden cardiac arrest or death in a young person combines features of a traditional clinical medical examination with those of forensic medicine. Nuances of the immediate peri-event history, when available, can be paramount. New genetic tools have greatly improved the yield of such investigations, but they must be carefully interpreted by genetic specialists. The approach to surviving patients, their family members, and to family members of non-survivors is best achieved in a structured programme that includes all appropriate specialists and support personnel. As an example, this may include all appropriate paediatric and internal medicine specialists, a geneticist, a genetic counsellor, a clinical psychologist, nurse specialist(s), and a programme coordinator. This family-centred strategy affords the patient, if surviving, and all family members the necessary emotional and medical support while at the same time providing the necessary diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  12. Barriers to recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency medical calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfsen, David; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Egerod, Ingrid;

    2015-01-01

    as influential factors. Though many of these factors are included in the algorithms used by medical dispatchers, many OHCA still remain not recognised. Qualitative studies investigating the communication between the caller and dispatcher are very scarce. There is a lack of knowledge about what influences...... the dispatchers' recognition of OHCA, focusing on the communication during the emergency call. The purpose of this study is to identify factors affecting medical dispatchers' recognition of OHCA during emergency calls in a qualitative analysis of calls. METHODS: An investigator triangulated inductive thematic...... analysis of recordings of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest emergency calls from December 2012. Participants were the callers (bystanders) and the emergency medical dispatchers. Data were analysed using a hermeneutic approach. RESULTS: Based on the concept of data saturation, 13 recordings of not recognised...

  13. The effect of targeted temperature management on coagulation parameters and bleeding events after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Marrit; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Targeted temperature management (TTM) is part of the standard treatment of comatose patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) to attenuate neurological injury. In other clinical settings, hypothermia promotes coagulopathy leading to an increase in bleeding and thrombosis tendency...

  14. Assessment of the quality of existing patient educational tools focused on sudden cardiac arrest: a systematic evaluation by the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Thought Leadership Alliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazelton G

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Garrett Hazelton,1 Sana M Al-Khatib,2,3 Gregg C Fonarow,4 Kevin L Thomas,3 David Hayes,5 Gillian D Sanders,2,3 Susan M Campbell,6 Clyde Yancy,7 Eric D Peterson,2,3 Samuel Sears8 1Department of Psychiatric Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, 2Duke Clinical Research Institute, 3Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, 4Division of Cardiology, Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 5Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, 6WomenHeart, The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease, Washington, DC, 7Division of Cardiology, Feinburg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, 8Departments of Psychology and Cardiology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA Background: Conveying contemporary treatment options for those at risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA is challenging. The purpose of the present research was to evaluate the quality and usability of available patient educational tools relevant to SCA and its treatment options, such as implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs. We hypothesized that this review would identify gaps in areas of information for the enhancement of patient education and decision-making materials. Methods: We used a formal instrument to assess specific domains of content, development, and effectiveness of 18 available SCA and ICD educational tools. The multidisciplinary review panel included two electrophysiologists, two general cardiologists, a cardiac psychologist, a health services researcher, and a patient advocate. Results: Of the 18 education tools, four were rated as “good, may need revisions, but sufficient for use”, 12 were rated as “marginal, needs revision prior to use”, and two were rated as “poor, inadequate for use”. None of the tools were rated as being of “very good” or “excellent” quality. Conclusion: There appear to be opportunities to improve the quality and completeness of existing educational tools for

  15. Risk Factor Analyses for the Return of Spontaneous Circulation in the Asphyxiation Cardiac Arrest Porcine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Jun Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Animal models of asphyxiation cardiac arrest (ACA are frequently used in basic research to mirror the clinical course of cardiac arrest (CA. The rates of the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC in ACA animal models are lower than those from studies that have utilized ventricular fibrillation (VF animal models. The purpose of this study was to characterize the factors associated with the ROSC in the ACA porcine model. Methods: Forty-eight healthy miniature pigs underwent endotracheal tube clamping to induce CA. Once induced, CA was maintained untreated for a period of 8 min. Two minutes following the initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, defibrillation was attempted until ROSC was achieved or the animal died. To assess the factors associated with ROSC in this CA model, logistic regression analyses were performed to analyze gender, the time of preparation, the amplitude spectrum area (AMSA from the beginning of CPR and the pH at the beginning of CPR. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to evaluate the predictive value of AMSA for ROSC. Results: ROSC was only 52.1% successful in this ACA porcine model. The multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that ROSC significantly depended on the time of preparation, AMSA at the beginning of CPR and pH at the beginning of CPR. The area under the ROC curve in for AMSA at the beginning of CPR was 0.878 successful in predicting ROSC (95% confidence intervals: 0.773∼0.983, and the optimum cut-off value was 15.62 (specificity 95.7% and sensitivity 80.0%. Conclusions: The time of preparation, AMSA and the pH at the beginning of CPR were associated with ROSC in this ACA porcine model. AMSA also predicted the likelihood of ROSC in this ACA animal model.

  16. Recognising out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls increases bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Bækgaard, Josefine Stokholm; Claesson, Andreas; Hollenberg, Jacob; Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy K

    2017-06-01

    Initiation of early bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) depends on bystanders' or medical dispatchers' recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The primary aim of our study was to investigate if OHCA recognition during the emergency call was associated with bystander CPR, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and 30-day survival. Our secondary aim was to identify patient-, setting-, and dispatcher-related predictors of OHCA recognition. We performed an observational study of all OHCA patients' emergency calls in the Capital Region of Denmark from 01/01/2013-31/12/2013. OHCAs were collected from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry and the Mobile Critical Care Unit database. Emergency call recordings were identified and evaluated. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied to all OHCAs and witnessed OHCAs only to analyse the association between OHCA recognition and bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of OHCA recognition. We included 779 emergency calls in the analyses. During the emergency calls, 70.1% (n=534) of OHCAs were recognised; OHCA recognition was positively associated with bystander CPR (odds ratio [OR]=7.84, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.10-12.05) in all OHCAs; and ROSC (OR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.13-3.06) and 30-day survival (OR=2.80, 95% CI: 1.58-4.96) in witnessed OHCA. Predictors of OHCA recognition were addressing breathing (OR=1.76, 95% CI: 1.17-2.66) and callers located by the patient's side (OR=2.16, 95% CI: 1.46-3.19). Recognition of OHCA during emergency calls was positively associated with the provision of bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival in witnessed OHCA. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Neurobehavioral Outcomes in Children After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomine, Beth S; Silverstein, Faye S; Christensen, James R; Holubkov, Richard; Page, Kent; Dean, J Michael; Moler, Frank W

    2016-04-01

    This study examined 12-month neurobehavioral outcomes in children who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OH-CA), were comatose after resuscitation, and were enrolled in a clinical trial to evaluate targeted temperature management to hypothermia (33.0°C) or normothermia (36.8°C) (Therapeutic Hypothermia after Pediatric Cardiac Arrest, Out-of-Hopsital [THAPCA-OH]; NCT00878644). Baseline functioning was assessed by caregiver responses on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-Second Edition (VABS-II) soon after OH-CA (based on functioning before OH-CA); children with broadly normal baseline functioning (VABS-II ≥70) were included in the THAPCA-OH primary outcome. VABS-II was completed again 12 months later. Then, face-to-face cognitive evaluations were completed. Analyses evaluated changes in VABS-II composite, domain, and subdomain scores and cognitive functioning at follow-up. Ninety-six of 295 enrolled children were alive at 12 months; 87 of 96 had broadly normal baseline functioning (VABS-II ≥70). Follow-up was obtained on 85/87. Forty-two of 85 had VABS-II ≥70 at 12 months. VABS-II composite, domain, and subdomain scores declined significantly between baseline and 12-month follow-up (P VABS-II scores were predictive of greater decline in neurobehavioral function. Treatment with hypothermia did not influence neurobehavioral outcomes. This is the largest study exploring long-term neurobehavioral outcomes in children surviving OH-CA who were comatose after resuscitation. Results revealed significant neurobehavioral morbidity across multiple functional domains, based both on caregiver reports and performance on objective cognitive measures, in survivors 1 year later. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Functional Outcome Trajectories after Out-of Hospital Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Faye S; Slomine, Beth; Christensen, James; Holubkov, Richard; Page, Kent; Dean, J. Michael; Moler, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze functional performance measures collected prospectively during the conduct of a clinical trial that enrolled children (up to age 18 years), resuscitated after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, who were at high risk for poor outcomes. Design Children with Glasgow Motor Scales VABS-II) score ≥70, did not differ between groups. Setting 38 North American pediatric ICU’s. Participants 295 children were enrolled; 270/295 had baseline VABS-II scores ≥70; 87/270 survived one year. Interventions Targeted temperatures were 33.0°C and 36.8°C for hypothermia and normothermia groups. Measurements and Main Results Baseline measures included VABS-II, Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category(PCPC), and Pediatric Overall Performance Category (POPC). PCPC and POPC were rescored at hospital discharges; all three were scored at 3 and 12 months. In survivors with baseline VABS-II scores ≥70, we evaluated relationships of hospital discharge PCPC with 3 and 12 month scores, and between 3 and 12 month VABS-II scores. Hospital discharge PCPC scores strongly predicted 3 and 12 month PCPC (r=0.82,0.79; pVABS-II scores (r=−0.81,−0.77; pVABS-II scores strongly predicted 12 month performance (r=0.95, p<0.0001). Hypothermia treatment did not alter these relationships. Conclusions In comatose children, with Glasgow Motor Scales <5 in the initial hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitation, function scores at hospital discharge and at 3 months predicted 12-month performance well in the majority of survivors. PMID:27509385

  19. Functional Outcome Trajectories After Out-of-Hospital Pediatric Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Faye S; Slomine, Beth S; Christensen, James; Holubkov, Richard; Page, Kent; Dean, J Michael; Moler, Frank W

    2016-12-01

    To analyze functional performance measures collected prospectively during the conduct of a clinical trial that enrolled children (up to age 18 yr old), resuscitated after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, who were at high risk of poor outcomes. Children with Glasgow Motor Scale score less than 5, within 6 hours of resuscitation, were enrolled in a clinical trial that compared two targeted temperature management interventions (THAPCA-OH, NCT00878644). The primary outcome, 12-month survival with Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, second edition, score greater or equal to 70, did not differ between groups. Thirty-eight North American PICUs. Two hundred ninety-five children were enrolled; 270 of 295 had baseline Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, second edition, scores greater or equal to 70; 87 of 270 survived 1 year. Targeted temperatures were 33.0°C and 36.8°C for hypothermia and normothermia groups. Baseline measures included Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, second edition, Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category, and Pediatric Overall Performance Category. Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category and Pediatric Overall Performance Category were rescored at hospital discharges; all three were scored at 3 and 12 months. In survivors with baseline Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, second edition scores greater or equal to 70, we evaluated relationships of hospital discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category with 3- and 12-month scores and between 3- and 12-month Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, second edition, scores. Hospital discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category scores strongly predicted 3- and 12-month Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category (r = 0.82 and 0.79; p Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, second edition, scores (r = -0.81 and -0.77; p Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, second edition, scores strongly predicted 12-month performance (r = 0.95; p Scale score less than 5 in the initial hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitation

  20. Greater temperature variability is not associated with a worse neurological outcome after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Leda; Lamanna, Irene; Fontana, Vito; Donadello, Katia; Dell'anna, Antonio Maria; Creteur, Jacques; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Pappalardo, Federico; Taccone, Fabio Silvio

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous alterations in temperature homeostasis after cardiac arrest (CA) are associated with worse outcome. However, it remains unclear the prognostic role of temperature variability (TV) during cooling procedures. We hypothesized that low TV during targeted temperature management (TTM) would be associated with a favourable neurological outcome after CA. We reviewed data from all comatose patients after in-hospital or out-of-hospital CA admitted to our Department of Intensive Care between December 2006 and January 2014 who underwent TTM (32-34°C) and survived at least 24h. We collected demographic data, CA characteristics, intensive care unit (ICU) survival and neurological outcome at three months (favourable neurological outcome was defined as cerebral performance category 1-2). TV was expressed using the standard deviation (SD) of all temperature measurements during hypothermia; high TV was defined as an SD >1°C. Of the 301 patients admitted over the study period, 72 patients were excluded and a total of 229 patients were studied; 88 had a favourable neurological outcome. The median temperature on ICU admission was 35.8 [34.9-36.9]°C and the median time to hypothermia (body temperature risk factors for high TV. Younger age, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, shorter time to return of spontaneous circulation, cardiac origin of arrest, shockable rhythm and longer time to target temperature were independent predictors of favourable neurological outcome, but TV was not. Among comatose survivors treated with TTM after CA, 25% of patients had high TV; however, this was not associated with a worse neurologic outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. GWAS for discovery and replication of genetic loci associated with sudden cardiac arrest in patients with coronary artery disease

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    Olgin Jeffrey E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiologic evidence suggests a heritable component to risk for sudden cardiac arrest independent of risk for myocardial infarction. Recent candidate gene association studies for community sudden cardiac arrests have focused on a limited number of biological pathways and yielded conflicting results. We sought to identify novel gene associations for sudden cardiac arrest in patients with coronary artery disease by performing a genome-wide association study. Methods Tagging SNPs (n = 338,328 spanning the genome were typed in a case-control study comparing 89 patients with coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation to 520 healthy controls. Results Fourteen SNPs including 7 SNPs among 7 genes (ACYP2, AP1G2, ESR1, DGES2, GRIA1, KCTD1, ZNF385B were associated with sudden cardiac arrest (all p -7, following Bonferroni correction and adjustment for population substructure, age, and sex; genetic variation in ESR1 (p = 2.62 × 10-8; Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.43, 95% confidence interval [CI]:1.277, 1.596 has previously been established as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In tandem, the role of 9 genes for monogenic long QT syndrome (LQT1-9 was assessed, yielding evidence of association with CACNA1C (LQT8; p = 3.09 × 10-4; OR = 1.18, 95% CI:1.079, 1.290. We also assessed 4 recently published gene associations for sudden cardiac arrest, validating NOS1AP (p = 4.50 × 10-2, OR = 1.15, 95% CI:1.003, 1.326, CSMD2 (p = 6.6 × 10-3, OR = 2.27, 95% CI:1.681, 2.859, and AGTR1 (p = 3.00 × 10-3, OR = 1.13, 95% CI:1.042, 1.215. Conclusion We demonstrate 11 gene associations for sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation in patients with coronary artery disease. Validation studies in independent cohorts and functional studies are required to confirm these associations.

  2. Association of mechanical chest compression and prehospital thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenaitia, Hichem; Fournier, Marc; Brun, Jean Paul; Michelet, Pierre; Auffray, Jean Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common cause of sudden death; the use of prehospital thrombolysis is currently a last-resort option and requires a prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Novel mechanical devices have recently been introduced that provides automatic mechanical chest compression (AMCC) according to the guidelines and continually without decrease efficiency throughout prolonged resuscitation. A 54 year-old woman with a history of breast cancer experienced sudden chest pain and severe dyspnea. A mobile intensive care unit was dispatched to her home. During physical examination, she suddenly collapsed with pulseless electrical activity as the initial rhythm. Prehospital thrombolysis during CPR combined with use of AMCC was performed based on a strongly suspected diagnosis of massive PE. After 75 minutes of effective CPR, return of spontaneous circulation was attained. After admission to an intensive care unit, computed tomographic scan confirmed bilateral PE. The patient was discharged 3 weeks after CPR in good neurologic condition. To our knowledge, this is the first case describing combined use of thrombolysis and AMCC in out-ofhospital cardiac arrest. However, for the time being, prehospital thrombolysis in CPR continues to be a measure that should only be performed on a case-by-case basis based on informed decision. Further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of AMCC with thrombolysis and thus prolonged CPR.

  3. Impact of a novel, resource appropriate resuscitation curriculum on Nicaraguan resident physician’s management of cardiac arrest

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    Breena R. Taira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Project Strengthening Emergency Medicine, Investing in Learners in Latin America (SEMILLA created a novel, language and resource appropriate course for the resuscitation of cardiac arrest for Nicaraguan resident physicians. We hypothesized that participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program would significantly improve the physician’s management of simulated code scenarios. Methods: Thirteen Nicaraguan resident physicians were evaluated while managing simulated cardiac arrest scenarios before, immediately, and at 6 months after participating in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program. This project was completed in 2014 in Leon, Nicaragua. The Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest, a validated scoring system, was used to evaluate performance on a standardized simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Mixed effect logistic regression models were constructed to assess outcomes. Results: On the pre-course simulation exam, only 7.7% of subjects passed the test. Immediately post-course, the subjects achieved a 30.8% pass rate and at 6 months after the course, the pass rate was 46.2%. Compared with pre-test scores, the odds of passing the CASTest at 6 months after the course were 21.7 times higher (95% CI 4.2 to 112.8, P<0.001. Statistically significant improvement was also seen on the number of critical items completed (OR=3.75, 95% CI 2.71-5.19, total items completed (OR=4.55, 95% CI 3.4-6.11, and number of “excellent” scores on a Likert scale (OR=2.66, 95% CI 1.85-3.81. Conclusions: Nicaraguan resident physicians demonstrate improved ability to manage simulated cardiac arrest scenarios after participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation course and retain these skills.

  4. Therapeutic effect analysis of prehospital first aid in patients with cardiopulmonary arrest caused by e-lectrical shock%电击致心跳呼吸骤停患者院前急救的疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭云泊

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨院前急救对电击致心跳呼吸骤停患者救治的意义。方法:选择2002年7月~2014年2月间我市社区健康服务中心收治的因电击伤致心跳呼吸骤停患者85例,探讨院前急救不同因素对复苏成功率、出院存活率的影响。结果:全组心跳呼吸骤停患者经院前急救后,心跳、呼吸恢复者21例(24.7%),患者存活并出院者13例(15.3%)。年龄高于60岁的高电压击伤的复苏成功率、出院存活率有所降低,但与<60岁组与低电压击伤组比较差异无显著性(P >0.05),电击后至行心肺复苏急救的时间<5 min 的患者的复苏成功率、出院存活率最高,且随着施救时间的延长(<5min,5~11min,11~16min,>16min),复苏成功率(58.33%比31.58%比8.00%比0%)、出院存活率(58.33%比15.79%比0%比0%)显著降低(P <0.05或<0.01)。结论:及早进行心肺复苏等院前急救措施,能够有效改善电击致心跳呼吸骤停患者的预后。%Objective:To explore clinical significance of prehospital first aid in treatment of patients with cardiopul-monary arrest caused by electrical shock.Methods:A total of 85 patients with cardiopulmonary arrest caused by e-lectrical shock,who hospitalized in our community health service center from Jul 2002 to Feb 2014,were selected. Influence of different factors of prehospital first aid on success rate of recovery and survival rate were explored.Re-sults:After prehospital first aid,heart beat and respiration recovered in 21 cases (24.7%)and 13 patients (15.3%) survived and discharged in 85 subjects.Success rate of recovery and survival rate on discharge in patients with age ≥60 years and high voltage wound were lower,but without significant difference compared with those of 0.05);for the time from electric shock to cardiopulmonary resuscitation,success rate of recovery and survival rate on discharge were the highest in

  5. Effects of Intraosseous Tibial vs. Intravenous Vasopressin in a Hypovolemic Cardiac Arrest Model

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    Justin Fulkerson, MSN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study compared the effects of vasopressin via tibial intraosseous (IO and intravenous (IV routes on maximum plasma concentration (Cmax, the time to maximum concentration (Tmax, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, and time to ROSC in a hypovolemic cardiac arrest model. Methods: This study was a randomized prospective, between-subjects experimental design. A computer program randomly assigned 28 Yorkshire swine to one of four groups: IV (n=7, IO tibia (n=7, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR + defibrillation (n=7, and a control group that received just CPR (n=7. Ventricular fibrillation was induced, and subjects remained in arrest for two minutes. CPR was initiated and 40 units of vasopressin were administered via IO or IV routes. Blood samples were collected at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, and 4 minutes. CPR and defibrillation were initiated for 20 minutes or until ROSC was achieved. We measured vasopressin concentrations using highperformance liquid chromatography. Results: There was no significant difference between the IO and IV groups relative to achieving ROSC (p=1.0 but a significant difference between the IV compared to the CPR+ defibrillation group (p=0.031 and IV compared to the CPR-only group (p=0.001. There was a significant difference between the IO group compared to the CPR+ defibrillation group (p=0.031 and IO compared to the CPR-only group (p=0.001. There was no significant difference between the CPR + defibrillation group and the CPR group (p=0.127. There was no significant difference in Cmax between the IO and IV groups (p=0.079. The mean ± standard deviation of Cmax of the IO group was 58,709±25,463pg/mL compared to the IV group, which was 106,198±62,135pg/mL. There was no significant difference in mean Tmax between the groups (p=0.084. There were no significant differences in odds of ROSC between the tibial IO and IV groups. Conclusion: Prompt access to the vascular system using the IO route can circumvent

  6. Establishing the Aus-ROC Australian and New Zealand out-of-hospital cardiac arrest Epistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Ben; Bray, Janet; Smith, Karen; Walker, Tony; Grantham, Hugh; Hein, Cindy; Thorrowgood, Melanie; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Tony; Dicker, Bridget; Swain, Andy; Bailey, Mark; Bosley, Emma; Pemberton, Katherine; Cameron, Peter; Nichol, Graham; Finn, Judith

    2016-04-05

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a global health problem with low survival. Regional variation in survival has heightened interest in combining cardiac arrest registries to understand and improve OHCA outcomes. While individual OHCA registries exist in Australian and New Zealand ambulance services, until recently these registries have not been combined. The aim of this protocol paper is to describe the rationale and methods of the Australian Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (Aus-ROC) OHCA epidemiological registry (Epistry). The Aus-ROC Epistry is designed as a population-based cohort study. Data collection started in 2014. Six ambulance services in Australia (Ambulance Victoria, SA Ambulance Service, St John Ambulance Western Australia and Queensland Ambulance Service) and New Zealand (St John New Zealand and Wellington Free Ambulance) currently contribute data. All OHCA attended by ambulance, regardless of aetiology or patient age, are included in the Epistry. The catchment population is approximately 19.3 million persons, representing 63% of the Australian population and 100% of the New Zealand population. Data are collected using Utstein-style definitions. Information incorporated into the Epistry includes demographics, arrest features, ambulance response times, treatment and patient outcomes. The primary outcome is 'survival to hospital discharge', with 'return of spontaneous circulation' as a key secondary outcome. Ethics approval was independently sought by each of the contributing registries. Overarching ethics for the Epistry was provided by Monash University HREC (Approval No. CF12/3938-2012001888). A population-based OHCA registry capturing the majority of Australia and New Zealand will allow risk-adjusted outcomes to be determined, to enable benchmarking across ambulance providers, facilitate the identification of system-wide strategies associated with survival from OHCA, and allow monitoring of temporal trends in process and outcomes to improve

  7. Comparison of use and role of adrenaline and amiodarone in cardiac arrest: Case of emergency center in Kosovo

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    Basri Lenjani

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Anti-arrhythmic drugs as with vasopressors, the evidence that anti-arrhythmic drugs are of benefit in cardiac is limited. No anti-arrhythmic drug given during human cardiac arrest has been shown to increase survival to hospital discharge, although amiodarone has been shown to increase survival to hospital admission after shock-refractory VF/VT. There are no data on the use of amiodarone for shock-refractory VF/VT when single shocks are used. Despite the lack of human long-term outcome data, the balance of evidence is in favour of the use of some anti-arrhythmic drugs for the management of arrhythmias in cardiac arrest.

  8. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest risk attributable to temperature in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have estimated the associations between extreme temperatures and mortality and morbidity; however, few have investigated the attributable fraction for a wide range of temperatures on the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We obtained daily records of OHCA cases in the 47 Japanese prefectures between 2005 and 2014. We examined the relationship between OHCA and temperature for each prefecture using a Poisson regression model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model. The estimated prefecture-specific associations were pooled at the nationwide level using a multivariate random-effect meta-analysis. A total of 659,752 cases of OHCA of presumed-cardiac origin met the inclusion criteria. Overall, 23.93% (95% empirical confidence interval [eCI]: 20.15–26.19) of OHCA was attributable to temperature. The attributable fraction to low temperatures was 23.64% (95% eCI: 19.76–25.87), whereas that of high temperatures was 0.29% (95% eCI: 0.21–0.35). The attributable fraction for OHCA was related to moderate low temperature with an overall estimate of 21.86% (95% eCI: 18.10–24.21). Extreme temperatures were responsible for a small fraction. The majority of temperature-related OHCAs were attributable to lower temperatures. The attributable risk of extremely low and high temperatures was markedly lower than that of moderate temperatures.

  9. Comparison of Cerebral Metabolism between Pig Ventricular Fibrillation and Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Zhang; Chun-Sheng Li; Cai-Jun Wu; Jun Yang; Chen-Chen Hang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Morbidity and mortality after resuscitation largely depend on the recovery of brain function.Ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VFCA) and asphyxial cardiac arrest (ACA) are the two most prevalent causes of sudden cardiac death.Up to now,most studies have focused on VFCA.However,results from the two models have been largely variable.So,it is necessary to characterize the features of postresuscitation cerebral metabolism of both models.Methods:Forty-four Wuzhishan miniature inbred pigs were randomly divided into three groups:18 for VFCA group,ACA group,respectively,and other 8 for sham-operated group (SHAM).VFCA was induced by programmed electric stimulation,andACA was induced by endotracheal tube clamping.After 8 min without treatment,standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was initiated.Following neurological deficit scores (NDS) were evaluated at 24 h after achievement of spontaneous circulation,cerebral metabolism showed as the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was measured by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.Levels of serum markers of brain injury,neuron specific enolase (NSE),and S100β were quantified with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results:Compared with VFCA group,fewer ACA animals achieved restoration of spontaneous circulation (61.1% vs.94.4%,P < 0.01) and survived 24-h after resuscitation (38.9% vs.77.8%,P < 0.01) with worse neurological outcome (NDS:244.3 ± 15.3 vs.168.8 ± 9.71,P < 0.01).The CPR duration of ACA group was longer than that of VFCA group (8.1 ± 1.2 min vs.4.5 ± 1.1 min,P < 0.01).Cerebral energy metabolism showed as SUVmax in ACA was lower than in VFCA (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01).Higher serum biomarkers of brain damage (NSE,S100β) were found inACA than VFCA after resuscitation (P < 0.01).Conclusions:Compared with VFCA,ACA causes more severe cerebral metabolism injuries with less successful resuscitation and worse neurological outcome.

  10. Electrocardiographic changes during induced therapeutic hypothermia in comatose survivors after cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pablo; Salinas; Esteban; Lopez-de-Sa; Laura; Pena-Conde; Ana; Viana-Tejedor; Juan; Ramon; Rey-Blas; Eduardo; Armada; Jose; Luis; Lopez-Sendon

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the safety of therapeutic hypothermia(TH) concerning arrhythmias we analyzed serial electrocardiograms(ECG) during TH.METHODS: All patients recovered from a cardiac arrest with Glasgow < 9 at admission were treated with induced mild TH to 32-34℃. TH was obtained with cool fluid infusion or a specific intravascular device. Twelvelead ECG before,during,and after TH,as well as ECG telemetry data was recorded in all patients. From a total of 54 patients admitted with cardiac arrest during the study period,47 patients had the 3 ECG and telemetry data available. ECG analysis was blinded and performed with manual caliper by two independent cardiologists from blinded copies of original ECG,recorded at 25 mm/s and 10 mm/m V. Coronary care unit staff analyzed ECG telemetry for rhythm disturbances. Variables measured in ECG were rhythm,RR,PR,QT and corrected QT(QTc by Bazett formula,measured in lead v2) intervals,QRS duration,presence of Osborn’s J wave and U wave,as well as ST segment displacement and T wave amplitude in leads Ⅱ,v2 and v5.RESULTS: Heart rate went down an average of 19 bpm during hypothermia and increased again 16 bpm with rewarming(P < 0.0005,both). There was a nonsignificant prolongation of the PR interval during TH and a significant decrease with rewarming(P = 0.041). QRS duration significantly prolonged(P = 0.041) with TH and shortened back(P < 0.005) with rewarming. QTc interval presented a mean prolongation of 58 ms(P < 0.005) during TH and a significant shortening with rewarming of 22.2 ms(P = 0.017). Osborn or J wave was found in 21.3% of the patients. New arrhythmias occurred in 38.3% of the patients. Most frequent arrhythmia was non-sustained ventricular tachycardia(19.1%),followed by severe bradycardia or paced rhythm(10.6%),accelerated nodal rhythm(8.5%) and atrial fibrillation(6.4%). No life threatening arrhythmias(sustained ventricular tachycardia,polymorphic ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation) occurred

  11. Comparison of Cerebral Metabolism between Pig Ventricular Fibrillation and Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest Models

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    Yi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Morbidity and mortality after resuscitation largely depend on the recovery of brain function. Ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VFCA and asphyxial cardiac arrest (ACA are the two most prevalent causes of sudden cardiac death. Up to now, most studies have focused on VFCA. However, results from the two models have been largely variable. So, it is necessary to characterize the features of postresuscitation cerebral metabolism of both models. Methods: Forty-four Wuzhishan miniature inbred pigs were randomly divided into three groups: 18 for VFCA group, ACA group, respectively, and other 8 for sham-operated group (SHAM. VFCA was induced by programmed electric stimulation, and ACA was induced by endotracheal tube clamping. After 8 min without treatment, standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR was initiated. Following neurological deficit scores (NDS were evaluated at 24 h after achievement of spontaneous circulation, cerebral metabolism showed as the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax was measured by 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Levels of serum markers of brain injury, neuron specific enolase (NSE, and S100β were quantified with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Compared with VFCA group, fewer ACA animals achieved restoration of spontaneous circulation (61.1% vs. 94.4%, P < 0.01 and survived 24-h after resuscitation (38.9% vs. 77.8%, P < 0.01 with worse neurological outcome (NDS: 244.3 ± 15.3 vs. 168.8 ± 9.71, P < 0.01. The CPR duration of ACA group was longer than that of VFCA group (8.1 ± 1.2 min vs. 4.5 ± 1.1 min, P < 0.01. Cerebral energy metabolism showed as SUVmax in ACA was lower than in VFCA (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01. Higher serum biomarkers of brain damage (NSE, S100β were found in ACA than VFCA after resuscitation (P < 0.01. Conclusions: Compared with VFCA, ACA causes more severe cerebral metabolism injuries with less successful resuscitation and worse

  12. Thromboelastometric analysis of the risk factors for return of spontaneous circulation in adult patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koami, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Sakurai, Ryota; Ohta, Miho; Imahase, Hisashi; Yahata, Mayuko; Umeka, Mitsuru; Miike, Toru; Nagashima, Futoshi; Iwamura, Takashi; Yamada, Kosuke Chris; Inoue, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that coagulopathy is observed in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Thrombolytic therapy for those patients has been controversial until now. The purpose of this study was to identify a significant predictor for return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) of OHCA patients in the emergency department (ED) using whole blood viscoelastic testing. Adult non-trauma OHCA patients transported to our hospital that underwent thromboelastometry (ROTEM) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation between January 2013 and December 2015 were enrolled in this study. We divided patients into two groups based on the presence or absence of ROSC, and performed statistical analysis utilizing patient characteristics, prehospital data, laboratory data, and ROTEM data. Seventy-five patients were enrolled. The ROSC group and non-ROSC group included 23 and 52 patients, respectively. The logistic regression analysis, utilizing significant parameters by univariate analysis, demonstrated that lactate level [odds ratio (OR) 0.880, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.785-0.986, p = 0.028] and A30 of EXTEM test [OR 1.039, 95% CI 1.010-1.070, p = 0.009] were independent risk factors for ROSC. The cut-off values of lactate and A30 in EXTEM were 12.0 mmol/L and A 48.0 mm, respectively. We defined a positive prediction for ROSC if the patient presented lower lactate level (<12.0 mmol/L) and higher A30 of EXTEM (≥48.0 mm) with high specificity (94.7%) and accuracy (75.0%). The present study showed that lactate level and ROTEM parameter of clot firmness were reliable predictors of ROSC in the ED for adult patients with OHCA.

  13. Potential association of bystander-patient relationship with bystander response and patient survival in daytime out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshio; Maeda, Tetsuo; Kamikura, Takahisa; Nishi, Taiki; Omi, Wataru; Hashimoto, Masaaki; Sakagami, Satoru; Inaba, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether the bystander-patient relationship affects bystander response to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and patient outcomes depending on the time of day. This population-based observational study in Japan involving 139,265 bystander-witnessed OHCAs (90,426 family members, 10,479 friends/colleagues, and 38,360 others) without prehospital physician involvement was conducted from 2005 to 2009. Factors associated with better bystander response [early emergency call and bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BCPR)] and 1-month neurologically favourable survival were assessed. The rates of dispatcher-assisted CPR during daytime (7:00-18:59) and nighttime (19:00-6:59) were highest in family members (45.6% and 46.1%, respectively, for family members; 28.7% and 29.2%, respectively, for friends/colleagues; and 28.1% and 25.3%, respectively, for others). However, the BCPR rates were lowest in family members (35.5% and 37.8%, respectively, for family members; 43.7% and 37.8%, respectively, for friends/colleagues; and 59.3% and 50.0%, respectively, for others). Large delays (≥ 5 min) in placing emergency calls and initiating BCPR were most frequent in family members. The overall survival rate was lowest (2.7%) for family members and highest (9.1%) for friends/colleagues during daytime. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the effect of bystander relationship on survival was significant only during daytime [adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) for survival from daytime OHCAs with family as reference were 1.51 (1.36-1.68) for friends/colleagues and 1.23 (1.13-1.34) for others]. Family members are least likely to perform BCPR and OHCAs witnessed by family members are least likely to survive during daytime. Different strategies are required for family-witnessed OHCAs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of an intubating laryngeal mask airway on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in a developing emergency medical service system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Li-Chien; Hsu, Hsiang-Chin; Lin, Chih-Hao; Cheng, Ching-Fa; Tung, Yung-Chuang; Hung, Hsien-Cheng; Yeh, Yu-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Che

    2012-01-01

    An intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) is an alternative device for airway control, capable of providing effective ventilation in various situations. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of the ILMA and bag-valve-mask (BVM) ventilation devices on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. An ILMA training course was conducted by emergency medical technicians (EMTs). Before training, OHCA patients had received BVM ventilation; these patients were defined as the BVM group. After training, all EMTs in the area being served were instructed to immediately use an ILMA on OHCA patients when possible; these patients were defined as the ILMA group. Demographics, transport time, first arterial blood gas data, and the short-term outcomes of these two groups were analyzed. A total of 398 OHCA patients (89 in the BVM group and 309 in the ILMA group) were analyzed. All of the EMTs passed the training course, and ILMAs were used in the emergency settings. The ILMA was applied to each OHCA patient for a longer-than-average field time than the BVM (9.5 vs. 7.8 minutes, p = 0.006). The 24-hour survival rate of the ILMA-treated patients was significantly higher than BVM-treated patients (36.2% vs. 24.7%, p = 0.033). Well-trained EMTs were able to insert the ILMA and ventilate OHCA patients properly in prehospital settings, and ILMA-treated OHCA patients had better short-term outcomes than BVM-treated patients. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Cerebral oximetry and cerebral blood flow monitoring in 2 pediatric survivors with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramo, Thomas; Aggarwal, Nitin; Kane, Ian; Crossman, Kristen; Meredith, Mark

    2014-04-01

    In pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (POHCA), cardiovascular monitoring tools have improved resuscitative endeavors and cardiovascular outcomes but with still poor neurologic outcomes. Regarding cardiac arrest in patients with congenital heart disease during surgery, the application of cerebral oximetry with blood volume index (BVI) during the resuscitation has shown significant results and prognostic significance. We present 2 POHCA patients who had cerebral oximetry with BVI monitoring during their arrest and postarrest phase in the emergency department and its potential prognostic aspect.Basic procedures include left and right cerebral oximetry with BVI monitoring at every 5-second interval during cardiac arrest, resuscitation, and postarrest in 2 POHCA patients in the pediatric emergency department.Regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (rSo2) with BVI readings in these 2 POHCA survivors demonstrated interesting cerebral physiology, blood flow, and potential prognostic outcome. In 1 patient, the reference range of cerebral rSo2 with positive blood flow during arrest and postarrest phases consistently occurred. This neurologic monitoring had its significance when the resuscitation effectiveness was used and end-tidal CO2 changes were lost. The other patient's cerebral rSo2 with simultaneous BVI readings and trending showed the effectiveness of the emergency medical services (EMS) resuscitation.Cerebral oximetry with cerebral blood flow index monitoring in these POHCA survivors demonstrates compelling periarrest and postarrest cerebral physiology information and prognostication. Cerebral oximetry with cerebral BVI monitoring during these arrest phases has potential as a neurologic monitor for the resuscitative intervention's effectiveness and its possible neurologic prognostic application in the pediatric OCHA patients.

  16. The Value of Arterial Blood Gas Parameters for Prediction of Mortality in Survivors of Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Auenmueller, Katharina Isabel; Christ, Martin; Sasko, Benjamin Michel; Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and early prognostication remains challenging. There is a lack of valid parameters for the prediction of survival after cardiac arrest. This study aims to investigate if arterial blood gas parameters correlate with mortality of patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. All patients who were admitted to our hospital after resuscitation following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2013, were included in this retrospective study. The patient's survival 5 days after resuscitation defined the study end-point. For the statistical analysis, the mean, standard deviation, Student's t-test, Chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were used (level of significance P Arterial blood gas samples were taken from 170 patients. In particular, pH arterial blood gas parameters correlate with mortality of patients after out-of-hospital resuscitation. The most relevant parameters are pH and lactate because they are strongly and independently associated with mortality within the first 5 days after resuscitation. Despite this correlation, none of these parameters by oneself is strong enough to allow an early prognostication. Still, these parameters can contribute as part of a multimodal approach to assessing the patients' prognosis.

  17. Successful treatment of thyroid storm presenting as recurrent cardiac arrest and subsequent multiorgan failure by continuous renal replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Soo Park

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid storm is a rare and potentially life-threatening medical emergency. We experienced a case of thyroid storm associated with sepsis caused by pneumonia, which had a catastrophic course including recurrent cardiac arrest and subsequent multiple organ failure (MOF. A 22-year-old female patient with a 10-year history of Graves’ disease was transferred to our emergency department (ED. She had a cardiac arrest at her home and a second cardiac arrest at the ED. Her heart recovered after 20 min of cardiac resuscitation. She was diagnosed with thyroid storm associated with hyperthyroidism complicated by pneumonia and sepsis. Although full conventional medical treatment was given, she had progressive MOF and hemodynamic instability consisting of hyperthermia, tachycardia and hypotension. Because of hepatic and renal failure with refractory hypotension, we reduced the patient’s dose of beta-blocker and antithyroid drug, and she was started on continuous veno-venous renal replacement therapy (CRRT with intravenous albumin and plasma supplementation. Subsequently, her body temperature and pulse rate began to stabilize within 1 h, and her blood pressure reached 120/60 mmHg after 6 h. We discontinued antithyroid drug 3 days after admission because of aggravated hyperbilirubinemia. The patient exhibited progressive improvement in thyroid function even after cessation of antithyroid drug, and she successfully recovered from thyroid storm and MOF. This is the first case of thyroid storm successfully treated by CRRT in a patient considered unfit for antithyroid drug treatment.

  18. Population density, call-response interval, and survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogawa Toshio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the effects of geographic variation on outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. The present study investigated the relationship between population density, time between emergency call and ambulance arrival, and survival of OHCA, using the All-Japan Utstein-style registry database, coupled with geographic information system (GIS data. Methods We examined data from 101,287 bystander-witnessed OHCA patients who received emergency medical services (EMS through 4,729 ambulatory centers in Japan between 2005 and 2007. Latitudes and longitudes of each center were determined with address-match geocoding, and linked with the Population Census data using GIS. The endpoints were 1-month survival and neurologically favorable 1-month survival defined as Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance categories 1 or 2. Results Overall 1-month survival was 7.8%. Neurologically favorable 1-month survival was 3.6%. In very low-density (2 and very high-density (≥10,000/km2 areas, the mean call-response intervals were 9.3 and 6.2 minutes, 1-month survival rates were 5.4% and 9.1%, and neurologically favorable 1-month survival rates were 2.7% and 4.3%, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, cause of arrest, first aid by bystander and the proportion of neighborhood elderly people ≥65 yrs, patients in very high-density areas had a significantly higher survival rate (odds ratio (OR, 1.64; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.44 - 1.87; p Conclusion Living in a low-density area was associated with an independent risk of delay in ambulance response, and a low survival rate in cases of OHCA. Distribution of EMS centers according to population size may lead to inequality in health outcomes between urban and rural areas.

  19. Intubation is not a marker for coma after in-hospital cardiac arrest: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Katherine M; Grossestreuer, Anne V; Uber, Amy; Patel, Parth V; Donnino, Michael W

    2017-10-01

    In-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) strikes over 200,000 people in the United States annually. Targeted temperature management (TTM) is considered beneficial in other settings, but there is no prospective data for IHCA. Recent work on TTM and IHCA found an association between TTM and worse outcome. However, the authors used intubation as a marker for coma to determine eligibility for TTM. The validity of this approach is unexplored. Retrospective, single center study of adult patients with IHCA occurring in an intensive care unit, intubated prior to or during the event, or immediately after ROSC. We evaluated the percentage of patients documented as comatose after arrest, defined as Glasgow Comas Score (GCS) <8 for the primary analysis. We also evaluated the difference in hospital survival in patients with GCS <8 versus ≥8. Two sensitivity analyses using different methods for defining coma using post-ROSC GCS were conducted. 29/102 (28%) intubated patients had a post-ROSC GCS≥8, and 22 (22%) were documented as following commands. Survival in patients with GCS≥8 vs.<8 was 62% (18/29) vs. 37% (27/73) in unadjusted analysis (p=0.02). The adjusted odds ratio for survival to hospital discharge was 3.81 (95%CI: 1.37-10.61, p=0.01). Results were similar in both sensitivity analyses. Intubation prior to or during IHCA was not a valid marker of coma after ROSC. Post-ROSC mental status was associated with hospital survival, and thus could be an important confounder when conducting observational studies on the association of TTM with outcomes in this patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ranking Businesses and Municipal Locations by Spatiotemporal Cardiac Arrest Risk to Guide Public Defibrillator Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Christopher L F; Brooks, Steven C; Morrison, Laurie J; Chan, Timothy C Y

    2017-03-21

    Efforts to guide automated external defibrillator placement for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) treatment have focused on identifying broadly defined location categories without considering hours of operation. Broad location categories may be composed of many businesses with varying accessibility. Identifying specific locations for automated external defibrillator deployment incorporating operating hours and time of OHCA occurrence may improve automated external defibrillator accessibility. We aim to identify specific businesses and municipal locations that maximize OHCA coverage on the basis of spatiotemporal assessment of OHCA risk in the immediate vicinity of franchise locations. This study was a retrospective population-based cohort study using data from the Toronto Regional RescuNET Epistry cardiac arrest database. We identified all nontraumatic public OHCAs occurring in Toronto, ON, Canada, from January 2007 through December 2015. We identified 41 unique businesses and municipal location types with ≥20 locations in Toronto from the YellowPages, Canadian Franchise Association, and the City of Toronto Open Data Portal. We obtained their geographic coordinates and hours of operation from Web sites, by phone, or in person. We determined the number of OHCAs that occurred within 100 m of each location when it was open (spatiotemporal coverage) for Toronto overall and downtown. The businesses and municipal locations were then ranked by spatiotemporal OHCA coverage. To evaluate temporal stability of the rankings, we calculated intraclass correlation of the annual coverage values. There were 2654 nontraumatic public OHCAs. Tim Hortons ranked first in Toronto, covering 286 OHCAs. Starbucks ranked first in downtown, covering 110 OHCAs. Coffee shops and bank machines from the 5 largest Canadian banks occupied 8 of the top 10 spots in both Toronto and downtown. The rankings exhibited high temporal stability with intraclass correlation values of 0.88 (95

  1. REGISTRO DE PARO CARDÍACO EN EL ADULTO Registries of outer hospital cardiac arrest in Bogotta-Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Navarro Vargas

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available En nuestro país no hay un registro estandarizado de los eventos cardíacos que requieren reanimación cerebro-cardio-pulmonar (RCCP siguiendo los lineamientos "Utstein". El propósito de este estudio fue determinar la calidad de los registros extrahospitalarios de paro cardíaco en el adulto, en Bogotá-Colombia. Entre enero y marzo de 2005 se realizó un análisis retrospectivo de los casos que correspondieron a paro cardíaco en el adulto atendidos por el "Centro Regulador de Urgencias del Distrito (CRU". El estudio reveló un registro deficiente de los eventos que requirieron RCCP realizados a nivel prehospitalario, e identificó al trauma como causa de paro cardíaco en 22% de los casos, una cifra particularmente elevada si se compara con los reportes mundiales, que oscilan entre 5% y 8%. Recomienda la estandarización del registro de paro cardíaco en el adulto, para lo cual se sugiere utilizar el formato de registro que sigue los lineamientos "Utstein".There is not a standardized registry form of cardiac events requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in our country such as the Utstein style. The purpose of this study was to determine the quality of the registries of out-ofhospital cardiac arrests in Bogotá-Colombia. A retrospective survey of registries of cardiac events assisted by a regulatory center "Centro Regulador de Urgencias del Distrito (CRU" was conducted, between January and March, 2005. The study reveals a poor registry of outof-hospital cardiac arrest in Bogotá-Colombia, and identifies trauma as the cause of cardiac arrest in 22% of cases, a particularly high figure compared with 5-8% registered worldwide. Recommend the standardization of the registry form of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and suggest to use the "uniform reporting of data following cardiac arrest - the Utstein style". The registry forms are shown in appendix 1-2. Suggestions are welcome.

  2. Increased prevalence of ECG markers for sudden cardiac arrest in refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, R J; Blom, M T; Novy, J; Belluzzo, M; Seldenrijk, A; Penninx, B W; Sander, J W; Tan, H L; Thijs, R D

    2015-03-01

    People with epilepsy are at increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) due to ECG-confirmed ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation, as seen in a community-based study. We aimed to determine whether ECG-risk markers of SCA are more prevalent in people with epilepsy. In a cross-sectional, retrospective study, we analysed the ECG recordings of 185 people with refractory epilepsy and 178 controls without epilepsy. Data on epilepsy characteristics, cardiac comorbidity, and drug use were collected, and general ECG variables (heart rate (HR), PQ and QRS intervals) assessed. We analysed ECGs for three markers of SCA risk: severe QTc prolongation (male >450 ms, female >470 ms), Brugada ECG pattern, and early repolarisation pattern (ERP). Multivariate regression models were used to analyse differences between groups, and to identify associated clinical and epilepsy-related characteristics. People with epilepsy had higher HR (71 vs 62 bpm, pepilepsy (QTc prolongation: 5% vs 0%; p=0.002; ERP: 34% vs 13%, p0.999). After adjustment for covariates, epilepsy remained associated with ERP (ORadj 2.4, 95% CI 1.1 to 5.5) and severe QTc prolongation (ORadj 9.9, 95% CI 1.1 to 1317.7). ERP and severe QTc prolongation appear to be more prevalent in people with refractory epilepsy. Future studies must determine whether this contributes to increased SCA risk in people with epilepsy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. The risk factors and prognostic implication of acute pulmonary edema in resuscitated cardiac arrest patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dae-hyun; Kim, Joonghee; Rhee, Joong Eui; Kim, Taeyun; Kim, Kyuseok; Jo, You Hwan; Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Yu Jin; Hwang, Seung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pulmonary edema is frequently observed after a successful resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Currently, its risk factors and prognostic implications are mostly unknown. Methods Adult OHCA patients with a presumed cardiac etiology who achieved sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in emergency department were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were grouped according to the severity of consolidation on their initial chest X-ray (group I, no consolidation; group II, patchy consolidations; group III, consolidation involving an entire lobe; group IV, total white-out of any lung). The primary objective was to identify the risk factors of developing severe pulmonary edema (group III or IV). The secondary objective was to evaluate the association between long-term prognosis and the severity of pulmonary edema. Results One hundred and seven patients were included. Total duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors of developing severe pulmonary edema with their odds ratio (OR) being 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00 to 1.04; per 1 minute) and 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.07; per 1 mmHg), respectively. The long term prognosis was significantly poor in patients with severe pulmonary edema with a OR for good outcome (6-month cerebral performance category 1 or 2) being 0.22 (95% CI, 0.06 to 0.79) in group III and 0.16 (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.63) in group IV compared to group I. Conclusion The duration of CPR and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors for the development of severe pulmonary edema after resuscitation in emergency department. The severity of the pulmonary edema was significantly associated with long-term outcome. PMID:27752581

  4. Etiology of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest diagnosed via detailed examinations including perimortem computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Moriwaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The spectrum of the etiology of out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest (OHCPA has not been established. We have performed perimortem computed tomography (CT during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Aims: To clarify the incidence of non-cardiac etiology (NCE, actual distribution of the causes of OHCPA via perimortem CT and its usefulness. Settings and Design: Population-based observational case series study. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 1846 consecutive OHCPA cases and divided them into two groups: 370 showing an obvious cause of OHCPA with NCE (trauma, neck hanging, terminal stage of malignancy, and gastrointestinal bleeding and others. Results: Of a total OHCPA, perimortem CT was performed in 57.5% and 62.5% were finally diagnosed as NCE: Acute aortic dissection (AAD 8.07%, pulmonary thrombo-embolization (PTE 1.46%, hypoxia due to pneumonia 5.25%, asthma and acute worsening of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 2.06%, cerebrovascular disorder (CVD 4.48%, airway obstruction 7.64%, and submersion 5.63%. The rates of patients who survived to hospital discharge were 6-14% in patients with NCE. Out of the 1476 cases excluding obvious NCE of OHCPA, 66.3% underwent perimortem CT, 14.6% of cases without obvious NCE and 22.1% of cases with perimortem CT were confirmed as having some NCE. Conclusions: Of the total OHCPA the incidences of NCE was 62.5%; the leading etiologies were AAD, airway obstruction, submersion, hypoxia and CVD. The rates of cases converted from cardiac etiology to NCE using perimortem CT were 14.6% of cases without an obvious NCE.

  5. Resuscitation and post resuscitation care of the very old after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is worthwhile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Hassager, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a poor prognosis. As comorbidity and frailty increase with age; ethical dilemmas may arise when OHCA occur in the very old. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate mortality, neurological outcome and post resuscitation care in octog......BACKGROUND: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a poor prognosis. As comorbidity and frailty increase with age; ethical dilemmas may arise when OHCA occur in the very old. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate mortality, neurological outcome and post resuscitation care...... to 86% (n=317, p=0.03) in the younger patients. CONCLUSION: OHCA in octogenarians was associated with a significantly higher mortality rate after adjustment for prognostic factors. However, the majority of octogenarian survivors were discharged with a favorable neurological outcome. Withholding...

  6. Advanced life support therapy and on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients: Applying signal processing and pattern recognition methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trygve Eftestøl

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In the US alone, several hundred thousands die of sudden cardiac arrests each year. Basic life support defined as chest compressions and ventilations and early defibrillation are the only factors proven to increase the survival of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and are key elements in the chain of survival defined by the American Heart Association. The current cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines treat all patients the same, but studies show need for more individualiza- tion of treatment. This review will focus on ideas on how to strengthen the weak parts of the chain of survival including the ability to measure the effects of therapy, improve time efficiency, and optimize the sequence and quality of the various components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  7. Targeted Temperature Management for 48 vs 24 Hours and Neurologic Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Hans; Søreide, Eldar; de Haas, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Importance: International resuscitation guidelines recommend targeted temperature management (TTM) at 33°C to 36°C in unconscious patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest for at least 24 hours, but the optimal duration of TTM is uncertain. Objective: To determine whether TTM at 33°C for 48....... Secondary outcomes included 6-month mortality, including time to death, the occurrence of adverse events, and intensive care unit resource use. Results: In 355 patients who were randomized (mean age, 60 years; 295 [83%] men), 351 (99%) completed the trial. Of these patients, 69% (120/175) in the 48-hour......: In unconscious survivors from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest admitted to the ICU, targeted temperature management at 33°C for 48 hours did not significantly improve 6-month neurologic outcome compared with targeted temperature management at 33°C for 24 hours. However, the study may have had limited power...

  8. Lay bystanders' perspectives on what facilitates cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of automated external defibrillators in real cardiac arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Rosenkranz, Simone Mørk; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    is crucial in improving survival, cannot cause substantial harm, and that the AED will provide guidance through CPR; prior hands-on training in AED use; during CPR performance, teamwork (ie, support), using the AED voice prompt and a ventilation mask, as well as demonstrating leadership and feeling a moral......BACKGROUND: Many patients who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest will fail to receive bystander intervention (cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR] or defibrillation) despite widespread CPR training and the dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). We sought to investigate what...... factors encourage lay bystanders to initiate CPR and AED use in a cohort of bystanders previously trained in CPR techniques who were present at an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS AND RESULTS: One-hundred and twenty-eight semistructured qualitative interviews with CPR-trained lay bystanders...

  9. Short-term Exposure to Microgravity and the Associated Risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest: Implications for Commercial Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Kevin J. C.; Russamono, Thais

    2013-02-01

    The likelihood of trained astronauts developing a life threatening cardiac event during spaceflight is relatively rare, whilst the incidence in untrained individuals is unknown. Space tourists who live a sedentary lifestyle have reduced cardiovascular function, but the associated danger of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) during a suborbital spaceflight (SOSF) is unclear. Risk during SOSF was examined by reviewing several microgravity studies and methods of determining poor cardiovascular condition. Accurately assessing cardiovascular function and improving baroreceptor sensitivity through exercise is suggested to reduce the incidence of SCA during future SOSFs. Future studies will benefit from past participants sharing medical history; allowing creation of risk profiles and suitable guidelines.

  10. Pheochromocytoma-induced atrial tachycardia leading to cardiogenic shock and cardiac arrest: resolution with atrioventricular node ablation and pacemaker placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawa, Hassan; Bajaj, Mandeep; Cunningham, Glenn R

    2014-12-01

    Pheochromocytoma should be considered in young patients who have acute cardiac decompensation, even if they have no history of hypertension. Atrioventricular node ablation and pacemaker placement should be considered for stabilizing pheochromocytoma patients with cardiogenic shock due to atrial tachyarrhythmias. A 38-year-old black woman presented with cardiogenic shock (left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiogenic shock and cardiac arrest unresolved by the placement of 2 different ventricular assist devices, but that was completely reversed by radiofrequency ablation of the atrioventricular node and the placement of a temporary pacemaker. We present the patient's clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings, and we review the relevant literature.

  11. A predictive model to identify patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes at high risk of cardiac arrest or in-hospital mortality: An IMMEDIATE Trial sub-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhab Ray

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: The multivariable predictive model developed identified patients with very early ACS at high risk of cardiac arrest or death. Using this model could assist treating those with greatest potential benefit from GIK.

  12. Association of serum lactate with outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated with therapeutic hypothermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novain, Michaël; Cattet, Florian; Plattier, Rémi; Nefzaoui, Mohamed; Hyvernat, Hervé; Raguin, Olivier; Kaidomar, Michel; Kerever, Sébastien; Ichai, Carole

    2017-01-01

    Aims Lactate reflects hypoxic insult in many conditions and is considered as a prognosis factor. But, after cardiac arrest, its interest is still debated. Our study aimed to assess the prognosis value of lactate in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Methods This retrospective observational study included out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia in four ICUs. Lactate levels were compared at different times during the first 24 hours according to outcome at ICU discharge and to the type of death (multiorgan or neurologic failure). Results Two hundred and seventy-two patients were included, 89 good outcome and 183 poor outcome. In the latter group, 171 patients died, from multiorgan failure in 30% and neurologic failure in 70%. Lactate levels were higher in the poor compared to the good outcome patients at admission (5.4 (3.3–9.4) vs. 2.2 (1.5–3.6) mmol/L; padmission (7.9 (3.9–12.0) vs. 5.2 (3.3–8.8) mmol/L; p<0.01), H12 (4.9 (2.1–8.9) vs. 2.2 (1.4–3.4) mmol/L; p<0.01) and H24 (3.3 (1.8–5.5) vs. 1.4 (1.1–2.5) mmol/L; p<0.01). Initial lactate levels showed an increasing proportion of poor outcome from the first to fourth quartile. Conclusions After out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated with therapeutic hypothermia, lactate levels during the first 24 hours seem linked with ICU outcome. Patients dying from multiorgan failure exhibit higher initial lactate concentrations than patients succumbing from neurological failure. PMID:28282398

  13. Management of Maternal Cardiac Arrest in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy: A Simulation-Based Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn Adams

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate confidence, knowledge, and competence after a simulation-based curriculum on maternal cardiac arrest in an Obstetrics & Gynecologic (OBGYN residency program. Methods. Four simulations with structured debriefing focusing on high yield causes and management of maternal cardiac arrest were executed. Pre- and post-individual knowledge tests (KT and confidence surveys (CS were collected along with group scores of critical performance steps evaluated by content experts for the first and final simulations. Results. Significant differences were noted in individual KT scores (pre: 58.9±8.9 versus post: 72.8±6.1, p=0.01 and CS total scores (pre: 22.2±6.4 versus post: 29.9±3.4, p=0.007. Significant differences were noted in airway management, p=0.008; appropriate cycles of drug/shock-CPR, p=0.008; left uterine displacement, p=0.008; and identifying causes of cardiac arrest, p=0.008. Nonsignificant differences were noted for administration of appropriate drugs/doses, p=0.074; chest compressions, p=0.074; bag-mask ventilation before intubation, p=0.074; and return of spontaneous circulation identification, p=0.074. Groups remained noncompetent in team leader tasks and considering therapeutic hypothermia. Conclusion. This study demonstrated improved OBGYN resident knowledge, confidence, and competence in the management of third trimester maternal cardiac arrest. Several skills, however, will likely require more longitudinal curricular exposure and training to develop and maintain proficiency.

  14. Mortality and neurological outcome in the elderly after target temperature management for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Pellis, Tommaso; Kuiper, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess older age as a prognostic factor in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital-cardiac arrest (OHCA) and the interaction between age and level of target temperature management. METHODS AND RESULTS: 950 patients included in the target temperature management (TTM) trial were randomly...... age groups, p = 0.001, the same was true for ST segment elevation on ECG at admission, p ....5-5.0, p target temperature...

  15. Neural Correlates of Consciousness at Near-Electrocerebral Silence in an Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donald E; Lee, Lauren G; Siu, Danny; Bazrafkan, Afsheen K; Farahabadi, Maryam H; Dinh, Tin J; Orellana, Josue; Xiong, Wei; Lopour, Beth A; Akbari, Yama

    2017-04-01

    Recent electrophysiological studies have suggested surges in electrical correlates of consciousness (i.e., elevated gamma power and connectivity) after cardiac arrest (CA). This study examines electrocorticogram (ECoG) activity and coherence of the dying brain during asphyxial CA. Male Wistar rats (n = 16) were induced with isoflurane anesthesia, which was washed out before asphyxial CA. Mean phase coherence and ECoG power were compared during different stages of the asphyxial period to assess potential neural correlates of consciousness. After asphyxia, the ECoG progressed through four distinct stages (asphyxial stages 1-4 [AS1-4]), including a transient period of near-electrocerebral silence lasting several seconds (AS3). Electrocerebral silence (AS4) occurred within 1 min of the start of asphyxia, and pulseless electrical activity followed the start of AS4 by 1-2 min. AS3 was linked to a significant increase in frontal coherence between the left and right motor cortices (p silence contains distinctive neural activity. Specifically, the burst in frontal coherence and posterior shift of ECoG power that we find during this period immediately preceding CA may be a neural correlate of conscious processing.

  16. Sudden cardiac arrest risk stratification based on 24-hour Holter ECG statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Keisuke; Shiobara, Masahito; Nakamura, Saya; Yamashiro, Koichiro; Yana, Kazuo; Ono, Takuya

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using indices obtained from a long term Holter ECG record for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) risk stratification. The ndices tested were the QT-RR interval co-variability and the alternans ratio percentile (ARP(θ)) which is defined as the θ(th) percentile of alternans ratios over a 24 hour period. The QT-RR interval co-variabilities are evaluated by the serial correlation coefficient between QT and RR trend sequences (QTRC). Previously reported Kalman filter technique and a simple smoothing spline method for the trend estimation are compared. Parameter θ in the alternans ratio percentile index was optimized to achieve the best classification accuracy. These indices were estimated from 26 cardiovascular outpatients for Holter ECG record. Patients were classified into high and low risk groups according to their clinical diagnosis, and the obtained indices were compared with those of 25 control subjects. A risk stratification using the two indices QTRC and ARP(θ) yielded an average sensitivity of 0.812 and a specificity of 0.925. The sensitivities and specificities of all three categories exceeded 0.8 except for the sensitivity to detect the high-risk patient group. Other short-term ECG parameters may need to be incorporated in order to improve the sensitivity.

  17. Bystander Automated External Defibrillator Use and Clinical Outcomes after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Mathias J; Vognsen, Mikael; Andersen, Mikkel S

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To systematically review studies comparing bystander automated external defibrillator (AED) use to no AED use in regard to clinical outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), and to provide a descriptive summary of studies on the cost-effectiveness of bystander AED use. METHODS: We...... randomized trials, and 13 cost-effectiveness studies were included. Meta-analysis of 6 observational studies without critical risk of bias showed that bystander AED use was associated with survival to hospital discharge (all rhythms OR: 1.73 [95%CI: 1.36, 2.18], shockable rhythms OR: 1.66 [95%CI: 1.54, 1.......79]) and favorable neurological outcome (all rhythms OR: 2.12 [95%CI: 1.36, 3.29], shockable rhythms OR: 2.37 [95%CI: 1.58, 3.57]). There was no association between bystander AED use and neurological outcome for non-shockable rhythms (OR: 0.76 [95%CI: 0.10, 5.87]). The Public-Access Defibrillation trial found higher...

  18. Ubiquitous protective effects of cyclosporine A in preventing cardiac arrest-induced multiple organ failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cour, Martin; Abrial, Maryline; Jahandiez, Vincent; Loufouat, Joseph; Belaïdi, Elise; Gharib, Abdallah; Varennes, Annie; Monneret, Guillaume; Thibault, Hélène; Ovize, Michel; Argaud, Laurent

    2014-10-15

    Opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) appears to be a pivotal event in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Resuscitated cardiac arrest (CA) leads to the post-CA syndrome that encompasses, not only myocardial dysfunction, but also brain injury, failure of other organs (kidney, liver, or lung), and systemic response to I/R. We aimed to determine whether cyclosporine A (CsA) might prevent multiple organ failure following CA through a ubiquitous mPTP inhibition in each distant vital organ. Anesthetized New Zealand White rabbits were subjected to 15 min of CA and 120 min of reperfusion. At the onset of resuscitation, the rabbits received CsA, its non-immunosuppressive derivative NIM811, or vehicle (controls). Survival, hemodynamics, brain damage, organ injuries, and systemic I/R response were analyzed. Fresh mitochondria were isolated from the brain, heart, kidney, liver, and lung to assess both oxidative phosphorylation and permeability transition. CsA analogs significantly improved short-term survival and prevented multiple organ failure, including brain damage and myocardial dysfunction (P ubiquitous mitochondrial protective effect at the level of each major distant organ.

  19. Blood brain barrier is impermeable to solutes and permeable to water after experimental pediatric cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tress, Erika E; Clark, Robert S B; Foley, Lesley M; Alexander, Henry; Hickey, Robert W; Drabek, Tomas; Kochanek, Patrick M; Manole, Mioara D

    2014-08-22

    Pediatric asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) results in unfavorable neurological outcome in most survivors. Development of neuroprotective therapies is contingent upon understanding the permeability of intravenously delivered medications through the blood brain barrier (BBB). In a model of pediatric CA we sought to characterize BBB permeability to small and large molecular weight substances. Additionally, we measured the percent brain water after CA. Asphyxia of 9 min was induced in 16-18 day-old rats. The rats were resuscitated and the BBB permeability to small (sodium fluorescein and gadoteridol) and large (immunoglobulin G, IgG) molecules was assessed at 1, 4, and 24 h after asphyxial CA or sham surgery. Percent brain water was measured post-CA and in shams using wet-to-dry brain weight. Fluorescence, gadoteridol uptake, or IgG staining at 1, 4h and over the entire 24 h post-CA did not differ from shams, suggesting absence of BBB permeability to these solutes. Cerebral water content was increased at 3h post-CA vs. sham. In conclusion, after 9 min of asphyxial CA there is no BBB permeability over 24h to conventional small or large molecule tracers despite the fact that cerebral water content is increased early post-CA indicating the development of brain edema. Evaluation of novel therapies targeting neuronal death after pediatric CA should include their capacity to cross the BBB. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Survival from sports-related sudden cardiac arrest: In sports facilities versus outside of sports facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijon, Eloi; Bougouin, Wulfran; Karam, Nicole; Beganton, Frankie; Lamhaut, Lionel; Perier, Marie-Cécile; Benameur, Nordine; Tafflet, Muriel; Beal, Guillaume; Hagege, Albert; Le Heuzey, Jean-Yves; Desnos, Michel; Spaulding, Christian; Carré, Francois; Dumas, Florence; Celermajer, David S; Cariou, Alain; Jouven, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    We sought to evaluate frequency, characteristics, and outcomes of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) during sports activities according to the location of occurrence (in sports facilities vs those occurring outside of sports facilities). This is an observational 5-year prospective national French survey of subjects 10 to 75 years old presenting with SCA during sports (2005-2010), in 60 French administrative regions (covering a population of 35 million people). Of the 820 SCA during sports, 426 SCAs (52%) occurred in sports facilities. Overall, a substantially higher survival rate at hospital discharge was observed among SCA in sports facilities (22.8%, 95% CI 18.8-26.8) compared to those occurring outside (8.0%, 95% CI 5.3-10.7) (P facilities were younger (42.1 vs 51.3 years, P facilities (9.3 vs 13.6, P=0.03), and the proportion of initially shockable rhythm was higher (58.8% vs 33.1%, P facilities was mainly explained by concomitant circumstances of occurrence (adjusted odds ratio 1.48, 95% CI 0.88-2.49, P = .134). Sports-related SCA is not a homogeneous entity. The 3-fold higher survival rate reported among sports-related SCA is mainly due to cases that occur in sports facilities, whereas SCA during sports occurring outside of sports facilities has the usual very low rate of survival. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Complement activation and its prognostic role in post-cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenei, Z M; Zima, E; Csuka, D;

    2014-01-01

    that the extent of complement activation might be a reliable predictor of mortality in this population. Forty-six comatose cardiac arrest patients were enrolled into our prospective cohort study, conducted in a tertiary care university clinic. All subjects were cooled to 32-34 °C body temperature for 24 h...... and then allowed to rewarm to normothermia. All patients underwent diagnostic coronary angiography. On admission, at 6 and 24 h, blood samples were taken from the arterial catheter. In these, complement products (C3a, C3, C4d, C4, SC5b9 and Bb) were measured by ELISA in blood samples. Patients were followed up...... for 30 days; 22 patients (47.8%) died by the end of this period. We observed that complement activation (determined as the C3a to C3 ratio) was higher in non-survivors than in survivors at each time point. In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, the C3a/C3 ratio determined 24 h after the initiation...

  2. Automated analysis of background EEG and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia in comatose patients after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noirhomme, Quentin; Lehembre, Rémy; Lugo, Zulay Del Rosario; Lesenfants, Damien; Luxen, André; Laureys, Steven; Oddo, Mauro; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2014-01-01

    Visual analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) background and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia provides important outcome information, but is time-consuming and not always consistent between reviewers. Automated EEG analysis may help quantify the brain damage. Forty-six comatose patients in therapeutic hypothermia, after cardiac arrest, were included in the study. EEG background was quantified with burst-suppression ratio (BSR) and approximate entropy, both used to monitor anesthesia. Reactivity was detected through change in the power spectrum of signal before and after stimulation. Automatic results obtained almost perfect agreement (discontinuity) to substantial agreement (background reactivity) with a visual score from EEG-certified neurologists. Burst-suppression ratio was more suited to distinguish continuous EEG background from burst-suppression than approximate entropy in this specific population. Automatic EEG background and reactivity measures were significantly related to good and poor outcome. We conclude that quantitative EEG measurements can provide promising information regarding current state of the patient and clinical outcome, but further work is needed before routine application in a clinical setting.

  3. Drones may be used to save lives in out of hospital cardiac arrest due to drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claesson, A; Svensson, L; Nordberg, P; Ringh, M; Rosenqvist, M; Djarv, T; Samuelsson, J; Hernborg, O; Dahlbom, P; Jansson, A; Hollenberg, J

    2017-05-01

    Drowning leading to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and death is a major public health concern. Submersion with duration of less than 10min is associated with favorable neurological outcome and nearby bystanders play a considerable role in rescue and resuscitation. Drones can provide a visual overview of an accident scene, their potential as lifesaving tools in drowning has not been evaluated. The aim of this simulation study was to evaluate the efficiency of a drone for providing earlier location of a submerged possible drowning victim in comparison with standard procedure. This randomized simulation study used a submerged manikin placed in a shallow (drone transmitting video to a tablet (intervention). Time from start to contact with the manikin was the primary endpoint. Twenty searches were performed in total, 10 for each group. The median time from start to contact with the manikin was 4:34min (IQR 2:56-7:48) for the search party (control) and 0:47min (IQR 0:38-0:58) for the drone-system (intervention) respectively (pdrone was 3:38min (IQR 2:02-6:38). A drone transmitting live video to a tablet is feasible, time saving in comparison to traditional search parties and may be used for providing earlier location of submerged victims at a beach. Drone search can possibly contribute to earlier onset of CPR in drowning victims. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxidative stress and abnormal cholesterol metabolism in patients with post-cardiac arrest syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Midori; Sakurai, Atsushi; Sugita, Atsunori; Matsumoto, Nozomi; Kubo, Airi; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Kosaku; Yamamoto, Yorihiro

    2017-09-01

    Patients with post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS) suffer from whole body ischemia/reperfusion injury similar to that experienced by newborn babies. Increased oxidative stress was confirmed in PCAS patients (n = 40) at the time of hospitalization by a significant increase in the percentage of the oxidized form of coenzyme Q10 in total coenzyme Q10 compared to age-matched healthy controls (n = 55). Tissue oxidative damage in patients was suggested by the significant increase in plasma levels of free fatty acids (FFA) and the significant decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents in total FFA. A greater decrease in free cholesterol (FC) compared to cholesterol esters (CE) was observed. Therefore, the FC/CE ratio significantly increased, suggesting deficiency of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase secreted from the liver. Time course changes of the above parameters were compared among 6 groups of patients divided according to outcome severity. Rapid declines of FC and CE were observed in patients who died within a day, while levels remained unchanged in patients discharged in a week. These data suggest that liver function is one of the key factors determining the survival of patients. Interestingly, therapeutic hypothermia treatment enhanced the increment of plasma ratio of coenzyme Q10 to total cholesterol at the end of rewarming.

  5. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests and Outdoor Air Pollution Exposure in Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichmann, Janine; Folke, Fredrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    -of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) and hourly and daily outdoor levels of PM(10), PM(2.5), coarse fraction of PM (PM(10-2.5)), ultrafine particle proxies, NO(x), NO(2), O(3) and CO in Copenhagen, Denmark, for the period 2000-2010. Susceptible groups by age and sex was also investigated. A case-crossover design...... was applied. None of the hourly lags of any of the pollutants were significantly associated with OHCA events. The strongest association with OHCA events was observed for the daily lag4 of PM(2.5), lag3 of PM(10), lag3 of PM(10-2.5), lag3 of NO(x) and lag4 of CO. An IQR increase of PM(2.5) and PM(10......) was associated with a significant increase of 4% (95% CI: 0%; 9%) and 5% (95% CI: 1%; 9%) in OHCA events with 3 days lag, respectively. None of the other daily lags or other pollutants was significantly associated with OHCA events. Adjustment for O(3) slightly increased the association between OHCA and PM(2.5...

  6. The role of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in predicting hospital mortality for percutaneous coronary interventions in the Clinical Outcomes Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Charles; Rao, Sunil V; Gregg, Mary; Phillips, Richard C; Reisman, Mark; Tucker, Eben; Goss, J Richard

    2009-01-01

    Published mortality models for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), including the Clinical Outcomes Assessment Program (COAP) model, have not considered the effect of out-ofhospital cardiac arrest. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the inclusion of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest altered the COAP mortality model for PCI. The COAP PCI database contains extensive demographic, clinical, procedural and outcome information, including out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, which was added to the data collection form in 2006. This study included 15,586 consecutive PCIs performed in 31 Washington State hospitals in 2006. Using development and test sets, the existing COAP PCI logistic regression mortality model was examined to assess the effect of out-of-hospital arrest on in-hospital mortality. Overall, 2% of individuals undergoing PCI had cardiac arrest prior to hospital arrival. Among 8 hospitals with PCI volumes 120 cases per year did. In-hospital mortality was 19% in the arrest group and was 1.0% in remaining procedures (p < 0.0001). In the new multivariate model, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was highly associated with mortality (odds ratio = 5.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.28-9.25). When evaluated in the test set, the new model had excellent discrimination (c-statistic = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.85-0.93). Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is an important determinant of risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality for PCI, particularly for hospitals with low volumes and relatively high volumes of cardiac arrest cases.

  7. Extensive colonic necrosis following cardiac arrest and successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation: report of a case and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsoulis Iraklis E

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Non-occlusive colonic ischaemia is a recognized albeit rare entity related to low blood flow within the visceral circulation and in most reported cases the right colon was affected. This is the second case report in the literature of extensive colonic necrosis following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. A 83-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our hospital due to a low energy hip fracture. On her way to the radiology department she sustained a cardiac arrest. CPR started immediately and was successful. A few hours later, the patient developed increasing abdominal distension and severe metabolic acidocis. An abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT scan was suggestive of intestinal ischaemia. At laparotomy, the terminal ileum was ischaemic and extensive colonic necrosis was found, sparing only the proximal third of the transverse colon. The rectum was also spared. The terminal ileum and the entire colon were resected and an end ileostomy was fashioned. Although the patient exhibited a transient improvement during the immediate postoperative period, she eventually died 24h later from multiple organ failure. Histology showed transmural colonic necrosis with no evidence of a thromboembolic process or vasculitis. Therefore, this entity was attributed to a low flow state within the intestinal circulation secondary to the cardiac arrest.

  8. Even Four Minutes of Poor Quality of CPR Compromises Outcome in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Zhengfei; Huang, Zitong; Chen, Bihua; Li, Yongqin; Yu, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Untrained bystanders usually delivered suboptimal chest compression to victims who suffered from cardiac arrest in out-of-hospital settings. We therefore investigated the hemodynamics and resuscitation outcome of initial suboptimal quality of chest compressions compared to the optimal ones in a porcine model of cardiac arrest. Methods. Fourteen Yorkshire pigs weighted 30 ± 2 kg were randomized into good and poor cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) groups. Ventricular fibrillation was electrically induced and untreated for 6 mins. In good CPR group, animals received high quality manual chest compressions according to the Guidelines (25% of animal's anterior-posterior thoracic diameter) during first two minutes of CPR compared with poor (70% of the optimal depth) compressions. After that, a 120-J biphasic shock was delivered. If the animal did not acquire return of spontaneous circulation, another 2 mins of CPR and shock followed. Four minutes later, both groups received optimal CPR until total 10 mins of CPR has been finished. Results. All seven animals in good CPR group were resuscitated compared with only two in poor CPR group (P CPR group. Conclusions. In a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest, even four minutes of initial poor quality of CPR compromises the hemodynamics and survival outcome. PMID:24364028

  9. Prediction of successful defibrillation in human victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a retrospective electrocardiographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristagno, G; Gullo, A; Berlot, G; Lucangelo, U; Geheb, E; Bisera, J

    2008-01-01

    In the present study we sought to examine the efficacy of an electrocardiographic parameter, 'amplitude spectrum area' (AMSA), to predict the likelihood that any one electrical shock would restore a perfusing rhythm during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in human victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. AMSA analysis is not invalidated by artefacts produced by chest compression and thus it can be performed during CPR, avoiding detrimental interruptions of chest compression and ventilation. We hypothesised that a threshold value of AMSA could be identified as an indicator of successful defibrillation in human victims of cardiac arrest. Analysis was performed on a database of electrocardiographic records, representing lead 2 equivalent recordings from automated external defibrillators including 210 defibrillation attempts from 90 victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A 4.1 second interval of ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia, recorded immediately preceding the delivery of the shock, was analysed using the AMSA algorithm. AMSA represents a numerical value based on the sum of the magnitude of the weighted frequency spectrum between two and 48 Hz. AMSA values were significantly greater in successful defibrillation (restoration of a perfusing rhythm), compared to unsuccessful defibrillation (P electrical shocks, reducing thereby post-resuscitation myocardial injury.

  10. Cognitive function in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest after target temperature management at 33°C versus 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilja, Gisela; Nielsen, Niklas; Friberg, Hans

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Target temperature management is recommended as a neuroprotective strategy after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Potential effects of different target temperatures on cognitive impairment commonly described in survivors have not been investigated sufficiently. The primary aim of this ...... survivors was also common in matched control subjects with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction not having had a cardiac arrest. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01946932....

  11. Incidence of and factors associated with perioperative cardiac arrest within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriphuwanun V

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Visith Siriphuwanun,1 Yodying Punjasawadwong,1 Worawut Lapisatepun,1 Somrat Charuluxananan,2 Ketchada Uerpairojkit2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Mueang District, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand Purpose: To determine the incidence of and factors associated with perioperative cardiac arrest within 24 hours of receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery. Patients and methods: This retrospective cohort study was approved by the ethical committee of Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital, Thailand. We reviewed the data of 44,339 patients receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery during the period from January 1, 2003 to March 31, 2011. The data included patient characteristics, surgical procedures, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA physical status classification, anesthesia information, location of anesthesia performed, and outcomes. Data of patients who had received topical anesthesia or monitoring anesthesia care were excluded. Factors associated with cardiac arrest were identified by univariate analyses. Multiple regressions for the risk ratio (RR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were used to determine the strength of factors associated with cardiac arrest. A forward stepwise algorithm was chosen at a P-value <0.05. Results: The incidence (within 24 hours of perioperative cardiac arrest in patients receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery was 163 per 10,000. Factors associated with 24-hour perioperative cardiac arrest in emergency surgery were age of 2 years or younger (RR =1.46, CI =1.03–2.08, P=0.036, ASA physical status classification of 3–4 (RR =5.84, CI =4.20–8.12, P<0.001 and 5–6 (RR =33.98, CI =23.09–49.98, P<0.001, the anatomic site of surgery (upper intra-abdominal, RR =2.67, CI =2.14–3.33, P<0.001; intracranial, RR =1.74, CI =1.35–2.25, P<0.001; intrathoracic, RR =2.35, CI =1.70–3

  12. The Responses of Tissues from the Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Liver to Resuscitation following Prolonged Cardiac Arrest by Examining Mitochondrial Respiration in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhwan; Villarroel, José Paul Perales; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Tai; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Hong, Angela; Lampe, Joshua W; Becker, Lance B

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrest induces whole-body ischemia, which causes damage to multiple organs. Understanding how each organ responds to ischemia/reperfusion is important to develop better resuscitation strategies. Because direct measurement of organ function is not practicable in most animal models, we attempt to use mitochondrial respiration to test efficacy of resuscitation on the brain, heart, kidney, and liver following prolonged cardiac arrest. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are subjected to asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest for 30 min or 45 min, or 30 min cardiac arrest followed by 60 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Mitochondria are isolated from brain, heart, kidney, and liver tissues and examined for respiration activity. Following cardiac arrest, a time-dependent decrease in state-3 respiration is observed in mitochondria from all four tissues. Following 60 min resuscitation, the respiration activity of brain mitochondria varies greatly in different animals. The activity after resuscitation remains the same in heart mitochondria and significantly increases in kidney and liver mitochondria. The result shows that inhibition of state-3 respiration is a good marker to evaluate the efficacy of resuscitation for each organ. The resulting state-3 respiration of brain and heart mitochondria following resuscitation reenforces the need for developing better strategies to resuscitate these critical organs following prolonged cardiac arrest.

  13. The Responses of Tissues from the Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Liver to Resuscitation following Prolonged Cardiac Arrest by Examining Mitochondrial Respiration in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhwan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest induces whole-body ischemia, which causes damage to multiple organs. Understanding how each organ responds to ischemia/reperfusion is important to develop better resuscitation strategies. Because direct measurement of organ function is not practicable in most animal models, we attempt to use mitochondrial respiration to test efficacy of resuscitation on the brain, heart, kidney, and liver following prolonged cardiac arrest. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are subjected to asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest for 30 min or 45 min, or 30 min cardiac arrest followed by 60 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Mitochondria are isolated from brain, heart, kidney, and liver tissues and examined for respiration activity. Following cardiac arrest, a time-dependent decrease in state-3 respiration is observed in mitochondria from all four tissues. Following 60 min resuscitation, the respiration activity of brain mitochondria varies greatly in different animals. The activity after resuscitation remains the same in heart mitochondria and significantly increases in kidney and liver mitochondria. The result shows that inhibition of state-3 respiration is a good marker to evaluate the efficacy of resuscitation for each organ. The resulting state-3 respiration of brain and heart mitochondria following resuscitation reenforces the need for developing better strategies to resuscitate these critical organs following prolonged cardiac arrest.

  14. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) plus delayed defibrillation versus immediate defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; He, Qing; Yang, Li J; Liu, Guan J; Jones, Alexander

    2014-09-12

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a common health problem associated with high levels of mortality. Cardiac arrest is caused by three groups of dysrhythmias: ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT), pulseless electric activity (PEA) and asystole. The most common dysrhythmia found in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is VF. During VF or VT, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) provides perfusion and oxygenation to the tissues, whilst defibrillation restores a viable cardiac rhythm. Early successful defibrillation is known to improve outcomes in VF/VT. However, it has been hypothesized that a period of CPR before defibrillation creates a more conducive physiological environment, increasing the likelihood of successful defibrillation. The order of priority of CPR versus defibrillation therefore remains in contention. As previous studies have remained inconclusive, we conducted a systematic review of available evidence in an attempt to draw conclusions on whether CPR plus delayed defibrillation or immediate defibrillation resulted in better outcomes in OHCA. To examine whether an initial one and one-half to three minutes of CPR administered by paramedics before defibrillation versus immediate defibrillation on arrival influenced survival rates, neurological outcomes or rates of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in OHCA. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials (CENTRAL) (2013, Issue 6); MEDLINE (Ovid) (1948 to May 2013); EMBASE (1980 to May 2013); the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science (1980 to May 2013) and the China Academic Journal Network Publishing Database (China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), 1980 to May 2013). We included studies published in all languages. We also searched the Current Controlled Trials and Clinical Trials databases for ongoing trials. We screened the references lists of studies included in our review against the reference

  15. Monitoring of immune activation using biochemical changes in a porcine model of cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Amann

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In animal models, immune activation is often difficult to assess because of the limited availability of specific assays to detect cytokine activities. In human monocytes/macrophages, interferon-γ induces increased production of neopterin and an enhanced activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, which degrades tryptophan via the kynurenine pathway. Therefore, monitoring of neopterin concentrations and of tryptophan degradation can serve to detect the extent of T helper cell 1-type immune activation during cellular immune response in humans. In a porcine model of cardiac arrest, we examined the potential use of neopterin measurements and determination of the tryptophan degradation rate as a means of estimating the extent of immune activation. Urinary neopterin concentrations were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and radioimmunoassay (RIA (BRAHMS Diagnostica, Berlin, Germany. Serum and plasma tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations were also determined using HPLC. Serum and urine neopterin concentrations were not detectable with HPLC in these specimens, whereas RIA gave weakly (presumably false positive results. The mean serum tryptophan concentration was 39.0 Ī 6.2 μmol/l, and the mean kynurenine concentration was 0.85 Ī 0.33 μmol/l. The average kynurenine-per-tryptophan quotient in serum was 21.7Ī 8.4 nmol/μmol, and that in plasma was 20.7Ī 9.5 nmol/μmol (n = 7, which corresponds well to normal values in humans. This study provides preliminary data to support the monitoring of tryptophan degradation but not neopterin concentrations as a potential means of detecting immune activation in a porcine model. The kynurenine-per-tryptophan quotient may serve as a short-term measurement of immune activation and hence permit an estimate of the extent of immune activation.

  16. "Stayin' alive": a novel mental metronome to maintain compression rates in simulated cardiac arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, John W; Sturgell, Jeremy L; Matlock, David L; Bockewitz, Elizabeth G; Barker, Lisa T

    2012-11-01

    A novel and yet untested memory aid has anecdotally been proposed for aiding practitioners in complying with American Heart Association (AHA) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) compression rate guidelines (at least 100 compressions per minute). This study investigates how subjects using this memory aid adhered to current CPR guidelines in the short and long term. A prospective observational study was conducted with medical providers certified in 2005 AHA guideline CPR. Subjects were randomly paired and alternated administering CPR compressions on a mannequin during a standardized cardiac arrest scenario. While performing compressions, subjects listened to a digital recording of the Bee Gees song "Stayin' Alive," and were asked to time compressions to the musical beat. After at least 5 weeks, the participants were retested without directly listening to the recorded music. Attitudinal views were gathered using a post-session questionnaire. Fifteen subjects (mean age 29.3 years, 66.7% resident physicians and 80% male) were enrolled. The mean compression rate during the primary assessment (with music) was 109.1, and during the secondary assessment (without music) the rate was 113.2. Mean CPR compression rates did not vary by training level, CPR experience, or time to secondary assessment. Subjects felt that utilizing the music improved their ability to provide CPR and they felt more confident in performing CPR. Medical providers trained to use a novel musical memory aid effectively maintained AHA guideline CPR compression rates initially and in long-term follow-up. Subjects felt that the aid improved their technical abilities and confidence in providing CPR. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. End-tidal carbon dioxide and defibrillation success in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savastano, Simone; Baldi, Enrico; Raimondi, Maurizio; Palo, Alessandra; Belliato, Mirko; Cacciatore, Elisa; Corazza, Valentina; Molinari, Simone; Canevari, Fabrizio; Danza, Aurora I; Iotti, Giorgio Antonio; Visconti, Luigi Oltrona

    2017-09-20

    Basing on the relationship between the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the responsiveness of VF to the defibrillation we aimed to assess whether the values of ETCO2 in the minute before defibrillation could predict the effectiveness of the shock. We retrospectively evaluated the reports generated by the manual monitor/defibrillator (Corpuls by GS Elektromedizinische Geräte G. Stemple GmbH, Germany) used for cases of VF cardiac arrest from January 2015 to December 2016. The mean ETCO2 value of the minute preceding the shock (METCO260) was computed. A blind evaluation of the effectiveness of each shock was provided by three cardiologists. A total amount of 207 shocks were delivered for 62 patients. When considering the three tertiles of METCO260 (T1:METCO260 ≤ 20mmHg; T2: 20mmHg 31mmHg) a statistically significant difference between the percentages of shock success was found (T1: 50%; T2: 63%; T3: 78%; Chi square p=0.003; p for trend <0.001). When the METCO260 was lower than 7mmHg no shock was effective and when the METCO260 was higher than 45mmHg no shock was ineffective. Shocks followed by ROSC were preceded by higher values of METCO260 as compared either to ineffective shocks or effective ones without ROSC. This is the first demonstration of the relation between ETCO2 and defibrillation effectiveness. Our findings stress the pivotal role of High Quality CPR, monitored via ETCO2, and suggest ETCO2 monitoring as an additional weapon to guide defibrillation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Prognostic implications of conversion from nonshockable to shockable rhythms in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yoshikazu; Maeda, Tetsuo; Nakatsu-Goto, Yumiko

    2014-09-22

    The prognostic significance of conversion from nonshockable to shockable rhythms in patients with initial nonshockable rhythms who experience out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains unclear. We hypothesized that the neurological outcomes in those patients would improve with subsequent shock delivery following conversion to shockable rhythms and that the time from initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation by emergency medical services personnel to the first defibrillation (shock delivery time) would influence those outcomes. We analyzed the data of 569,937 OHCA adults with initial nonshockable rhythms. The data were collected in a nationwide Utstein-style Japanese database between 2005 and 2010. Patients were divided into subsequently shocked (n =21,944) and subsequently not-shocked (n =547,993) cohorts. The primary study endpoint was 1-month favorable neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Categories scale, category 1 or 2). In the subsequently shocked cohort, the ratio of 1-month favorable neurological outcome was significantly higher than that in the subsequently not-shocked cohort (1.79% versus 0.60%, P delivery time was less than 20 minutes, subsequent shock delivery was significantly associated with increased odds of 1-month favorable neurological outcomes (adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval), 6.55 (5.21 to 8.22) and 2.97 (2.58 to 3.43) for shock delivery times less than 10 minutes and from 10 to 19 minutes, respectively). However, when the shock delivery time was more than or equal to 20 minutes, subsequent shock delivery was not associated with increased odds of 1-month favorable neurological outcomes. In patients with an initial nonshockable rhythm after OHCA, subsequent conversion to shockable rhythms during emergency medical services resuscitation efforts was associated with increased odds of 1-month favorable neurological outcomes when the shock delivery time was less than 20 minutes.

  19. Location of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest as a determinant in the survival of patients

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    Jokšić-Mazinjanin Radojka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cardiac arrest (CA is defined as a sudden cessation of normal circulation of blood due to failure of the heart to contract effectively during systole. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the difference in outcome among patients, depending on the location of out-of-hospital CA; to determine the influence of observed determinants on the survival rate. Methods. Observational and retrospective study was conducted in the Institute for Emergency Medical Service Novi Sad (IEMS NS. It included patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR by medical ambulance squads. Patients were divided into three groups, based on the location of CA: private place, public place, and medical institution. Results. CA occurred in private places in 151 cases (76.26%. The shortest duration of a phone call with the dispatcher and Reaction Time I was in the group of patients with CA in a public place (59.1 ± 36.4 seconds and 137.1 ± 89.8 seconds, respectively. CA was recognized in more than 80% of cases, but CPR was initiated in only 9.09% of patients in private places and in 19.35% of patients in public places. Though they initially presented with shockable rhythm in 57.14% of cases in public places, this group has the worst immediate outcome (11.43%, in contrast to the patients with CA in medical institutions (58.33%. Factors determining the survival of patients with CA were CPR attempted immediately after collapse, initial rhythm and eyewitnesses of CA. Conclusion. In order to improve survival of patients with out-of-hospital CA, both education of laymen and introduction of standard questioning protocol in the IEMS Call Centre are necessary. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175007

  20. Spatial Variation and Resuscitation Process Affecting Survival after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests (OHCA.

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    Chien-Chou Chen

    Full Text Available Ambulance response times and resuscitation efforts are critical predictors of the survival rate after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA. On the other hand, rural-urban differences in the OHCA survival rates are an important public health issue.We retrospectively reviewed the January 2011-December 2013 OHCA registry data of Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. With particular focus on geospatial variables, we aimed to unveil risk factors predicting the overall OHCA survival until hospital admission. Spatial analysis, network analysis, and the Kriging method by using geographic information systems were applied to analyze spatial variations and calculate the transport distance. Logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors for OHCA survival.Among the 4,957 patients, the overall OHCA survival to hospital admission was 16.5%. In the multivariate analysis, female sex (adjusted odds ratio:, AOR, 1.24 [1.06-1.45], events in public areas (AOR: 1.30 [1.05-1.61], exposure to automated external defibrillator (AED shock (AOR: 1.70 [1.30-2.23], use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA (AOR: 1.35 [1.16-1.58], non-trauma patients (AOR: 1.41 [1.04-1.90], ambulance bypassed the closest hospital (AOR: 1.28 [1.07-1.53], and OHCA within the high population density areas (AOR: 1.89 [1.55-2.32] were positively associated with improved OHCA survival. By contrast, a prolonged total emergency medical services (EMS time interval was negatively associated with OHCA survival (AOR: 0.98 [0.96-0.99].Resuscitative efforts, such as AED or LMA use, and a short total EMS time interval improved OHCA outcomes in emergency departments. The spatial heterogeneity of emergency medical resources between rural and urban areas might affect survival rate.

  1. Cost-utility analysis of treating out of hospital cardiac arrests in Jerusalem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Gary M; Kark, Jeremy D; Einav, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) initiates a chain of responses including emergency medical service mobilization and medical treatment, transfer and admission first to a hospital Emergency Department (ED) and then usually to an intensive care unit and ward. Costly pre- and in-hospital care may be followed by prolonged post discharge expenditure on treatment of patients with severe neurological sequelae. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of treatment of OHCA by calculating the cost per Disability Adjusted Life Year (DALY) averted. We studied 3355 consecutive non-traumatic OHCAs (2005-2010) in Jerusalem, Israel, supplemented by hospital utilization data extracted from patient files (n = 570) and post-discharge follow-up (n = 196). Demographic, utilization and economic data were incorporated into a spreadsheet model to calculate the cost-utility ratio. Advanced life support was administered to 2264 of the 3355 OHCAs (67.5%) and 1048 (45.6%) patients were transferred to the ED. Of 676 (20.1%) patients who survived the ED and were admitted, there were 206 (6.1%) survivors to discharge, among them only 113 (3.4%) neurologically intact. Total cost ($39,100,000) per DALY averted (1353) was $28,864. The current package of OHCA interventions in Jerusalem appears to be very cost-effective as the cost per averted DALY of $28,864 is less than the Gross Domestic Product per capita ($33,261). This paper provides a basis for studying the effects of potential interventions that can be evaluated in terms of their incremental costs per averted DALY for treatment of OHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sudden cardiac arrest recorded during Holter monitoring: prevalence, antecedent electrical events, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Eiichi; Tanabe, Teruhisa; Osaka, Motohisa; Chishaki, Akiko; Takase, Bonpei; Niwano, Shinichi; Watanabe, Ichiro; Sugi, Kaoru; Katoh, Takao; Takayanagi, Kan; Mawatari, Koushi; Horie, Minoru; Okumura, Ken; Inoue, Hiroshi; Atarashi, Hirotsugu; Yamaguchi, Iwao; Nagasawa, Susumu; Moroe, Kazuo; Kodama, Itsuo; Sugimoto, Tsuneaki; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2014-08-01

    Causative arrhythmias of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) are changing in this age of improved coronary care. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of terminal arrhythmias and the electrical events prior to SCA. We analyzed 24-hour Holter recordings of 132 patients enrolled from 41 institutions who either died (n = 88) or had an aborted death (n = 44). The Holter recordings were obtained for diagnosing and evaluating diseases and arrhythmias in those without any episodes suggestive of SCA. In 97 patients (73%), SCA was associated with ventricular tachyarrhythmias and in 35 (27%) with bradyarrhythmias. The bradyarrhythmia-related SCA patients were older than those with a tachyarrhythmia-related SCA (70 ± 13 years vs. 58 ± 19 years, P < .001). The most common arrhythmia for a tachyarrhythmia-related SCA was ventricular tachycardia degenerating to ventricular fibrillation (45%). The bradyarrhythmia-related SCA was caused by asystole (74%) or AV block (26%). Spontaneous conversion was observed in 37 patients (38%) with ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Of those, 62% of the patients experienced symptoms including syncope, chest pain, or convulsion. Multivariate logistic analysis revealed that independent predictors of mortality for tachyarrhythmia-related SCAs were advanced age (odds ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.08) and ST elevation within the hour before SCA (odds ratio 3.54, 95% confidence interval 1.07-13.5). In contrast, the presence of preceding torsades de pointes was associated with spontaneous conversion (odds ratio 0.20, 95% confidence interval 0.05-0.66). The most frequent cause of SCA remains ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Advanced age and ST elevation before SCA are risk factors for mortality in tachyarrhythmia-related SCAs. Copyright © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of blood gas analysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients.

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    Kim, Youn-Jung; Lee, You Jin; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong-Woo; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-06-01

    To determine the relationship between acid-base findings, such as pH, pCO2, and serum lactate levels, obtained immediately after starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC).A prospective observational study of adult, nontraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients was conducted at an urban academic teaching institution between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2015. Arterial blood sample for acid-base data was taken from all OHCA patients on arrival to the emergency department. Of 224 OHCA patients, 88 patients with unavailable blood samples or delayed blood sampling or ROSC within 4 minutes were excluded, leaving 136 patients for analysis.The pH in the ROSC group was significantly higher than in the non-ROSC group (6.96 vs. 6.85; P = 0.009). pCO2 and lactate levels in the ROSC group were significantly lower than those in the non-ROSC group (74.0 vs. 89.5 mmHg, P < 0.009; 11.6 vs. 13.6 mmol/L, P = 0.044, respectively). In a multivariate regression analysis, pCO2 was the only independent biochemical predictor for sustained ROSC (OR 0.979; 95% CI 0.960-0.997; P = 0.025) and pCO2 of <75 mmHg was 3.3 times more likely to achieve ROSC (OR 0.302; 95% CI 0.146-0.627; P = 0.001).pCO2 levels obtained during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on ER arrival was associated with ROSC in OHCA patients. It might be a potentially marker for reflecting the status of the ischemic insult. These preliminary results need to be confirmed in a larger population.

  4. Ambulance telephone triage using 'NHS Pathways' to identify adult cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Charles D; England, Simon; Diffey, Debbie

    2017-05-01

    UK ambulance services are called to 30 000 cardiac arrests (CAs) annually where resuscitation is attempted. Correct identification by the ambulance service trebles survival by facilitating bystander-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and immediate ambulance dispatch. Identification of CA by telephone is challenging and involves algorithms to identify key features. 'NHS Pathways' is now used for triage by six of 12 UK ambulance services, covering a population of 20 million. With the significant improvements in survival when CA is accurately identified, it is vital that 'NHS Pathways' is able to identify CA correctly. All '999' emergency calls to South Central Ambulance Service (SCAS) over a 12-month period screened by NHS Pathways v9.04 were identified. All actual or presumed CAs identified by the emergency call taker were cross-referenced with the ambulance crew's Patient Report Form to identify all confirmed CAs. A total of 469 400 emergency (999) calls were received by SCAS. Of the 3119 CA identified by ambulance crew, 753 were not initially classified as CA by NHS Pathways (24.1%). Overall, sensitivity=0.759 (95% CI 0.743 to 0.773); specificity=0.986 (95% CI 0.9858 to 0.98647); and positive predictive value=26.80% (95% CI 25.88 to 27.73%). NHS Pathways accurately identifies 75.9% of adult CAs. The remainder represents approximately 7500 treatable CAs in the UK annually where the diagnosis is missed, with significant implications for patient outcome. Further work is required to improve this first link in the chain of survival. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Emergency medical service provider decision-making in out of hospital cardiac arrest: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandling, J; Kirby, K; Black, S; Voss, S; Benger, J

    2017-07-25

    There are approximately 60,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) in the United Kingdom (UK) each year. Within the UK there are well-established clinical practice guidelines that define when resuscitation should be commenced in OHCA, and when resuscitation should cease. Background literature indicates that decision-making in the commencement and cessation of resuscitation efforts in OHCA is complex, and not comprehensively understood. No relevant research from the UK has been published to date and this research study seeks to explore the influences on UK Emergency Medical Service (EMS) provider decision-making when commencing and ceasing resuscitation attempts in OHCA. The aim of this research to explore the influences on UK Emergency Medical Services provider decision-making when commencing and ceasing resuscitation attempts in OHCA. Four focus groups were convened with 16 clinically active EMS providers. Four case vignettes were discussed to explore decision-making within the focus groups. Thematic analysis was used to analyse transcripts. This research found that there are three stages in the decision-making process when EMS providers consider whether to commence or cease resuscitation attempts in OHCA. These stages are: the call; arrival on scene; the protocol. Influential factors present at each of the three stages can lead to different decisions and variability in practice. These influences are: factual information available to the EMS provider; structural factors such as protocol, guidance and research; cultural beliefs and values; interpersonal factors; risk factors; personal values and beliefs. An improved understanding of the circumstantial, individual and interpersonal factors that mediate the decision-making process in clinical practice could inform the development of more effective clinical guidelines, education and clinical decision support in OHCA. These changes have the potential to lead to greater consistency. and EMS provider confidence, with

  6. The value of arterial blood gas parameters for prediction of mortality in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

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    Katharina Isabel von Auenmueller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Sudden cardiac death is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and early prognostication remains challenging. There is a lack of valid parameters for the prediction of survival after cardiac arrest. Aims: This study aims to investigate if arterial blood gas parameters correlate with mortality of patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Materials and Methods: All patients who were admitted to our hospital after resuscitation following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2013, were included in this retrospective study. The patient's survival 5 days after resuscitation defined the study end-point. For the statistical analysis, the mean, standard deviation, Student's t-test, Chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were used (level of significance P< 0.05. Results: Arterial blood gas samples were taken from 170 patients. In particular, pH < 7.0 (odds ratio [OR]: 7.20; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.11–16.69; P< 0.001 and lactate ≥ 5.0 mmol/L (OR: 6.79; 95% CI: 2.77–16.66; P< 0.001 showed strong and independent correlations with mortality within the first 5 days after hospital admission. Conclusion: Our study results indicate that several arterial blood gas parameters correlate with mortality of patients after out-of-hospital resuscitation. The most relevant parameters are pH and lactate because they are strongly and independently associated with mortality within the first 5 days after resuscitation. Despite this correlation, none of these parameters by oneself is strong enough to allow an early prognostication. Still, these parameters can contribute as part of a multimodal approach to assessing the patients' prognosis.

  7. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Potential Prognostic Implications After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Substudy of the Target Temperature Management Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Wanscher, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Whole-body ischemia during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest triggers immediate activation of inflammatory systems leading to a sepsis-like syndrome. The aim was to investigate the association between level of systemic inflammation and mortality in survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac...

  8. Myocardial infarction is a frequent cause of exercise-related resuscitated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a general non-athletic population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig;

    2014-01-01

    performed (88% vs. 54%, pCardiac etiology was the predominant cause of OHCA in both exercise and non-exercise patients......BACKGROUND: Performing exercise is shown to prevent cardiovascular disease, but the risk of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is temporarily increased during strenuous activity. We examined the etiology and outcome after successfully resuscitated OHCA during exercise in a general non......: OHCA occurring during exercise was associated with a significantly lower mortality in successfully resuscitated patients even after adjusting for confounding factors. Acute coronary syndrome was more common among exercise-related cardiac arrest patients....

  9. Location of In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in the United States-Variability in Event Rate and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perman, Sarah M; Stanton, Emily; Soar, Jasmeet; Berg, Robert A; Donnino, Michael W; Mikkelsen, Mark E; Edelson, Dana P; Churpek, Matthew M; Yang, Lin; Merchant, Raina M

    2016-09-29

    In-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) is a major public health problem with significant mortality. A better understanding of where IHCA occurs in hospitals (intensive care unit [ICU] versus monitored ward [telemetry] versus unmonitored ward) could inform strategies for reducing preventable deaths. This is a retrospective study of adult IHCA events in the Get with the Guidelines-Resuscitation database from January 2003 to September 2010. Unadjusted analyses were used to characterize patient, arrest, and hospital-level characteristics by hospital location of arrest (ICU versus inpatient ward). IHCA event rates and outcomes were plotted over time by arrest location. Among 85 201 IHCA events at 445 hospitals, 59% (50 514) occurred in the ICU compared to 41% (34 687) on the inpatient wards. Compared to ward patients, ICU patients were younger (64±16 years versus 69±14; Plocations. Survival rates vary based on location of IHCA. Optimizing patient assignment to unmonitored wards versus telemetry wards may contribute to improved survival after IHCA. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  10. Out-of hospital cardiac arrest in Okayama city (Japan: outcome report according to the "Utsutein Style".

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    Hayashi,Hoei

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in the city of Okayama, Japan, during a 1-year period after the reorganization of defibrillation by Emergency Life-Saving Technicians (ELSTs with standing orders of CPR. The data were collected prospectively according to an Utstein style between June 1, 2003 and May 31, 2004; OHCA was confirmed in 363 patients. Cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac etiology (179 was witnessed by a bystander in 62 (34.6% cases. Of this group, ventricular fibrillation (VF was documented in 20 cases (32.3%, and 1 patient (5% was discharged alive without severe neurological disability. This outcome is average in Japan, but it is quite low level compared with Western countries because there is less VF in Japan. The Utstein style revealed that we must try to detect VF before the rhythm changes and to provide defibrillation as soon as possible in order to improve outcomes. Further research will be required to accurately evaluate OHCA in Okayama city.

  11. Characteristics and outcome among patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: Factors associated with survival

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    Trpković S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to define factors associated with an improved outcome among patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA using the Utstain style data collection. We examined 200 patients suffering from OHCA in a prospective study in a two years period. We determined survival from cardiac arrest (CA to discharge from hospital and the factors associated with survival. 78% of CA patients had a cardiac aetiology, 65% occurred at home, 3.7% received bystander CPR. 36% were found in VF/VT, 64% in asystole/PEA. 52% of patients were intubated in the field, survival to discharge from hospital was significantly higher among patients who were intubated in the field. The mean response time was 6.6 minutes. 66.7% of patients were given the shock after 4 minutes. 131 (65.5% were pronounced dead in the field, 69 patients were transported to the hospital. 53 (76.8% patients of them died during the transport or in the ED, 7 died after hospital admission and 9 survived to hospital discharge. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that variables significantly associated with survival to hospital discharge were: age, endotracheal intubation in the field and mean response time. The outcome of CPR was better in patients who were younger, who were intubated in the field and when the response time was shorter.

  12. Prophylactic antibiotics are associated with a lower incidence of pneumonia in cardiac arrest survivors treated with targeted temperature management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagnon, David J; Nielsen, Niklas; Fraser, Gilles L

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Prophylactic antibiotics (PRO) reduce the incidence of early-onset pneumonia in comatose patients with structural brain injury, but have not been examined in cardiac arrest survivors undergoing targeted temperature management (TTM). We investigated the effect of PRO on the development......-34 °C were enrolled in the registry. Differences were analyzed in univariate analyses and with logistic regression models to evaluate independent associations of clinical factors with incidence of pneumonia and good functional outcome. RESULTS: 416 of 1240 patients (33.5%) received PRO. Groups were...... similar in age, gender, arrest location, initial rhythm, and time from collapse to return of spontaneous circulation. PRO patients had less pneumonia (12.6% vs. 54.9%, p incidence...

  13. Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation using a load-distributing band external cardiac support device for in-hospital cardiac arrest: a single centre experience of AutoPulse-CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, J R; White, S; Quinn, N; Gubran, C J; Ludman, P F; Townend, J N; Doshi, S N

    2015-02-01

    Poor quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) predicts adverse outcome. During invasive cardiac procedures automated-CPR (A-CPR) may help maintain effective resuscitation. The use of A-CPR following in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) remains poorly described. Firstly, we aimed to assess the efficiency of healthcare staff using A-CPR in a cardiac arrest scenario at baseline, following re-training and over time (Scenario-based training). Secondly, we studied our clinical experience of A-CPR at our institution over a 2-year period, with particular emphasis on the details of invasive cardiac procedures performed, problems encountered, resuscitation rates and in-hospital outcome (AutoPulse-CPR Registry). Scenario-based training: Forty healthcare professionals were assessed. At baseline, time-to-position device was slow (mean 59 (±24) s (range 15-96s)), with the majority (57%) unable to mode-switch. Following re-training time-to-position reduced (28 (±9) s, pCPR Registry: 285 patients suffered IHCA, 25 received A-CPR. Survival to hospital discharge following conventional CPR was 28/260 (11%) and 7/25 (28%) following A-CPR. A-CPR supported invasive procedures in 9 patients, 2 of whom had A-CPR dependant circulation during transfer to the catheter lab. A-CPR may provide excellent haemodynamic support and facilitate simultaneous invasive cardiac procedures. A significant learning curve exists when integrating A-CPR into clinical practice. Further studies are required to better define the role and effectiveness of A-CPR following IHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Serial plasma choline measurements after cardiac arrest in patients undergoing mild therapeutic hypothermia: a prospective observational pilot trial.

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    Christian Storm

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Choline is related to phospholipid metabolism and is a marker for global ischaemia with a small reference range in healthy volunteers. The aim of our study was to characterize the early kinetics of plasma free choline in patients after cardiac arrest. Additionally, we investigated the potential of plasma free choline to predict neurological outcome. METHODS: Twenty patients admitted to our medical intensive care unit were included in this prospective, observational trial. All patients were enrolled between May 2010 and May 2011. They received post cardiac arrest treatment including mild therapeutic hypothermia which was initiated with a combination of cold fluid and a feedback surface cooling device according to current guidelines. Sixteen blood samples per patient were analysed for plasma free choline levels within the first week after resuscitation. Choline was detected by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Most patients showed elevated choline levels on admission (median 14.8 µmol/L; interquartile range; IQR 9.9-20.1 which subsequently decreased. 48 hours after cardiac arrest choline levels in all patients reached subnormal levels at a median of 4.0 µmol/L (IQR 3-4.9; p = 0.001. Subsequently, choline levels normalized within seven days. There was no significant difference in choline levels when groups were analyzed in relation to neurological outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate a choline deficiency in the early postresucitation phase. This could potentially result in impaired cell membrane recovery. The detailed characterization of the early choline time course may aid in planning of choline supplementation trials. In a limited number of patients, choline was not promising as a biomarker for outcome prediction.

  15. Meanings of people's lived experiences of surviving an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, 1 month after the event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, Ann-Sofie; Zingmark, Karin; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Lundblad, Dan; Söderberg, Siv

    2014-01-01

    The out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival rate has been poor and stable for a long time, but more recent studies describe its increase. However, there are few studies in which people narrate their experiences from surviving. The aim of this study was to elucidate meanings of people's lived experiences of surviving an OHCA with validated myocardial infarction (MI) etiology, 1 month after the event. A purposive sample of 2 women and 9 men was interviewed between February 2011 and May 2012. A phenomenological hermeneutical method was used for analysis, which involved 3 steps: naive reading and understanding, structural analysis, and comprehensive understanding. There were 2 themes, (1) returning to life and (2) revaluing life, and five subthemes, (1a) waking up and missing the whole picture, (1b) realizing it was not time to die, (2a) wondering why and seeking explanations, (2b) feeling ambiguous in relations, and (2c) wondering whether life will be the same. All were constructed from the analysis. Surviving an OHCA with validated MI etiology meant waking up and realizing that one had experienced a cardiac arrest and had been resuscitated. These survivors had memory loss and a need to know what had happened during the time they were dead/unconscious. They searched for a reason why they experienced an MI and cardiac arrest and had gone from being "heart-healthy" to having a lifelong illness. They all had the experience of passing from life to death and back to life again. For the participants, these differences led to a revaluation of what is important in life.

  16. Factors associated with the successful recognition of abnormal breathing and cardiac arrest by ambulance communications officers: a qualitative iterative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jan L; Vaillancourt, Christian; Tweedle, Jessica; Kasaboski, Ann; Charette, Manya; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Brehaut, Jamie C; Osmond, Martin H; Wells, George A; Stiell, Ian G

    2012-01-01

    We sought to identify barriers and facilitators to ambulance communications officers' (ACOs') recognition of abnormal breathing and administration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instructions. We conducted semistructured qualitative interviews based on the constructs of the Theory of Planned Behavior to elicit salient attitudes, social influences, and behavioral controls potentially influencing ACOs' intent to recognize abnormal breathing as a symptom of cardiac arrest and administer CPR instructions over the phone. We conducted interviews until achieving data saturation. We recorded interviews and transcribed them verbatim. Two independent reviewers performed inductive analyses to identify emerging themes. We interviewed 24 ACOs from four Canadian provinces (67% female, median 9.5 years of experience, 33% with paramedic training). We identified eight behavioral, 14 subjective normative, and 22 control beliefs. Important attitudes were as follows: 1) CPR instructions may help the patient and are likely to be beneficial for the caller; 2) abnormal breathing is an early sign of cardiac arrest; and 3) dispatch-assisted CPR instructions can improve survival. The leading social influence was management/quality assurance staff. Behavioral control was the construct most associated with ACOs' ability to recognize abnormal breathing, including 1) adherence to mandatory scripted protocol, 2) poor caller description of breathing pattern, and 3) ACO training on abnormal breathing. This qualitative study found that control beliefs are most influential on ACOs' intention to recognize abnormal breathing and provide CPR instructions over the phone. Training and policy changes should target these beliefs to increase the frequency of ACO-administered CPR instructions to callers reporting a patient in cardiac arrest.

  17. Activity and Life After Survival of a Cardiac Arrest (ALASCA and the effectiveness of an early intervention service: design of a randomised controlled trial

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    Bakx Wilbert GM

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac arrest survivors may experience hypoxic brain injury that results in cognitive impairments which frequently remain unrecognised. This may lead to limitations in daily activities and participation in society, a decreased quality of life for the patient, and a high strain for the caregiver. Publications about interventions directed at improving quality of life after survival of a cardiac arrest are scarce. Therefore, evidence about effective rehabilitation programmes for cardiac arrest survivors is urgently needed. This paper presents the design of the ALASCA (Activity and Life After Survival of a Cardiac Arrest trial, a randomised, controlled clinical trial to evaluate the effects of a new early intervention service for survivors of a cardiac arrest and their caregivers. Methods/design The study population comprises all people who survive two weeks after a cardiac arrest and are admitted to one of the participating hospitals in the Southern part of the Netherlands. In a two-group randomised, controlled clinical trial, half of the participants will receive an early intervention service. The early intervention service consists of several consultations with a specialised nurse for the patient and their caregiver during the first three months after the cardiac arrest. The intervention is directed at screening for cognitive problems, provision of informational, emotional and practical support, and stimulating self-management. If necessary, referral to specialised care can take place. Persons in the control group will receive the care as usual. The primary outcome measures are the extent of participation in society and quality of life of the patient one year after a cardiac arrest. Secondary outcome measures are the level of cognitive, emotional and cardiovascular impairment and daily functioning of the patient, as well as the strain for and quality of life of the caregiver. Participants and their caregivers will be followed

  18. Prognostic implication of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in patients with cardiogenic shock and acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld, Sarah; Lindholm, Matias Greve; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) and cardiogenic shock (CS) presenting with and without out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). BACKGROUND: Despite general improvement in outcome after acute MI, CS remains a leading cause of death in acute MI patients...... to a tertiary centre with the diagnosis of CS and acute MI were enrolled, 118 (48%) presented with OHCA and 130 (52%) without (non-OHCA patients). Mean lactate level at admission was significantly higher in OHCA patients compared with non-OCHA patients (9mmol/l (SD 6) vs. 6mmol/l (SD 4) p

  19. Cardiac Arrest due to Recurrent Ventricular Fibrillation Triggered by Unifocal Ventricular Premature Complexes in a Silent Myocardial Infarction

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    Dong Hyun Lee

    2014-11-01

    Suspecting idiopathic VF, emergency radiofrequency catheter ablation was planned for the VPCs. However, when coronary angiography was performed to exclude silent ischemia, the results showed a total occlusion of the right coronary artery posterolateral branch, which is thought to supply the left ventricular inferior and septal wall. After successful reperfusion, VF episodes and the triggering VPCs disappeared. We are documenting this case to emphasize the potential for silent myocardial infarction to cause out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest even in a patient without any symptom or sign of acute coronary syndrome.

  20. Association of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Survival According to Ambulance Response Times After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gerds, Thomas A; Kragholm, Kristian; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Karlsson, Lena; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2016-12-20

    Bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) increases patient survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but it is unknown to what degree bystander CPR remains positively associated with survival with increasing time to potential defibrillation. The main objective was to examine the association of bystander CPR with survival as time to advanced treatment increases. We studied 7623 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients between 2005 and 2011, identified through the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between time from 911 call to emergency medical service arrival (response time) and survival according to whether bystander CPR was provided (yes or no). Reported are 30-day survival chances with 95% bootstrap confidence intervals. With increasing response times, adjusted 30-day survival chances decreased for both patients with bystander CPR and those without. However, the contrast between the survival chances of patients with versus without bystander CPR increased over time: within 5 minutes, 30-day survival was 14.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.8-16.4) versus 6.3% (95% CI: 5.1-7.6), corresponding to 2.3 times higher chances of survival associated with bystander CPR; within 10 minutes, 30-day survival chances were 6.7% (95% CI: 5.4-8.1) versus 2.2% (95% CI: 1.5-3.1), corresponding to 3.0 times higher chances of 30-day survival associated with bystander CPR. The contrast in 30-day survival became statistically insignificant when response time was >13 minutes (bystander CPR vs no bystander CPR: 3.7% [95% CI: 2.2-5.4] vs 1.5% [95% CI: 0.6-2.7]), but 30-day survival was still 2.5 times higher associated with bystander CPR. Based on the model and Danish out-of-hospital cardiac arrest statistics, an additional 233 patients could potentially be saved annually if response time was reduced from 10 to 5 minutes and 119 patients if response time was reduced from 7 (the median

  1. Severe autonomic dysreflexia induced cardiac arrest under isoflurane anesthesia in a patient with lower thoracic spine injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of severe autonomic dysreflexia (AD progressing to cardiac arrest and death under isoflurane anesthesia. Though AD in chronic cervical spine injury is a common entity, occurrence of such an event in the stage of flaccid paralysis in lower dorsal spinal cord injury is rare, especially under general anesthesia. Manipulation of urinary bladder catheter under light plane of isoflurane anesthesia might be the precipitating factor. Increasing concentration of isoflurane failed to abort the episode or might have aggravated it. High level of suspicion and vigilance is necessary to prevent, diagnose and treat such a condition.

  2. Neuroprotective Effects of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog Exenatide After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Hassager, Christian; Schmidt, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In-hospital mortality in comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is ≈50%. In OHCA patients, the leading cause of death is neurological injury secondary to ischemia and reperfusion. Glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs are approved for type 2 diabetes...... mellitus; preclinical and clinical data have suggested their organ-protective effects in patients with ischemia and reperfusion injury. The aim of this trial was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of the glucagon-like peptide-1 analog exenatide in resuscitated OHCA patients. METHODS: We randomly...

  3. Unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) in out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claesson, A; Fredman, D; Svensson, L; Ringh, M; Hollenberg, J; Nordberg, P; Rosenqvist, M; Djarv, T; Österberg, S; Lennartsson, J; Ban, Y

    2016-10-12

    The use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) prior to EMS arrival can increase 30-day survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) significantly. Drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) can fly with high velocity and potentially transport devices such as AEDs to the site of OHCAs. The aim of this explorative study was to investigate the feasibility of a drone system in decreasing response time and delivering an AED. Data of Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates from historical OHCA in Stockholm County was used in a model using a Geographic Information System (GIS) to find suitable placements and visualize response times for the use of an AED equipped drone. Two different geographical models, urban and rural, were calculated using a multi-criteria evaluation (MCE) model. Test-flights with an AED were performed on these locations in rural areas. In total, based on 3,165 retrospective OHCAs in Stockholm County between 2006-2013, twenty locations were identified for the potential placement of a drone. In a GIS-simulated model of urban OHCA, the drone arrived before EMS in 32 % of cases, and the mean amount of time saved was 1.5 min. In rural OHCA the drone arrived before EMS in 93 % of cases with a mean amount of time saved of 19 min. In these rural locations during (n = 13) test flights, latch-release of the AED from low altitude (3-4 m) or landing the drone on flat ground were the safest ways to deliver an AED to the bystander and were superior to parachute release. The difference in response time for EMS between urban and rural areas is substantial, as is the possible amount of time saved using this UAV-system. However, yet another technical device needs to fit into the chain of survival. We know nothing of how productive or even counterproductive this system might be in clinical reality. To use drones in rural areas to deliver an AED in OHCA may be safe and feasible. Suitable placement of drone systems can be designed by using GIS models

  4. Cardiac Arrest Alters Regional Ubiquitin Levels in Association with the Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown and Neuronal Damages in the Porcine Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Hari S; Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna; Lafuente, José Vicente; Miclescu, Adriana; Wiklund, Lars

    2015-10-01

    The possibility that ubiquitin expression is altered in cardiac arrest-associated neuropathology was examined in a porcine model using immunohistochemical and biochemical methods. Our observations show that cardiac arrest induces progressive increase in ubiquitin expression in the cortex and hippocampus in a selective and specific manner as compared to corresponding control brains using enzyme-linked immunoassay technique (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)). Furthermore, immunohistochemical studies showed ubiquitin expression in the neurons exhibiting immunoreaction in the cytoplasm and karyoplasm of distorted or damaged cells. Separate Nissl and ubiquitin staining showed damaged and distorted neurons and in the same cortical region ubiquitin expression indicating that ubiquitin expression after cardiac arrest represents dying neurons. The finding that methylene blue treatment markedly induced neuroprotection following identical cardiac arrest and reduced ubiquitin expression strengthens this view. Taken together, our observations are the first to show that cardiac arrest enhanced ubiquitin expression in the brain that is related to the magnitude of neuronal injury and the finding that methylene blue reduced ubiquitin expression points to its role in cell damage, not reported earlier.

  5. Introduction of the I-gel supraglottic airway device for prehospital airway management in a UK ambulance service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckett, Jay; Fell, P; Han, K; Kimber, C; Taylor, C

    2014-06-01

    To clinically review the use of basic and advanced airway management techniques within the North East Ambulance Service National Health Service Foundation Trust (NEAS) for cardiac arrests following the introduction of the i-gel. Two retrospective clinical audits were carried out over a monthly period (May 2011 and January 2012) using electronic and paper NEAS patient records. This audit confirmed that a range of basic and/or advanced airway management techniques are being successfully used to manage the airways of cardiac arrest patients. I-gel is emerging as a popular choice for maintaining and securing the airway during prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Success rates for i-gel insertion are higher (94%, 92%) than endotracheal (ET) tube insertion (90%, 86%). Documentation of the airway management method was poor in 11% of the records. The Quality Improvement Officers addressed this by providing individual feedback. I-gel shows a higher success rate in cardiac arrest patients compared to the ET tube. Staff who chose to use methods other than i-gel indicated this was a confidence issue when using new equipment. The re-audit indicated an upward trend in the popularity of i-gel; insertion is faster with a higher success rate, which allows the crew to progress with the other resuscitation measures more promptly. Airway soiling and aspiration beforehand have been reasons staff resort to ET intubation. It is anticipated by the authors that i-gel will emerge as the first choice of airway management device in prehospital cardiac arrests. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Successful resuscitation from two cardiac arrests in a female patient with critical aortic stenosis, severe mitral regurgitation and coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijušković Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The incidence of sudden cardiac death in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis is up to 34% and resuscitation is described as highly unsuccessful. Case report. A 72-year-old female patient with severe aortic stenosis combined with severe mitral regurgitation and three-vessel coronary artery disease was successfully resuscitated following two in-hospital cardiac arrests. The first cardiac arrest occurred immediately after intraarterial injection of low osmolar iodinated agent during coronary angiography. Angiography revealed 90% occlusion of the proximal left main coronary artery and circumflex branch. The second arrest followed induction of anesthesia. Following successful open-chest resuscitation, aortic valve replacement, mitral valvuloplasty and three-vessel aortocoronary bypass were performed. Postoperative pericardial tamponade required surgical revision. The patient recovered completely. Conclusion. Decision to start resuscitation may be justified in selected patients with critical aortic stenosis, even though cardiopulmonary resuscitation in such cases is generally considered futile.

  7. The association between the first locating emergency ambulance being single crewed and cardiac arrest outcomes in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicker, Bridget; Davey, Paul; Smith, Tony

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the association between the first locating emergency ambulance being single crewed on outcomes following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in New Zealand. Using data from the St John cardiac arrest registry for the period of 1 October 2013 to 30 June 2015, cases were included if a resuscitation attempt was made and the patient was an adult. Logistic regression modelling was used to account for confounding factors. The primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. A total of 2,347 cases were included. There was no difference in the rate of return of spontaneous circulation sustained to hospital handover in patients attended by either single-crewed (27%) or double-crewed ambulances (32%); p=0.059. However, patients were significantly less likely to survive to hospital discharge when attended by single-crewed (12%) compared to double-crewed ambulances (17%) with an OR of 0.533, 95% confidence interval 0.320-0.888 and p=0.016. Patients had lower survival to hospital discharge outcomes when the first locating ambulance was single crewed than those where the first locating ambulance was double crewed.

  8. Renal Doppler and Novel Biomarkers to Assess Acute Kidney Injury in a Swine Model of Ventricular Fibrillation Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Mei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Majority of the research on cardiac arrest (CA have focused on post-CA brain injury and myocardial dysfunction, the renal dysfunction and acute kidney injury (AKI in other critical illnesses after CA have not been well described. This study was designed to assess AKI with renal Doppler and novel AKI biomarkers in a swine model of ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VFCA. Methods: Thirty healthy piglets were divided into VFCA group (n = 22 and Sham group (n = 8 in a blinded manner. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output were recorded continuously. Cardiac arrest (CA was induced by programmed electric stimulation in the VFCA group, and then cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed. Twenty piglets returned of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and received intensive care. Blood and urine samples were collected for AKI biomarkers testing, and Color Doppler flow imaging was performed at baseline, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h, respectively after ROSC. At ROSC 24 h, the animals were sacrificed and a semi-quantitative evaluation of pathologic kidney injury was performed. Results: In the VFCA group, corrected resistive index (cRI increased from 0.47 ± 0.03 to 0.64 ± 0.06, and pulsatility index (PI decreased from 0.82 ± 0.03 to 0.68 ± 0.04 after ROSC. Cystatin C (CysC in both serum and urine samples increased at ROSC 6 h, but neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL in serum increased to 5.34 ± 1.68 ng/ml at ROSC 6 h, and then decreased to 3.16 ± 0.69 ng/ml at ROSC 24 h while CysC increasing constantly. According to the renal histopathology, 18 of 20 animals suffered from kidney injury. The grade of renal injury was highly correlated with RI, cRI, NGAL, and CysC. Linear regression equation was established: Grade of renal injury = 0.002 × serum CysC + 6.489 × PI + 4.544 × cRI - 8.358 (r2 = 0.698, F = 18.506, P < 0.001. Conclusions: AKI is common in post-CA syndrome. Renal Doppler and novel AKI biomarkers in serum and

  9. Renal Doppler and Novel Biomarkers to Assess Acute Kidney Injury in a Swine Model of Ventricular Fibrillation Cardiac Arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Mei; Chen-Chen Hang; Shuo Wang; Chun-Sheng Li; Ze-Xing Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Majority of the research on cardiac arrest (CA) have focused on post-CA brain injury and myocardial dysfunction, the renal dysfunction and acute kidney injury (AKI) in other critical illnesses after CA have not been well described.This study was designed to assess AKI with renal Doppler and novel AKI biomarkers in a swine model ofventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VFCA).Methods: Thirty healthy piglets were divided into VFCA group (n =22) and Sham group (n =8) in a blinded manner.Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output were recorded continuously.Cardiac arrest (CA) was induced by programmed electric stimulation in the VFCA group, and then cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed.Twenty piglets retumed of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and received intensive care.Blood and urine samples were collected for AKI biomarkers testing, and Color Doppler flow imaging was performed at baseline, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h,respectively after ROSC.At ROSC 24 h, the animals were sacrificed and a semi-quantitative evaluation of pathologic kidney injury was performed.Results: In the VFCA group, corrected resistive index (cRI) increased from 0.47 ± 0.03 to 0.64 ± 0.06, and pulsatility index (PI) decreased from 0.82 ± 0.03 to 0.68 ± 0.04 after ROSC.Cystatin C (CysC) in both serum and urine samples increased at ROSC 6 h, but neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in serum increased to 5.34 ± 1.68 ng/ml at ROSC 6 h, and then decreased to 3.16 ± 0.69 ng/ml at ROSC 24 h while CysC increasing constantly.According to the renal histopathology, 18 of 20 animals suffered from kidney injury.The grade of renal injury was highly correlated with RI, cRI, NGAL, and CysC.Linear regression equation was established: Grade of renal injury =0.002 × serum CysC + 6.489 × PI + 4.544 × cRI-8.358 (r2 =0.698, F =18.506, P < 0.001).Conclusions: AKI is common in post-CA syndrome.Renal Doppler and novel AKI biomarkers in serum and urine are of significant

  10. Target Temperature Management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest--a randomized, parallel-group, assessor-blinded clinical trial--rationale and design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Wetterslev, Jørn; al-Subaie, Nawaf

    2012-01-01

    from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A systematic review indicates that the evidence for recommending this intervention is inconclusive, and the GRADE level of evidence is low. Previous trials were small, with high risk of bias, evaluated select populations, and did not treat hyperthermia......Experimental animal studies and previous randomized trials suggest an improvement in mortality and neurologic function with induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest. International guidelines advocate the use of a target temperature management of 32°C to 34°C for 12 to 24 hours after resuscitation...... in the control groups. The optimal target temperature management strategy is not known....

  11. A statistical analysis protocol for the time-differentiated target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (TTH48) clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Hans; Pedersen, Asger Roer; Pettilä, Ville;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The TTH48 trial aims to determine whether prolonged duration (48 hours) of targeted temperature management (TTM) at 33 (±1) °C results in better neurological outcomes compared to standard duration (24 hours) after six months in comatose out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients...... predetermine covariates for adjusted analyses and pre-specify sub-groups for sensitivity analyses. This pre-planned SAP will reduce analysis bias and add validity to the findings of this trial on the effect of length of TTM on important clinical outcomes after cardiac arrest. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical...

  12. Nonaccidental Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in an Urban Area as a Potential Source of Uncontrolled Organ Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabisiak, Krzysztof; Krejczy, Arkadiusz; Dutkiewicz, Grażyna; Safranow, Krzysztof; Sienko, Jerzy; Bohatyrewicz, Romuald; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz

    2016-09-15

    BACKGROUND Donation after cardiac death offers the possibility of increasing the pool of organs for transplantation by up to 30%. Maastricht category type 3 (M3) dominates in most countries with active DCD programs. During preparations to introduce a permanent program for uncontrolled donation after circulatory death in Szczecin, Poland, the donor pool has been estimated. In Poland, Maastricht category type 2 (M2) is considered a basic source for organ recovery. MATERIAL AND METHODS This was a retrospective cohort study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) reported to local Emergency Medical Services (EMS) between 1 December 2014 and 30 November 2015. The following inclusion criteria were used in the analysis: demographic (age 18-60 years, known identity), clinical (no chest or abdominal injury, no cachexia as an equivalent of wasting diseases), and organizational (weekdays from 8:00 am to 3:00 pm). RESULTS During 12-month period, 118 EMS interventions were recorded in response to sudden cardiac arrest. The stratification process mentioned above used criteria to establish potential, eligible, qualified, and actual donor pools (27 (30.3%), 24 (26.4%), 7 (7.3%), and 6 (6.7%), respectively). To establish a "virtual" actual number of uDCD, the nationwide average level of lack of authorization for donation was 12%. CONCLUSIONS Activation of a permanent program of organ recovery from uDCD would increase the donor pool by 6 cases. Compared to the number of brain-dead donors referred from regional hospitals, this increase would be equivalent to the formation of a new reporting center. The number of transplantable organs could increase by 22% per year.

  13. Application of Positron Emission TomographyintheDetection of Myocardial Metabolism inPigVentricularFibrillation and Asphyxiation Cardiac Arrest ModelsafterResuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUCaiJun; LIChunSheng; ZHANGYi; YANGJun

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo study the application of positron emission tomography (PET) in detection of myocardial metabolism in pig ventricular fibrillation and asphyxiation cardiac arrest models after resuscitation. MethodsThirty-two healthyminiature pigs were randomized into aventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VFCA) group (n=16) and an asphyxiation cardiac arrest (ACA)group (n=16). Cardiac arrest (CA) was induced byprogrammed electric stimulationorendotracheal tube clamping followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) anddefibrillation. At four hours and 24 h afterspontaneous circulation was achieved, myocardial metabolism was assessed by PET.18F-FDG myocardial uptake in PET was analyzed and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was measured. ResultsSpontaneous circulation was 100% and 62.5% in VFCA group and ACA group, respectively.PET demonstrated that the myocardial metabolism injuries was more severe and widespread after ACA than after VFCA. The SUVmax was higher in VFCA group than in ACA group (P<0.01).In VFCA group,SUVmaxat 24h after spontaneous circulation increased to the level of baseline. ConclusionACA causes more severe cardiac metabolism injuries than VFCA. Myocardial dysfunction is associated with less successful resuscitation. Myocardial stunning does occur with VFCA but not with ACA.

  14. Prognostic factors for death and survival with or without complications in cardiac arrest patients receiving CPR within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriphuwanun V

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Visith Siriphuwanun,1 Yodying Punjasawadwong,1 Worawut Lapisatepun,1 Somrat Charuluxananan,2 Ketchada Uerpairojkit2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand Purpose: To determine prognostic factors for death and survival with or without complications in cardiac arrest patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR within 24 hours of receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery. Patients and methods: A retrospective cohort study approved by the Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai University Hospital Ethical Committee. Data used were taken from records of 751 cardiac arrest patients who received their first CPR within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery between January 1, 2003 and October 31, 2011. The reviewed data included patient characteristics, surgical procedures, American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA physical status classification, anesthesia information, the timing of cardiac arrest, CPR details, and outcomes at 24 hours after CPR. Univariate and polytomous logistic regression analyses were used to determine prognostic factors associated with the outcome variable. P-values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: The outcomes at 24 hours were death (638/751, 85.0%, survival with complications (73/751, 9.7%, and survival without complications (40/751, 5.3%. The prognostic factors associated with death were: age between 13–34 years (OR =3.08, 95% CI =1.03–9.19; ASA physical status three and higher (OR =6.60, 95% CI =2.17–20.13; precardiopulmonary comorbidity (OR =3.28, 95% CI =1.09–9.90; the condition of patients who were on mechanical ventilation prior to receiving anesthesia (OR =4.11, 95% CI =1.17–14.38; surgery in the upper abdominal site (OR =14.64, 95% CI =2.83–75.82; shock prior to cardiac arrest (OR =6.24, 95% CI =2.53–15

  15. Exploring the safety and efficacy of targeted temperature management amongst infants with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to apparent life threatening events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meert, Kathleen; Telford, Russell; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S; Christensen, James R; Dean, J Michael; Moler, Frank W

    2016-12-01

    To explore the safety and efficacy of targeted temperature management amongst infants with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to an apparent life threatening event (ALTE) recruited to the Therapeutic Hypothermia after Paediatric Cardiac Arrest Out-of-Hospital trial. Fifty-four infants (48h to VABS-II) score ≥70, 12-month survival, change in VABS-II score from pre-arrest to 12 months post-arrest, and select safety measures. Amongst infants with pre-arrest VABS-II ≥70 (n=52), there was no difference in 12-month survival with VABS-II ≥70 between therapeutic hypothermia and therapeutic normothermia groups (2/25 (8.0%) vs. 1/27 (3.7%); relative risk 2.16; 95% confidence interval 0.21-22.38, p=0.60). Amongst all evaluable infants (n=53), the change in VABS-II score from pre-arrest to 12 months post-arrest did not differ (p=0.078) between therapeutic hypothermia and therapeutic normothermia groups, nor did 12-month survival (5/26 (19.2%) vs. 1/27 (3.7%); relative risk 5.19; 95% confidence interval 0.65-41.50, p=0.10). Mortality was high amongst infants that were comatose after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to ALTE in both therapeutic hypothermia and therapeutic normothermia treated groups. Functional status was markedly reduced among survivors. (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00878644). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The impact of airway management on quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation: an observational study in patients during cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Joyce; Chilwan, Mehboob; Field, Richard; Davies, Robin; Gao, Fang; Perkins, Gavin D

    2014-07-01

    Minimising interruptions in chest compressions is associated with improved survival from cardiac arrest. Current in-hospital guidelines recommend continuous chest compressions after the airway is secured on the premise that this will reduce no flow time. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of advanced airway use on the no flow ratio and other measures of CPR quality. Consecutive adult patients who sustained an in-hospital cardiac arrest were enrolled in this prospective observational study. The quality of CPR was measured using the Q-CPR device (Phillips, UK) before and after an advanced airway device (endotracheal tube [ET] or laryngeal mask airway [LMA]) was inserted. Patients receiving only bag-mask ventilation were used as the control cohort. The primary outcome was no flow ratio (NFR). Secondary outcomes were chest compression rate, depth, compressions too shallow, compressions with leaning, ventilation rate, inflation time, change in impedance and time required to successfully insert airway device. One hundred patients were enrolled in the study (2008-2011). Endotracheal tube and LMA placement took similar durations (median 15.8 s (IQR 6.8-19.4) vs. LMA median 8.0s (IQR 5.5-15.9), p=0.1). The use of an advanced airway was associated with improved no flow ratios (endotracheal tube placement (n=50) improved NFR from baseline median 0.24 IQR 0.17-0.40) to 0.15 to (IQR 0.09-0.28), p=0.012; LMA (n=25) from median 0.28 (IQR 0.23-0.40) to 0.13 (IQR 0.11- 0.19), p=0.0001). There was no change in NFR in patients managed solely with bag valve mask (BVM) (n=25) (median 0.29 (IQR 0.18-0.59) vs. median 0.26 (IQR 0.12-0.37), p=0.888). There was no significant difference in time taken to successfully insert the airway device between the two groups. The use of an advanced airway (ETT or LMA) during in-hospital cardiac arrest was associated with improved no flow ratio. Further studies are required to determine the effect of airway devices on overall patient

  17. A managed protocol for treatment of deceased potential donors reduces the incidence of cardiac arrest before organ explant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Glauco Adrieno; Zaclikevis, Viviane Renata; Vieira, Kalinca Daberkow; Cordeiro, Rodrigo de Brito; Horner, Marina Borges W.; de Oliveira, Thamy Pellizzaro; Duarte, Robson; Sperotto, Geonice; da Silveira, Georgiana; Caldeira, Milton; Coll, Elisabeth; Yus-Teruel, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of the application of a managed protocol for the maintenance care of deceased potential multiple organ donors at two hospitals. Methods A before (Phase 1)/after (Phase 2) study conducted at two general hospitals, which included consecutively potential donors admitted to two intensive care units. In Phase 1 (16 months), the data were collected retrospectively, and the maintenance care measures of the potential donors were instituted by the intensivists. In Phase 2 (12 months), the data collection was prospective, and a managed protocol was used for maintenance care. The two phases were compared in terms of their demographic variables, physiological variables at diagnosis of brain death and the end of the process, time to performance of brain death confirmatory test and end of the process, adherence to bundles of maintenance care essential measures, losses due to cardiac arrest, family refusal, contraindications, and the conversion rate of potential into actual donors. Student's t- and chi-square tests were used, and p-value < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results A total of 42 potential donors were identified (18 in Phase 1 and 24 in Phase 2). The time interval between the first clinical assessment and the recovery decreased in Phase 2 (Phase 1: 35.0±15.5 hours versus Phase 2: 24.6±6.2 hours; p = 0.023). Adherence increased to 10 out of the 19 essential items of maintenance care, and losses due to cardiac arrest also decreased in Phase 2 (Phase 1: 27.8 versus 0% in Phase 2; p = 0.006), while the convertion rate increased (Phase 1: 44.4 versus 75% in Phase 2; p = 0.044). The losses due to family refusal and medical contraindication did not vary. Conclusion The adoption of a managed protocol focused on the application of essential measures for the care of potential deceased donors might reduce the loss of potential donors due to cardiac arrest. PMID:23917929

  18. Clinical value of ST-segment change after return of spontaneous cardiac arrest and emergent coronary angiography in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: Diagnostic and therapeutic importance of vasospastic angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Kazuya; Abe, Daisuke; Iwama, Tooru; Hamabe, Yuichi; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Sato, Akira

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the association between initial ST-segment change after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and the incidence of acute coronary lesions in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), and clinical outcomes of patients with OHCA caused by vasospastic angina pectoris (VSA). Among 2779 OHCA patients in our institution, all patients with ROSC underwent emergent coronary angiography (CAG) except for those with an obvious extra-cardiac cause of OHCA. Initial ST-segment changes after ROSC were reviewed, and 30-day survival and neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Category) were evaluated. Of the 155 patients, 52 (34%) had ST-segment elevation (STE) and 103 (66%) had non-STE. Significant coronary culprit lesions were present in 81% of patients with STE and in 33% of patients with non-STE ( P<.001). Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was successful in 60 patients (93.8%) and failed in 4 patients (6.2%). Among 155 patients, 74 patients (47.7%) had favorable neurological prognosis, and 104 patients (67.1%) were alive at 30 days. ST-segment analysis showed good positive predictive value (81%) but low negative predictive value (68%) in diagnosing the presence of acute coronary lesions. VSA was found in 5 patients (9.6%) in the STE group and in 12 patients (11.7%) in the non-STE group. Of these 17 patients, 9 (52.9%) had favorable neurological outcome and 14 (82.4%) were alive at 30 days. An acute culprit lesion may be the cause of OHCA even in the absence of STE. In survivors of OHCA with normal coronary arteries, spasm provocation testing should be performed to detect VSA as a cause of the arrest.

  19. Cardiac arrest provoked by itraconazole and amiodarone interaction: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betrosian Alex

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Azoles, and specifically itraconazole, are often prescribed for the treatment of fungal diseases or empirically for persistent sepsis in patients who are neutropenic or in intensive care. Occasional cardiovascular adverse events have been associated with itraconazole use, and are usually attributed to the interaction of itraconazole with cisapride, terfenadine or digoxin. Its interaction with amiodarone has not been previously described. Case presentation A 65-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit at our facility for an extensive ischemic stroke associated with atrial fibrillation. Due to rapid ventricular response he was started on intravenous amiodarone and few days later itraconazole was also prescribed for presumed candidemia. After receiving the first dose our patient became profoundly hypotensive but responded rapidly to fluids and adrenaline. Then, two months later, itraconazole was again prescribed for confirmed fungemia. After receiving the first dose via a central venous catheter our patient became hypotensive and subsequently arrested. He was resuscitated successfully, and as no other cause was identified the arrest was attributed to septic shock and his antifungal treatment was changed to caspofungin. When sensitivity test results became available, antifungal treatment was down-staged to itraconazole and immediately after drug administration our patient suffered another arrest and was once again resuscitated successfully. This time the arrest was related to itraconazole, which was discontinued, and from then on our patient remained stable until his discharge to our neurology ward. Conclusions Itraconazole and amiodarone coadministration can lead to serious cardiovascular adverse events in patients who are critically ill. Intensivists, pharmacists and medical physicians should be aware of the interaction of these two commonly used drugs.

  20. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions--a nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2011-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...

  1. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions-A nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2010-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...

  2. Ventricular ectopic burden in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated with targeted temperature management at 33°C and 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Graff, Claus

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Life threatening arrhythmias are increasingly frequent with lower body temperature. While targeted temperature management (TTM) with mild hypothermia following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is generally considered safe and has been suggested as a potential antiarrhythmic add...... in ventricular ectopic activity (pincidence of ventricular ectopic...

  3. Incidence, Causes, and Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children A Comprehensive, Prospective, Population-Based Study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardai, Abdennasser; Berdowski, Jocelyn; van der Werf, Christian; Ceelen, Manon; van Langen, Irene M.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Koster, Rudolph W.; Tan, Hanno L.; Blom, Marieke T.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine comprehensively the incidence of pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and its contribution to total pediatric mortality, the causes of pediatric OHCA, and the outcome of resuscitation of pediatric OHCA patients. Background There is a paucity of

  4. Quality of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation When Directing the Area of maximal Compression by Transesophageal Echocardiography During Cardiac Arrest in Swine (Sus scrofa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    at 20mins CPP was measured over the duration of the experiment ROSC was defined as a regular cardiac rhythm with SBP >60 for 1min...69.2) 0 (0.00) No ROSC 4 (30.8) 13 ( 100 ) * * * p=0.032 p=0.002 pɘ.001 Figure 1. CPP at baseline, during VF arrest, BLS, and ACLS

  5. Hemodynamics and vasopressor support during targeted temperature management at 33°C Versus 36°C after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Annborn, Martin; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the hemodynamic profile associated with different target temperatures and to assess the prognostic implication of inotropic/vasopressor support and mean arterial pressure after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. There is a lack of information how different target temperatures...

  6. Incidence, Causes, and Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children A Comprehensive, Prospective, Population-Based Study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bardai; J. Berdowski; C. van der Werf; M.T. Blom; M. Ceelen; I.M. van Langen; J.G.P. Tijssen; A.A.M. Wilde; R.W. Koster; H.L. Tan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine comprehensively the incidence of pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and its contribution to total pediatric mortality, the causes of pediatric OHCA, and the outcome of resuscitation of pediatric OHCA patients. Background There is a paucity of co

  7. Age-specific prognostication after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest - The ethical dilemma between 'life-sustaining treatment' and 'the right to die' in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzgruber, Patrick; Sterz, Fritz; Poppe, Michael; Schober, Andreas; Lobmeyr, Elisabeth; Datler, Philip; Keferböck, Markus; Zeiner, Sebastian; Nürnberger, Alexander; Hubner, Pia; Stratil, Peter; Wallmueller, Christian; Weiser, Christoph; Warenits, Alexandra-Maria; van Tulder, Raphael; Zajicek, Andreas; Buchinger, Angelika; Testori, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    While prognostic values on survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have been well investigated, less attention has been paid to their age-specific relevance. Therefore, we aimed to identify suitable age-specific early prognostication in elderly patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in order to reduce the burden of unnecessary treatment and harm. In a prospective population-based observational trial on individuals suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, a total of 2223 patients receiving resuscitation attempts by the local emergency medical service in Vienna, Austria, were enrolled. Patients were stratified according to age as follows: young and middle-aged individuals (85 years). There was an increasing rate of 30-day mortality (+21.8%, p 85-year-olds. Frailty was directly associated with mortality (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.01-1.51, p = 0.049), showing a 30-day survival of 5.6% and a favourable neurological outcome of 1.1% among elderly individuals. An initially shockable electrocardiogram proved to be a suitable tool for risk assessment and decision making in order to predict a successful outcome in elderly victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, the outcomes of elderly patients seemed to be exceptionally poor in frail individuals and need to be considered in order to reduce unnecessary treatment decisions.

  8. Distance to invasive heart centre, performance of acute coronary angiography, and angioplasty and associated outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranberg, Tinne; Knudsen Lippert, Freddy; Christensen, Erika F

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate whether the distance from the site of event to an invasive heart centre, acute coronary angiography (CAG)/percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and hospital-level of care (invasive heart centre vs. local hospital) is associated with survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest...

  9. Tertiary centres have improved survival compared to other hospitals in the Copenhagen area after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Wachtell, Kristian; Nielsen, Søren Loumann;

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has been reported to carry very varying morbidity and mortality. However, it remains unclear whether this is caused by intrinsic factors of the OHCA or due to the level of in-hospital care. The aim of this study is to compare 30-day and long......-term mortality after OHCA at tertiary heart centres and non-tertiary university hospitals. METHODS AND RESULTS: Data from the Copenhagen OHCA registry from June 2002 through December 2010 included a total of 1218 consecutive patients treated by the same mobile emergency care unit (MECU) with either return...... angiography. Therefore, patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (n=198) were excluded from the analysis. 30-day mortality was 56% vs. 76% and long term (up to 8years) mortality was 78% vs. 94% for tertiary and non-tertiary hospitals, respectively, both p...

  10. Prevalence and Prognostic Implications of Bundle Branch Block in Comatose Survivors of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grand, Johannes; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Kjærgaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the prevalence and prognostic impact of right bundle branch block (RBBB) and left bundle branch block (LBBB) in the admission electrocardiogram (ECG) of comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The present study is part of the predefined electrocardiographic...... substudy of the prospective randomized target temperature management trial, which found no benefit of targeting 33°C over 36°C in terms of outcome. Six-hundred eighty-two patients were included in the substudy. An admission ECG, which defined the present study population, was available in 602 patients (88...... was directly associated with higher mortality and independently associated with higher odds of unfavorable neurologic outcome. RBBB is seemingly an early indicator of an unfavorable prognosis after OHCA....

  11. Enalapril protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in a swine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoxing; Zhang, Qian; Yuan, Wei; Wu, Junyuan; Li, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence to suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) protect against local myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. This study was designed to explore whether ACEIs exert cardioprotective effects in a swine model of cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation. Male pigs were randomly assigned to three groups: sham-operated group, saline treatment group and enalapril treatment group. Thirty minutes after drug infusion, the animals in the saline and enalapril groups were subjected to ventricular fibrillation (8 min) followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (up to 30 min). Cardiac function was monitored, and myocardial tissue and blood were collected for analysis. Enalapril pre-treatment did not improve cardiac function or the 6-h survival rate after CA and resuscitation; however, this intervention ameliorated myocardial ultrastructural damage, reduced the level of plasma cardiac troponin I and decreased myocardial apoptosis. Plasma angiotensin (Ang) II and Ang-(1–7) levels were enhanced in the model of CA and resuscitation. Enalapril reduced the plasma Ang II level at 4 and 6 h after the return of spontaneous circulation whereas enalapril did not affect the plasma Ang-(1–7) level. Enalapril pre-treatment decreased the myocardial mRNA and protein expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Enalapril treatment also reduced the myocardial ACE/ACE2 ratio, both at the mRNA and the protein level. Enalapril pre-treatment did not affect the upregulation of ACE2, Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and MAS after CA and resuscitation. Taken together, these findings suggest that enalapril protects against ischemic injury through the attenuation of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis after CA and resuscitation in pigs. These results suggest the potential therapeutic value of ACEIs in patients with CA. PMID:27633002

  12. Early Administration of Glutamine Protects Cardiomyocytes from Post-Cardiac Arrest Acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan-Ren; Li, Chao-Jui; Syu, Shih-Han; Wen, Cheng-Hao; Buddhakosai, Waradee; Wu, Han-Ping; Hsu Chen, Cheng; Lu, Huai-En; Chen, Wen-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Postcardiac arrest acidosis can decrease survival. Effective medications without adverse side effects are still not well characterized. We aimed to analyze whether early administration of glutamine could improve survival and protect cardiomyocytes from postcardiac arrest acidosis using animal and cell models. Forty Wistar rats with postcardiac arrest acidosis (blood pH < 7.2) were included. They were divided into study (500 mg/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, n = 20) and control (normal saline, n = 20) groups. Each of the rats received resuscitation. The outcomes were compared between the two groups. In addition, cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells were exposed to HBSS with different pH levels (7.3 or 6.5) or to culture medium (control). Apoptosis-related markers and beating function were analyzed. We found that the duration of survival was significantly longer in the study group (p < 0.05). In addition, in pH 6.5 or pH 7.3 HBSS buffer, the expression levels of cell stress (p53) and apoptosis (caspase-3, Bcl-xL) markers were significantly lower in cardiomyocytes treated with 50 mM L-glutamine than those without L-glutamine (RT-PCR). L-glutamine also increased the beating function of cardiomyocytes, especially at the lower pH level (6.5). More importantly, glutamine decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased these cells' beating function at a low pH level.

  13. Early Administration of Glutamine Protects Cardiomyocytes from Post-Cardiac Arrest Acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Ren Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Postcardiac arrest acidosis can decrease survival. Effective medications without adverse side effects are still not well characterized. We aimed to analyze whether early administration of glutamine could improve survival and protect cardiomyocytes from postcardiac arrest acidosis using animal and cell models. Forty Wistar rats with postcardiac arrest acidosis (blood pH < 7.2 were included. They were divided into study (500 mg/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, n=20 and control (normal saline, n=20 groups. Each of the rats received resuscitation. The outcomes were compared between the two groups. In addition, cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells were exposed to HBSS with different pH levels (7.3 or 6.5 or to culture medium (control. Apoptosis-related markers and beating function were analyzed. We found that the duration of survival was significantly longer in the study group (p<0.05. In addition, in pH 6.5 or pH 7.3 HBSS buffer, the expression levels of cell stress (p53 and apoptosis (caspase-3, Bcl-xL markers were significantly lower in cardiomyocytes treated with 50 mM L-glutamine than those without L-glutamine (RT-PCR. L-glutamine also increased the beating function of cardiomyocytes, especially at the lower pH level (6.5. More importantly, glutamine decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased these cells’ beating function at a low pH level.

  14. Difficulties with neurological prognostication in a young woman with delayed-onset generalised status myoclonus after cardiac arrest due to acute severe asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Rajamani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological prognostication in cardiac arrest survivors is difficult, especially when the primary etiology is respiratory arrest. Prognostic factors designed to have zero false-positive rates to robustly confirm poor outcome are usually inadequate to rule out poor outcomes (i.e., high specificity and low sensitivity. One of the least understood prognosticators is generalised status myoclonus (GSM, with case reports confusing GSM, isolated myoclonic jerks and post-hypoxic intention myoclonus (Lance Adams syndrome [LAS]. With several prognostic indicators (including status myoclonus having been validated in the pre-hypothermia era, their current relevance is debatable. New modalities such as brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and continuous electroencephalography are being evaluated. We describe here a pregnant woman resuscitated from a cardiac arrest due to acute severe asthma, and an inability to reach a consensus based on published guidelines, with a brief overview of myoclonus, LAS and the role of MRI brain in assisting prognostication.

  15. Association between bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundgaard, Kristian; Hansen, Steen M; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark; Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Malta; Lippert, Freddy; Gislason, Gunnar; Køber, Lars; Nielsen, Jimmi; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen; Kragholm, Kristian

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to examine rates of redeemed prescriptions of antidepressants and anxiolytics, used as markers for cerebral dysfunction in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors, and examine the association between bystander CPR and these psychoactive drugs. We included all 30-day survivors of OHCA in Denmark between 2001 and 2011, who had not redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants or anxiolytics in the last six months prior to OHCA. Main outcome measures were redeemed prescriptions of antidepressants and anxiolytics within one year after OHCA. Among 2,001 30-day survivors, 174 (8.6% died and 12.0% redeemed a first prescription for an antidepressant and 8.2% for an anxiolytic drug within one year after arrest. The corresponding frequencies for redeemed prescribed drugs among age- and sex-matched population controls were 7.5% and 5.2%, respectively. Among survivors who received bystander CPR, prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics were redeemed in 11.1% [95% CI 9.2-13.3%] and 6.3% [95% CI 4.9-8.0%] of the cases, respectively, versus 17.2% [95% CI 13.9-21.1%] and 13.4% [95% CI 10.5-17.0%], respectively, among patients who had not received bystander CPR. Adjusted for age, sex, year of arrest, comorbidity, witnessed status and socioeconomic status, bystander CPR was associated with significant reductions in redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants, Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.71 [95% CI 0.52-0.98], P=0.031; and anxiolytics, HR 0.55 [95% CI 0.38-0.81], P=0.002. Relative to no bystander CPR, redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics were significantly lower among 30-day survivors of OHCA who received bystander CPR, suggesting a cerebral dysfunction-lowering potential of bystander CPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Association between bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Kristian; Hansen, Steen M; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark

    2017-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to examine rates of redeemed prescriptions of antidepressants and anxiolytics, used as markers for cerebral dysfunction in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors, and examine the association between bystander CPR and these psychoactive drugs. METHODS: We included all....... Among survivors who received bystander CPR, prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics were redeemed in 11.1% [95% CI 9.2-13.3%] and 6.3% [95% CI 4.9-8.0%] of the cases, respectively, versus 17.2% [95% CI 13.9-21.1%] and 13.4% [95% CI 10.5-17.0%], respectively, among patients who had not received...... bystander CPR. Adjusted for age, sex, year of arrest, comorbidity, witnessed status and socioeconomic status, bystander CPR was associated with significant reductions in redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants, Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.71 [95% CI 0.52-0.98], P=0.031; and anxiolytics, HR 0.55 [95% CI 0...

  17. Hyperoxia Early After Hospital Admission in Comatose Patients with Non-Traumatic Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Martin; von Auenmueller, Katharina Isabel; Brand, Michael; Amirie, Scharbanu; Sasko, Benjamin Michel; Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Background The clinical effect of hyperoxia in patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains uncertain. We therefore initiated this study to find out whether there is an association between survival and hyperoxia early after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in OHCA patients admitted to our hospital. Material/Methods All OHCA patients admitted to our hospital between 1 January 2008 and 30 June 2015 were identified by analysis of our central admission register. Data from individual patients were collected from patient health records and anonymously stored on a central database. Results Altogether, there were 280 OHCA patients admitted to our hospital between 1 January 2008 and 30 June 2015, including 35 patients (12.5%) with hyperoxia and 99 patients (35.4%) with normoxia. Comparison of these 2 groups showed lower pH values in OHCA patients admitted with normoxia compared to those with hyperoxia (7.10±0.18 vs. 7.21±0.17; p=0.001) but similar rates of initial lactate (7.92±3.87 mmol/l vs. 11.14±16.40 mmol/l; p=0.072). Survival rates differed between both groups (34.4% vs. 54.3%; p=0.038) with better survival rates in OHCA patients with hyperoxia at hospital admission. Conclusions Currently, different criteria are used to define hyperoxia following OHCA, but if the negative effects of hyperoxia in OHCA patients are a cumulative effect over time, hyperoxia < 60 min after hospital admission as investigated in this study would be equivalent to a short period of hyperoxia. It may be that the positive effect of buffering metabolic acidosis early after cardiac arrest maintains the negative effects of hyperoxia in general. PMID:27638399

  18. Erythrocyte very long-chain saturated fatty acids associated with lower risk of incident sudden cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Rozenn N; King, Irena B; Rice, Kenneth; McKnight, Barbara; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rea, Thomas D; Johnson, Catherine O; Raghunathan, Trivellore E; Cobb, Leonard A; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Siscovick, David S

    2014-10-01

    Prior studies suggest that circulating n-3 and trans-fatty acids influence the risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Yet, while other fatty acids also differ in their membrane properties and biological activities which may influence SCA, little is known about the associations of other circulating fatty acids with SCA. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of 17 erythrocyte membrane fatty acids with SCA risk. We used data from a population-based case-control study of SCA in the greater Seattle, Washington, area. Cases, aged 25-74 years, were out-of-hospital SCA patients, attended by paramedics (n=265). Controls, matched to cases by age, sex and calendar year, were randomly identified from the community (n=415). All participants were free of prior clinically-diagnosed heart disease. Blood was obtained at the time of cardiac arrest by attending paramedics (cases) or at the time of an interview (controls). Higher levels of erythrocyte very long-chain saturated fatty acids (VLSFA) were associated with lower risk of SCA. After adjustment for risk factors and levels of n-3 and trans-fatty acids, higher levels of 20:0 corresponding to 1 SD were associated with 30% lower SCA risk (13-43%, p=0.001). Higher levels of 22:0 and 24:0 were associated with similar lower SCA risk (ORs for 1 SD-difference: 0.71 [95% CI: 0.57-0.88, p=0.002] for 22:0; and 0.79 [95% CI: 0.63-0.98, p=0.04] for 24:0). These novel findings support the need for investigation of biologic effects of circulating VLSFA and their determinants.

  19. Regions of High Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Incidence and Low Bystander CPR Rates in Victoria, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straney, Lahn D.; Bray, Janet E.; Beck, Ben; Finn, Judith; Bernard, Stephen; Dyson, Kylie; Lijovic, Marijana; Smith, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Background Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains a major public health issue and research has shown that large regional variation in outcomes exists. Of the interventions associated with survival, the provision of bystander CPR is one of the most important modifiable factors. The aim of this study is to identify census areas with high incidence of OHCA and low rates of bystander CPR in Victoria, Australia Methods We conducted an observational stud