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Sample records for prehospital adult nontraumatic

  1. Does Pre-hospital Endotracheal Intubation Improve Survival in Adults with Non-traumatic Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest? A Systematic Review

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    Ling Tiah

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Endotracheal intubation (ETI is currently considered superior to supraglottic airway devices (SGA for survival and other outcomes among adults with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. We aimed to determine if the research supports this conclusion by conducting a systematic review. Methods: We searched the MEDLINE, Scopus and CINAHL databases for studies published between January 1, 1980, and 30 April 30, 2013, which compared pre-hospital use of ETI with SGA for outcomes of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC; survival to hospital admission; survival to hospital discharge; and favorable neurological or functional status. We selected studies using pre-specified criteria. Included studies were independently screened for quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. We did not pool results because of study variability. Study outcomes were extracted and results presented as summed odds ratios with 95% CI. Results: We identified five eligible studies: one quasi-randomized controlled trial and four cohort studies, involving 303,348 patients in total. Only three of the five studies reported a higher proportion of ROSC with ETI versus SGA with no difference reported in the remaining two. None found significant differences between ETI and SGA for survival to hospital admission or discharge. One study reported better functional status at discharge for ETI versus SGA. Two studies reported no significant difference for favorable neurological status between ETI and SGA. Conclusion: Current evidence does not conclusively support the superiority of ETI over SGA for multiple outcomes among adults with OHCA. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  2. Nontraumatic hypotension and shock in the emergency department and the prehospital setting, prevalence, etiology, and mortality: a systematic review.

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    Jon Gitz Holler

    Full Text Available Acute patients presenting with hypotension in the prehospital or emergency department (ED setting are in need of focused management and knowledge of the epidemiology characteristics might help the clinician. The aim of this review was to address prevalence, etiology and mortality of nontraumatic hypotension (SBP ≤ 90 mmHg with or without the presence of shock in the prehospital and ED setting.We performed a systematic literature search up to August 2013, using Medline, Embase, Cinahl, Dare and The Cochrane Library. The analysis and eligibility criteria were documented according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA-guidelines and The Cochrane Collaboration. No restrictions on language, publication date, or status were imposed. We used the Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment scale (NOS-scale and the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE-statement to assess the quality.Six observational studies were considered eligible for analysis based on the evaluation of 11,880 identified papers. Prehospital prevalence of hypotension was 19.5/1000 emergency medicine service (EMS contacts, and the prevalence of hypotensive shock was 9.5-19/1000 EMS contacts with an inhospital mortality of shock between 33 to 52%. ED prevalence of hypotension was 4-13/1000 contacts with a mortality of 12%. Information on mortality, prevalence and etiology of shock in the ED was limited. A meta-analysis was not feasible due to substantial heterogeneity between studies.There is inadequate evidence to establish concise estimates of the characteristics of nontraumatic hypotension and shock in the ED or in the prehospital setting. The available studies suggest that 2% of EMS contacts present with nontraumatic hypotension while 1-2% present with shock. The inhospital mortality of prehospital shock is 33-52%. Prevalence of hypotension in the ED is 1% with an inhospital mortality of 12%. Prevalence

  3. Nontraumatic Hypotension and Shock in the Emergency Department and the Prehospital setting, Prevalence, Etiology, and Mortality

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    Holler, Jon Gitz; Bech, Camilla Nørgaard; Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard;

    2015-01-01

    studies in Epidemiology (STROBE-statement) to assess the quality. RESULTS: Six observational studies were considered eligible for analysis based on the evaluation of 11,880 identified papers. Prehospital prevalence of hypotension was 19.5/1000 emergency medicine service (EMS) contacts, and the prevalence...

  4. Non-traumatic diaphragmatic hernia of the liver in an adult:a case repor t

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    Hai-Feng Luo; Ting Lei; Hong-Jiang Wang; Guang Tan; Zhong-Yu Wang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diaphragmatic hernia of the liver is a rare clinical entity, usually found after trauma in adults. This study was undertaken to elucidate a misdiagnosis of non-traumatic diaphragmatic hernia of the liver in an adult. METHOD: The clinical data of one patient with non-traumatic diaphragmatic hernia of the liver was analyzed. RESULTS:A tumor in the right lower thorax was revealed by chest X-ray and computed tomography. Non-traumatic diaphragmatic hernia of the liver was not identiifed until the operation. Pathological analysis conifrmed the ifnding. The patient recovered well. CONCLUSIONS: Non-traumatic diaphragmatic hernia of the liver in an adult is a rare right-sided diaphragmatic hernia, which can move up into the chest cavity. It should be distinguished from lung cancer. The diagnosis and evaluation of non-traumatic diaphragmatic hernia of the liver can help optimize surgical management. 5 Kearney PA, Rouhana SW, Burnay RE. Blunt rupture of the diaphragmatic:mechanism, diagnosis, and treatment. Ann Emerg Med 1989;18:1326-1330. 6 Demos TC, Solomon C, Posniak HV, Flisak MJ. Computed tomography in traumatic defects of the diaphragm. Clin Imaging 1989;13:62-67. 7 Mar Fan MJ, Coulson ML, Siu SK. Adult incarcerated right-sided Bochdalek hernia. Aust N Z J Surg 1999;69:239-241. 8 Arsalane A, Herman D, Bazelly B. Left strangulated diaphragmatic hernia: an unusual complication of gastric bypass. Rev Pneumol Clin 2005;61:374-377. 9 Thomas S, Kapur B. Adult Bochdalek hernia--clinical features, management and results of treatment. Jpn J Surg 1991;21:114-119. 10 Kitano Y, Lally KP, Lally PA; Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Study Group. Late-presenting congenital diaphrag-matic hernia. J Pediatr Surg 2005;40:1839-1843. 11 Hubbard AM, Adzick NS, Crombleholme TM, Haselgrove JC. Left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia: value of prenatal MR imaging in preparation for fetal surgery. Radiology 1997;203:636-640. 12 Kilian AK, Busing KA, Schaible T, Neff KW. Fetal

  5. Six-year course and prognosis of nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults in general practice: a prospective cohort study.

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    Kastelein, Marlous; Luijsterburg, Pim A J; Belo, Janneke N; Verhaar, Jan A N; Koes, Bart W; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A

    2011-09-01

    To examine the 6-year course of nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults in general practice, to identify prognostic factors for unfavorable outcome, and to develop a clinical prediction rule. Adults (ages >35 years) with incident nontraumatic knee symptoms (n = 549) were followed for 6 years. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify prognostic factors associated with an unfavorable outcome, the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was calculated to determine discriminative ability, and a clinical prediction rule was developed. Unfavorable outcome is defined as persistent knee symptoms at 6-year followup or having undergone knee replacement surgery during followup. At 6-year followup, 42.1% of patients had an unfavorable outcome. Having persistent knee symptoms (odds ratio [OR] 5.31, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 3.27-8.61) and fulfilling the clinical American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for osteoarthritis (OA; OR 2.65, 95% CI 1.48-4.73) at 1-year followup were significantly associated with unfavorable outcome, while fulfilling the clinical ACR criteria for OA at baseline was not. Baseline factors independently associated with an unfavorable outcome were low/middle education level, comorbidity of the skeletal system, duration of knee symptoms of >3 months, bilateral knee symptoms, self-reported warm knee, history of nontraumatic knee symptoms, valgus alignment, pain at passive knee flexion/extension, and bony enlargement of the knee joint (AUC 0.80). Nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults in general practice appear to become a chronic disorder in nearly half of the patients. The developed clinical prediction rule with 10 baseline prognostic factors can be used to select high-risk patients for an unfavorable outcome at long-term followup. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  6. Pre-hospital treatment of convulsive status epilepticus in adults

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    Fei TIAN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE is the most serious seizure type in status epilepticus (SE, which may cause irreversible damage of brain and other vital organs without prompt and effective treatment, and result in a high mortality. Therefore, effective pre-hospital drug therapy can ensure the success of treatment for CSE. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.11.004

  7. Proportion of out-of-hospital adult non-traumatic cardiac or respiratory arrest among calls for seizure.

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    Dami, Fabrice; Rossetti, Andrea O; Fuchs, Vincent; Yersin, Bertrand; Hugli, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    To measure the proportion of adult non-traumatic cardiac or respiratory arrest among calls for seizure to an emergency medical dispatch centre and to record whether known epileptic patients present cardiac or respiratory arrest together with seizure. This 2-year prospective observational investigation involved the collection of tape recordings of all incoming calls to the emergency medical dispatch centre, in which an out-of-hospital non-traumatic seizure was the chief complaint in patients >18 years, in addition to the paramedics' records of all patients who presented with respiratory or cardiac arrest. The authors also recorded whether the bystander spontaneously mentioned to the dispatcher that the victim was known to have epilepsy. During the 24-month period, the call centre received 561 incoming calls for an out-of-hospital non-traumatic seizure in an adult. Twelve cases were classified as cardiac or respiratory arrest by paramedics. In one case, the caller spontaneously mentioned that the victim had a history of epilepsy. The proportion of cardiac or respiratory arrest among calls for seizure was 2.1%. Although these cases are rare, dispatchers should closely monitor seizure patients with the help of bystanders to exclude an out-of-hospital cardiac or respiratory arrest, in which case the dispatcher can offer telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation advice until the paramedics arrive. Whenever the activity of the centre allows it and no new incoming call is on hold, this can be achieved by staying on the line with the caller or by calling back. A history of epilepsy should not modify the type of monitoring performed by the dispatcher as those patients may also have an arrest together with seizure.

  8. Nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage.

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    Fischbein, Nancy J; Wijman, Christine A C

    2010-11-01

    Nontraumatic (or spontaneous) intracranial hemorrhage most commonly involves the brain parenchyma and subarachnoid space. This entity accounts for at least 10% of strokes and is a leading cause of death and disability in adults. Important causes of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage include hypertension, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, aneurysms, vascular malformations, and hemorrhagic infarcts (both venous and arterial). Imaging findings in common and less common causes of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage are reviewed.

  9. Prehospital Care for the Adult and Pediatric Seizure Patient: Current Evidence-based Recommendations

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    Silverman, Eric C.; Sporer, Karl A.; Lemieux, Justin M.; Brown, John F.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.; Gilbert, Greg H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of adult and pediatric patients with a seizure and to compare these recommendations against the current protocol used by the 33 emergency medical services (EMS) agencies in California. Methods We performed a review of the evidence in the prehospital treatment of patients with a seizure, and then compared the seizure protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. We analyzed the type and route of medication administered, number of additional rescue doses permitted, and requirements for glucose testing prior to medication. The treatment for eclampsia and seizures in pediatric patients were analyzed separately. Results Protocols across EMS Agencies in California varied widely. We identified multiple drugs, dosages, routes of administration, re-dosing instructions, and requirement for blood glucose testing prior to medication delivery. Blood glucose testing prior to benzodiazepine administration is required by 61% (20/33) of agencies for adult patients and 76% (25/33) for pediatric patients. All agencies have protocols for giving intramuscular benzodiazepines and 76% (25/33) have protocols for intranasal benzodiazepines. Intramuscular midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult dose, 2 to 8 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intranasal midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult or pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intravenous/intrasosseous midazolam dosages ranged from 1 to 6 mg per single adult dose, 1 to 5 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.05 to 0.1 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Eclampsia is specifically addressed by 85% (28/33) of agencies. Forty-two percent (14/33) have a protocol for administering magnesium sulfate, with intravenous dosages ranging from 2 to 6 mg, and 58% (19/33) allow benzodiazepines to be administered

  10. Ureterosigmoidostomy[corrected]-associated quadriparesis, non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis, and tetany in an adult.

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    Ozmen, Sehmus; Danis, Ramazan; Akin, Davut; Gullu, Nezir; Ozmen, Cihan Akgul; Yazanel, Orhan

    2008-01-01

    We report an adult case of ureterosigmoidostomy-associated quadriparesis, rhabdomyolysis, and tetany which may be the first such case in the literature. A 32-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency room of our hospital, having been unable to walk or use her arms for 24 h. Neurological examination revealed quadriparesis. She had severe hypokalemia (1.27 mmol/l) and metabolic acidosis (pH=7.05). Creatine kinase value was 2,590 U/l on the third day. She received intensive therapy to correct the hypokalemia and acidosis. On the third day of hospitalization tetany was detected in her upper extremities. The patient regained full muscle power after intravenous potassium chloride, bicarbonate, and calcium replacement therapy.

  11. Acute Alcohol Use and Injury Patterns in Young Adult Prehospital Patients.

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    Barton, David J; Tift, Frank W; Cournoyer, Lauren E; Vieth, Julie T; Hudson, Korin B

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine if acute alcohol consumption is associated with differences in injury pattern among young adult patients with traumatic injuries presenting to emergency medical services (EMS). A cross-sectional, retrospective review of prehospital patient care reports (PCRs) was conducted evaluating injured patients who presented to a collegiate EMS agency from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2012. Included patients were age 18-24 y and sustained an injury within the previous 24 h. PCRs were reviewed independently by two abstractors to determine if the patient was documented to have acutely consumed alcohol proximate to his/her injury. Primary and secondary sites of regional body injury were recorded. Injury severity was recorded using the Revised Trauma Score (RTS). The association between primary injury site and acute alcohol use was assessed using a chi-square test. Multiple logistic regression was used to control for sex in predicting injury type. Of 440 injured patients, 135 (30.6%) had documented alcohol use prior to injury. Acute alcohol consumption altered the overall pattern of regional injury (p Alcohol users were more likely to present with injury secondary to assault, fall/trip, and unknown mechanism of injury (p alcohol group (p alcohol consumption predicted increased risk of head/neck injury 5.59-fold (p alcohol use in collegiate EMS patients appears to alter injury patterns in young adults and increases risk of head/neck injury. EMS providers in similar agencies should consider these trends when assessing and treating injured college-aged patients.

  12. Correlation of non-traumatic neck pain with cervical angle and shoulder retractor power in adult clerical population

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    Isha Avadhut Godbole

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A forward head posture (or chin poking is perhaps the most common abnormality associated with NP and is commonly defined as the protrusion of the head in the sagittal plane so that the head is placed anterior to the trunk. Forward head posture can occur because of an anterior translation of the head, lower cervical flexion, or both, and it is claimed to be associated with an increase in upper-cervical extension. It is suggested that forward head posture leads to an increase in the compressive forces on the cervical apophyseal joints and posterior part of the vertebra and to changes in connective tissue length and strength (because of stretching of the anterior structures of the neck and shortening of the posterior muscles resulting in pain. The objective of the study was to correlate neck pain with cervical angle and shoulder retractor power in non-traumatic neck pain patients. Methods: 50 clerical workers having non traumatic neck pain were included. Neck pain was measured on VAS, cervical angle was measured using photometric method and shoulder retractor power was measured. Results: VAS showed moderate positive correlation with cervical angles (0.63 and 0.72 and moderate negative correlation with shoulder retractor power (-0.59 and -0.71. A moderate positive correlation of craniocervical angle to VAS seen (0.66 whereas there was negative correlation with shoulder retractors I and II (-0.59 and -0.61 A positive correlation was seen between VAS and craniocervical angle but is moderately negative with shoulder retractors I (Rhomboids and II (Middle trapezius (0.78, 0.04, -0.69 and -0.64. Conclusion: A moderate increase in cranio vertebral and craniocervical angle showed plausible weakness in lower Trapezius and rhomboids among clerks` having Non-traumatic neck pain. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(4.000: 859-862

  13. Cross-sectional study of the prehospital management of adult patients with a suspected seizure (EPIC1)

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    Taylor, Louise H; Shewan, Jane; Baldwin, Trevor; Grünewald, Richard A; Reuber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Suspected seizures are a common reason for emergency calls to ambulance services. Prehospital management of these patients is an important element of good quality care. The aim of this study, conducted in a regional ambulance service in the UK, was to quantify the number of emergency telephone calls for suspected seizures in adults, the associated costs, and to describe the patients’ characteristics, their prehospital management and their immediate outcomes. Design Quantitative cross-sectional study using routinely collected data and a detailed review of the clinical records of a consecutive series of adult patients (≥16 years). Setting A regional ambulance service within the National Health Service in England. Participants Cross-sectional data from all 605 481 adult emergency incidents managed by the ambulance service from 1 April 2012 to 31 March 2013. We selected a consecutive series of 178 individual incidents from May 2012 for more detailed analysis (132 after exclusions and removal of non-seizure cases). Results Suspected seizures made up 3.3% of all emergency incidents. True medical emergencies were uncommon but 3.3% had partially occluded airways, 6.8% had ongoing seizure activity and 59.1% had clinical problems in addition to the seizure (29.1% involving injury). Emergency vehicles were dispatched for 97.2% of suspected seizures, the seizure had terminated on arrival in 93.2% of incidents, 75% of these patients were transported to hospital. The estimated emergency management cost per annum of suspected seizures in the English ambulance services is £45.2 million (€64.0 million, $68.6 million). Conclusions Many patients with suspected seizures could potentially be treated more effectively and at lower cost by modifying ambulance call handling protocols. The development of innovative care pathways could give call handlers and paramedics alternatives to hospital transportation. Increased adoption of care plans could reduce 999 calls and

  14. Long-term, passive exposure to non-traumatic acoustic noise induces neural adaptation in the adult rat medial geniculate body and auditory cortex.

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    Lau, Condon; Zhang, Jevin W; McPherson, Bradley; Pienkowski, Martin; Wu, Ed X

    2015-02-15

    Exposure to loud sounds can lead to permanent hearing loss, i.e., the elevation of hearing thresholds. Exposure at more moderate sound pressure levels (SPLs) (non-traumatic and within occupational limits) may not elevate thresholds, but could in the long-term be detrimental to speech intelligibility by altering its spectrotemporal representation in the central auditory system. In support of this, electrophysiological and behavioral changes following long-term, passive (no conditioned learning) exposure at moderate SPLs have recently been observed in adult animals. To assess the potential effects of moderately loud noise on the entire auditory brain, we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study noise-exposed adult rats. We find that passive, pulsed broadband noise exposure for two months at 65 dB SPL leads to a decrease of the sound-evoked blood oxygenation level-dependent fMRI signal in the thalamic medial geniculate body (MGB) and in the auditory cortex (AC). This points to the thalamo-cortex as the site of the neural adaptation to the moderately noisy environment. The signal reduction is statistically significant during 10 Hz pulsed acoustic stimulation (MGB: pnoise exposure has a greater effect on the processing of higher pulse rate sounds. This study has enhanced our understanding of functional changes following exposure by mapping changes across the entire auditory brain. These findings have important implications for speech processing, which depends on accurate processing of sounds with a wide spectrum of pulse rates.

  15. Comparison of ambulance dispatch protocols for nontraumatic abdominal pain.

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    Lammers, R L; Roth, B A; Utecht, T

    1995-11-01

    To compare rates of undertriage and overtriage of six ambulance dispatch protocols for the presenting complaint of nontraumatic abdominal pain, and to identify the optimal protocol. Retrospective prehospital and emergency department chart review to classify patients' conditions as "emergency" or "nonemergency." Utility analysis was used to identify the preferred protocol and monetary cost-effectiveness analysis to identify the least expensive protocol. County emergency medical services (EMS) system with five receiving hospitals serving a mainly urban population of approximately 350,000. Records of 902 patients who called 911 for nontraumatic abdominal pain were reviewed; patients not transported were excluded. Twenty-seven county EMS medical directors completed questionnaires. Six ambulance dispatch protocols for nontraumatic abdominal pain were developed: indiscriminate-dispatch, four selective protocols, and no-dispatch. A dichotomous classification system was derived prospectively from the prehospital and medical records of patients who had activated the EMS system before the study period to define "emergency" and "nonemergency" conditions associated with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Emergency criteria identified patients with conditions requiring medical treatment within 1 hour. Reviewers determined, for each patient, whether an ambulance would have been dispatched by each of the protocols. Undertriage and overtriage rates were calculated for each protocol. County EMS medical directors assigned utility values to four potential outcomes of ambulance dispatch by the direct scaling method. The outcomes comprised correct and incorrect decisions to dispatch ambulances to patients with and without emergencies. The protocols were compared by decision analysis. A cost analysis was also performed, using an estimated marginal cost per transport of $302. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated the effect of varying the cost of an undertriage error and the cost per response. Of

  16. Using external lumbar CSF drainage to treat communicating external hydrocephalus in adult patients after acute traumatic or non-traumatic brain injury.

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    Manet, Romain; Payen, Jean-François; Guerin, Romain; Martinez, Orianne; Hautefeuille, Serge; Francony, Gilles; Gergelé, Laurent

    2017-08-08

    Despite various treatments to control intracranial pressure (ICP) after brain injury, patients may present a late onset of high ICP or a poor response to medications. External lumbar drainage (ELD) can be considered a therapeutic option if high ICP is due to communicating external hydrocephalus. We aimed at describing the efficacy and safety of ELD used in a cohort of traumatic or non-traumatic brain-injured patients. In this multicentre retrospective analysis, patients had a delayed onset of high ICP after the initial injury and/or a poor response to ICP treatments. ELD was considered in the presence of radiological signs of communicating external hydrocephalus. Changes in ICP values and side effects following the ELD procedure were reported. Thirty-three patients with a median age of 51 years (25-75th percentile: 34-61 years) were admitted after traumatic (n = 22) or non-traumatic (n = 11) brain injuries. Their initial Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 (4-11). Eight patients underwent external ventricular drainage prior to ELD. Median time to ELD insertion was 5 days (4-8) after brain insult. In all patients, ELD was dramatically effective in lowering ICP: 25 mmHg (20-31) before versus 7 mmHg (3-10) after (p < 0.001). None of the patients showed adverse effects such as pupil changes or intracranial bleeding after the procedure. One patient developed an ELD-related infection. These findings indicate that ELD may be considered potentially effective in controlling ICP, remaining safe if a firm diagnosis of communicating external hydrocephalus has been made.

  17. Paramedic use of needle thoracostomy in the prehospital environment.

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    Warner, Keir J; Copass, Michael K; Bulger, Eileen M

    2008-01-01

    The use of prehospital needle thoracostomy (NT) is controversial as it is not without risk. Issues such as inappropriate patient selection, misplacement causing iatrogenic injury, treatment failures in obese patients, and delaying definitive tube thoracostomy in the emergency department contribute to this controversy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a cohort of patients undergoing NT by paramedics for tension pneumothorax and review the indications for use, complications, and emergency department outcomes of NT. We conducted a retrospective review of patients undergoing NT in the prehospital setting and transported directly to a Level 1 trauma center over a one-year period. Patients were transported by a single ground transport agency staffed by paramedics. All paramedics were trained to follow uniform protocols for treatment procedures. Variables included indications for NT, patient demographics, prehospital vital signs, injury mechanism, chest X-ray, and Emergency Department outcomes. Paramedics responded to 20,330 advanced life support calls, and 39 (0.2%) patients had a NT placed for treatment of tension pneumothorax. Twenty-two (56.4%) patients were in circulatory arrest, with 12 suffering traumatic arrest and 10 patients in nontraumatic PEA arrest. The remaining 17 (43.6%) patients were treated for nonarrest causes. The use of NT appears to be a safe procedure when preformed by paramedics in an urban EMS system. Prehospital NT resulted in four cases of unexpected survival.

  18. Surgical, non-traumatic splenopathies

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    Ivonne López Masó

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available As our modern-day understanding about the role of the spleen in the immune system has developed, indications for splenectomies have also changed. Illnesses like idiopatic thrombocytopenic purple, hereditary spherocytosis, sickle cell anemia, beta thalassemia, portal hypertension and other non-traumatic disseases that carry out with congestive splenomegaly and hypersplenism, find an effective alternative with the total or partially splenectomy. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Portal hypertension, approved by consensus in the 4th National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Las Tunas, Cuba, March, 2005.

  19. Prehospital transported patients

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    Bech, Camilla Louise Nørgaard; Brabrand, M.; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The survival of patients transported by ambulance to the emergency department (ED) depends on clinical conditions, patient-related factors and organisational prehospital set up. Data and information concerning patients in the prehospital system could form a valuable resource for asse......Introduction The survival of patients transported by ambulance to the emergency department (ED) depends on clinical conditions, patient-related factors and organisational prehospital set up. Data and information concerning patients in the prehospital system could form a valuable resource......-time ambulance transport to the ED at Odense University Hospital in the period 1 April 2012 to 30 September 2013. Ambulance personnel recorded vital signs and other clinical findings on a structured form on paper during the ambulance transport. Each contact was linked to information from population...

  20. Usability Testing of the iPhone App to Improve Pain Assessment for Older Adults with Cognitive Impairment (Prehospital Setting): A Qualitative Study.

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    Docking, Rachael E; Lane, Matthew; Schofield, Pat A

    2017-03-15

    Pain assessment in older adults with cognitive impairment is often challenging, and paramedics are not given sufficient tools/training to assess pain. The development of a mobile app may improve pain assessment and management in this vulnerable population. We conducted usability testing of a newly developed iPhone pain assessment application with potential users, in this case as a tool for clinical paramedic practice to improve pain assessment of older adults with cognitive impairment. We conducted usability testing with paramedic students and a Delphi panel of qualified paramedics. Participants studied the app and paper-based algorithm from which the app was developed. The potential use for the app was discussed. Usability testing focus groups were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using a thematic approach. Proposed recommendations were disseminated to the Delphi panel that reviewed and confirmed them. Twenty-four paramedic students from two UK ambulance services participated in the focus groups. Usability of the app and its potential were viewed positively. Four major themes were identified: 1) overall opinion of the app for use in paramedic services; 2) incorporating technological applications into the health care setting; 3) improving knowledge and governance; and 4) alternative uses for the app. Subthemes were identified and are presented. Our results indicate that the pain assessment app constitutes a potentially useful tool in the prehospital setting. By providing access to a tool specifically developed to help identify/assess pain in a user-friendly format, paramedics are likely to have increased knowledge and confidence in assessing pain in patients with dementia.

  1. Non-traumatic Thickening of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

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    Oh, Hyun Jun; Park, Jin Gyoon; Song, Sang Gook [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of non-traumatic thickening of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and to evaluate the associated lesions. Between January 2003 and August 2005, 44 knees of 44 patients who had thickened ACLs on MR images and had no history of knee trauma were analyzed retrospectively. The normal thickness of the ACL was measured on axial T2-weighted images of 40 healthy adult knees. The MR imaging findings of the thickened ACLs and associated lesions were analyzed. In 40 cases of healthy knees, the thickness of the proximal ACL was 3-6 mm. In 44 cases of non-traumatic thickening of the ACL, the thickness of the proximal ACL was 8-14 mm. There was an increased signal intensity and ill-defined border in all cases of thickened ACLs, linear low-signal intensity fibers parallel to the long axis of the thickened ACL (celery stalk appearance) in 24 cases, and entrapment in 10 cases. With respect to associated lesions, there was osteoarthritis in 40 cases, meniscal tears in 42 cases, and degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament in 7 cases. Non-traumatic thickening of the ACL was associated with osteoarthritis and meniscal tears in almost all cases and showed increased signal intensity and ill-defined borders simulating acute ligamentous tears

  2. Prehospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac arrest (PaRAMeDIC) trial protocol.

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    Perkins, Gavin D; Woollard, Malcolm; Cooke, Matthew W; Deakin, Charles; Horton, Jessica; Lall, Ranjit; Lamb, Sarah E; McCabe, Chris; Quinn, Tom; Slowther, Anne; Gates, Simon

    2010-11-05

    Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is closely linked to the quality of CPR, but in real life, resuscitation during prehospital care and ambulance transport is often suboptimal. Mechanical chest compression devices deliver consistent chest compressions, are not prone to fatigue and could potentially overcome some of the limitations of manual chest compression. However, there is no high-quality evidence that they improve clinical outcomes, or that they are cost effective. The Prehospital Randomised Assessment of a Mechanical Compression Device In Cardiac Arrest (PARAMEDIC) trial is a pragmatic cluster randomised study of the LUCAS-2 device in adult patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The primary objective of this trial is to evaluate the effect of chest compression using LUCAS-2 on mortality at 30 days post out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, compared with manual chest compression. Secondary objectives of the study are to evaluate the effects of LUCAS-2 on survival to 12 months, cognitive and quality of life outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Ambulance service vehicles will be randomised to either manual compression (control) or LUCAS arms. Adult patients in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, attended by a trial vehicle will be eligible for inclusion. Patients with traumatic cardiac arrest or who are pregnant will be excluded. The trial will recruit approximately 4000 patients from England, Wales and Scotland. A waiver of initial consent has been approved by the Research Ethics Committees. Consent will be sought from survivors for participation in the follow-up phase. The trial will assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the LUCAS-2 mechanical chest compression device. The trial is registered on the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Registry (ISRCTN08233942).

  3. Prehospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac arrest (PaRAMeDIC trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCabe Chris

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is closely linked to the quality of CPR, but in real life, resuscitation during prehospital care and ambulance transport is often suboptimal. Mechanical chest compression devices deliver consistent chest compressions, are not prone to fatigue and could potentially overcome some of the limitations of manual chest compression. However, there is no high-quality evidence that they improve clinical outcomes, or that they are cost effective. The Prehospital Randomised Assessment of a Mechanical Compression Device In Cardiac Arrest (PARAMEDIC trial is a pragmatic cluster randomised study of the LUCAS-2 device in adult patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods/design The primary objective of this trial is to evaluate the effect of chest compression using LUCAS-2 on mortality at 30 days post out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, compared with manual chest compression. Secondary objectives of the study are to evaluate the effects of LUCAS-2 on survival to 12 months, cognitive and quality of life outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Methods: Ambulance service vehicles will be randomised to either manual compression (control or LUCAS arms. Adult patients in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, attended by a trial vehicle will be eligible for inclusion. Patients with traumatic cardiac arrest or who are pregnant will be excluded. The trial will recruit approximately 4000 patients from England, Wales and Scotland. A waiver of initial consent has been approved by the Research Ethics Committees. Consent will be sought from survivors for participation in the follow-up phase. Conclusion The trial will assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the LUCAS-2 mechanical chest compression device. Trial Registration: The trial is registered on the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Registry (ISRCTN08233942.

  4. Giant nontraumatic intradiploic arachnoid cyst in a young male*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajesh; Gupta, Puneet; Mahajan, Manik; Sharma, Poonam; Gupta, Anchal; Khurana, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Intradiploic arachnoid cysts have scarcely been reported in the literature, most reported cases being secondary to trauma. Nontraumatic arachnoid cysts are quite rare and have been reported mostly in adults. Here, we report the case of a 16-year-old male presenting with a slowly growing mass in the occipital region and intermittent headaches. On the basis of the findings of X-rays, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the head, the mass was diagnosed as a giant intradiploic arachnoid cyst. PMID:27818549

  5. Giant nontraumatic intradiploic arachnoid cyst in a young male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Sharma

    Full Text Available Abstract Intradiploic arachnoid cysts have scarcely been reported in the literature, most reported cases being secondary to trauma. Nontraumatic arachnoid cysts are quite rare and have been reported mostly in adults. Here, we report the case of a 16-year-old male presenting with a slowly growing mass in the occipital region and intermittent headaches. On the basis of the findings of X-rays, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the head, the mass was diagnosed as a giant intradiploic arachnoid cyst.

  6. Prehospital Care of Burn Patients and Trajectories on Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallinen, Outi; Koljonen, Virve; Tukiainen, Erkki; Randell, Tarja; Kirves, Hetti

    2016-01-01

    We sought to identify factors associated with the prognosis and survival of burn patients by analyzing data related to the prehospital treatment of burn patients transferred directly to the burn unit from the accident site. We also aimed to assess the role of prehospital physicians and paramedics providing care to major burn patients. This study included adult burn patients with severe burns treated between 2006 and 2010. Prehospital patient records and clinical data collected during treatment were analyzed, and the Injury Severity Scale (ISS) was calculated. Patients were grouped into two cohorts based on the presence or absence of a physician during the prehospital phase. Data were analyzed with reference to survival by multivariable regression model. Specific inclusion criteria resulted in a sample of 67 patients. The groups were comparable with regard to age, gender, and injury etiology. Patients treated by prehospital physicians (group 1, n = 49) were more severely injured than patients treated by paramedics (group 2, n = 18) in terms of total burn surface area (%TBSA) (32% vs. 17%, p = 0.033), ISS (25 vs. 8, p prehospital prognostic factors affecting patient outcomes. Based on the results from this study, our current EMS system is capable of identifying seriously injured burn patients who may benefit from physician attendance at the injury scene.

  7. Prehospital and Early Clinical Care of Infants, Children, and Teenagers Compared to an Adult Cohort : Analysis of 2,961 Children in Comparison to 21,435 Adult Patients from the Trauma Registry of DGU in a 15-Year Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyen, Hendrik; Jakob, Heike; Wutzler, Sebastian; Lefering, Rolf; Laurer, Helmut L; Marzi, Ingo; Lehnert, Mark

    2010-08-01

    Although the incidence of pediatric patients in emergency services is as low as 5-10%, trauma remains one of the leading causes of death during childhood. Only a few reports exist about the quality of the initial treatment of pediatric trauma patients. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis of whether prehospital treatment and emergency management in pediatric trauma patients is similar to the treatment that is provided for adult patients. We performed a retrospective data analysis of the German Trauma Registry of the DGU from January 1993 to December 2007. Exclusion criteria were missing information about injury severity and/or age and patients older than 50 years. All pediatric patients were subdivided into five groups (infants 0-1 year, toddlers 2-5 years, children 6-9 years, pupils 10-13 years, teenagers 14-17 years) with regard to their age and were compared with the adult cohort (18-50 years). From 24,396 patients, 2,961 were below 18 years of age, thus, about 12% of the whole population of injured patients below the age of 50 years. 66.4% of infants sustained relevant head injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] ≥3), and this rate declined with increasing age. The mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) increased from 21.0 (±11.6) in the group of infants to 26.7 (±13.9) in the adult cohort. In all groups, the majority of patients were male. The injury pattern differed according to age, with predominant traumatic brain injury (TBI) in infants. During the preclinical treatment, infants were less often intubated and this was contrasted by a higher rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in this group (infants 16.2%, toddlers 6.8%, adults 3.1%). Diagnostic multislice computed tomography (CT) examination was less often performed in infants as compared to the other groups (infants 57.1%, toddlers 77.2%, adults 77.8%). Mortality and quality indicators such as timelines show no significant differences between children and adults. We observed typical age

  8. Pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark H; Habig, Karel; Wright, Christopher; Hughes, Amy; Davies, Gareth; Imray, Chirstopher H E

    2015-12-19

    Pre-hospital care is emergency medical care given to patients before arrival in hospital after activation of emergency medical services. It traditionally incorporated a breadth of care from bystander resuscitation to statutory emergency medical services treatment and transfer. New concepts of care including community paramedicine, novel roles such as emergency care practitioners, and physician delivered pre-hospital emergency medicine are re-defining the scope of pre-hospital care. For severely ill or injured patients, acting quickly in the pre-hospital period is crucial with decisions and interventions greatly affecting outcomes. The transfer of skills and procedures from hospital care to pre-hospital medicine enables early advanced care across a range of disciplines. The variety of possible pathologies, challenges of environmental factors, and hazardous situations requires management that is tailored to the patient's clinical need and setting. Pre-hospital clinicians should be generalists with a broad understanding of medical, surgical, and trauma pathologies, who will often work from locally developed standard operating procedures, but who are able to revert to core principles. Pre-hospital emergency medicine consists of not only clinical care, but also logistics, rescue competencies, and scene management skills (especially in major incidents, which have their own set of management principles). Traditionally, research into the hyper-acute phase (the first hour) of disease has been difficult, largely because physicians are rarely present and issues of consent, transport expediency, and resourcing of research. However, the pre-hospital phase is acknowledged as a crucial period, when irreversible pathology and secondary injury to neuronal and cardiac tissue can be prevented. The development of pre-hospital emergency medicine into a sub-specialty in its own right should bring focus to this period of care.

  9. Benign nontraumatic osteolytic vertebral collapse simulating malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattari, Azadeh [Hopital Lariboisiere, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Paris Cedex 10 (France); Quillard, Alain [Hopital Lariboisiere, Department of Pathology, Paris Cedex 10 (France); Laredo, Jean-Denis [Hopital Lariboisiere, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Paris Cedex 10 (France); University of Pennsylvania Health System, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2008-03-15

    This study described the imaging features of a distinctive pattern of biopsy-proven benign non-traumatic vertebral collapse (VC) that can mimic malignancy. Among 240 patients referred with painful VC over a 10-year period, we retrospectively selected 15 cases of benign VC which simulated malignancy, due to cortical bone destruction on radiographs. The diagnosis of benign origin was documented by percutaneous biopsy and 12-months of follow-up. Radiographs, CT and MR images of the spine were reviewed. Findings suggestive of malignancy included destruction involving the anterolateral cortex, posterior cortex and pedicles of the vertebral body (46%,15% and 15% respectively) at CT, epidural soft-tissue masses on CT (23%) and MR images (21%), and diffuse low signal-intensity (SI) of the vertebral body (50%) and pedicles (79%) on T1-weighted images. Features suggestive of a benign origin included an intravertebral vacuum phenomenon on radiographs and CT (13%), fracture lines within the vertebral body (92%) or pedicles (62%) at CT and presence an intravertebral area of high SI on T2-weighted images (93%). Benign non-traumatic osteolytic VC can simulate malignancy on radiographs. The features, above mentioned on CT and MR suggestive of a benign VC, are useful in interpreting biopsy results of such lesions and avoiding unnecessary repeat biopsy. (orig.)

  10. Termination of prehospital resuscitative efforts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Caroline; Binderup, Lars Grassmé

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Discussions on ethical aspects of life-and-death decisions within the hospital are often made in plenary. The prehospital physician, however, may be faced with ethical dilemmas in life-and-death decisions when time-critical decisions to initiate or refrain from resuscitative efforts...... need to be taken without the possibility to discuss matters with colleagues. Little is known whether these considerations regarding ethical issues in crucial life-and-death decisions are documented prehospitally. This is a review of the ethical considerations documented in the prehospital medical....... The medical records with possible documentation of ethical issues were independently reviewed by two philosophers in order to identify explicit ethical or philosophical considerations pertaining to the decision to resuscitate or not. RESULTS: In total, 1275 patients were either declared dead at the scene...

  11. Nontraumatic Fat Embolism Found Following Maternal Death after Cesarean Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabitha Schrufer-Poland

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction - Fat embolism is a rare form of nonthrombotic embolization. Limited literature exists regarding the diagnosis of fat embolism during the perinatal period. We present the first case of maternal death that resulted from nontraumatic fat embolization following Cesarean delivery. Case Description - A 29-year-old gravida 1 with a complex medical and surgical history underwent a primary Cesarean delivery at term. On postoperative day 2 the patient was found to be unresponsive. Despite resuscitative efforts, the patient succumbed. Autopsy findings were remarkable for diffuse pulmonary fat emboli. Furthermore, there was no histological evidence of either amniotic fluid embolism or thromboembolism. The primary cause of death was attributed to nontraumatic fat embolization. Discussion - Multiple risk factors may have contributed to the development of nontraumatic fat embolization in our patient. Obstetricians should maintain a high level of suspicion for nontraumatic fat embolization in cases of maternal respiratory decompression and sudden maternal mortality.

  12. Multicenter observational prehospital resuscitation on helicopter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, John B; Swartz, Michael D; DeSantis, Stacia M; Greene, Thomas J; Fox, Erin E; Stein, Deborah M; Bulger, Eileen M; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Goodman, Michael; Schreiber, Martin A; Zielinski, Martin D; O'Keeffe, Terence; Inaba, Kenji; Tomasek, Jeffrey S; Podbielski, Jeanette M; Appana, Savitri N; Yi, Misung; Wade, Charles E

    2017-07-01

    Earlier use of in-hospital plasma, platelets, and red blood cells (RBCs) has improved survival in trauma patients with severe hemorrhage. Retrospective studies have associated improved early survival with prehospital blood product transfusion (PHT). We hypothesized that PHT of plasma and/or RBCs would result in improved survival after injury in patients transported by helicopter. Adult trauma patients transported by helicopter from the scene to nine Level 1 trauma centers were prospectively observed from January to November 2015. Five helicopter systems had plasma and/or RBCs, whereas the other four helicopter systems used only crystalloid resuscitation. All patients meeting predetermined high-risk criteria were analyzed. Patients receiving PHT were compared with patients not receiving PHT. Our primary analysis compared mortality at 3 hours, 24 hours, and 30 days, using logistic regression to adjust for confounders and site heterogeneity to model patients who were matched on propensity scores. Twenty-five thousand one hundred eighteen trauma patients were admitted, 2,341 (9%) were transported by helicopter, of which 1,058 (45%) met the highest-risk criteria. Five hundred eighty-five of 1,058 patients were flown on helicopters carrying blood products. In the systems with blood available, prehospital median systolic blood pressure (125 vs 128) and Glasgow Coma Scale (7 vs 14) was significantly lower, whereas median Injury Severity Score was significantly higher (21 vs 14). Unadjusted mortality was significantly higher in the systems with blood products available, at 3 hours (8.4% vs 3.6%), 24 hours (12.6% vs 8.9%), and 30 days (19.3% vs 13.3%). Twenty-four percent of eligible patients received a PHT. A median of 1 unit of RBCs and plasma were transfused prehospital. Of patients receiving PHT, 24% received only plasma, 7% received only RBCs, and 69% received both. In the propensity score matching analysis (n = 109), PHT was not significantly associated with mortality

  13. Protocol Adherence in Prehospital Medical Care Provided for Patients with Chest Pain and Loss of Consciousness; a Brief Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Mehrara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although many protocols are available in the field of the prehospital medical care (PMC, there is still a notable gap between protocol based directions and applied clinical practice. This study measures the rate of protocol adherence in PMC provided for patients with chest pain and loss of consciousness (LOC.Method: In this cross-sectional study, 10 educated research assistants audited the situation of provided PMC for non-traumatic chest pain and LOC patients, presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary level teaching hospital, compare to national recommendations in these regards.Results: 101 cases with the mean age of 56.7 ± 12.3 years (30-78 were audited (55.4% male. 61 (60.3% patients had chest pain and 40 (39.7% cases had LOC. Protocol adherence rates for cardiac monitoring (62.3%, O2 therapy (32.8%, nitroglycerin administration (60.7%, and aspirin administration (52.5% in prehospital care of patients with chest pain were fair to poor. Protocol adherence rates for correct patient positioning (25%, O2 therapy (75%, cardiac monitoring (25%, pupils examination (25%, bedside glucometery (50%, and assessing for naloxone administration (55% in prehospital care of patients with LOC were fair to poor.Conclusion: There were more than 20% protocol violation regarding prehospital care of chest pain patients regarding cardiac monitoring, O2 therapy, and nitroglycerin and aspirin administration. There were same situation regarding O2 therapy, positioning, cardiac monitoring, pupils examination, bedside glucometery, and assessing for naloxone administration of LOC patients in prehospital setting.

  14. Advances in prehospital airway management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Pe; Grabinsky, A

    2014-01-01

    Prehospital airway management is a key component of emergency responders and remains an important task of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) systems worldwide. The most advanced airway management techniques involving placement of oropharyngeal airways such as the Laryngeal Mask Airway or endotracheal tube. Endotracheal tube placement success is a common measure of out-of-hospital airway management quality. Regional variation in regard to training, education, and procedural exposure may be the major contributor to the findings in success and patient outcome. In studies demonstrating poor outcomes related to prehospital-attempted endotracheal intubation (ETI), both training and skill level of the provider are usually often low. Research supports a relationship between the number of intubation experiences and ETI success. National standards for certification of emergency medicine provider are in general too low to guarantee good success rate in emergency airway management by paramedics and physicians. Some paramedic training programs require more intense airway training above the national standard and some EMS systems in Europe staff their system with anesthesia providers instead. ETI remains the cornerstone of definitive prehospital airway management, However, ETI is not without risk and outcomes data remains controversial. Many systems may benefit from more input and guidance by the anesthesia department, which have higher volumes of airway management procedures and extensive training and experience not just with training of airway management but also with different airway management techniques and adjuncts.

  15. Prehospital management of evolving critical illness by the primary care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Kerri A; Hosseinnezhad, Alireza; Ullah, Ashfaq; Vinagre, Yuka-Marie; Baker, Stephen P; Lilly, Craig M

    2013-10-01

    The factors that limit primary care providers (PCPs) from intervening for adults with evolving, acute, severe illness are less understood than the increasing frequency of management by acute care providers. Rates of prehospital patient management by a PCP and of communication with acute care teams were measured in a multicenter, cross-sectional, descriptive study conducted in all four of the adult medical ICUs of the three hospitals in central Massachusetts that provide tertiary care. Rates were measured for 390 critical care encounters, using a validated instrument to abstract the medical record and conduct telephone interviews. PCPs implemented prehospital management for eight episodes of acute illness among 300 encounters. Infrequent prehospital management by PCPs was attributed to their lack of awareness of the patient's evolving acute illness. Only 21% of PCPs were aware of the acute illness before their patient was admitted to an ICU, and 33% were not aware that their patient was in an ICU. Rates of PCP involvement were not appreciably different among provider groups or by patient age, sex, insurance status, hospital, ICU, or ICU staffing model. We identified lack of PCP awareness of patients' acute illness and high rates of PCP referral to acute care providers as the most frequent barriers to prehospital management of evolving acute illness. These findings suggest that implementing processes that encourage early patient-PCP communication and increase rates of prehospital management of infections and acute exacerbations of chronic diseases could reduce use of acute care services.

  16. NEUROMONITORING IN PATIENTS WITH INTRACRANIAL NONTRAUMATIC HEMORRHAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Alakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Investigation of patients with intracranial non-traumatic hemorrhage (INH with the use of prolonged electroencephalographic (EEG monitoring allows for more effective identification of acute symptomatic seizures, subclinic epileptiform activity, local and diffuse abnormalities that are markers of brain functional activity.Aim: To increase treatment efficacy of patients with INH.Materials and methods: Thirty three patients were assessed in acute period of INH. Assessments included clinical and neurological examination, NIHSS (National Institute of Health Stroke Severity scale, GCS (Glasgow coma scale, HHS (Hunt-Hess scale; prolonged EEG monitoring with computerized tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Patients received medical and surgical treatment (minimally invasive endovascular interventions or open operations, such as aneurysm clipping or wrapping/coating.Results: Twenty seven patients had open-type surgeries (among them, 23 patients had aneurysm clipping and 4, aneurysm wrapping. Two patients underwent the procedure of aneurysm embolization. Four patients were treated conservatively. According to results of prolonged pre-, peri- and postoperative EEG monitoring, most of patients had signs of disorganized electrical activity, with no regional differences, fragmented or absent alfa rhythm and diffuse polymorphic theta-activity. Marked EEG abnormalities correlated with severity registered with the assessment scales and with outcomes. During the study, epileptiform activity was registered in 1 patient, EEG comate in 3, diffuse abnormalities in 15 and local abnormalities in 14.Conclusion: The use of prolonged pre-, peri- and postoperative EEG monitoring allows for timely identification of status epilepticus, including the one without seizures. Minimally invasive interventions performed on time are associated with better prognosis in INH patients, whereas marked EEG abnormalities are associated with low scores of

  17. Uterine artery pseudoaneurysm: not a rare condition occurring after non-traumatic delivery or non-traumatic abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Yosuke; Matsubara, Shigeki; Kuwata, Tomoyuki; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Usui, Rie; Saruyama, Miyuki; Nakata, Manabu; Suzuki, Mitsuaki

    2014-09-01

    Uterine artery pseudoaneurysm (UAP) is considered a rare disorder after traumatic delivery or traumatic pregnancy termination such as cesarean section or dilatation and curettage, initially manifesting as genital hemorrhage. Our clinical impression contradicts these three assumptions; after traumatic delivery/termination, hemorrhage, and its rarity. Thus, we attempted to clarify these three issues. We retrospectively analyzed 22 UAP cases treated at our institute over a 6-year period. Uterine artery pseudoaneurysm occurred in 2-3/1,000 deliveries. Of 22 cases, half occurred after non-traumatic deliveries or non-traumatic pregnancy termination. Fifty-five percent (12/22) showed no hemorrhage; ultrasound or color Doppler revealed UAP. Thus, half of UAP occurred after non-traumatic deliveries or non-traumatic pregnancy termination and showed no hemorrhage at the time of their diagnoses. All patients received transarterial embolization, which stopped blood flow into UAP or achieved hemostasis. We must be aware that UAP may not be so rare and it may be present in patients after non-traumatic deliveries/pregnancy termination and without postpartum or postabortal hemorrhage.

  18. Prognostic Factors in Adults With Knee Pain in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belo, J. N.; Berger, M. Y.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To predict the 1-year outcome of incident nontraumatic knee symptoms in adults presenting in general practice. Methods. Adults age >35 years with nontraumatic knee symptoms (n = 480) were followed for 1 year. At baseline, data on knee symptoms and demographics were collected and a

  19. Acute Renal Failure due to Non-Traumatic Rhabdomyolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagehan Aslan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis is a musculoskeletal clinical and biochemical syndrome which is seen associated with traumatic and non-traumatic causes and is known as muscular dystrophy. Rhabdomyolysis which develops following crush-type trauma (Crush syndrome is rarely seen but is a well-known clinical event in the etiology of acute renal failure. Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is rare. The case is here presented of a patient who was diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis on presentation with acute renal failure and to whom repeated dialysis was applied.

  20. Some Ethical Issues in Prehospital Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbay, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Prehospital emergency medical care has many challenges including unpredictable patient profiles, emergency conditions, and administration of care in a non-medical area. Many conflicts occur in a prehospital setting that require ethical decisions to be made. An overview of the some of ethical issues in prehospital emergency care settings is given in this article. Ethical aspects of prehospital emergency medicine are classified into four groups: the process before medical interventions, including justice, stigmatization, dangerous situations, and safe driving; the treatment process, including triage, refusal of treatment or transport, and informed consent; the end of life and care, including life-sustaining treatments, prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), withholding or withdrawal of CPR, and family presence during resuscitation; and some ambulance perception issues, including ambulance misuse, care of minors, and telling of bad news. Prehospital emergency medicine is quite different from emergency medicine in hospitals, and all patients and situations are unique. Consequently, there are no quick formulas for the right action and emotion. It is important to recognize the ethical conflicts that occur in prehospital emergency medicine and then act to provide the appropriate care that is of optimal value.

  1. Outcome following physician supervised prehospital resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Krüger, Andreas J; Zwisler, Stine T

    2015-01-01

    patient were manually established in each case in a combined audit of the prehospital database, the discharge summary of the MECU and the medical records from the hospital. Outcome parameters were final outcome, the aetiology of the life-threatening condition and the level of competences necessary...... to their own home. CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates that anaesthesiologist administrated prehospital therapy increases the level of treatment modalities leading to an increased survival in relation to a prehospital system consisting of emergency medical technicians and paramedics alone and thus...

  2. Constitution and clinical characteristic analysis of adult non-traumatic acute abdomen disease%成年人非外伤性急腹症病种构成及临床特点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴鹏程; 郑焕城; 陆品端

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore constitution and the clinical features of adult non - traumatic acute abdomen disease, for purpose of providing reference for diagnosis and treatment about acute abdomen. Methods Totally 17 082 cases of a-dult non traumatic acute abdomen patients from June 1, 2011 to May 31, 2012 were collected by a retrospective analysis at emergency department of our hospital. According to the age, 17082 cases were divided into young group, middle age group, the older group, according to subject,the cases were divided into surgery acute abdomen, internal medicine acute abdomen and gynecology acute abdomen, According to the primary site of pain and disease relations respectively,the cases numbers were added up. Results The occurrence probability of young group, middle age group, the older group were 70. 17% , 21. 82% , 8% ; occurrence probability of internal medicine, surgery, gynecology acute abdomen were 72.46% , 22. 15% , 5. 39% ; research shows that every primary position of pain have relative diseases, the misdiagnosed rate of non traumatic acute abdomen was 0. 88% . Conclusions Adult non traumatic acute abdomen diseases are varied, different a-ges, different subjects, different positions of non traumatic acute abdomen in adult have different diseases, Clinicians need to grasp the characteristics of non traumatic acute abdomen in order to reduce the misdiagnosis and mistreatment.%目的 探讨成人非外伤性急腹症的病种构成及临床特点,为急腹症的诊断和治疗提供参考依据,降低误诊、漏诊的发生率,以减少医疗纠纷.方法 回顾性分析2011年6月1日至2012年5月31日17 082例成年人非外伤性急腹症患者的病例资料.按照年龄分为青年组、中年组、老年组;按学科划分为外科急腹症、内科急腹症、妇科急腹症,按初发疼痛部位与原发病对应关系分别统计例数.结果 青年、中年、老年发病分别为69.74%、22.29%、7.96%;内科、外科、妇产

  3. A nontraumatic para-aortic lymphocele complicating nephrolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyson, E A; Belleza, N A; Lowman, R M

    1977-09-01

    Many cases of traumatic para-aortic lymphocele have been reported. Recently, a case of nontraumatic para-aortic lymphocele was investigated. The etiologic consideration for this lymphocele formation is either a localized inflammatory process, or fibrosis induced by prior passage of calculi.

  4. Prehospital identification of stroke - room for improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, C.E.; Barnung, S.; Nielsen, S.L.;

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Rapid recognition of stroke is important because it allows early brain imaging and management such as thrombolytic therapy. We evaluated the identification of the diagnosis acute cerebrovascular incident in a physician-based prehospital emergency medical system. METHODS: From...... cerebrovascular incident in the prehospital setting with room and need for improvement in order to allow appropriate and expeditious referral for thrombolytic therapy Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8...

  5. Cross-sectional imaging of nontraumatic emergencies of the spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabousi, Abdullah; Patlas, Michael N; Scaglione, Mariano; Romano, Luigia; Soto, Jorge A

    2014-01-01

    Multiple nontraumatic splenic emergencies are encountered during the imaging of patients in emergency room. Occasionally, patients are investigated for symptoms of suspected splenic pathology, such as abscess, infarct, symptomatic splenic artery aneurysm and pseudoaneurysm, splenic torsion, or rupture. More often, however, splenic emergencies, such as splenic masses and splenic vein thrombosis, are detected in patients in the emergency room during the evaluation of nonspecific abdominal pain. It is essential for radiologists to be vigilant in the identification of nontraumatic splenic emergencies and to be familiar with interventional radiology management options for these pathologies. Our aim is to highlight factors affecting lesion detection on multiple imaging modalities and to discuss the advantages of different cross-sectional modalities for the diagnosis of splenic abnormalities. Finally, we review the management options with emphasis on interventional radiology where applicable.

  6. Optimizing Survival Outcomes For Adult Patients With Nontraumatic Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julianna

    2016-10-01

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed.

  7. The prehospital management of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Scott A; Rojanasarntikul, Dhanadol; Jagoda, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important cause of death and disability, particularly in younger populations. The prehospital evaluation and management of TBI is a vital link between insult and definitive care and can have dramatic implications for subsequent morbidity. Following a TBI the brain is at high risk for further ischemic injury, with prehospital interventions targeted at reducing this secondary injury while optimizing cerebral physiology. In the following chapter we discuss the prehospital assessment and management of the brain-injured patient. The initial evaluation and physical examination are discussed with a focus on interpretation of specific physical examination findings and interpretation of vital signs. We evaluate patient management strategies including indications for advanced airway management, oxygenation, ventilation, and fluid resuscitation, as well as prehospital strategies for the management of suspected or impending cerebral herniation including hyperventilation and brain-directed hyperosmolar therapy. Transport decisions including the role of triage models and trauma centers are discussed. Finally, future directions in the prehospital management of traumatic brain injury are explored. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Prehospital Cricothyrotomy Kits Used in Combat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Steven G; April, Michael D; Cunningham, Cord W; Long, Adrianna N; Carter, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Surgical cricothyrotomy remains the only definitive airway management modality for the tactical setting recommended by Tactical Combat Casualty Care guidelines. Some units have fielded commercial cricothyrotomy kits to assist Combat Medics with surgical cricothyrotomy. To our knowledge, no previous publications report data on the use of these kits in combat settings. This series reports the the use of two kits in four patients in the prehospital combat setting. Using the Department of Defense Trauma Registry and the Prehospital Trauma Registry, we identified four cases of patients who underwent prehospital cricothyrotomy with the use of commercial kits. In the first two cases, a Medic successfully used a North American Rescue CricKit (NARCK) to obtain a surgical airway in a Servicemember with multiple amputations from an improvised explosive device explosion. In case 3, the Medic unsuccessfully used an H&H Medical kit to attempt placement of a surgical airway in a Servicemember shot in the head by small arms fire. A second attempt to place a surgical airway using a NARCK was successful. In case 4, a Soldier sustained a gunshot wound to the chest. A Medic described fluid in the airway precluding bag-valve-mask ventilation; the Medic attempted to place a surgical airway with the H&H kit without success. Four cases of prehospital surgical airway cannulation on the battlefield demonstrated three successful uses of prehospital cricothyrotomy kits. Further research should focus on determining which kits may be most useful in the combat setting. 2017.

  9. Prehospital care in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C B; Lai, K K; Mak, K P

    2000-09-01

    A quick and efficient prehospital emergency response depends on immediate ambulance dispatch, patient assessment, triage, and transport to hospital. During 1999, the Ambulance Command of the Hong Kong Fire Services Department responded to 484,923 calls, which corresponds to 1329 calls each day. Cooperation between the Fire Services Department and the Hospital Authority exists at the levels of professional training of emergency medical personnel, quality assurance, and a coordinated disaster response. In response to the incident at the Hong Kong International Airport in the summer of 1999, when an aircraft overturned during landing, the pre-set quota system was implemented to send patients to designated accident and emergency departments. Furthermore, the 'first crew at the scene' model has been adopted, whereby the command is established and triage process started by the first ambulance crew members to reach the scene. The development of emergency protocols should be accompanied by good field-to-hospital and interhospital communication, the upgrading of decision-making skills, a good monitoring and auditing structure, and commitment to training and skills maintenance.

  10. Implementing an Innovative Prehospital Care Provider Training Course in Nine Cambodian Provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Peter; Newberry, Jennifer A; Hattaway, Leonard Bud F; Socheat, Phan; Raingsey, Prak P; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2016-06-27

    Despite significant improvements in health outcomes nationally, many Cambodians continue to experience morbidity and mortality due to inadequate access to quality emergency medical services. Over recent decades, the Cambodian healthcare system and civil infrastructure have advanced markedly and now possess many of the components required to establish a well functioning emergency medical system. These components include enhanced access to emergency transportation through large scale road development efforts, widspread availability of emergency communication channels via the spread of cellphone and internet technology, and increased access to health services for poor patients through the implementation of health financing schemes. However, the system still lacks a number of key elements, one of which is trained prehospital care providers. Working in partnership with local providers, our team created an innovative, Cambodia-specific prehospital care provider training course to help fill this gap. Participants received training on prehospital care skills and knowledge most applicable to the Cambodian healthcare system, which was divided into four modules: Basic Prehospital Care Skills and Adult Medical Emergencies, Traumatic Emergencies, Obstetric Emergencies, and Neonatal/Pediatric Emergencies. The course was implemented in nine of Cambodia's most populous provinces, concurrent with a number of overarching emergency medical service system improvement efforts. Overall, the course was administered to 1,083 Cambodian providers during a 27-month period, with 947 attending the entire course and passing the course completion exam.

  11. Effect of pre-hospital advanced airway management for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest caused by respiratory disease: a propensity score-matched study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi-Fukuda, N; Fukuda, T; Yahagi, N

    2017-05-01

    Optimal pre-hospital care for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) caused by respiratory disease may differ from that for OHCA associated with other aetiologies, especially with respect to respiratory management. We aimed to investigate whether pre-hospital advanced airway management (AAM) was associated with favourable outcomes after OHCA caused by intrinsic respiratory disease. This nationwide, population-based, propensity score-matched study of adult patients in Japan with OHCA due to respiratory disease from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2012 compared patients with and without pre-hospital AAM. The primary outcome was neurologically favourable survival at one month after the OHCA. Of 49,534 eligible patients, 20,458 received pre-hospital AAM and 29,076 did not. In a propensity score-matched cohort (18,483 versus 18,483 patients), the odds of neurologically favourable survival were significantly lower for patients receiving pre-hospital AAM (0.6% versus 1.5%; odds ratio [OR] 0.42 [95% confidence interval {CI} 0.34 to 0.52]). The results from multivariable logistic regression analysis also showed that pre-hospital AAM was significantly associated with a decreased chance of neurologically favourable survival (adjusted OR 0.43 [95% CI 0.35 to 0.52]). Similar findings were observed for one-month survival and pre-hospital return of spontaneous circulation. In subgroup analyses, pre-hospital AAM was associated with poor neurological outcomes, regardless of the type of airway device used (laryngeal mask airway, adjusted OR 0.35 [95% CI 0.19 to 0.57]; oesophageal obturator airway, adjusted OR 0.44 [95% CI 0.35 to 0.55]; and endotracheal tube, adjusted OR 0.47 [95% CI 0.30 to 0.69]). In conclusion, pre-hospital AAM was associated with poor neurological outcome among patients with OHCA caused by intrinsic respiratory disease.

  12. Evolving prehospital, emergency department, and "inpatient" management models for geriatric emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Platts-Mills, Timothy F

    2013-02-01

    Alternative management methods are essential to ensure high-quality and efficient emergency care for the growing number of geriatric adults worldwide. Protocols to support early condition-specific treatment of older adults with acute severe illness and injury are needed. Improved emergency department care for older adults will require providers to address the influence of other factors on the patient's health. This article describes recent and ongoing efforts to enhance the quality of emergency care for older adults using alternative management approaches spanning the spectrum from prehospital care, through the emergency department, and into evolving inpatient or outpatient processes of care.

  13. High Prevalence of Nontraumatic Shoulder Pain in a Regional Sample of Female High School Volleyball Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Kayt E.; Clark, Jacob; Hanson, Chad; Fagerness, Chris; Conway, Adam; Hoogendoorn, Lindsay

    2017-01-01

    Background: Shoulder pain is becoming increasingly problematic in young players as volleyball gains popularity. Associations between repetitive motion and pain and overuse injury have been observed in other overhand sports (most notably baseball). Studies of adult athletes suggest that there is a shoulder pain and overuse problem present in volleyball players, but minimal research has been done to establish rates and causes in juvenile participants. Purpose: To establish rates of shoulder pain, regardless of whether it resulted in a loss of playing time, in female high school volleyball players. A secondary goal was to determine whether high repetition volumes correlated with an increased likelihood of experiencing pain. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: A self-report survey focusing on the prevalence of pain not associated with a traumatic event in female high school youth volleyball players was developed. Survey questions were formulated by certified athletic trainers, experienced volleyball coaches, and biomechanics experts. Surveys were received from 175 healthy, active high school volleyball players in Iowa, South Dakota, and Minnesota. Results: Forty percent (70/175) of active high school volleyball players remembered experiencing shoulder pain not related to traumatic injury, but only 33% (23/70) reported taking time off to recover from the pain. Based on these self-reported data, activities associated with significantly increased risk of nontraumatic shoulder pain included number of years playing competitive volleyball (P = .01) and lifting weights out of season (P = .001). Players who reported multiple risk factors were more likely to experience nontraumatic shoulder pain. Conclusion: When using time off for recovery as the primary injury criterion, we found that the incidence of shoulder pain is more than twice as high as the incidence of injury reported by previous studies. Findings also indicated that the incidence of shoulder pain

  14. 'Drooping shoulder' - nontraumatic causes of glenohumeral subluxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lev-Toaff, A.S.; Karasick, D.; Rao, V.M.

    1984-06-01

    Nontraumatic glenohumeral subluxation can occur in patients with hemiplegia or brachial plexus involvement by tumor. Two cases of inferior subluxation of the humeral head are presented and nontraumatic etiologies of the ''drooping shoulder'' are discussed.

  15. Prehospital care of head injured patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dash Hari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Resuscitation of head injured patients at the accident site is paramount in minimizing morbidity and mortality. This can be achieved through prehospital care which is nonexistent in our country. This review is a step forward, so that we can formulate guidelines in this regard.

  16. Nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the distal pole of the scaphoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavuk Garg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Post traumatic osteonecrosis of distal pole of scaphoid is very rare. We present a case of 34 years old male, drill operator by occupation with nontraumatic osteonecrosis of distal pole of the scaphoid. The patient was managed conservatively and was kept under regular follow-up every three months. The patient was also asked to change his profession. Two years later, the patient had no pain and had mild restriction of wrist movements (less than 15 degrees in either direction. The radiographs revealed normal density of the scaphoid suggesting revascularization.

  17. Parenteral midazolam is superior to diazepam for treatment of prehospital seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemency, Brian M; Ott, Jamie A; Tanski, Christopher T; Bart, Joseph A; Lindstrom, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Diazepam and midazolam are commonly used by paramedics to treat seizures. A period of drug scarcity was used as an opportunity to compare their effectiveness in treating prehospital seizures. A retrospective chart review of a single, large, commercial agency during a 29-month period was performed. The period included alternating shortages of both medications. Ambulances were stocked with either diazepam or midazolam based on availability of the drugs. Adult patients who received at least 1 parenteral dose of diazepam or midazolam for treatment of seizures were included. The regional prehospital protocol recommended 5 mg intravenous (IV) diazepam, 5 mg intramuscular (IM) diazepam, 5 mg IM midazolam, or 2.5 mg IV midazolam. Medication effectiveness was compared with respect to the primary end point: cessation of seizure without repeat seizure during the prehospital encounter. A total of 440 study subjects received 577 administrations of diazepam or midazolam and met the study criteria. The subjects were 52% male, with a mean age of 48 (range 18-94) years. A total of 237 subjects received 329 doses of diazepam, 64 (27%) were treated with first-dose IM. A total of 203 subjects received 248 doses of midazolam; 71 (35%) were treated with first-dose IM. Seizure stopped and did not recur in 49% of subjects after parenteral diazepam and 65% of subjects after parenteral midazolam (p = 0.002). Diazepam and midazolam exhibited similar first dose success for IV administration (58 vs. 62%; p = 0.294). Age, gender, seizure history, hypoglycemia, the presence of trauma, time to first administration, prehospital contact time, and frequency of IM administration were similar between groups. For parenteral administration, midazolam demonstrated superior first-dose seizure suppression. This study demonstrates how periods of drug scarcity can be utilized to study prehospital medication effectiveness.

  18. What is dignity in prehospital emergency care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelsson, Anna; Lindwall, Lillemor

    2017-05-01

    Ethics and dignity in prehospital emergency care are important due to vulnerability and suffering. Patients can lose control of their body and encounter unfamiliar faces in an emergency situation. To describe what specialist ambulance nurse students experienced as preserved and humiliated dignity in prehospital emergency care. The study had a qualitative approach. Data were collected by Flanagan's critical incident technique. The participants were 26 specialist ambulance nurse students who described two critical incidents of preserved and humiliated dignity, from prehospital emergency care. Data consist of 52 critical incidents and were analyzed with interpretive content analysis. Ethical considerations: The study followed the ethical principles in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. The result showed how human dignity in prehospital emergency care can be preserved by the ambulance nurse being there for the patient. The ambulance nurses meet the patient in the patient's world and make professional decisions. The ambulance nurse respects the patient's will and protects the patient's body from the gaze of others. Humiliated dignity was described through the ambulance nurse abandoning the patient and by healthcare professionals failing, disrespecting, and ignoring the patient. It is a unique situation when a nurse meets a patient face to face in a critical life or death moment. The discussion describes courage and the ethical vision to see another human. Dignity was preserved when the ambulance nurse showed respect and protected the patient in prehospital emergency care. The ambulance nurse students' ethical obligation results in the courage to see when a patient's dignity is in jeopardy of being humiliated. Humiliated dignity occurs when patients are ignored and left unprotected. This ethical dilemma affects the ambulance nurse students badly due to the fact that the morals and attitudes of ambulance nurses are reflected in their actions toward the patient.

  19. Ischemia-modified albumin is not better than creatine kinase-MB and cardiac troponin I in predicting a cardiac injury in nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydin, Ahmet; Amanvermez, Ramazan; Tuncel, Özgür Korhan; Ocak, Metin; Meric, Murat; Cokluk, Cengiz

    2015-04-01

    The aims were to investigate the role of serum ischemia-modified albumin (IMA), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) and to evaluate the relationship between IMA and cardiac markers (creatine kinase myocardial isoenzyme [CK-MB] and cardiac troponin I [cTnI]) related to cardiac abnormalities in adult patients after nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Twenty-nine patients with nontraumatic SAH admitted to the emergency department and 20 healthy adults as the control group were included in the study. Ischemia-modified albumin, TNF-α, MPO, CK-MB, cTnI, and leukocyte count (white blood cell [WBC]) in the circulation were measured on admission. Ischemia-modified albumin, TNF-α, and MPO levels were higher by mean values of 11.6%, 9.5%, and 2.9%, respectively, in patients with SAH compared with control group. However, levels of these parameters were not statistically different between the groups (P > .05). However, WBC, CK-MB, and cTnI values were significantly higher in patients with SAH compared with healthy control (P MB, and cTnI tests to differentiate between patients after SAH and controls according to receiver operating characteristic curve. The results suggest that IMA is not better than CK-MB and cTnI in predicting a cardiac injury in patients after nontraumatic SAH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-traumatic spinal extradural haematoma: magnetic resonance findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, E.M.; Smith, P.J.; Fitt, G.; Hennessy, O.F. [St. Vincent`s Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia). University of Melbourne, Department of Medical Imaging

    1999-05-01

    Non-traumatic extradural spinal haematoma is an uncommon condition that is usually associated with a poor outcome. It may present acutely with signs and symptoms of major neurological dysfunction secondary to cord compression, or subacutely over a number of days or weeks with fluctuating symptoms. The exact aetiology of this condition is incompletely understood, but it is believed that the blood is venous in origin, as distinct from the arterial origin of intracranial extradural haematomas. Causes of non-traumatic extradural spinal haematoma include anticoagulation, vasculitis such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and spinal arteriovenous malformations. Conditions that may mimic an acute spinal haematoma include extradural abscess and extradural metastatic infiltration. It is important to make a diagnosis of extradural compression because surgery may offer the best hope in restoring neurological function in these patients. Imaging modalities used for the investigation of extradural haematomas include myelography, CT myelography (CTM) and MRI with or without gadolinium enhancement. The MR appearances of acute extradural abscess and extradural tumour can mimic an extradural haematoma. In subacute haematoma, owing to the magnetic properties of blood degradation products, MR is more specific in diagnosing and ageing of the haematoma. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 11 refs., 3 figs.

  1. The Danish quality database for prehospital emergency medical services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frischknecht Christensen, Erika; Berlac, Peter Anthony; Nielsen, Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish quality database for prehospital emergency medical services (QEMS) is to assess, monitor, and improve the quality of prehospital emergency medical service care in the entire prehospital patient pathway. The aim of this review is to describe the design......: Descriptive data included age, region, and Danish Index for Emergency Care including urgency level. CONCLUSION: QEMS is a new database under establishment and is expected to provide the basis for quality improvement in the prehospital setting and in the entire patient care pathway, for example, by providing...

  2. Multivariate predictors of failed prehospital endotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry E; Kupas, Douglas F; Paris, Paul M; Bates, Robyn R; Costantino, Joseph P; Yealy, Donald M

    2003-07-01

    Conventionally trained out-of-hospital rescuers (such as paramedics) often fail to accomplish endotracheal intubation (ETI) in patients requiring invasive airway management. Previous studies have identified univariate variables associated with failed out-of-hospital ETI but have not examined the interaction between the numerous factors impacting ETI success. This study sought to use multivariate logistic regression to identify a set of factors associated with failed adult out-of-hospital ETI. The authors obtained clinical and demographic data from the Prehospital Airway Collaborative Evaluation, a prospective, multicentered observational study involving advanced life support (ALS) emergency medical services (EMS) systems in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Providers used standard forms to report details of attempted ETI, including system and patient demographics, methods used, difficulties encountered, and initial outcomes. The authors excluded data from sedation-facilitated and neuromuscular blockade-assisted intubations. The main outcome measure was ETI failure, defined as failure to successfully place an endotracheal tube on the last out-of-hospital laryngoscopy attempt. Logistic regression was performed to develop a multivariate model identifying factors associated with failed ETI. Data were used from 45 ALS systems on 663 adult ETIs attempted during the period June 1, 2001, to November 30, 2001. There were 89 cases of failed ETI (failure rate 13.4%). Of 61 factors potentially related to ETI failure, multivariate logistic regression revealed the following significant covariates associated with ETI failure (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval; likelihood ratio p-value): presence of clenched jaw/trismus (9.718; 95% CI = 4.594 to 20.558; p endotracheal tube through the vocal cords (7.653; 95% CI = 3.561 to 16.447; p < 0.0001); inability to visualize the vocal cords (7.638; 95% CI = 3.966 to 14.707; p < 0.0001); intact gag reflex (7.060; 95% CI = 3.552 to 14

  3. [Prehospital care in extremity major vascular injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvallov, I M; Reva, V A; Pronchenko, A A; Seleznev, A B

    2011-09-01

    The problem of temporary hemorrhage control is one of the most important issues of modern war surgery and surgery of trauma. It is a review of literature devoted to prehospital care in extremity major vascular injuries, embraced up-to-date domestic materials as well as the modern foreign papers in this area. The most important historical landmarks of temporary hemorrhage control system are considered. We paid special attention to the most usable methods and means of hemorrhage control which are utilized at the modern time: pressure bandages, tourniquets, local haemostatic agents. The comprehensive analysis of the contamporary haemostatic means concerning U.S. Army has done. The experience of foreign colleagues in development of prehospital care for the injured, creation and progress of new haemostatic methods, application of temporary hemorrhage control system is analyzed.

  4. Prehospital ACLS--does it work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Alok; Mehrotra, Avanti; Gupta, Anoop K; Thakur, Ranjan K

    2002-11-01

    Cardiac disease is the most common cause of death in the United States, and sudden cardiac arrest frequently claims the lives of men and women during their most productive years. It is believed that much better survival rates can be achieved for victims of cardiac arrest through optimizing the "chain of survival" as described by the American Heart Association. The relative and incremental benefit of full prehospital ACLS over basic life support and defibrillation is unproven, however. This is an important issue in this era of cost containment. Some of the ongoing studies including the OPALS study may clarify the cost effectiveness and relative efficacy of rapid defibrillation and full ACLS programs for victims of prehospital cardiac arrest [6].

  5. Prehospital care and new models of regionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, David C; Brooke Lerner, E; Band, Roger A; Renjilian, Chris; Bobrow, Bentley J; Crawford Mechem, C; Carter, Alix J E; Kupas, Douglas F; Spaite, Daniel W

    2010-12-01

    This article summarizes the discussions of the emergency medical services (EMS) breakout session at the June 2010 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Beyond Regionalization: Integrated Networks of Emergency Care." The group focused on prehospital issues such as the identification of patients by EMS personnel, protocol-driven destination selection, bypassing closer nondesignated centers to transport patients directly to more distant designated specialty centers, and the modes of transport to be used as they relate to the regionalization of emergency care. It is our hope that the proposed research agenda will be advanced in a way that begins to rigorously approach the unanswered research questions and that these answers, in turn, will lead to an evidence-based, cohesive, comprehensive, and more uniform set of guidelines that govern the delivery and practice of prehospital emergency care.

  6. Ethical conflicts in the prehospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J G; Arnold, R; Siminoff, L; Wolfson, A B

    1992-10-01

    To assess the range of ethical conflicts that confront prehospital care providers. Convenience sample, from October 1989 to January 1990. An urban advanced life support emergency medical service that transports approximately 3,000 patients per month. Six hundred seven paramedic responses were analyzed by a single observer. An ethical conflict was identified when the paramedic faced a dilemma about what "ought to be done" and the paramedic's values conflicted or potentially conflicted with the patient's. Cases with potential ethical consequence were brought to experts in medical ethics and epidemiology for further analysis and classification. Ethical conflicts arose in 14.4% of paramedic responses (88 of 607 cases). Twenty-seven percent of the conflicts involved issues of informed consent, such as refusal of treatment or transport, conflicts of hospital destination, treatment of minors, and consent for research. Difficulties regarding the duty of the paramedics, usually under threatening circumstances, accounted for 19% of the dilemmas encountered. Requests for limitation of resuscitation accounted for 14%. Other circumstances that presented ethical conflicts involved questions of patient competence (17%), resource allocation (10%), confidentiality (8%), truth telling (3%), and training (1%). The data demonstrate a range of ethical conflicts in the prehospital setting and point to areas in which policy needs to be developed. The data also can be used in a prehospital ethics curriculum for paramedics and physicians. Because case sampling was not strictly random, absolute conclusions should not be drawn regarding the frequency of the dilemmas.

  7. Nontraumatic head and neck injuries: a clinical approach. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea Álvarez, B; Esteban García, L; Tuñón Gómez, M; Cepeda Ibarra, Y

    Nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck represent a challenge in the field of neuroradiology for two reasons. As explained in the first part of this update, these entities affect an area where the thorax joins the cranial cavity and can thus compromise both structures; second, they are uncommon, so they are not well known. Maintaining the same approach as in the first part, focusing on the clinical presentations in the emergency department rather than on the anatomic regions affected, we will study the entities that present with two patterns: those that present with a combination of cervical numbness, dysphagia, and dyspnea and those that present with acute sensory deficits. In the latter group, we will specifically focus on visual deficits, because this is the most common symptom that calls for urgent imaging studies. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Maternal death due to non-traumatic fat embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayel, Ferah; Arican, Nadir; Kavas, Gamze; Turan, Arzu Akcay; Pakis, Isil

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this report is to document a case of non-traumatic fat embolism (NTFE) and to address the need for considerition of fat embolism in suspicious deaths resulting from respiratory distress in the postpartum period. A 28-years-old woman autopsied at the Morgue Department of the Council of Forensic Medicine is included to the study. This female became unconscious and developed respiratory distress 4 h after delivery, and this was followed by respiratory arrest. External examination revealed resuscitation marks and normal postmortem changes. Light microscopy revealed massive fat embolization involving most of the alveolar capillaries on several sections. Only in one particular area was a bone marrow embolus. Pathological diagnosis of the lung was diffuse pulmonary fat embolism. There was no evidence of other organ involvement with emboli. Other visceral organs showed no striking findings other than mild congestion. The cause of death was considered to be respiratory insufficiency resulting from severe fat embolism of the lungs.

  9. A validation of ground ambulance pre-hospital times modeled using geographic information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Alka B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluating geographic access to health services often requires determining the patient travel time to a specified service. For urgent care, many research studies have modeled patient pre-hospital time by ground emergency medical services (EMS using geographic information systems (GIS. The purpose of this study was to determine if the modeling assumptions proposed through prior United States (US studies are valid in a non-US context, and to use the resulting information to provide revised recommendations for modeling travel time using GIS in the absence of actual EMS trip data. Methods The study sample contained all emergency adult patient trips within the Calgary area for 2006. Each record included four components of pre-hospital time (activation, response, on-scene and transport interval. The actual activation and on-scene intervals were compared with those used in published models. The transport interval was calculated within GIS using the Network Analyst extension of Esri ArcGIS 10.0 and the response interval was derived using previously established methods. These GIS derived transport and response intervals were compared with the actual times using descriptive methods. We used the information acquired through the analysis of the EMS trip data to create an updated model that could be used to estimate travel time in the absence of actual EMS trip records. Results There were 29,765 complete EMS records for scene locations inside the city and 529 outside. The actual median on-scene intervals were longer than the average previously reported by 7–8 minutes. Actual EMS pre-hospital times across our study area were significantly higher than the estimated times modeled using GIS and the original travel time assumptions. Our updated model, although still underestimating the total pre-hospital time, more accurately represents the true pre-hospital time in our study area. Conclusions The widespread use of generalized EMS pre-hospital

  10. A validation of ground ambulance pre-hospital times modeled using geographic information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alka B; Waters, Nigel M; Blanchard, Ian E; Doig, Christopher J; Ghali, William A

    2012-10-03

    Evaluating geographic access to health services often requires determining the patient travel time to a specified service. For urgent care, many research studies have modeled patient pre-hospital time by ground emergency medical services (EMS) using geographic information systems (GIS). The purpose of this study was to determine if the modeling assumptions proposed through prior United States (US) studies are valid in a non-US context, and to use the resulting information to provide revised recommendations for modeling travel time using GIS in the absence of actual EMS trip data. The study sample contained all emergency adult patient trips within the Calgary area for 2006. Each record included four components of pre-hospital time (activation, response, on-scene and transport interval). The actual activation and on-scene intervals were compared with those used in published models. The transport interval was calculated within GIS using the Network Analyst extension of Esri ArcGIS 10.0 and the response interval was derived using previously established methods. These GIS derived transport and response intervals were compared with the actual times using descriptive methods. We used the information acquired through the analysis of the EMS trip data to create an updated model that could be used to estimate travel time in the absence of actual EMS trip records. There were 29,765 complete EMS records for scene locations inside the city and 529 outside. The actual median on-scene intervals were longer than the average previously reported by 7-8 minutes. Actual EMS pre-hospital times across our study area were significantly higher than the estimated times modeled using GIS and the original travel time assumptions. Our updated model, although still underestimating the total pre-hospital time, more accurately represents the true pre-hospital time in our study area. The widespread use of generalized EMS pre-hospital time assumptions based on US data may not be appropriate in a

  11. Cognitive and adaptive outcomes and age at insult effects after non-traumatic coma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forsyth, R J; Wong, C P; Kelly, T P; Borrill, H; Stilgoe, D; Kendall, S; Eyre, J A

    2001-01-01

    ...-traumatic coma; prognosis; age related effects Non-traumatic coma (NTC) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children. In the first population based epidemiological survey of pae...

  12. Prehospital chest tube thoracostomy: effective treatment or additional trauma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg, W.; Bergs, B.; Krijen, P.; Schipper, I.; Ringburg, A.; Steyerberg, E.W.; Edwards, M.J.R.; Schipper, I.B.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of prehospital chest tube thoracostomy (TT) remains controversial because of presumed increased complication risks. This study analyzed infectious complication rates for physician-performed prehospital and emergency department (ED) TT. METHODS: Over a 40-month period, all consecu

  13. Prehospital chest tube thoracostomy: effective treatment or additional trauma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg, W.; Bergs, B.; Krijen, P.; Schipper, I.; Ringburg, A.; Steyerberg, E.W.; Edwards, M.J.R.; Schipper, I.B.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of prehospital chest tube thoracostomy (TT) remains controversial because of presumed increased complication risks. This study analyzed infectious complication rates for physician-performed prehospital and emergency department (ED) TT. METHODS: Over a 40-month period, all consecu

  14. A Review of Full-Body Radiography in Nontraumatic Emergency Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the application of full-body radiography to nontraumatic emergency situations. The Lodox Statscan is an X-ray machine capable of imaging the entire body in 13 seconds using linear slit scanning radiography (LSSR). Nontraumatic emergency applications in ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt visualisation, emergency room arteriography (ERA), detection of foreign bodies, and paediatric emergency imaging are presented. Reports show that the fast, full-body, and low-dose scanning c...

  15. A review of full-body radiography in nontraumatic emergency medicine

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the application of full-body radiography to nontraumatic emergency situations. The Lodox Statscan is an X-ray machine capable of imaging the entire body in 13 seconds using linear slit scanning radiography (LSSR). Nontraumatic emergency applications in ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt visualisation, emergency room arteriography (ERA), detection of foreign bodies, and paediatric emergency imaging are presented. Reports show that the fast, full-body, and low-dose scanning c...

  16. Functional outcomes of traumatic and non-traumatic rotator cuff tears after arthroscopic repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abechain, José Jorge Kitagaki; Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; Matsunaga, Fabio Teruo; Netto, Nicola Archetti; Daou, Julia Pozzetti; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare the functional outcomes of traumatic and non-traumatic rotator cuff tears after arthroscopic repair. METHODS Eighty-seven patients with rotator cuff tears following arthroscopic treatment were divided into traumatic and non-traumatic tear groups. Postoperative muscle strength and outcomes using the modified University of California, Los Angeles score were evaluated. Sex, age, affected limb and dominant limb were correlated between groups. Muscle strength of the repaired and unaffected shoulders was compared. Rotator cuff injury size was measured. RESULTS Of the 87 patients who underwent rotator cuff repairs, 35 had traumatic tears and 52 had non-traumatic tears. In patients with non-traumatic tears, the average age was 59 years, 74.5% were female, 96.1% were right-hand dominant and 92.3% had their dominant shoulder affected. Patients with traumatic tears were 59.5 years old on average, 51.4% were female, 91.4% were right-hand dominant and 88.5% had their dominant shoulder affected. No difference existed in the mean modified University of California, Los Angeles score between patients with traumatic tears (33.7) compared with those with non-traumatic tears (32.8). No strength differences were observed between groups: The strength difference between the non-affected and affected sides was 1.21 kg in the non-traumatic group and 1.39 kg in the traumatic group (P = 0.576), while the strength ratio between the non-affected/affected sides was 0.805 in the non-traumatic group and 0.729 in the traumatic group (P = 0.224). CONCLUSION The functional results of traumatic rotator cuff repairs are similar to non-traumatic tears. Both outcomes are satisfactory. PMID:28875129

  17. Does prehospital time affect survival of major trauma patients where there is no prehospital care?

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    S B Dharap

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Survival after major trauma is considered to be time dependent. Efficient prehospital care with rapid transport is the norm in developed countries, which is not available in many lower middle and low-income countries. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prehospital time and primary treatment given on survival of major trauma patients in a setting without prehospital care. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was carried out in a university hospital in Mumbai, from January to December 2014. The hospital has a trauma service but no organized prehospital care or defined interhospital transfer protocols. All patients with life- and/or limb-threatening injuries were included in the study. Injury time and arrival time were noted and the interval was defined as “prehospital time” for the directly arriving patients and as “time to tertiary care” for those transferred. Primary outcome measure was in-hospital death (or discharge. Results: Of 1181 patients, 352 were admitted directly from the trauma scene and 829 were transferred from other hospitals. In-hospital mortality was associated with age, mechanism and mode of injury, shock, Glasgow Coma Score <9, Injury Severity Score ≥16, need for intubation, and ventilatory support on arrival; but neither with prehospital time nor with time to tertiary care. Transferred patients had a significantly higher mortality (odds ratio = 1.869, 95% confidence interval = 1.233–2.561, P = 0.005 despite fewer patients with severe injury. Two hundred and ninety-four (35% of these needed airway intervention while 108 (13% needed chest tube insertion on arrival to the trauma unit suggesting inadequate care at primary facility. Conclusion: Mortality is not associated with prehospital time but with transfers from primary care; probably due to deficient care. To improve survival after major trauma, enhancement of resources for resuscitation and capacity building of on

  18. The utility of the prehospital electrocardiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew T; Dukelow, Adam; McLeod, Shelley; Rodriguez, Severo; Lewell, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) can capture valuable information in the prehospital setting. By the time patients are assessed by an emergency department (ED) physician, their symptoms and any ECG changes may have resolved. We sought to determine whether the prehospital electrocardiogram (pECG) could influence ED management and how often the pECG was available to and reviewed by the ED physician. A retrospective medical record review was conducted on a random sample of patients ≥ 18 years who had a prehospital 12-lead ECG and were transported to one of two tertiary care centres. Data were recorded onto a standardized data extraction tool. Three investigators independently compared the pECG to the first ECG obtained in the ED after patient arrival at the hospital. Any abnormalities not present on the ED ECG were adjudicated to ascertain whether they had the potential to change ED management. Of 115 ambulance runs selected, 47 had no pECG attached to the ambulance call record (ACR) and another 5 were excluded (one ST elevation myocardial infarction, one cardiac arrest, three ACR missing). Of the 63 pECGs reviewed, 16 (25%) showed changes not apparent on the initial ED ECG (κ  =  0.83; 95% CI 0.74-0.93), of which 12 had differences that might influence ED management (κ  =  0.76; 95% CI 0.72-0.82). Only one hospital record contained a copy of the pECG, despite the current protocol that paramedics print two copies of the pECG on arrival in the ED (one copy for the ACR and one to be handed to the medical personnel). None of 110 ED charts documented that the pECG was reviewed by the ED physician. The pECG has the potential to influence ED management. Improvement in paramedic and physician documentation and a formal pECG handover process appear necessary.

  19. Safety and Efficacy of Prehospital Diltiazem

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    Jeffrey H Luk

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Very few studies exist on the use of diltiazem in the prehospital setting. Some practitioners believe this medication is prone to causing hypotension in this setting. Our goals were to determine whether the prehospital administration of diltiazem induced hypotension and to evaluate the efficacy of the drug.Methods: Our two-tiered system is located in a suburban region of New Jersey with advanced life support (ALS care provided by fly-car units. The ALS units do not transport patients, and all of them are hospital based. The ALS providers are employed by the hospital system. In New Jersey, all ALS care requires online medical control, including the administration of diltiazem. We retrospectively reviewed patient care records for those who were believed to be in rapid atrial fibrillation and were given diltiazem in a suburban emergeny medical services system over a 22-month period. We examined the differences between heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP on the initial evaluation and on arrival to the emergency department (ED. A hypotensive response was defined as a final systolic BP (SBP less than 90 mmHg and a drop in SBP of at least 10 mmHg. Diltiazem was considered effective if the ED HR was ,100 beats per minute (bpm or if it decreased [1]20%.Results: During the study period, 26,979 patients were transported. Of these patients, 2,488 had a documented rhythm of atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. Of the 320 patients who received diltiazem, 42 patient encounters were excluded for incomplete data, yielding 278 patients for analysis. The average initial SBP was 139 mmHg and the average diastolic BP was 84 mmHg. The average diltiazem dosage was 16.7 mg. Two patients became hypotensive. The average initial HR was 154 bpm. On arrival to the ED, 33% of the patients had an HR , 100 bpm and 69% had a drop in HR [1] 20%. The overall efficacy of prehospital diltiazem was 73%.Conclusion: In the prehospital setting, diltiazem is associated

  20. The role of prehospital advanced airway management on outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seungmin; Ahn, Ki Ok; Shin, Sang Do

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to compare the benefits of prehospital advanced airway management (AAM) and basic airway management (BAM) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Two investigators performed a systematic review of PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database to identify all peer-reviewed articles relevant to this meta-analysis. We included all articles describing emergency medical system-treated nontraumatic OHCAs; specifically, all articles that described intervention of the prehospital AAM type were considered. The primary outcome was survival to discharge, whereas the secondary outcome was neurologic recovery after an OHCA event. For subgroup analysis, we compared the clinical outcome of endotracheal intubation (ETI), a specific type of AAM, vs BAM. We reviewed 1452 studies, 10 of which satisfied all the inclusion criteria and involved 17 380 patients subjected to AAM and 67 525 subjected to BAM. Based on the full random effects model, patients who received AAM had lower odds of survival (odds ratio [OR], 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.90) compared with BAM. Subgroup analysis for ETI vs BAM showed no significant association with respect to survival (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.16-1.23). There were no significant differences in the odds of neurologic recovery between AAM and BAM (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.03-1.37). Our results reveal decreased survival odds for OHCA patients treated with AAM by emergency medical service personnel compared with BAM. However, the role of prehospital AAM, especially ETI, on achieving neurologic recovery remains unclear. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-traumatic ileal perforation: A retrospective study

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    Gurjit Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine clinical features, operative findings and post-operative complications in patients operated for non-traumatic ileal perforation and to discuss the role of typhoid vaccination. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out from 2009-2010. Seven patients were admitted through casualty as cases of acute abdomen. Underlying conditions were typhoid ulcers (4 patients and non-specific etiology (3 patients. Diagnosis was made on clinical grounds, laboratory investigations, radiology and operative findings. Exploratory laporotomy was done. Different variables studied post-operatively were wound infection, residual abscess, recurrence and delayed post-operative complications. Results: Tenderness, distension and rigidity were found in maximum patients. Gases under diaphragm and air fluid levels were common radiological findings. However, widal test and blood culture for S. typhi was positive in four patients. Six patients had single perforation and one patient had two perforations, all being on antimesentric border of ileum. Maximum patients had peritoneal collection of less than 1000 ml. In five patients simple closure of perforation was done and in remaining two resection with end to side ileotransverse anatomosis was required. Wound infection and residual intraabdominal abscess were found in one patient each. Conclusion: Management criteria remain same in typhoid and non-specific perforations. Commonest cause of ileal perforation is typhoid fever in our country, so immunization against typhoid beyond 18 years of age is recommended.

  2. Endoscopic optic nerve decompression for nontraumatic compressive optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-long REN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To describe the preliminary experience with endoscopic optic nerve decompression (EOND for nontraumatic compressive optic neuropathies (NCONs. Methods The clinical data of 10 patients, male 5 and female 5, with a mean age of 44.3±5.1 years, who underwent EOND for visual loss (n=5 or visual deterioration (n=5 due to tumor compression in General Hospital of Armed Police Forces of China in the period from April 2013 to April 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Preoperative and 6-month-postoperative clinical and imaging data of these patients were reviewed and analyzed. Results Among 5 patients who lost light perception (including 2 patients with bilateral optic nerve compression before operation, 4 of them showed visual improvement to different degrees on the 7th day after operation (with improvement of bilateral visual acuity. The other 5 patients with visual impairment before operation recovered their visual acuity to different extent after the operation. All of the patients had no obvious post-operative complications. Conclusion EOND is a safe, effective, and minimally invasive surgical technique affording recovery of visual function to NCON patients. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.11.12

  3. Nontraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage concomitant with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Makoto; Inatomi, Yuichiro; Yonehara, Toshiro; Hirano, Teruyuki; Ando, Yukio

    2014-07-01

    Nontraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) rarely occurs subsequent to acute ischemic stroke. The incidence, clinical background characteristics, and outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients with cSAH were investigated. Our stroke center database was reviewed to identify patients with acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) who demonstrated acute cSAH within 14 days of admission between 2005 and 2011. Background characteristics, clinical course, and outcomes at discharge and 3 months after onset were investigated in these patients. Of 4953 acute stroke/TIA patients, cSAH was observed in 8 (.14%) patients (7 men, mean age 71 years): 7 were detected incidentally, and the other was found immediately after a convulsion. Two patients died during their hospital stay, 1 died after discharge, and 3 were dependent at 3 months. Major artery occlusion or severe stenosis was observed in 5 patients. Two patients subsequently developed subcortical hemorrhage. On gradient echo imaging, lobar cerebral microbleeds were observed in 2 patients, and chronic superficial siderosis was observed in 2 patients. In this retrospective review of cases with ischemic stroke and cSAH, over half of patients had occlusion of major arteries. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy was suggested by magnetic resonance imaging findings and subsequent events in 3 patients. The overall outcome was unfavorable although the causal relationship with cSAH was unclear. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors Affecting Mortality After Major Nontraumatic Lower Extremity Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinc, Tolga; Polat Duzgun, Arife; Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Erdogan, Ahmet; Yavuz, Zeynep; Coskun, Faruk

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the factors affecting the mortality of patients who underwent nontraumatic major lower limb amputation due to ischemic and/or diabetic causes. A total of 100 patients were included in the study. Among these patients, 70 (70%) underwent below-knee amputation, whereas 30 (30%) underwent above-knee amputation. Eleven (15.7%) of the 70 patients who underwent below-knee amputation and 12 (40%) of the 30 patients who underwent above-knee amputation (P = .008) were deceased. After multivariable Poisson regression analysis, female gender (risk ratio [RR] = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.07-3.74) and a neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (NLR) less than 6.8 (RR = 5.12, 95% CI = 1.86-14.08) were found to be independent risk factors for mortality. The value of 6.8 was used as a cutoff point for the NLR (area under the curve = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.62-0.85), with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 83%, 66%, 57%, and 92%, respectively. The NLR and female gender were found to be independent factors that are related to increased mortality in patients who underwent lower limb amputation due to diabetic and/or ischemic causes. The coexistence of congestive heart failure and the amputation level (above knee) were found to be predictors of mortality in univariable analysis, but significance could not be demonstrated in multivariable analysis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Nontraumatic spontaneous rupture of the kidney : etiology and CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Tae Haeng; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Shin, Hyun Joon [Konkuk Univ. College of Medicine, chungju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bo Hyun [Seongkyunkwan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyoung Sik [Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hwa [Soonchunhyang Univ. College of Medicine, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Hyup [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Churl Min [Korea Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of CT scanning in determining the etiology of spontaneous rupture of the kidney We retrospectively analyzed the CT findings of spontaneous rupture of the kidney in eleven patients, Four were male and seven were female, and they were aged between 20 and 71 (mean, 46.6) years. Both pre- and post-contrast enhanced CT scanning was performed in all patients. Spontaneous renal rupture was induced in seven cases by neoplasms (three angiomyolipomas, three renal cell carcinomas, and one metastatic choriocarcinoma), in three cases by infection or inflammation (acute and chronic pyelonephritis, and renal abscess), and in one, by renal cyst. Common CT findings of rupture of the kidney were the accumulation of high density fluid in the perirenal and anterior pararenal space, and inhomogeneous irregular low density of renal parenchyma and the rupture site. Angiomyolipoma showed fat and an angiomatous component in the lesion, while acute and chronic pyelonephrities revealed thinning of the renal parenchyma and an irregular renal outline. Renal cell carcinoma showed a dense soft tissue mass in the parenchyma. Well-defined, round low-density lesions were noted in the case of renal cyst and renal abscess. CT is very useful in diagnosing and determining the etiology of non-traumatic spontaneous rupture of the kidney and plays an important role in the evaluation of emergency cases.

  6. The Prehospital Predictors of Tracheal Intubation for in Patients who Experience Convulsive Seizures in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kenichiro; Arai, Noritoshi; Omori-Mitsue, Aki; Hida, Ayumi; Kimura, Akio; Takeuchi, Sousuke

    2017-08-15

    Objective To identify the prehospital factors predicting the performance of tracheal intubation (TI) at the emergency department (ED) in patients with convulsive seizure or epilepsy. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of seizure patients who underwent TI at the ED soon after arrival. The clinical variables obtained in the prehospital setting were reviewed. Patients The study population included consecutive adult patients who were transported to an urban tertiary care ED due to convulsive seizure between August 2010 and September 2015. Results Among the 822 eligible patients, 59 patients (7.2%) underwent TI at the ED. Four independent prehospital predictors were identified using multivariate analysis: age ≥50 years (+1 point), meeting the definition of convulsive status epilepticus (+4 points), and an on-scene heart rate of ≥120 bpm (+1 point) led to a higher likelihood of TI, while a higher on-scene (alert or confused) level of consciousness (-3 points) led to a lower likelihood of TI. The derived prediction rule (the sum of all points) had good predictive performance with an area under the curve of 0.88 (95% confidence interval: 0.79-0.97), a sensitivity of 0.62, a specificity of 0.91, and a positive likelihood ratio of 10.6, when the cut-off value was set to 5 points. Conclusion We constructed a simple prehospital prediction rule to help predict the need for TI in seizure patients, even in the prehospital phase. This may possibly lead to the more effective management of seizure patients in the ED.

  7. An Observational study of prehospital and hospital delay in reperfusion for acute myocardial infarction at a University Hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Choudhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among Indian adults, and approximately 50% of deaths usually occur during the 1st hour after symptom onset before arriving at the hospital. A study was planned to evaluate the prehospital and hospital delay in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI. Methods: This was a prospective observational study of 390 patients with AMI admitted to the Department of Cardiology between March 2014 and August 2015. Detailed patient demographics, socioeconomic status, and prehospital and hospital delay were reviewed. Results: The mean age of presentation for male and female was 57 ± 12.91 and 61.5 ± 12.83 years, respectively. The mean prehospital delay, time to act after chest pain, and travel time were 9.08 ± 6.3, 7.16 ± 6.1, and 1.84 ± 0.8 h, respectively, and only three (9.7% patients reached the hospital within 2 h after symptom onset. Out of 300 patients who received reperfusion therapy, thrombolysis was done in 276 (92% patients while primary percutaneous coronary intervention was performed in only 24 (8% patients. Mean door-to-needle (D-N time and door-to-device time for those who received reperfusion therapy were 27.8 ± 4.3 and 78.95 ± 9.5 min, respectively. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the prehospital delay was significantly associated with older age, female sex, rural background, diabetes, having atypical pain, and lack of knowledge regarding the seriousness of chest pain. Conclusion: Approximately 79% of total prehospital delay was due to patient-related factors; old age, female sex, rural background, diabetes, atypical angina, and lack of knowledge being the significant attributes. D-N time and door-to-device time were within the limits of those recommended by current guidelines.

  8. Effect of the prehospital trauma life support program (PHTLS) on prehospital trauma care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, J; Adam, R U; Gana, T J; Bedaysie, H; Williams, J I

    1997-05-01

    Improvement in trauma patient outcome has been demonstrated after the implementation of the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) program in Trinidad and Tobago. This study was aimed at identifying prehospital care factors that may explain this improvement. All patients transferred by ambulance to the major trauma referral hospital had assessment of airway control, oxygen use, cervical (C)-spine control, and hemorrhage control, as well as splinting of extremities during pre-PHTLS (July of 1990 to December of 1991; n = 332) and post-PHTLS periods (January of 1994 to June of 1995; n = 350). Pre-PHTLS data were compared with post-PHTLS data by chi 2 analysis with a p value PHTLS period for airway control (10 vs. 99.7%), C-spine control (2.1 vs. 89.4%), splinting of extremities (22 vs. 60.6%), hemorrhage control (16 vs. 96.9%), and oxygen use (6.6 vs. 89.5%) when no specific problem was identified. When a specific problem was identified in these areas, the post-PHTLS percentage also increased for airway control (16.2 vs. 100%), C-spine control (25 vs. 100%), splinting of extremities (33.9 vs. 100%), hemorrhage control (18 vs. 100%), and oxygen use (43.2 vs. 98.9%). Prehospital trauma care has changed after the introduction of the PHTLS program as indicated by more frequent airway control, use of oxygen, control of cervical (C)-spine and hemorrhage, as well as splinting of fractures. This finding was evident not only as a routine but particularly when a specific related problem was identified. This change in prehospital care could be responsible for the improved trauma patient outcome after PHTLS.

  9. Trauma patient outcome after the Prehospital Trauma Life Support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, J; Adam, R U; Gana, T J; Williams, J I

    1997-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated a significant improvement in trauma patient outcome after the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) program in Trinidad and Tobago. In January of 1992, a Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) program was also instituted. This study assessed trauma patient outcome after the PHTLS program. Morbidity (length of stay and degree of disability), mortality, injury severity score, mechanism of injury, age, and sex among all adult trauma patients transported by ambulance to the major trauma hospital were assessed between July of 1990 to December of 1991 (pre-PHTLS, n = 332) and January of 1994 to June of 1995 (post-PHTLS, n = 350). Age, sex distribution, percentage blunt injury, and injury severity score were similar for both groups. Mortality pre-PHTLS (15.7%) was greater than post-PHTLS (10.6%). Length of stay and disability were statistically significantly decreased post-PHTLS. Age, injury severity score, and mechanism of injury were positively correlated with mortality in both periods. The previously reported post-ATLS mortality was similar to the pre-PHTLS mortality. Post-PHTLS mortality and morbidity were significantly decreased, suggesting a positive impact of the PHTLS program on trauma patient outcome.

  10. Prevalence of Prehospital Hypoxemia and Oxygen Use in Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    prehospital endotracheal intubation . Hypoxemia occurred in 86 (38.4%), paramedics suspected traumatic brain injury in 22 (9.8%), and 20 (8.9%) were...admitted; 36.2% sustained a penetrating injury. None underwent prehospital endotracheal intubation . Hypoxemia occurred in 86 (38.4%), paramedics...36.2% sustained a penetrating injury. No subject underwent endotracheal intubation in the pre hospital setting; 7 (3.1%) underwent intubation in the

  11. Prehospital Use of Plasma for Traumatic Hemorrhage - PUPTH-IIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    and communications within a common hierarchical organisational structure. Conventional ICS organisation consists of five function modules: Command...the Prehospital Use of Plasma in Traumatic Hemorrhage (PUPTH) trial. This trial was a multi- departmental , multi-agency, randomised clinical trial...to re-organise and manage a large multi-agency, multi- departmental clinical trial, Prehospital Use of Plasma in Traumatic Hemorrhage (PUPTH) trial

  12. A Review of Full-Body Radiography in Nontraumatic Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Whiley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the application of full-body radiography to nontraumatic emergency situations. The Lodox Statscan is an X-ray machine capable of imaging the entire body in 13 seconds using linear slit scanning radiography (LSSR. Nontraumatic emergency applications in ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunt visualisation, emergency room arteriography (ERA, detection of foreign bodies, and paediatric emergency imaging are presented. Reports show that the fast, full-body, and low-dose scanning capabilities of the Lodox system make it well suited to these applications, with the same or better image quality, faster processing times, and lower dose to patients. In particular, the large format scans allowing visualisation of a greater area of anatomy make it well suited to VP shunt monitoring, ERA, and the detection of foreign bodies. Whilst more studies are required, it can be concluded that the Lodox Statscan has the potential for widespread use in these and other nontraumatic emergency radiology applications.

  13. A review of full-body radiography in nontraumatic emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiley, S P; Mantokoudis, G; Ott, D; Zimmerman, H; Exadaktylos, A K

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the application of full-body radiography to nontraumatic emergency situations. The Lodox Statscan is an X-ray machine capable of imaging the entire body in 13 seconds using linear slit scanning radiography (LSSR). Nontraumatic emergency applications in ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt visualisation, emergency room arteriography (ERA), detection of foreign bodies, and paediatric emergency imaging are presented. Reports show that the fast, full-body, and low-dose scanning capabilities of the Lodox system make it well suited to these applications, with the same or better image quality, faster processing times, and lower dose to patients. In particular, the large format scans allowing visualisation of a greater area of anatomy make it well suited to VP shunt monitoring, ERA, and the detection of foreign bodies. Whilst more studies are required, it can be concluded that the Lodox Statscan has the potential for widespread use in these and other nontraumatic emergency radiology applications.

  14. Nontraumatic head and neck emergencies: a clinical approach. Part 1: cervicofacial swelling, dysphagia, and dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea Álvarez, B; Tuñón Gómez, M; Esteban García, L; García Hidalgo, C Y; Ruiz Peralbo, R M

    2016-01-01

    Nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck represent a challenge in the field of neuroradiology for two reasons: first, they affect an area where the thorax joins the cranial cavity and can thus compromise both structures; second, they are uncommon, so they are not well known. Various publications focus on nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck from the viewpoints of anatomic location or of particular diseases. However, these are not the most helpful viewpoints for dealing with patients in the emergency department, who present with particular signs and symptoms. We propose an analysis starting from the four most common clinical presentations of patients who come to the emergency department for nontraumatic head and neck emergencies: cervical swelling, dysphagia, dyspnea, and loss of vision. Starting from these entities, we develop an approach to the radiologic management and diagnosis of these patients. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Prehospital Care of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TVSP Murthy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI occurs when a sudden trauma causes brain damage. Depending on the severity, outcome can be anything from complete recovery to permanent disability or death. Emergency medical services play a dominant role in provision of primary care at the site of injury. Since little can be done to reverse the initial brain damage due to trauma, attempts to prevent further brain damage and stabilize the patient before he can be brought to a specialized trauma care centre play a pivotal role in the final outcome. Recognition and early treatment of hypoten-sion, hypoxemia, and hypoglycemia, objective neurological assessment based on GCS and pupils, and safe transport to an optimal care centre are the key elements of prehospital care of a TBI patient.

  16. The prehospital management of avalanche victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhall, Daniel K; Martens-Nielsen, Julie

    2016-12-01

    Avalanche accidents are frequently lethal events with an overall mortality of 23%. Mortality increases dramatically to 50% in instances of complete burial. With modern day dense networks of ambulance services and rescue helicopters, health workers often become involved during the early stages of avalanche rescue. Historically, some of the most devastating avalanche accidents have involved military personnel. Armed forces are frequently deployed to mountain regions in order to train for mountain warfare or as part of ongoing conflicts. Furthermore, military units are frequently called to assist civilian organised rescue in avalanche rescue operations. It is therefore important that clinicians associated with units operating in mountain regions have an understanding of, the medical management of avalanche victims, and of the preceding rescue phase. The ensuing review of the available literature aims to describe the pathophysiology particular to avalanche victims and to outline a structured approach to the search, rescue and prehospital medical management.

  17. Pre-hospital care--current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyington, T; Williams, D

    1995-01-01

    After a brief outline of past developments in the training of ambulance personnel, this paper traces the adoption in the UK of Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) courses from the US. The 1991 World Student Games in Sheffield, UK led to liaison between training staff from South Yorkshire Metropolitan Ambulance and Paramedic Service (SYMAPS) and from Western New York Medical Training Institute. As a result, the trauma care policy of SYMAPS was altered from aiming to stabilise the patient at the scene of the accident to emphasising rapid and thorough assessment, packaging and transport. This is a resume of the scope of the PHTLS provider course. The course concentrates on the principles of PHTLS for the multisystems trauma victim.

  18. Patterns of dental service utilization following nontraumatic dental condition visits to the emergency department in Wisconsin Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajewski, Nicholas M; Okunseri, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    To examine patterns of dental service utilization for adult Medicaid enrollees in Wisconsin following nontraumatic dental condition (NTDC) visits to the emergency department (ED). This is a retrospective, observational study of claims for NTDC visits to the ED and dental service encounters from the Wisconsin Medicaid Evaluation and Decision Support database (2001-2009). We used competing risk models to predict probabilities of returning to the ED versus obtaining follow-up care from a dentist. We observed a 43 percent increase in the rate of NTDC visits to the ED, with most of this increase occurring from 2001 to 2005. Within 30 days of an NTDC visit to the ED, ∼29.6 percent of enrollees will first visit a dentist office, while ∼9.9 percent will return to the ED. Young to middle-aged adults (18 to dental providers were more likely to return to the ED following a NTDC visit. Among the enrollees that first visited a dental office following an ED visit, 37.6 percent had an extraction performed at this visit. Almost one in five adult Medicaid enrollees will subsequently return to the ED following a previous NTDC visit. The provision of definitive care for these individuals appears to primarily consist of extractions. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  19. Time-dependent test characteristics of neck stiffness in patients suspected of nontraumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, Daan; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Sturkenboom, A. J Martijn; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neck stiffness can be the only diagnostic clue for subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) at neurological examination in patients with a clinical suspicion of nontraumatic SAH who present with a normal level of consciousness and no focal neurologic deficits. Since the clinical impression is that

  20. The etiology and outcome of non-traumatic coma in critical care: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsting, Marlene Wb B; Franken, Mira D; Meulenbelt, Jan; van Klei, Wilton A; de Lange, Dylan W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-traumatic coma (NTC) is a serious condition requiring swift medical or surgical decision making upon arrival at the emergency department. Knowledge of the most frequent etiologies of NTC and associated mortality might improve the management of these patients. Here, we present the res

  1. The etiology and outcome of non-traumatic coma in critical care : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsting, Marlene WB; Franken, Mira D.; Meulenbelt, Jan; van Klei, Wilton A.; de Lange, Dylan W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non-traumatic coma (NTC) is a serious condition requiring swift medical or surgical decision making upon arrival at the emergency department. Knowledge of the most frequent etiologies of NTC and associated mortality might improve the management of these patients. Here, we present the res

  2. Very low survival rates after non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a consecutive series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Holm, Gitte; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate factors potentially influencing short- and long-term mortality in patients who had a non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a university hospital. A consecutive series of 93 amputations (16% toe/foot, 33% trans-tibial, 9% through knee and 42...

  3. Intubation of Profoundly Agitated Patients Treated with Prehospital Ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olives, Travis D; Nystrom, Paul C; Cole, Jon B; Dodd, Kenneth W; Ho, Jeffrey D

    2016-12-01

    Profound agitation in the prehospital setting confers substantial risk to patients and providers. Optimal chemical sedation in this setting remains unclear. The goal of this study was to describe intubation rates among profoundly agitated patients treated with prehospital ketamine and to characterize clinically significant outcomes of a prehospital ketamine protocol. This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients who received prehospital ketamine, per a predefined protocol, for control of profound agitation and who subsequently were transported to an urban Level 1 trauma center from May 1, 2010 through August 31, 2013. Identified records were reviewed for basic ambulance run information, subject characteristics, ketamine dosing, and rate of intubation. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) ambulance run data were matched to hospital-based electronic medical records. Clinically significant outcomes are characterized, including unadjusted and adjusted rates of intubation. Overall, ketamine was administered 227 times in the prehospital setting with 135 cases meeting study criteria of use of ketamine for treatment of agitation. Endotracheal intubation was undertaken for 63% (85/135) of patients, including attempted prehospital intubation in four cases. Male gender and late night arrival were associated with intubation in univariate analyses (χ2=12.02; P=.001 and χ2=5.34; P=.021, respectively). Neither ketamine dose, co-administration of additional sedating medications, nor evidence of ethanol (ETOH) or sympathomimetic ingestion was associated with intubation. The association between intubation and both male gender and late night emergency department (ED) arrival persisted in multivariate analysis. Neither higher dose (>5mg/kg) ketamine nor co-administration of midazolam or haloperidol was associated with intubation in logistic regression modeling of the 120 subjects with weights recorded. Two deaths were observed. Post-hoc analysis of intubation rates suggested a

  4. COST-EFFECTIVENESS EVALUATION OF PREHOSPITAL THROMBOLYSIS WITH TENECTEPLASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Omel'yanovskiy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate clinical and cost effectiveness of different reperfusion strategies in myocardial infarction with ST segment elevation (STEMI, including pre-hospital thrombolysis with tenecteplase.  Material and methods. Methods of cost-effectiveness analysis and economic modeling were used to calculate the costs of reperfusion in STEMI, expected number of life gains, the cost of life gains depending on reperfusion strategy (no reperfusion, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, prehospital thrombolysis, hospital thrombolysis.  Results. In accordance to analysis results and from economic point of view, the most effective strategy is primary PCI in patients within "therapeutic window" and pre-hospital thrombolysis in the remaining patients with STEMI. More complex strategy of patients flow control with patient division into groups of primary PCI, pre-hospital thrombolysis and hospital thrombolysis lead to decrease in reperfusion costs efficacy.  Conclusion. The reperfusion model with primary PCI in the first 120 minutes after STEMI symptoms onset, and pre-hospital thrombolysis with bolus thrombolytic administration, when PCI is not possible in this period, is the most effective economically and in respect on mortality reduction in patients with STEMI.

  5. COST-EFFECTIVENESS EVALUATION OF PREHOSPITAL THROMBOLYSIS WITH TENECTEPLASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Omel'yanovskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate clinical and cost effectiveness of different reperfusion strategies in myocardial infarction with ST segment elevation (STEMI, including pre-hospital thrombolysis with tenecteplase.  Material and methods. Methods of cost-effectiveness analysis and economic modeling were used to calculate the costs of reperfusion in STEMI, expected number of life gains, the cost of life gains depending on reperfusion strategy (no reperfusion, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, prehospital thrombolysis, hospital thrombolysis.  Results. In accordance to analysis results and from economic point of view, the most effective strategy is primary PCI in patients within "therapeutic window" and pre-hospital thrombolysis in the remaining patients with STEMI. More complex strategy of patients flow control with patient division into groups of primary PCI, pre-hospital thrombolysis and hospital thrombolysis lead to decrease in reperfusion costs efficacy.  Conclusion. The reperfusion model with primary PCI in the first 120 minutes after STEMI symptoms onset, and pre-hospital thrombolysis with bolus thrombolytic administration, when PCI is not possible in this period, is the most effective economically and in respect on mortality reduction in patients with STEMI.

  6. Perioperative outcomes of laparoscopic versus open splenectomy for nontraumatic diseases: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jiang; Ma Rui; Yang Shouzhang; Lin Shuang; He Shilin; Cai Xiujun

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment has become the standard treatment for nontreumatic diseases of the spleen.This metaanalysis compared the relative merits of laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) with open splenectomy (OS) for nontraumatic splenic diseases.Methods A literature search was performed to identify studies comparing perioperative outcomes in patients who underwent LS or OS for nontraumatic diseases.Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (C/s) were calculated using a fixed-or random-effects model.Results Thirty-five studies matched the selection criteria.Of the 7 269 patients included 3 981 underwent LS and 3 288 underwent OS for nontraumatic diseases.OS was associated with shorter operation time (WMD=42.65,95% CI:25.58-59.73),whereas LS was associated with reduced operative blood loss (WMD=-133.95,95% CI:-229.02 to-38.88),need for blood transfusion requirement (OR=0.53,95% CI:0.39-0.72),overall postoperative morbidity rate (OR=0.44,95% CI:0.38-0.51),postoperative mortality rate (OR=0.38,95% CI:0.24-0.59),and length of hospital stay (WMD =-2.73,95%CI:-3.34 to-2.12).Conclusions LS is superior to OS for nontraumatic diseases,with reduced operative blood loss,need for blood transfusion,postoperative morbidity and mortality rates,and length of hospital stay,although OS is associated with reduced operation time.LS may be a good alternative to OS for patients with nontraumatic splenic diseases.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Haakan [Oerebro University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Norrman, Eva [Oerebro University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Geijer, Mats [Lund University and Skaane University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Jansson, Kjell [Oerebro University, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden)

    2016-06-15

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  8. Prehospital thrombolysis in acute myocardial infarction: the Belgian eminase prehospital study (BEPS). BEPS Collaborative Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    Interest in early thrombolysis has prompted a study on the feasibility and time course of prehospital thrombolysis in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in six centres in Belgium. Patients with clinically suspected AMI and with typical ECG changes presenting within 4 h after onset of pain were treated with 30 units of Anisoylated Plasminogen Streptokinase Activator Complex (APSAC, eminase) intravenously by a mobile intensive care unit (MICU). Sixty-two patients were included in the study and an AMI was confirmed in 60. The mean time (+/- 1 SD) from onset of pain to injection of APSAC was 95 +/- 47 min and the mean estimated time gain, calculated as the time difference between the arrival of the MICU at home and the arrival of the MICU at the emergency department, was 50 +/- 17 min. In the prehospital period four patients developed ventricular fibrillation and one cardiogenic shock. During hospital stay severe complications were observed in four patients. Two events were fatal, one diffuse haemorrhage and one septal rupture; two events were non fatal, one feasible and that an estimated time gain of 50 min can be obtained. Potential risks and benefits remain to be demonstrated in a large controlled clinical trial.

  9. Refraining from pre-hospital advanced airway management: a prospective observational study of critical decision making in an anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital critical care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognås, Leif; Hansen, Troels Martin; Kirkegaard, Hans; Tønnesen, Else

    2013-10-25

    We report prospectively recorded observational data from consecutive cases in which the attending pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologist considered performing pre-hospital advanced airway management but decided to withhold such interventions. Anaesthesiologists from eight pre-hospital critical care teams in the Central Denmark Region (a mixed rural and urban region with 1.27 million inhabitants) registered data from February 1st 2011 to October 31st 2012. Included were patients of all ages for whom pre-hospital advanced airway management were considered but not performed. The main objectives were to investigate (1) the pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists' reasons for considering performing pre-hospital advanced airway management in this group of patients (2) the pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists' reasons for not performing pre-hospital advanced airway management (3) the methods used to treat these patients (4) the incidence of complications related to pre-hospital advanced airway management not being performed. We registered data from 1081 cases in which the pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists' considered performing pre-hospital advanced airway management. The anaesthesiologists decided to withhold pre-hospital advanced airway management in 32.1% of these cases (n = 347). In 75.1% of these cases (n = 257) pre-hospital advanced airway management were withheld because of the patient's condition and in 30.8% (n = 107) because of patient co-morbidity. The most frequently used alternative treatment was bag-mask ventilation, used in 82.7% of the cases (n = 287). Immediate complications related to the decision of not performing pre-hospital advanced airway management occurred in 0.6% of the cases (n = 2). We have illustrated the complexity of the critical decision-making associated with pre-hospital advanced airway management. This study is the first to identify the most common reasons why pre-hospital critical care

  10. Prehospital emergency medical services in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisamuddin, N A R Nik; Hamzah, M Shah; Holliman, C James

    2007-05-01

    Once a very slowly developing country in a Southeast Asia region, Malaysia has undergone considerable change over the last 20 years after the government changed its focus from agriculture to developing more industry and technology. The well-known "Vision 2020," introduced by the late Prime Minister, set a target for the nation to be a developed country in the Asia region by the year 2020. As the economy and standard of living have improved, the demand from the public for a better health care system, in particular, emergency medical services (EMS), has increased. Despite the effort by the government to improve the health care system in Malaysia, EMS within the country are currently limited, best described as being in the "developing" phase. The Ministry of Health, Ministry of Education, Civil Defense, and non-governmental organizations such as Red Crescent and St. John's Ambulance, provide the current ambulance services. At the present time, there are no uniform medical control or treatment protocols, communication systems, system management, training or education, or quality assurance policies. However, the recent development of and interest in an Emergency Medicine training program has gradually led to improved EMS and prehospital care.

  11. Management of pain in pre-hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Michael; Rodgers, Antony

    2015-06-01

    Assessment and management of pain in pre-hospital care settings are important aspects of paramedic and clinical team roles. As emergency department waiting times and delays in paramedic-to-nurse handover increase, it becomes more and more vital that patients receive adequate pre-hospital pain relief. However, administration of analgesia can be inadequate and can result in patients experiencing oligoanalgesia, or under-treated pain. This article examines these issues along with the aetiology of trauma and the related socioeconomic background of traumatic injury. It reviews validated pain-assessment tools, outlines physiological responses to traumatic pain and discusses some of the misconceptions about the provision of effective analgesia in pre-hospital settings.

  12. Factors influencing prehospital delay for patients with acute myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shujuan CHENG; Lufen GUO; Juyuan LIU; Xiaoling ZHU; Hongbing YAN

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influencing factors for prehospital delay in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI).Methods A total of 807 consecutive patients with AMI who presented to the emergency department of Beijing Anzhen Hospital were analyzed. The influence of several potential risk factors on the prehospital delay time (PDT) was evaluated by comparing patients admitted more than 2 hours after onset of chese pain with those admitted within 2 hours after onset. Results Among 807 patients, 402 came to the hospital within 2 hours while the others arrived at the hospital after 2 hours. The median PDT was 130 min. Among the potential variables, advanced age, history of diabetes mellitus, occurrence of symptom at night and use of emergency medical service significantly affected PDT by multivariate analysis. Conclusion Interventions aimed at reducing the prehospital delay in AMI should primarily focus on the awareness of the risk and help-seeking behavior of patients.

  13. "DETERMINANTS OF PREHOSPITAL DELAY IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alidoosti

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Determination of pre-hospital delay time of patients with acute myocardial infarction and seeking ways of speeding up the time for reperfusion is an important factor to lower mortality in these patients. This is a cross-sectional study to determine pre-hospital delay time, its components, and related causes and conditions, obtained in 375 patients with prolonged chest pain referred to four hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Means of transport to hospital, reasons of ambulance disuse, decision time by the patient and finally the entire time of pre-hospital delay were specified. Suspected factors related to delays of more than 2 and 6 h were scrutinized with chi-square test. Rate of ambulance utility (18.9% directly correlated with age of patients (P<0.05. Principal motives to disuse ambulance insuccession were unrememberance (33.7%, access to private vehicle (32.8% and supposition of sufficient speed of personal reference (18.9%. Pre-hospital delay time was 8.1 ± 9.1 h (mean ± SD in whole patients and 7.6 ± 9.1 h in those with acute myocardial infarction. Delays of more than 2 and 6 hoccurred in 67.5% and 33.6% of patients, respectively. Decision time constitute three fourth of whole pre-hospital delay and was correlated with female gender, older age, history of diabetes, lower level of literacy and nocturnal onset of symptoms. In conclusion, a significant number of patients with acute myocardial infarction have pre-hospital delay of more than 2 and even 6 h, when golden time for thrombolytic therapy has already been elapsed.

  14. Paramedic Recognition of Sepsis in the Prehospital Setting: A Prospective Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Green

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients with sepsis benefit from early diagnosis and treatment. Accurate paramedic recognition of sepsis is important to initiate care promptly for patients who arrive by Emergency Medical Services. Methods. Prospective observational study of adult patients (age ≥ 16 years transported by paramedics to the emergency department (ED of a Canadian tertiary hospital. Paramedic identification of sepsis was assessed using a novel prehospital sepsis screening tool developed by the study team and compared to blind, independent documentation of ED diagnoses by attending emergency physicians (EPs. Specificity, sensitivity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive value, and likelihood ratios were calculated with 95% confidence intervals. Results. Overall, 629 patients were included in the analysis. Sepsis was identified by paramedics in 170 (27.0% patients and by EPs in 71 (11.3% patients. Sensitivity of paramedic sepsis identification compared to EP diagnosis was 73.2% (95% CI 61.4–83.0, while specificity was 78.8% (95% CI 75.2–82.2. The accuracy of paramedic identification of sepsis was 78.2% (492/629, 52 true positive, 440 true negative. Positive and negative predictive values were 30.6% (95% CI 23.8–38.1 and 95.9% (95% CI 93.6–97.5, respectively. Conclusion. Using a novel prehospital sepsis screening tool, paramedic recognition of sepsis had greater specificity than sensitivity with reasonable accuracy.

  15. Prehospital emergency care and injury prevention in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Elbashir

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Due to an absence of published literature in Sudan, much of the data have been recorded from paper records and empirical observations. Prehospital care and injury prevention in the Sudan is a recent initiative, but it is developing into a promising model with many opportunities for improvement. This momentum should be nurtured and requires a purposive, collective collaboration to draw a blueprint for a locally relevant, effective and efficient prehospital system in Sudan. It is hoped that this article will highlight and encourage further progress.

  16. Rationale, development, and implementation of the Electrocardiographic Methods for the Prehospital Identification of Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Events (EMPIRE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zaiti, Salah S; Martin-Gill, Christian; Sejdić, Ervin; Alrawashdeh, Mohammad; Callaway, Clifton

    2015-01-01

    The serum rise of cardiac troponin remains the gold standard for diagnosing non-ST elevation (NSTE) myocardial infarction (MI) despite its delayed response. Novel methods for real-time detection of NSTEMI would result in more immediate initiation of definitive medical therapy and faster transport to facilities that can provide specialized cardiac care. EMPIRE is an ongoing prospective, observational cohort study designed to quantify the magnitude of ischemia-induced repolarization dispersion for the early detection of NSTEMI. In this ongoing study, prehospital ECG data is gathered from patients who call 9-1-1 with a chief complaint of non-traumatic chest pain. This data is then analyzed using the principal component analysis (PCA) technique of 12-lead ECGs to fully characterize the spatial and temporal qualities of STT waveforms. Between May and December of 2013, Pittsburgh EMS obtained and transmitted 351 prehospital ECGs of the 1149 patients with chest pain-related emergency dispatches transported to participating hospitals. After excluding those with poor ECG signal (n=40, 11%) and those with pacing or LBBB (n=50, 14%), there were 261 eligible patients (age 57±16years, 45% female, 45% Black). In this preliminary sample, there were 19 STEMI (7%) and 33 NSTEMI (12%). More than 50% of those with infarction (STEMI or NSTEMI) had initially negative troponin values upon presentation. We present ECG data of such NSTEMI case that was identified correctly using our methods. Concrete ECG algorithms that can quantify NSTE ischemia and allow differential treatment based on such ECG changes could have an immediate clinical impact on patient outcomes. We describe the rationale, development, design, and potential usefulness of the EMPIRE study. The findings may provide insights that can influence guidelines revisions and improve public health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of pre-hospital care on the outcome of children arriving with agonal breathing to a pediatric emergency service in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Das Adhikari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Data on the prehospital interventions received by critically ill children at arrival to Paediatric Emergency Services (PES is limited in developing countries. This study aims to describe the pre-hospital care scenario, transport and their impact on outcome in non-traumatic, acutely ill children presenting in PES with agonal breathing. Methods: Prospective observational study done on children aged below 15 years arriving in PES with agonal breathing due to non-trauma related causes. Results: Out of 75 children studied, 69% were infants. The duration of illness among 65% of them (75 was less than 3 days. Majority of them (81% had received treatment prior to arrival. Government sector physicians (72%, half of them (51% being pediatricians were the major treating doctors. 37% of the children had arrived to the Emergency in an ambulance. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR was given to 27% on arrival in PES. Other interventions included fluid boluses to correct shock (92% and inotrope infusion (56%. Sepsis (24% and pneumonia (24% were the most common diagnoses. Out of 75, 57 (76% children who were stabilized and shifted to PICU and among them 27 (47% survived to discharge. Normal blood pressure (p=0.0410 and non-requirement of CPR (0.0047 and inotropic infusion (0.0459 in PES were associated with a higher chance of survival. Conclusion: 36% (27/75 of children who arrived to our PES with agonal breathing survived to hospital discharge. Survival was significantly better among those who did not need CPR.

  18. Anaesthetist-provided pre-hospital advanced airway management in children: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpgaard, Mona; Hansen, Troels Martin; Rognås, Leif

    2015-08-27

    Pre-hospital advanced airway management has been named one of the top-five research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care. Few studies have been made on paediatric pre-hospital advanced airway management. The aim of this study was to investigate pre-hospital endotracheal intubation success rate in children, first-pass success rates and complications related to pre-hospital advanced airway management in patients younger than 16 years of age treated by pre-hospital critical care teams in the Central Denmark Region (1.3 million inhabitants). A prospective descriptive study based on data collected from eight anaesthetist-staffed pre-hospital critical care teams between February 1st 2011 and November 1st 2012. Primary endpoints were 1) pre-hospital endotracheal intubation success rate in children 2) pre-hospital endotracheal intubation first-pass success rate in children and 3) complications related to prehospital advanced airway management in children. The pre-hospital critical care anaesthetists attempted endotracheal intubation in 25 children, 13 of which were less than 2 years old. In one patient, a neonate (600 g birth weight), endotracheal intubation failed. The patient was managed by uneventful bag-mask ventilation. All other 24 children had their tracheas successfully intubated by the pre-hospital critical care anaesthetists resulting in a pre-hospital endotracheal intubation success rate of 96 %. Overall first pass success-rate was 75 %. In the group of patients younger than 2 years old, first pass success-rate was 54 %. The total rate of airway management related complications such as vomiting, aspiration, accidental intubation of the oesophagus or right main stem bronchus, hypoxia (oxygen saturation advanced airway management. Compared with the total population of patients receiving pre-hospital advanced airway management in our system, the overall success rate following pre-hospital endotracheal intubations in children is acceptable but

  19. Acute non-traumatic marrow edema syndrome in the knee: MRI findings at presentation, correlation with spinal DEXA and outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karantanas, Apostolos H. [Department of Radiology, University of Crete, Heraklion 711 10 Greece (Greece)], E-mail: apolsen@yahoo.com; Drakonaki, Elena [Department of Radiology, University of Crete, Heraklion 711 10 Greece (Greece); Karachalios, Theophilos [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Thessaly, Larissa 411 10 Greece (Greece); Korompilias, Anastasios V. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 451 10 (Greece); Malizos, Konstantinos [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Thessaly, Larissa 411 10 Greece (Greece)

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to present the MRI findings of non-traumatic edema-like lesions presented acutely in the adult knee and to correlate them with the 3-year outcome and the bone mineral density (BMD) in the spine. Materials and methods: Ninety-eight patients (40 men, 58 women, mean age 60.1 {+-} 11 years, age range 27-82 years), were followed up clinically as well as with MR imaging, when indicated, for at least 3 years. Patients were classified according to presentation in 3 groups (A: bone marrow edema (BME), B: BME and subchondral fracture, C: BME and articular collapse) and according to outcome in 2 groups (A: reversible BME, B: articular collapse). BMD measurements of the spine were carried out in males over 70 and females over 60 years old using DEXA. Results: The isolated BME pattern was observed in 64.3% (Group A), subchondral fractures without articular collapse in 11.2% (Group B) and articular collapse in 24.5% (Group C). Significant differences were found among the 3 groups at presentation, regarding the age, sex, BMD, affected area and duration of symptoms prior to imaging (p < 0.05). Localization of the lesions in the weight-bearing areas of the knee was shown in 100% of C, in 90.9% of B and in 50.8% of A. The duration of symptoms prior to imaging was longer in C (7.6 {+-} 2.8 m) than in A (2.5 {+-} 1.7 m) and B (4.0 {+-} 3.2 m) (p < 0.05). Group B progressed to articular collapse in 45.5%, the rest demonstrating a favourable outcome. Group C showed clinical improvement in 75% and persistent symptoms that required knee arthroplasty in 25% of cases. Articular collapse was the final outcome in 29.6% and transient BME in 70.4% of patients. These two groups showed significant differences regarding the age (p {approx} 0), sex (p = 0.002), low BMD (p = 0.004), affected area (p {approx} 0), presence of subchondral sparing (p {approx} 0), duration of symptoms prior to imaging (p {approx} 0), time from onset of symptoms to the final outcome (p

  20. Prehospitalization Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury during Hospitalization for Serious Infections in the REGARDS Cohort

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    Henry E. Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Acute kidney injury (AKI frequently occurs in hospitalized patients. In this study, we determined prehospitalization characteristics associated with AKI in community-dwelling adults hospitalized for a serious infection. Methods: We used prospective data from 30,239 participants of the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS study, a national cohort of community-dwelling adults ≥45 years old. We identified serious infection hospitalizations between 2003 and 2012. Using the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO criteria, we defined AKI as an increase in serum creatinine (sCr ≥0.3 mg/dl from the first inpatient sCr measurement during the first 7 hospitalization days. We excluded individuals with a history of renal transplant or preexisting end-stage renal disease as well as individuals with Results: Over a median follow-up of 4.5 years (interquartile range 2.4-6.3, we included 2,074 serious infection hospitalizations among 1,543 individuals. AKI occurred in 296 of 2,074 hospitalizations (16.5%. On multivariable analysis, prehospitalization characteristics independently associated with AKI among individuals hospitalized for a serious infection included a history of diabetes [odds ratio (OR 1.38; 95% CI 1.02-1.89], increased cystatin C (OR 1.73 per SD; 95% CI 1.20-2.50, and increased albumin-to-creatinine ratio (OR 1.19 per SD; 95% CI 1.007-1.40. Sex, race, hypertension, myocardial infarction, estimated glomerular filtration rate, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory, statin, or antihypertensive medications were not associated with AKI. Conclusions: Community-dwelling adults with a history of diabetes or increased cystatin C or albumin-to-creatinine ratio are at increased risk for AKI after hospitalization for a serious infection. These findings may be used to identify individuals at high risk for AKI.

  1. Bilateral spontaneous non-traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widdowson David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present an interesting case of spontaneous non-traumatic bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendons, which is a rare condition. Delayed or missed diagnosis of Achilles tendon ruptures by primary treating physicians is relatively common. Case report A 78-year-old Caucasian woman presented with spontaneous non-traumatic bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendons. Her symptoms started two days after she took ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily for a urinary tract infection and prednisolone 30 mg once daily for chronic obstructive airway disease. Conclusion This case report aims to increase the awareness of this rare condition, which should be borne in mind with regard to patients who are on steroid therapy and are concurrently started on fluoroquinolones.

  2. Predicting prehospital care students' first-year academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Veronica

    2006-01-01

    To answer two research questions: First, can previously identified factors relating to academic performance be used to predict first-year academic success for students undertaking a newly developed and vocationally oriented prehospital care course delivered in a rural setting? Second, can the study's findings be used to develop appropriate student selection criteria to assist in the admission of students into relevant tertiary studies or the prehospital care industry? A retrospective review of all first-year, on-campus prehospital care students enrolled in a vocational course at a rural Australian university from 1998 to 2001 was conducted. Six predictors of academic performance were examined, namely: University Admission Index (UAI), postsecondary educational qualifications, student entry type (traditional or mature-aged), previous health-related experience, gender, and background (rural or urban). Three dependent variables assessed academic performance: grade point average (GPA) of students who completed all required first-year subjects, GPA of students who completed at least one subject in the first year, and the student's ability to successfully complete the first year. UAI > 50, previous health-related experience, postsecondary educational qualifications, background, student entry type, and gender were all found to be significant predictors of first-year academic performance in selective cohorts. In addition, a combination of predictors produced higher GPAs than did any single predictor. Academic performance of first-year students in the prehospital care discipline can be predicted given the appropriate selection variables. Admission selection can be assisted with the generated Student Selection 001.

  3. Prehospital lung ultrasound for the diagnosis of cardiogenic pulmonary oedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Christian B; Hänselmann, Anja; Posth, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    : The sensitivity of PLUS is high, making it a potential tool for ruling-out cardiogenic pulmonary. The observed specificity was lower than what has been described in previous studies. CONCLUSIONS: Performed, as part of a physician based prehospital emergency service, PLUS seems fast and highly feasible in patients...

  4. Prehospital endotracheal intubation; need for routine cuff pressure measurement?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.H.; Hoogerwerf, N.

    2013-01-01

    In endotracheal intubation, a secured airway includes an insufflated cuff distal to the vocal cords. High cuff pressures may lead to major complications occurring after a short period of time. Cuff pressures are not routinely checked after intubation in the prehospital setting, dealing with a vulner

  5. Prehospital thrombolysis for acute st-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamfers, Evert Jan Pieter

    2003-01-01

    Early treatment of acute ST elevation myocardial infarction is associated with a good prognosis and a low incidence of complications. Prehospital administration of thrombolytic treatment is one of the ways of starting treatment early after onset of symptoms. Fifteen years of experience in prehospita

  6. Prehospital Volume Therapy as an Independent Risk Factor after Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Matthias; Lefering, Rolf; Touma, Alexander; Schoeneberg, Carsten; Keitel, Judith; Lendemans, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Background. Prehospital volume therapy remains widely used after trauma, while evidence regarding its disadvantages is growing. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the volume administered in a prehospital setting as an independent risk factor for mortality. Material and Methods. Patients who met the following criteria were analyzed retrospectively: Injury Severity Score = 16, primary admission (between 2002 and 2010), and age = 16 years. The following data had to be available: volume administered (including packed red cells), blood pressure, Glasgow Coma Scale, therapeutic measures, and laboratory results. Following a univariate analysis, independent risk factors for mortality after trauma were investigated using a multivariate regression analysis. Results. A collective of 7,641 patients met the inclusion criteria, showing that increasing volumes administered in a prehospital setting were an independent risk factor for mortality (odds ratio: 1.34). This tendency was even more pronounced in patients without severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) (odds ratio: 2.71), while the opposite tendency was observed in patients with TBI. Conclusions. Prehospital volume therapy in patients without severe TBI represents an independent risk factor for mortality. In such cases, respiratory and circulatory conditions should be stabilized during permissive hypotension, and patient transfer should not be delayed. PMID:25949995

  7. Prehospital Volume Therapy as an Independent Risk Factor after Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern Hussmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prehospital volume therapy remains widely used after trauma, while evidence regarding its disadvantages is growing. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the volume administered in a prehospital setting as an independent risk factor for mortality. Material and Methods. Patients who met the following criteria were analyzed retrospectively: Injury Severity Score = 16, primary admission (between 2002 and 2010, and age = 16 years. The following data had to be available: volume administered (including packed red cells, blood pressure, Glasgow Coma Scale, therapeutic measures, and laboratory results. Following a univariate analysis, independent risk factors for mortality after trauma were investigated using a multivariate regression analysis. Results. A collective of 7,641 patients met the inclusion criteria, showing that increasing volumes administered in a prehospital setting were an independent risk factor for mortality (odds ratio: 1.34. This tendency was even more pronounced in patients without severe traumatic brain injury (TBI (odds ratio: 2.71, while the opposite tendency was observed in patients with TBI. Conclusions. Prehospital volume therapy in patients without severe TBI represents an independent risk factor for mortality. In such cases, respiratory and circulatory conditions should be stabilized during permissive hypotension, and patient transfer should not be delayed.

  8. Road Traffic Injury in Lagos, Nigeria: Assessing Prehospital Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nasiru A; Ajani, Abdul Wahab O; Mustafa, Ibrahim A; Balogun, Rufai A; Oludara, Mobolaji A; Idowu, Olufemi E; Solagberu, Babatunde A

    2017-08-01

    Introduction Injuries are the third most important cause of overall deaths globally with one-quarter resulting from road traffic crashes. Majority of these deaths occur before arrival in the hospital and can be reduced with prompt and efficient prehospital care. The aim of this study was to highlight the burden of road traffic injury (RTI) in Lagos, Nigeria and assess the effectiveness of prehospital care, especially the role of Lagos State Ambulance Service (LASAMBUS) in providing initial care and transportation of the injured to the hospital. A three-year, retrospective review of road traffic injured patients seen at the Surgical Emergency Room (SER) of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Ikeja, Nigeria, from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2014 was conducted. Parameters extracted from the Institution Trauma Registry included bio-data, date and time of injury, date and time of arrival in SER, host status, type of vehicle involved, and region(s) injured. Information on how patients came to the hospital and outcome in SER also were recorded. Results were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS; IBM Corporation; Armonk, New York USA) version 16. A total of 23,537 patients were seen during the study period. Among them, 16,024 (68.1%) had trauma. Road traffic crashes were responsible in 5,629 (35.0%) of trauma cases. Passengers constituted 42.0% of the injured, followed by pedestrians (34.0%). Four wheelers were the most frequent vehicle type involved (54.0%), followed by motor cycles (30.0%). Regions mainly affected were head and neck (40.0%) and lower limb (29.0%). Less than one-quarter (24.0%) presented to the emergency room within an hour, while one-third arrived between one and six hours following injury. Relatives brought 55.4%, followed by bystanders (21.4%). Only 2.3% had formal prehospital care and were brought to the hospital by LASAMBUS. They also had significantly shorter arrival time. One hundred and nine patients

  9. Evaluating condom catheter balloon tamponade in non-traumatic postpartum haemorrhage resistant to medical management

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    Syed Nawaz Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Placement of a condom catheter balloon can successfully treat non-traumatic PPH refractory to medical management. It is simple, inexpensive, easily, available and in those with successful placement no procedure related morbidity was observed. The potential for it to be used by inexperienced operators in areas with limited resources makes it a useful tool in management of PPH. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(6.000: 1874-1878

  10. Evaluating condom catheter balloon tamponade in non-traumatic postpartum haemorrhage resistant to medical management

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Nawaz Ahmad; Sunita Seth; Shefali Agarwal; Swati Choudhary

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obstetric haemorrhage remains the most important cause of maternal mortality worldwide accounting for 25% of maternal deaths annually. The aim of the study was to evaluate efficacy of a condom catheter assembly for uterine tamponade in the management of non-traumatic postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). Methods: It was a prospective interventional study done in a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. Thirty three women with intractable PPH unresponsive to medical management were...

  11. Management in non-traumatic arm, neck and shoulder complaints: differences between diagnostic groups

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    textabstractArm, neck and/or shoulder complaints are common in western societies. In the Netherlands, general practice guidelines are issued on shoulder pain and epicondylitis only. Little is known about actual management of the total range of diagnoses. The objectives of the study are: to determine management in patients consulting the GP with a new episode of non-traumatic arm neck and shoulder complaints up to 6 months after the first consultation. To evaluate differences in management bet...

  12. Outcome of tube thoracostomy in paediatric non-traumatic pleural fluid collections

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    Eyo E Ekpe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Management of pleural fluid collection not due to trauma increases workload of the paediatric thoracic surgeons, while delay or inappropriate treatment worsens the prognosis of the disease. This study aimed at assessing the outcome of therapeutic tube thoracostomy in non-traumatic paediatric pleural fluid collections and identifying factors responsible for treatment failure with tube thoracostomy. Design: Prospective analysis of socio-demographic characteristics, clinical features, clinical diagnosis, radiological diagnosis, and bacteriological diagnosis including bacteria cultured with sensitivity pattern, also treatment offered including tube thoracostomy with duration of tube thoracostomy and length of hospitalisation, indication for additional surgical procedure with type, and outcome of treatment of 30 paediatric patients with non-traumatic pleural fluid collection. Results: Thirty paediatric patients with various causes of non-traumatic pleural fluid collection in 34 pleural spaces were analysed. Their ages ranged between six months and 16 years (mean = 6.5 years and M:F ratio of 2:1. Pleural effusion and empyema thoracis accounted for 46% and 40% with staphylococcus aureus and streptococcus pneumoniae cultured in 10% each and a high negative culture rate of 46%, which was higher with age. The parents of 40% of the patients belonged to social class 3. Success rate of tube thoracostomy was 86% in unilateral cases, 50% in bilateral cases and 81% in all cases. Alternative treatment with thoracotomy and decortications gave a success rate of 100%. Conclusion: Thoracotomy with decortication is superior to tube thoracostomy in paediatric non-traumatic pleural fluid collection and should be chosen as the primary treatment option when there is bilateral disease, chronicity, loculated effusion, thickened pleural membranes or trapped lung.

  13. Outcome of tube thoracostomy in paediatric non-traumatic pleural fluid collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpe, Eyo E; Akpan, M U

    2013-01-01

    Management of pleural fluid collection not due to trauma increases workload of the paediatric thoracic surgeons, while delay or inappropriate treatment worsens the prognosis of the disease. This study aimed at assessing the outcome of therapeutic tube thoracostomy in non-traumatic paediatric pleural fluid collections and identifying factors responsible for treatment failure with tube thoracostomy. Prospective analysis of socio-demographic characteristics, clinical features, clinical diagnosis, radiological diagnosis, and bacteriological diagnosis including bacteria cultured with sensitivity pattern, also treatment offered including tube thoracostomy with duration of tube thoracostomy and length of hospitalisation, indication for additional surgical procedure with type, and outcome of treatment of 30 paediatric patients with non-traumatic pleural fluid collection. Thirty paediatric patients with various causes of non-traumatic pleural fluid collection in 34 pleural spaces were analysed. Their ages ranged between six months and 16 years (mean = 6.5 years) and M:F ratio of 2:1. Pleural effusion and empyema thoracis accounted for 46% and 40% with staphylococcus aureus and streptococcus pneumoniae cultured in 10% each and a high negative culture rate of 46%, which was higher with age. The parents of 40% of the patients belonged to social class 3. Success rate of tube thoracostomy was 86% in unilateral cases, 50% in bilateral cases and 81% in all cases. Alternative treatment with thoracotomy and decortications gave a success rate of 100%. Thoracotomy with decortication is superior to tube thoracostomy in paediatric non-traumatic pleural fluid collection and should be chosen as the primary treatment option when there is bilateral disease, chronicity, loculated effusion, thickened pleural membranes or trapped lung.

  14. Acute Nontraumatic Clavicle Fracture Associated with Long-Term Bisphosphonate Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Shen Hwa Vun; Yahya Husami; Sajan Shareef; Diane Bramley

    2014-01-01

    Cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw, insufficiency fractures and atypical low energy or atraumatic fractures of pelvis, femur (subtrochanteric/mid-shaft/distal-third), tibia, fibula, metatarsal, humerus, and ulna related to long-term bisphosphonate therapy have been reported in the literature. We present the case of an acute nontraumatic clavicle fracture, associated with long-term bisphosphonate therapy, which to our knowledge has not been reported previously. This case highlights the need of ...

  15. Spontaneous nontraumatic epidermoid cyst of the clitoris: a rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts are slow growing, intradermal or subcutaneous tumors with a wall composed of true epidermis. They are rarely seen in the clitoral region but when found; they are commonly seen following female genital mutilation. Spontaneous onset clitoral epidermoid cysts have been scarcely reported .We report a rare case of a large spontaneous nontraumatic epidermoid cyst of clitoris in a 22 year old nulliparous female. This presentation mimicked clitoromegaly but was diagnosed to be a larg...

  16. Importance of sagittal MR imaging in nontraumatic femoral head osteonecrosis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Alice S. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wells, Lawrence [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Jaramillo, Diego [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2008-11-15

    In nontraumatic femoral head osteonecrosis, characterization of femoral head collapse is important in staging disease progression and planning treatment. Few prior studies have quantitatively compared the ability of sagittal and coronal MR images to detect femoral head collapse. We hypothesized that sagittal MR images show a greater degree and angular span of femoral head collapse than coronal images. We reviewed 38 hip MRI scans of nontraumatic femoral head osteonecrosis from 34 pediatric patients. In both sagittal and coronal images, the maximal extent and angular location along with the angular span of the femoral head collapse were measured. Differences were evaluated using a paired t-test. The extent of bone and cartilage loss from the femoral head was evaluated. Sagittal MR images showed 29% maximal femoral head radius collapse, whereas coronal images showed 16% collapse (P<0.001). Sagittal images showed a larger angular span of collapse (115 ) than coronal images (55 , P<0.001). Sagittal images showed greater epiphyseal bone loss in the anterior than in the posterior portion (P<0.001), whereas coronal images did not show a significant difference in bone loss between the medial and lateral portion (P=0.32). Sagittal images show greater femoral head collapse than coronal images in nontraumatic femoral head osteonecrosis. (orig.)

  17. Significance of magnetic resonance imaging in differential diagnosis of nontraumatic brachial plexopathy

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    Perić Stojan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Nontraumatic brachial plexopathies may be caused by primary or secondary tumors, radiation or inflammation. The aim of this study was to present the significance of MRI in revealing the cause of nontraumatic brachial plexopathy. Methods. A two-year retrospective study included 22 patients with nontraumatic brachial plexopathy. In all the patients typical clinical findings were confirmed by upper limb neurophysiological studies. In all of them MRI of brachial plexus was performed by 1.5 T scanner in T1 and T1 FS sequence with and without contrast, as well as in T2 and T2 FS sequences. Results. Seven (32% patients had brachial plexopathy with signs of inflammatory process, 5 (23% patients had secondary tumors, in 4 (18% patients multifocal motor neuropathy was established and in the same number (18% of the patients postradiation fibrosis was found. Two patients (9% had primary neurogenic tumors. Conclusion. According to the results of this study MRI is a method which may determine localization and cause of brachial plexopathy. MRI can detect focal nerve lesions when other methods fail to find them. Thus, MRI has a direct impact on further diagnostic and therapeutical procedures.

  18. Pre-hospital midazolam for benzodiazepine-treated seizures before and after the Rapid Anticonvulsant Medication Prior to Arrival Trial: A national observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtull-Leber, Eytan; Silbergleit, Robert; Meurer, William J

    2017-01-01

    Implementation of evidence-based treatment for pre-hospital status epilepticus can improve outcomes. We hypothesized that publication of a pivotal pre-hospital clinical trial (RAMPART), demonstrating superiority of intramuscular midazolam over intravenous lorazepam, altered the national utilization rates of midazolam for pre-hospital benzodiazepine-treated seizures, while upholding its safety and efficacy outside the trial setting. This is a retrospective, observational cohort study of pre-hospital patient encounters throughout the United States in the National Emergency Medicine Services Information System database, from January 2010 through December 2014. We compared the rates and odds of midazolam use as first-line treatment among all adult and pediatric benzodiazepine-treated seizures before and after RAMPART publication (February 2012). Secondary analyses were conducted for rates of airway interventions and rescue therapy, as proxies for safety and efficacy of seizure termination. 156,539 benzodiazepine-treated seizures were identified. Midazolam use increased from 26.1% in January 2010 to 61.7% in December 2014 (difference +35.6%, 95% CI, 32.7%-38.4%). The annual rate of midazolam adoption increased significantly from 5.9% per year to 8.9% per year after the publication of RAMPART (difference +3.0% per year; 95%CI, 1.6%-4.5% per year; adjusted OR 1.24; 95%CI, 1.17-1.32). Overall frequency of rescue therapy and airway interventions changed little after the publication of RAMPART. These data are consistent with effective, ongoing, but incomplete clinical translation of the RAMPART results. The effects of the trial, however, cannot be isolated. The study was limited by broad inclusion of all benzodiazepine-treated seizures as well as a lack of information on route of drug of administration. The safety and effectiveness of midazolam for benzodiazepine-treated seizures in prehospital clinical practice appear consistent with trial data, which should encourage

  19. Pre-hospital midazolam for benzodiazepine-treated seizures before and after the Rapid Anticonvulsant Medication Prior to Arrival Trial: A national observational cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbergleit, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Background Implementation of evidence-based treatment for pre-hospital status epilepticus can improve outcomes. We hypothesized that publication of a pivotal pre-hospital clinical trial (RAMPART), demonstrating superiority of intramuscular midazolam over intravenous lorazepam, altered the national utilization rates of midazolam for pre-hospital benzodiazepine-treated seizures, while upholding its safety and efficacy outside the trial setting. Methods and findings This is a retrospective, observational cohort study of pre-hospital patient encounters throughout the United States in the National Emergency Medicine Services Information System database, from January 2010 through December 2014. We compared the rates and odds of midazolam use as first-line treatment among all adult and pediatric benzodiazepine-treated seizures before and after RAMPART publication (February 2012). Secondary analyses were conducted for rates of airway interventions and rescue therapy, as proxies for safety and efficacy of seizure termination. 156,539 benzodiazepine-treated seizures were identified. Midazolam use increased from 26.1% in January 2010 to 61.7% in December 2014 (difference +35.6%, 95% CI, 32.7%-38.4%). The annual rate of midazolam adoption increased significantly from 5.9% per year to 8.9% per year after the publication of RAMPART (difference +3.0% per year; 95%CI, 1.6%-4.5% per year; adjusted OR 1.24; 95%CI, 1.17–1.32). Overall frequency of rescue therapy and airway interventions changed little after the publication of RAMPART. Conclusions These data are consistent with effective, ongoing, but incomplete clinical translation of the RAMPART results. The effects of the trial, however, cannot be isolated. The study was limited by broad inclusion of all benzodiazepine-treated seizures as well as a lack of information on route of drug of administration. The safety and effectiveness of midazolam for benzodiazepine-treated seizures in prehospital clinical practice appear consistent

  20. Strategies Used by Prehospital Providers to Overcome Language Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Ramsey C; Hodkinson, Peter W; Meehan-Coussee, Kelly; Cooperstein, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Language barriers are commonly encountered in the prehospital setting but there is a paucity of research on how prehospital providers address language discordance. We sought to identify the communication strategies, and the limitations of those strategies, used by emergency medical services (EMS) providers when confronted with language barriers in a variety of linguistic and cultural contexts. EMS providers were queried regarding communication strategies to overcome language barriers as part of an international, multi-site, sequential explanatory, qualitative-predominant, mixed methods study of prehospital language barriers. A survey of EMS telecommunicators was administered at dispatch centers in New Mexico (United States) and Western Cape (South Africa). Semi-structured qualitative interviews of EMS field providers were conducted at agencies who respond to calls from participating dispatch centers. Survey data included quantitative data on demographics and communication strategies used to overcome language barriers as well as qualitative free-text responses on the limitations of strategies. Interviews elicited narratives of encounters with language-discordant patients and the strategies used to communicate. Data from the surveys and interviews were integrated at the point of analysis. 125 telecommunicators (overall response rate of 84.5%) and a purposive sample of 27 field providers participated in the study. The characteristics of participants varied between countries and between agencies, consistent with variations in participating agencies' hiring and training practices. Telecommunicators identified 3rd-party telephonic interpreter services as the single most effective strategy when available, but also described time delays and frustration with interpreter communications that leads them to preferentially try other strategies. In the field, all providers reported using similar strategies, relying heavily on bystanders, multilingual coworkers, and non

  1. Prehospital care for multiple trauma patients in Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marc Maegele

    2015-01-01

    For the German speaking countries,Tscherne's definition of "polytrauma" which represents an injury of at least two body regions with one or a combination being life-threatening is still valid.The timely and adequate management including quick referral of the trauma patient into a designated trauma center may limit secondary injury and may thus improve outcomes already during the prehospital phase of care.The professional treatment of multiple injured trauma patients begins at the scene in the context of a well structured prehospital emergency medical system.The "Primary Survey" is performed by the emergency physician at the scene according to the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS)-concept.The overall aim is to rapidly assess and treat life-threatening conditions even in the absence of patient history and diagnosis ("treat-first-what-kills-first").If no immediate treatment is necessary,a "Secondary Survey" follows with careful and structured body examination and detailed assessment of the trauma mechanism.Massive and life-threatening states of hemorrhage should be addressed immediately even disregarding the ABCDE-scheme.Critical trauma patients should be referred without any delay ("work and go") to TR-DGU(R) certified trauma centers of the local trauma networks.Due to the difficult prehospital environment the number of quality studies in the field is low and,as consequence,the level of evidence for most recommendations is also low.Much information has been obtained from different care systems and the interchangeability of results is limited.The present article provides a synopsis of recommendations for early prehospital care for the severely injured based upon the 2011 updated multidisciplinary S3-Guideline "Polytrauma/Schwerstverletzten Behandlung",the most recently updated European Trauma guideline and the current PHTLS-algorithms including grades of recommendation whenever possible.

  2. Intracranial Non-traumatic Aneurysms in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorteberg, Angelika; Dahlberg, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    An intracranial aneurysm in a child or adolescent is a rare, but potentially devastating condition. As little as approximately 1200 cases are reported between 1939 and 2011, with many of the reports presenting diverting results. There is consensus, though, in that pediatric aneurysms represent a pathophysiological entity different from their adult counterparts. In children, there is a male predominance. About two-thirds of pediatric intracranial aneurysms become symptomatic with hemorrhage and the rate of re-hemorrhage is higher than in adults. The rate of hemorrhage from an intracranial aneurysm peaks in girls around menarche. The most common aneurysm site in children is the internal carotid artery, in particular at its terminal ending. Aneurysms in the posterior circulation are more common in children than adults. Children more often develop giant aneurysms, and may become symptomatic from the mass effect of the aneurysm (tumorlike symptoms). The more complex nature of pediatric aneurysms poses a larger challenge to treatment alongside with higher demands to the durability of treatment. Outcome and mortality are similar in children and adults, but long-term outcome in the pediatric population is influenced by the high rate of aneurysm recurrences and de novo formation of intracranial aneurysms. This urges the need for life-long follow-up and screening protocols. PMID:24696670

  3. Characteristics of Patients with an Abnormal Glasgow Coma Scale in the Prehospital Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durant, Edward

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This cross-sectional study describes the characteristics of patients with an abnormal Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS in the prehospital setting.Methods: We reviewed existing prehospital care reports (PCRs in the San Mateo County, California, emergency medical services (EMS database from January 1 to December 31, 2007. Adults age 18 or greater with a documented GCS fit inclusion criteria. We excluded single and multisystem trauma patients, as well as patients in cardiac arrest, respiratory arrest, or listed as deceased from the study. We classified the remaining patients as a normal GCS of 15 or abnormal (defined as less than 15 at any time during paramedic contact, and then further sub-classified into mild (GCS 13-14, moderate (GCS 9-12 or severe (GCS 3-8.Results: Of the 12,235 unique prehospital care record in the database, 9,044 (73.9% met inclusion criteria, comprised of 2,404 (26.6% abnormal GCS patients and 6,640 (73.4% normal GCS patients. In the abnormal GCS category, we classified 1,361 (56.6% patients as mild, 628 (26.1% as moderate, and 415 (17.3% as severe. Where sex was recorded, we identified 1,214 (50.5% abnormal GCS patients and 2,904 (43.7% normal GCS patients as male. Mean age was 65.6 years in the abnormal GCS group and 61.4 in the normal GCS group (p<0.0001. Abnormal GCS patients were more likely to have a history of conditions known to be associated, such as alcohol abuse (odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]=2.75-3.00, diabetes (OR 1.34, 95% CI=1.17-1.54, substance abuse (OR 1.6, CI=1.09-2.3, stroke/transient ischemic attack (OR 2.0, CI=1.64-2.5, and seizures (OR 3.0, CI=1.64-2.5. Paramedics established intravenous (IV access on 1,821 (75.7%, OR 1.94, CI=1.74-2.2 abnormal GCS patients and administered medications to 777 (32.3%, OR 1.01, CI=0.92-1.12. Compared to patients with normal GCS, patients with a mildly abnormal GCS were less likely to receive medications (OR 0.61, CI=0.53-0.70 while those with a

  4. Intracranial Non-traumatic Aneurysms in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Sorteberg, Angelika; Dahlberg, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    An intracranial aneurysm in a child or adolescent is a rare, but potentially devastating condition. As little as approximately 1200 cases are reported between 1939 and 2011, with many of the reports presenting diverting results. There is consensus, though, in that pediatric aneurysms represent a pathophysiological entity different from their adult counterparts. In children, there is a male predominance. About two-thirds of pediatric intracranial aneurysms become symptomatic with hemorrhage an...

  5. A Comparison of Alerting Strategies for Hemorrhage Identification During Prehospital Emergency Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    cumulative sum method. In this report, we applied these strategies to continuously monitored prehospital vital-sign data from trauma patients during...optimized for one use case (e.g., long prehospital transport times) may not necessarily yield performance data that are optimized for another...clinical application (e.g., short prehospital transport times, intensive care units, etc.). I. INTRODUCTION Real-time alerting of life-threatening

  6. Study of Tranexamic Acid during Air Medical Prehospital Transport (STAAMP) Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    during Air Medical Prehospital transport (STAAMP) trial PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jason L. Sperry, MD, MPH CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Tranexamic acid during Air Medical Prehospital transport (STAAMP) trial 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-2-0080 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...and explained the purpose of this study to Pittsburgh local and surrounding area. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prehospital ; Tranexamic acid 16

  7. Pre-hospital treatment of acute poisonings in Oslo

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    Nore Anne K

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poisoned patients are often treated in and discharged from pre-hospital health care settings. Studies of poisonings should therefore not only include hospitalized patients. Aims: To describe the acutely poisoned patients treated by ambulance personnel and in an outpatient clinic; compare patients transferred to a higher treatment level with those discharged without transfer; and study the one-week mortality after pre-hospital discharge. Methods A one-year multi-centre study with prospective inclusion of all acutely poisoned patients ≥ 16 years of age treated in ambulances, an outpatient clinic, and hospitals in Oslo. Results A total of 3757 health service contacts from 2997 poisoning episodes were recorded: 1860 were treated in ambulances, of which 15 died and 750 (40% were discharged without transfer; 956 were treated in outpatient clinic, of which 801 (84% were discharged without transfer; and 941 episodes were treated in hospitals. Patients discharged alive after ambulance treatment were mainly poisoned by opiates (70%, were frequently comatose (35%, had respiratory depression (37%, and many received naloxone (49%. The majority of the patients discharged from the outpatient clinic were poisoned by ethanol (55%, fewer were comatose (10%, and they rarely had respiratory depression (4%. Among the hospitalized, pharmaceutical poisonings were most common (58%, 23% were comatose, and 7% had respiratory depression. Male patients comprised 69% of the pre-hospital discharges, but only 46% of the hospitalized patients. Except for one patient, who died of a new heroin overdose two days following discharge from an ambulance, there were no deaths during the first week after the poisonings in the 90% of the pre-hospital discharged patients with known identity. Conclusion More than half of the poisoned patients treated in pre-hospital treatment settings were discharged without transfer to higher levels. These poisonings were more often

  8. Revisiting the value of pre-hospital tracheal intubation: an all time systematic literature review extracting the Utstein airway core variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossius, Hans Morten; Sollid, Stephen J M; Rehn, Marius; Lockey, David J

    2011-01-01

    Although tracheal intubation (TI) in the pre-hospital setting is regularly carried out by emergency medical service (EMS) providers throughout the world, its value is widely debated. Heterogeneity in procedures, providers, patients, systems and stated outcomes, and inconsistency in data reporting make scientific reports difficult to interpret and compare, and the majority are of limited quality. To hunt down what is really known about the value of pre-hospital TI, we determined the rate of reported Utstein airway variables (28 core variables and 12 fixed-system variables) found in current scientific publications on pre-hospital TI. We performed an all time systematic search according to the PRISMA guidelines of Medline and EMBASE to identify original research pertaining to pre-hospital TI in adult patients. From 1,076 identified records, 73 original papers were selected. Information was extracted according to an Utstein template for data reporting from in-the-field advanced airway management. Fifty-nine studies were from North American EMS systems. Of these, 46 (78%) described services in which non-physicians conducted TI. In 12 of the 13 non-North American EMS systems, physicians performed the pre-hospital TI. Overall, two were randomised controlled trials (RCTs), and 65 were observational studies. None of the studies presented the complete set of recommended Utstein airway variables. The median number of core variables reported was 10 (max 21, min 2, IQR 8-12), and the median number of fixed system variables was 5 (max 11, min 0, IQR 4-8). Among the most frequently reported variables were "patient category" and "service mission type", reported in 86% and 71% of the studies, respectively. Among the least-reported variables were "co-morbidity" and "type of available ventilator", both reported in 2% and 1% of the studies, respectively. Core data required for proper interpretation of results were frequently not recorded and reported in studies investigating TI in

  9. Pre-hospital advanced airway management by experienced anaesthesiologists: a prospective descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognås, Leif; Hansen, Troels Martin; Kirkegaard, Hans; Tønnesen, Else

    2013-07-25

    We report data from the first Utstein-style study of physician-provided pre-hospital advanced airway management. Anaesthesiologists from eight pre-hospital critical care teams in the Central Denmark Region (a mixed rural and urban region with 1.27 million inhabitants) prospectively registered data according to the template for reporting data from pre-hospital advanced airway management. Data collection took place from February 1st 2011 to October 31st 2012. Included were patients of all ages on whom pre-hospital advanced airway management was performed. The objective was to estimate the incidences of failed and difficult pre-hospital endotracheal intubation, and complications related to pre-hospital advanced airway management. The overall incidence of successful pre-hospital endotracheal intubation among 636 intubation attempts was 99.7%, even though 22.4% of pre-hospital endotracheal intubations required more than one intubation attempt. The overall incidence of complications related to pre-hospital advanced airway management was 7.9%. Following rapid sequence intubation, the incidence of first pass success was 85.8%, the overall incidence of complications was 22.0%, the incidence of hypotension 7.3% and that of hypoxia 5.3%. Multiple endotracheal intubation attempts were associated with an increased overall incidence of complications. No airway management related deaths occurred. The overall incidence of successful pre-hospital endotracheal intubations compares to those found in other physician-staffed pre-hospital systems. The incidence of pre-hospital endotracheal intubations requiring more than one attempt is higher than suspected. The incidence of hypotension or hypoxia after pre-hospital rapid sequence intubation compares to those found in UK emergency departments. Pre-hospital advanced airway management including pre-hospital endotracheal intubation performed by experienced anaesthesiologists is associated with high success rates and relatively low

  10. ANALYSIS OF PRE-HOSPITAL TREATMENT OF ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Reshetko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the pre-hospital treatment of patients with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina in 2001 and 2006.Material and methods. Retrospective pre-hospital treatment survey was performed in 1114 patients with acute coronary syndrome (acute myocardial infarction (AMI or unstable angina (UA in 2001 and 2006.Results. For acute myocardial infarction use of aspirin, β-blockers, heparin was 0%, 0%, 81,5% in 2001 and 23,9%, 8%, 13,4% in 2006, respectively. Use of aspirin, β-blockers, heparin in unstable angina were 0%, 16,2%, 12,3% in 2001 and 3,4%, 1,6%, 0,5% in 2006, respectively. Fibrinolytic therapy was not provided. Polypragmasia reduced in 2006 in comparison with 2001.Conclusions. This survey demonstrates the discordance between existing current practice and guidelines for acute coronary syndrome.

  11. ANALYSIS OF PRE-HOSPITAL TREATMENT OF ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Reshetko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the pre-hospital treatment of patients with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina in 2001 and 2006.Material and methods. Retrospective pre-hospital treatment survey was performed in 1114 patients with acute coronary syndrome (acute myocardial infarction (AMI or unstable angina (UA in 2001 and 2006.Results. For acute myocardial infarction use of aspirin, β-blockers, heparin was 0%, 0%, 81,5% in 2001 and 23,9%, 8%, 13,4% in 2006, respectively. Use of aspirin, β-blockers, heparin in unstable angina were 0%, 16,2%, 12,3% in 2001 and 3,4%, 1,6%, 0,5% in 2006, respectively. Fibrinolytic therapy was not provided. Polypragmasia reduced in 2006 in comparison with 2001.Conclusions. This survey demonstrates the discordance between existing current practice and guidelines for acute coronary syndrome.

  12. A dramatic drop in blood pressure following prehospital GTN administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Malcolm J

    2007-03-01

    A male in his sixties with no history of cardiac chest pain awoke with chest pain following an afternoon sleep. The patient did not self medicate. The patient's observations were within normal limits, he was administered oxygen via a face mask and glyceryl trinitrate (GTN). Several minutes after the GTN the patient experienced a sudden drop in blood pressure and heart rate, this was rectified by atropine sulphate and a fluid challenge. There was no further deterioration in the patient's condition during transport to hospital. There are very few documented case like this in the prehospital scientific literature. The cause appears to be the Bezold-Jarish reflex, stimulation of the ventricular walls which in turn decreases sympathetic outflow from the vasomotor centre. Prehospital care providers who are managing any patient with a syncopal episode that fails to recover within a reasonable time frame should consider the Bezold-Jarisch reflex as the cause and manage the patient accordingly.

  13. [Prehospital teamwork life support service for traffic accident victims].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Waleska Antunes da Porciúncula; Lima, Maria Alice Dias da Silva

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize prehospital teamwork service for traffic accident victims, identifying the actors' activities, the teamwork and the relations with actors from other areas. This is a qualitative study, in which data collection took place by observing the events that occurred at a public service in the city of Porto Alegre, in addition to interviews with each professional involved in the service. The results showed that prehospital care is founded on teamwork and that the understanding among professionals should go beyond the historical hierarchic relation existing in health organizations. There is a need to value the broad field of knowledge, which is associated with the core of care activities that meet most trauma victim needs.

  14. Advanced communication infrastructure for pre-hospital EMS care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orthner, Helmuth; Mazza, Giovanni; Mazza, Giovanni Giorgio; Shenvi, Rohit; Battles, Marcie

    2008-11-06

    The traditional communication infrastructure of the pre-hospital Emergency Medical System (EMS) is limited to voice communication using radio or cell phone technologies. With the emergence of 3rd Generation wireless networks (3G) and enhanced mobile devices capable of data communication (e.g., mobile tablets, PDAs with cell phones, or cell phones with PDA capabilities), the voice communication can be enhanced with interactive data messaging and perhaps even with interactive video communication. However, video requires substantially more bandwidth which 4th Generation (4G) systems are promising. However, their availability is limited. We present an infrastructure that allows dynamic selection of the best data transport mode in the pre-hospital EMS environment.

  15. Prehospital use of furosemide for the treatment of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Andy; Stiell, Ian G; Dionne, Richard; Maloney, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of acute decompensated heart failure (HF) in the prehospital setting can be challenging. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the appropriateness of furosemide use by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and its association with adverse outcomes. This study was a multi-centre health records review of EMS patients who received prehospital furosemide or had an emergency department (ED) diagnosis of HF. We included acutely ill patients ≥50 years of age with shortness of breath transported by land EMS. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were performed to determine associations between furosemide use and serious adverse outcomes (acute renal failure, intubation, vasopressors or death). The study population consisted of 330 patients (N=58, furosemide given by EMS but no HF diagnosed in ED; N=110, furosemide given, HF diagnosed; N=162, no furosemide given, HF diagnosed). The median dose of intravenous furosemide was 80 mg (range 20-80 mg). Serious adverse outcomes occurred in 61 patients (19.0%, 23.6% and 14.8% of the three groups, respectively; p=0.18). The adjusted ORs for adverse events with furosemide use was 0.62 (95% CI 0.33 to 1.43) in patients with a diagnosis of HF and 1.14 (95% CI 0.58 to 2.23) in those without. More than a third of patients who received prehospital furosemide did not have an HF diagnosis, suggesting that the prehospital diagnosis of HF can be challenging. Serious adverse outcomes were identified in all patient groups and we found no statistically significant associations between furosemide use and adverse events. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Prehospital care for multiple trauma patients in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maegele, Marc

    2015-01-01

    For the German speaking countries, Tscherne's definition of "polytrauma" which represents an injury of at least two body regions with one or a combination being life-threatening is still valid. The timely and adequate management including quick referral of the trauma patient into a designated trauma center may limit secondary injury and may thus improve outcomes already during the prehospital phase of care. The professional treatment of multiple injured trauma patients begins at the scene in the context of a well structured prehospital emergency medical system. The "Primary Survey" is performed by the emergency physician at the scene according to the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS)-concept. The overall aim is to rapidly assess and treat life-threatening conditions even in the absence of patient history and diagnosis ("treat-first-what-kills-first"). If no immediate treatment is necessary, a "Secondary Sur- vey" follows with careful and structured body examination and detailed assessment of the trauma mechanism. Massive and life-threatening states of hemorrhage should be addressed immediately even disregarding the ABCDE-scheme. Critical trauma patients should be referred without any delay ("work and go")toTR-DGU® certified trauma centers of the local trauma networks. Due to the difficult pre- hospital environment the number of quality studies in the field is low and, as consequence, the level of evidence for most recommendations is also low. Much information has been obtained from different care systems and the interchangeability of results is limited. The present article provides a synopsis of rec- ommendations for early prehospital care for the severely injured based upon the 2011 updated multi- disciplinary S3-Guideline "Polytrauma/Schwerstverletzten Behandlung", the most recently updated European Trauma guideline and the current PHTLS-algorithms including grades of recommendation whenever possible.

  17. Comparison of Three Prehospital Cervical Spine Protocols to Missed Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Rick; Meenan, Molly; Prince, Erin; Murphy, Ronald; Tambussi, Caitlin; Rohrbach, Rick; Baumann, Brigitte M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We wanted to compare 3 existing emergency medical services (EMS) immobilization protocols: the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS, mechanism-based); the Domeier protocol (parallels the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study [NEXUS] criteria); and the Hankins’ criteria (immobilization for patients 65 years, those with altered consciousness, focal neurologic deficit, distracting injury, or midline or paraspinal tenderness).To determine the proportion of patients wh...

  18. Comparison of Three Prehospital Cervical Spine Protocols for Missed Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Rick Hong; Molly Meenan; Erin Prince; Ronald Murphy; Caitlin Tambussi; Rick Rohrbach; Baumann, Brigitte M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We wanted to compare 3 existing emergency medical services (EMS) immobilization protocols: the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS, mechanism-based); the Domeier protocol (parallels the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study [NEXUS] criteria); and the Hankins’ criteria (immobilization for patients 65 years, those with altered consciousness, focal neurologic deficit, distracting injury, or midline or paraspinal tenderness).To determine the proportion of patients wh...

  19. Comparison of Three Prehospital Cervical Spine Protocols to Missed Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Rick; Meenan, Molly; Prince, Erin; Murphy, Ronald; Tambussi, Caitlin; Rohrbach, Rick; Baumann, Brigitte M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We wanted to compare 3 existing emergency medical services (EMS) immobilization protocols: the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS, mechanism-based); the Domeier protocol (parallels the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study [NEXUS] criteria); and the Hankins’ criteria (immobilization for patients 65 years, those with altered consciousness, focal neurologic deficit, distracting injury, or midline or paraspinal tenderness).To determine the proportion of patients wh...

  20. Comparison of Three Prehospital Cervical Spine Protocols for Missed Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Rick Hong; Molly Meenan; Erin Prince; Ronald Murphy; Caitlin Tambussi; Rick Rohrbach; Baumann, Brigitte M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We wanted to compare 3 existing emergency medical services (EMS) immobilization protocols: the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS, mechanism-based); the Domeier protocol (parallels the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study [NEXUS] criteria); and the Hankins’ criteria (immobilization for patients 65 years, those with altered consciousness, focal neurologic deficit, distracting injury, or midline or paraspinal tenderness).To determine the proportion of patients wh...

  1. Job Burnout Status among Pre-Hospital Emergency Technicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohre Moradi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since pre-hospital emergency staff, who play a vital role in saving peoples’ lives, work under a lot of pressure, determining the rate and dangers of their job burnout is very important. Therefore, this study was carried out to determine the job burnout rate of the pre-hospital emergency staff in Isfahan, Iran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, all of the pre-hospital emergency staff in all emergency operation centers in Isfahan were included. Using the standard Maslach burnout inventory questionnaire, the job burnout rate of emergency technicians was measured. The studied aspects were frequency and intensity of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment feeling, which were then divided into 3 levels (low, average and high according to the intensity and frequency of these feelings. Results: In the end, 68 technicians were involved in this study (Mean age 26.97±7.7; 42.6% single. Regarding intensity, their mean emotional exhaustion score was 25.59±20.39, depersonalization score was 10.57±7.83 and personal accomplishment feeling was 34.6±8.46. Moreover, the mean emotional exhaustion frequency was 21.21±11.95 (low level, depersonalization frequency was 8.94±5.43 (low level and personal accomplishment feeling frequency was 26.82±5.72 (high level. Conclusion: The data obtained in this study shows that the pre-hospital emergency technicians in Isfahan show average levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization intensity and frequency and feel highly unaccomplished.

  2. Man or machine? An experimental study of prehospital emergency amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech, Caroline; Porter, Keith

    2016-09-01

    Prehospital emergency amputation is a rare procedure, which may be necessary to free a time-critical patient from entrapment. This study aimed to evaluate four techniques of cadaveric lower limb prehospital emergency amputation. A guillotine amputation of the distal femur was undertaken in fresh frozen self-donated cadavers. A prehospital doctor conducted a surgical amputation with Gigli saw or hacksaw for bone cuts and firefighters carried out the procedure using the reciprocating saw and Holmatro device. The primary outcome measures were time to full amputation and the number of attempts required. The secondary outcomes were observed quality of skin cut, soft tissue cut and CT assessment of the proximal bone. Observers also noted the potential risks to the rescuer or patient during the procedure. All techniques completed amputation within 91 s. The reciprocating saw was the quickest technique (22 s) but there was significant blood spattering and continuation of the cut to the surface under the leg. The Holmatro device took less than a minute. The quality of the proximal femur was acceptable with all methods, but 5 cm more proximal soft tissue damage was made by the Holmatro device. Emergency prehospital guillotine amputation of the distal femur can effectively be performed using scalpel and paramedic shears with bone cuts by the Gigli saw or fire service hacksaw. The reciprocating saw could be used to cut bone if no other equipment was available but carried some risks. The Holmatro cutting device is a viable option for a life-threatening entrapment where only firefighters can safely access the patient, but would not be a recommended primary technique for medical staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Association of mechanical chest compression and prehospital thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenaitia, Hichem; Fournier, Marc; Brun, Jean Paul; Michelet, Pierre; Auffray, Jean Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common cause of sudden death; the use of prehospital thrombolysis is currently a last-resort option and requires a prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Novel mechanical devices have recently been introduced that provides automatic mechanical chest compression (AMCC) according to the guidelines and continually without decrease efficiency throughout prolonged resuscitation. A 54 year-old woman with a history of breast cancer experienced sudden chest pain and severe dyspnea. A mobile intensive care unit was dispatched to her home. During physical examination, she suddenly collapsed with pulseless electrical activity as the initial rhythm. Prehospital thrombolysis during CPR combined with use of AMCC was performed based on a strongly suspected diagnosis of massive PE. After 75 minutes of effective CPR, return of spontaneous circulation was attained. After admission to an intensive care unit, computed tomographic scan confirmed bilateral PE. The patient was discharged 3 weeks after CPR in good neurologic condition. To our knowledge, this is the first case describing combined use of thrombolysis and AMCC in out-ofhospital cardiac arrest. However, for the time being, prehospital thrombolysis in CPR continues to be a measure that should only be performed on a case-by-case basis based on informed decision. Further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of AMCC with thrombolysis and thus prolonged CPR.

  4. Organization of prehospital medical care for patients with cerebral stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Anatolyevich Shamalov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main tasks of prehospital medical care are to make a correct diagnosis of stroke and to minimize patient transportation delays. Stroke is a medical emergency so all patients with suspected stroke must be admitted by a first arrived ambulance team to a specialized neurology unit for stroke patients. Most rapidly transporting the patient to hospital, as well as reducing the time of examination to verify the pattern of stroke are a guarantee of successful thrombolytic therapy that is the most effective treatment for ischemic stroke. Substantially reducing the time of in-hospital transfers (the so-called door-to-needle time allows stroke patients to be directly admitted to the around the clock computed tomography room, without being sent to the admission unit. Prehospital stroke treatment policy (basic therapy is to correct the body’s vital functions and to maintain respiration, hemodynamics, and water-electrolyte balance and it can be performed without neuroimaging verification of the pattern of stroke. The application of current organizational, methodical, and educational approaches is useful in improving the quality of medical care for stroke patients, in enhancing the continuity between prehospital and hospital cares, and in promoting new effective technologies in stroke therapy.

  5. Ostomy in Nontraumatic Conditions: Our Experience and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükaşık, Kenan; Gürbulak, Bünyamin; Özoran, Emre; Düzköylü, Yiğit; Kabul Gürbulak, Esin; Arı, Aziz; Bektaş, Hasan

    2016-12-01

    A number of nontraumatic acute abdomen can result in peritonitis leading to sepsis. In emergent conditions, various procedures like segmentary colectomy and/or subtotal colectomy with anastomosis, Hartmann's procedure, transverse colectomy, and/or expandable metallic stent (SEMS) placement can be performed, considering the status of the patient and the facilitaties of the institution. In our study, we examined the cases diagnosed as acute abdomen without the history of trauma, which had lead to a procedure requiring colostomy. We retrospectively analysed 105 cases of nontraumatic acute abdomen, resulted in a procedure requiring colostomy. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scoring and Mannheim Peritonitis Index (MPI) were used in the evaluation of the risk of mortality and morbidity. There were colonic perforations of rectosigmoid tumor in 66 cases (62.8 %), sigmoid volvulus in 10 cases (9.5 %), colonic anastomotic leakage in 9 cases (8.5 %), intestinal adhesions in 8 cases (7.6 %), mesenteric ischemia in 5 cases (4.7 %), gynecological diseases in 3 cases (2.85 %), strangulated hernias in 3 (2.85 %), and Ogilvie syndrome in 1 case (0.95 %). Rate of morbidity was found to be 25.7 %, while mortality occurred in 2.8 % of the cases. Cases with mortality and morbidity had ASA scores above two and MPI scores above 23. Anastomotic leakage was the only reason of mortality. In nontraumatic occasions, the management and prognosis of cases with peritonitis, general status of the patients play major roles. The prognosis rates of morbidity and mortality can be highly predicted when ASA and MPI scores are evaluated together.

  6. Pre-hospital transfusion of plasma in hemorrhaging trauma patients independently improves hemostatic competence and acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Hanne H; Rahbar, Elaheh; Baer, Lisa A; Holcomb, John B; Cotton, Bryan A; Steinmetz, Jacob; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Stensballe, Jakob; Johansson, Pär I; Wade, Charles E

    2016-12-09

    The early use of blood products has been associated with improved patient outcomes following severe hemorrhage or traumatic injury. We aimed to investigate the influence of pre-hospital blood products (i.e. plasma and/or RBCs) on admission hemostatic properties and patient outcomes. We hypothesized that pre-hospital plasma would improve hemostatic function as evaluated by rapid thrombelastography (rTEG). We conducted a prospective observational study recruiting 257 trauma patients admitted to a Level I trauma center having received either blood products pre-hospital or in-hospital within 6 hours of admission. Clinical data on patient demographics, blood biochemistry, injury severity score and mortality were collected. Admission rTEG was conducted to characterize the coagulation profile and hemostatic function. 75 patients received pre-hospital plasma and/or RBCs (PH group; nearly half received both RBCs and plasma) whereas 182 patients only received in-hospital blood products (RBCs, Plasma and Platelets) within 6 hours of admission (IH group). PH patients had lower Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores, more penetrating injuries, lower systolic blood pressures, lower hemoglobin levels, lower platelet counts and greater acidosis upon ED admission than the IH group (all p plasma, more pre-hospital plasma transfusion was tendency towards improved rTEG variables. When adjusting for pre-hospital RBC, pre-hospital plasma was associated with significantly higher rTEG MA (p = 0.012) at hospital admission. After adjusting for pre-hospital RBCs, pre-hospital plasma transfusion was independently associated with increased rTEG MA, as well as arrival indices of shock and hemodynamic instability. Besides more severe injury and worse clinical presentation, the group that received pre-hospital transfusion had early and late mortality similar to patients not transfused pre-hospital. These data suggest that early administration of plasma can provide significant hemostatic and potential

  7. Chronic nontraumatic spinal epidural hematoma of the lumbar spine: MRI diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez-Barquero, A.; Pinto, J.I. [Univ. Hospital ' ' Marques de Valdecilla' ' , Santander (Spain). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Abascal, F.; Garcia-Valtuille, R.; Cerezal, L. [Hospital Mompia, Cantabria, (Spain). Dept. of Radiology; Figols, F.J. [Univ. Hospital Marques de Valdecilla, Santander (Spain). Dept. of Pathology

    2000-10-01

    An uncommon case of chronic nontraumatic spinal epidural hematoma of the lumbar spine in a 75-year-old woman is reported. The patient presented with a 7-month history of low back pain and bilateral sciatica. Magnetic resonance imaging enabled a correct preoperative diagnosis revealing a nodular, well-circumscribed epidural mass with peripheral enhancement and signal intensities consistent with chronic hematoma, which extended from L2 to L3. Laminectomy of L2-L3 was performed and the hematoma was totally resected. Histological examination of the surgical specimen demonstrated a chronic encapsulated hematoma. No evidence of vascular malformation was found. The patient recovered fully after surgical treatment. (orig.)

  8. Spontaneous nontraumatic epidermoid cyst of the clitoris: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Nayak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cysts are slow growing, intradermal or subcutaneous tumors with a wall composed of true epidermis. They are rarely seen in the clitoral region but when found; they are commonly seen following female genital mutilation. Spontaneous onset clitoral epidermoid cysts have been scarcely reported .We report a rare case of a large spontaneous nontraumatic epidermoid cyst of clitoris in a 22 year old nulliparous female. This presentation mimicked clitoromegaly but was diagnosed to be a large epidermoid cyst after excision. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(6.000: 2081-2083

  9. A case of nontraumatic gas gangrene in a common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Masahiko; Inoue, Takashi; Ueno, Masami; Morita, Hanako; Hayashimoto, Nobuhito; Kawai, Kenji; Itoh, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    The common marmoset is widely used in neuroscience and regenerative medicine research. However, information concerning common marmoset disorders, particularly infectious diseases, is scarce. Here, we report a case of a female common marmoset that died suddenly due to gas gangrene. The animal presented with gaseous abdominal distention at postmortem, and Clostridium perfringens type A was isolated from several tissues. Vacuoles, a Gram-positive bacteremia and intravascular hemolysis were observed microscopically in the muscles, liver and lungs. On the basis of these findings, we diagnosed nontraumatic gas gangrene caused by Clostridium perfringens type A in this common marmoset.

  10. Etiology and Outcome of Non-Traumatic Coma in Children Admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Khodapanahandeh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Non-traumatic coma is a relatively common condition in children that may cause considerable mortality and morbidity. The purpose of this study was to determine clinical presentation, etiology and outcome of non-traumatic coma in children.Methods: In a retrospective cross sectional study over a period of 5 years, files of 150 children aged between 1 month and 14 years admitted with non-traumatic coma to pediatric intensive care unit of Rasool Akram hospital were reviewed. Historical, presenting symptoms, clinical and laboratory data were collected. Etiology of coma was determined on the basis of clinical history and relevant investigations. The outcome was recorded as died or neurological condition at discharge as normal, mild or sever disability. Chi-square test was used to test the differences in categorical variables.Findings: There were 63 (42% boys and 87 (58% girls. The mean±SD age of patients was 2.7±2.35 years. Systemic presentations including nausea, vomiting, fever, lethargy and poor feeding were more prominent in children under 2 years. Etiology of coma in 49 patients (32.7% was infectious (meningitis, encephalitis, respiratory and systemic. Other causes were status epilepticus 44 (29.4%, metabolic (diabetic ketoacidosis, inborn errors of metabolism 11 (7.3%, intoxications 10 (6.7%, accidental (drowning, electrical shock, suffocation 9 (6%, shunt dysfunction (secondary to congenital brain malformations 7 (4.6%, others (acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, vasculitis, hypertensive encephalopathy 11 (7.3%, unknown 9 (6%. Infection occurred significantly (P=0.002 in children under 2 years of age, whereas accidents and intoxications were more prominent (P=0.004 in those between 2 and 6 years. Overall 25 children (16.6% died. Of those survived 16 became severely disabled. Accidents and infections had higher mortality compared to other groups (P<0.001 and P=0.02 respectively.Conclusion: Our results showed that infection was the

  11. Chronic neck pain patients with traumatic or non-traumatic onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ris Hansen, Inge; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Boyle, Eleanor

    2017-01-01

    tests of cervical range of motion, gaze stability, eye movement, cranio-cervical flexion, cervical extensors, and pressure pain threshold. The participants completed the following questionnaires: physical and mental component summary of the Short Form Health Survey, EuroQol-5D, Neck Disability Index...... in the traumatic group showed worse results on all measures compared with those in the non-traumatic group, significantly on neck muscle function (cervical extension mobility p = 0.005, cranio-cervical flexion test p = 0.007, cervical extensor test p = 0.006) and cervical pressure pain threshold bilateral (p = 0...

  12. Acute Nontraumatic Clavicle Fracture Associated with Long-Term Bisphosphonate Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Hwa Vun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw, insufficiency fractures and atypical low energy or atraumatic fractures of pelvis, femur (subtrochanteric/mid-shaft/distal-third, tibia, fibula, metatarsal, humerus, and ulna related to long-term bisphosphonate therapy have been reported in the literature. We present the case of an acute nontraumatic clavicle fracture, associated with long-term bisphosphonate therapy, which to our knowledge has not been reported previously. This case highlights the need of critical evaluation of patients with atypical fractures during long-term bisphosphonate therapy.

  13. Acute nontraumatic clavicle fracture associated with long-term bisphosphonate therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vun, Shen Hwa; Husami, Yahya; Shareef, Sajan; Bramley, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw, insufficiency fractures and atypical low energy or atraumatic fractures of pelvis, femur (subtrochanteric/mid-shaft/distal-third), tibia, fibula, metatarsal, humerus, and ulna related to long-term bisphosphonate therapy have been reported in the literature. We present the case of an acute nontraumatic clavicle fracture, associated with long-term bisphosphonate therapy, which to our knowledge has not been reported previously. This case highlights the need of critical evaluation of patients with atypical fractures during long-term bisphosphonate therapy.

  14. Telemedicine in pre-hospital care: a review of telemedicine applications in the pre-hospital environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadi-Obi, Ahjoku; Gilligan, Peadar; Owens, Niall; O'Donnell, Cathal

    2014-01-01

    The right person in the right place and at the right time is not always possible; telemedicine offers the potential to give audio and visual access to the appropriate clinician for patients. Advances in information and communication technology (ICT) in the area of video-to-video communication have led to growth in telemedicine applications in recent years. For these advances to be properly integrated into healthcare delivery, a regulatory framework, supported by definitive high-quality research, should be developed. Telemedicine is well suited to extending the reach of specialist services particularly in the pre-hospital care of acute emergencies where treatment delays may affect clinical outcome. The exponential growth in research and development in telemedicine has led to improvements in clinical outcomes in emergency medical care. This review is part of the LiveCity project to examine the history and existing applications of telemedicine in the pre-hospital environment. A search of electronic databases including Medline, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) for relevant papers was performed. All studies addressing the use of telemedicine in emergency medical or pre-hospital care setting were included. Out of a total of 1,279 articles reviewed, 39 met the inclusion criteria and were critically analysed. A majority of the studies were on stroke management. The studies suggested that overall, telemedicine had a positive impact on emergency medical care. It improved the pre-hospital diagnosis of stroke and myocardial infarction and enhanced the supervision of delivery of tissue thromboplasminogen activator in acute ischaemic stroke. Telemedicine presents an opportunity to enhance patient management. There are as yet few definitive studies that have demonstrated whether it had an effect on clinical outcome.

  15. Use of the GlideScope Ranger Video Laryngoscope for Emergency Intubation in the Prehospital Setting: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmel, Helmut; Kreutziger, Janett; Fitzka, Robert; Szüts, Stephan; Derdak, Christoph; Koch, Elisabeth; Erwied, Boris; Voelckel, Wolfgang G

    2016-07-01

    We sought to assess whether the GlideScope Ranger video laryngoscope may be a reliable alternative to direct laryngoscopy in the prehospital setting. Multicenter, prospective, randomized, control trial with patient recruitment over 18 months. Four study centers operating physician-staffed rescue helicopters or ground units in Austria and Norway. Adult emergency patients requiring endotracheal intubation. Airway management strictly following a prehospital algorithm. First and second intubation attempt employing GlideScope or direct laryngoscopy as randomized; third attempt crossover. After three failed intubation attempts, immediate use of an extraglottic airway device. A total of 326 patients were enrolled. Success rate with the GlideScope (n = 168) versus direct laryngoscopy (n = 158) group was 61.9% (104/168) versus 96.2% (152/158), respectively (p intubation were failure to advance the tube into the larynx or trachea (26/168 vs 0/158; p intubation failed, direct laryngoscopy was successful in 61 of 64 patients (95.3%), whereas GlideScope enabled intubation in four of six cases (66.7%) where direct laryngoscopy failed (p = 0.055). In addition, GlideScope was prone to impaired visualization of the monitor because of ambient light (29/168; 17.3%). There was no correlation between success rates and body mass index, age, indication for airway management, or experience of the physicians, respectively. Video laryngoscopy is an established tool in difficult airway management, but our results shed light on the specific problems in the emergency medical service setting. Prehospital use of the GlideScope was associated with some major problems, thus resulting in a lower intubation success rate when compared with direct laryngoscopy.

  16. Effect of ultrasound training of physicians working in the prehospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Charlotte Loumann; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rudolph, Søren Steemann

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Advances in technology have made ultrasound (US) devices smaller and portable, hence accessible for prehospital care providers. This study aims to evaluate the effect of a four-hour, hands-on US training course for physicians working in the prehospital setting. The primary outcome...

  17. Risk assessment of pre-hospital trauma airway management by anaesthesiologists using the predictive Bayesian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakstad Anders R

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Endotracheal intubation (ETI has been considered an essential part of pre-hospital advanced life support. Pre-hospital ETI, however, is a complex intervention also for airway specialist like anaesthesiologists working as pre-hospital emergency physicians. We therefore wanted to investigate the quality of pre-hospital airway management by anaesthesiologists in severely traumatised patients and identify possible areas for improvement. Method We performed a risk assessment according to the predictive Bayesian approach, in a typical anaesthesiologist-manned Norwegian helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS. The main focus of the risk assessment was the event where a patient arrives in the emergency department without ETI despite a pre-hospital indication for it. Results In the risk assessment, we assigned a high probability (29% for the event assessed, that a patient arrives without ETI despite a pre-hospital indication. However, several uncertainty factors in the risk assessment were identified related to data quality, indications for use of ETI, patient outcome and need for special training of ETI providers. Conclusion Our risk assessment indicated a high probability for trauma patients with an indication for pre-hospital ETI not receiving it in the studied HEMS. The uncertainty factors identified in the assessment should be further investigated to better understand the problem assessed and consequences for the patients. Better quality of pre-hospital airway management data could contribute to a reduction of these uncertainties.

  18. Use of Morphine Sulphate by South African Paramedics for Prehospital Pain Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Vincent-Lambert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence in the literature highlights the fact that acute pain in the prehospital setting remains poorly managed. Morphine remains the most commonly used analgesic agent in the South African prehospital emergency care setting. Although guidelines and protocols relating to the dosage and administration of morphine exist, little data are available describing its use by South African paramedics.

  19. Prehospital intraosseus access with the bone injection gun by a helicopter-transported emergency medical team.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritse, B.M.; Scheffer, G.J.; Draaisma, J.M.T.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the use of the bone injection gun to obtain vascular access in the prehospital setting by an Helicopter-Transported Emergency Medical Team. METHODS: Prospective descriptive study to assess the frequency and success rate of the use of the bone injection gun in prehospital care

  20. Non-traumatic brachial plexopathies, clinical, radiological and neurophysiological findings from a tertiary centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullins, G M

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: To establish the clinical characteristics, aetiology, neuro-physiological characteristics, imaging findings and other investigations in a cohort of patients with non-traumatic brachial plexopathy (BP). METHODS: A 3-year retrospective study of patients with non-traumatic BP identified by electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction studies (NCS). Clinical information was retrieved from patients\\' medical charts. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients were identified. Causes of BP included neuralgic amyotrophy (NA) (48%), neoplastic (16%), radiation (8%), post infectious (12%), obstetric (4%), rucksack injury (4%), thoracic outlet syndrome (4%) and iatrogenic (4%). Patients with NA presented acutely in 50%. The onset was subacute in all others. Outcome was better for patients with NA. All patients with neoplastic disease had a previous history of cancer. MRI was abnormal in 3\\/16 patients (18.8%). PET scanning diagnosed metastatic plexopathy in two cases. CONCLUSIONS: NA was the most common cause of BP in our cohort and was associated with a more favourable outcome. The authors note potentially discriminating clinical characteristics in our population that aid in the assessment of patients with brachial plexopathies. We advise NCS and EMG be performed in all patients with suspected plexopathy. Imaging studies are useful in selected patients.

  1. Late Nontraumatic Dissociation of the Femoral Head and Trunnion in a Total Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J. M. Parker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Modular total hip arthroplasties are increasingly popular because customisation allows optimal restoration of patient biomechanics. However, the introduction of component interfaces provides greater opportunities for failure. We present a case of late nontraumatic dissociation of the head-neck interface, more than 10 years after insertion. Case Description. A 58-year-old woman had a left metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty in 2002 for hip dysplasia. Following an uneventful 10-year period, she presented to hospital in severe pain after standing from a seated position, and radiographs demonstrated complete dissociation of the modular femoral head from the stem, with the femoral head remaining in its cup. There was no prior trauma or infection. Mild wear and metallosis were present on the articulating surface between the femoral head and trunnion. Soft tissues were unaffected. Discussion and Conclusions. This is the latest occurrence reported to date for nontraumatic component failure in such an implant by more than 7 years. The majority of cases occur in the context of dislocation and attempted closed reduction. We analyse and discuss possible mechanisms for failure, aiming to raise awareness of this potential complication and encouraging utmost care in component handling and insertion, as well as the long term follow-up of such patients.

  2. Protocol for a systematic review of the clinical effectiveness of pre-hospital blood components compared to other resuscitative fluids in patients with major traumatic haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dretzke, Janine; Smith, Iain M; James, Robert H; Midwinter, Mark J

    2014-10-24

    There is growing interest in the use of blood components for pre-hospital resuscitation of patients with major traumatic haemorrhage. It has been speculated that early resuscitation with blood components may have benefits in terms of treating trauma-induced coagulopathy, which in turn may influence survival. The proposed systematic review will evaluate the evidence on the clinical effectiveness of pre-hospital blood components (red blood cells and/or plasma or whole blood), in both civilian and military settings, compared with other resuscitation strategies in patients with major traumatic haemorrhage. Standard systematic review methods aimed at minimising bias will be employed for study identification, selection and data extraction. General medical and specialist databases will be searched; the search strategy will combine terms for the population, intervention and setting. Studies will be selected for review if the population includes adult patients with major traumatic haemorrhage who receive blood components in a pre-hospital setting (civilian or military). Systematic reviews, randomised and non-randomised controlled trials and controlled observational studies will be included. Uncontrolled studies will be considered depending on the volume of controlled evidence. Quality assessment will be tailored to different study designs. Both patient related and surrogate outcomes will be considered. Synthesis is likely to be primarily narrative, but meta-analyses and subgroup analyses will be undertaken where clinical and methodological homogeneity exists. Given the increasing use by emergency services of blood components for pre-hospital resuscitation, this is a timely systematic review, which will attempt to clarify the evidence base for this practice. As far as the authors are aware, the proposed systematic review will be the first to address this topic. PROSPERO CRD42014013794.

  3. An evaluation of merits of total hip arthroplasty done for traumatic and non-traumatic displaced fracture neck of femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Agarwal

    2016-05-01

    Results: On clinical and functional evaluation, patients scored 84% excellent/good in non-traumatic group whereas 68% excellent/good score in traumatic group. 12% and 16% patients scored poor in non-traumatic group and in traumatic group respectively. In non-traumatic group, following complications were observed. Dislocation rate of 4% (one hip, 4% incidence of aseptic acetabular loosening (one hip, and 16% incidence of heterotrophic ossification (four hips. In traumatic group, we observed 2 (8% dislocations, 4 (16% heterotopic ossifications. Loosening of acetabulum and subsidence were observed in two (8% patients. Conclusions: There are higher chances of dislocation among patients undergoing total hip replacement for a traumatic indications as compared to their non-traumatic indications. Chances of dislocation can be curtailed by keeping known factors in mind along with careful patient selection, adherence to postoperative protocol and use of a lateral approach with large head in high risk patients. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(5.000: 1632-1635

  4. Rupture of the lateral ventricle secondary to a fourth ventricle tumour resulting in an indirect nontraumatic cerebrospinal fluid fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, S.P.; Liew, W.F. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Yaacob Latif, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Abdullah, B.J.J. [Department of Radiology, University Malaya Medical Centre (Malaysia); Waran, V. [Department of Neurosurgery, University Malaya Medical Centre (Malaysia)

    2003-01-01

    We present a rare indirect nontraumatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula secondary to a fourth ventricle ependymoma. The fistula resulted from rupture of the left temporal horn, distant from the tumour. The fistula was well demonstrated by MRI. High-resolution CT demonstrated a defect in the roof of the sphenoid sinus, but no leakage of CSF was seen on CT cisternography. (orig.)

  5. Prehospital Intubation is Associated with Favorable Outcomes and Lower Mortality in ProTECT III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denninghoff, Kurt R; Nuño, Tomas; Pauls, Qi; Yeatts, Sharon D; Silbergleit, Robert; Palesch, Yuko Y; Merck, Lisa H; Manley, Geoff T; Wright, David W

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes more than 2.5 million emergency department visits, hospitalizations, or deaths annually. Prehospital endotracheal intubation has been associated with poor outcomes in patients with TBI in several retrospective observational studies. We evaluated the relationship between prehospital intubation, functional outcomes, and mortality using high quality data on clinical practice collected prospectively during a randomized multicenter clinical trial. ProTECT III was a multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of early administration of progesterone in 882 patients with acute moderate to severe nonpenetrating TBI. Patients were excluded if they had an index GCS of 3 and nonreactive pupils, those with withdrawal of life support on arrival, and if they had documented prolonged hypotension and/or hypoxia. Prehospital intubation was performed as per local clinical protocol in each participating EMS system. Models for favorable outcome and mortality included prehospital intubation, method of transport, index GCS, age, race, and ethnicity as independent variables. Significance was set at α = 0.05. Favorable outcome was defined by a stratified dichotomy of the GOS-E scores in which the definition of favorable outcome depended on the severity of the initial injury. Favorable outcome was more frequent in the 349 subjects with prehospital intubation (57.3%) than in the other 533 patients (46.0%, p = 0.003). Mortality was also lower in the prehospital intubation group (13.8% v. 19.5%, p = 0.03). Logistic regression analysis of prehospital intubation and mortality, adjusted for index GCS, showed that odds of dying for those with prehospital intubation were 47% lower than for those that were not intubated (OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.36-0.78). 279 patients with prehospital intubation were transported by air. Modeling transport method and mortality, adjusted for index GCS, showed increased odds of dying in those transported by ground

  6. EMS Attitudes Towards Geriatric Prehospital Care And Continuing Medical Education in Geriatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lars-Kristofer N.; Fairbanks, Rollin J.; Hettinger, Aaron Z.; Shah, Manish N.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To understand the opinions of emergency medical service (EMS) providers regarding their ability to care for older adults, the domains of geriatric medicine in which they need more training, and the modality through which continuing education could be best delivered. Design Qualitative study using key informant interviews. Setting Prehospital EMS system in Rochester, New York. Participants EMS providers, EMS instructors and administrators, emergency physicians, and geriatricians. Outcome Measures Semi-structured interviews were conducted using an interview guide that addressed the following domains: 1)knowledge and skill deficiencies; 2)recommendations for improvement of geriatrics continuing education; 3)delivery methods of education. Results Participant responses were generally congruous despite the diverse backgrounds, and redundancy was achieved rapidly. All participants perceived a deficit in EMS education on the care of older adults, particularly related to communications with patients and skilled nursing facility staff. All desired more geriatric continuing education for EMS providers, especially in communications and psychosocial issues. Education was desired in various modalities. Conclusion Further geriatrics continuing education for EMS providers is needed. Some specific topics relate to medical issues, but a large proportion involve communications and psychosocial issues. Education should be delivered in a variety of modalities to meet the needs of the EMS community. Emerging online video technologies may bridge the gap between learners preferring classroom based modailities and those preferring self-study modules. PMID:19170777

  7. Characterization of trauma patients treated in a pre-hospital care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda de Ornelas Carvalho

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the characteristics of trauma patientstreated in a pre-hospital care service, to characterize the factorsrelated to the trauma event and quantify the severity of trauma,according to the Revised Trauma Score. Methods: This is adescriptive, exploratory, retrospective study carried out at thePre-Hospital Care Service of the Military Police - Rescue in thecity of São Paulo. Data comprised a randomized sample of 60nursing charts, distributed among the four advanced life supportunits in the city. Results: Of the occurrences dealt with, 65% arerelated to public streets, 20% are medical cases, 65% are maleindividuals, predominantly young adults. The predominantmechanisms of trauma are crash and run-over. Casa Verde wasthe care unit which obtained the highest Revised Trauma Scoreweighted mean. Conclusions: The results presented here are inconformity with the national statistics on trauma: young adults, ofworking age, involved in road accidents are most frequentlyaffected. Identifying this population is of utmost importance forthe development of preventive and educational measures.

  8. Severe Cranioencephalic Trauma: Prehospital Care, Surgical Management and Multimodal Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Rafael Moscote-Salazar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death in developed countries. It is estimated that only in the United States about 100,000 people die annually in parallel among the survivors there is a significant number of people with disabilities with significant costs for the health system. It has been determined that after moderate and severe traumatic injury, brain parenchyma is affected by more than 55% of cases. Head trauma management is critical is the emergency services worldwide. We present a review of the literature regarding the prehospital care, surgical management and intensive care monitoring of the patients with severe cranioecephalic trauma.

  9. [Scandinavian guidelines for prehospital management of severe traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollid, S.; Sundstrom, T.; Kock-Jensen, C.

    2008-01-01

    Head trauma is the cause the death for many young persons. The number of fatalities can be reduced through systematic management. Prevention of secondary brain injury combined with the fastest possible transport to a neurosurgical unit, have been shown to effectively reduce mortality and morbidity....... Evidence-based guidelines already exist that focus on all steps in the process. In the present article members of the Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee present recommendations on prehospital management of traumatic brain injury adapted to the infrastructure of the Nordic region Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/26...

  10. Emergency Physician Awareness of Prehospital Procedures and Medications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Waldron

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Maintaining patient safety during transition from prehospital to emergency department (ED care depends on effective handoff communication between providers. We sought to determine emergency physicians’ (EP knowledge of the care provided by paramedics in terms of both procedures and medications, and whether the use of a verbal report improved physician accuracy. Methods: We conducted a 2-phase observational survey of a convenience sample of EPs in an urban, academic ED. In this large ED paramedics have no direct contact with physicians for non-critical patients, giving their report instead to the triage nurse. In Phase 1, paramedics gave verbal report to the triage nurse only. In Phase 2, a research assistant (RA stationed in triage listened to this report and then repeated it back verbatim to the EPs caring for the patient. The RA then queried the EPs 90 minutes later regarding their patients’ prehospital procedures and medications. We compared the accuracy of these 2 reporting methods. Results: There were 163 surveys completed in Phase 1 and 116 in Phase 2. The oral report had no effect on EP awareness that the patient had been brought in by ambulance (86% in Phase 1 and 85% in Phase 2. The oral report did improve EP awareness of prehospital procedures, from 16% in Phase 1 to 45% in Phase 2, OR=4.28 (2.5-7.5. EPs were able to correctly identify all oral medications in 18% of Phase 1 cases and 47% of Phase 2 cases, and all IV medications in 42% of Phase 1 cases and 50% of Phase 2 cases. The verbal report led to a mild improvement in physician awareness of oral medications given, OR=4.0 (1.09-14.5, and no improvement in physician awareness of IV medications given, OR=1.33 (0.15-11.35. Using a composite score of procedures plus oral plus IV medications, physicians had all three categories correct in 15% of Phase 1 and 39% of Phase 2 cases (p<0.0001. Conclusion: EPs in our ED were unaware of many prehospital procedures and

  11. [Scandinavian guidelines for prehospital management of severe traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollid, S.; Sundstrom, T.; Kock-Jensen, C.

    2008-01-01

    . Evidence-based guidelines already exist that focus on all steps in the process. In the present article members of the Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee present recommendations on prehospital management of traumatic brain injury adapted to the infrastructure of the Nordic region Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/26......Head trauma is the cause the death for many young persons. The number of fatalities can be reduced through systematic management. Prevention of secondary brain injury combined with the fastest possible transport to a neurosurgical unit, have been shown to effectively reduce mortality and morbidity...

  12. Comparison of supraglottic airway versus endotracheal intubation for the pre-hospital treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Both supraglottic airway devices (SGA) and endotracheal intubation (ETI) have been used by emergency life-saving technicians (ELST) in Japan to treat out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs). Despite traditional emphasis on airway management during cardiac arrest, its impact on survival from OHCA and time dependent effectiveness remains unclear. Methods All adults with witnessed, non-traumatic OHCA, from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2008, treated by the emergency medical services (EMS) with an advanced airway in Osaka, Japan were studied in a prospective Utstein-style population cohort database. The primary outcome measure was one-month survival with neurologically favorable outcome. The association between type of advanced airway (ETI/SGA), timing of device placement and neurological outcome was assessed by multiple logistic regression. Results Of 7,517 witnessed non-traumatic OHCAs, 5,377 cases were treated with advanced airways. Of these, 1,679 were ETI while 3,698 were SGA. Favorable neurological outcome was similar between ETI and SGA (3.6% versus 3.6%, P = 0.95). The time interval from collapse to ETI placement was significantly longer than for SGA (17.2 minutes versus 15.8 minutes, P predictor (AOR 0.71, 95% CI 0.39 to 1.30) but the presence of an ETI certified ELST (AOR, 1.86, 95% CI 1.04 to 3.34) was a significant predictor for favorable neurological outcome. Conclusions There was no difference in neurologically favorable outcome from witnessed OHCA for ETI versus SGA. Early airway management with advanced airway regardless of type and rhythm was associated with improved outcomes. PMID:21985431

  13. A demographic profile of 7273 traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injured patients in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Vahid; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: To evaluate demographic profile of traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injured (SCI) patients. Methods: Mobile rehabilitation teams gathered data in 20 out of 30 provinces in Iran. Of 8104 traumatic and non-traumatic SCI patients under coverage of the State Welfare Organization of Iran registered in the database, 7273 were included in the analysis. The aggregate data on SCIs, including age, gender, place of residence, education level, marital status, etiology of injury, age at the time of injury, time passed since injury, level of injury, type of cord injury, having caregiver, and occupation were recorded. Results: Of 7273 patients, 5175 (71.1%) were male. At the time of the study, 46% were in the age group 20-40 years old, 34% were more than 40, and 20% were less than 20 years old. The residential place of 26% was in villages. 23.9% were illiterate, 6.9% had high school diploma or higher. The distribution of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar levels of injury was 17.7, 24.4, and 57.9%, respectively. Overall, there were 49% married and 45.8% never married, while 1.4% patients were single because their partners had left them, 1.7% of partners had died, 1.9% had divorced, and 0.3% had remarried. At the time of the presentation of patients, 33% were 21-30 years-old, 17% were 31-40, and 16% were less than 20 years. About the type of cord injury, the paraplegia, paraparesia, quadriplegia, quadriparesia, and hemiparesia were present in 72.1, 12.5, 10.2, 4.0, and 1.1% of patients, respectively. Unemployment was reported in 55.6% of patients. However, 17% were unable to work, 7.1% had a job, and 3.4% were retired. Caregiver was not provided for 7.5% of them. The most prevalent causes of the injury were: trauma (57.4%), congenital (14.4%), tumors (4.4%), spinal degenerative disorder such as canal stenosis (2.2%), genetic (2.0%), infection (1.9%), scoliosis (1.1%), and miscellaneous (10.6%). Conclusions: These data will provide the information to guide

  14. Wireless local area network in a prehospital environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimes Gary J

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wireless local area networks (WLANs are considered the next generation of clinical data network. They open the possibility for capturing clinical data in a prehospital setting (e.g., a patient's home using various devices, such as personal digital assistants, laptops, digital electrocardiogram (EKG machines, and even cellular phones, and transmitting the captured data to a physician or hospital. The transmission rate is crucial to the applicability of the technology in the prehospital setting. Methods We created two separate WLANs to simulate a virtual local are network environment such as in a patient's home or an emergency room (ER. The effects of different methods of data transmission, number of clients, and roaming among different access points on the file transfer rate were determined. Results The present results suggest that it is feasible to transfer small files such as patient demographics and EKG data from the patient's home to the ER at a reasonable speed. Encryption, user control, and access control were implemented and results discussed. Conclusions Implementing a WLAN in a centrally managed and multiple-layer-controlled access control server is the key to ensuring its security and accessibility. Future studies should focus on product capacity, speed, compatibility, interoperability, and security management.

  15. Imaging of non-cardiac, non-traumatic causes of acute chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzl, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.kienzl@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Prosch, Helmut; Töpker, Michael; Herold, Christian [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2012-12-15

    Non-traumatic chest pain is a common symptom in patients who present in the emergency department. From a clinical point of view, it is important to differentiate cardiac chest pain from non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). Among the plethora of potential causes of NCCP, life-threatening diseases, such as aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, tension pneumothorax, and esophageal rupture, must be differentiated from non-life threatening causes. The majority of NCCP, however, is reported to be benign in nature. The presentation of pain plays an important role in narrowing the differential diagnosis and initiating further diagnostic management and treatment. As the benign causes tend to recur, and may lead to patient anxiety and great costs, a meticulous evaluation of the patient is necessary to diagnose the underlying disorder or disease.

  16. Prehospital delay in acute coronary syndrome--an analysis of the components of delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Michael Mundt; Dixen, Ulrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian;

    2004-01-01

    more frequently atypical symptoms and increased prehospital delay caused by prolonged physician and transportation delay. Physician delay among women and men were 69 and 16 min, respectively. Patients with prior myocardial infarction had reduced prehospital delay, which was caused by shorter decision...... admitted with acute coronary syndrome is warranted. METHODS: A structured interview was conducted on 250 consecutive patients admitted alive with acute coronary syndrome. RESULTS: Median prehospital, decision, physician and transportation delays were 107, 74, 25 and 22 min, respectively. Women (n=77) had...... of acute coronary syndrome among women, and thereby contributes to unnecessary long delay to treatment. The patient's prior experience and interpretation has a significant influence on behaviour....

  17. [Prehospital stage of medical aid to patients with acute coronary syndrome and elevated ST segment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertkin, A L; Morozov, S N; Fedorov, A I

    2013-01-01

    We studied effect of time on the outcome of acute coronary syndrome and elevated ST segment at the prehospital stage. Logistic regression analysis revealed two time-dependent predictors: "symptom-needle" time and total call service time. In patients undergoing prehospital thrombolysis, these indices (88 and 85 min respectively) reliably predicted the probability of fatal outcome. Their values of 71 and 77 min respectively predicted the risk of unfavourable outcome. The total call service time may serve as an indicator of the quality of work of an ambulance crew at the prehospital stage of management of acute coronary syndrome with elevated ST segment.

  18. pre-hospital management of febrile seizures in children seen at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    appropriate health education to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with ... parents/caregivers of children with febrile seizures and the maternal .... consequences of harmful traditional pre-hospital treatment of .... The natural history of.

  19. Pre-hospital management of mass casualty civilian shootings: a systematic literature review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turner, Conor D. A; Lockey, David J; Rehn, Marius

    2016-01-01

    .... This study aims to systematically identify, describe and appraise the quality of indexed and non-indexed literature on the pre-hospital management of modern civilian mass shootings to guide future practice...

  20. The value of the pre-hospital learning environment as part of the emergency nursing programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonett van Wyk

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: The research findings support the value and continuation of utilising the pre-hospital clinical learning environment for placing post-basic emergency nursing students when enrolled in the emergency nursing programme.

  1. Prehospital Pediatric Care: Opportunities for Training, Treatment, and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayna, Patrick C; Browne, Lorin R; Guse, Clare E; Brousseau, David C; Lerner, E Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric transports comprise approximately 10% of emergency medical services (EMS) requests for aid, but little is known about the clinical characteristics of pediatric EMS patients and the interventions they receive. Our objective was to describe the pediatric prehospital patient cohort in a large metropolitan EMS system. This retrospective analysis of all pediatric (age Pox), and respiratory effort. We defined abnormal vital signs using previously reported age-specific standards. We identified the working assessments most frequently associated with abnormal vital signs and the working assessments associated with the most commonly performed interventions. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. There were 9,956 pediatric transports, 8.7% of the total call volume. The most common working assessments were "other" (16.1%), respiratory distress (13.7%), seizure (12.4%), and blunt trauma (12.0%). Vital signs were documented at variable rates: RR (91.1%), GCS (82.9%), SBP (71.3%), pulse (69.4%), respiratory effort (49.7%), and Pox (33.5%). Of all transported patients, 61.5% had a documented abnormal initial vital sign. Patients with an abnormal vital sign had the same most common working assessments as those with normal vital signs. Glucometry (16.9%), medication delivery (13.6%), and IV placement (11.5%) were the most common interventions and were most often provided to patients with working assessments of seizure, asthma, trauma, altered consciousness, or "other." Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (0.4%), bag mask ventilation (0.4%), and advanced airway (0.4%) occurred rarely and were most often performed for cardiac arrest and trauma. Children made up a small part of EMS providers' clinical practice; those encountered most frequently had respiratory distress, seizures, trauma, or an undefined assessment (i.e., "other"). EMS providers frequently encounter children with physiologic evidence of acute illness, although vital sign documentation was incomplete

  2. Performance of a prehospital trauma diversion system in Hong Kong, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tak-Wai Lui; Kit-Ling Fan; Ling-Pong Leung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose:To evaluate the performance of a prehospital trauma diversion system in Hong Kong,China.Methods:A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data in the trauma registry of Queen Mary Hospital,Hong Kong from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2013 was done.All adult patients aged 18 years or above,either primarily or secondarily diverted to Queen Mary Hospital according to the trauma patient diversion protocol,were recruited.Need for trauma center level of care was based on a consensus-based criterion standard published in 2014.Performance of the protocol in terms of overdiversion and under-diversion was determined.Results:A total of 209 patients were included for analysis.About 30% of the patients required trauma center level of care.The most common reason was the need for vascular,neurologic,abdominal,thoracic,pelvic,spine or limb-conserving surgery within 24 h of presentation.The over-diversion rate and underdiversion rate were 69.6% and 19.7% respectively.Conclusion:The trauma patient diversion protocol currently in use in Hong Kong is not accurate enough.Further revision and refinement is needed.

  3. Novel wireless electroencephalography system with a minimal preparation time for use in emergencies and prehospital care

    OpenAIRE

    Jakab, Andrei; Kulkas, Antti; Salpavaara, Timo; Kauppinen, Pasi; Verho, Jarmo; Heikkilä, Hannu; Jäntti, Ville

    2014-01-01

    Background Although clinical applications such as emergency medicine and prehospital care could benefit from a fast-mounting electroencephalography (EEG) recording system, the lack of specifically designed equipment restricts the use of EEG in these environments. Methods This paper describes the design and testing of a six-channel emergency EEG (emEEG) system with a rapid preparation time intended for use in emergency medicine and prehospital care. The novel system comprises a quick-applicati...

  4. Prehospital score for acute disease: a community-based observational study in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiwara Hidekazu

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ambulance usage in Japan has increased consistently because it is free under the national health insurance system. The introduction of refusal for ambulance transfer is being debated nationally. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between prehospital data and hospitalization outcome for acute disease patients, and to develop a simple prehospital evaluation tool using prehospital data for Japan's emergency medical service system. Methods The subjects were 9,160 consecutive acute disease patients aged ≥ 15 years who were transferred to hospital by Kishiwada City Fire Department ambulance between July 2004 and March 2006. The relationship between prehospital data (age, systolic blood pressure, pulse rate, respiration rate, level of consciousness, SpO2 level and ability to walk and outcome (hospitalization or non-hospitalization was analyzed using logistic regression models. The prehospital score component of each item of prehospital data was determined by beta coefficients. Eligible patients were scored retrospectively and the distribution of outcome was examined. For patients transported to the two main hospitals, outcome after hospitalization was also confirmed. Results A total of 8,330 (91% patients were retrospectively evaluated using a prehospital score with a maximum value of 14. The percentage of patients requiring hospitalization rose from 9% with score = 0 to 100% with score = 14. With a cut-off point score ≥ 2, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 97%, 16%, 39% and 89%, respectively. Among the 6,498 patients transported to the two main hospitals, there were no deaths at scores ≤ 1 and the proportion of non-hospitalization was over 90%. The proportion of deaths increased rapidly at scores ≥ 11. Conclusion The prehospital score could be a useful tool for deciding the refusal of ambulance transfer in Japan's emergency medical

  5. Personal protective equipment provision in prehospital care: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzanicki, D A; Porter, K M

    2009-12-01

    Safety in prehospital practice is a paramount principle. Personal protective equipment (PPE) use is intrinsic to safe practice. There is varied guidance as to what constitutes effective PPE. No evidence is available of what current provision encompasses. A questionnaire-based study directed to all ambulance trusts, British Association for Immediate Care (BASICS) schemes and air ambulance operations in England, Scotland and Wales. Total response rate was in excess of 66%. A specific protocol for PPE use was issued by 81%, 89% and 38% of ambulance trusts, air ambulance and BASICS schemes, respectively. There was a wide variation in provision of PPE both within and between different groups of providers. Fewer than 55% of providers had an evaluation system in place for reviewing PPE use. Many reasons account for the differences in provision. There is a clear need for a standard to be set nationally in conjunction with locally implemented evaluation and re-accreditation processes.

  6. Influence of The Education and Training of Prehospital Medical Crews on Measures of Performance and Patient Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Blomberg, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Prehospital care has developed dramatically the last decades with the implementation of new devices and educational concepts. Clinical decisions and treatments have moved out from the hospitals to the prehospital setting. In Sweden this has been accompanied by an increase in the level of competence, i.e. by introducing nurses in the ambulances. With some exceptions the scientific support for these changes is poor. This thesis deals with such changes in three different subsets of prehospital c...

  7. Influence of The Education and Training of Prehospital Medical Crews on Measures of Performance and Patient Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Blomberg, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Prehospital care has developed dramatically the last decades with the implementation of new devices and educational concepts. Clinical decisions and treatments have moved out from the hospitals to the prehospital setting. In Sweden this has been accompanied by an increase in the level of competence, i.e. by introducing nurses in the ambulances. With some exceptions the scientific support for these changes is poor. This thesis deals with such changes in three different subsets of prehospital c...

  8. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility and postural balance in patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain – a pilot study

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    Eriksson Magnus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although cervical pain is widespread, most victims are only mildly and occasionally affected. A minority, however, suffer chronic pain and/or functional impairments. Although there is abundant literature regarding nontraumatic neck pain, little focuses on diagnostic criteria. During the last decade, research on neck pain has been designed to evaluate underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, without noteworthy success. Independent researchers have investigated postural balance and cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility among patients with chronic neck pain, and have (in most cases concluded the source of the problem is a reduced ability in the neck's proprioceptive system. Here, we investigated cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility and postural balance among patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain. Methods Ours was a two-group, observational pilot study of patients with complaints of continuous neck pain during the 3 months prior to recruitment. Thirteen patients with chronic neck pain of nontraumatic origin were recruited from an institutional outpatient clinic. Sixteen healthy persons were recruited as a control group. Cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility was assessed by exploring head repositioning accuracy and postural balance was measured with computerized static posturography. Results Parameters of cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility were not reduced. However, in one of six test movements (flexion, global repositioning errors were significantly larger in the experimental group than in the control group (p Conclusion In patients with nontraumatic chronic neck pain, we found statistically significant global repositioning errors in only one of six test movements. In this cohort, we found no evidence of impaired postural balance. Head repositioning accuracy and computerized static posturography are imperfect measures of functional proprioceptive impairments. Validity of (and procedures for using these

  9. Advanced airway management is necessary in prehospital trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockey, D J; Healey, B; Crewdson, K; Chalk, G; Weaver, A E; Davies, G E

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of airway compromise in trauma patients is a priority. Basic airway management is provided by all emergency personnel, but the requirement for on-scene advanced airway management is controversial. We attempted to establish the demand for on-scene advanced airway interventions. Trauma patients managed with standard UK paramedic airway interventions were assessed to determine whether airway compromise had been effectively treated or whether more advanced airway management was required. A prospective observational study was conducted to identify trauma patients requiring prehospital advanced airway management attended by a doctor-paramedic team. The team assessed and documented airway compromise on arrival, interventions performed before and after their arrival, and their impact on airway compromise. Four hundred and seventy-two patients required advanced airway intervention and received 925 airway interventions by ground-based paramedics. Two hundred and sixty-nine patients (57%) still had airway compromise on arrival of the enhanced care team; no oxygen had been administered to 52 patients (11%). There were 45 attempted intubations by ground paramedics with a 64% success rate and 11% unrecognized oesophageal intubation rate. Doctor-paramedic teams delivering prehospital anaesthesia achieved definitive airway management for all patients. A significant proportion of severely injured trauma patients required advanced airway interventions to effectively treat airway compromise. Standard ambulance service interventions were only effective for a proportion of patients, but might not have always been applied appropriately. Complications of advanced airway management occurred in both provider groups, but failed intubation and unrecognized oesophageal intubation were a particular problem in the paramedic intubation group. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  10. [Prehospital analgesia by emergency physicians and paramedics : Comparison of effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schempf, B; Casu, S; Häske, D

    2017-05-01

    In some German emergency medical service districts, analgesia is performed by paramedics without support of emergency physicians on scene. With regard to safety and effectiveness, paramedics should not be overshadowed by emergency physicians. Is prehospital analgesia performed by paramedics under medical supervision or emergency physicians comparable regarding processes and effectiveness in the case of isolated limb injury? As a retrospective analysis of patients with isolated limb injury, analgesia performed by paramedics and by emergency physicians was analyzed. In addition to pain reduction, prescribed monitoring, and further airway maneuvers, vital parameters (Glasgow coma scale, systolic blood pressure, heartrate and respiratory rate, oxygen saturation) were recorded at the beginning and end of prehospital treatment. Pain was reduced from NRS 8 ± 1 to NRS 2 ± 1 in the paramedic group, and from NRS 8 ± 2 to NRS 2 ± 2 in the physician group, so the mean pain reduction was 6 ± 2 in the paramedic-group and 5 ± 2 in the physician group (p < 0.001). Adequate analgesia was found in 96.9% in the physician group and 91.7% in the paramedic group (p = 0.113). ECG monitoring and oxygen administration according to SOP was significantly more frequent in the paramedic group than in the physician group (p < 0.001). Respiratory frequency was significantly more frequent in the physician group than in the paramedic group (p < 0.001). The study shows, with a given indication, that German paramedics can independently perform safe and successful analgesia under medical supervision.

  11. Diagnostic Accuracy of Cincinnati Pre-Hospital Stroke Scale

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    Behzad Zohrevandi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stroke is recognized as the third cause of mortality after cardiovascular and cancer diseases, so that lead to death of about 5 million people, annually. There are several scales to early prediction of at risk patients and decreasing the rate of mortality by transferring them to the stroke center. In the present study, the accuracy of Cincinnati pre-hospital stroke scale was assessed. Methods: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study done to assess accuracy of Cincinnati scale in prediction of stroke probability in patients referred to the emergency department of Poursina Hospital, Rasht, Iran, 2013 with neurologic symptoms. Three criteria of Cincinnati scale including facial droop, dysarthria, and upper extremity weakness as well as the final diagnosis of patients were gathered. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios of Cincinnati scale were calculated using SPSS version 20. Results: 448 patients were assessed. The agreement rate of Cincinnati scale and final diagnosis was 0.483 ± 0.055 (p<0.0001. The sensitivity of 93.19% (95% Cl: 90.11-95.54, specificity of 51.85% (95% Cl: 40.47-63.10, positive predictive value of 89.76% (95% Cl: 86.27-92.62, negative predictive value of 62.69% (95% Cl: 55.52-72.45, positive likelihood ratio of 1.94% (95% Cl: 1.54-2.43, and negative likelihood ratio of 0.13% (95% Cl: 0.09-0.20 were calculated. Conclusion: It seems that pre-hospital Cincinnati scale can be an appropriate screening tool in prediction of stroke in patients with acute neurologic syndromes.

  12. Challenges in the Diagnosis and Management of Acquired Nontraumatic Urethral Strictures in Boys in Yaoundé, Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouafo Tambo, F. F.; Fossi kamga, G.; Kamadjou, C.; Mbouche, L.; Nwaha Makon, A. S.; Birraux, J.; Andze, O. G.; Angwafo, F. F.; Mure, P. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Urethral strictures in boys denote narrowing of the urethra which can be congenital or acquired. In case of acquired strictures, the etiology is iatrogenic or traumatic and rarely infectious or inflammatory. The aim of this study was to highlight the diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties of acquired nontraumatic urethral strictures in boys in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Methodology. The authors report five cases of nontraumatic urethral strictures managed at the Pediatric Surgery Department of the YGOPH over a two-year period (November 2012–November 2014). In order to confirm the diagnosis of urethral stricture, all patients were assessed with both cystourethrography and urethrocystoscopy. Results. In all the cases the urethra was inflammatory with either a single or multiple strictures. The surgical management included internal urethrotomy (n = 1), urethral dilatation (n = 1), vesicostomy (n = 2), and urethral catheterization (n = 3). With a median follow-up of 8.2 months (4–16 months) all patients remained symptoms-free. Conclusion. The authors report the difficulties encountered in the diagnosis and management of nontraumatic urethral strictures in boys at a tertiary hospital in Yaoundé, Cameroon. The existence of an inflammatory etiology of urethral strictures in boys deserves to be considered. PMID:27239364

  13. Resilience and vulnerability among refugee children of traumatized and non-traumatized parents

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    Daud Atia

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to explore resilience among refugee children whose parents had been traumatized and were suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD. Methods The study comprised 80 refugee children (40 boys and 40 girls, age range 6–17 yrs, divided into two groups. The test group consisted of 40 refugee children whose parents had been tortured in Iraq before coming to Sweden. In accordance with DSM-IV criteria, these children were further divided in two sub-groups, those who were assessed as having PTSD-related symptoms (n = 31 and those who did not have PTSD-related symptoms (n = 9. The comparison group consisted of 40 children from Egypt, Syria and Morocco whose parents had not been tortured. Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, 3rd edn. (WISC-III, Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents- Revised (DICA-R, Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms checklist (PTSS, "I Think I am" (ITIA and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ were used to assess IQ; PTSD-related symptoms; self-esteem; possible resilience and vulnerability. Results Children without PTSD/PTSS in the traumatized parents group had more favorable values (ITIA and SDQ with respect to total scores, emotionality, relation to family, peer relations and prosocial behavior than the children in the same group with PTSD/PTSS and these values were similar to those the children in the comparison group (the non-traumatized parents group. The children in the non-traumatized parents group scored significantly higher on the IQ test than the children with traumatized parents, both the children with PTSD-related symptoms and those without PTSD-related symptoms. Conclusion Adequate emotional expression, supportive family relations, good peer relations, and prosociality constituted the main indicators of resilience. Further investigation is needed to explore the possible effects of these factors and the effects of IQ. The findings of this study are

  14. The mean prehospital machine; accurate prehospital non-invasive blood pressure measurement in the critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muecke, Sandy; Bersten, Andrew; Plummer, John

    2010-06-01

    Non-invasive blood pressure recordings may be inaccurate in the critically ill patient and measurement difficulties are intensified in the prehospital setting. This may adversely impact upon outcomes for many critically ill patients, particularly those with traumatic brain injury and/or lengthy prehospital times. This study aimed to validate a non-invasive, oscillometric, ambulatory blood pressure measuring device, the Oscar 2, Model 222 (SunTech Medical, Morrisville, USA) during the ambulance transport of critically ill patients. We have previously shown that mean arterial blood pressures observed by Intensive Care Unit nurses from a patient monitor can be considered interchangeable with reference intra-arterial integrated mean pressures. In the current study, we compared non-invasive device mean pressures to intra-arterial pressures observed by retrieval nurses from the patient monitor, during the ambulance transportation of critically ill patients. Device performance was required to fulfil the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) protocol requirements. Additionally, linear mixed effects analyses and Bland-Altman comparisons were undertaken. For 157 measurements recorded from 23 patients, when the Oscar 2 did not indicate a measurement was associated with a fault, the device fulfilled the AAMI protocol requirements, with a mean error of -1.1 mmHg (standard deviation 7.8 mmHg), 95% confidence intervals (linear mixed effects analysis) -2.9, 0.8; P = 0.26. Bland-Altman plots indicated uniform agreement across a wide range of blood pressures. Sixteen percent of recordings were associated with a patient, environment, or device generated fault. When the Oscar 2 does not indicate a fault has occurred, clinicians may be confident the mean pressure, within acceptable limits, is accurate, even during ambulance motion, administration of high doses of vasopressors and mechanical ventilation. The Oscar 2 appears to be an accurate and rugged out

  15. Isolated acute nontraumatic cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage: Etiologies based on MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eun; Kang, Myung Jin; Kim, Sang Hyeon [Dept. of Radiology, Dong-A University Medical Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify common underlying etiologies that may be responsible for isolated acute nontraumatic cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) by analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the brain. From August 2005 to February 2014, 15 cSAH patients were admitted to our institution. All patients with cSAH underwent brain MRI and magnetic resonance angiography as a part of their initial evaluation. An analysis of the patients' medical history, clinical presentations, and brain MRI findings was retrospectively performed. Among the combined pathologies that were suspected causes of cSAH, 11 patients showed acute or subacute cerebral infarctions at the ipsilateral hemisphere of cSAH on the diffusion-weighted images. Four of 11 patients had only cerebral infarction, but the other 7 had combined vasculopathy of extra- and intracranial arteries. Four of 15 patients who did not have cerebral infarction, had intracranial artery stenosis, or showed possible cerebral amyloid angiopathy, or no abnormal findings on the brain MRI. Ischemic stroke, such as cerebral infarction or vasculopathy of the extra and intracranial arteries is regarded as a common underlying etiology of the cSAH based on MRI findings.

  16. CT in nontraumatic acute thoracic aortic disease: typical and atypical features and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañer, Eva; Andreu, Marta; Gallardo, Xavier; Mata, Josep Maria; Cabezuelo, María Angeles; Pallardó, Yolanda

    2003-10-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection is the most frequent cause of aortic emergency, and unless it is rapidly diagnosed and treated, the result is death. Helical computed tomography (CT) permits the diagnosis of acute aortic dissection with a sensitivity and specificity of nearly 100%. This imaging modality also enables differentiation between proximal aortic dissection (type A in the Stanford classification) and distal aortic dissection (Stanford type B), which are treated differently and have different prognoses. In 70% of patients in whom nontraumatic acute thoracic aortic dissection is diagnosed after evaluation with helical CT, scans show the typical signs of aortic dissection, with rupture and displacement of the intima. CT also can depict other pathologic entities with similar clinical manifestations, such as intramural hematoma and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. Awareness of the different radiologic appearances of these disease entities is essential for differential diagnosis. More than one-third of patients with aortic dissection show signs and symptoms indicative of systemic involvement. Because branch-vessel involvement may increase morbidity and mortality, in this group of patients it is important to evaluate the entire aorta so as to determine the distal extent of the dissection and detect any systemic involvement.

  17. Unilateral neck pain: a case of Eagle syndrome with associated nontraumatic styloid fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlik, Kseniya; Griffin, Gregory D; Zoumberakis, Erick

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of Eagle syndrome in a 77-year-old woman with associated aneurysm and nontraumatic styloid process fracture, without history of tonsillectomy, who presented to the emergency department. The first set of symptoms associated with the elongation of the temporal styloid process and/or the calcification of the stylomandibular or stylohyoid ligaments was described by Eagle in 1937. Classically, unilateral pain in the oropharynx radiating to the neck and face that is exacerbated by head turning and neck rotation is characteristic of Eagle syndrome. However, styloid process elongation and stylohyoid calcification found in Eagle syndrome may also present with vascular symptomsthrough impingement and injury of the carotid arteries. Eagle syndrome is a rare but important differential that the emergency physician must consider in a patient with unilateral neck pain and positional neurological symptoms with head turning and in posttonsillectomy patients. Patients with medical history of Eagle syndrome presenting with neck pain and especially neurological symptomsmust be thoroughly evaluated for carotid and jugular venous injury. Specifically, the decision to obtain computed tomography and computed tomographic angiography to evaluate for carotid artery injury is important for patient management and disposition.

  18. Non-traumatic cortical subarachnoid haemorrhage: diagnostic work-up and aetiological background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitzer, C.; Kosinski, C.M. [University Hospital of RWTH Aachen, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Mull, M. [University Hospital of RWTH Aachen, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Rohde, V. [University Hospital of RWTH Aachen, Department of Neurosurgery, Aachen (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Only 15% of all subarachnoid haemorrhages (SAHs) are not of aneurysmal origin. Among those, circumscribed SAHs along the cortical convexity are rare and have only been described in singular case reports so far. Here, we present a collection of 12 cases of SAH along the convexity, of non-traumatic origin. Over a period of 10 years, 12 cases of circumscribed SAH along the convexity were identified at our clinic. The clinical presentations, neuroradiological SAH characteristics, further diagnostic work-up to identify the underlying aetiologies, the therapy and clinical outcome were analysed. The patients' chief complaints were unspecific cephalgia, focal or generalised seizures and focal neurological deficits. Typical signs of basal SAH, such as nuchal rigidity, thunderclap-headache or alteration of consciousness, were rare. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) revealed different aetiologies, namely postpartal posterior encephalopathy (three), cerebral vasculitis (two), dural sinus thrombosis (two), cortical venous thrombosis (one), intracerebral abscesses (one) and cerebral cavernoma (one). Two cases remained unresolved. Treatment of the underlying disease and symptomatic medication led to good clinical outcome in almost all cases. On the basis of these findings, we demonstrate that the clinical presentation, localisation and aetiology of cortical SAH differ clearly from other SAHs. A diagnostic work-up with MRI and eventually DSA is essential. Mostly, the causative disease can be identified, and specific treatment allows a favourable outcome. (orig.)

  19. Non-traumatic splenic rupture: Report of seven cases and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ercan Gedik; Sadullah Girgin; Mustafa Aldemir; Celalettin Keles; Mehmet Cudi Tuncer; Ayfer Aktas

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate seven patients with non-traumatic splenic rupture (NSR).NSR is an uncommon dramatic abdominal emergency that requires immediate diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment to ensure the patient's survival.METHODS:Within 11 years,seven cases were evaluated for patient characteristics,anamnesis and symptoms,method of diagnosis,findings of laparotomy,and etiology of NSR.RESULTS:There were six (86%) male and one female (14%) patient,whose mean age was 36±12.8 (17-56)years.We report here four cases of Plasmodium vivax malaria (cases Ⅰ-Ⅳ),one case of hemodialysis (case V),one case of spontaneous splenic rupture (case Ⅵ),and one case of hairy cell leukemia (case Ⅶ).Splenectomy was performed in all patients.All of them made an uneventful recovery and were discharged in stable condition.CONCLUSION:NSR is a rare entity that needs a high index of suspicion for diagnosis.Using ultrasonography or computer tomography,and peritoneal aspiration of fresh blood may assist in the diagnosis of NSR.Increased awareness of NSR can enhance early diagnosis and effective treatment.

  20. A Rare Case of Spontaneous Pneumocephalus Associated with Nontraumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

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    Murad Baba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Spontaneous nontraumatic pneumocephalus (PNC and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leaks are both very uncommon conditions. We report a rare case of spontaneous pneumocephalus associated with CSF leak secondary to right sphenoid sinus bony defect without history of trauma. Case Description. 51-year-old Hispanic female with past medical history of hypertension and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri presented to the emergency room complaining of headache and clear discharge from the right nostril. Physical examination was significant for right frontal sinus tenderness and clear discharge from right nostril. Computed Tomography (CT scan of the brain showed moderate amount of extra-axial air within the right cerebral hemisphere indicative of pneumocephalus. CT scan of facial bones showed bony defect along the right sphenoid sinus with abnormal CSF collection. The patient was started on intravenous antibiotics for meningitis prophylaxis and subsequently underwent transsphenoidal repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak with abdominal fat graft. CSF rhinorrhea stopped completely after the surgery with near complete resolution of pneumocephalus before discharge. Conclusions. Early identification of pneumocephalus and surgical intervention can help decrease the morbidity and avoid possible complications. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, although rare, can lead to CSF leak and pneumocepahlus.

  1. National Prehospital Evidence-Based Guidelines Strategy: A Summary for EMS Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Gill, Christian; Gaither, Joshua B; Bigham, Blair L; Myers, J Brent; Kupas, Douglas F; Spaite, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    Multiple national organizations have recommended and supported a national investment to increase the scientific evidence available to guide patient care delivered by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and incorporate that evidence directly into EMS systems. Ongoing efforts seek to develop, implement, and evaluate prehospital evidence-based guidelines (EBGs) using the National Model Process created by a multidisciplinary panel of experts convened by the Federal Interagency Committee on EMS (FICEMS) and the National EMS Advisory Council (NEMSAC). Yet, these and other EBG efforts have occurred in relative isolation, with limited direct collaboration between national projects, and have experienced challenges in implementation of individual guidelines. There is a need to develop sustainable relationships among stakeholders that facilitate a common vision that facilitates EBG efforts. Herein, we summarize a National Strategy on EBGs developed by the National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) with involvement of 57 stakeholder organizations, and with the financial support of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the EMS for Children program. The Strategy proposes seven action items that support collaborative efforts in advancing prehospital EBGs. The first proposed action is creation of a Prehospital Guidelines Consortium (PGC) representing national medical and EMS organizations that have an interest in prehospital EBGs and their benefits to patient outcomes. Other action items include promoting research that supports creation and evaluates the impact of EBGs, promoting the development of new EBGs through improved stakeholder collaboration, and improving education on evidence-based medicine for all prehospital providers. The Strategy intends to facilitate implementation of EBGs by improving guideline dissemination and incorporation into protocols, and seeks to establish standardized evaluation methods for prehospital EBGs. Finally, the Strategy

  2. Prehospital Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Increase the Positive Predictive Value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for High-Mortality Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The impact of prehospital endotracheal intubation on outcome in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. J. Trauma 58, 933–939. 6. Magazzini, S...tracheal intubation after traumatic injury.4 In addition, the GCS is often relied upon in prehospital research to help control for degree of TBI (for...GCS, hypotension, and higher mortality has been quantified in classic prehospital severity scores, such as the trauma score,14 the prehospital index

  3. Low-cost improvements in prehospital trauma care in a Latin American city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreola-Risa, C; Mock, C N; Lojero-Wheatly, L; de la Cruz, O; Garcia, C; Canavati-Ayub, F; Jurkovich, G J

    2000-01-01

    Prehospital care is a critical component of efforts to lower trauma mortality. In less-developed countries, scarce resources dictate that any improvements in prehospital care must be low in cost. In one Latin American city, recent efforts to improve prehospital care have included an increase in the number of sites of ambulance dispatch from two to four and introduction of the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) course. The effect of increased dispatch sites was evaluated by comparing response times before and after completion of the change. The effect of PHTLS was evaluated by comparing prehospital treatment for the 3 months before initiation of the course (n = 361 trauma patients) and the 6 months after (n = 505). Response time decreased from a mean of 15.5 +/- 5.1 minutes, when there were two sites of dispatch, to 9.5 +/- 2.7 minutes, when there were four sites. Prehospital trauma care improved after initiation of the PHTLS course. For all trauma patients, use of cervical immobilization increased from 39 to 67%. For patients in respiratory distress, there were increases in the use of oropharyngeal airways (16-39%), in the use of suction (10-38%), and in the administration of oxygen (64-87%). For hypotensive patients, there was an increase in use of large-bore intravenous lines from 26 to 58%. The improved prehospital treatment did not increase the mean scene time (5.7 +/- 4.4 minutes before vs. 5.9 +/- 6.8 minutes after). The percent of patients transported who died in route decreased from 8.2% before the course to 4.7% after. These improvements required a minimal increase (16%) in the ambulance service budget. Increase in sites of dispatch and increased training in the form of the PHTLS course improved the process of pre-hospital care in this Latin American city and resulted in a decrease in prehospital deaths. These improvements were low cost and should be considered for use in other less developed countries.

  4. PRE-HOSPITAL THROMBOLYSIS IN KRASNOYARSK: RESULTS OF A RETROSPECTIVE COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Skripkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the safety and efficacy of pre-hospital thrombolysis with tenecteplase and hospital thrombolysis with alteplase. Material and Methods. Pre-hospital thrombolytic therapy with tenecteplase (n=15 and hospital thrombolysis with alteplaza (n=60 in patients with acute coronary syndrome and acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were analyzed in retrospective comparative study. Time characteristics of thrombolysis and its efficacy and safety were assessed. Results. The mean time from patients emergency medical service call to pre-hospital thrombolysis was 51.8±1.23 min, whereas to hospital thrombolysis 106.5±2.15 min (p<0.05. The effective hospital thrombolysis was observed in 68.3 and 83.3% of patients according to ECG (>50% resolution of ST-segment elevation and coronary angiography criteria, respectively. The effective pre-hospital thrombolysis was registered in 93.3% of patients as demonstrated with ECG and coronary angiography. Conclusion. Pre-hospital thrombolysis in patients with acute coronary syndrome was performed by 54.7 min earlier than hospital thrombolysis was. This can improve the patient prognosis.

  5. [Results of a national survey about the use of sedation scales in emergency prehospital medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belpomme, V; Devaud, M-L; Pariente, D; Ricard-Hibon, A; Mantz, J

    2009-04-01

    The primary goal of sedation in emergency prehospital care is to guarantee the security of the mechanically ventilated patients by optimising their adaptation to the respirator. If the French prehospital guidelines are well codified, their applicability in routine clinical practice seem to be rather empirical. The aim of this national survey was to evaluate the use of the clinical sedation scales by the prehospital physicians. This prospective and clinical practice survey was begun in January 2005. An anonymous questionnaire was sent to the physicians working in the 377 Mobile Intensive Care Unit of the 105 French Emergency Medical Service System. The total response rate from physicians was 28% (n=497). Only 29% of the physicians (n=145) declared to use a sedation scale for a mechanically ventilated patient. The Ramsay score was used in 97% of the cases (n=141).The principal reasons given by the physicians for not using the sedation scales were their ignorance in 57% of the cases (n=200) and the systematic choice of a deep sedation in 42% of the cases (n=147). For 18% of them (n=62), the use of sedation scores was considered too complicated. The final results show that the utilisation ratio of the sedation scores is very low in emergency prehospital medicine and suggest that an effort toward improving the use of sedation in prehospital emergency medicine is necessary.

  6. [Prehospital trauma care training course. Integration of emergency physician and rescue services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopschina, C; Stangl, R

    2008-08-01

    With the emergence of a trauma network in the metropolitan area of Nuremberg, Germany, the question arose whether prehospital trauma management and emergency department management could be better integrated. A training scheme was designed for prehospital trauma care by the rescue services of the Workers' Samaritan Federation Germany (ASB), the Bavarian Red Cross, Maltese Ambulance, St. Johns Ambulance, representatives of the emergency physicians, and physicians of Rummelsberg Hospital. A detailed search of the international literature was done for all subjects regarding prehospital trauma management, and the American training systems (ITLS, PHTLS) were studied. The review was followed by a critical evaluation of the reality of on site-care, and the German and American systems were compared. A 2-day course with 6 sessions (accident place and kinetics, trauma investigation, pathologies, resuscitation, practical training, and evaluation) was developed, adapted from the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) algorithm. Special attention was given to the integration and position of the emergency physician in Germany, as well as to the defined authority of the rescue services. Conversion into practice was facilitated by teamwork. The course is free of charge to all rescue services and members of the concept group. With a qualified prehospital system that works smoothly with the ATLS concepts, improved prehospital care for trauma patients seems possible.

  7. [Prehospital emergency care in Mexico City: the opportunities of the healthcare system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinet, Luis M

    2005-01-01

    Unintentional vehicle traffic injuries cause 1.2 million preventable deaths per year worldwide, mostly affecting the population in their productive years of life. In Mexico, unintentional vehicle traffic injuries are one of the main causes of death; in Mexico City they account for 8% of deaths. Prehospital systems are set up to provide hospital medical care to the population, by means of a complex network that includes transportation, communications, resources (material, financial and human), and public participation. These systems may be designed in a variety of ways, depending on availability, capacity and quality of resources, according to specific community needs, always abiding by laws and regulations. In Mexico, several institutions and organizations offer prehospital services without being overseen in terms of coordination, regulation and performance evaluation, despite the high rates of morbidity and mortality due to injuries and preventable conditions amenable to effective therapy during the prehospital period. Prehospital care may contribute to decrease the morbidity and mortality rates of injuries requiring prompt medical care. Emphasis is made on the importance of assessing the performance of prehospital care, as well as on identification of needs for future development.

  8. Effects of physician-based emergency medical service dispatch in severe traumatic brain injury on prehospital run time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franschman, G.; Verburg, N.; Brens-Heldens, V.; Andriessen, T. M. J. C.; Van der Naalt, J.; Peerdeman, S. M.; Hoogerwerf, N.; Greuters, S.; Schober, P.; Vos, P. E.; Christiaans, H. M. T.; Boer, C.; Valk, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Prehospital care by physician-based helicopter emergency medical services (P-HEMS) may prolong total prehospital run time. This has raised an issue of debate about the benefits of these services in traumatic brain injury (TBI). We therefore investigated the effects of P-HEMS dispatch o

  9. Effects of physician-based emergency medical service dispatch in severe traumatic brain injury on prehospital run time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franschman, G.; Verburg, N.; Brens-Heldens, V.; Andriessen, T.M.J.C.; Naalt, J. van der; Peerdeman, S.M.; Valk, J.P.M. van der; Hoogerwerf, N.; Greuters, S.; Schober, P.; Vos, P.E.; Christiaans, H.M.; Boer, C.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Prehospital care by physician-based helicopter emergency medical services (P-HEMS) may prolong total prehospital run time. This has raised an issue of debate about the benefits of these services in traumatic brain injury (TBI). We therefore investigated the effects of P-HEMS dispatch o

  10. The characteristics and pre-hospital management of blunt trauma patients with suspected spinal column injuries : a retrospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwold, J. T.; Sagel, D. C.; van Grunsven, P. M.; Holla, M.; de Man-van Ginkel, J.; Berben, S.

    Background Pre-hospital spinal immobilisation by emergency medical services (EMS) staff is currently the standard of care in cases of suspected spinal column injuries. There is, however, a lack of data on the characteristics of patients who received spinal immobilisation during the pre-hospital

  11. Pre-hospital and hospital delay in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes in tertiary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S. Youssef

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Pre-hospital delay was mainly patient-related. Hospital delay was mainly related to healthcare resources. Governmental measures to promote ambulance emergency services may reduce the pre-hospital delay, while improving the utilization of healthcare resources may reduce hospital delay.

  12. Prehospital Dextrose Extravasation Causing Forearm Compartment Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Matthew; Colella, M Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman was found at home by paramedics to be hypoglycemic with altered mental status. She had multiple attempts at IV access and eventually a 22G IV was established and D50 was infused into her right forearm. Extravasation of the dextrose was noted after approximately 12 g of the medication was infused. She was given a dose of glucagon intramuscularly and her mental status improved. Shortly after her arrival to the emergency department, she was noted to have findings of compartment syndrome of her forearm at the site of the dextrose extravasation. She was evaluated by plastic surgery and taken to the operating room for emergent fasciotomy. She recovered well from the operation. D50 is well known to cause phlebitis and local skin necrosis as a complication. This case illustrates the danger of compartment syndrome after D50 extravasation. It is the first documented case of prehospital dextrose extravasation leading to compartment syndrome. There may be safer alternatives to D50 administration and providers must be acutely aware to monitor for D50 infusion complications.

  13. [Pre-hospital observation as an alternative to emergency hospitalisation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensvold, Morten; Seim, Arnfinn

    2014-09-30

    Pre-hospital observation beds in community care centres have for many years served as an alternative to hospitalisation in rural districts of Norway. The article presents the use of observation beds associated with the Fosen A&E centre. A retrospective review of records of patients who had contacted Fosen A&E centre during the period 21 August 2006-21 August 2009 was undertaken. Patient characteristics and clinical pathways were registered, including admissions to hospital or to an observation bed, as well as re-admissions. Ever since observation beds were first introduced, clear inclusion and exclusion criteria have been applied with regard to the allocation of patients to observation beds. Altogether 8027 patients had been in direct contact with an A&E doctor, and 2342 were admitted, of whom 77% to hospital and 23% to an observation bed. Of the 530 patients admitted to an observation bed, 55% were 70 years or older. Of these, 68% were discharged to their homes within 36 hours, 17% were transferred to hospital, and the remainder received further treatment in a local rehabilitation unit or nursing home. The rate of readmission to observation beds or hospital amounted to 4% among those who had been discharged after no more than three days, and 18% among those discharged after 3-28 days. A low number of readmissions may indicate that the use of observation beds is an alternative to hospitalisation.

  14. The effect of paramedic training on pre-hospital trauma care (EPPTC-study): a study protocol for a prospective semi-qualitative observational trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Accidents are the leading cause of death in adults prior to middle age. The care of severely injured patients is an interdisciplinary challenge. Limited evidence is available concerning pre-hospital trauma care training programs and the advantage of such programs for trauma patients. The effect on trauma care procedures or on the safety of emergency crews on the scene is limited; however, there is a high level of experience and expert opinion. Methods I – Video-recorded case studies are the basis of an assessment tool and checklist being developed to verify the results of programs to train participants in the care of seriously injured patients, also known as “objective structured clinical examination” (OSCE). The timing, completeness and quality of the individual measures are assessed using appropriate scales. The evaluation of team communication and interaction will be analyzed with qualitative methods and quantified and verified by existing instruments (e.g. the Clinical Team Scale). The developed assessment tool is validated by several experts in the fields of trauma care, trauma research and medical education. II a) In a German emergency medical service, the subjective assessment of paramedics of their pre-hospital care of trauma patients is evaluated at three time points, namely before, immediately after and one year after training. b) The effect of a standardized course concept on the quality of documentation in actual field operations is determined based on three items relevant to patient safety before and after the course. c) The assessment tool will be used to assess the effect of a standardized course concept on procedures and team communication in pre-hospital trauma care using scenario-based case studies. Discussion This study explores the effect of training on paramedics. After successful study completion, further multicenter studies are conceivable, which would evaluate emergency-physician staffed teams. The influence on the patients

  15. Angiography in non-traumatic brain haematoma. An analysis of 100 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, P.D. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Academic Dept. of Radiology; Beveridge, C.J.; Gholkar, A. [Newcastle General Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    1997-09-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this project was to study the anatomical characteristics of intracerebral haematoma (ICH) in order to determine features that may negate the need for angiography in some patients. Material and Methods: The study was prospective and designed to investigate the underlying cause of non-traumatic ICH in 100 cases assessed by conventional angiography. Patients were excluded if there was a history of trauma or known pre-existing brain abnormality. All patients were examined with CT and angiography within 4 days of the ictus. Results: Ruptured aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) were diagnosed on the initial angiogram in 49% of cases: 27 AVMs and 22 aneurysms. One case of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis was also detected. Vascular abnormalities were found most frequently in the under-40 age group and in cases in which subarachnoid haemorrhage, intraventricular haemorrhage or extracerebral haematoma accompanied the ICH. The temporal lobe was the most frequent anatomical location (37%). When a temporal lobe haematoma extended into the Sylvian fissure from the inferior pole of the temporal lobe or when it was associated with subarachnoid haemorrhage, structural abnormalities were found in over 90% of cases. Conclusions: There are groups of patients with ICH in whom the CT features are highly suggestive of AVM or aneurysm rupture. If the initial angiography is negative in these cases, careful follow up by repeat angiography and/or MR imaging is essential. However, potentially treatable abnormalities cannot be excluded with certainty by the distribution of the haematoma on CT alone, even if there is a history of pre-existing hypertension. (orig.).

  16. Uterine artery pseudoaneurysm: its occurrence after non-traumatic events, and possibility of "without embolization" strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Yosuke; Takahashi, Hironori; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Suzuki, Hirotada; Kuwata, Tomoyuki; Usui, Rie; Saruyama, Miyuki; Ogoyama, Manabu; Nagayama, Shiho; Nakamura, Hiroyasu; Ugajin, Atsushi; Matsubara, Shigeki

    2016-10-01

    Uterine artery pseudoaneurysm (UAP) has been considered to occur very rarely after traumatic delivery/abortion, and is usually detected after its rupture, yielding massive bleeding. Our hypothesis is: some UAP may be undetected without massive bleeding and may spontaneously resolve, and, thus, may not require transarterial embolization (TAE). We attempted: (1) to detect both ruptured and non-ruptured UAP, thereby characterizing candidates of spontaneously resolving UAP, and (2) to confirm that UAP is not rare and not always associated with traumatic events. This was a retrospective observational study of 50 women with angiographically confirmed UAP and treated by TAE. Angiograms and medical charts were retrieved to examine the associations among symptoms, ultrasound findings, and extravasation. Gray-scale ultrasound was performed for all women after delivery or abortion as our routine practice. UAP occurred in 3-6/1000 deliveries and 40% occurred after non-traumatic deliveries/abortion. While 36% had active vaginal bleeding at admission, 64% did not. While 100% of patients with current active bleeding showed extravasation from the pseudoaneurysmal sac, patients without it showed a varied incidence of extravasation depending on the bleeding pattern/history and ultrasound findings. Interestingly, all patients with current bleeding (-), bleeding history (+), and ultrasound-discernable-intrauterine low echoic mass (-) were devoid of extravasation, suggesting that UAP may show progression to thrombosis and, thus, resolve spontaneously. UAP may not be so rare and not associated with traumatic delivery/abortion. Some UAP may resolve, and, thus, may not require TAE, at least immediately. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Management in non-traumatic arm, neck and shoulder complaints: differences between diagnostic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feleus, Anita; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Miedema, Harald S; Verhaar, Jan A N; Koes, Bart W

    2008-09-01

    Arm, neck and/or shoulder complaints are common in western societies. In the Netherlands, general practice guidelines are issued on shoulder pain and epicondylitis only. Little is known about actual management of the total range of diagnoses. The objectives of the study are: to determine management in patients consulting the GP with a new episode of non-traumatic arm neck and shoulder complaints up to 6 months after the first consultation. To evaluate differences in management between patients with specific diagnoses versus non-specific diagnoses and between specific diagnostic groups. In a prospective cohort study in general practice. We recruited 682 eligible patients. Data on diagnosis, management, patient- and complaint-characteristics were collected. Co-occurrence of treatment options was presented in scaled rectangles. After 6 months, additional diagnostic tests had been performed in 18% of the patients, mainly radiographic examination (14%). Further, 49% had been referred for physiotherapy and 12% to the medical specialist. Patients with specific diagnoses were more frequently referred for specialist treatment, and patients with non-specific diagnoses for physiotherapy. Corticosteroid injections (17%) were mainly applied specific diagnoses (e.g. impingement syndrome, frozen shoulder, carpal tunnel and M. Quervain). Frequencies of prescribed medication (51%) did not differ between specific and non-specific diagnoses. In 19% of the patients no referral, prescribed analgesics or injection was applied. Braces (4%) were mainly prescribed in epicondylitis. Overall, management most frequently consisted of prescribed analgesics and referral for physiotherapy. Specific and non-specific diagnostic subgroups differed in the frequency corticosteroid injections were applied, and referrals to physiotherapy and to a medical specialist.

  18. Urodynamic profile of patients with neurogenic bladder following non-traumatic myelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the urodynamic profile of the patients following non-traumatic myelopathies (NTMs with neurogenic bladder. Setting: Neurological rehabilitation department of university tertiary research hospital. Materials and Methods: Seventy-nine patients (44 men with monophasic NTM, with the age range 8-65 years (31.0 ± 16.0 years, were admitted for inpatients′ rehabilitation. Length of stay in rehabilitation ranged from 6 to 120 days (32.0 ± 24.8 days. Fifty-six patients (70.9% had spinal lesion above D10, 17 had lesion between D10 and L2 (21.5%, and 6 (7.6% had cauda equina syndrome. All patients had neurogenic bladder with urinary complaints. Urodynamic study (UDS was performed in all patients. Results: UDS showed 71.4% patients (40/56 had neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO with or without sphincter dyssynergy (DSD with lesion above D10; only 52.9% patients (9/17 had NDO with or without DSD detrusor with lesion between D10 and L2; and majority (5/6 patients had underactive detrusor in the cauda equina group. Bladder management was based on the UDS findings. No significant correlation was found (P > 0.05 between detrusor behavior and the level, severity (ASIA Impairment Scale of spinal injury, or gender using chi-square test. Conclusions: Neurogenic bladder following NTM was observed in all patients. UDS suggested predominantly NDO in lesions above D10 and mixed pattern in between D10 and L2 lesions. No significant correlation was found between detrusor behavior and the level or severity of NTM in the study.

  19. Operative management of a non-traumatic cervico-thoracic spondylolisthesis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwingenberger Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In contrast to spondylolisthesis of the lumbar spine, non-traumatic cervico-thoracic spondylolisthesis is a very rare lesion. Even minor changes in the displacement of the vertebrae or the cord can lead to cervical myelopathy and paralysis. Since only a few cases have been well-documented, there is currently no clear preference between operative techniques. Case presentation We describe the case of a 63-year-old Caucasian man with a 13 mm spondylolisthesis between C7 and T1. Within a few months, a progressive cervical myelopathy developed as he began to suffer pain and loss of function of his digits and was no longer able to walk unassisted. In an interdisciplinary collaboration between neurological and orthopedic surgeons, a ventral-dorsal-ventral approach was performed on one vertebral section. The ventral removal of the intervertebral disc was followed by laminectomy and dorsal instrumentation. A new application technique was established by inserting bicortical screws into the transverse processes of T2 and T3. The structure was subsequently stabilized by the ventral insertion of a Harms basket. The procedure was successful as it halted progression of the myelopathy. The patient demonstrated improved sensitivity and recovered the ability to walk unassisted. He has now been able to walk unassisted for two years postoperatively. Conclusion This paper describes a successful treatment for a very rare case of cervico-thoracic spondylolisthesis. The technique of inserting bicortical screws into the transverse processes is a fast, safe and successful method that does not require the use of intraoperative radiographs for placement of the bicortical screws into the transverse processes.

  20. Diagnostic performance and system delay using telemedicine for prehospital diagnosis in triaging and teatment of STEMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Martin Bøhme; Frost, Lars; Stengaard, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Objective: European ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) guidelines recommend prehospital diagnosis to facilitate early reperfusion in patients with STEMI, and they provide recommendations regarding optimal system delay (time from first medical contact (FMC) to the primary...... percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI)). There are limited data on achievable system delays in an optimal STEMI system of care using prehospital diagnosis to triage patients with STEMI directly to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) centres. We examined the proportion of tentative prehospital STEMI...... patients diagnosed using telemedicine. Results: During the study period, a tentative diagnosis of STEMI was established in 1061 patients, of whom 919 were triaged directly to the PCI centre. In 771 (84%) patients, a diagnosis of STEMI was confirmed. Patients transported

  1. Continuous positive airway pressure and noninvasive ventilation in prehospital treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Skule A; Bøtker, Morten Thingemann; Riddervold, Ingunn S;

    2014-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and noninvasive ventilation (NIV) are frequently used inhospital for treating respiratory failure, especially in treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Early initiation of treatment...... is important for success and introduction already in the prehospital setting may be beneficial. Our goal was to assess the evidence for an effect of prehospital CPAP or NIV as a supplement to standard medical treatment alone on the following outcome measures; mortality, hospital length of stay, intensive care...... examine prehospital CPAP. Of these, only one small, randomized controlled trial shows a reduced mortality rate and a reduced intubation rate with supplemental CPAP. The other three studies have neutral findings, but in two of these a trend toward lower intubation rate is found. The effect of supplemental...

  2. Association of prehospital advanced airway management with neurologic outcome and survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Hiraide, Atsushi; Chang, Yuchiao; Brown, David F M

    2013-01-16

    It is unclear whether advanced airway management such as endotracheal intubation or use of supraglottic airway devices in the prehospital setting improves outcomes following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) compared with conventional bag-valve-mask ventilation. To test the hypothesis that prehospital advanced airway management is associated with favorable outcome after adult OHCA. Prospective, nationwide, population-based study (All-Japan Utstein Registry) involving 649,654 consecutive adult patients in Japan who had an OHCA and in whom resuscitation was attempted by emergency responders with subsequent transport to medical institutions from January 2005 through December 2010. Favorable neurological outcome 1 month after an OHCA, defined as cerebral performance category 1 or 2. Of the eligible 649,359 patients with OHCA, 367,837 (57%) underwent bag-valve-mask ventilation and 281,522 (43%) advanced airway management, including 41,972 (6%) with endotracheal intubation and 239,550 (37%) with use of supraglottic airways. In the full cohort, the advanced airway group incurred a lower rate of favorable neurological outcome compared with the bag-valve-mask group (1.1% vs 2.9%; odds ratio [OR], 0.38; 95% CI, 0.36-0.39). In multivariable logistic regression, advanced airway management had an OR for favorable neurological outcome of 0.38 (95% CI, 0.37-0.40) after adjusting for age, sex, etiology of arrest, first documented rhythm, witnessed status, type of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of public access automated external defibrillator, epinephrine administration, and time intervals. Similarly, the odds of neurologically favorable survival were significantly lower both for endotracheal intubation (adjusted OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.37-0.45) and for supraglottic airways (adjusted OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.36-0.40). In a propensity score-matched cohort (357,228 patients), the adjusted odds of neurologically favorable survival were significantly lower both for

  3. An enhanced treatment program with markedly reduced mortality after a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten T; Holm, Gitte; Krasheninnikoff, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - Historically, high 30-day and 1-year mortality post-amputation rates (> 30% and 50%, respectively) have been reported in patients with a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation (LEA). We evaluated whether allocating experienced staff and implementing...... was compared with historical and concurrent national controls in Denmark. Results - The 30-day and 1-year mortality rates were 16% and 37%, respectively, in the intervention group, as compared to 35% and 59% in the historical control group treated in the same orthopedic ward. Cox proportional harzards models...

  4. Anaesthesiologist-provided prehospital airway management in patients with traumatic brain injury: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognås, Leif; Hansen, Troels M; Kirkegaard, Hans; Tønnesen, Else

    2014-12-01

    Guidelines recommend that patients with brain trauma with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of less than 9 should have an airway established. Hypoxia, hypotension and hypertension as well as hypoventilation and hyperventilation may worsen outcome in these patients. The objectives were to investigate guideline adherence, reasons for nonadherence and the incidences of complications related to prehospital advanced airway management in patients with traumatic brain injury. We prospectively collected data from eight anaesthesiologist-staffed prehospital critical care teams in the Central Denmark Region according to the Utstein-style template. Among 1081 consecutive prehospital advanced airway management patients, we identified 54 with a traumatic brain injury and an initial GCS score of less than 9. Guideline adherence in terms of airway management was 92.6%. The reasons for nonadherence were the patient's condition, anticipated difficult airway management and short distance to the emergency department. Following rapid sequence intubation (RSI), 11.4% developed oxygen saturation below 90%, 9.1% had a first post-RSI systolic blood pressure below 90 mmHg and 48.9% had a first post-RSI systolic blood pressure below 120 mmHg. The incidence of hypertension following prehospital RSI was 4.5%. The incidence of postendotracheal intubation hyperventilation was as high as 71.1%. The guideline adherence was high. The incidences of post-RSI hypoxia and systolic blood pressure below 90 compare with the results reported from other physician-staffed prehospital services. The incidence of systolic blood pressure below 120 as well as that of hyperventilation following prehospital endotracheal intubation in patients with traumatic brain injury call for a change in our current practice.

  5. EMS Adherence to a Pre-hospital Cervical Spine Clearance Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson, David

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the degree of adherence to a cervical spine (c-spine clearance protocol by pre-hospital Emergency Medical Services (EMS personnel by both self-assessment and receiving hospital assessment, to describe deviations from the protocol, and to determine if the rate of compliance by paramedic self-assessment differed from receiving hospital assessment. Methods: A retrospective sample of pre-hospital (consecutive series and receiving hospital (convenience sample assessments of the compliance with and appropriateness of c-spine immobilization. The c-spine clearance protocol was implemented for Orange County EMS just prior to the April-November 1999 data collection period. Results: We collected 396 pre-hospital and 162 receiving hospital data forms. From the pre-hospital data sheet. the percentage deviation from the protocol was 4.096 (16/396. Only one out of 16 cases that did not comply with the protocol was due to over immobilization (0.2%. The remaining 15 cases were under immobilized, according to protocol. Nine of the under immobilized cases (66% that should have been placed in c-spine precautions met physical assessment criteria in the protocol, while the other five cases met mechanism of injury criteria. The rate of deviations from protocol did not differ over time. The receiving hospital identified 8.0% (13/162; 6/16 over immobilized, 7/16 under immobilized of patients with deviations from the protocol; none was determined to have actual c-spine injury. Conclusion: The implementation of a pre-hospital c-spine clearance protocol in Orange County was associated with a moderate overall adherence rate (96% from the pre-hospital perspective, and 92% from the hospital perspective, p=.08 for the two evaluation methods. Most patients who deviated from protocol were under immobilized, but no c-spine injuries were missed. The rate of over immobilization was better than previously reported, implying a saving of resources.

  6. Pre-hospital antibiotic treatment and mortality caused by invasive meningococcal disease, adjusting for indication bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matute-Cruz Petra

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD has remained stable over the last thirty years and it is unclear whether pre-hospital antibiotherapy actually produces a decrease in this mortality. Our aim was to examine whether pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy reduces mortality from IMD, adjusting for indication bias. Methods A retrospective analysis was made of clinical reports of all patients (n = 848 diagnosed with IMD from 1995 to 2000 in Andalusia and the Canary Islands, Spain, and of the relationship between the use of pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy and mortality. Indication bias was controlled for by the propensity score technique, and a multivariate analysis was performed to determine the probability of each patient receiving antibiotics, according to the symptoms identified before admission. Data on in-hospital death, use of antibiotics and demographic variables were collected. A logistic regression analysis was then carried out, using death as the dependent variable, and pre-hospital antibiotic use, age, time from onset of symptoms to parenteral antibiotics and the propensity score as independent variables. Results Data were recorded on 848 patients, 49 (5.72% of whom died. Of the total number of patients, 226 had received oral antibiotics before admission, mainly betalactams during the previous 48 hours. After adjusting the association between the use of antibiotics and death for age, time between onset of symptoms and in-hospital antibiotic treatment, pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy remained a significant protective factor (Odds Ratio for death 0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.15–0.93. Conclusion Pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy appears to reduce IMD mortality.

  7. Chest Pain of Suspected Cardiac Origin: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Brian Savino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of chest pain of suspected cardiac origin and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods: We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of chest pain and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the chest pain protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were use of supplemental oxygen, aspirin, nitrates, opiates, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG, ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI regionalization systems, prehospital fibrinolysis and β-blockers. Results: The protocols varied widely in terms of medication and dosing choices, as well as listed contraindications to treatments. Every agency uses oxygen with 54% recommending titrated dosing. All agencies use aspirin (64% recommending 325mg, 24% recommending 162mg and 15% recommending either, as well as nitroglycerin and opiates (58% choosing morphine. Prehospital 12- Lead ECGs are used in 97% of agencies, and all but one agency has some form of regionalized care for their STEMI patients. No agency is currently employing prehospital fibrinolysis or β-blocker use. Conclusion: Protocols for chest pain of suspected cardiac origin vary widely across California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols.

  8. Strategically Leapfrogging Education in Prehospital Trauma Management: Four-Tiered Training Protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Rohit; Vyas, Dinesh; Narayan, Mayur; Vyas, Arpita

    2015-01-01

    Trauma-related injury in fast developing countries are linked to 90% of international mortality rates, which can be greatly reduced by improvements in often non-existent or non-centralized emergency medical systems (EMS)—particularly in the pre-hospital care phase. Traditional trauma training protocols—such as Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS), International Trauma Life Support (ITLS), and Basic Life Support (BLS)—have failed to produce an effective pre-hospital ground force of medical firs...

  9. Effect of prehospital ultrasound on clinical outcomes of non-trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Søren Steemann; Sørensen, Martin Kryspin; Svane, Christian

    2014-01-01

    studies for additional relevant studies. We then performed a risk of bias analysis and descriptive data analysis. RESULTS: We identified 1707 unique citations and included ten studies with a total of 1068 patients undergoing prehospital US examination. Included publications ranged from case series to non...... studies were of large heterogeneity and all showed a high risk of bias. We were thus unable to assess the effect of prehospital US on clinical outcomes. However, consistent reports suggested that US may improve patient management with respect to diagnosis, treatment, and hospital referral....

  10. The effectiveness of a military pre-hospital fluid infusion strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, M; Wood, P; Thurgood, A; Porter, K

    2007-09-01

    We performed a study to assess the effectiveness of a fluid infusion strategy currently used in the military pre-hospital environment using the patient's own body weight as an infusion device. Thirteen healthy volunteers were cannulated and 0.9% sodium chloride infused over a period of ten minutes. The volumes infused were measured and flow rates derived. A mean flow rate of 40 ml per minute was seen through an 18 g cannula. This strategy generates reasonable flow rates, but whether this is sufficient to the clinical aim of fluid resuscitation in pre-hospital settings is unknown.

  11. Prehospital Emergency Ultrasound: A Review of Current Clinical Applications, Challenges, and Future Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen J. El Sayed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging modalities in the prehospital setting are helpful in the evaluation and management of time-sensitive emergency conditions. Ultrasound is the main modality that has been applied by emergency medical services (EMS providers in the field. This paper examines the clinical applications of ultrasound in the prehospital setting. Specific focus is on applications that provide essential information to guide triage and management of critical patients. Challenges of this modality are also described in terms of cost impact on EMS agencies, provider training, and skill maintenance in addition to challenges related to the technical aspect of ultrasound.

  12. Functional independence: A comparison of the changes during neurorehabilitation between patients with non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracerebral hemorrhage or acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stabel, Henriette Holm; Pedersen, Asger Roer; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare the changes in functional independence measured by the FIM after specialized neurorehabilitation between patients with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) or acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Design Historical cohort study......) comprised patients with a first-time nontraumatic SAH (n=212) and age-matched patients with a first-time ICH/AIS (n=448). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Crude and adjusted comparisons of FIM (total and item by item) measured at baseline and at discharge. Results Patients...

  13. Education On Prehospital Pain Management: A Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott C. French

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most common reason patients seek medical attention is pain. However,there may be significant delays in initiating prehospital pain therapy. In a 2001 qualityimprovement (QI study, we demonstrated improvement in paramedic knowledge,perceptions, and management of pain. This follow-up study examines the impact of thisQI program, repeated educational intervention (EI, and effectiveness of a new painmanagement standard operating procedure.Methods: 176 paramedics from 10 urban and suburban fire departments and two privateambulance services participated in a 3-hour EI. A survey was performed prior to the EI andrepeated one month after the EI. We reviewed emergency medical services (EMS runs withpain complaints prior to the EI and one month after the EI. Follow-up results were comparedto our prior study. We performed data analysis using descriptive statistics and chi-square tests.Results: The authors reviewed 352 surveys and 438 EMS runs with pain complaints. Usingthe same survey questions, even before the EI, 2007 paramedics demonstrated significantimprovement in the knowledge (18.2%; 95% CI 8.9%, 27.9%, perceptions (9.2%; 95% CI6.5%, 11.9%, and management of pain (13.8%; 95% CI 11.3%, 16.2% compared to 2001.Following EI in 2007, there were no significant improvements in the baseline knowledge (0%;95% CI 5.3%, 5.3% but significant improvements in the perceptions of pain principles (6.4%;95% CI 3.9%, 9.0% and the management of pain (14.7%; 95% CI 11.4%, 18.0%.Conclusion: In this follow up study, paramedics’ baseline knowledge, perceptions, andmanagement of pain have all improved from 6 years ago. Following a repeat educationalintervention, paramedics further improved their field management of pain suggestingparamedics will still benefit from both initial and also ongoing continuing education on thetopic of pain management.

  14. Comparison of three prehospital cervical spine protocols for missed injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Rick; Meenan, Molly; Prince, Erin; Murphy, Ronald; Tambussi, Caitlin; Rohrbach, Rick; Baumann, Brigitte M

    2014-07-01

    We wanted to compare 3 existing emergency medical services (EMS) immobilization protocols: the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS, mechanism-based); the Domeier protocol (parallels the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study [NEXUS] criteria); and the Hankins' criteria (immobilization for patients 65 years, those with altered consciousness, focal neurologic deficit, distracting injury, or midline or paraspinal tenderness).To determine the proportion of patients who would require cervical immobilization per protocol and the number of missed cervical spine injuries, had each protocol been followed with 100% compliance. This was a cross-sectional study of patients ≥18 years transported by EMS post-traumatic mechanism to an inner city emergency department. Demographic and clinical/historical data obtained by physicians were recorded prior to radiologic imaging. Medical record review ascertained cervical spine injuries. Both physicians and EMS were blinded to the objective of the study. Of 498 participants, 58% were male and mean age was 48 years. The following participants would have required cervical spine immobilization based on the respective protocol: PHTLS, 95.4% (95% CI: 93.1-96.9%); Domeier, 68.7% (95% CI: 64.5-72.6%); Hankins, 81.5% (95% CI: 77.9-84.7%). There were 18 cervical spine injuries: 12 vertebral fractures, 2 subluxations/dislocations and 4 spinal cord injuries. Compliance with each of the 3 protocols would have led to appropriate cervical spine immobilization of all injured patients. In practice, 2 injuries were missed when the PHTLS criteria were mis-applied. Although physician-determined presence of cervical spine immobilization criteria cannot be generalized to the findings obtained by EMS personnel, our findings suggest that the mechanism-based PHTLS criteria may result in unnecessary cervical spine immobilization without apparent benefit to injured patients. PHTLS criteria may also be more difficult to implement due to the

  15. Prehospital Identification of Stroke Subtypes in Chinese Rural Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Qiang Jin; Jin-Chao Wang; Yong-An Sun; Pu Lyu; Wei Cui; Yuan-Yuan Liu; Zhi-Gang Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Background:Differentiating intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) from cerebral infarction as early as possible is vital for the timely initiation of different treatments.This study developed an applicable model for the ambulance system to differentiate stroke subtypes.Methods:From 26,163 patients initially screened over 4 years,this study comprised 1989 consecutive patients with potential first-ever acute stroke with sudden onset of the focal neurological deficit,conscious or not,and given ambulance transport for admission to two county hospitals in Yutian County of Hebei Province.All the patients underwent cranial computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging to confirm the final diagnosis based on stroke criteria.Correlation with stroke subtype clinical features was calculated and Bayes' discriminant model was applied to discriminate stroke subtypes.Results:Among the 1989 patients,797,689,109,and 394 received diagnoses of cerebral infarction,ICH,subarachnoid hemorrhage,and other forms of nonstroke,respectively.A history of atrial fibrillation,vomiting,and diabetes mellitus were associated with cerebral infarction,while vomiting,systolic blood pressure ≥180 mmHg,and age <65 years were more typical of ICH.For noncomatose stroke patients,Bayes' discriminant model for stroke subtype yielded a combination of multiple items that provided 72.3% agreement in the test model and 79.3% in the validation model; for comatose patients,corresponding agreement rates were 75.4% and 73.5%.Conclusions:The model herein presented,with multiple parameters,can predict stroke subtypes with acceptable sensitivity and specificity before CT scanning,either in alert or comatose patients.This may facilitate prehospital management for patients with stroke.

  16. Determinants of Success and Failure in Prehospital Endotracheal Intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas A. Myers

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to identify factors associated with successful endotracheal intubation (ETI by a multisite emergency medical services (EMS agency. Methods: We collected data from the electronic prehospital record for all ETI attempts made from January through May 2010 by paramedics and other EMS crew members at a single multistate agency. If documentation was incomplete, the study team contacted the paramedic. Paramedics use the current National Association of EMS Physicians definition of an ETI attempt (laryngoscope blade entering the mouth. We analyzed patient and EMS factors affecting ETI. Results: During 12,527 emergent ambulance responses, 200 intubation attempts were made in 150 patients. Intubation was successful in 113 (75%. A crew with paramedics was more than three times as likely to achieve successful intubation as a paramedic/emergency medical technician-Basic crew (odds ratio [OR], 3.30; p=0.03. A small tube (≤7.0 inches was associated with a more than 4-fold increased likelihood of successful ETI compared with a large tube (≥7.5 inches (OR, 4.25; p=0.01. After adjustment for these features, compared with little or no view of the glottis, a partial or entire view of the glottis was associated with a nearly 13-fold (OR, 12.98; p=0.001 and a nearly 40-fold (OR, 39.78; p<0.001 increased likelihood of successful intubation, respectively. Conclusion: Successful ETI was more likely to be accomplished when a paramedic was partnered with another paramedic, when some or all of the glottis was visible and when a smaller endotracheal tube was used.

  17. PHTLS ® (Prehospital Trauma Life Support) provider courses in Germany – who takes part and what do participants think about prehospital trauma care training?

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Christian B; Wölfl, Christoph G; Hogan, Aidan; Suda, Arnold J.; Gühring, Thorsten; Gliwitzky, Bernhard; Münzberg, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to examine PHTLS Provider courses in Germany and to proof the assumption that formation of physicians and paramedics in prehospital trauma care can be optimized. Methods PHTLS participants were asked to fill out standardized questionnaires during their course preparation and directly after the course. There were some open questions regarding their professional background and closed questions concerning PHTLS itself. Further questions were to be answered o...

  18. PHTLS ® (Prehospital Trauma Life Support) provider courses in Germany – who takes part and what do participants think about prehospital trauma care training?

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Christian B; Christoph G Wölfl; Hogan, Aidan; Suda, Arnold J.; Gühring, Thorsten; Gliwitzky, Bernhard; Münzberg, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to examine PHTLS Provider courses in Germany and to proof the assumption that formation of physicians and paramedics in prehospital trauma care can be optimized. Methods PHTLS participants were asked to fill out standardized questionnaires during their course preparation and directly after the course. There were some open questions regarding their professional background and closed questions concerning PHTLS itself. Further questions were to be answered o...

  19. Pontine axonal injury after brain trauma and nontraumatic hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, M; Meissner, C; Schmidt, V; Pedal, I; König, H G

    1999-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that diffuse axonal injury is usually induced by positive or negative acceleration mechanisms. In order to determine the reliability of axonal injury (AI) as a marker of this type of traumatic insult, we compared cases of trauma-induced focal cortical hemorrhage without dural involvement (n = 67) with cases of trauma-induced subdural bleeding without cortical hemorrhage (n = 26). Both groups exhibited a wide range of post-traumatic survival times. The injuries in the first group were caused mainly by direct impact to the head, those in the second by acceleration/deceleration mechanisms. The investigations were based primarily on immunohistochemical demonstration of antibodies targeted to beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP) in the pons as a marker of AI and the results were assessed semiquantitatively. No significant differences were found between the two groups. In both groups AI was detected in 80-100% of cases with survival times of more than 3 h and two thirds of all positive cases showed pronounced positivity. Additional comparison of cases of brain death due to mechanical trauma (n = 14) with cases of brain death due to non-mechanical trauma (n = 18) also disclosed no significant intergroup differences. Finally, investigations of the pons in cases of non-traumatic death due to cerebral hypoxia/ischemia (n = 51) demonstrated AI with the same frequency as in the other groups, although the expression tended to be less pronounced. Our results confirm that beta-APP expression in the pons is a reliable indicator of AI but does not discriminate between injuries caused by traumatic strain or shearing mechanisms and secondary damage due to cerebral hypoxia/ischemia or edema. In the large majority of cases with prolonged post-traumatic survival, it can therefore be assumed that AI in the pons is the consequence of primary and/or secondary events or a combination of both, as is common in non-missile head injury survived for more than

  20. Analysis of Prehospital Documentation of Injury-Related Pain Assessment and Analgesic Administration on the Contemporary Battlefield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Robert T; Reeves, Patrick T; Kotwal, Russ S; Mabry, Robert L; Robinson, John B; Butler, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In addition to life-saving interventions, the assessment of pain and subsequent administration of analgesia are primary benchmarks for quality emergency medical services care which should be documented and analyzed. Analyze US combat casualty data from the Department of Defense Trauma Registry (DoDTR) with a primary focus on prehospital pain assessment, analgesic administration and documentation. Retrospective cohort study of battlefield prehospital and hospital casualty data were abstracted by DoDTR from available records from 1 September 2007 through 30 June 2011. Data included demographics; injury mechanism; prehospital and initial combat hospital pain assessment documented by standard 0-to-10 numeric rating scale; analgesics administered; and survival outcome. Records were available for 8,913 casualties (median ISS of 5 [IQR 2 to 10]; 98.7% survived). Prehospital analgesic administration was documented for 1,313 cases (15%). Prehospital pain assessment was recorded for 581 cases (7%; median pain score 6 [IQR 3 to 8]), hospital pain assessment was recorded for 5,007 cases (56%; median pain score5 [CI95% 3 to 8]), and 409 cases (5%) had both prehospital and hospital pain assessments that could be paired. In this paired group, 49.1% (201/409) had alleviation of pain evidenced by a decrease in pain score (median 4,, IQR 2 to 5); 23.5% (96/409) had worsening of pain evidenced by an increase in pain score (median 3, CI95 2.8 to 3.7, IQR 1 to 5); 27.4% (112/409) had no change; and the overall difference was an average decrease in pain score of 1.1 (median 0, IQR 0 to 3, p prehospital and hospital pain assessment documentation and prehospital analgesic documentation. Our study demonstrates that prehospital pain assessment, management, and documentation remain primary targets for performance improvement on the battlefield. Results of paired prehospital to hospital pain scores and time-series analysis demonstrate both feasibility and benefit of prehospital analgesics

  1. Pre-hospital transfusion of plasma in hemorrhaging trauma patients independently improves hemostatic competence and acidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Hanne Herborg; Rahbar, Elaheh; Baer, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The early use of blood products has been associated with improved patient outcomes following severe hemorrhage or traumatic injury. We aimed to investigate the influence of pre-hospital blood products (i.e. plasma and/or RBCs) on admission hemostatic properties and patient outcomes. W...

  2. Is the current level of training in the use of equipment for prehospital radio communication sufficient?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jimmy Højberg

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physicians working in prehospital care are expected to handle radio communication both within their own sector as well as with other divisions of the National Emergency Services. To date, no study has been conducted on the level of training received by physicians in the use of the equ......BACKGROUND: Physicians working in prehospital care are expected to handle radio communication both within their own sector as well as with other divisions of the National Emergency Services. To date, no study has been conducted on the level of training received by physicians in the use...... of the equipment provided or on the level of competency acquired by physicians. METHODS: In order to investigate the self-assessed skill level acquired in the use of the TETRA (TErrestrial Trunked RAdio) authority radio for communication in a prehospital setting, a cross-sectional study was conducted...... setting 38% of physicians reported having received no training in the use of the equipment, while 80% of physicians reported having received one1 hour of training or less. Among the majority of physicians their current level of training was sufficient for their everyday needs for prehospital communication...

  3. The development and features of the Spanish prehospital advanced triage method (META) for mass casualty incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael; Cuartas Alvarez, Tatiana; Garijo Gonzalo, Gracia; Martinez Monzon, Carlos; Pelaez Corres, Nieves; Rodriguez Soler, Alberto; Turegano Fuentes, Fernando

    2016-04-29

    This text describes the process of development of the new Spanish Prehospital Advanced Triage Method (META) and explain its main features and contribution to prehospital triage systems in mass casualty incidents. The triage META is based in the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols, patient's anatomical injuries and mechanism of injury. It is a triage method with four stages including early identification of patients with severe trauma that would benefit from a rapid evacuation to a surgical facility and introduces a new patient flow by-passing the advanced medical post to improve evacuation. The stages of triage META are: I) Stabilization triage that classifies patients according to severity to set priorities for initial emergency treatment; II) Identifying patients requiring urgent surgical treatment, this is done at the same time than stage I and creates a new flow of patients with high priority for evacuation; III) Implementation of Advanced Trauma Life Support protocols to patients previously classified according to stablished priority; and IV) Evacuation triage, stablishing evacuation priorities in case of lacks of appropriate transport resources. The triage META is to be applied only by prehospital providers with advanced knowledge and training in advanced trauma life support care and has been designed to be implemented as prehospital procedure in mass casualty incidents (MCI).

  4. Effects of Crew Resource Management Training on Medical Errors in a Simulated Prehospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart, Elliot D.

    2012-01-01

    This applied dissertation investigated the effect of crew resource management (CRM) training on medical errors in a simulated prehospital setting. Specific areas addressed by this program included situational awareness, decision making, task management, teamwork, and communication. This study is believed to be the first investigation of CRM…

  5. Measurement of lactate in a prehospital setting is related to outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, Paul A.; Mulder, Peter Jan; Oetomo, Suparto Bambang; van den Broek, Bert; Kuiper, Michael A.; Spronk, Peter E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the relationship of lactate measured in a preclinical setting with outcome. Simultaneously, we evaluated the feasibility of implementing blood lactate measurement in a prehospital setting as part of a quality improvement project Methods Chart review of patients from whom serum

  6. Prehospital diagnosis in STEMI patients treated by primary PCI : the key to rapid reperfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, R. P.; Jaarsma, T.; Hanenburg, F. G. A.; Nannenberg, J. W.; Jessurun, G. A. J.; Zijlstra, F.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Primary coronary intervention (PCI) for acute myocardial infarction should be performed as quickly as possible, with a door-to-balloon time of less then 90 minutes. However, in daily practice this cannot always be achieved. Prehospital diagnosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STE

  7. Prehospital administration of P2Y12 inhibitors and early coronary reperfusion in primary PCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Ratcovich, Hanna; Biasco, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    to prehospital loading with clopidogrel in a real-world ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) setting. Over a 70-month period, 3497 patients with on-going STEMI of less than 6 hours and without cardiac arrest or cardiogenic shock underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) at our centre...

  8. Ischaemic Heart Disease: Accuracy of the Prehospital Diagnosis—A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Houlberg Hansen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU in Odense, Denmark, services a population of 260.000. All admissions in 2009 concerning patients diagnosed in the IHD category were assessed. Outcome and diagnosis of each patient were manually validated in accordance to the final diagnosis established following admission to hospital, using the discharge summary from the relevant department as reference. Results. 428 MECU runs with a prehospital diagnosis of IHD were registered. 422 of these were included in the study and 354 of those patients were suitable for this analysis. 73,4% of the patients hospitalized with a prehospital diagnosis of IHD were initially admitted to the relevant ward. Of these patients, 40,0% had their preliminary diagnosis of IHD confirmed. 14,1% of all patients admitted to the hospital were diagnosed with nonheart conditions. Preliminary diagnoses of STEMI had an accuracy of 87,5%. Conclusions. The preliminary IHD diagnoses assigned by the MECU physicians were acceptable. In case of STEMI patients the diagnostic accuracy was excellent. In this study there was an apparent overtriage.

  9. Prehospital Unassisted Assessment of Stroke Severity Using Telemedicine A Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hooff, Robbert-Jan; Cambron, Melissa; Van Dyck, Rita; De Smedt, Ann; Moens, Maarten; Espinoza, Alexis Valenzuela; Van de Casseye, Rohny; Convents, Andre; Hubloue, Ives; De Keyser, Jacques; Brouns, Raf

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose We evaluated the feasibility and the reliability of remote stroke severity quantification in the prehospital setting using the Unassisted TeleStroke Scale (UTSS) via a telestroke ambulance system and a fourth-generation mobile network. Methods The technical feasibility and the

  10. Issues and Solutions in Introducing Western Systems to the Prehospital Care System in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki, Tetsuji

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This report aims to illustrate the history and current status of Japanese emergency medical services (EMS, including development of the specialty and characteristics adapted from the U.S. and European models. In addition, recommendations are made for improvement of the current systems.Methods: Government reports and academic papers were reviewed, along with the collective experiences of the authors. Literature searches were performed in PubMed (English and Ichushi (Japanese, using keywords such as emergency medicine and pre-hospital care. More recent and peer-reviewed articles were given priority in the selection process.Results: The pre-hospital care system in Japan has developed as a mixture of U.S. and European systems. Other countries undergoing economic and industrial development similar to Japan may benefit from emulating the Japanese EMS model.Discussion: Currently, the Japanese system is in transition, searching for the most suitable and efficient way of providing quality pre-hospital care.Conclusion: Japan has the potential to enhance its current pre-hospital care system, but this will require greater collaboration between physicians and paramedics, increased paramedic scope of medical practice, and greater Japanese societal recognition and support of paramedics.

  11. Response interval is important for survival until admission after prehospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Hien Quoc; Nielsen, Søren Loumann; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2010-01-01

    An increasing distance to the nearest hospital must be expected as a result of centralization of acute care at a small number of hospitals. This may have important consequences in emergency situations, such as prehospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) where the aim is to obtain return...

  12. The accuracy of prehospital diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular accidents: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluszkiewicz, Marcin; Członkowska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Time to treatment is the key factor in stroke care. Although the initial medical assessment is usually made by a non-neurologist or a paramedic, it should ensure correct identification of all acute cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs). Our aim was to evaluate the accuracy of the physician-made prehospital diagnosis of acute CVA in patients referred directly to the neurological emergency department (ED), and to identify conditions mimicking CVAs. Material and methods This observational study included consecutive patients referred to our neurological ED by emergency physicians with a suspicion of CVA (acute stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA) or a syndrome-based diagnosis) during 12 months. Referrals were considered correct if the prehospital diagnosis of CVA proved to be stroke or TIA. Results The prehospital diagnosis of CVA was correct in 360 of 570 cases. Its positive predictive value ranged from 100% for the syndrome-based diagnosis, through 70% for stroke, to 34% for TIA. Misdiagnoses were less frequent among ambulance physicians compared to primary care and outpatient physicians (33% vs. 52%, p CVA cases were referred with prehospital diagnoses other than CVA. Conclusions Emergency physicians appear to be sensitive in diagnosing CVAs but their overall accuracy does not seem high. They tend to overuse the diagnosis of TIA. Constant education and adoption of stroke screening scales may be beneficial for emergency care systems based both on physicians and on paramedics. PMID:26170845

  13. Ambulance or taxi? High acuity prehospital transports in the Ashanti region of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Nee-Kofi Mould-Millman

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Although a minority of patients were transported by ambulance, they represented the most acute patients arriving at the KATH EC. Given the limited availability of EMS resources and ambulances in Ashanti, selective ambulance use appears warranted and should inform prehospital care planning.

  14. Trauma in elderly people: access to the health system through pre-hospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilderjane Carla da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify the prevalence of trauma in elderly people and how they accessed the health system through pre-hospital care. Method: documentary and retrospective study at a mobile emergency care service, using a sample of 400 elderly trauma victims selected through systematic random sampling. A form validated by experts was used to collect the data. Descriptive statistical analysis was applied. The chi-square test was used to analyze the association between the variables. Results: Trauma was predominant among women (52.25% and in the age range between 60 and 69 years (38.25%, average age 74.19 years (standard deviation±10.25. Among the mechanisms, falls (56.75% and traffic accidents (31.25% stood out, showing a significant relation with the pre-hospital care services (p<0.001. Circulation, airway opening, cervical control and immobilization actions were the most frequent and Basic Life Support Services (87.8% were the most used, with trauma referral hospitals as the main destination (56.7%. Conclusion: trauma prevailed among women, victims of falls, who received pre-hospital care through basic life support services and actions and were transported to the trauma referral hospital. It is important to reorganize pre-hospital care, avoiding overcrowded hospitals and delivering better care to elderly trauma victims.

  15. Equipment to prevent, diagnose, and treat hypothermia: a survey of Norwegian pre-hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Anders M; Thomassen, Oyvind; Vikenes, Bjarne H; Brattebø, Guttorm

    2013-08-12

    Hypothermia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in trauma patients and poses a challenge in pre-hospital treatment. The aim of this study was to identify equipment to prevent, diagnose, and treat hypothermia in Norwegian pre-hospital services. In the period of April-August 2011, we conducted a survey of 42 respondents representing a total of 543 pre-hospital units, which included all the national ground ambulance services, the fixed wing and helicopter air ambulance service, and the national search and rescue service. The survey explored available insulation materials, active warming devices, and the presence of protocols describing wrapping methods, temperature monitoring, and the use of warm i.v. fluids. Throughout the services, hospital duvets, cotton blankets and plastic "bubble-wrap" were the most common insulation materials. Active warming devices were to a small degree available in vehicle ambulances (14%) and the fixed wing ambulance service (44%) but were more common in the helicopter services (58-70%). Suitable thermometers for diagnosing hypothermia were lacking in the vehicle ambulance services (12%). Protocols describing how to insulate patients were present for 73% of vehicle ambulances and 70% of Search and Rescue helicopters. The minority of Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (42%) and Fixed Wing (22%) units was reported to have such protocols. The most common equipment types to treat and prevent hypothermia in Norwegian pre-hospital services are duvets, plastic "bubble wrap", and cotton blankets. Active external heating devices and suitable thermometers are not available in most vehicle ambulance units.

  16. Prehospital Unassisted Assessment of Stroke Severity Using Telemedicine A Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hooff, Robbert-Jan; Cambron, Melissa; Van Dyck, Rita; De Smedt, Ann; Moens, Maarten; Espinoza, Alexis Valenzuela; Van de Casseye, Rohny; Convents, Andre; Hubloue, Ives; De Keyser, Jacques; Brouns, Raf

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose We evaluated the feasibility and the reliability of remote stroke severity quantification in the prehospital setting using the Unassisted TeleStroke Scale (UTSS) via a telestroke ambulance system and a fourth-generation mobile network. Methods The technical feasibility and the

  17. Prehospital Medical Documentation in the Joint Theater Trauma Registry: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Nesbitt , DSc, PA-C, Amelia M. Duran-Stanton, PhD, PA-C, and Robert T. Gerhardt, MD, MPH, FACEP Background: Prehospital care of combat casualties is a...5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Therien S. P., Nesbitt M. E., Duran-Stanton A. M., Gerhardt R. T., 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f

  18. Prehospital Lactate Measurement by Emergency Medical Services in Patients Meeting Sepsis Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori L. Boland

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We aimed to pilot test the delivery of sepsis education to emergency medical services (EMS providers and the feasibility of equipping them with temporal artery thermometers (TATs and handheld lactate meters to aid in the prehospital recognition of sepsis. Methods: This study used a convenience sample of prehospital patients meeting established criteria for sepsis. Paramedics received education on systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS criteria, were trained in the use of TATs and hand-held lactate meters, and enrolled patients who had a recent history of infection, met ≥ 2 SIRS criteria, and were being transported to a participating hospital. Blood lactate was measured by paramedics in the prehospital setting and again in the emergency department (ED via usual care. Paramedics entered data using an online database accessible at the point of care. Results: Prehospital lactate values obtained by paramedics ranged from 0.8 to 9.8 mmol/L, and an elevated lactate (i.e. ≥ 4.0 was documented in 13 of 112 enrolled patients (12%. The unadjusted correlation of prehospital and ED lactate values was 0.57 (p< 0.001. The median interval between paramedic assessment of blood lactate and the electronic posting of the ED-measured lactate value in the hospital record was 111 minutes. Overall, 91 patients (81% were hospitalized after ED evaluation, 27 (24% were ultimately diagnosed with sepsis, and 3 (3% died during hospitalization. Subjects with elevated prehospital lactate were somewhat more likely to have been admitted to the intensive care unit (23% vs 15% and to have been diagnosed with sepsis (38% vs 22% than those with normal lactate levels, but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion: In this pilot, EMS use of a combination of objective SIRS criteria, subjective assessment of infection, and blood lactate measurements did not achieve a level of diagnostic accuracy for sepsis that would warrant hospital

  19. Imaging of acquired non-traumatic cochlear lesions: iconographic essay; Avaliacao por imagem das lesoes cocleares adquiridas (nao-traumaticas): ensaio iconografico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Gonzaga, Juliana Gontijo [Clinica Axial - Centro de Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: cidbh@cidbh.com.br; marcelogarcia@superig.com.br

    2006-04-15

    Different non-traumatic acquired cochlear lesions are shown in this article with imaging methods. They may be responsible for neuro sensorial hearing loss or vertigo. The method of choice is computed tomography when evaluating the osseous labyrinth whereas magnetic resonance imaging has superior resolution in the studies of the membranaceous labyrinth. (author)

  20. The effectiveness of postmortem multidetector computed tomography in the detection of fatal findings related to cause of non-traumatic death in the emergency department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Naoya; Higuchi, Takeshi; Shiotani, Motoi [Niigata City General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Niigata, Niigata (Japan); Hirose, Yasuo [Niigata City General Hospital, Department of Emergency and Critical Care, Niigata (Japan); Shibuya, Hiroyuki; Hashidate, Hideki [Niigata City General Hospital, Department of Pathology, Niigata (Japan); Yamanouchi, Haruo; Funayama, Kazuhisa [Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Department of Community Preventive Medicine, Division of Legal Medicine, Niigata (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of postmortem multidetector computed tomography (PMMDCT) for the detection of fatal findings related to causes of non-traumatic death in the emergency department (ED). 494 consecutive cases of clinically diagnosed non-traumatic death in ED involving PMMDCT were enrolled. The fatal findings were detected on PMMDCT and classified as definite or possible findings. These findings were confirmed by autopsy in 20 cases. The fatal findings were detected in 188 subjects (38.1%) including 122 with definite (24.7%) and 66 with possible finding (13.4%). Definite findings included 21 cases of intracranial vascular lesions, 84 with intra-thoracic haemorrhage, 13 with retroperitoneal haemorrhage and one with oesophagogastric haemorrhage. In three patients who had initially been diagnosed with non-traumatic death, PMMDCT revealed fatal traumatic findings. Two definite findings (two haemopericardiums) and seven possible findings (two intestinal obstructions, one each of multiple liver tumours central pulmonary artery dilatation, pulmonary congestion, peritoneal haematoma, and brain oedema) were confirmed by autopsy. The causes of death were not determined in cases with possible findings without autopsy. PMMDCT is a feasible tool for detecting morphological fatal findings in non-traumatic death in ED. It is important to know the ability and limitation of PMMDCT. (orig.)

  1. Shoulder-specific outcomes 1 year after nontraumatic full-thickness rotator cuff repair: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnani, Navin; van Deurzen, Derek F P; van den Bekerom, Michel P J

    2017-10-01

    Nontraumatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears are commonly initially treated conservatively. If conservative treatment fails, rotator cuff repair is a viable subsequent option. The objective of the present meta-analysis is to evaluate the shoulder-specific outcomes one year after arthroscopic or mini-open rotator cuff repair of nontraumatic rotator cuff tears. A literature search was conducted in PubMed and EMBASE within the period January 2000 to January 2017. All studies measuring the clinical outcome at 12 months after nontraumatic rotator cuff repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears were listed. We included 16 randomized controlled trials that met our inclusion criteria with a total of 1.221 shoulders. At 12 months after rotator cuff repair, the mean Constant score had increased 29.5 points; the mean American Shoulder and Elbow Score score increased by 38.6 points; mean Simple Shoulder Test score was 5.6 points; mean University of California Los Angeles score improved by 13.0 points; and finally, mean Visual Analogue Scale score decreased by 4.1 points. Based on this meta-analysis, significant improvements in the shoulder-specific indices are observed 12 months after nontraumatic arthroscopic or mini-open rotator cuff repair.

  2. The top five research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care: a consensus report from a European research collaboration

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    Lockey David

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physician-manned emergency medical teams supplement other emergency medical services in some countries. These teams are often selectively deployed to patients who are considered likely to require critical care treatment in the pre-hospital phase. The evidence base for guidelines for pre-hospital triage and immediate medical care is often poor. We used a recognised consensus methodology to define key priority areas for research within the subfield of physician-provided pre-hospital critical care. Methods A European expert panel participated in a consensus process based upon a four-stage modified nominal group technique that included a consensus meeting. Results The expert panel concluded that the five most important areas for further research in the field of physician-based pre-hospital critical care were the following: Appropriate staffing and training in pre-hospital critical care and the effect on outcomes, advanced airway management in pre-hospital care, definition of time windows for key critical interventions which are indicated in the pre-hospital phase of care, the role of pre-hospital ultrasound and dispatch criteria for pre-hospital critical care services. Conclusion A modified nominal group technique was successfully used by a European expert group to reach consensus on the most important research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care.

  3. APPROACHES TO INCREASE THE AVAILABILITY AND EFFECTIVENESS OF PRE-HOSPITAL THROMBOLYSIS IN REAL CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Ostroumova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To identify the factors of the increasing the availability and effectiveness of pre-hospital thrombolytic therapy of patients with ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (STEACS. Material and methods. STEACS patients (n=70 were included in the study and stratified into two groups. Patients of the 1st group (n=30 received emergency medical assistance from the feldsher teams and patients of the 2nd group (n=40 — from the doctor teams. Expert estimation approach was used for the real practice assessment. Results. The hospital-matched diagnose rate was 97.5% in the doctor teams in comparison with 76.7% in feldsher teams (p<0.05. The efficiency of pre-hospital thrombolysis in 90 minutes after its beginning was 60.1% for the doctor teams versus 73.3% for the feldsher teams (p>0.05. The deviation from the standard operating procedure of the medical care for myocardial infarction patients was observed more often in the doctor teams in comparison with this in the feldsher teams. Time for the decision about pre-hospital thrombolysis start, the rate of unreasonable use or unreasonable refusal of thrombolysis did not differ significantly in feldsher and doctor teams. Conclusion. To increase the effectiveness of pre-hospital thrombolysis therapy it is necessary to follow strictly the standard of the medical care for patients with acute coronary syndrome. One of the main approaches to improve the availability of up to date medical care technologies in STEACS treatment is implementation of pre-hospital thrombolysis in practice of feldsher teams.

  4. Pre-hospital and initial management of head injury patients: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumul Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most of the bad outcomes in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI are related to the presence of a high incidence of pre-hospital secondary brain insults. Therefore, knowledge of these variables and timely management of the disease at the pre-hospital period can significantly improve the outcome and decrease the mortality. The Brain Trauma Foundation guideline on "Prehospital Management" published in 2008 could provide the standardized protocols for the management of patients with TBI; however, this guideline has included the relevant papers up to 2006. Methods: A PubMed search for relevant clinical trials and reviews (from 1 January 2007 to 31 March 2013, which specifically discussed about the topic, was conducted. Results: Based on the evidence, majority of the management strategies comprise of rapid correction of hypoxemia and hypotension, the two most important predictors for mortality. However, there is still a need to define the goals for the management of hypotension and inclusion of newer difficult airway carts as well as proper monitoring devices for ensuring better intubation and ventilatory management. Isotonic saline should be used as the first choice for fluid resuscitation. The pre-hospital hypothermia has more adverse effects; therefore, this should be avoided. Conclusion: Most of the management trials published after 2007 have focused mainly on the treatment as well as the prevention strategies for secondary brain injury. The results of these trials would be certainly adopted by new standardized guidelines and therefore may have a substantial impact on the pre-hospital management in patients with TBI.

  5. Prehospital management and fluid resuscitation in hypotensive trauma patients admitted to Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talving, Peep; Pålstedt, Joakim; Riddez, Louis

    2005-01-01

    Few previous studies have been conducted on the prehospital management of hypotensive trauma patients in Stockholm County. The aim of this study was to describe the prehospital management of hypotensive trauma patients admitted to the largest trauma center in Sweden, and to assess whether prehospital trauma life support (PHTLS) guidelines have been implemented regarding prehospital time intervals and fluid therapy. In addition, the effects of the age, type of injury, injury severity, prehospital time interval, blood pressure, and fluid therapy on outcome were investigated. This is a retrospective, descriptive study on consecutive, hypotensive trauma patients (systolic blood pressure or = 15 years) recruited, the median age was 35.5 years (range: 27-55 years) and 77 patients (75%) had suffered blunt injury. The predominant trauma mechanisms were falls between levels (24%) and motor vehicle crashes (22%) with an ISS of 28.5 (range: 16-50). The on-scene time interval was 19 minutes (range: 12-24 minutes). Fluid therapy was initiated at the scene of injury in the majority of patients (73%) regardless of the type of injury (77 blunt [75%] / 25 penetrating [25%]) or injury severity (ISS: 0-20; 21-40; 41-75). Age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.04), male gender (OR = 3.2), ISS 21-40 (OR = 13.6), and ISS >40 (OR = 43.6) were the significant factors affecting outcome in the exact logistic regression analysis. The time interval at the scene of injury exceeded PHTLS guidelines. The vast majority of the hypotensive trauma patients were fluid-resuscitated on-scene regardless of the type, mechanism, or severity of injury. A predefined fluid resuscitation regimen is not employed in hypotensive trauma victims with different types of injuries. The outcome was worsened by male gender, progressive age, and ISS > 20 in the exact multiple regression analysis.

  6. Cost-effectiveness and benefit of alternatives to improve training for prehospital trauma care in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreola-Risa, Carlos; Mock, Charles; Herrera-Escamilla, Alejandro J; Contreras, Ismael; Vargas, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    In Latin America, there is a preponderance of prehospital trauma deaths. However, scarce resources mandate that any improvements in prehospital medical care must be cost-effective. This study sought to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of several approaches to improving training for personnel in three ambulance services in Mexico. In Monterrey, training was augmented with PreHospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) at a cost of [US] dollar 150 per medic trained. In San Pedro, training was augmented with Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), and a locally designed airway management course, at a cost of dollar 400 per medic. Process and outcome of trauma care were assessed before and after the training of these medics and at a control site. The training was effective for both intervention services, with increases in basic airway maneuvers for patients in respiratory distress in Monterrey (16% before versus 39% after) and San Pedro (14% versus 64%). The role of endotrachal intubation for patients with respiratory distress increased only in San Pedro (5% versus 46%), in which the most intensive Advanced Life Support (ALS) training had been provided. However, mortality decreased only in Monterrey, where it had been the highest (8.2% before versus 4.7% after) and where the simplest and lowest cost interventions were implemented. There was no change in process or outcome in the control site. This study highlights the importance of assuring uniform, basic training for all prehospital providers. This is a more cost-effective approach than is higher-cost ALS training for improving prehospital trauma care in environments such as Latin America.

  7. Prehospital and en route cricothyrotomy performed in the combat setting: a prospective, multicenter, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Ed B G; Ervin, Alicia T; Mabry, Robert L; Bebarta, Vikhyat S

    2014-01-01

    Airway compromise is the third most common cause of potentially preventable combat death. Surgical cricothyrotomy is an infrequently performed but lifesaving airway intervention. There are limited published data on prehospital cricothyrotomy in civilian or military settings. Our aim was to prospectively describe the survival rate and complications associated with cricothyrotomy performed in the military prehospital and en route setting. The Life-Saving Intervention (LSI) study is a prospective, institutional review board-approved, multicenter trial examining LSIs performed in the prehospital combat setting. We prospectively recorded LSIs performed on patients in theater who were transported to six combat hospitals. Trained site investigators evaluated patients on arrival and recorded demographics, vital signs, and LSIs performed. LSIs were predefined and include cricothyrotomies, chest tubes, intubations, tourniquets, and other procedures. From the large dataset, we analyzed patients who had a cricothyrotomy performed. Hospital outcomes were cross-referenced from the Department of Defense Trauma Registry. Descriptive statistics or Wilcoxon test (nonparametric) were used for data comparisons; statistical significance was set at pcombat medic (pre-evacuation), and 18 by an evacuation helicopter medic. Combat-hospital outcome data were available for 26 patients, 13 (50%) of whom survived to discharge. The cricothyrotomy patients had more LSIs than noncricothyrotomy patients (four versus two LSIs per patient; pcombat, procedural success was higher than previously reported. In addition, the majority of cricothyrotomies were performed by the evacuation helicopter medic rather than the prehospital combat medic. Prehospital military medics should receive training in decision making and be provided with adjuncts to facilitate this lifesaving procedure. 2014.

  8. Positive Coping: A Unique Characteristic to Pre-Hospital Emergency Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Abbas; Froutan, Razieh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction It is important to gain a thorough understanding of positive coping methods adopted by medical emergency personnel to manage stressful situations associated with accidents and emergencies. Thus, the purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of positive coping strategies used by emergency medical service providers. Methods This study was conducted using a qualitative content analysis method. The study participants included 28 pre-hospital emergency personnel selected from emergency medical service providers in bases located in different regions of the city of Mashhad, Iran, from April to November 2016. The purposive sampling method also was used in this study, which was continued until data saturation was reached. To collect the data, semistructured open interviews, observations, and field notes were used. Results Four categories and 10 subcategories were extracted from the data on the experiences of pre-hospital emergency personnel related to positive coping strategies. The four categories included work engagement, smart capability, positive feedback, and crisis pioneering. All the obtained categories had their own subcategories, which were determined based on their distinctly integrated properties. Conclusion The results of this study show that positive coping consists of several concepts used by medical emergency personnel, management of stressful situations, and ultimately quality of pre-hospital clinical services. Given the fact that efficient methods such as positive coping can prevent debilitating stress in an individual, pre-hospital emergency authorities should seek to build and strengthen “positive coping” characteristics in pre-hospital medical emergency personnel to deal with accidents, emergencies, and injuries through adopting regular and dynamic policies. PMID:28243409

  9. Comparison of Three Prehospital Cervical Spine Protocols for Missed Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Hong

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We wanted to compare 3 existing emergency medical services (EMS immobilization protocols: the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS, mechanism-based; the Domeier protocol (parallels the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study [NEXUS] criteria; and the Hankins’ criteria (immobilization for patients 65 years, those with altered consciousness, focal neurologic deficit, distracting injury, or midline or paraspinal tenderness.To determine the proportion of patients who would require cervical immobilization per protocol and the number of missed cervical spine injuries, had each protocol been followed with 100% compliance. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of patients ≥18 years transported by EMS post-traumatic mechanism to an inner city emergency department. Demographic and clinical/historical data obtained by physicians were recorded prior to radiologic imaging. Medical record review ascertained cervical spine injuries. Both physicians and EMS were blinded to the objective of the study. Results: Of 498 participants, 58% were male and mean age was 48 years. The following participants would have required cervical spine immobilization based on the respective protocol: PHTLS, 95.4% (95% CI: 93.1-96.9%; Domeier, 68.7% (95% CI: 64.5-72.6%; Hankins, 81.5% (95% CI: 77.9-84.7%. There were 18 cervical spine injuries: 12 vertebral fractures, 2 subluxations/dislocations and 4 spinal cord injuries. Compliance with each of the 3 protocols would have led to appropriate cervical spine immobilization of all injured patients. In practice, 2 injuries were missed when the PHTLS criteria were mis-applied. Conclusion: Although physician-determined presence of cervical spine immobilization criteria cannot be generalized to the findings obtained by EMS personnel, our findings suggest that the mechanism-based PHTLS criteria may result in unnecessary cervical spine immobilization without apparent benefit to injured patients. PHTLS

  10. Customer care. Patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, G T

    1998-09-01

    The focus of the study was to prioritize six emergency medical service treatment factors in terms of their impact upon patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting. The six treatment areas analyzed were: EMS response time; medical care provided on scene; explanation of care by the provider; the provider's ability to reduce patient anxiety; the provider's ability to meet the patient's non-medical needs; and the level of courtesy/politeness shown by the EMS provider toward the patient. Telephone interviews were conducted with both patients and bystanders to obtain their perception of how well the system met their needs. The study analyzed how the six issues were rated and then evaluated the impact an individual's low score in a category had on that person's overall rating of the service provided. The overall satisfaction rating is not a calculated score, but an overall score specified by the respondent. The effect each issue had on the respondent's overall rating was determined by averaging the overall ratings for a category's low scorers, averaging the overall ratings for high scorers and then measuring the difference. Results of the study indicate that the factor with the greatest negative impact on patient satisfaction came from a perceived lack of crew courtesy and politeness. Respondents who indicated a fair to poor score in this category decreased their overall score by 60.2%. Ratings in other categories yielded the following results: When respondents rated the response time as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed an 18.4% decrease. When respondents rated the quality of medical care as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed a decrease of 22.6%. When the crew's ability to explain what was happening to the patient was rated as fair to poor, the average overall score dropped 33.6%. When the EMT's and medic's ability to reduce the patient's anxiety was rated fair to poor, average overall score declined by 32.6%. Finally, when the crew

  11. Indications and morbidity of tube thoracostomy performed for traumatic and non-traumatic free pleural effusions in a low-income setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefire, Alain Chichom; Fokou, Marcus; Dika, Louis Din

    2014-01-01

    Tube thoracostomy (TT) is widely used to resolve a number of pleural conditions. Few data are available on the complications of TT performed for non-traumatic conditions, especially in low income setting. The aim of this study is to analyse the indications and complications of TT performed for both traumatic and non-traumatic conditions of the chest in a low-income environment. This retrospective study conducted over a four years period in a the Regional Hospital, Limbe in South-West Cameroon analyses the rate and nature of complications after TT performed for both traumatic and non-traumatic conditions. Different factors related to complications are analysed. We analysed 134 patients who had 186 chest tubes inserted. After placement, tubes were either connected to a water seal system (40%) or submitted to suction (60%). Most (91%) procedures were performed for a non-traumatic condition. Non-infectious pleural effusion in patients with HIV infection or pulmonary tuberculosis was the most common indication. Sixty six per-cents of procedures were carried out by a general surgeon. The complication rate was 19.35%. The most common complications included tube dislocation and pneumothorax. Most complications were solved by replacement of the tube. The nature of operator (general surgeon vs general practitioner) was a significant predictor of outcome (p < 0.01). No procedure related death was recorded. TT is a safe and efficient procedure to drain pleural collections of both traumatic and non-traumatic origins, even in low-income settings. The incidence of complications could be reduced by a better training of general practitioners on this procedure.

  12. Pre-hospital identification and post-recovery challenges of intoxication with synthetic cannabinoid containing legal high products such as 'Exodus Damnation'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, David; O'Meara, Patrick; Cunningham, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    This short report describes the case of a young adult male who had smoked a synthetic cannabinoid legal high product called 'Exodus Damnation'. The patient's presentation was atypical from that described in the literature, with hypotension and hypoxaemia. Of note was the rapid recovery after pre-hospital intervention with high-flow oxygen therapy and intravenous fluids. The patient refused on-going care, despite repeated advice to attend the Emergency Department. The distinct lack of specialist support and referral to drug treatment for this patient population, with whom ambulance services are coming into contact with increasing frequency, is reported. For those patients with the capacity to refuse on-going care, ambulance services may be in an opportune position to actively promote referral to support services for these vulnerable individuals.

  13. Kinesiophobia in patients with non-traumatic arm, neck and shoulder complaints: a prospective cohort study in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernsen Roos MD

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complaints of arm, neck and shoulder are common in Western societies. Of those consulting a general practitioner (GP with non-traumatic arm, neck or shoulder complaints, about 50% do not recover within 6 months. Kinesiophobia (also known as fear of movement/(reinjury may also play a role in these complaints, as it may lead to avoidance behaviour resulting in hypervigilance to bodily sensations, followed by disability, disuse and depression. However, in relation to arm, neck and shoulder complaints little is known about kinesiophobia and its associated variables. Therefore this study aimed to: describe the degree of kinesiophobia in patients with non-traumatic complaints of arm, neck and shoulder in general practice; to determine whether mean scores of kinesiophobia change over time in non-recovered patients; and to evaluate variables associated with kinesiophobia at baseline. Methods In this prospective cohort study set in general practice, consulters with a first or new episode of non-traumatic arm, neck or shoulder complaints (aged 18–64 years entered the cohort. Baseline data were collected on kinesiophobia using the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, the 13-item adjusted version: TSK-AV, and on patient-, complaint-, and psychosocial variables using self-administered questionnaires. The mean TSK-AV score was calculated. In non-recovered patients the follow-up TSK-AV scores at 6 and 12 months were analyzed with the general linear mixed model. Variables associated with kinesiophobia at baseline were evaluated using multivariate linear regression analyses. Results The mean TSK-AV score at baseline was 24.8 [SD: 6.2]. Among non-recovered patients the mean TSK-AV score at baseline was 26.1 [SD: 6.6], which remained unchanged over 12- months follow-up period. The strongest associations with kinesiophobia were catastrophizing, disability, and comorbidity of musculoskeletal complaints. Additionally, having a shoulder complaint, low

  14. A consensus-based template for documenting and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruger, Andreas J; Lockey, David; Kurola, Jouni

    2011-01-01

    by the experts. Subsequent rounds reduced the number of core variables to 45. These constituted the final core data set. Emphasis was placed on the standardisation of reporting time variables, chief complaints and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. CONCLUSIONS: Using a modified nominal group technique, we...... a higher quality of care to pre-hospital patients. There is no current data set collected to document the activity of physician pre-hospital activity which makes shared research efforts difficult. The aim of this study was to develop a core data set for routine documentation and reporting in physician......-staffed pre-hospital services in Europe. METHODS: Using predefined criteria, we recruited sixteen European experts in the field of pre-hospital care. These experts were guided through a four-step modified nominal group technique. The process was carried out using both e-mail-based communication and a plenary...

  15. Incidence of difficult airway situations during prehospital airway management by emergency physicians--a retrospective analysis of 692 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoeni, Nils; Piegeler, Tobias; Brueesch, Martin; Sulser, Simon; Haas, Thorsten; Mueller, Stefan M; Seifert, Burkhardt; Spahn, Donat R; Ruetzler, Kurt

    2015-05-01

    In the prehospital setting, advanced airway management is challenging as it is frequently affected by facial trauma, pharyngeal obstruction or limited access to the patient and/or the patient's airway. Therefore, incidence of prehospital difficult airway management is likely to be higher compared to the in-hospital setting and success rates of advanced airway management range between 80 and 99%. 3961 patients treated by an emergency physician in Zurich, Switzerland were included in this retrospective analysis in order to determine the incidence of a difficult airway along with potential circumstantial risk factors like gender, necessity of CPR, NACA score, GCS, use and type of muscle relaxant and use of hypnotic drugs. 692 patients underwent advanced prehospital airway management. Seven patients were excluded due to incomplete or incongruent documentation, resulting in 685 patients included in the statistical analysis. Difficult intubation was recorded in 22 patients, representing an incidence of a difficult airway of 3.2%. Of these 22 patients, 15 patients were intubated successfully, whereas seven patients (1%) had to be ventilated with a bag valve mask during the whole procedure. In this physician-led service one out of five prehospital patients requires airway management. Incidence of advanced prehospital difficult airway management is 3.2% and eventual success rate is 99%, if performed by trained emergency physicians. A total of 1% of all prehospital intubation attempts failed and alternative airway device was necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical utility and cost-effectiveness of CT-angiography in the diagnosis of nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbarli, Ramazan; Shah, Mukesch; Hippchen, Beate; Velthoven, Vera van [University Hospital of Freiburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Freiburg/Breisgau (Germany); Taschner, Christian [University Hospital of Freiburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); Kaier, Klaus [University Hospital of Freiburg, Institute for Medical Biometry and Medical Informatics, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    CT-angiography gains an increasing role in the initial diagnosis of patients with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). However, the implementation of CT-angiography does not always exclude the necessity of conventional angiography. Our objective was to determine the practical utility and cost-effectiveness of CT-angiography. All patients with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage admitted to our university hospital after implementation of CT-angiography between June 1, 2011 and June 30, 2012 were retrospectively analyzed in regard to factors of treatment flow, radiation exposure, harms of contrast medium loading, and diagnostic costs. A control group of the same size was assembled from previously admitted SAH patients, who did not undergo pretreatment CT-angiography. Furthermore, cost-effectiveness analysis was performed. The final analysis consisted of 93 patients in each group. Of 93 patients with pretreatment CT-angiography, 74 had to undergo conventional angiography for diagnostic and/or therapeutic purposes. CT-angiography had significant impact on the reduction of collective effective radiation dose by 4.419 mSv per person (p = 0.0002) and was not associated with additional harms. Despite the significantly earlier detection of aneurysms with CT-angiography (p < 0.0001), there were no significant differences in the timing of aneurysm repair and duration of ICU and general hospital stay. There was an increase of diagnostic costs - the cost-effectiveness analysis showed, however, that benefits of CT-angiography in respect to radiation exposure and risk of conventional angiography-related complications justify the additional costs of CT-angiography. Although the implementation of CT-angiography in SAH diagnosis cannot completely replace conventional angiography, it can be approved in regard to radiation hygiene and cost-effectiveness. (orig.)

  17. Scenario based outdoor simulation in pre-hospital trauma care using a simple mannequin model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grier Gareth

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We describe a system of scenario-based training using simple mannequins under realistic circumstances for the training of pre-hospital care providers. Methods A simple intubatable mannequin or student volunteers are used together with a training version of the equipment used on a routine basis by the pre-hospital care team (doctor + paramedic. Training is conducted outdoors at the base location all year round. The scenarios are led by scenario facilitators who are predominantly senior physicians. Their role is to brief the training team and guide the scenario, results of patient assessment and the simulated responses to interventions and treatment. Pilots, fire-fighters and medical students are utilised in scenarios to enhance realism by taking up roles as bystanders, additional ambulance staff and police. These scenario participants are briefed and introduced to the scene in a realistic manner. After completion of the scenario, the training team would usually be invited to prepare and deliver a hospital handover as they would in a real mission. A formal structured debrief then takes place. Results This training method technique has been used for the training of all London Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (London HEMS doctors and paramedics over the last 24 months. Informal participant feedback suggests that this is a very useful teaching method, both for improving motor skills, critical decision-making, scene management and team interaction. Although formal assessment of this technique has not yet taken place we describe how this type of training is conducted in a busy operational pre-hospital trauma service. Discussion The teaching and maintenance of pre-hospital care skills is essential to an effective pre-hospital trauma care system. Simple mannequin based scenario training is feasible on a day-to-day basis and has the advantages of low cost, rapid set up and turn around. The scope of scenarios is limited only by

  18. Where there are no emergency medical services-prehospital care for the injured in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nobhojit; Murlidhar, V; Chowdhury, Ritam; Patil, Sandeep B; Supe, Priyanka A; Vaishnav, Poonam D; Vatkar, Arvind

    2010-01-01

    In a populous city like Mumbai, which lacks an organized prehospital emergency medical services (EMS) system, there exists an informal network through which victims arrive at the trauma center. This baseline study describes the prehospital care and transportation that currently is available in Mumbai. A prospective trauma database was created by interviewing 170 randomly selected patients from a total of 454 admitted over a two-month period (July-August 2005) at a Level-I, urban, trauma center. The injured victim in Mumbai usually is rescued by a good Samaritan passer-by (43.5%) and contrary to popular belief, helped by the police (89.7%). Almost immediately after rescue, the victim begins transport to the hospital. No one waits for the EMS ambulance to arrive, as there is none. A taxi cab is the most popular substitute for the ambulance (39.3%). The trauma patient in India usually is a young man in his late-twenties, from a lower socioeconomic class. He mostly finds himself in a government hospital, as private hospitals are reluctant to provide trauma care to the seriously injured. The injured who do receive prehospital care receive inadequate and inappropriate care due to the high cost of consumables in resuscitation, and in part due to the providers' lack of training in emergency care. Those who were more likely to receive prehospital care suffered from road traffic injuries (odds ratio (OR) = 2.3) and those transported by government ambulances (OR = 10.83), as compared to railway accident victims (OR = 0 .41) and those who came by taxi (OR = 0.54). Currently, as a result of not having an EMS system, prehospital care is a citizen responsibility using societal networks. It is easy to eliminate this system and shift the responsibility to the state. The moot point is whether the state-funded EMS system will be robust enough in a resource-poor setting in which public hospitals are poorly funded. Considering the high funding cost of EMS systems in developed countries

  19. PHTLS ® (Prehospital Trauma Life Support) provider courses in Germany - who takes part and what do participants think about prehospital trauma care training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Christian B; Wölfl, Christoph G; Hogan, Aidan; Suda, Arnold J; Gühring, Thorsten; Gliwitzky, Bernhard; Münzberg, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine PHTLS Provider courses in Germany and to proof the assumption that formation of physicians and paramedics in prehospital trauma care can be optimized. PHTLS participants were asked to fill out standardized questionnaires during their course preparation and directly after the course. There were some open questions regarding their professional background and closed questions concerning PHTLS itself. Further questions were to be answered on an analog scale in order to quantify subjective impressions of confidence, knowledge and also to describe individual levels of education and training. 247 questionnaires could be analyzed. Physicians noted significant (p PHTLS (p = 0.005), didn't benefit as much as the rest (p = 0.004) and stated more often, that the course was of less value for their daily work (p = 0.03). After the course confidence increased remarkably and reached higher rates than before the course (p PHTLS both groups showed similar ratings concerning the course concept indicating that PHTLS could equalize some training deficits and help to gain confidence and assurance in prehospital trauma situations. 90% of the paramedics and 100% of the physicians would recommend PHTLS. Physicians and especially anesthetists revised their opinions with regard to providing PHTLS at Medical School after having taken part in a PHTLS course. The evaluation of PHTLS courses in Germany indicates the necessity for special prehospital trauma care training. Paramedics and physicians criticize deficits in their professional training, which can be compensated by PHTLS. With respect to relevant items like confidence and knowledge PHTLS leads to a statistically significant increase in ratings on a visual analogue scale. PHTLS should be integrated into the curriculum at Medical School.

  20. PHTLS ® (Prehospital Trauma Life Support) provider courses in Germany – who takes part and what do participants think about prehospital trauma care training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to examine PHTLS Provider courses in Germany and to proof the assumption that formation of physicians and paramedics in prehospital trauma care can be optimized. Methods PHTLS participants were asked to fill out standardized questionnaires during their course preparation and directly after the course. There were some open questions regarding their professional background and closed questions concerning PHTLS itself. Further questions were to be answered on an analog scale in order to quantify subjective impressions of confidence, knowledge and also to describe individual levels of education and training. Results 247 questionnaires could be analyzed. Physicians noted significant (p PHTLS (p = 0.005), didn’t benefit as much as the rest (p = 0.004) and stated more often, that the course was of less value for their daily work (p = 0.03). After the course confidence increased remarkably and reached higher rates than before the course (p PHTLS both groups showed similar ratings concerning the course concept indicating that PHTLS could equalize some training deficits and help to gain confidence and assurance in prehospital trauma situations. 90% of the paramedics and 100% of the physicians would recommend PHTLS. Physicians and especially anesthetists revised their opinions with regard to providing PHTLS at Medical School after having taken part in a PHTLS course. Conclusion The evaluation of PHTLS courses in Germany indicates the necessity for special prehospital trauma care training. Paramedics and physicians criticize deficits in their professional training, which can be compensated by PHTLS. With respect to relevant items like confidence and knowledge PHTLS leads to a statistically significant increase in ratings on a visual analogue scale. PHTLS should be integrated into the curriculum at Medical School. PMID:25050135

  1. Risk factors for 48-hours mortality after prehospital treatment of opioid overdose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichmann, Sine; Nielsen, Søren Loumann; Siersma, Volkert Dirk

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Opioid overdose is commonly treated by prehospital emergency services and the majority of the patients are discharged immediately after treatment and a short observation period. There is a minor risk for rebound opioid toxicity and other life-threatening conditions might occur after...... such episodes. The authors describe the short-term outcome and identify risk factors for death within 48 h after prehospital treatment of opioid overdose in Copenhagen, the capital of Denmark. METHODS: Data on all cases of opioid overdose treated by the medical emergency care unit between 1994 and 2003 were...... recorded prospectively. Risk factors for death within 48 h after initial medical emergency care unit contact were analysed in a multivariable logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The authors recorded 4762 episodes of opioid overdose, covering 1967 unique identified patients. A total of 78 patients (8...

  2. Efficacy of a sedo-analgesia protocol in pre-hospital trauma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savino Occhionorelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pre-hospital trauma treatment is an important situation in which pain should be appropriately assessed and treated, but there is a great lack of studies about it. Literature has widely pointed out that the underanalgesia problem is spread to all groups of patients. The objective of the study is to verify the efficacy of a sedation-analgesia protocol based on the use of NSAIDs, Fentanyl and Midazolam, for prehospital treatment of trauma patients. The protocol was tested in three Emergency Medical Services for a four month period, in which 30 patients were included in the study. Results evidenced a good management of both pain and anxiety in the majority of patients treated, with the achievement of analgesia target in 80% of the patients and sedation target in 100% of the patients.

  3. Feasibility and safety of prehospital administration of bivalirudin in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejersten, Maria; Nielsen, Søren Loumann; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    /kg bivalirudin bolus in the ambulance followed by infusion during angiography/primary percutaneous coronary intervention were compared with a STEMI control group (from the preceding year) treated with 10,000 U unfractionated heparin in the ambulance followed by in-hospital treatment with a GPI. A total of 102...... of this preliminary study was to describe the feasibility and safety of a switch from prehospital administration of unfractionated heparin to bivalirudin in ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients referred for primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients with STEMI treated with a 1-mg...... patients (59%) receiving bivalirudin and 72 receiving heparin were followed during hospitalization. The baseline characteristics and prehospital treatment times were comparable between the 2 groups. The thrombolysis in myocardial infarction flow before and after primary percutaneous coronary intervention...

  4. Mortality in primary angioplasty patients starting antiplatelet therapy with prehospital prasugrel or clopidogrel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, Patrick; Grieco, Niccolò; Ince, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    was associated with a significantly lower risk of CV death than treatment with clopidogrel (odds ratio 0.248; 95% confidence interval 0.06-0.89). CONCLUSION: In STEMI patients from routine practice undergoing primary angioplasty, who were able to start oral antiplatelet therapy prehospital, treatment...... hospitalization, we report here the 1-year follow-up data, including cardiovascular (CV) mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: MULTIPRAC is a multinational, prospective registry of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) from 25 hospitals in nine countries, all of which had an established practice...... from prehospital loading dose through hospital discharge. Prasugrel (n=824) was more commonly used than clopidogrel (n=425). The observed 1-year rates for CV death were 0.5% with prasugrel and 2.6% with clopidogrel. After adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics, treatment with prasugrel...

  5. Dyspnea is a dangerous symptom in the pre-hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtker, Morten Thingemann; Kirkegaard, Hans; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht

    ABSTRACT: Background Electrocardiogram (ECG) based telemedicine is a cornerstone in pre-hospital triage of patients with suspected ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). An ECG transmitted from the ambulance is reviewed by a cardiologist on-call in case of ongoing or recent chest pain......, resuscitation from cardiac arrest, acute dyspnea of unknown origin and other suspicion of STEMI. We hypothesize that unresolved dyspnea is an independent predictor of mortality in this prehospital setting and that the mortality is higher in patients with acute dyspnea of unknown origin than in patients......,204 (70%) of the patients, acute dyspnea of unknown origin in 1,461 (8 %), resuscitated from cardiac arrest in 163 (1%) and other suspicion of STEMI in 3,533 (20%). When adjusting for age, sex, systolic blood pressure and Charlson Comorbidity Index (p

  6. Characteristics and prognoses of patients treated by an anaesthesiologist-manned prehospital emergency care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Lossius, Hans Morten; Toft, Palle

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: When planning and dimensioning an emergency medical system, knowledge of the population serviced is vital. The amount of literature concerning the prehospital population is sparse. In order to add to the current body of literature regarding prehospital treatment, thus aiding future...... by a MECU operating in a mixed urban/rural area in Denmark from 1 May 2006 to 31 December 2014. Information on missions was extracted from the local MECU registry and linked at the individual level to the Danish population-based databases, the National Patient Registry and the Civil Registration System....... PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome measures were number of missions and number of patient contacts. Secondary patient variables were mortality and association between mortality and age, sex, comorbidity, prior admission to hospital and response time. RESULTS: The MECU completed 41 513...

  7. Factors Influencing Pre-hospital Patient Delay in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    La Xie; Su-Fang Huang∗; You-Zhen Hu

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction ( AMI) is a dangerous disease with a high mortality rate. For AMI patients, the outcome of the patients depends on time to beginning of effective treatment in addition to other factors such as severity of disease and involved vessels etc. The key is whether reperfusion therapy is started early enough after the onset of symptoms, and the benefit of reperfu-sion therapy depends on the time, too. The delay of AMI treatment is divided into pre-hospital de-lay and in-hospital delay. In-hospital delay, Door-to-Balloon Time, has been well controlled. Pre-hospital delay, accounting for 75% of the total delay time, is the most important factor affect-ing AMI treatment. Patient delay ( PD) time for AMI patients is summarised in this study.

  8. A systematic review of stroke recognition instruments in hospital and prehospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Matthew; Buck, Deborah; Ford, Gary A; Price, Christopher I

    2016-11-01

    We undertook a systematic review of all published stroke identification instruments to describe their performance characteristics when used prospectively in any clinical setting. A search strategy was applied to Medline and Embase for material published prior to 10 August 2015. Two authors independently screened titles, and abstracts as necessary. Data including clinical setting, reported sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value were extracted independently by two reviewers. 5622 references were screened by title and or abstract. 18 papers and 3 conference abstracts were included after full text review. 7 instruments were identified; Face Arm Speech Test (FAST), Recognition of Stroke in the Emergency Room (ROSIER), Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen (LAPSS), Melbourne Ambulance Stroke Scale (MASS), Ontario Prehospital Stroke Screening tool (OPSS), Medic Prehospital Assessment for Code Stroke (MedPACS) and Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS). Cohorts varied between 50 and 1225 individuals, with 17.5% to 92% subsequently receiving a stroke diagnosis. Sensitivity and specificity for the same instrument varied across clinical settings. Studies varied in terms of quality, scoring 13-31/36 points using modified Standards for the Reporting of Diagnostic accuracy studies checklist. There was considerable variation in the detail reported about patient demographics, characteristics of false-negative patients and service context. Prevalence of instrument detectable stroke varied between cohorts and over time. CPSS and the similar FAST test generally report the highest level of sensitivity, with more complex instruments such as LAPSS reporting higher specificity at the cost of lower detection rates. Available data do not allow a strong recommendation to be made about the superiority of a stroke recognition instrument. Choice of instrument depends on intended purpose, and the consequences of a false-negative or false

  9. Prevalence of difficult airway predictors in cases of failed prehospital endotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, Joshua B; Spaite, Daniel W; Stolz, Uwe; Ennis, Joshua; Mosier, Jarrod; Sakles, John J

    2014-09-01

    Difficult airway predictors (DAPs) are associated with failed endotracheal intubation (ETI) in the emergency department (ED). However, little is known about the relationship between DAPs and failed prehospital ETI. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of common DAPs among failed prehospital intubations. We reviewed a quality-improvement database, including all cases of ETI in a single ED, over 3 years. Failed prehospital (FP) ETI was defined as a case brought to the ED after attempted prehospital ETI, but bag-valve-mask ventilation, need for a rescue airway (supraglottic device, cricothyrotomy, etc.), or esophageal intubation was discovered at the ED. Physicians performing ETI evaluated each case for the presence of DAPs, including blood/emesis, facial/neck trauma, airway edema, spinal immobilization, short neck, and tongue enlargement. There were a total of 1377 ED ETIs and 161 had an FP-ETI (11.8%). Prevalence of DAPs in cases with FP-ETI was obesity 13.0%, large tongue 18.0%, short neck 13%, small mandible 4.3%, cervical immobility 49.7%, blood in airway 57.8%, vomitus in airway 23.0%, airway edema 12.4%, and facial or neck trauma 32.9%. The number of cases with FP-ETI and 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 or more DAPs per case was 22 (13.6%), 43 (26.7%), 23 (24.3%), 42 (26.1%), and 31 (19.3%), respectively. DAPs are common in cases of FP-ETI. Some of these factors may be associated with FP-ETI. Additional study is needed to determine if DAPs can be used to identify patients that are difficult to intubate in the field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prehospital Use of the Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway in Patients with Severe Polytrauma: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Mason

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A case series of five patients is described demonstrating the utility of the intubating laryngeal mask airway in the prehospital setting, both as a primary airway rescue device and as a bridge to tracheal intubation. All patients were hypoxaemic, had sustained severe polytrauma and were trapped in their vehicles following road traffic collisions. A probability of survival study showed better-than-predicted outcomes for the group as a whole.

  11. Facilitators and obstacles in pre-hospital medical response to earthquakes: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castrén Maaret

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Earthquakes are renowned as being amongst the most dangerous and destructive types of natural disasters. Iran, a developing country in Asia, is prone to earthquakes and is ranked as one of the most vulnerable countries in the world in this respect. The medical response in disasters is accompanied by managerial, logistic, technical, and medical challenges being also the case in the Bam earthquake in Iran. Our objective was to explore the medical response to the Bam earthquake with specific emphasis on pre-hospital medical management during the first days. Methods The study was performed in 2008; an interview based qualitative study using content analysis. We conducted nineteen interviews with experts and managers responsible for responding to the Bam earthquake, including pre-hospital emergency medical services, the Red Crescent, and Universities of Medical Sciences. The selection of participants was determined by using a purposeful sampling method. Sample size was given by data saturation. Results The pre-hospital medical service was divided into three categories; triage, emergency medical care and transportation, each category in turn was identified into facilitators and obstacles. The obstacles identified were absence of a structured disaster plan, absence of standardized medical teams, and shortage of resources. The army and skilled medical volunteers were identified as facilitators. Conclusions The most compelling, and at the same time amenable obstacle, was the lack of a disaster management plan. It was evident that implementing a comprehensive plan would not only save lives but decrease suffering and enable an effective praxis of the available resources at pre-hospital and hospital levels.

  12. Prehospital Use of IM Ketamine for Sedation of Violent and Agitated Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A. Scheppke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Violent and agitated patients pose a serious challenge for emergency medical services (EMS personnel. Rapid control of these patients is paramount to successful prehospital evaluation and also for the safety of both the patient and crew. Sedation is often required for these patients, but the ideal choice of medication is not clear. The objective is to demonstrate that ketamine, given as a single intramuscular injection for violent and agitated patients, including those with suspected excited delirium syndrome (ExDS, is both safe and effective during the prehospital phase of care, and allows for the rapid sedation and control of this difficult patient population. Methods: We reviewed paramedic run sheets from five different catchment areas in suburban Florida communities. We identified 52 patients as having been given intramuscular ketamine 4mg/kg IM, following a specific protocol devised by the EMS medical director of these jurisdictions, to treat agitated and violent patients, including a subset of which would be expected to suffer from ExDS. Twenty-six of 52 patients were also given parenteral midazolam after medical control was obtained to prevent emergence reactions associated with ketamine. Results: Review of records demonstrated that almost all patients (50/52 were rapidly sedated and in all but three patients no negative side effects were noted during the prehospital care. All patients were subsequently transported to the hospital before ketamine effects wore off. Conclusion: Ketamine may be safely and effectively used by trained paramedics following a specific protocol. The drug provides excellent efficacy and few clinically significant side effects in the prehospital phase of care, making it an attractive choice in those situations requiring rapid and safe sedation especially without intravenous access. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:–0.

  13. Prehospital treatment of opioid overdose in Copenhagen--is it safe to discharge on-scene?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Søren; Jehu, G; Nielsen, Søren Loumann

    2011-01-01

    In the prehospital setting opioid overdose is often treated with naloxone. In our physician-based medical emergency care unit (MECU) we have adopted a discharge-on-scene policy, where patients are released on scene if no residual signs of opioid intoxication are found after treatment. The aim...... of this study was to describe our experience with the discharge-on-scene policy used during a 10-year-period with focus on the frequency of rebound opioid toxicity....

  14. Factors influencing pre-hospital delay among patients with acute myocardial infarction in Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maryam Momeni; Arsalan Salari; Shora Shafighnia; Atefeh Ghanbari; Fardin Mirbolouk

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause of morbidity and disability among Iranian population.Pre-hospital delay is an important cause of increasing early and also late mortality in AMI.Thus the aim of the present study was to identify the factors influencing pre-hospital delay among patients with AMI in Iran.Methods Between August 2010 and May 2011,a cross-sectional and single-center survey was conducted on 162 consecutive patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) admitted to Cardiac Care Unit (CCU) of Dr.Heshmat Hospital,Rasht.All patients were interviewed by the third author within 7 days after admission by using a four-part questionnaire including socio-demographic,clinical,situational and cognitive factors.Data were analyzed by descriptive and Logistic regression model at P < 0.05 using SPSS 16.Results Mean age was (60.11±12.29) years in all patients.Majority of patients (65.4%) were male.The median of pre-hospital delay was 2 hours,with a mean delay of 7.4 hours (±16.25 hours).Regression analysis showed that admission in weekend (P <0.04,OR=1.033,95% Cl=1.187-2.006) and misinterpretation of symptoms as cardiac origin (P <0.002,OR=1.986,95% Cl=1.254-3.155) and perceiving symptoms to not be so serious (P <0.003,OR=3.264,95%Cl=1.492-7.142) were factors influencing pre-hospital delay > 2 hours.Conclusions Our findings highlight the importance of cognitive factors on decision-making process and pre-hospital delays.Health care providers can educate the public on AMI to enable them recognize the signs and symptoms of AMI correctly and realize the benefits of early treatment.

  15. Effect of educational television commercial on pre-hospital delay in patients with ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Haruo; Kon, Tomoya; Ueno, Tatsuya; Haga, Rie; Yamazaki, Keishi; Yagihashi, Kei; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Nunomura, Jin-ichi; Baba, Masayuki; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Administering intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) within 4.5 h or endovascular procedures within 8 h of ischemic stroke onset may reduce the risk of disability. The effectiveness of media campaigns to raise stroke awareness and shorten pre-hospital delay is unclear. We studied 1144 consecutive ischemic stroke patients at Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital, Japan, between March 2010 and February 2014. From March 2012, the government sponsored an educational campaign based on a television commercial to improve knowledge of stroke symptoms and encourage ambulance calls for facial palsy, arm palsy, or speech disturbance. For the 544 and 600 patients admitted before and during the intervention, respectively, we recorded the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke type, the time when patients or bystanders recognized stroke symptoms, and hospital arrival time. Pre-hospital delay, as the time interval from awareness of stroke to hospital arrival, was categorized as 0-3, 3-6, and 6+ h. The mean pre-hospital delay was shorter (12.0 vs 13.5 h; P = 0.0067), the proportion of patients arriving within 3 h was larger (55.7 vs 46.5 %; P = 0.0021), and the proportion arriving after 6 h was smaller (32.7 vs 39.5 %; P = 0.0162) in the intervention group than in the pre-intervention group. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients treated with r-tPA (6 and 7.5 % of the intervention and pre-intervention groups, respectively). A television-based public education campaign potentially reduced pre-hospital delay for ischemic stroke patients, but the r-tPA treatment rate was unchanged.

  16. Pre-hospital transport times and survival for Hypotensive patients with penetrating thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Swaroop

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achieving definitive care within the "Golden Hour" by minimizing response times is a consistent goal of regional trauma systems . This study hypothesizes that in urban Level I Trauma Centers, shorter pre-hospital times would predict outcomes in penetrating thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed using a statewide trauma registry for the years 1999-2003 . Total pre-hospital times were measured for urban victims of penetrating thoracic trauma. Crude and adjusted mortality rates were compared by pre-hospital time using STATA statistical software. Results: During the study period, 908 patients presented to the hospital after penetrating thoracic trauma, with 79% surviving . Patients with higher injury severity scores (ISS were transported more quickly. Injury severity scores (ISS ≥16 and emergency department (ED hypotension (systolic blood pressure, SBP <90 strongly predicted mortality (P < 0.05 for each . In a logistic regression model including age, race, and ISS, longer transport times for hypotensive patients were associated with higher mortality rates (all P values <0.05. This was seen most significantly when comparing patient transport times 0-15 min and 46-60 min (P < 0.001. Conclusion: In victims of penetrating thoracic trauma, more severely injured patients arrive at urban trauma centers sooner . Mortality is strongly predicted by injury severity, although shorter pre-hospital times are associated with improved survival . These results suggest that careful planning to optimize transport time-encompassing hospital capacity and existing resources, traffic patterns, and trauma incident densities may be beneficial in areas with a high burden of penetrating trauma.

  17. Prehospital plasma resuscitation associated with improved neurologic outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Matthew C; Thiels, Cornelius A; Aho, Johnathon M; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Zielinski, Martin D; Stubbs, James A; Jenkins, Donald H; Zietlow, Scott P

    2017-09-01

    Trauma-related hypotension and coagulopathy worsen secondary brain injury in patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Early damage control resuscitation with blood products may mitigate hypotension and coagulopathy. Preliminary data suggest resuscitation with plasma in large animals improves neurologic function after TBI; however, data in humans are lacking. We retrospectively identified all patients with multiple injuries age >15 years with head injuries undergoing prehospital resuscitation with blood products at a single Level I trauma center from January 2002 to December 2013. Inclusion criteria were prehospital resuscitation with either packed red blood cells (pRBCs) or thawed plasma as sole colloid resuscitation. Patients who died in hospital and those using anticoagulants were excluded. Primary outcomes were Glasgow Outcomes Score Extended (GOSE) and Disability Rating Score (DRS) at dismissal and during follow-up. Of 76 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 53% (n = 40) received prehospital pRBCs and 47% (n = 36) received thawed plasma. Age, gender, injury severity or TBI severity, arrival laboratory values, and number of prehospital units were similar (all p > 0.05). Patients who received thawed plasma had an improved neurologic outcome compared to those receiving pRBCs (median GOSE 7 [7-8] vs. 5.5 [3-7], p plasma had improved functionality compared to pRBCs (median DRS 2 [1-3.5] vs. 9 [3-13], p plasma compared to pRBCs by both median GOSE (8 [7-8] vs. 6 [6-7], p plasma is associated with improved neurologic and functional outcomes at discharge and during follow-up compared to pRBCs alone. These preliminary data support the further investigation and use of plasma in the resuscitation of critically injured TBI patients. Therapeutic, level V.

  18. Pre-Hospital and In-Hospital Thoracostomy: Indications and Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylwin, Christopher J; Brohi, Karim; Davies, Gareth D; Walsh, Michael S

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pleural drainage with chest tube insertion for thoracic trauma is a common and often life-saving technique. Although considered a simple procedure, complication rates have been reported to be 2–25%. We conducted a prospective cohort observational study of emergency pleural drainage procedures to validate the indications for pre-hospital thoracostomy and to identify complications from both pre- and in-hospital thoracostomies. PATIENTS AND METHODS Data were collected over a 7-month period on all patients receiving either pre-hospital thoracostomy or emergency department tube thoracostomy. Outcome measures were appropriate indications, errors in tube placement and subsequent complications. RESULTS Ninety-one chest tubes were placed into 52 patients. Sixty-five thoracostomies were performed in the field without chest tube placement. Twenty-six procedures were performed following emergency department identification of thoracic injury. Of the 65 pre-hospital thoracostomies, 40 (61%) were for appropriate indications of suspected tension pneumothorax or a low output state. The overall complication rate was 14% of which 9% were classified as major and three patients required surgical intervention. Twenty-eight (31%) chest tubes were poorly positioned and 15 (17%) of these required repositioning. CONCLUSIONS Pleural drainage techniques may be complicated and have the potential to cause life-threatening injury. Pre-hospital thoracostomies have the same potential risks as in-hospital procedures and attention must be paid to insertion techniques under difficult scene conditions. In-hospital chest tube placement complication rates remain uncomfortably high, and attention must be placed on training and assessment of staff in this basic procedure. PMID:18201502

  19. Advance Directives and Communication Skills of Prehospital Physicians Involved in the Care of Cardiovascular Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gigon, Fabienne; Merlani, Paolo; Ricou, Bara

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Advance directives (AD) were developed to respect patient autonomy. However, very few patients have AD, even in cases when major cardiovascular surgery is to follow. To understand the reasons behind the low prevalence of AD and to help decision making when patients are incompetent, it is necessary to focus on the impact of prehospital practitioners, who may contribute to an increase in AD by discussing them with patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate self-rated commun...

  20. Maximizing resource efficiency in rural prehospital emergency medical services through call frequency analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Flynn, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Rural prehospital emergency medical services are often lacking when compared with their urban counterparts in terms of resources and coordinated resource use: can only employ important resources, such as paramedics, during limited shifts. This project demonstrates a method for determining the most effective use of these limited resources in a rural Red Cross ambulance service in Guápiles, Costa Rica. In this community, paramedic services are only available six days a week for twelve hours. Em...

  1. Large discrepancy between prehospital visitation to mobile emergency care unit and discharge diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Christine Puck; Wichmann, Sine; Nielsen, Søren Loumann

    2012-01-01

    In Copenhagen, Denmark, patients in need of prehospital emergency assistance dial 112 and may then receive evaluation and treatment by physicians (from the Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU)). ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a severe condition leaving only a limited time frame to del...... diagnosis on the scene and, furthermore, to compare these on-scene diagnoses with the primary discharge diagnoses from hospital....

  2. 911 (nueve once): Spanish-speaking parents' perspectives on prehospital emergency care for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jennifer; Cowden, John D; Cupertino, A Paula; Dowd, M Denise; Kennedy, Chris

    2011-06-01

    Racial, ethnic and language-based disparities occur throughout the US health system. Pediatric prehospital emergency medical services are less likely to be used by Latinos. We identified perceptions of and barriers to prehospital pediatric emergency care (911) access among Spanish-speaking parents. A qualitative study involving six focus groups was conducted. Spanish-speaking parents participated with a bilingual moderator. Topics discussed included experiences, knowledge, beliefs, fears, barriers, and improvement strategies. All groups were audiotaped, transcribed, and reviewed for recurring themes. Forty-nine parents participated. Though parents believed 911 was available to all, many were uncertain how to use it, and what qualified as an emergency. Barriers included language discordance, fear of exposing immigration status, and fear of financial consequences. Parents strongly desired to learn more about 911 through classes, brochures, and media campaigns. Prehospital emergency care should be available to all children. Further quantitative studies may help solidify the identified barriers and uncover areas needing improvement within Emergency Medical Systems. Addressing barriers to 911 use in Spanish-speaking communities could improve the equity of health care delivery, while also decreasing the amount of non-emergency 911 use.

  3. Pre-hospital advanced airway management by anaesthesiologists: is there still room for improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollid, Stephen J M; Heltne, Jon Kenneth; Søreide, Eldar; Lossius, Hans Morten

    2008-07-21

    Endotracheal intubation is an important part of pre-hospital advanced life support that requires training and experience, and should only be performed by specially trained personnel. In Norway, anaesthesiologists serve as Helicopter Emergency Medical Service HEMS physicians. However, little is known about how they themselves evaluate the quality and safety of pre-hospital advanced airway management. Using a semi-structured questionnaire, we interviewed anaesthesiologists working in the three HEMS programs covering Western Norway. We compared answers from specialists and non-specialists as well as full- and part-time HEMS physicians. Of the 17 available respondents, most (88%) felt that their continuous exposure to intubations was not sufficient. Additional training was mainly acquired through other clinical practice and mannequin- or cadaver-based skills training. Of the respondents, 77% and 35% reported having experienced difficult and failed intubations, respectively. Further, 59% reported knowledge of airway management-related deaths in their HEMS program. Significantly more full- than part-time HEMS physicians had experienced these problems. All respondents had airway back-up equipment in their service, but 29% were not familiar with all the equipment. The majority of anaesthesiologists working as HEMS physicians view pre-hospital advanced airway management as a high-risk procedure. Relevant airway management competencies for HEMS physicians in Norway seem to be insufficiently trained and maintained. A better-defined level of competence with better training methods and systems seems warranted.

  4. Pre-hospital advanced airway management by anaesthesiologists: Is there still room for improvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søreide Eldar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endotracheal intubation is an important part of pre-hospital advanced life support that requires training and experience, and should only be performed by specially trained personnel. In Norway, anaesthesiologists serve as Helicopter Emergency Medical Service HEMS physicians. However, little is known about how they themselves evaluate the quality and safety of pre-hospital advanced airway management. Method Using a semi-structured questionnaire, we interviewed anaesthesiologists working in the three HEMS programs covering Western Norway. We compared answers from specialists and non-specialists as well as full- and part-time HEMS physicians. Results Of the 17 available respondents, most (88% felt that their continuous exposure to intubations was not sufficient. Additional training was mainly acquired through other clinical practice and mannequin- or cadaver-based skills training. Of the respondents, 77% and 35% reported having experienced difficult and failed intubations, respectively. Further, 59% reported knowledge of airway management-related deaths in their HEMS program. Significantly more full- than part-time HEMS physicians had experienced these problems. All respondents had airway back-up equipment in their service, but 29% were not familiar with all the equipment. Conclusion The majority of anaesthesiologists working as HEMS physicians view pre-hospital advanced airway management as a high-risk procedure. Relevant airway management competencies for HEMS physicians in Norway seem to be insufficiently trained and maintained. A better-defined level of competence with better training methods and systems seems warranted.

  5. [PHTLS team course: a pilot project. Structured student education in prehospital care of severely injured patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelfl, C G; Guehring, T; Moghaddam, A; Gliwitzky, B; Schaedler, T; Gruetzner, P A; Riess, M; Frank, C B

    2012-03-01

    The training of medical school students at the University of Heidelberg seems to be improvable regarding prehospital trauma treatment compared to an established anaesthesiology-based training for medical emergencies. This study addresses the current situation and possibilities for advancing this training. A baseline was set by interviews of the medical school students. Based on this the hypothesis was postulated that there is a deficit in the education of the medical school students concerning the training in prehospital trauma treatment. This was proved by questionnaires given to the students in the 7th and 8th semesters at the University of Heidelberg Medical School. The results were evaluated and a possible approach for improvement was developed. A total of 111 questionnaires could be evaluated. It could be shown that the existing education was not effectual and that there is a need for a praxis-orientated 1-day course in prehospital trauma treatment. Especially the treatment of multiply injured patients is a challenge for young medical professionals. However, there is a high motivation to learn and train in emergency medicine. The students long for a practical trauma course compared to the advanced medical CPR course provided by the Department of Anaesthesiology of the University of Heidelberg. Those algorithm-based trauma courses do exist with PHTLS® and ATLS®. Based on these courses we developed the PHTLS® TEAM course.

  6. [Essential measures for prehospital treatment of severely injured patients: The trauma care bundle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, G; Trentzsch, H; Wölfl, C G; Paffrath, T; Flohe, S; Schweigkofler, U; Ekkernkamp, A; Schulz-Drost, S

    2015-08-01

    In order to ensure adequate treatment and to avoid complications, care bundles are increasingly being implemented. These are comprehensive and evidence-based procedures for the treatment of individual diseases or injuries which should be carried out for every patient. The aim of this study was to define a care bundle for the prehospital treatment of severely injured patients. The scientific contents of the bundle were gathered from the interdisciplinary evidence-based S3 guidelines for the treatment of severely injured patients by the German Trauma Society. The ABCDE scheme suggested by the prehospital trauma life support (PHTLS®) and the advanced trauma life support (ATLS®) functioned as a matrix for the individual elements in the bundles. The identified elements were finalized by a consensus process. A bundle of six elements was suggested and a comprehensive summary of key items during prehospital management of severely injured patients was identified. In a next step the effectiveness of the care bundle should be evaluated in a clinical trial.

  7. Lightweight physiologic sensor performance during pre-hospital care delivered by ambulance clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mort, Alasdair J; Fitzpatrick, David; Wilson, Philip M J; Mellish, Chris; Schneider, Anne

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of motion generated by ambulance patient management on the performance of two lightweight physiologic sensors. Two physiologic sensors were applied to pre-hospital patients. The first was the Contec Medical Systems CMS50FW finger pulse oximeter, monitoring heart rate (HR) and blood oxygen saturation (SpO2). The second was the RESpeck respiratory rate (RR) sensor, which was wireless-enabled with a Bluetooth(®) Low Energy protocol. Sensor data were recorded from 16 pre-hospital patients, who were monitored for 21.2 ± 9.8 min, on average. Some form of error was identified on almost every HR and SpO2 trace. However, the mean proportion of each trace exhibiting error was ambulance transit on the incidence of HR or SpO2 error. The RESpeck RR sensor delivered an average of 4.2 (±2.2) validated breaths per minute, but did not produce any validated breaths during the gross motion of ambulance transit as its pre-defined motion threshold was exceeded. However, this was many more data points than could be achieved using traditional manual assessment of RR. Error was identified on a majority of pre-hospital physiologic signals, which emphasised the need to ensure consistent sensor attachment in this unstable and unpredictable environment, and in developing intelligent methods of screening out such error.

  8. Insurance and Prehospital Delay in Patients ≤55 Years of Age with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Serene I.; Wang, Yongfei; Dreyer, Rachel; Strait, Kelly M.; Spatz, Erica S.; Xu, Xiao; Smolderen, Kim G.; Desai, Nihar R.; Lorenze, Nancy P.; Lichtman, Judith H.; Spertus, John A.; D’Onofrio, Gail; Bueno, Héctor; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study assessed whether gender differences in health insurance help explain gender differences in delay in seeking care for US patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We also assessed gender differences in such prehospital delay for AMI in Spain, a country with universal insurance. We used data from 2,951 US and 496 Spanish patients aged 18–55 years with AMI. US patients were grouped by insurance status: adequately insured, underinsured, or uninsured. For each country, we assessed the association between gender and prehospital delay (symptom onset to hospital arrival). For the US cohort, we modeled the relationship between insurance groups and delay of >12 hours. US women were less likely than men to be uninsured, but more likely to be underinsured and a larger proportion of women than men experienced delays of >12 hours (38% versus 29%). We found no association between insurance status and delays of >12 hours in men or women. Only 17.3% of Spanish patients had delays of >12 hours and there were no significant gender differences. In conclusion, women were more likely than men to delay, though it was not explained by differences in insurance status. The lack of gender differences in prehospital delays in Spain suggests that these differences may vary by health care system and culture. PMID:26541907

  9. Development and validation of the Pre-hospital Stroke Symptoms Coping Test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuli Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Measures of specific knowledge of coping with pre-hospital stroke symptoms can help educate high-risk patients and family caregivers. This study aimed to develop and validate the Pre-hospital Stroke Symptoms Coping Test (PSSCT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Reliability and validity were analyzed using multiple data sources. The Delphi expert consultation method was applied to assess the test's surface validity and content validity index. The final edition of the 19-item PSSCT contained 3 sections assessing coping with typical symptoms and symptoms associated with vomiting and twitching. Its psychometric properties were investigated in a community sample of 300 high-risk patients and family members. RESULTS: The PSSCT was readily accepted by participants. It demonstrated adequate surface validity and content validity, and good internal consistency (KR20 = 0.822 and test-retest reliability (0.769, with difficulty (P and degree of differentiation (D ranges of 0.28-0.83 and 0.15-0.66, respectively. It was also able to distinguish between individuals who had/had not experienced a stroke. Experienced individuals scored significantly higher overall and on coping with typical symptoms and twitching (P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: The PSSCT can practically and directly assess critical knowledge regarding coping with pre-hospital stroke symptoms and has good reliability and validity.

  10. Factors associated with prehospital death among traffic accident patients in Osaka City, Japan: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Yusuke; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Iwami, Taku; Kawamura, Takashi; Hayashida, Sumito; Ogura, Hiroshi; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2017-06-28

    Although it is important to assess the factors associated with traffic accident fatalities to decrease them as a matter of public health, such factors have not been fully identified. Using a large-scale data set of ambulance records in Osaka City, Japan, we retrospectively analyzed all traffic accident patients transported to hospitals by emergency medical service personnel from 2013 to 2014. In this study, prehospital death was defined as that occurring at the scene or in the emergency department immediately after hospital arrival. We assessed prehospital factors associated with prehospital death due to traffic accidents by logistic regression models. This study enrolled 28,903 emergency patients involved in traffic accidents, of whom 68 died prehospital. In a multivariate model, elderly patients aged ≥75 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.29-8.23), nighttime (AOR = 2.75; 95% CI, 1.65-4.70), and type of injured person compared to bicyclists such as pedestrians (AOR = 9.58; 95% CI, 5.07-17.99), motorcyclists (AOR = 2.75; 95% CI, 1.21-6.24), and car occupants (AOR = 2.98; 95% CI, 1.39-6.40) were significantly associated with prehospital death due to traffic accidents. In addition, the AOR for automobile versus nonautomobile as the collision opponent was 4.76 (95% CI, 2.30-9.88). In this population, the factors associated with prehospital death due to traffic accidents were elderly people, nighttime, and pedestrian as the type of patient. The proportion of prehospital deaths due to traffic accidents was also high when the collision component was an automobile.

  11. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR inhibits miR-17-5p to regulate osteogenic differentiation and proliferation in non-traumatic osteonecrosis of femoral head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baoxiang; Guo, Xiaxia; Liu, Song

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim The biological functions of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been widely identified in many human diseases. In the present study, the relationship between long non-coding RNA HOTAIR and microRNA-17-5p (miR-17-5p) and their roles in osteogenic differentiation and proliferation in non-traumatic osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) were investigated. Methods The expression levels of HOTAIR and miR-17-5p in the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from patients with non-traumatic ONFH and osteoarthritis (OA) were examined by real-time PCR. BMP-2 induced human MSCs from bone marrow (hMSC-BM) were used for osteogenic differentiation. Results It was observed that the expression level of miR-17-5p was lower and the level of HOTAIR was higher in samples of non-traumatic ONFH compared with OA. HOTAIR downregulation induced by si-HOTAIR led to the increase of miR-17-5p expression and the decrease of miR-17-5p target gene SMAD7 expression. The values of osteogenic differentiation markers, including RUNX2 and COL1A1 mRNA expression and ALP activity, were also elevated by si-HOTAIR. However, the increase of these values was canceled by miR-17-5p inhibitor or SMAD7 upregulation. Conclusion HOTAIR played a role in regulating osteogenic differentiation and proliferation through modulating miR-17-5p and its target gene SMAD7 in non-traumatic ONFH. PMID:28207735

  12. The Need for More Prehospital Research on Language Barriers: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Ramsey C

    2015-12-01

    Despite evidence from other healthcare settings that language barriers negatively impact patient outcomes, the literature on language barriers in emergency medical services (EMS) has not been previously summarized. The objective of this study is to systematically review existing studies of the impact of language barriers on prehospital emergency care and identify opportunities for future research. A systematic review with narrative synthesis of publications with populations specific to the prehospital setting and outcome measures specific to language barriers was conducted. A four-prong search strategy of academic databases (PubMed, Academic Search Complete, and Clinical Key) through March 2015, web-based search for gray literature, search of citation lists, and review of key conference proceedings using pre-defined eligibility criteria was used. Language-related outcomes were categorized and reported as community-specific outcomes, EMS provider-specific outcomes, patient-specific outcomes, or health system-specific outcomes. Twenty-two studies met eligibility criteria for review. Ten publications (45%) focused on community-specific outcomes. Language barriers are perceived as a barrier by minority language speaking communities to activating EMS. Eleven publications (50%) reported outcomes specific to EMS providers, with six of these studies focused on EMS dispatch. EMS dispatchers describe less accurate and delayed dispatch of resources when confronted with language discordant callers, as well as limitations in the ability to provide medical direction to callers. There is a paucity of research on EMS treatment and transport decisions, and no studies provided patient-specific or health system-specific outcomes. Key research gaps include identifying the mechanisms by which language barriers impact care, the effect of language barriers on EMS utilization and clinically significant outcomes, and the cost implications of addressing language barriers. The existing

  13. Prehospital evaluation and economic analysis of different coronary syndrome treatment strategies - PREDICT - Rationale, Development and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Alan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A standard of prehospital care for patients presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI includes prehospital 12-lead and advance Emergency Department notification or prehospital bypass to percutaneous coronary intervention centres. Implementation of either care strategies is variable across communities and neither may exist in some communities. The main objective is to compare prehospital care strategies for time to treatment and survival outcomes as well as cost effectiveness. Methods/Design PREDICT is a multicentre, prospective population-based cohort study of all chest pain patients 18 years or older presenting within 30 mins to 6 hours of symptom onset and treated with nitroglycerin, transported by paramedics in a number of different urban and rural regions in Ontario. The primary objective of this study is to compare the proportion of study subjects who receive reperfusion within the target door-to-reperfusion times in subjects obtained after four prehospital strategies: 12-lead ECG and advance emergency department (ED notification or 3-lead ECG monitoring and alert to dispatch prior to hospital arrival; either with or without the opportunity to bypass to a PCI centre. Discussion We anticipate four challenges to successful study implementation and have developed strategies for each: 1 diversity in the interpretation of the ethical and privacy issues across 47 research ethics boards/commiittees covering 71 hospitals, 2 remote oversight of data guardian abstraction, 3 timeliness of implementation, and 4 potential interference in the study by concurrent technological advances. Research ethics approvals from academic centres were obtained initially and submitted to non academic centre applications. Data guardians were trained by a single investigator and data entry is informed by a detailed data dictionary including variable definitions and abstraction instrucations and subjected to error and logic

  14. The Need for More Prehospital Research on Language Barriers: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsey C. Tate

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite evidence from other healthcare settings that language barriers negatively impact patient outcomes, the literature on language barriers in emergency medical services (EMS has not been previously summarized. The objective of this study is to systematically review existing studies of the impact of language barriers on prehospital emergency care and identify opportunities for future research. Methods: A systematic review with narrative synthesis of publications with populations specific to the prehospital setting and outcome measures specific to language barriers was conducted. A fourprong search strategy of academic databases (PubMed, Academic Search Complete, and Clinical Key through March 2015, web-based search for gray literature, search of citation lists, and review of key conference proceedings using pre-defined eligibility criteria was used. Language-related outcomes were categorized and reported as community-specific outcomes, EMS provider-specific outcomes, patient-specific outcomes, or health system-specific outcomes. Results: Twenty-two studies met eligibility criteria for review. Ten publications (45% focused on community-specific outcomes. Language barriers are perceived as a barrier by minority language speaking communities to activating EMS. Eleven publications (50% reported outcomes specific to EMS providers, with six of these studies focused on EMS dispatch. EMS dispatchers describe less accurate and delayed dispatch of resources when confronted with language discordant callers, as well as limitations in the ability to provide medical direction to callers. There is a paucity of research on EMS treatment and transport decisions, and no studies provided patient-specific or health system-specific outcomes. Key research gaps include identifying the mechanisms by which language barriers impact care, the effect of language barriers on EMS utilization and clinically significant outcomes, and the cost implications of

  15. Trauma-informed care for children in the ambulance: international survey among pre-hospital providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisic, Eva; Tyler, Mark P; Giummarra, Melita J; Kassam-Adams, Rahim; Gouweloos, Juul; Landolt, Markus A; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pre-hospital providers, such as paramedics and emergency medical technicians, are in a position to provide key emotional support to injured children and their families. Objective: Our goal was to examine (a) pre-hospital providers' knowledge of traumatic stress in children, attitudes towards psychosocial aspects of care, and confidence in providing psychosocial care, (b) variations in knowledge, attitudes, and confidence according to demographic and professional characteristics, and (c) training preferences of pre-hospital providers regarding psychosocial care to support paediatric patients and their families. Method: We conducted a cross-sectional, online survey among an international sample of 812 pre-hospital providers from high-income countries. The questionnaire was adapted from a measure for a similar study among Emergency Department staff, and involved 62 items in 7 main categories (e.g. personal and work characteristics, knowledge of paediatric traumatic stress, and confidence regarding 18 elements of psychosocial care). The main analyses comprised descriptive statistics and multiple regression analyses. Results: On average, respondents answered 2.7 (SD = 1.59) out of seven knowledge questions correctly. Respondents with higher knowledge scores were more often female, parent of a child under 17, and reported that at least 10% of their patients were children. A majority of participants (83.5%) saw all 18 aspects of psychosocial care as part of their job. Providers felt moderately confident (M = 3.2, SD = 0.45) regarding their skills in psychosocial care, which was predicted by gender (female), having more experience, having a larger proportion of child patients, and having received training in psychosocial care in the past five years. Most respondents (89.7%) wanted to gain more knowledge and skills regarding psychosocial care for injured children. In terms of training format, they preferred an interactive website or a one-off group

  16. Validation of the use of the ROSIER scale in prehospital assessment of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Mingfeng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the utility of the Recognition of Stroke in the Emergency Room (ROSIER scale as a stroke recognition tool among Chinese patients in the prehospital setting. Materials and Methods: Compared with the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS, emergency physicians prospectively used the ROSIER as a stroke recognition tool on suspected patients in the prehospital setting. And, the final discharge diagnosis of stroke or transient ischemic attack made by neurologists, after assessment and review of clinical symptomatology and brain imaging findings, was used as the reference standard for diagnosis in the study. Then, the ROSIER and the CPSS like sensitivity (Se, specificity (Sp, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV, related coefficient (r and Kappa value were calculated. Results: In this study, 540 of 582 suspected stroke patients met the study criteria. The CPSS showed a diagnostic Se of 88.77% (95% confidence intervals [CI] 86.11-91.43%, Sp of 68.79% (95% CI 64.88-72.70%, PPV of 87.40% (95% CI 85.97-88.83%, NPV of 71.52% (95% CI 67.71-75.33% and r of 0.503. Relatively, the ROSIER showed a diagnostic Se of 89.97% (95% CI 87.44-92.64%, Sp of 83.23% (95% CI 80.08-86.38%, PPV of 92.66% (95% CI 90.46-94.86%, NPV of 77.91% (95% CI 74.41-81.41% and r of 0.584. According to the final discharge diagnosis, both the ROSIER and the CPSS were associated with the final discharge diagnosis (P 0.05. Conclusions: The ROSIER is a sensitive and specific stroke recognition tool for health providers′ use among Chinese patients in the prehospital setting. However, it cannot be used to confidently rule out or identify stroke as a diagnosis. Comprehensive clinical assessment and further examination on potential stroke patients are still important and cannot be replaced. When it is difficult to objectively complete the ROSIER for patients, the CPSS could replace it in the prehospital setting.

  17. Trauma-informed care for children in the ambulance: international survey among pre-hospital providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisic, Eva; Tyler, Mark P.; Giummarra, Melita J.; Kassam-Adams, Rahim; Gouweloos, Juul; Landolt, Markus A.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Pre-hospital providers, such as paramedics and emergency medical technicians, are in a position to provide key emotional support to injured children and their families. Objective: Our goal was to examine (a) pre-hospital providers’ knowledge of traumatic stress in children, attitudes towards psychosocial aspects of care, and confidence in providing psychosocial care, (b) variations in knowledge, attitudes, and confidence according to demographic and professional characteristics, and (c) training preferences of pre-hospital providers regarding psychosocial care to support paediatric patients and their families. Method: We conducted a cross-sectional, online survey among an international sample of 812 pre-hospital providers from high-income countries. The questionnaire was adapted from a measure for a similar study among Emergency Department staff, and involved 62 items in 7 main categories (e.g. personal and work characteristics, knowledge of paediatric traumatic stress, and confidence regarding 18 elements of psychosocial care). The main analyses comprised descriptive statistics and multiple regression analyses. Results: On average, respondents answered 2.7 (SD = 1.59) out of seven knowledge questions correctly. Respondents with higher knowledge scores were more often female, parent of a child under 17, and reported that at least 10% of their patients were children. A majority of participants (83.5%) saw all 18 aspects of psychosocial care as part of their job. Providers felt moderately confident (M = 3.2, SD = 0.45) regarding their skills in psychosocial care, which was predicted by gender (female), having more experience, having a larger proportion of child patients, and having received training in psychosocial care in the past five years. Most respondents (89.7%) wanted to gain more knowledge and skills regarding psychosocial care for injured children. In terms of training format, they preferred an interactive website or a one

  18. Pain originating from the sacroiliac joint is a common non-traumatic musculoskeletal complaint in elite inline-speedskaters - an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhe Alexander

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Study design Observational study Objectives To investigate common non-traumatic musculoskeletal complaints of the low back in elite inline-speedskaters of the German national team. Summary of background data Traumatic injuries associated with falls or collisions are well documented in speedskaters but so far no studies have investigated non-traumatic low back pain. Previously, the sacroiliac joint was suspected as a frequent origin of complaint, we aimed to investigate this assumption. Methods Two chiropractors examined elite inline-speedskaters of the German national team during three sports events between summer 2010 and 2011. A test cluster of five provocative tests for the sacroiliac joint was selected based on reliability and validity. Results A total of 37 examinations were conducted on 34 athletes with low back pain during the three sport events. The reported pain intensities ranged from mild to moderate pain (VAS 23.4 ± 13.4 to 35.1 ± 19.2. About 90% of cases showed involvement of the SI joint of which again 90% presented with left sided symptoms. Conclusions Non-traumatic complaints of the low back originating from the left sacroiliac joint frequently occur in competitive inline speedskaters.

  19. Trauma Simulation Training Increases Confidence Levels in Prehospital Personnel Performing Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients

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    Christine M. Van Dillen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Limited evidence is available on simulation training of prehospital care providers, specifically the use of tourniquets and needle decompression. This study focused on whether the confidence level of prehospital personnel performing these skills improved through simulation training. Methods. Prehospital personnel from Alachua County Fire Rescue were enrolled in the study over a 2- to 3-week period based on their availability. Two scenarios were presented to them: a motorcycle crash resulting in a leg amputation requiring a tourniquet and an intoxicated patient with a stab wound, who experienced tension pneumothorax requiring needle decompression. Crews were asked to rate their confidence levels before and after exposure to the scenarios. Timing of the simulation interventions was compared with actual scene times to determine applicability of simulation in measuring the efficiency of prehospital personnel. Results. Results were collected from 129 participants. Pre- and postexposure scores increased by a mean of 1.15 (SD 1.32; 95% CI, 0.88–1.42; P<0.001. Comparison of actual scene times with simulated scene times yielded a 1.39-fold difference (95% CI, 1.25–1.55 for Scenario 1 and 1.59 times longer for Scenario 2 (95% CI, 1.43–1.77. Conclusion. Simulation training improved prehospital care providers’ confidence level in performing two life-saving procedures.

  20. Usage of documented pre-hospital observations in secondary care: a questionnaire study and retrospective comparison of records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Geir O; Fredriksen, Knut

    2013-03-01

    The patient handover is important for the safe transition from the pre-hospital setting to secondary care. The loss of critical information about the pre-hospital phase may impact upon the clinical course of the patient. University Hospital Emergency Care registrars answered a questionnaire about how they perceive clinical documentation from the ambulance services. We also reviewed patient records retrospectively, to investigate to what extent eight selected parameters were transferred correctly to hospital records by clinicians. Only parameters outside the normal range were selected. The registrars preferred a verbal handover with hand-written pre-hospital reports as the combined source of clinical information. Scanned report forms were infrequently used. Information from other doctors was perceived as more important than the information from ambulance crews. Less than half of the selected parameters in pre-hospital notes were transferred to hospital records, even for parameters regarded as important by the registrars. Abnormal vital signs were not transferred as often as mechanism of injury, medication administered and immobilisation of trauma patients. Data on pre-hospital abnormal vital signs are frequently not transferred to the hospital admission notes. This information loss may lead to suboptimal care.

  1. Delays in the treatment of patients with acute coronary syndrome: Focus on pre-hospital delays and non-ST-elevated myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, K. A.; Rahel, B. M.; Meeder, J. G.; van Casteren, B. C. A. M.; Doevendans, P. A.; Cramer, M. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Delays in patients suspected of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) should be kept as short as possible to reduce complications and mortality. In this review we discuss the substantial pre-hospital delays of ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients as well as non-STEMI patients. The pre-hospital

  2. Nontraumatic avulsion of the lesser trochanter: A pathognomonic sign of metastatic disease

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    Phillips, C.D.; Pope, T.L. Jr.; Jones, J.E.; Keats, T.E.; MacMillan, R.H. III

    1988-03-01

    Isolated avulsion fractures of the lesser trochanter resulting from trauma are most commonly seen in adolescent athletes and are rare in adults. Standard therapy is nonsurgical with bedrest and immobilization of the leg. However, when this lesion is seen in the adult without significant trauma, it should be regarded as secondary to metastatic neoplasm until proven otherwise. Treatment should be surgical with prophylactic internal fixation of the hip to help prevent the commonly associated subtrochanteric pathologic fracture. In a patient without a known primary malignancy, biopsy should be carried out before therapy. We describe four patients with isolated avulsion fracture of the lesser trochanter due to metastatic carcinoma. Radiologists should be aware of this lesion because its presence has a decisive effect on therapy.

  3. [Pre-hospital management of adults with life-threatening emergencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattel, Francis; Dubois, François

    2012-01-01

    In France, acute life-threatening situations are handled by the French Secours a Personne (assistance to persons) and emergency medical facilities. An unequivocal success, this early management of life-threatening emergency situations relies upon centralized call reception, medical dispatching, and immediate on-site emergency medical care. We describe the different emergency care providers and steps involved in the response to emergency situations. Each call centre (Samu, phone number 15; Sapeurs-Pompiers, 18) provides a response tailored to the nature of incoming calls for assistance. A check-list of grounds for an "automatic response" by the SDIS (Service Départemental d'Incendie et de Secours--the French fire brigade) is in use, ensuring that firefighters are often the first on the spot, while the knowledge and skills of the dispatching physician are essential to ascertain the patient's needs, to preserve life and vital functions, and to ensure the patient is sent to the appropriate emergency healthcare facility. In life-threatening emergency situations, patients must be brought straight to the appropriate reference emergency healthcare facility, as quickly as possible, without prior admittance to an emergency department. This is the procedure for extremely acute emergency situations in the following areas: trauma (multiple trauma and/or uncontrolled bleeding, spinal cord trauma), delivery bleeding, other life-threatening situations such as ischemic heart disease, cardiac arrest (sudden death), cerebrovascular stroke and ensuing brain damage, some acute respiratory situations such as anaphylactic shock, foreign-body inhalation, electrocution, drowning, drug overdose, certain forms of poisoning, and conditions requiring initial hyperbaric oxygen (diving accidents, acute carbon monoxide and smoke poisoning). The reasons for suboptimal emergency care in life-threatening situations are currently a major issue, with medical facilities being reduced in some areas, fewer voluntary firemen, hospital reorganization, tight funding, difficulties of medical dispatching, and the varying skills of "first-on-the-scene "emergency workers. Grievances include late emergency responses, inappropriate medical care, and dispatching to the wrong facility. This raises the question of equal opportunity for all in a country with widely varying geographic features and population density. Improvement in the system's efficiency will require a series of objectives to be met in varied and complementary--Enhanced functional coordination, by speeding up the deployment of the ANTARES digital radio-frequency transmission network (Adaptation Nationale des Transmissions Aux Risques Et aux Secours).--Implementation of a network of emergency services with varying degrees of emergency healthcare management related to the technical nature of the facilities. Three levels of emergency healthcare must be made available: level 1 is provided by local hospitals, level 2 includes support facilities available in general hospitals (not necessarily the nearest hospital), and level 3 provides specialized healthcare in large and/or training hospitals with specialized departments. Life-threatening emergency situations are to be handled by level 2 or 3 facilities. Specific facilities must be selected as reference centers. In France, the ARS (Agences Régionales de Santé) is in charge of this procedure, as it provide funding for healthcare continuity--Reducing inequalities in access to emergency care. This will involve improving the network of SDIS brigades, making local medical facilities more responsive, delegating more medical procedures, on-site telemedicine, providing more helicopters equipped with healthcare facilities, more automated external defibrillators, and more dedicated neuro-vascular units.--First aid training must be made widely available. The French National Academy of Medicine has approved ten recommendations regarding organization and facilities.

  4. Two different immunostaining patterns of beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) may distinguish traumatic from nontraumatic axonal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Nakamae, Takuma; Higo, Eri; Ogata, Mamoru

    2015-09-01

    Immunostaining for beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) is recognized as an effective tool for detecting traumatic axonal injury, but it also detects axonal injury due to ischemic or other metabolic causes. Previously, we reported two different patterns of APP staining: labeled axons oriented along with white matter bundles (pattern 1) and labeled axons scattered irregularly (pattern 2) (Hayashi et al. (Leg Med (Tokyo) 11:S171-173, 2009). In this study, we investigated whether these two patterns are consistent with patterns of trauma and hypoxic brain damage, respectively. Sections of the corpus callosum from 44 cases of blunt head injury and equivalent control tissue were immunostained for APP. APP was detected in injured axons such as axonal bulbs and varicose axons in 24 of the 44 cases of head injuries that also survived for three or more hours after injury. In 21 of the 24 APP-positive cases, pattern 1 alone was observed in 14 cases, pattern 2 alone was not observed in any cases, and both patterns 1 and 2 were detected in 7 cases. APP-labeled injured axons were detected in 3 of the 44 control cases, all of which were pattern 2. These results suggest that pattern 1 indicates traumatic axonal injury, while pattern 2 results from hypoxic insult. These patterns may be useful to differentiate between traumatic and nontraumatic axonal injuries.

  5. Long-term outcomes of transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy for non-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, D; Hasegawa, Y; Okura, T; Osawa, Y; Ishiguro, N

    2017-02-01

    Transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy (TRO) is performed for young patients with non-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) to preserve the hip. We aimed to investigate the long-term outcomes and the risk factors for failure 15 years after this procedure. This study included 95 patients (111 hips) with a mean age of 40 years (21 to 64) who underwent TRO for ONFH. The mean follow-up was 18.2 years (3 to 26). Kaplan-Meier survivorship analyses were performed with conversion to total hip arthroplasty (THA) and radiological failure due to secondary collapse of the femoral head or osteoarthritic changes as the endpoint. Multivariate analyses were performed to assess risk factors for each outcome. Survival rates at 15 years with conversion to THA and radiological failure as the endpoint were 59% (95% confidence interval (CI) 49 to 67) and 30% (95% CI 22 to 39), respectively. Necrotic type C2 ONFH (lesions extending laterally to the acetabular edge) (hazards ratio (HR) 3.9) and age > 40 years (HR 2.5) were risk factors for conversion to THA. Stage > 3a ONFH (HR 2.0) and age > 40 years (HR 1.9) were risk factors for radiological failure. The 15 year outcomes after TRO for ONFH are unfavorable because osteoarthritic changes occur after five years post-operatively. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:175-83. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  6. Limited evidence for intranasal fentanyl in the emergency department and the prehospital setting--a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Sejer; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2013-01-01

    The intranasal (IN) mode of application may be a valuable asset in non-invasive pain management. Fentanyl demonstrates pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties that are desirable in the management of acute pain, and IN fentanyl may be of value in the prehospital setting. The aim of this sys......The intranasal (IN) mode of application may be a valuable asset in non-invasive pain management. Fentanyl demonstrates pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties that are desirable in the management of acute pain, and IN fentanyl may be of value in the prehospital setting. The aim...... of this systematic review was to evaluate the current evidence for the use of IN fentanyl in the emergency department (ED) and prehospital setting....

  7. Characteristics and prognoses of patients treated by an anaesthesiologist-manned prehospital emergency care unit. A retrospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Lossius, Hans Morten; Toft, Palle

    2017-01-01

    public health planning, we describe the workload of a prehospital anaesthesiologist-manned mobile emergency care unit (MECU) and the total population it services in terms of factors associated with mortality. PARTICIPANTS: The study is a register-based study investigating all missions carried out......OBJECTIVE: When planning and dimensioning an emergency medical system, knowledge of the population serviced is vital. The amount of literature concerning the prehospital population is sparse. In order to add to the current body of literature regarding prehospital treatment, thus aiding future....... PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome measures were number of missions and number of patient contacts. Secondary patient variables were mortality and association between mortality and age, sex, comorbidity, prior admission to hospital and response time. RESULTS: The MECU completed 41 513...

  8. [Prehospital management of very elderly patients with ST segment elevation in Paris by mobile intensive care units (Samu)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, J E; Bensouda, C; Durand, E; Greffet, A; Scemama, A; Carli, P; Danchin, N; Sauval, P

    2005-03-01

    More and more elderly people are hospitalised with myocardial infarction. Little is known on their pre-hospital management. In 2001 and 2002, 105 patients aged 80 years or more with suspected ST elevation infarction were managed by the mobile intensive care unit system of the SAMU de Paris-Necker. Diagnosis of infarction was confirmed in 92 (88%). Over 60% of the patients were women. Median time delay from symptom onset to call to the emergency service was 127 minutes, longer in nonagenarians (175 vs 101 minutes). Prehospital use of aspirin was 81% and 39% received an intravenous bolus of heparin. A reperfusion strategy was decided in only 30% (primary PCI: 23/26). One-month mortality was 21% and was related to older age, time when the call to the Samu was made, and absence of current smoking. Overall, the prehospital management of very elderly patients with suspected ST elevation infarction appears far from optimal.

  9. Taking the Blood Bank to the Field: The Design and Rationale of the Prehospital Air Medical Plasma (PAMPer) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joshua B; Guyette, Francis X; Neal, Matthew D; Claridge, Jeffrey A; Daley, Brian J; Harbrecht, Brian G; Miller, Richard S; Phelan, Herb A; Adams, Peter W; Early, Barbara J; Peitzman, Andrew B; Billiar, Timothy R; Sperry, Jason L

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhage and trauma induced coagulopathy remain major drivers of early preventable mortality in military and civilian trauma. Interest in the use of prehospital plasma in hemorrhaging patients as a primary resuscitation agent has grown recently. Trauma center-based damage control resuscitation using early and aggressive plasma transfusion has consistently demonstrated improved outcomes in hemorrhaging patients. Additionally, plasma has been shown to have several favorable immunomodulatory effects. Preliminary evidence with prehospital plasma transfusion has demonstrated feasibility and improved short-term outcomes. Applying state-of-the-art resuscitation strategies to the civilian prehospital arena is compelling. We describe here the rationale, design, and challenges of the Prehospital Air Medical Plasma (PAMPer) trial. The primary objective is to determine the effect of prehospital plasma transfusion during air medical transport on 30-day mortality in patients at risk for traumatic hemorrhage. This study is a multicenter cluster randomized clinical trial. The trial will enroll trauma patients with profound hypotension (SBP ≤ 70 mmHg) or hypotension (SBP 71-90 mmHg) and tachycardia (HR ≥ 108 bpm) from six level I trauma center air medical transport programs. The trial will also explore the effects of prehospital plasma transfusion on the coagulation and inflammatory response following injury. The trial will be conducted under exception for informed consent for emergency research with an investigational new drug approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration utilizing a multipronged community consultation process. It is one of three ongoing Department of Defense-funded trials aimed at expanding our understanding of the optimal therapeutic approaches to coagulopathy in the hemorrhaging trauma patient.

  10. The effects of standardized trauma training on prehospital pain control: have pain medication administration rates increased on the battlefield?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, W Joseph; Nesbitt, Michael E; Therien, Sean P

    2012-08-01

    The US Military has served in some of the most austere locations in the world. In this ever-changing environment, units are organized into smaller elements operating in very remote areas. This often results in longer evacuation times, which can lead to a delay in pain management if treatment is not initiated in the prehospital setting. Early pain control has become an increasingly crucial military prehospital task and must be controlled from the pain-initiating event. The individual services developed their standardized trauma training based on the recommendations by Frank Butler and the Defense Health Board Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care. This training stresses evidence-based treatment modalities, including pain control, derived from casualty injury analysis. Inadequate early pain control may lead to multiple acute and potentially chronic effects. These effects encompass a wide range from changes in blood pressure to delayed wound healing and posttraumatic stress disorder. Therefore, it is essential that pain be addressed in the prehospital environment. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective Joint Theater Trauma Registry comparative study evaluating whether standardized trauma training increased prehospital pain medication administration between 2007 and 2009. These years were selected on the basis of mandatory training initiation dates and available Joint Theater Trauma Registry records. Records were analyzed for all US prehospital trauma cases with documented pain medication administration from Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom for the specified years. Data analysis revealed 232 patients available for review (102 for 2007 and 130 for 2009). A statistically significant prehospital pain treatment increase was noted, from 3.1% in 2007 to 6.7% in 2009 (p importance of early pain control.

  11. Nontraumatic subperiosteal orbital hematoma associated with ethmoid sinusitis: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Soo; Han, Jong Kyu; Baek, Byoung Joon; Oh, Mee Hye; Jou, Sung Shick; Kim, Hyung Hwan; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young [Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    Subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit is a rare disease and most of the cases occur in young adult males as a result of direct facial or orbital trauma. In the absence of direct facial or orbital trauma, nontranmatic subperiosteal orbital hematoma has rarely been reported in association with a sudden elevation of cranial venous pressure or venous congestion, systemic diseases associated with a bleeding diathesis and paranasal sinusitis. We report here on a rare case of subperiosteal orbital hemaboma associated with ethmoid sinusitis, as was seen on CT imaging.

  12. [Prehospital management of febrile convulsions by the Mobile Emergency Care Unit in the Capital Region of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekaer, A.L.; Nielsen, S.L.; Pedersen, Ulf Gøttrup

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We conducted a quality assurance project of The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in the Capital Region of Denmark when dispatched to febrile convulsions. The study focuses on prehospital treatment, comparison between prehospital and in-hospital diagnoses and parents' perceptions...... of their child's febrile convulsions and their satisfaction with the MECU. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The period of investigation was from March 1st 2004 to March 31st 2005. Children with a diagnosis of febrile convulsions or relevant differential diagnoses were eligible for inclusion. Children were excluded...... should still be dispatched primarily to febrile convulsions Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11/24...

  13. Predictors of Mortality and Prehospital Monitoring Limitations in Blunt Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Strnad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at determining predictors of in-hospital mortality and prehospital monitoring limitations in severely injured intubated blunt trauma patients. We retrospectively reviewed patients’ charts. Prehospital vital signs, Injury Severity Score (ISS, initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, Revised Trauma Score (RTS, arterial blood gases, and lactate were compared in two study groups: survivors (n=40 and nonsurvivors (n=30. There were no significant differences in prehospital vital signs between compared groups. Nonsurvivors were older (P=0.006, with lower initial GCS (P<0.001 and higher ISS (P<0.001, along with higher lactate (P<0.001 and larger base deficit (BD; P=0.006, whereas RTS (P=0.001 was lower in nonsurvivors. For predicting mortality, area under the curve (AUC was calculated: for lactate 0.82 (P<0.001, for ISS 0.82 (P<0.001, and for BD 0.69 (P=0.006. Lactate level of 3.4 mmol/L or more was 82% sensitive and 75% specific for predicting in-hospital death. In a multivariate logistic regression model, ISS (P=0.037, GCS (P=0.033, and age (P=0.002 were found to be independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. The AUC for regression model was 0.93 (P<0.001. Increased levels of lactate and BD on admission indicate more severe occult hypoperfusion in nonsurvivors whereas vital signs did not differ between the groups.

  14. The role of pre-hospital blood gas analysis in trauma resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katila Ari

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess, whether arterial blood gas measurements during trauma patient's pre-hospital shock resuscitation yield useful information on haemodynamic response to fluid resuscitation by comparing haemodynamic and blood gas variables in patients undergoing two different fluid resuscitation regimens. Methods In a prospective randomised study of 37 trauma patients at risk for severe hypovolaemia, arterial blood gas values were analyzed at the accident site and on admission to hospital. Patients were randomised to receive either conventional fluid therapy or 300 ml of hypertonic saline. The groups were compared for demographic, injury severity, physiological and outcome variables. Results 37 patients were included. Mean (SD Revised Trauma Score (RTS was 7.3427 (0.98 and Injury Severity Score (ISS 15.1 (11.7. Seventeen (46% patients received hypertonic fluid resuscitation and 20 (54% received conventional fluid therapy, with no significant differences between the groups concerning demographic data or outcome. Base excess (BE values decreased significantly more within the hypertonic saline (HS group compared to the conventional fluid therapy group (mean BE difference -2.1 mmol/l vs. -0.5 mmol/l, p = 0.003. The pH values on admission were significantly lower within the HS group (mean 7.31 vs. 7.40, p = 0.000. Haemoglobin levels were in both groups lower on admission compared with accident site. Lactate levels on admission did not differ significantly between the groups. Conclusion Pre-hospital use of small-volume resuscitation led to significantly greater decrease of BE and pH values. A portable blood gas analyzer was found to be a useful tool in pre-hospital monitoring for trauma resuscitation.

  15. Pre-hospital care after a seizure: Evidence base and United Kingdom management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Andrew; Taylor, Louise; Reuber, Markus; Grünewald, Richard A; Parkinson, Martin; Dickson, Jon M

    2015-01-01

    Seizures are a common presentation to pre-hospital emergency services and they generate significant healthcare costs. This article summarises the United Kingdom (UK) Ambulance Service guidelines for the management of seizures and explores the extent to which these guidelines are evidence-based. Summary of the Clinical Practice Guidelines of the UK Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee relating to the management of seizures. Review of the literature relating to pre-hospital management of seizure emergencies. Much standard practice relating to the emergency out of hospital management of patients with seizures is drawn from generic Advanced Life Support (ALS) guidelines although many patients do not need ALS during or after a seizure and the benefit of many ALS interventions in seizure patients remains to be established. The majority of studies identified pertain to medical treatment of status epilepticus. These papers show that benzodiazepines are safe and effective but it is not possible to draw definitive conclusions about the best medication or the optimal route of administration. The evidence base for current pre-hospital guidelines for seizure emergencies is incomplete. A large proportion of patients are transported to hospital after a seizure but many of these may be suitable for home management. However, there is very little research into alternative care pathways or criteria that could be used to help paramedics avoid transport to hospital. More research is needed to improve care for people after a seizure and to improve the cost-effectiveness of the healthcare systems within which they are treated. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) training of ambulance caregivers and impact on survival of trauma victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jakob; Blomberg, Hans; Svennblad, Bodil; Wernroth, Lisa; Melhus, Håkan; Byberg, Liisa; Michaëlsson, Karl; Karlsten, Rolf; Gedeborg, Rolf

    2012-10-01

    The Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) course has been widely implemented and approximately half a million prehospital caregivers in over 50 countries have taken this course. Still, the effect on injury outcome remains to be established. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between PHTLS training of ambulance crew members and the mortality in trauma patients. A population-based observational study of 2830 injured patients, who either died or were hospitalized for more than 24 h, was performed during gradual implementation of PHTLS in Uppsala County in Sweden between 1998 and 2004. Prehospital patient records were linked to hospital-discharge records, cause-of-death records, and information on PHTLS training and the educational level of ambulance crews. The main outcome measure was death, on scene or in hospital. Adjusting for multiple potential confounders, PHTLS training appeared to be associated with a reduction in mortality, but the precision of this estimate was poor (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.42-1.19). The mortality risk was 4.7% (36/763) without PHTLS training and 4.5% (94/2067) with PHTLS training. The predicted absolute risk reduction is estimated to correspond to 0.5 lives saved annually per 100,000 population with PHTLS fully implemented. PHTLS training of ambulance crew members may be associated with reduced mortality in trauma patients, but the precision in this estimate was low due to the overall low mortality. While there may be a relative risk reduction, the predicted absolute risk reduction in this population was low. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prehospital management of gunshot patients at major trauma care centers: exploring the gaps in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-09-01

    Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed.

  18. Development and Validation of a Portable Platform for Deploying Decision-Support Algorithms in Prehospital Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisner, A. T.; Khitrov, M. Y.; Chen, L.; Blood, A.; Wilkins, K.; Doyle, W.; Wilcox, S.; Denison, T.; Reifman, J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Advanced decision-support capabilities for prehospital trauma care may prove effective at improving patient care. Such functionality would be possible if an analysis platform were connected to a transport vital-signs monitor. In practice, there are technical challenges to implementing such a system. Not only must each individual component be reliable, but, in addition, the connectivity between components must be reliable. Objective We describe the development, validation, and deployment of the Automated Processing of Physiologic Registry for Assessment of Injury Severity (APPRAISE) platform, intended to serve as a test bed to help evaluate the performance of decision-support algorithms in a prehospital environment. Methods We describe the hardware selected and the software implemented, and the procedures used for laboratory and field testing. Results The APPRAISE platform met performance goals in both laboratory testing (using a vital-sign data simulator) and initial field testing. After its field testing, the platform has been in use on Boston MedFlight air ambulances since February of 2010. Conclusion These experiences may prove informative to other technology developers and to healthcare stakeholders seeking to invest in connected electronic systems for prehospital as well as in-hospital use. Our experiences illustrate two sets of important questions: are the individual components reliable (e.g., physical integrity, power, core functionality, and end-user interaction) and is the connectivity between components reliable (e.g., communication protocols and the metadata necessary for data interpretation)? While all potential operational issues cannot be fully anticipated and eliminated during development, thoughtful design and phased testing steps can reduce, if not eliminate, technical surprises. PMID:24155791

  19. Impact of the prehospital trauma life support programme in Trinidad and Tobago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, J; Adam, R U; Gana, T J; George, B; Taylor, A; Patino, T; West, U; Ali, E; Bedaysie, H

    1998-09-01

    The impact of the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) programme, introduced in Trinidad and Tobago in 1992, was assessed by questionnaires completed by 26 medical personnel (MP); 71 ambulance personnel (AP); and 50 non ambulance paramedical personnel (NAP). Of the 23 MP, 45 AP and 38 NAP who were aware of the programme, 19 (82.6%) MP, 40 (88.9%) AP and 25 (65.8%) NAP were able to differentiate personnel that had taken the PHTLS programme based on their performance. 32 (71.1%) of the AP were PHTLS trained. 24 (53.3%) and 4 (9%) of the AP identified poor equipment and poor supervision, respectively, as reasons for difficulty in applying PHTLS principles. Improvements observed among those completing the PHTLS programme were: improved resuscitation techniques by 20 (86.9%) MP, 38 (84.4%) AP and 27 (71.1%) NAP; better vital signs recording by 8 (34.8%) MP, 27 (60%) AP and 8 (21.1%) NAP; improved immobilization by 23 (100%) MP, 40 (88.9%) AP and 33 (86.8%) NAP; better haemorrhage control by 22 (95.6%) MP, 40 (88.9%) AP and 24 (63.2%) NAP; appropriate splinting of fractures by 23 (100%) MP, 40 (88.9%) AP and 32 (84.2%) NAP; and increased utilization of oxygen by 15 (65.2%) MP, 31 (68.9%) AP and 21 (55.3%) NAP. 32 (71.1%) AP with PHTLS training indicated improvement in their ability to resuscitate and transport trauma victims, with 42 (93.3%) reporting improvement in overall prehospital care. Medical, paramedical and ambulance personnel all perceive a significant positive impact of PHTLS training on prehospital trauma care. Although improvements in supervision, documentation and equipment are still required, improved trauma resuscitative techniques after PHTLS training should improve trauma patient outcome in Trinidad and Tobago.

  20. Impact of Prehospital Transportation on Survival in Skiers and Snowboarders with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai; Samra, Navdeep S; Kalakoti, Piyush; Sharma, Kanika; Patra, Devi Prasad; Dossani, Rimal H; Thakur, Jai Deep; Disbrow, Elizabeth A; Phan, Kevin; Veeranki, Sreenivas P; Pabaney, Aqueel; Notarianni, Christina; Owings, John T; Nanda, Anil

    2017-08-01

    Prehospital helicopter use and its impact on outcomes in snowboarders and skiers incurring traumatic brain injury (TBI) is unknown. The present study investigates the association of helicopter transport with survival of snowboarders and skiers with TBI, in comparison with ground emergency medical services (EMS), by using data derived from the National Trauma Data Bank (2007-2014). Primary and secondary endpoints were defined as in-hospital survival and absolute risk reduction based upon number needed to transport (treat) respectively. Multivariable regression models including traditional logit model, model fitted with generalized estimating equations, and those incorporating results from propensity score matching methods were used to investigate the association of helicopter transport with survival compared with ground EMS. Of the 1018 snowboarders and skiers who met the criteria, 360 (35.4%) were transported via helicopters whereas 658 (64.6%) via ground EMS with a mortality rate of 1.7% and 1.5%, respectively. Multivariable log-binomial models demonstrated association of prehospital helicopter transport with increased survival (odds ratio 8.58; 95% confidence interval 1.09-67.64; P = 0.041; absolute risk reduction: 10.06%). This finding persisted after propensity score matching (odds ratio 24.73; 95% confidence interval 5.74-152.55; P < 0.001). The corresponding absolute risk reduction implies that approximately 10 patients need to be transported via helicopter to save 1 life. Based on our robust statistical analysis of retrospective data, our findings suggest prehospital helicopter transport improved survival in patients incurring TBI after snowboard- or ski-related falls compared with those transported via ground EMS. Policies directed at using helicopter services at remote winter resorts or ski or snowboarding locations should be implemented. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Importance of transport in prehospital treatment of children with craniocerebral injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanić-Čanji Danica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In initial, prehospital, phase of treatment of the injured pediatric patient, transport plays an important role. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of an adequate transport on the survival rate and final outcome of patients with craniocerebral injuries. Method. This study is a clinical, partly prospective, partly retrospective study that includes 60 patients with isolated craniocerebral injuries, aged up to 17 years, and with Glasgow Coma Scale under 8, that did not require surgical treatment. The patients were divided in two groups each with 30 patients. The first group included patients that had adequate prehospital treatment. The second group included patients that had improper prehospital treatment. In both groups the emphasis was on the transport as an important step in initial treatment. Results. There was a statistically significant difference in respect to the mode of transport. In group I there was a greater number of patients transported by specialized emergency vehicles (93.3% compared to the group II. There was also a difference regarding the time that had elapsed from the moment of injury to the moment of arrival to the hospital - a significantly shorter time in group I. In a group of patients that survived, a greater percentage of patients had been transported by specialized emergency vehicles compared to the group of patients that did not survive. Conclusion. Adequate transport improves the survival rate of the patients with craniocerebral injuries. Also the time that has elapsed from the moment of injury to the moment of arrival to the hospital also influences the survival rate, but the final outcome, too. Transport of pediatric patients is globally neglected. Transport of unstable, critically ill and injured patients accompanied by inexperienced and unspecialized staff is followed an increased mortality rate. .

  2. Development and Implementation of a Novel Prehospital Care System in the State of Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Heather A; Douglass, Katherine A; Ejas, Shafi; Poovathumparambil, Venugopalan

    2016-12-01

    Most low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have struggled to find a system for prehospital care that can provide adequate patient care and geographical coverage while maintaining a feasible price tag. The emergency medical systems of the Western world are not necessarily relevant in developing economic systems, given the lack of strict legislation, the scarcity of resources, and the limited number of trained personnel. Meanwhile, most efforts to provide prehospital care in India have taken the form of adapting Western models to the Indian context with limited success. Described here is a novel approach to prehospital care designed for and implemented in the State of Kerala, India. The Active Network Group of Emergency Life Savers (ANGELS) was launched in 2011 in Calicut City, the third largest city in the Indian State of Kerala. The ANGELS integrated an existing fleet of private and state-owned ambulances into a single network utilizing Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and a single statewide call number. A total of 85 volunteer emergency medical certified technicians (EMCTs) were trained in basic first aid and trauma care principles. Public awareness campaigns accompanied all activities to raise awareness amongst community members. Funding was provided via public-private partnership, aimed to minimize costs to patients for service utilization. Over a two-year period from March 2011 to April 2013, 8,336 calls were recorded, of which 54.8% (4,569) were converted into actual ambulance run sheets. The majority of calls were for medical emergencies and most patients were transported to Medical College Hospital in Calicut. This unique public-private partnership has been responsive to the needs of the population while sustaining low operational costs. This system may provide a relevant template for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) development in other resource-limited settings. Brown HA , Douglass KA , Ejas S , Poovathumparambil V . Development and

  3. Response interval is important for survival until admission after prehospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Hien Quoc; Nielsen, Søren Loumann; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2010-01-01

    An increasing distance to the nearest hospital must be expected as a result of centralization of acute care at a small number of hospitals. This may have important consequences in emergency situations, such as prehospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) where the aim is to obtain return...... of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), i.e. successful resuscitation. The aim of this study was to describe the impact of response interval on sustained ROSC, i.e. ROSC at hospital admission, after OHCA with presumed cardiac aetiology....

  4. Communicative Management in Ambulatory Services: Prehospital Management Communication--Limits and Possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordby, Halvor

    2015-01-01

    Poor management communication in healthcare services affects employees' motivation, commitment, and, in the final instance, organizational performance and the quality of patient care. In any area of health management, good communication is, therefore, key to successful management. This article discusses how managers of ambulance stations should secure communication with their paramedic crews. The first part uses ethical concepts to analyze communicative disagreement in interactive dialogue between managers and paramedics. The second part outlines basic communication principles that can serve as conceptual tools for avoiding misinterpretation in prehospital manager-employee interaction.

  5. [Standardised primary care of multiple trauma patients. Prehospital Trauma Life Support und Advanced Trauma Life Support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfl, C G; Gliwitzky, B; Wentzensen, A

    2009-10-01

    Standardised management improves treatment results in seriously injured patients. For conditions like stroke or acute coronary syndrome (ACS) there are set treatment pathways which have been established for prehospital and primary hospital care. The treatment of critical trauma patients, however, follows varying procedures in both the prehospital and primary hospital phases. From an analysis of the trauma register of the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU), we know that a seriously injured patient remains on the road for 70 min on average before transferral to hospital. This requires improvement. With the 2003 introduction of the ATLS programme in Germany, the initial clinical phase could be improved upon simply by means of standardised training. PHTLS und ATLS complement one another. PHTLS und ATLS represent training concepts which teach standardised, priority-based prehospital and hospital trauma management. The aim is to make an initial rapid and accurate assessment of the patient's condition, thereby identifying the"critical" patient. The concepts also make priority-based treatment possible and facilitate decision-making as to whether patients can receive further on-the-spot treatment or whether immediate transport is necessary. The procedure is identical in the shock room. The primary consideration is to prevent secondary damage, not to lose track of time and to ensure consistent quality of care. The courses teach systematic knowledge, techniques, skills and conduct in diagnosis and therapy. The courses are oriented to all medical specialities associated with trauma care. With the support of the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU) and the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Medicine (DGAI), the German Professional Organisation of Rescue Services (DBRD) has adopted the PHTLS course system on licence from the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMT) and the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and has been offering it in

  6. [Prehospital arterial blood gas analysis after collapse connected to triathlon participation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettrup-Christensen, Asbjørn; Amstrup-Hansen, Louise; Zwisler, Stine T

    2017-05-01

    Long-distance athletes are at risk of serious fluid and electrolyte disturbances, such as hypernatraemia (dehydration). Recently, cases of serious morbidity have been reported, due to acute exercise-associated hyponatraemia, which can advance to encephalopathy. An arterial blood gas analysis (ABG) was drawn from collapsed athletes at the championship of full-distance triathlon 2015, and different electrolyte imbalances were found. Our findings show that prehospital ABG can assist in differentiating the cause of collapse, and presumably, targeted treatment can be initiated already on scene.

  7. An application of the MEMbrain training module: Pre-hospital rescue operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, V.

    1998-01-01

    A system for training in pre-hospital emergency management is being developed and the first version of a prototype has been completed. The training system fulfils the demands from the domain of hospital emergency planning centres and medical attendants concerning increased efficiency of rescue...... efforts. This includes enhanced first aid on site and improved overall co-ordination amongst the organisations involved in coping with emergency situations. The training system is based on the Multi-User System for Training Emergency Response (MUSTER) concept which is used for the training module...... in the decision support system MEMbrain. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  8. [Scandinavian guidelines on the pre-hospital management of traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, N.; Sollid, S.; Sundstrom, T.

    2008-01-01

    Head trauma causes the death of many young persons. The number of fatalities can be reduced through systematic management. Preventing secondary brain injury together with the fastest possible transport to a neurosurgical unit has been shown to be effective in reducing mortality and morbidity....... Evidence-based guidelines already exist that focus on all steps in the management. This article, which was written by members of the Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee, presents recommendations on the pre-hospital management of traumatic brain injury adapted to the infrastructure of Scandinavia...

  9. Large discrepancy between prehospital visitation to mobile emergency care unit and discharge diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Christine Puck; Wichmann, Sine; Nielsen, Søren Loumann

    2012-01-01

    In Copenhagen, Denmark, patients in need of prehospital emergency assistance dial 112 and may then receive evaluation and treatment by physicians (from the Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU)). ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a severe condition leaving only a limited time frame...... to deliver optimal care in the form of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. In theory, all patients with chest pain could have STEMI. The aim of this study was to study which of the patients suspected of having acute cardiac disease based on the 112 calls and met by the MECU were given a cardiac...

  10. Termination of pre-hospital resuscitation by anaesthesiologists - causes and consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, S; Lossius, H M; Binderup, L G

    2017-01-01

    extinct in situations where an emergency medical technician (EMT) would have been required to resuscitate. METHODS: All lifeless patients seen pre-hospitally by the anaesthesiologist-manned Mobile Emergency Care Unit in Odense, Denmark, from 2010 to 2014 were retrospectively studied. RESULTS: Of 17 035......, or do-not-resuscitate order. CONCLUSION: In one patient in 30, the MECU refrained from futile resuscitation in cases where legislation required an EMT to initiate resuscitation. This practice reduced unethical attempts of resuscitation, reduced unnecessary emergency ambulance transports, and reduced...

  11. Variations in pre-hospital fibrinolysis process of care: insights from the Assessment of the Safety and Efficacy of a New Thrombolytic 3 Plus international acute myocardial infarction pre-hospital care survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welsh, R.C.; Goldstein, P.; Adgey, J.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Bestilny, S.A.; Wallentin, L.; Werf, F. van de; Armstrong, P.W.

    2004-01-01

    The Assessment of the Safety and Efficacy of a New Thrombolytic 3 (ASSENT 3 PLUS) Plus trial (n=1639) was an international trial of pre-hospital fibrinolysis with tenecteplase randomly assigned to enoxaparin or unfractionated heparin, involving 106 sites in 12 countries. Given the potential impact o

  12. Hyperoxia Early After Hospital Admission in Comatose Patients with Non-Traumatic Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Martin; von Auenmueller, Katharina Isabel; Brand, Michael; Amirie, Scharbanu; Sasko, Benjamin Michel; Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Background The clinical effect of hyperoxia in patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains uncertain. We therefore initiated this study to find out whether there is an association between survival and hyperoxia early after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in OHCA patients admitted to our hospital. Material/Methods All OHCA patients admitted to our hospital between 1 January 2008 and 30 June 2015 were identified by analysis of our central admission register. Data from individual patients were collected from patient health records and anonymously stored on a central database. Results Altogether, there were 280 OHCA patients admitted to our hospital between 1 January 2008 and 30 June 2015, including 35 patients (12.5%) with hyperoxia and 99 patients (35.4%) with normoxia. Comparison of these 2 groups showed lower pH values in OHCA patients admitted with normoxia compared to those with hyperoxia (7.10±0.18 vs. 7.21±0.17; p=0.001) but similar rates of initial lactate (7.92±3.87 mmol/l vs. 11.14±16.40 mmol/l; p=0.072). Survival rates differed between both groups (34.4% vs. 54.3%; p=0.038) with better survival rates in OHCA patients with hyperoxia at hospital admission. Conclusions Currently, different criteria are used to define hyperoxia following OHCA, but if the negative effects of hyperoxia in OHCA patients are a cumulative effect over time, hyperoxia < 60 min after hospital admission as investigated in this study would be equivalent to a short period of hyperoxia. It may be that the positive effect of buffering metabolic acidosis early after cardiac arrest maintains the negative effects of hyperoxia in general. PMID:27638399

  13. Nontraumatic femoral head necrosis. Classification of bone scintigraphic findings and diagnostic value of SPECT following planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Anzai, Yoshimi; Uno, Kimiichi; Arimizu, Noboru (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine bone scintigraphic findings in nontraumatic femoral head avascular necrosis and diagnostic value of SPECT imaging following a conventional planar imaging. Forty-three femoral heads in twenty-six cases with idiopathic femoral head necrosis (n=2), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=22), aplastic anemia (n=1), and renal transplantation (n=1) were studied. The diagnosis for femoral head necrosis was based on magnetic resonance imaging as well as other diagnostic studies in all cases. Scintigraphic findings of planar and SPECT images were classified into six categories: normal (N); cold or decrease (C); partial increase with cold or decrease (PH+C); ring-like increase with a cold center (RH+C); partial increase (PH); diffuse and/or irregular increase (DH). Avascular necrosis was confirmed in twenty-four femoral heads, in which planar and SPECT images showed scintigraphic findings of N (n=3, 2), C (n=1, 3), PH+C (n=2, 8), RH+C (n=2, 3), PH (n=9, 2), and DH (n=7, 6), respectively. Femoral heads without avascular necrosis demonstrated planar and SPECT findings of N (n=16, 12), C (n=0, 6), and DH (n=3, 1), respectively. When considering C, PH+C, and RH+C as diagnostic findings for avascular necrosis, sensitivities of planar and SPECT images were 21% and 58%, and specificities were 100% and 68%, respectively. In nineteen femoral heads with normal planar findings (N), SPECT correctly identified avascular necrosis in two femoral heads and misidentified six normal femoral heads as avascular necrosis. In nineteen femoral heads with nondiagnostic abnormalities (PH, DH), SPECT correctly identified avascular necrosis in seven femoral heads and showed no false positive. Diagnostic planar findings in five femoral heads were concordant with SPECT diagnosis. These results indicate that SPECT imaging is most valuable when planar images show nondiagnostic abnormalities based on the proposed classification of scintigraphic findings. (author).

  14. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of hip articular cartilage between non-traumatic necrosis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenyu; Liu, Yang; Hao, Jingcan; Zheng, Shuyu; Wen, Yan; Xiao, Xiao; He, Awen; Fan, Qianrui; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Ruiyu

    2016-10-10

    Hip cartilage destruction is consistently observed in the non-traumatic osteonecrosis of femoral head (NOFH) and accelerates its bone necrosis. The molecular mechanism underlying the cartilage damage of NOFH remains elusive. In this study, we conducted a systematically comparative study of gene expression profiles between NOFH and osteoarthritis (OA). Hip articular cartilage specimens were collected from 12 NOFH patients and 12 controls with traumatic femoral neck fracture for microarray (n=4) and quantitative real-time PCR validation experiments (n=8). Gene expression profiling of articular cartilage was performed using Agilent Human 4×44K Microarray chip. The accuracy of microarray experiment was further validated by qRT-PCR. Gene expression results of OA hip cartilage were derived from previously published study. Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) software was applied for identifying differently expressed genes. Gene ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis were conducted by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis software and DAVID tool, respectively. Totally, 27 differently expressed genes were identified for NOFH. Comparing the gene expression profiles of NOFH cartilage and OA cartilage detected 8 common differently expressed genes, including COL5A1, OGN, ANGPTL4, CRIP1, NFIL3, METRNL, ID2 and STEAP1. GO comparative analysis identified 10 common significant GO terms, mainly implicated in apoptosis and development process. Pathway comparative analysis observed that ECM-receptor interaction pathway and focal adhesion pathway were enriched in the differently expressed genes of both NOFH and hip OA. In conclusion, we identified a set of differently expressed genes, GO and pathways for NOFH articular destruction, some of which were also involved in the hip OA. Our study results may help to reveal the pathogenetic similarities and differences of cartilage damage of NOFH and hip OA.

  15. Is intra-articular pathology associated with MCL edema on MR imaging of the non-traumatic knee?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenbaker, Donna G.; De Smet, Arthur A. [University of Wisconsin Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Madison (United States); Fine, Jason P. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Statistics, Madison (United States); University of Wisconsin, Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, Madison (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Edema surrounding the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is seen on MR imaging in patients with MCL injuries and in patients with radiographic osteoarthritis in the non-traumatic knee. Because we noted MCL edema in patients without prior trauma or osteoarthritis, we studied the association between intra-articular pathology and MCL edema in patients without knee trauma. We evaluated the MR examinations of 247 consecutive patients (121 male, 126 female with a mean age of 44 years) without recent trauma for the presence of edema surrounding the MCL, meniscal and ACL tears, medial meniscal extrusion, medial compartment chondromalacia, and osteoarthritis. The percentages of patients illustrating MCL edema with and without each type of pathology were compared using Fisher's exact test to determine if there was a statistically significant association. We found MCL edema in 60% of 247 patients. MCL edema was present in 67% of patients with medial meniscal tears, 35% with lateral meniscal tears, 100% with meniscal extrusion of 3 mm or more, 78% with femoral chondromalacia, 82% with tibial chondromalacia, and 50% with osteoarthritis. The percentage of patients with edema increased with the severity of the chondromalacia. These associations were all statistically significant (p <0.02). The mean age of those with MCL edema was 49.7 years compared with 34.9 years without MCL edema (p <0.001). Patient gender and ACL tear did not correlate with MCL edema. Nine (4%) of the 247 patients had MCL edema without intra-articular pathology. None of these 9 patients had MCL tenderness or joint laxity on physical examination. We confirmed that MCL edema is associated with osteoarthritis, but is also associated with meniscal tears, meniscal extrusion, and chondromalacia. In addition, MCL edema can be seen in patients without intra-articular pathology, recent trauma or MCL abnormality on physical examination. (orig.)

  16. Association between Prehospital CPR Quality and End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide Levels in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ryan A; Bobrow, Bentley J; Spaite, Daniel W; Hu, Chengcheng; McDannold, Robyn; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler F

    2016-01-01

    International Guidelines recommend measurement of end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) to enhance cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality and optimize blood flow during CPR. Numerous factors impact EtCO2 (e.g., ventilation, metabolism, cardiac output), yet few clinical studies have correlated CPR quality and EtCO2 during actual out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitations. The purpose of this study was to describe the association between EtCO2 and CPR quality variables during OHCA. This is an observational study of prospectively collected CPR quality and capnography data from two EMS agencies participating in a statewide resuscitation quality improvement program. CPR quality and capnography data from adult (≥18 years) cardiac resuscitation attempts (10/2008-06/2013) were collected and analyzed on a minute-by-minute basis using RescueNet™ Code Review. Linear mixed effect models were used to evaluate the association between (log-transformed) EtCO2 level and CPR variables: chest compression (CC) depth, CC rate, CC release velocity (CCRV), ventilation rate. Among the 1217 adult OHCA cases of presumed cardiac etiology, 925 (76.0%) had a monitor-defibrillator file with CPR quality data, of which 296 (32.0%) cases had >1 minute of capnography data during CPR. After capnography quality review, 66 of these cases (22.3%) were excluded due to uninterpretable capnography, resulting in a final study sample of 230 subjects (mean age 68 years; 69.1% male), with a total of 1581 minutes of data. After adjustment for other CPR variables, a 10 mm increase in CC depth was associated with a 4.0% increase in EtCO2 (p < 0.0001), a 10 compression/minute increase in CC rate with a 1.7% increase in EtCO2 (p = 0.02), a 10 mm/second increase in CCRV with a 2.8% increase in EtCO2 (p = 0.03), and a 10 breath/minute increase in ventilation rate with a 17.4% decrease in EtCO2 (p < 0.0001). When controlling for known CPR quality variables, increases in CC depth, CC rate and CCRV

  17. The emergency department as a 'last resort': why parents seek care for their child's nontraumatic dental problems in the emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostajer Haqiqi, Azadeh; Bedos, Christophe; Macdonald, Mary Ellen

    2016-10-01

    Over the last two decades, there has been an increasing trend in the number of families using emergency departments (EDs) for treating their children's nontraumatic dental problems. We do not know why families use the ED in this way; to date, little research has addressed parents' decisions. The purpose of this study was to explore the reasons that lead parents to select the ED over a dental clinic for their child's nontraumatic dental problem. Using a qualitative descriptive design, we conducted semi-structured interviews with parents of children under age 10 who sought care for nontraumatic dental problems in an ED of a pediatric hospital. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for thematic analysis using Grembowski's dental care process model as a sensitizing construct. Fifteen parents were recruited (ten mothers and five fathers). Three salient themes were identified: (i) parental beliefs and socioeconomic challenges which contributed to their care seeking, (ii) barriers parents faced in finding oral healthcare options for their children in their communities (e.g., poor access to care and poor quality of care), and (iii) parent's high satisfaction with the care provided through the ED. The ED was families' last resort; parents took their child to the ED because of the lack of other options in their communities rather than a belief that the ED was the best choice for dental care. The current pattern of ED use resulted in stress for these parents and repercussions for the children (e.g., pain, longer waiting, and increased complications); further, it has been shown in the literature to be an economic strain on the health system. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Prehospital thrombolytic therapy with tenecteplase in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokina, E G; Grachev, V G; Lipchenko, A A; Kholkin, I V; Bushuev, A V; Kozlov, S V

    2008-01-01

    We carried out prehospital thrombolytic therapy (TLT) with tenecteplase in 24 patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (MI) at the background of standard concomitant therapy with unfractionated heparin, aspirin, and clopidogrel and analyzed clinical course of MI, ECG dynamics, systolic left ventricular function according to echocardiography. In 20 patients coronary angiography was performed after TLT. Mean symptom - needle time was 113 min. In 14 patients (58%) TLT was carried out within 2 hours after appearance of symptoms. In 19 patients the course of disease was uncomplicated. Electrocardiographic criteria of effective reperfusion were registered in 14 patients (58%), angiographic criteria - in 13 patients (65% of subjected to angiography). Percutaneous intervention was performed in 18 patients (75%). Systolic left ventricular dysfunction was revealed in 5 patients (21%), aborted MI - in 4 patients. Significant correlation was found between aborted MI (r=0,38, p=0,034) and uncomplicated MI (r=0,40, p=0,027) and performance of TLT during first 2 hours. There were no hemorrhagic complications. Results of the study evidence for high efficacy of prehospital thrombolysis with tenecteplase and real possibility of its use under conditions of existing system of organization of urgent cardiological aid.

  19. Language barriers as a reported cause of prehospital care delay in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grow, Robert W; Sztajnkrycer, Matthew D; Moore, Brian R

    2008-01-01

    Although anecdotal reports exist, the frequency of language barriers encountered between EMS providers and patients/families in the prehospital environment remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of EMS provider-reported perceived delays in care due to language barrier and to characterize the nature of calls involved. Retrospective analysis of the Minnesota State Ambulance Reporting system (MNSTAR) database, a mandated statewide EMS data collection tool. All EMS run reports submitted between January 1, 2004, and June 30, 2005, were reviewed to identify instances of reported treatment delay secondary to a language barrier. During the 18-month study period, 629,738 patient encounter reports were submitted to MNSTAR, of which 2,052 identified treatment delays secondary to language. The rate of language barrier care delays in the state of Minnesota is 3.3 per 1,000 prehospital patient encounters. EMS responses troubled by delays in care secondary to language barriers represent a small percentage of total runs in Minnesota. However, approximately 1,370 cases per year occur.

  20. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) from Endemic Influenza A/H1N1: Prehospital Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihefendic, Nizama; Zildzic, Muharem; Ahmetagic, Sead

    2015-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a form of acute life threatening respiratory failure. In daily practice there is difficulty in diagnostic and therapeutic management of Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We observed delay in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with clinical signs for the presence of severe respiratory disorders. Finding timely evidence of the presence the clinical signs of threatening ARDS and underlying diseases like influenza A/H1N1 during prehospital period in early stage of disease it is possible introduce early adequate treatment: high flow oxygen, fluid replacement and pharmacological and antiviral therapy. This measure can reduce high mortality in patients who develop ARDS. It is important to improve diagnostic criteria for a precise definition of ARDS and transfer it in practice of emergency and family medicine, microbiology, intensive care units, hospital departments of infectious and respiratory diseases. In this article we underlined the key elements of the new definition of ARDS, diagnostic criteria and the importance of early diagnosis in prehospital period following clinical feature and course (a presence of severe dyspnea) by adding chest x-ray and laboratory investigations.

  1. Exertional Heat Injury: Effects of Adding Cold (4°C) Intravenous Saline to Prehospital Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Gordon; DeGroot, David; Hathaway, Nathanael E; Bigley, Daniel P; McGuire, Christopher S

    This article reviews current prehospital treatment for heat casualties and introduces a retrospective study on the addition of cold (4 °C) intravenous (IV) saline to prehospital treatment and its effect on morbidity. The study is a retrospective cohort reviewing electronic medical records of 290 heat casualties admitted to Martin Army Community Hospital, Ft. Benning, GA, comparing two treatment groups; U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (ice-sheeting and ambient temperature IV saline) versus Benning (ice-sheeting and cold IV saline). U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command group significantly differed from Benning group on a number of measures, the median length of stay in the hospital was 3 and 2 d, respectively (P < 0.0001); pCr were 1.8 to 1.4 mg·dL, respectively (difference of 0.4 mg·dL pCr, P < 0.0001). However, creatine phosphokinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase were not significantly different across groups. Findings demonstrate that adding cold IV saline to ice-sheeting as a protocol reduces the length of hospitalization of heat casualties and lowers their peak creatinine values.

  2. Berlin prehospital or usual delivery of acute stroke care - Study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebinger, Martin; Harmel, Peter; Nolte, Christian H; Grittner, Ulrike; Siegerink, Bob; Audebert, Heinrich J

    2017-08-01

    Rationale Prehospital stroke care in specialized ambulances increases thrombolysis rates, reduces alarm-to-treatment times, and improves the prehospital triage. Preliminary analyses suggest cost-effectiveness. However, scientific proof of better functional outcome compared to usual care is still lacking. Aim To prove better functional outcomes after deployment of the Stroke Emergency Mobile compared to regular ambulances. Sample size estimates A sample size of 686 patients will be required in each arm (Stroke Emergency Mobile group vs. regular care) to detect a difference regarding the primary outcome with 80% power at a two-sided significance level of 0.05. Methods and design This is a pragmatic, prospective study with blinded outcome assessment. Primary outcome will be functional status as defined by modified Rankin Scale score three months after the incident event. We will include cerebral ischemia patients within a predefined catchment area in Berlin, Germany. The study population consists of patients who might be candidates for acute recanalizing treatments, with onset-to-alarm time ≤4 h, symptoms not resolved at time of ambulance arrival, and able to walk without assistance prior to the qualifying incident. About 45% of Stroke Emergency Mobile dispatches are expected to be handled by regular ambulances, since Stroke Emergency Mobile will be already in operation creating the control group. Primary outcome Functional outcome after three months measured by the modified Rankin Scale over the entire range. Discussion The results will inform decision makers on the effectiveness of Stroke Emergency Mobile.

  3. Instrument for assessing the quality of mobile emergency pre-hospital care: content validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Assis Neves Dantas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES To validate an instrument to assess quality of mobile emergency pre-hospital care. METHOD A methodological study where 20 professionals gave their opinions on the items of the proposed instrument. The analysis was performed using Kappa test (K and Content Validity Index (CVI, considering K> 0.80 and CVI ≥ 0.80. RESULTS Three items were excluded from the instrument: Professional Compensation; Job Satisfaction and Services Performed. Items that obtained adequate K and CVI indexes and remained in the instrument were: ambulance conservation status; physical structure; comfort in the ambulance; availability of material resources; user/staff safety; continuous learning; safety demonstrated by the team; access; welcoming; humanization; response time; costumer privacy; guidelines on care; relationship between professionals and costumers; opportunity for costumers to make complaints and multiprofessional conjunction/actuation. CONCLUSION The instrument to assess quality of care has been validated and may contribute to the evaluation of pre-hospital care in mobile emergency services.

  4. Physiological-Social Scores in Predicting Outcomes of Prehospital Internal Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasali Ebrahimian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiological-social modified early warning score system is a newly developed instrument for the identification of patients at risk. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the physiological-social modified early warning score system for the identification of patients that needed prehospital emergency care. This prospective cohort study was conducted with 2157 patients. This instrument was used as a measure to detect critical illness in patients hospitalised in internal wards. Judgment by an emergency medicine specialist was used as a measure of standard. Data were analyzed by using receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve with 95% confidence interval. The mean score of the physiological-social modified early warning score system was 2.71 ± 3.55. Moreover, 97.6% patients with the score ≥ 4 needed prehospital emergency services. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.738 (95% CI = 0.708–0.767. Emergency medical staffs can use PMEWS ≥ 4 to identify those patients hospitalised in the internal ward as at risk patients. The physiological-social modified early warning score system is suggested to be used for decision-making of emergency staff about internal patients’ wards in EMS situations.

  5. Physiological-social scores in predicting outcomes of prehospital internal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, Abbasali; Seyedin, Hesam; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz; Masoumi, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    The physiological-social modified early warning score system is a newly developed instrument for the identification of patients at risk. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the physiological-social modified early warning score system for the identification of patients that needed prehospital emergency care. This prospective cohort study was conducted with 2157 patients. This instrument was used as a measure to detect critical illness in patients hospitalised in internal wards. Judgment by an emergency medicine specialist was used as a measure of standard. Data were analyzed by using receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve with 95% confidence interval. The mean score of the physiological-social modified early warning score system was 2.71 ± 3.55. Moreover, 97.6% patients with the score ≥ 4 needed prehospital emergency services. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.738 (95% CI = 0.708-0.767). Emergency medical staffs can use PMEWS ≥ 4 to identify those patients hospitalised in the internal ward as at risk patients. The physiological-social modified early warning score system is suggested to be used for decision-making of emergency staff about internal patients' wards in EMS situations.

  6. Analysis of 78 cases of prehospital death due to traffic accident injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡孝菽; 洪勇; 等

    1999-01-01

    Objective The cause and time of prehospital death for the injured patients caused by traffic accidents were studied in order to improve traffic management and clinical treatment,and reduce mortality.Methods The characteristics of the injury,the rescue procedure,the status of the injury leading to death were analyzed based on the retrospective data of 78 cases died before admission.Results The main causes of prehospital death in the traffic accidents included:1.head injury,2.bleeding,3.chest and heart wound,4.spinal cord injury at upper cervix.Death happened immediately after injury was in 17 cases.Death happened from the accident site to our hospital was in 47 cases.Death happened within half an hour after reaching emergency room was in 14 cases.In all of the cases,the death on the transfer took up 62.5%.Conclusions Findings from analysis of the data will be presented on a wide range of traffic safety issues.These include enhancing education of traffic safety and administration of drivers and motor vehicles,establishing a perfect emergency medical service system and a well-trained team of first aid,and popularizing first aid knowledge to all people.

  7. Pre-hospital and early in-hospital management of severe injuries: changes and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussmann, Bjoern; Lendemans, Sven

    2014-10-01

    The pre-hospital and early in-hospital management of most severely injured patients has dramatically changed over the last 20 years. In this context, the factor time has gained more and more attention, particularly in German-speaking countries. While the management in the early 1990s aimed at comprehensive and complete therapy at the accident site, the premise today is to stabilise trauma patients at the accident site and transfer them into the hospital rapidly. In addition, the introduction of training and education programmes such as Pre-hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS(®)), Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS(®)) concept or the TEAM(®) concept has increased the quality of treatment of most severely injured trauma patients both in the preclinical field and in the emergency trauma room. Today, all emergency surgical procedures in severely injured patients are generally performed in accordance with the Damage Control Orthopaedics (DCO) principle. The advancements described in this article provide examples for the improved quality of the management of severely injured patients in the preclinical field and during the initial in-hospital treatment phase. The implementation of trauma networks, the release of the S3 polytrauma guidelines, and the DGU "Weißbuch" have contributed to a more structured management of most severely injured patients.

  8. Determining the composition and benefit of the pre-hospital medical response team in the conflict setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, P R; Rickards, A C; Ollerton, J E

    2007-12-01

    To determine the optimal composition o f the pre-hospital medical response team (MERT) and the value of pre-hospital critical care interventions in a military setting, and specifically to determine both the benefit of including a doctor in the pre-hospital response team and the relevance of the time and distance to definitive care. A comprehensive review of the literature incorporating a range of electronic search engines and hand searches of key journals. There was no level 1 evidence on which to base conclusions. The 15 most relevant articles were analysed in detail. There was one randomized controlled trial (level 2 evidence) that supports the inclusion of a doctor on MERT. Several cohort studies were identified that analysed the benefits of specific critical care interventions in the pre-hospital setting. A doctor with critical care skills deployed on the MERT is associated with improved survival in victims of major trauma. Specific critical care interventions including emergency endotracheal intubation and ventilation, and intercostal drainage are associated with improved survival and functional recovery in certain patients. These benefits appear to be more easily demonstrated for the rural and remote setting than for the urban setting.

  9. First-pass intubation success rate during rapid sequence induction of prehospital anaesthesia by physicians versus paramedics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.H.; Wageningen, B. van; Hendriks, I.; Eijk, R.J.R.; Edwards, M.J.; Hoogerwerf, N.; Biert, J.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Endotracheal intubation is a frequently performed procedure for securing the airway in critically injured or ill patients. Performing prehospital intubation may be challenging and intubation skills vary. We reviewed the first-attempt tracheal intubation success rate in a Dutch prehospi

  10. Patients with cardiac arrest are ventilated two times faster than guidelines recommend : An observational prehospital study using tracheal pressure measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maertens, Vicky L.; De Smedt, Lieven E. G.; Lemoyne, Sabine; Huybrechts, Sofie A. M.; Wouters, Kristien; Kalmar, Alain F.; Monsieurs, Koenraad G.

    Aim: To measure ventilation rate using tracheal airway pressures in prehospitally intubated patients with and without cardiac arrest. Methods: Prospective observational study. In 98 patients (57 with and 41 without cardiac arrest) an air-filled catheter was inserted into the endotracheal tube and

  11. Patients with cardiac arrest are ventilated two times faster than guidelines recommend : An observational prehospital study using tracheal pressure measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maertens, Vicky L.; De Smedt, Lieven E. G.; Lemoyne, Sabine; Huybrechts, Sofie A. M.; Wouters, Kristien; Kalmar, Alain F.; Monsieurs, Koenraad G.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To measure ventilation rate using tracheal airway pressures in prehospitally intubated patients with and without cardiac arrest. Methods: Prospective observational study. In 98 patients (57 with and 41 without cardiac arrest) an air-filled catheter was inserted into the endotracheal tube and co

  12. Implementation of a pre-hospital decision rule in general practice. Triage of patients with suspected myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W.M. Grijseels (Els); J.W. Deckers (Jaap); A.W. Hoes (Arno); H. Boersma (Eric); J.A.M. Hartman; E. van der Does (Emiel); M.L. Simoons (Maarten)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To improve pre-hospital triage of patients with suspected acute cardiac disease. DESIGN: Prospective study. SUBJECTS. Patients with symptoms suggestive of acute cardiac pathology, who were seen by a general practitioner, for whom acute admission into hospital was requested, an

  13. Prehospital thoracostomy in patients with traumatic circulatory arrest: results from a physician-staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.H.; Ketelaars, R.; Wageningen, B. van; Biert, J.; Hoogerwerf, N.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Until recently, traumatic cardiac arrest (tCA) was believed to be associated with high mortality and low survival rates. New data suggest better outcomes. The most common error in tCA management is failing to treat a tension pneumothorax (TP). In the prehospital setting, we prefer thoraco

  14. Longer pre-hospital delay in acute myocardial infarction in women because of longer doctor decision time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, J; Broer, J; Bleeker, J; van Sonderen, E; Meyboom-de Jong, B; DeJongste, MJL

    1999-01-01

    Study objective-To measure the prehospital delay times in patients with proven acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and to identify possibilities for reduction of treatment delay. Design-Descriptive three centre study. Setting-One university teaching hospital and two regional hospitals in Groningen, th

  15. Epidemiology of injuries and outcomes among trauma patients receiving prehospital care at a tertiary teaching hospital in Kigali, Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabin Mbanjumucyo

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: A linked prehospital and hospital database provided critical epidemiological information describing trauma patients in a low-resource setting. Blunt trauma from motor vehicle collisions involving young males constituted the majority of traumatic injury. Among this cohort, hospital resource utilisation was high as was mortality. This data can help guide the implementation of interventions to improve trauma care in the Rwandan setting.

  16. Barriers of Pre-Hospital Services in Road Traffic Injuries in Tehran: The Viewpoint of Service Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrokh Alinia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Iran is one of the countries with considerable road traffic injuries. Pre-hospital interventions have an important role in preventing mortalities and disabilities caused by traffic accidents.The present study aimed to explore the barriers of pre-hospital care in traffic injuries in Tehran, Iran. Methods: A qualitative content analysis approach was conducted based on 21 semi-structured interviews with 18 participants. A purposeful sampling method was applied until reaching data saturation. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and then data condensing, labeling, coding and defining categories were performed by qualitative content analysis. Results: Four main barriers including 4 main categories and 13 subcategories emerged; they included Barriers related to people, Barriers related to metropolitan infrastructure,Barriers related to the profession and Barriers related to managerial issues. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, pre-hospital service barriers in traffic accidents have many dimensions including cultural, structural and managerial domains. Policy makers in health system can use these findings to promote the quality of pre-hospital services, especially in the field of traffic injuries.

  17. Variation of current protocols for managing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in prehospital settings among Asian countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hao Lin

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: International variation in practices and polices related to OHCAs do exist. Concerns regarding prehospital TOR rules include medical evidence, legal considerations, EMS manpower, public perception, medical oversight, education, EMS characteristics, and cost-effectiveness analysis. Further research is needed to achieve consensus regarding management protocols, especially for EMS that perform resuscitation during transportation of OHCA patients.

  18. Protocol for a prospective observational study to improve prehospital notification of injured patients presenting to trauma centres in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Biswadev; Mathew, Joseph; Gupta, Amit; Cameron, Peter; O'Reilly, Gerard; Soni, Kapil Dev; Kaushik, Gaurav; Howard, Teresa; Fahey, Madonna; Stephenson, Michael; Kumar, Vineet; Vyas, Sharad; Dharap, Satish; Patel, Pankaj; Thakor, Advait; Sharma, Naveen; Walker, Tony; Misra, Mahesh Chandra; Gruen, Russell; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2017-07-17

    Prehospital notification of injured patients enables prompt and timely care in hospital through adequate preparation of trauma teams, space, equipment and consumables necessary for resuscitation, and may improve outcomes. In India, anecdotal reports suggest that prehospital notification, in those few places where it occurs, is unstructured and not linked to a well-defined hospital response. The aim of this manuscript is to describe, in detail, a study protocol for the evaluation of a formalised approach to prehospital notification. This is a longitudinal prospective cohort study of injured patients being transported by ambulance to major trauma centres in India. In the preintervention phase, prospective data on patients will be collected on prehospital assessment, notification, inhospital assessment, management and outcomes and recorded in a new tailored multihospital trauma registry. All injured patients arriving by ambulance and allocated to a red or yellow priority category will be eligible for inclusion. The intervention will be a prehospital notification application to be used by ambulance clinicians to notify emergency departments of the impending arrival of a patient. The proportion of eligible patients arriving to hospital after notification will be the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes evaluated will be availability of a trauma cubicle, presence of a trauma team on patient arrival, time to first chest X-ray and inhospital mortality. Ethical approval has been obtained from the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi and site-specific approval granted by relevant trauma services. The trial has also been registered with the Monash University Human Research and Ethics Committee; Project number: CF16/1814 - 2016000929. Results will be fed back to prehospital and hospital clinicians via a series of reports and presentations. These will be used to facilitate discussions about service redesign and implementation. It is expected that evidence

  19. Active extravasation of contrast within the hemorrhage (spot sign: a multidetector computed tomography finding that predicts growth and a worse prognosis in non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Rosa Junior

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH causes high rates of disability and neurological sequelae Objective To evaluate spot signs as predictors of expansion and worse prognosis in non-traumatic ICH in a Brazilian cohort. Method We used multidetector computed tomography angiography to study 65 consecutive patients (40 men, 61.5%, with ages varying from 33 to 89 years (median age 55 years. Clinical and imaging findings were correlated with the findings based on the initial imaging. Results Of the individuals who presented a spot sign, 73.7% died (in-hospital mortality, whereas in the absence of a spot sign the mortality rate was 43.0%. Although expansion of ICH was detected in 75% of the patients with a spot sign, expansion was observed in only 9.0% of the patients who did not present a spot sign. Conclusions The spot sign strongly predicted expansion in non-traumatic ICH and an increased risk of in-hospital mortality.

  20. Effects of Modified Qing'e Pill () on expression of adiponectin, bone morphogenetic protein 2 and coagulation-related factors in patients with nontraumatic osteonecrosis of femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Gang; Shen, Lin; Yang, Yan-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Juan; Shuai, Bo; Ma, Chen

    2017-03-01

    To observe the regulation of Chinese herbal medicine, Modifified Qing'e Pill (, MQEP), on the expression of adiponectin, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and other potentially relevant risk factors in patients with nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). A total of 96 patients with nontraumatic ONFH were unequal randomly divided into treatment group (60 cases) and control group (36 cases). The treatment group were treated with MQEP while the control group were treated with simulated pills. Both groups were given caltrate D. Six months were taken as a treatment course. Patients were followed up every 2 months. The levels of plasma adiponectin, BMP2, OPG, von Willebrand factor (vWF), von Willebrand factor cleaving protease (vWF-cp), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), C-reactive protein (CRP), blood rheology, bone mineral density (BMD) of the femoral head and Harris Hip Score were measured before and after treatment. After 6 months of treatment, compared with the control group, patients in the treatment group had signifificantly higher adiponectin and BMP2 levels (Padiponectin showed a positive association with BMP2 (r=0.231, P=0.003) and a negative association with PAI-1 (r=-0.159, Padiponectin, regulating bone metabolism and improving the hypercoagulation state, which may provide an experimental base for its clinical effects.

  1. Autobiographical memory in adult offspring of traumatized parents with and without posttraumatic stress symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittekind, Charlotte E; Jelinek, Lena; Moritz, Steffen; Muhtz, Christoph; Berna, Fabrice

    2016-08-30

    The present study examined potential transgenerational effects of trauma on autobiographical memory in adult offspring of elderly participants with and without PTSD symptoms who were exposed to an early trauma during childhood. As traumatization is associated with reduced memory specificity for past events, we hypothesized that offspring of traumatized parents might be exposed to a less elaborative narrative style, which, in turn, might result in less specific autobiographical memories in the offspring. Results show that autobiographical memory specificity did not differ significantly between adult offspring of traumatized elderly participants with PTSD symptoms, without PTSD symptoms, and non-traumatized elderly participants.

  2. Factors Impacting Mortality in the Pre-Hospital Period After Road Traffic Accidents in Urban India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharan, Ananthnarayan; Nanavati, Aditya J; Prabhakar, Sandhya; Prabhakar, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    India currently has the dubious distinction of experiencing the highest number of road traffic accidents in the world. We believe that this study on road traffic accidents may help to identify factors in the pre-hospital setting that may influence mortality rates. A prospective observational study was carried out in a metro area in India over a period of one year. The study included consecutive patients admitted to the trauma service after road traffic accidents. Demographic information, time and place of accident, and details regarding the vehicle and the events leading up to the hospital admission were recorded. Injury severity, management in the hospital, and final outcomes in terms of mortality were noted. The data were analyzed with SPSS software. A total of 773 patients were enrolled. Of these, there were 197 deaths and 576 survivors. The majority of patients were aged 15 - 40 years (67%) and were male (87.84%). More accidents occurred at night (58.2%) than during the day (41.8%). Mortality was not significantly associated with age, sex, or time of accident. City roads (38.9%) saw more accidents than highways (26.13%), but highway accidents were more likely to be fatal. Two-wheeler riders (37.65%) and pedestrians (35.75%) formed the majority of our study population. Mortality was significantly associated with crossing the road on foot (P = 0.004). Pillion riders on two-wheeler vehicles were more likely to experience poor outcomes (relative risk [RR] = 1.9, P = 0.001). Front-seat occupants in four-wheeler vehicles were at an increased risk of not surviving the accident (61.98%; RR=2.56, P = 0.01). Lack of safety gear, such as helmets, seat belts, and airbags, was significantly associated with mortality (P = 0.05). Delays in transfers of patients to the hospital and a lack of pre-hospital emergency services was significantly associated with increased mortality (P = 0.000). A lack of respect for the law, weak legislation and law enforcement, disregard for

  3. Effect of basic prehospital trauma life support program on cognitive and trauma management skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, J; Adam, R; Josa, D; Pierre, I; Bedsaysie, H; West, U; Winn, J; Ali, E; Haynes, B

    1998-12-01

    We tested the effectiveness of a basic prehospital trauma life support (PHTLS) program by assessing cognitive performance and trauma management skills among prehospital trauma personnel. Fourteen subjects who completed a standard PHTLS course (group I) were compared to a matched group not completing a PHTLS program (group II). Cognitive performance was assessed on 50-item multiple choice examinations, and trauma skills management was assessed with four simulated trauma patients. Pre-PHTLS multiple choice questionnaire scores were similar (45.8 +/- 9.4% vs. 48.8 +/- 8.9% for groups I and II, respectively), but the post-PHTLS scores were higher in group I (80.4 +/- 5.9%) than in group II (52.6 +/- 4.9%). Pre-PHTLS simulated trauma patient performance scores (standardized to a maximum total of 20 for each station) were similar at all four stations for both groups, ranging from 7.9 to 10.4. The post-PHTLS scores were statistically significantly higher at all four stations for group I (range 16.0-19.0) compared to those for group II (range 8.0-11.1). The overall mean pre-PHTLS score for all four stations was 8.3 +/- 2.1 for group I and 8.8 +/- 2.0 (NS) for group II; the group I post-PHTLS mean score for the four stations was 17.1 +/- 2.7 (p PHTLS Adherence to Priority scores on a scale of 1 to 7 were similar (1.1 +/- 0.9 for group I and 1.2 +/- 1.0 for group II). Post-PHTLS group I Priority scores increased to 5.9 +/- 1.1. Group II (1.1 +/- 1.0) did not improve their post-PHTLS scores. The pre-PHTLS Organized Approach scores in the simulated trauma patients on a scale of 1 to 5 were 2.1 +/- 1.0 for group I and 1.9 +/- 1.2 for group II (NS) compared to 4.2 +/- 0.9 (p PHTLS. This study demonstrates improved cognitive and trauma management skills performance among prehospital paramedical personnel who complete the basic PHTLS program.

  4. Effects of golden hour thrombolysis: a Prehospital Acute Neurological Treatment and Optimization of Medical Care in Stroke (PHANTOM-S) substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebinger, Martin; Kunz, Alexander; Wendt, Matthias; Rozanski, Michal; Winter, Benjamin; Waldschmidt, Carolin; Weber, Joachim; Villringer, Kersten; Fiebach, Jochen B; Audebert, Heinrich J

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke is time dependent. The effects are likely to be highest if the time from symptom onset to treatment is within 60 minutes, termed the golden hour. To determine the achievable rate of golden hour thrombolysis in prehospital care and its effect on outcome. The prospective controlled Prehospital Acute Neurological Treatment and Optimization of Medical Care in Stroke study was conducted in Berlin, Germany, within an established infrastructure for stroke care. Weeks were randomized according to the availability of a specialized ambulance (stroke emergency mobile unit (STEMO) from May 1, 2011, through January 31, 2013. We included 6182 consecutive adult patients for whom a stroke dispatch (44.1% male; mean [SD] age, 73.9 [15.0] years) or regular care (45.0% male; mean [SD] age, 74.2 [14.9] years) were included. The STEMO was deployed when the dispatchers suspected an acute stroke during emergency calls. If STEMO was not available (during control weeks, when the unit was already in operation, or during maintenance), patients received conventional care. The STEMO is equipped with a computed tomographic scanner plus a point-of-care laboratory and telemedicine connection. The unit is staffed with a neurologist trained in emergency medicine, a paramedic, and a technician. Thrombolysis was started in STEMO if a stroke was confirmed and no contraindication was found. Rates of golden hour thrombolysis, 7- and 90-day mortality, secondary intracerebral hemorrhage, and discharge home. Thrombolysis rates in ischemic stroke were 200 of 614 patients (32.6%) when STEMO was deployed and 330 of 1497 patients (22.0%) when conventional care was administered (P golden hour thrombolysis was 6-fold higher after STEMO deployment (62 of 200 patients [31.0%] vs 16 of 330 [4.9%]; P golden hour thrombolysis had no higher risks for 7- or 90-day mortality (adjusted odds ratios, 0.38 [95% CI, 0.09-1.70]; P = .21 and 0.69 [95% CI

  5. Epidemiological analysis of prehospital care in Shenzhen%深圳市院外急救流行病学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琴; 余益民

    2012-01-01

    causes of trauma were traffic accidents, accounting for 20.81% among the total cases and accounting for 43.67% among the trauma cases; poisoning ranked the second highest, accounting for 9.66%, and among the total poisoning cases, alcoholism accounted for 58.21% , and drug poisoning accounted for 12.29% ; cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases totally accounted for 14.73%. ④ Among the total prehospital patients with their ages recorded, male accounted for 59.40% while female accounted for 33.40%. Young adults aged 21~50 accounted for 62.60% among the total prehospital patients. Conclusion The efficient accepted phone call rate in Shenzhen is still low. July and August are the busiest months for first aid. The poisoning takes the second place in the disease spectrum in the prehospital care in Shenzhen.

  6. Shoulder pain in primary care: diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination tests for non-traumatic acromioclavicular joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    .41) and four positive clinical features resulted in 95% specificity (95% CI 0.90, 0.98) and a LR+ of 4.98 (95% CI 1.69, 13.84). Conclusions In this cohort of primary care patients with predominantly subacute or chronic ACJ pain of non-traumatic onset, traditional ACJ tests were of limited diagnostic value. Combinations of other history and physical examination findings were able to more accurately identify injection-confirmed ACJ pain in this cohort. PMID:23634871

  7. Duration of Prehospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Favorable Neurological Outcomes for Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests: A Nationwide, Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yoshikazu; Funada, Akira; Goto, Yumiko

    2016-12-20

    The appropriate duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains unclear and may differ based on initial rhythm. We aimed to determine the relationship between the duration of prehospital CPR by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel and post-OHCA outcomes. We analyzed the records of 12 877 pediatric patients who experienced OHCAs (CPR duration was defined as the time from CPR initiation by EMS personnel to prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or to hospital arrival when prehospital ROSC was not achieved during prehospital CPR efforts. The rates of 30-day survival and 30-day CPC 1 to 2 were 9.1% (n=1167) and 2.5% (n=325), respectively. Prehospital EMS-initiated CPR duration was significantly and inversely associated with 30-day outcomes (adjusted odds ratio for 1-minute increments: 0.94, 95% confidence interval: 0.93-0.95 for survival; adjusted odds ratio: 0.90, 95% confidence interval: 0.88-0.92 for CPC 1-2). The duration of prehospital EMS-initiated CPR, beyond which the chance for favorable outcomes diminished to CPR durations beyond which the chance for 30-day survival with CPC 1 to 2 diminished to CPR, the prehospital CPR duration, beyond which the chance for favorable outcome diminished to CPR duration for pediatric OHCAs was independently and inversely associated with 30-day favorable outcomes. The duration of prehospital EMS-initiated CPR, beyond which the chance for 30-day favorable outcomes diminished to CPR duration to achieve this proportion of outcomes differed based on initial rhythm. Further research is required to elucidate appropriate CPR duration for pediatric OHCAs, including in-hospital CPR time. URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02432196. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Does the Norwegian emergency medical dispatch classification as non-urgent predict no need for pre-hospital medical treatment? An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusd, Eystein; Kramer-Johansen, Jo

    2016-05-06

    The number of ambulance call-outs in Norway is increasing owing to societal changes and increased demand from the public. Together with improved but more expensive education of ambulance staff, this leads to increased costs and staffing shortages. We wanted to study whether the current dispatch triage tools could reliably identify patients who only required transport, and not pre-hospital medical care. This could allow selection of such patients for designated transport units, freeing up highly trained ambulance staff to attend patients in greater need. A cross-sectional observational study was used, drawing on all electronic and paper records in our ambulance service from four random days in 2012. The patients were classified into acuity groups, based on Emergency Medical Dispatch codes, and pre-hospital interventions were extracted from the Patient Report Forms. Of the 1489 ambulance call-outs included in this study, 82 PRFs (5 %) were missing. A highly significant association was found between acuity group and recorded pre-hospital intervention (p ≤ 0.001). We found no correlation between gender, distance to hospital, age and pre-hospital interventions. Ambulances staffed by paramedics performed more interventions (234/917, 26 %) than those with emergency medical technicians (42/282, 15 %). The strongest predictor for needing pre-hospital interventions was found to be the emergency medical dispatch acuity descriptor. This study has demonstrated that the Norwegian dispatch system is able to correctly identify patients who do not need pre-hospital interventions. Patients with a low acuity code had a very low level of pre-hospital interventions. Evaluation of adherence to protocol in the Emergency Medical Dispatch is not possible due to the inherent need for medical experience in the triage process. This study validates the Norwegian dispatch tool (Norwegian index) as a predictor of patients who do not need pre-hospital interventions.

  9. Experience in using injectable valproic acid (convulex in patients with serial epileptic seizures and status epilepticus at the prehospital stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Lebedeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficacy of injectable valproate (convulex in patients with serial epileptic seizures and status epilepticus (SE at the prehospital stage.Patients and methods. Thirty-two adult patients, including 17 (53% men and 15 (47% women, were examined. Most patients were aged over 40 years (mean age 54.7±9.4 years. To define the required dose of the drug, the authors estimated the patient's weight that averaged 76.8±1.9 kg, i.e. there was a preponderance of patients who needed convulex, more than 500 mg, to achieve a therapeutic effect.Results. It was impossible to reliably and validly evaluate the type of a seizure as the medical emergency team (MET generally observed the patient with a just evolving seizure and the medical history data were not always valid therefore the type of convulsions and the type of a seizure were evaluated. In most cases, solitary convulsive attacks (tonic and/or clonic convulsions and/or serial seizures were observed in 12 (37.5% and 14 (43.7% patients, respectively; SE was recorded in 6 (8.8% patients. Generalized seizures (without a clear focal onset were prevalent in 24 (75% patients while 8 (25% patients were found to have partial seizures (seizure onset lateralization, a focal onset. According to the pattern of convulsions, seizures may be classified into three types: tonic-clonic, clonic, and tonic in 22 (68.8%, 7 (21.9%, and 3 (9.3% patients, respectively. Analysis of the efficacy of intravenously injectable valproate (convulex in the group of patients with SE and epileptic seizures indicated that complete cessation of seizures could be achieved in 68.8%, their rate decreased in other 9.4% of the patients. Seizures were preserved in 7 (21.8% cases, which required additional administration of drugs. Conclusion. Injectable valproic acid (convulex has a high efficacy and may be preclinically used as the drug of choice to arrest SE and serial seizures caused by both epilepsy and other

  10. Association between prehospital physician involvement and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton, Annika; Steinmetz, Jacob; Wissenberg, Mads

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Sudden out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is an important public health problem. While several interventions are known to improve survival, the impact of physician-delivered advanced cardiac life support for OHCA is unclear. We aimed to assess the association between prehospital physician...... involvement and 30-day survival. METHODS: Observational study including persons registered with first-time OHCA of any cause in the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry during 2005-2012. We used logistic regression analysis to assess the association between 30-day survival and involvement of a physician at any time...... before arrival at the hospital. Secondary outcomes were 1-year survival and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) before arrival at the hospital. The associations were explored in three multivariable models: a model with simple adjustment, a model with multiple imputation of missing variables...

  11. Systolic blood pressure and short-term mortality in the emergency department and prehospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders Kasper Bruun; Holler, Jon Gitz; Mikkelsen, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    staffed mobile emergency care unit in Odense between 2007 and 2013. We used the first recorded systolic blood pressure and the main outcome was 7-day mortality. Best performing thresholds were identified with methods based on receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and multivariate regression......INTRODUCTION: Systolic blood pressure is a widely used tool to assess circulatory function in acutely ill patients. The systolic blood pressure limit where a given patient should be considered hypotensive is the subject of debate and recent studies have advocated higher systolic blood pressure...... thresholds than the traditional 90 mmHg. The aim of this study was to identify the best performing systolic blood pressure thresholds with regards to predicting 7-day mortality and to evaluate the applicability of these in the emergency department as well as in the prehospital setting. METHODS...

  12. Anaesthesiologists in prehospital care make a difference to certain groups of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Melchiorsen, Hanne; Kilsmark, J.;

    2003-01-01

    ACKGROUND: Knowledge of the population using prehospital emergency services is scarce except for selected subgroups. Interventions are often made without evaluation. The aim of this study was (1) to describe mortality, hospitalization and the diagnostic pattern among emergency ambulance users...... and (2) to evaluate the impact of one mobile emergency care unit (MECU) staffed by an anesthesiologist. DESIGN AND METHODS: A descriptive and quasi-experimental study of consecutive emergency ambulance users during two 3-month periods: before the MECU (Period 1) and after (Period 2). Hospitalization......, diagnostic and 0-180-day mortality data were requested from national registers. Diagnoses were according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). RESULTS: Periods 1 and 2 included 2950 and 2869 users, respectively. The MECU attended 27.7% in Period 2. Fewer users were brought to hospital...

  13. Gravidade do trauma avaliada na fase pré-hospitalar Trauma severity assessment in prehospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Y. Whitaker

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available A avaliação da gravidade do trauma e a instituição de manobras para manutenção básica da vida, no local do evento, podem representar a oportunidade de sobrevida para as vítimas de trauma até a sua chegada ao hospital. OBJETIVO: Estudar vítimas de causas externas avaliadas por um índice fisiológico denominado Trauma Score modificado (TSm aplicado durante o atendimento pré-hospitalar. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Analisaram-se, retrospectivamente, 1.414 vítimas de causas externas atendidas pelo Sistema de Atendimento Móvel às Urgências (SAMU-RESGATE-SP no município de São Paulo, no ano de 1991. Os dados foram obtidos da ficha de atendimento pré-hospitalar e laudo de necropsia. RESULTADOS: O atendimento pré-hospitalar em 81,31% ocorreu até 40 minutos, dos quais 83,96% das vítimas não-fatais obtiveram escores TSm 12 e 11, e 53,96% das vítimas fatais obtiveram escores 0, 1 e 2. Superfície externa (30,25% e região da cabeça/pescoço (20,98% foram as mais acometidas. Das vítimas fatais, 63,63% com Injury Severity Score (ISS > ou = 16 morreram nas primeiras 24 horas. No cotejamento dos escores TSm e ISS, verificou-se que vítimas fatais com escore TSm entre 0 e 11 foram confirmadas como com ISS crítico (ISS > ou = 16. CONCLUSÃO: Constataram-se fortes indícios de que vítimas fatais com escores TSm baixos relacionaram-se com escores ISS altos.The trauma severity assessment and basic life support maneuvers in prehospital setting can represent to the trauma victim the opportunity of survival until his/her can get assistance in the hospital. PURPOSE: To study external cause victims assessed in the prehospital phase by the physiologic index named Trauma Score modificado (TSm. METHODS: Retrospective analyses were made of 1414 victims attended by Sistema de Atendimento Móvel às Urgências (SAMU-RESGATE-SP in the Municipality of São Paulo during 1991. Data were gathered from prehospital data recording sheets and necropsy records

  14. Prehospital endotracheal tube airway or esophageal gastric tube airway: a critical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, S R; MacDonald, J R; Gruzinski, G

    1985-02-01

    This study compares two similar groups of patients in cardiopulmonary arrest with ventricular fibrillation (VF). In the survival study group of 296 patients, 148 patients received an endotracheal tube airway (ETA) and 148 patients received an esophageal gastric tube airway (EGTA), the improved version of the esophageal obturator airway (EOA). Survival rates, both short term (ETA = 35.8%, EGTA = 39.1%) and long term (ETA = 11.5%, EGTA = 16.2%), and neurological sequelae of survivors showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P greater than .05). In addition, we found that success and complication rates of intubation were similar. Training time was longer for the ETA. We conclude that both airways have a place in the prehospital setting.

  15. Prehospital treatment of opioid overdose in Copenhagen--is it safe to discharge on-scene?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, S.S.; Jehu, G.; Nielsen, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In the prehospital setting opioid overdose is often treated with naloxone. In our physician-based medical emergency care unit (MECU) we have adopted a discharge-on-scene policy, where patients are released on scene if no residual signs of opioid intoxication are found after treatment....... The aim of this study was to describe our experience with the discharge-on-scene policy used during a 10-year-period with focus on the frequency of rebound opioid toxicity. METHODS: Data were prospectively recorded in our MECU database and we reviewed all cases of opioid overdose between 1994 and 2003....... The MECU database was cross-referenced with the Central Personal Registry. For patients who died within 48 h of MECU contact we reviewed the forensic autopsy reports to establish whether rebound opioid toxicity was likely. RESULTS: We found 4762 cases of acute opioid overdose. In 3245 cases positive...

  16. Pre-Hospital Fast Positive Cases Identified by DFB Ambulance Paramedics – Final Clinical Diagnosis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Feeney, A

    2016-04-01

    Ischaemic stroke clinical outcomes are improved by earlier treatment with intravenous thrombolysis. An existing pathway at the Mater University Hospital for assessment of suspected acute stroke in the Emergency Department was updated, aiming to shorten ‘door to needle time’. This study examines the final clinical diagnosis of Dublin Fire Brigade Ambulance Paramedic identified Face Arm Speech Test (FAST) positive patients presenting to the Emergency Department over a 7 month period. A retrospective analysis was carried out of 177 consecutive FAST positive patients presenting between March and November 2014. The final clinical diagnosis was acute stroke in 57.1% (n=101) of patients. Of these, 76 were ischaemic strokes of whom 56.5% (n=43) were thrombolysed. In the pre-hospital setting Ambulance Paramedics can identify, with reasonable accuracy, acute stroke using the FAST test. Over half of the ischaemic stroke patients presenting via this pathway can be treated with intravenous thrombolysis

  17. Hospital and Pre-Hospital Triage Systems in Disaster and Normal Conditions; a Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Safari

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Triage is a priority classification system based on the severity of problem to do the best therapeutic proceedings for patients in the less time. A triage system should be performed in a way which can make a decision with high accuracy and in the least time for each patient. Simplicity and reliability of the performance are the most important features of a standard triage system. An appropriate triage causes to increase the quality of health care services and patients’ satisfaction rate, decrease the waiting time as well as mortality rate, and increase the yield and efficiency of emergency wards along with reducing the related expenses. Considering to the above statements, in the present study the history of triage formation was evaluated and categorizing of all triage systems regarding prehospital and hospital as well as triage in normal and critical conditions were assessed, too.

  18. An Intelligent Ecosystem for Providing Support in Prehospital Trauma Care in Cuenca, Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbi-Sisalima, Cristian; Rodas, Edgar B; Salamea, Juan C; Sacoto, Hernán; Monje-Ortega, Diana; Robles-Bykbaev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    According to facts given by the World Health Organization, one in ten deaths worldwide is due to an external cause of injury. In the field of pre-hospital trauma care, adequate and timely treatment in the golden period can impact the survival of a patient. The aim of this paper is to show the design of a complete ecosystem proposed to support the evaluation and treatment of trauma victims, using standard tools and vocabulary such as OpenEHR, as well as mobile systems and expert systems to support decision-making. Preliminary results of the developed applications are presented, as well as trauma-related data from the city of Cuenca, Ecuador.

  19. [Cooperation between emergency and forensic medicine - retrospective evaluation of pre-hospital emergency measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Claas T; Kleber, Christian; Tsokos, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Hess, Thorsten; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2015-06-01

    Emergency medical research is subject to special conditions. Emergency patients e.g. are generally considered to be non-capable of giving consent. This results in sparse emergency medical data when compared to clinical observation studies under controlled conditions. After emergency medical treatment, deceased patients are not rarely subject to forensic investigation. The cooperation between emergency and forensic medicine has not only emergency medical training potential in individual cases, but also scientific innovation potential especially with respect to the retrospective evaluation of pre-hospital emergency measures. Such partnerships (like in Berlin at the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin between the Institute of Legal Medicine and the Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery or in Hamburg between the Institute for Legal Medicine at the University Hospital and the Municipal Fire Brigade with the Emergency Medical Service) are yet exceptional in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Evaluation of pre-hospital transport time of stroke patients to thrombolytic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Sofie; Andresen, Morten; Michelsen, Lene;

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundEffective treatment of stroke is time dependent. Pre-hospital management is an important link in reducing the time from occurrence of stroke symptoms to effective treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate time used by emergency medical services (EMS) for stroke patients during...... a five-year period in order to identify potential delays and evaluate the reorganization of EMS in Copenhagen in 2009.MethodsWe performed a retrospective analysis of ambulance records from stroke patients suitable for thrombolysis from 1 January 2006 to 7 July 2011. We noted response time from dispatch...... of the ambulance to arrival at the scene, on-scene time and transport time to the hospital¿in total, alarm-to-door time. In addition, we noted baseline characteristics.ResultsWe reviewed 481 records (58% male, median age 66 years). The median (IQR) alarm-to-door time in minutes was 41 (33¿52), of which 18 (12...

  1. Evaluation of intensified prehospital treatment in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, F; Nielsen, J R; Gram, L;

    1991-01-01

    with doctors collaborating (advanced EMS) were used, and 11 (13%) patients were discharged. The intermediate EMS system was used in another area with 45,000 inhabitants/population density of 340/km2, and in this area 20 (18%) patients were discharged. Among the survivors a psychological assessment in form...... of a test for dementia was assessed in long-term survivors (n = 30) together with 28 patients surviving acute myocardial infarction and 11 control persons. The results of the investigation demonstrate that the more intensive the prehospital treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, the more patients...... survive and the more patients survive with good cerebral function. However, the ambulances with specially trained paramedics were only effective in the area with 340 inhabitants/km2....

  2. Critical incidents during prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: what are the problems nobody wants to talk about?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenstein, Christian; Rupp, Peter; Fleischmann, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    We wanted to identify incidents that led or could have led to patient harm during prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A nationwide anonymous and Internet-based critical incident reporting system gave the data. During a 4-year period we received 548 reports of which 74 occurred during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Human error was responsible for 85% of the incidents, whereas equipment failure contributed to 15% of the reports. Equipment failure was considered to be preventable in 61% of all the cases, whereas incidents because of human error could have been prevented in almost all the cases. In most cases, prevention can be accomplished by simple strategies with the Poka-Yoke technique. Insufficient training of emergency medical service physicians in Germany requires special attention. The critical incident reports raise concerns regarding the level of expertize provided by emergency medical service doctors.

  3. NATO Blood Panel perspectives on changes to military prehospital resuscitation policies: current and future practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Tom; Badloe, John; Bohonek, Milos; Taylor, Audra L; Erik Heier, Hans; Doughty, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Blood Panel exists to promote interoperability of transfusion practice between NATO partners. However, it has served as an important forum for the development of prehospital transfusion and transfusion in the austere environment. There are synergies with the trauma hemostasis and oxygen research community especially in the areas of innovation and research. Four presentations are summarized together with a review of some scientific principles. The past decade has already seen significant changes in early transfusion support. Sometimes practice has preceded the evidence and has stretched regulatory and logistic constraints. Ethical and philosophical issues are also important and require us to question "should we" and not just "could we." The challenge for the combined communities is to continue to optimize transfusion support underpinned by evidence-based excellence.

  4. Stroke awareness decreases prehospital delay after acute ischemic stroke in korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Su-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delayed arrival at hospital is one of the major obstacles in enhancing the rate of thrombolysis therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Our study aimed to investigate factors associated with prehospital delay after acute ischemic stroke in Korea. Methods A prospective, multicenter study was conducted at 14 tertiary hospitals in Korea from March 2009 to July 2009. We interviewed 500 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke who arrived within 48 hours. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors influencing prehospital delay. Results Among the 500 patients (median 67 years, 62% men, the median time interval from symptom onset to arrival was 474 minutes (interquartile range, 170-1313. Early arrival within 3 hours of symptom onset was significantly associated with the following factors: high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score, previous stroke, atrial fibrillation, use of ambulance, knowledge about thrombolysis and awareness of the patient/bystander that the initial symptom was a stroke. Multivariable logistic regression analysis indicated that awareness of the patient/bystander that the initial symptom was a stroke (OR 4.438, 95% CI 2.669-7.381, knowledge about thrombolysis (OR 2.002, 95% CI 1.104-3.633 and use of ambulance (OR 1.961, 95% CI 1.176-3.270 were significantly associated with early arrival. Conclusions In Korea, stroke awareness not only on the part of patients, but also of bystanders, had a great impact on early arrival at hospital. To increase the rate of thrombolysis therapy and the incidence of favorable outcomes, extensive general public education including how to recognize stroke symptoms would be important.

  5. Use of the Airtraq laryngoscope for emergency intubation in the prehospital setting: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmel, Helmut; Kreutziger, Janett; Fertsak, Georg; Fitzka, Robert; Dittrich, Markus; Voelckel, Wolfgang G

    2011-03-01

    The optical Airtraq laryngoscope (Prodol Meditec, Vizcaya, Spain) has been shown to have advantages when compared with direct laryngoscopy in difficult airway patients. Furthermore, it has been suggested that it is easy to use and handle even for inexperienced advanced life support providers. As such, we sought to assess whether the Airtraq may be a reliable alternative to conventional intubation when used in the prehospital setting. Prospective, randomized control trial in emergency patients requiring endotracheal intubation provided by anesthesiologists or emergency physicians responding with an emergency medical service helicopter or ground unit associated with the Department of Anesthesiology, General Hospital, Wiener Neustadt, Austria. During the 18-month study period, 212 patients were enrolled. When the Airtraq was used as first-line airway device (n=106) vs. direct laryngoscopy (n=106), success rate was 47% vs. 99%, respectively (pintubation were related to the fiber-optic characteristic of this device (i.e., impaired sight due to blood and vomitus, n=11) or to assumed handling problems (i.e., cuff damage, tube misplacement, or inappropriate visualization of the glottis, n=24). In 54 of 56 patients where Airtraq intubation failed, direct laryngoscopy was successful on the first attempt; in the remaining two and in one additional case of failed direct laryngoscopy, the airway was finally secured employing the Fastrach laryngeal mask. There was no correlation between success rates and body mass index, age, indication for airway management, emergency medical service unit, or experience of the physicians. Based on these results, the use of the Airtraq laryngoscope as a primary airway device cannot be recommended in the prehospital setting without significant clinical experience obtained in the operation room. We conclude that the clinical learning process of the Airtraq laryngoscope is much longer than reported in the anesthesia literature.

  6. A prospective multicenter evaluation of prehospital airway management performance in a large metropolitan region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    To determine 1) the success rate of prehospital endotracheal intubation; 2) the unrecognized tube malposition rate; and 3) predictors of tube malposition upon arrival to the emergency department (ED) in the setting of a large metropolitan area that includes 18 hospitals and 34 transporting emergency medical services (EMS) agencies. Prospective data were collected on patients for whom prehospital intubation was attempted between September 1, 2004, and January 31, 2005. Endotracheal tube (ETT) position upon arrival to the ED was verified by emergency medicine attending physicians. Missing cases were identified by matching prospective data with lists of attempted intubations submitted by EMS agencies, and data were obtained for these cases by retrospective chart review. Successful intubation was defined as an "endotracheal tube balloon below the cords" on arrival to the ED. Patients were the unit of analysis; proportions with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Nine hundred twenty-six patients had an attempted intubation. Methods of airway management were determined for 97.5% (825/846) of those transported to a hospital and 33.8% (27/80) of those who died in the field. For transported patients, 74.8% were successfully intubated, 20% had a failed intubation, 5.2% had a malpositioned tube on arrival to the ED, and 0.6% had another method of airway management used. Malpositioned tubes were significantly more common in pediatric patients (13.0%, compared with 4.0% for nonpediatric patients). Overall intubation success was low, and consistent with previously published series. The frequency of malpositioned ETT was unacceptably high, and also consistent with prior studies. Our data support the need for ongoing monitoring of EMS providers' practices of endotracheal intubation.

  7. Effect of prehospital advanced airway management for pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Fukuda, Tatsuma; Doi, Kent; Morimura, Naoto

    2017-05-01

    Respiratory care may be important in pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) due to the asphyxial nature of the majority of events. However, evidence of the effect of prehospital advanced airway management (AAM) for pediatric OHCA is scarce. This was a nationwide population-based study of pediatric OHCA in Japan from 2011 to 2012 based on data from the All-Japan Utstein Registry. We included pediatric OHCA patients aged between 1 and 17 years old. The primary outcome was one-month neurologically favorable survival defined as a Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance category (CPC) score of 1-2 (corresponding to a Pediatric CPC score of 1-3). A total of 2157 patients were included in the final cohort; 365 received AAM and 1792 received bag-valve-mask (BVM) ventilation only. Among the 2157 patients, 213 (9.9%) survived with favorable neurological outcomes (CPC of 1-2) one month after OHCA. There were no significant differences in neurologically favorable survival between the AAM and BVM groups after adjusting for potential confounders, although there was a tendency favoring BVM ventilation: propensity score matching, OR 0.74 (95%CI 0.35-1.59), and multivariable logistic regression modeling, ORadjusted 0.55 (95%CI 0.24-1.14). Subgroup analyses demonstrated that there were no subgroups in which AAM was associated with neurologically favorable survival, including the non-cardiac (primarily asphyxial) etiology group. In pediatric OHCA, prehospital AAM was not associated with an increased chance of neurologically favorable survival compared with BVM-only ventilation. However, careful consideration is required to interpret the findings, as there may be unmeasured residual confounders and selection bias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Scandinavian SSAI clinical practice guideline on pre-hospital airway management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehn, M; Hyldmo, P K; Magnusson, V; Kurola, J; Kongstad, P; Rognås, L; Juvet, L K; Sandberg, M

    2016-08-01

    The Scandinavian society of anaesthesiology and intensive care medicine task force on pre-hospital airway management was asked to formulate recommendations following standards for trustworthy clinical practice guidelines. The literature was systematically reviewed and the grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation (GRADE) system was applied to move from evidence to recommendations. We recommend that all emergency medical service (EMS) providers consider to: apply basic airway manoeuvres and airway adjuncts (good practice recommendation); turn unconscious non-trauma patients into the recovery position when advanced airway management is unavailable (good practice recommendation); turn unconscious trauma patients to the lateral trauma position while maintaining spinal alignment when advanced airway management is unavailable [strong recommendation, low quality of evidence (QoE)]. We suggest that intermediately trained providers use a supraglottic airway device (SAD) or basic airway manoeuvres on patients in cardiac arrest (weak recommendation, low QoE). We recommend that advanced trained providers consider using an SAD in selected indications or as a rescue device after failed endotracheal intubation (ETI) (good practice recommendation). We recommend that ETI should only be performed by advanced trained providers (strong recommendation, low QoE). We suggest that videolaryngoscopy is considered for ETI when direct laryngoscopy fails or is expected to be difficult (weak recommendation, low QoE). We suggest that advanced trained providers apply cricothyroidotomy in 'cannot intubate, cannot ventilate' situations (weak recommendation, low QoE). This guideline for pre-hospital airway management includes a combination of techniques applied in a stepwise fashion appropriate to patient clinical status and provider training. © 2016 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Acta Anaesthesiologica

  9. Novel wireless electroencephalography system with a minimal preparation time for use in emergencies and prehospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Andrei; Kulkas, Antti; Salpavaara, Timo; Kauppinen, Pasi; Verho, Jarmo; Heikkilä, Hannu; Jäntti, Ville

    2014-05-08

    Although clinical applications such as emergency medicine and prehospital care could benefit from a fast-mounting electroencephalography (EEG) recording system, the lack of specifically designed equipment restricts the use of EEG in these environments. This paper describes the design and testing of a six-channel emergency EEG (emEEG) system with a rapid preparation time intended for use in emergency medicine and prehospital care. The novel system comprises a quick-application cap, a device for recording and transmitting the EEG wirelessly to a computer, and custom software for displaying and streaming the data in real-time to a hospital. Bench testing was conducted, as well as healthy volunteer and patient measurements in three different environments: a hospital EEG laboratory, an intensive care unit, and an ambulance. The EEG data was evaluated by two experienced clinical neurophysiologists and compared with recordings from a commercial system. The bench tests demonstrated that the emEEG system's performance is comparable to that of a commercial system while the healthy volunteer and patient measurements confirmed that the system can be applied quickly and that it records quality EEG data in a variety of environments. Furthermore, the recorded data was judged to be of diagnostic quality by two experienced clinical neurophysiologists. In the future, the emEEG system may be used to record high-quality EEG data in emergency medicine and during ambulance transportation. Its use could lead to a faster diagnostic, a more accurate treatment, and a shorter recovery time for patients with neurological brain disorders.

  10. Cost-utility analysis of prehospital spine immobilization recommendations for penetrating trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Arturo; Liu, Terrence H; Victorino, Gregory P

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Surgeons' Committee on Trauma's recent prehospital trauma life support recommendations against prehospital spine immobilization (PHSI) after penetrating trauma are based on a low incidence of unstable spine injuries after penetrating injuries. However, given the chronic and costly nature of devastating spine injuries, the cost-utility of PHSI is unclear. Our hypothesis was that the cost-utility of PHSI in penetrating trauma precludes routine use of this prevention strategy. A Markov model based cost-utility analysis was performed from a society perspective of a hypothetical cohort of 20-year-old males presenting with penetrating trauma and transported to a US hospital. The analysis compared PHSI with observation alone. The probabilities of spine injuries, costs (US 2010 dollars), and utility of the two groups were derived from published studies and public data. Incremental effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life-years. Subset analyses of isolated head and neck injuries as well as sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the strength of the recommendations. Only 0.2% of penetrating trauma produced unstable spine injury, and only 7.4% of the patients with unstable spine injury who underwent spine stabilization had neurologic improvement. The total lifetime per-patient cost was $930,446 for the PHSI group versus $929,883 for the nonimmobilization group, with no difference in overall quality-adjusted life-years. Subset analysis demonstrated that PHSI for patients with isolated head or neck injuries provided equivocal benefit over nonimmobilization. PHSI was not cost-effective for patients with torso or extremity penetrating trauma. Despite increased incidence of unstable spine injures produced by penetrating head or neck injuries, the cost-benefit of PHSI in these patients is equivocal, and further studies may be needed before omitting PHSI in patients with penetrating head and neck injuries. Economic and value-based evaluation

  11. Inadequate needle thoracostomy rate in the prehospital setting for presumed pneumothorax: an ultrasound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaivas, Michael

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of inadequate needle chest thoracostomy in the prehospital setting in trauma patients suspected of having a pneumothorax (PTX) on the basis of physical examination. This study took place at a level I trauma center. All trauma patients arriving via emergency medical services with a suspected PTX and a needle thoracostomy were evaluated for a PTX with bedside ultrasound. Patients too unstable for ultrasound evaluation before tube thoracostomy were excluded, and convenience sampling was used. All patients were scanned while supine. Examinations began at the midclavicular line and included the second through fifth ribs. If no sliding lung sign (SLS) was noted, a PTX was suspected, and the lung point was sought for definitive confirmation. When an SLS was noted throughout and a PTX was ruled out on ultrasound imaging, the thoracostomy catheter was removed. Descriptive statistics were calculated. A total of 57 patients were evaluated over a 3-year period. All had at least 1 needle thoracostomy attempted; 1 patient underwent 3 attempts. Fifteen patients (26%) had a normal SLS on ultrasound examination and no PTX after the thoracostomy catheter was removed. None of the 15 patients were later discovered to have a PTX on subsequent computed tomography. In this study, 26% of patients who received needle thoracostomy in the prehospital setting for a suspected PTX appeared not to have had a PTX originally, nor had 1 induced by the needle thoracostomy. It may be prudent to evaluate such patients with bedside ultrasound instead of automatically converting all needle thoracostomies to tube thoracostomies.

  12. [Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS): An interdisciplinary training in preclinical trauma care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfl, C G; Bouillon, B; Lackner, C K; Wentzensen, A; Gliwitzky, B; Gross, B; Brokmann, J; Hauer, T

    2008-09-01

    There is clinical evidence that standardized management of trauma patients in the emergency department improves outcome. Standardized prehospital management has been established for stroke patients and those suffering acute coronary syndrome. Prehospital treatment of trauma patients differs quite significantly from one system to another. The data from the German Trauma Registry show that the average time from accident until arrival in the emergency department is 72 min. This needs improvement. PHTLS is a training course that teaches a systematic approach to the trauma patient in the preclinical setting. The aim is to rapidly and accurately assess the patient's physiologic status, treat according to priorities, and decide whether the patient is critical and needs rapid rescue and transport. Above all, it is important for caregivers to prevent secondary injury, to realize the relevance of timing in the initial treatment, and to assure a high standard of care. PHTLS provides the participant with knowledge, skills, and necessary behaviors. The course is open to persons in all specialties involved in the initial management of severely injured patients. The German Board of Emergency Technicians e.V. inaugurated the course concept in cooperation with the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMT) and the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and is authorized to organize PHTLS courses in Germany. PHTLS teaches a standardized and established approach to the trauma patient in the emergency department. It has been established in 36 countries and the content is reviewed regularly to consider new scientific evidence. Healthcare personnel in Germany have the chance to participate in this international standard of care and to introduce their own experiences into the review process.

  13. Defining Components of Team Leadership and Membership in Prehospital Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Remle P; Wagoner, Robert L; Rodriguez, Severo A; Bentley, Melissa A; Page, David

    2017-01-01

    Teamwork is critical for patient and provider safety in high-stakes environments, including the setting of prehospital emergency medical services (EMS). We sought to describe the components of team leadership and team membership on a single patient call where multiple EMS providers are present. We conducted a two-day focus group with nine subject matter experts in crew resource management (CRM) and EMS using a structured nominal group technique (NGT). The specific question posed to the group was, "What are the specific components of team leadership and team membership on a single patient call where multiple EMS providers are present?" After round-robin submission of ideas and in-depth discussion of the meaning of each component, participants voted on the most important components of team leadership and team membership. Through the NGT process, we identified eight components of team leadership: a) creates an action plan; b) communicates; c) receives, processes, verifies, and prioritizes information; d) reconciles incongruent information; e) demonstrates confidence, compassion, maturity, command presence, and trustworthiness; f) takes charge; g) is accountable for team actions and outcomes; and h) assesses the situation and resources and modifies the plan. The eight essential components of team membership identified included: a) demonstrates followership, b) maintains situational awareness, c) demonstrates appreciative inquiry, d) does not freelance, e) is an active listener, f) accurately performs tasks in a timely manner, g) is safety conscious and advocates for safety at all times, and h) leaves ego and rank at the door. This study used a highly structured qualitative technique and subject matter experts to identify components of teamwork essential for prehospital EMS providers. These findings and may be used to help inform the development of future EMS training and assessment initiatives.

  14. Advance Directives and Communication Skills of Prehospital Physicians Involved in the Care of Cardiovascular Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigon, Fabienne; Merlani, Paolo; Ricou, Bara

    2015-12-01

    Advance directives (AD) were developed to respect patient autonomy. However, very few patients have AD, even in cases when major cardiovascular surgery is to follow. To understand the reasons behind the low prevalence of AD and to help decision making when patients are incompetent, it is necessary to focus on the impact of prehospital practitioners, who may contribute to an increase in AD by discussing them with patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate self-rated communication skills and the attitudes of physicians potentially involved in the care of cardiovascular patients toward AD.Self-administered questionnaires were sent to general practitioners, cardiologists, internists, and intensivists, including the Quality of Communication Score, divided into a General Communication score (QOCgen 6 items) and an End-of-life Communication score (QOCeol 7 items), as well as questions regarding opinions and practices in terms of AD.One hundred sixty-four responses were received. QOCgen (mean (±SD)): 9.0/10 (1.0); QOCeol: 7.2/10 (1.7). General practitioners most frequently start discussions about AD (74/149 [47%]) and are more prone to designate their own specialty (30/49 [61%], P communication skills as good, whereas end-of-life communication was rated much lower. Only half of those surveyed speak about AD with cardiovascular patients. The majority would prefer that physicians of another specialty, most frequently general practitioners, initiate conversation about AD. In order to increase prehospital AD incidence, efforts must be centered on improving practitioners' communication skills regarding death, by providing trainings to allow physicians to feel more at ease when speaking about end-of-life issues.

  15. Comparison between two mobile pre-hospital care services for trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonsaga Ricardo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Pre-hospital care (PH in Brazil is currently in the phase of implementation and expansion, and there are few studies on the impacts of this public health service. The purpose of this study is to assess the quality of care and severity of trauma among the population served, using trauma scores, attendance response times, and mortality rates. This work compares two pre-hospital systems: the Mobile Emergency Care Service, or SAMU 192, and the Fire Brigade Group, or CB. Method Descriptive study evaluating all patients transported by both systems in Catanduva, SP, admitted to a single hospital. Results 850 patients were included, most of whom were men (67.5%; the mean age was 38.5 ± 18.5 years. Regarding the use of PH systems, most patients were transported by SAMU (62.1%. The trauma mechanisms involved motorcycle accidents in 32.7% of cases, transferred predominantly by SAMU, followed by falls (25.8%. Regarding the response time, CB showed the lowest rates. In relation to patient outcome, only 15.5% required hospitalization. The average score on the Glasgow Coma Scale was 14.7 ± 1.3; average RTS was 7.7 ± 0.7; ISS 3.8 ± 5.9; and average TRISS 97.6 ± 9.3. The data analysis showed no statistical differences in mortality between the groups studied (SAMU - 1.5%; CB - 2.5%. The trauma scores showed a higher severity of trauma among the fatal victims. Conclusion Trauma victims are predominantly young and male; the trauma mechanism that accounted for the majority of PH cases was motorcycle accidents; CB responded more quickly than SAMU; and there was no statistical difference between the services of SAMU and CB in terms of severity of the trauma and mortality rates.

  16. [Factors affecting the survival of transplants from donors after prehospital cardiac death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos Rodríguez, Alonso Antonio; Andrés Belmonte, Amado; Del Río Gallegos, Francisco; Coll, Elisabeth

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate factors that influence the survival of transplanted organs from donors after prehospital cardiac death. Retrospective observational study of data collected from hospital emergency service records. Information included prehospital cardiac deaths evaluated as donors as well as patients who received transplants. Two hundred cases from 2008 through 2011 were studied. Sixty-nine potential donors (34.5%) were rejected. Three hundred organs were extracted from the remaining 131 donor cases, to yield a mean (SD) of 2.32 (0.83) transplanted organs/donor or 1.52 (1.29) organs/potential donor. One hundred fifty-two potential donors (76%) were treated with mechanical cardiopumps during transport. We detected no significant differences between cases transported with manual chest compressions and cases treated with cardiopumps regarding age (40.1 vs 43.5 years, P=.06), responder arrival times (13 min 54 s vs 12 min 54 s, P=.45), or transport times (1 h 27 min vs 1 h 32 min). However, case transported with manual chest compressions yielded significantly more kidneys (mean, 1.96/potential donor) than those transported with cardiopump compressions (mean, 1.38/potential donor) (P=.008). Eleven of the 229 kidneys harvested (4%) were not transplanted. The median (interquartile range) serum creatinine concentrations after kidney transplants at 6 and 12 months, respectively, were 1.37 (1.10-1.58) mg/dL and 1.43 (1.11-1.80) mg/dL. Our findings suggest that the use of a cardiopump reduces donor recruitment. Long-term creatinine levels are similar after transplantation of kidneys from donors transported with a cardiopump or with manual compressions.

  17. Cost-benefit analysis of telehealth in pre-hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langabeer, James R; Champagne-Langabeer, Tiffany; Alqusairi, Diaa; Kim, Junghyun; Jackson, Adria; Persse, David; Gonzalez, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Objective There has been very little use of telehealth in pre-hospital emergency medical services (EMS), yet the potential exists for this technology to transform the current delivery model. In this study, we explore the costs and benefits of one large telehealth EMS initiative. Methods Using a case-control study design and both micro- and gross-costing data from the Houston Fire Department EMS electronic patient care record system, we conducted a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) comparing costs with potential savings associated with patients treated through a telehealth-enabled intervention. The intervention consisted of telehealth-based consultation between the 911 patient and an EMS physician, to evaluate and triage the necessity for patient transport to a hospital emergency department (ED). Patients with non-urgent, primary care-related conditions were then scheduled and transported by alternative means to an affiliated primary care clinic. We measured CBA as both total cost savings and cost per ED visit averted, in US Dollars ($USD). Results In total, 5570 patients were treated over the first full 12 months with a telehealth-enabled care model. We found a 6.7% absolute reduction in potentially medically unnecessary ED visits, and a 44-minute reduction in total ambulance back-in-service times. The average cost for a telehealth patient was $167, which was a statistically significantly $103 less than the control group ( p cost savings from the societal perspective, or $2468 cost savings per ED visit averted (benefit). Conclusion Patient care enabled by telehealth in a pre-hospital environment, is a more cost effective alternative compared to the traditional EMS 'treat and transport to ED' model.

  18. First responder performance in pediatric trauma: a comparison with an adult cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankole, Sunday; Asuncion, Arsenia; Ross, Steven; Aghai, Zubair; Nollah, Laura; Echols, Heather; Da-Silva, Shonola

    2011-07-01

    Is the prehospital care of injured children comparable with adult standards? This question has been asked repeatedly by many clinicians, yet there are no definite answers. To evaluate the prehospital care provided by first responders to pediatric patients (12 yrs of age) to determine whether the emergency medical services providers are able to adequately assess the children and provide emergency services comparable with adult standards. A retrospective 4-yr review of pediatric (n = 102) and adult (n = 99) patients with head injury and Glasgow coma scale score <15 who were treated at a level 1 trauma center. Emergency medical service interventions such as intravenous access, endotracheal intubation, and fluid resuscitation were reviewed. Patients who required further intervention on arrival at the trauma center either from nonperformance of a required procedure or complications arising from such procedures were documented. There were 102 pediatric and 99 adult patients included in the final analysis. Injury severity based on Glasgow coma scale score was not different between the groups. A total of 91 patients, 52 adults (52.5%) and 39 children (38.2%), needed endotracheal intubation at the scene. Significantly more pediatric patients had problems with intubation, 27 children (69.2%) vs. 11 adults (21.2%), p < .001.Intravenous access was successfully established in 85.9% of adults compared to 65.7% in children at the scene (p = .001). Consequently, on arrival at the trauma center, more children required intravenous access, 80.4% compared with 63.6% for adults (p = .011). As a result, more children (25.5%) required initial or additional fluid bolus at the trauma center compared with adults (9.1%, p = .003). Prehospital care of children is suboptimal compared with adults in areas of endotracheal intubation, establishment of peripheral intravenous access, and fluid resuscitation.

  19. Are degenerative rotator cuff disorders a cause of shoulder pain? Comparison of prevalence of degenerative rotator cuff disease to prevalence of nontraumatic shoulder pain through three systematic and critical reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Karl; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Gagey, Olivier

    2017-05-01

    The role of degeneration is not well understood for rotator cuff pain. If age-related degenerative changes would be the cause of symptoms, degeneration would precede or concur with self-reported pain. We performed 3 systematic literature reviews. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence estimates for rotator cuff partial or complete tears (1) in cadavers and (2) in the general population and (3) to estimate the incidence/prevalence of self-reported nontraumatic shoulder pain in the general population in order to compare their respective age-related profiles. We searched PubMed and ScienceDirect, including 2015, for cadaveric studies and transverse and longitudinal studies of the general population reporting the incidence/prevalence of rotator cuff disorders or nontraumatic shoulder pain, or both, according to age. The review process followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Results were interpreted visually. We found 6 cadaveric studies, 2 studies from the general population reporting complete tears, and 10 articles on nontraumatic shoulder pain in the general population that met our criteria. The profiles of degeneration vs. pain were very similar in early years. Although degenerative rotators cuff lesions increased gradually after 50 years, the incidence/prevalence of nontraumatic shoulder pain decreased after 65 years. The profile of age-related degenerative rotator cuff disorders fails to correlate systematically with self-reported nontraumatic shoulder pain, particularly in older age; thus, it appears that degeneration should not be considered the primary source of the pain. Physical activity may play an important role in the production of the pain, a theory that warrants further study. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. ROC trials update on prehospital hypertonic saline resuscitation in the aftermath of the US-Canadian trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Dubick

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this review are to assess the current state of hypertonic saline as a prehospital resuscitation fluid in hypotensive trauma patients, particularly after the 3 major Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium trauma trials in the US and Canada were halted due to futility. Hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury are the leading causes of death in both military and civilian populations. Prehospital fluid resuscitation remains controversial in civilian trauma, but small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic fluids is of utility in military scenarios with prolonged or delayed evacuation times. A large body of pre-clinical and clinical literature has accumulated over the past 30 years on the hemodynamic and, most recently, the anti-inflammatory properties of hypertonic saline, alone or with dextran-70. This review assesses the current state of hypertonic fluid resuscitation in the aftermath of the failed Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium trials.

  1. Establishing a successful pre-hospital emergency service in a developing country: experience from Rescue 1122 service in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Hunniya; Naseer, Rizwan; Razzak, Junaid Abdul

    2011-06-01

    As in many other developing countries, emergency medical services, especially pre-hospital emergency care, has long been neglected in Pakistan. Consequently, patients are brought to the emergency departments by relatives or bystanders in private cars, taxis or any other readily available mode of transportation. Ambulances, where they exist, have barely a stretcher and arrangements for oxygen supply. Modern emergency services are considered too costly for many countries. A model of pre-hospital emergency services, called Rescue 1122 and established in Punjab province of Pakistan, is presented. The system is supported by government funding and provides a quality service. The article describes the process of establishment of the service, the organisational structure, the scope of services and the role it is currently playing in the healthcare of the region it serves.

  2. Definitive airway management of patients presenting with a pre-hospital inserted King LT(S)-D laryngeal tube airway: a historical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Arun; Garcia-Marcinkiewicz, Annery G; Brown, Daniel R; Brown, Michael J; Diedrich, Daniel A

    2016-03-01

    The King LT(S)-D laryngeal tube (King LT) has gained popularity as a bridge airway for pre-hospital airway management. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the use of the King LT and its associated airway outcomes at a single Level 1 trauma centre. The data on all adult patients presenting to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota with a King LT in situ from July 1, 2007 to October 10, 2012 were retrospectively evaluated. Data collected and descriptively analyzed included patient demographics, comorbidities, etiology of respiratory failure, airway complications, subsequent definitive airway management technique, duration of mechanical ventilation, and status at discharge. Forty-eight adult patients met inclusion criteria. The most common etiology for respiratory failure requiring an artificial airway was cardiac arrest [28 (58%) patients] or trauma [9 (19%) patients]. Four of the nine trauma patients had facial trauma. Surgical tracheostomy was the definitive airway management technique in 14 (29%) patients. An airway exchange catheter, direct laryngoscopy, and video laryngoscopy were used in 11 (23%), ten (21%), and ten (21%) cases, respectively. Seven (78%) of the trauma patients underwent surgical tracheostomy compared with seven (18%) of the medical patients. Adverse events associated with King LT use occurred in 13 (27%) patients, with upper airway edema (i.e., tongue engorgement and glottic edema) being most common (19%). In this study of patients presenting to a hospital with a King LT, the majority of airway exchanges required an advanced airway management technique beyond direct laryngoscopy. Upper airway edema was the most common adverse observation associated with King LT use.

  3. Is mechanism of injury alone in the prehospital setting a predictor of major trauma – a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle Malcolm J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature identifying mechanism of injury came to prominence in the mid to late 1980s. The current Victorian prehospital triage guidelines do not necessarily reflect the conditions within the Victorian population as the triage guidelines are based on studies undertaken and validated in the U.S.A. The objective of this study was to identify the mechanism of injury alone literature and the predictability of the mechanism criteria. Methods A search of the prehospital related electronic databases was undertaken utilising the Ovid and EMASE systems available through the Monash University library. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE databases were searched from their beginning until the end of June 2006. Selected non-electronic listed prehospital journals were hand searched. References from articles gathered were reviewed. Results The electronic database search located 203 articles for review. Three additional articles were identified from the reference lists. Of these articles 17 were considered relevant. After reviewing the articles only five provided sufficient information about mechanism of injury alone and its triage capability. None of the articles identified mechanism of injury criteria as a good predictor of major trauma. Conclusion This study identified only five articles on the predictability of the mechanism of injury criteria alone. All studies stated that the mechanism of injury criteria alone are not good predictors of major trauma or the need for trauma team activation. This study was the precursor of a Victorian prehospital study to determine the predictability of the mechanism of injury alone criteria for trauma patients in the Australian context.

  4. A consensus-based template for uniform reporting of data from pre-hospital advanced airway management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollid, Stephen J M; Lockey, David; Lossius, Hans Morten

    2009-11-20

    Advanced airway management is a critical intervention that can harm the patient if performed poorly. The available literature on this subject is rich, but it is difficult to interpret due to a huge variability and poor definitions. Several initiatives from large organisations concerned with airway management have recently propagated the need for guidelines and standards in pre-hospital airway management. Following the path of other initiatives to establish templates for uniform data reporting, like the many Utstein-style templates, we initiated and carried out a structured consensus process with international experts to establish a set of core data points to be documented and reported in cases of advanced pre-hospital airway management. A four-step modified nominal group technique process was employed. The inclusion criterion for the template was defined as any patient for whom the insertion of an advanced airway device or ventilation was attempted. The data points were divided into three groups based on their relationship to the intervention, including system-, patient-, and post-intervention variables, and the expert group agreed on a total of 23 core data points. Additionally, the group defined 19 optional variables for which a consensus could not be achieved or the data were considered as valuable but not essential. We successfully developed an Utstein-style template for documenting and reporting pre-hospital airway management. The core dataset for this template should be included in future studies on pre-hospital airway management to produce comparable data across systems and patient populations and will be implemented in systems that are influenced by the expert panel.

  5. A consensus-based template for uniform reporting of data from pre-hospital advanced airway management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockey David

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advanced airway management is a critical intervention that can harm the patient if performed poorly. The available literature on this subject is rich, but it is difficult to interpret due to a huge variability and poor definitions. Several initiatives from large organisations concerned with airway management have recently propagated the need for guidelines and standards in pre-hospital airway management. Following the path of other initiatives to establish templates for uniform data reporting, like the many Utstein-style templates, we initiated and carried out a structured consensus process with international experts to establish a set of core data points to be documented and reported in cases of advanced pre-hospital airway management. Methods A four-step modified nominal group technique process was employed. Results The inclusion criterion for the template was defined as any patient for whom the insertion of an advanced airway device or ventilation was attempted. The data points were divided into three groups based on their relationship to the intervention, including system-, patient-, and post-intervention variables, and the expert group agreed on a total of 23 core data points. Additionally, the group defined 19 optional variables for which a consensus could not be achieved or the data were considered as valuable but not essential. Conclusion We successfully developed an Utstein-style template for documenting and reporting pre-hospital airway management. The core dataset for this template should be included in future studies on pre-hospital airway management to produce comparable data across systems and patient populations and will be implemented in systems that are influenced by the expert panel.

  6. Prehospital trauma life support training of ambulance caregivers and the outcomes of traffic-injury victims in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Hans; Svennblad, Bodil; Michaelsson, Karl; Byberg, Liisa; Johansson, Jakob; Gedeborg, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    There is limited evidence that the widely implemented Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) educational program improves patient outcomes. The primary aim of this national study in Sweden was to investigate the association between regional implementation of PHTLS training and mortality after traffic injuries. We extracted information from the Swedish National Patient Registry and the Cause of Death Registry on victims of motor-vehicle traffic injuries in Sweden from 2001 to 2004 (N = 28,041). During this time period, PHTLS training was implemented at a varying pace in different regions. To control for other influences on patient outcomes related to regional and hospital-level effects, such as variations in performance of trauma care systems, we used Bayesian hierarchical regression models to estimate odds ratios for prehospital mortality and 30-day mortality after hospital admission. We also controlled for the calendar year for each injury to account for period effects. We analyzed the time to death after hospital admission and time to return to work using Cox's proportional hazards frailty models. After multivariable adjustment, the odds ratio for prehospital mortality with PHTLS-trained prehospital staff was 1.54 (95% credibility interval, 1.07-2.13). For 30-day mortality among those surviving to hospital admission, the odds ratio was 0.85 (95% credibility interval, 0.45-1.48). There was no association between PHTLS training and time to death (hazard ratio = 0.99; 95% CI, 0.85-1.14) or time to return to work (hazard ratio = 0.98; 95% CI, 0.92-1.05). In this observational study, the implementation of PHTLS training did not appear to be associated with reduced mortality or ability to return to work after motor-vehicle traffic injuries. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of a thoracic ultrasound training module for the detection of pneumothorax and pulmonary edema by prehospital physician care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Jean-Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While ultrasound (US has continued to expedite diagnosis and therapy for critical care physicians inside the hospital system, the technology has been slow to diffuse into the pre-hospital system. Given the diagnostic benefits of thoracic ultrasound (TUS, we sought to evaluate image recognition skills for two important TUS applications; the identification of B-lines (used in the US diagnosis of pulmonary edema and the identification of lung sliding and comet tails (used in the US diagnosis of pneumothorax. In particular we evaluated the impact of a focused training module in a pre-hospital system that utilizes physicians as pre-hospital providers. Methods 27 Paris Service D'Aide Médicale Urgente (SAMU physicians at the Hôpital Necker with varying levels of US experience were given two twenty-five image recognition pre-tests; the first test had examples of both normal and pneumothorax lung US and the second had examples of both normal and pulmonary edema lung US. All 27 physicians then underwent the same didactic training modules. A post-test was administered upon completing the training module and results were recorded. Results Pre and post-test scores were compared for both the pneumothorax and the pulmonary edema modules. For the pneumothorax module, mean test scores increased from 10.3 +/- 4.1 before the training to 20.1 +/- 3.5 after (p Conclusion This brief training module resulted in significant improvement of image recognition skills for physicians both with and without previous ultrasound experience. Given that rapid diagnosis of these conditions in the pre-hospital system can change therapy, especially in systems where physicians can integrate this information into treatment decisions, the further diffusion of this technology would seem to be beneficial and deserves further study.

  8. Prehospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac arrest (PaRAMeDIC) trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    McCabe Chris; Lamb Sarah E; Lall Ranjit; Horton Jessica; Deakin Charles; Cooke Matthew W; Woollard Malcolm; Perkins Gavin D; Quinn Tom; Slowther Anne; Gates Simon

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is closely linked to the quality of CPR, but in real life, resuscitation during prehospital care and ambulance transport is often suboptimal. Mechanical chest compression devices deliver consistent chest compressions, are not prone to fatigue and could potentially overcome some of the limitations of manual chest compression. However, there is no high-quality evidence that they improve clinical outcomes, or that they are cost ef...

  9. Prehospital cooling of severe burns: Experience of the Emergency Department at Edendale Hospital, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiandeiro, D; Govindsamy, J; Maharaj, R C

    2015-06-01

    Early cooling with 10 - 20 minutes of cool running water up to 3 hours after a burn has a direct impact on the depth of the burn and therefore on the clinical outcome of the injury. An assessment of the early cooling of burns is essential to improve this aspect of burns management. To assess the rates and adequacy of prehospital cooling received by patients with severe burns before presentation to the Emergency Department (ED) at Edendale Hospital, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. Patients with inadequate prehospital cooling who presented to the ED within 3 hours were also identified. A retrospective reviewof the burns database for all the patients with severe burns admitted from the ED at Edendale Hospital from September 2012 to August 2013 was undertaken. Demographic details, characteristics and timing of the burns, and presentation were correlated with burn cooling. Ninety patients were admitted with severe burns. None received sufficient cooling of their burns, 25.6% received cooling of inadequate duration, and 32.3% arrived at the ED within 3 hours after the burn with either inadequate or no cooling. The median time to presentation to the ED after the burn was 260 minutes. Appropriate cooling of severe burns presenting to Edendale Hospital is inadequate. Education of the community and prehospital healthcare workers about the iiportance of early appropriate cooling of severe burns is required. Many patients would benefit from cooling of their burns in the ED, and facilities should be provided for this vital function.

  10. Experience in Prehospital Emergency of Acute Abdomen%急腹症的院前急救体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国成

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the prehospital first-aid and effect of acute abdomen. Methods:78 cases of acute abdomen adopted prehospital emer-gency, and then sent to emergency room of hospital, observing the prognosis of patients. Results:75 patients were successfully rescued and cured, 3 patients died in the intensive care unit because of excessive hemorrhage. Conclusion:Timely and effective prehospital emergency measures can in-crease the successful rescue rate of acute abdomen, and improve the prognosis.%目的:探讨急腹症患者入院前的急救方法和效果。方法:78例急腹症患者进行院前急救后送医院急救室,观察患者预后。结果:75例患者抢救成功并治愈出院,3例患者在重症监护室抢救时因失血过多死亡。结论:及时有效的院前急救措施可提高急腹症患者的抢救成功率,改善其预后。

  11. Between professional values and the social valuation of patients: the fluctuating economy of pre-hospital emergency work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurok, Michael; Henckes, Nicolas

    2009-02-01

    A number of authors have shown how medical decisions are influenced by social values; others have minimized the putative influence of values and have argued that medical decisions are predominantly constrained by the organization of medical work. Based on fieldwork in France and the USA observing pre-hospital resuscitations, we seek to resolve these views by showing that while judgments about the social value of a patient do influence professional decisions, so do judgments about the work that must be accomplished to manage a case. Pre-hospital emergency work has many facets that are variably valued by different professionals at different moments of an emergency's trajectory. These values compete with each other in what we call a "fluctuating economy". This article analyses the role of social, technical, medical or surgical, heroic, and competence values in the course of pre-hospital emergency work. We show how these values may conflict or align with each other, forcing professionals to constantly establish priorities during an emergency trajectory.

  12. The implementation and evaluation of an evidence-based statewide prehospital pain management protocol developed using the national prehospital evidence-based guideline model process for emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathleen M; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Alcorta, Richard; Weik, Tasmeen S; Lawner, Ben; Ho, Shiu; Wright, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration funded the development of a model process for the development and implementation of evidence-based guidelines (EBGs) for emergency medical services (EMS). We report on the implementation and evaluation of an evidence-based prehospital pain management protocol developed using this model process. An evidence-based protocol for prehospital management of pain resulting from injuries and burns was reviewed by the Protocol Review Committee (PRC) of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS). The PRC recommended revisions to the Maryland protocol that reflected recommendations in the EBG: weight-based dosing and repeat dosing of morphine. A training curriculum was developed and implemented using Maryland's online Learning Management System and successfully accessed by 3,941 paramedics and 15,969 BLS providers. Field providers submitted electronic patient care reports to the MIEMSS statewide prehospital database. Inclusion criteria were injured or burned patients transported by Maryland ambulances to Maryland hospitals whose electronic patient care records included data for level of EMS provider training during a 12-month preimplementation period and a 12-month postimplementation period from September 2010 through March 2012. We compared the percentage of patients receiving pain scale assessments and morphine, as well as the dose of morphine administered and the use of naloxone as a rescue medication for opiate use, before and after the protocol change. No differences were seen in the percentage of patients who had a pain score documented or the percent of patients receiving morphine before and after the protocol change, but there was a significant increase in the total dose and dose in mg/kg administered per patient. During the postintervention phase, patients received an 18% higher total morphine dose and a 14.9% greater mg/kg dose. We demonstrated that the implementation of a revised

  13. Number of test trials needed for performance stability and interrater reliability of the one leg stand test in patients with a major non-traumatic lower limb amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Nielsen, Anni Østergaard; Madsen Topp, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Balance is beneficial for daily functioning of patients with a lower limb amputation and sometimes assessed by the one-leg stand test (OLST). The aims of the study were to examine (1) the number of trials needed to achieve performance stability, (2) the interrater reliability of the OLST in patie......Balance is beneficial for daily functioning of patients with a lower limb amputation and sometimes assessed by the one-leg stand test (OLST). The aims of the study were to examine (1) the number of trials needed to achieve performance stability, (2) the interrater reliability of the OLST...... in patients with a major non-traumatic lower limb amputation, and (3) to provide a test procedure....

  14. Clinical Course of Non-Traumatic Non-Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Single Institution Experience over 10 Years and Review of the Contemporary Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcakaya, Mehmet Osman; Aydoseli, Aydın; Aras, Yavuz; Sabanci, Pulat Akın; Barburoglu, Mehmet; Alkir, Gorkem; Sencer, Altay; Sencer, Serra; Aydin, Kubilay; Kiris, Talat; Hepgul, Kemal; Unal, Omer Faruk; Barlas, Orhan; Izgi, Nail

    2017-01-01

    To report our experience with a relatively large series of patients with non-traumatic non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (NNSAH) to identify the prognosis associated with different bleeding patterns as well as a further diagnostic work-up to determine the underlying cause. Between January 2004 and December 2014, 81 patients with angiography-negative non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were treated at our institution. Diagnosis was confirmed with a typical history of spontaneous SAH and cranial computed tomography (CT) scan or lumbar puncture (LP). The patients were grouped according to the bleeding pattern on the CT scan: Group 1: Perimesencephalic (PM) SAH (n=33, 40.7%); Group 2: Non-perimesencephalic (nPM) SAH (n=41, 50.6%); and Group 3: CT-negative NNSAH (n=7, 8.6%). The clinical course, hospitalization period, and complications were noted. All patients underwent an initial four-vessel digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), repeat DSA investigations and spinal MRI were performed in all patients. The mean hospital stays were 6.3, 14.7 and 10.1 days for patient groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The mortality rate was 1.2% (1 patient) in our series. Repeat DSA investigations were positive in two patients (2.5%), both from Group 2 (4.9%). Cranial MRI revealed 100% negative results. Spinal MRI revealed positive results in three patients from Group 2 (7.3%). We suggest our diagnostic work-up for patients with nPM-SAH, namely repeat DSA and spinal MRI, until an evidence-based guideline is established for the patient management.

  15. Prehospital evaluation and economic analysis of different coronary syndrome treatment strategies--PREDICT--rationale, development and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Laurie J; Rac, Valeria E; Bowen, James M; Schwartz, Brian; Perreira, Tyrone; Ryan, Welson; Zahn, Cathy; Chadha, Rishab; Craig, Alan; O'Reilly, Daria; Goeree, Ron

    2011-03-29

    A standard of prehospital care for patients presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) includes prehospital 12-lead and advance Emergency Department notification or prehospital bypass to percutaneous coronary intervention centres. Implementation of either care strategies is variable across communities and neither may exist in some communities. The main objective is to compare prehospital care strategies for time to treatment and survival outcomes as well as cost effectiveness. PREDICT is a multicentre, prospective population-based cohort study of all chest pain patients 18 years or older presenting within 30 mins to 6 hours of symptom onset and treated with nitroglycerin, transported by paramedics in a number of different urban and rural regions in Ontario. The primary objective of this study is to compare the proportion of study subjects who receive reperfusion within the target door-to-reperfusion times in subjects obtained after four prehospital strategies: 12-lead ECG and advance emergency department (ED) notification or 3-lead ECG monitoring and alert to dispatch prior to hospital arrival; either with or without the opportunity to bypass to a PCI centre. We anticipate four challenges to successful study implementation and have developed strategies for each: 1) diversity in the interpretation of the ethical and privacy issues across 47 research ethics boards/committees covering 71 hospitals, 2) remote oversight of data guardian abstraction, 3) timeliness of implementation, and 4) potential interference in the study by concurrent technological advances. Research ethics approvals from academic centres were obtained initially and submitted to non academic centre applications. Data guardians were trained by a single investigator and data entry is informed by a detailed data dictionary including variable definitions and abstraction instructions and subjected to error and logic checks. Quality oversight provided by a single investigator. The

  16. Prehospital administered fascia iliaca compartment block by emergency medical service nurses, a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients with a proximal femur fracture are often difficult to evacuate from the accident scene. Prehospital pain management for this vulnerable group of patients may be challenging. Multiple co-morbidities, polypharmacy and increased age may limit the choice of suitable analgesics. The fascia iliaca compartment (FIC) block may be an alternative to intravenous analgesics. However this peripheral nerve block is mainly applied by physicians. In the Netherlands, prehospital emergency care is mostly provided by EMS-nurses. Therefore we examined whether well-trained EMS-nurses are able to successfully perform a FIC block in order to ensure timely and appropriate effective analgesia. The study was study was registered in the Netherlands Trial Register (NTR-nr 3824). Methods Ten EMS nurses were educated in the performance of a FIC-block. Indications, technique, side-effects and complications were discussed. Hereafter the trained EMS-nurses staffed ambulance teams were dispatched to patients with a suspicion for a proximal femur fracture. After confirmation of the diagnosis, the block was performed and 0.3 ml/kg lidocaine (10 mg/ml) with adrenaline 5 μg/ml was injected. The quality of pain relief, occurrence of complications and patient satisfaction were evaluated. Results In 108 patients a block was performed. One hundred patients could be included. Every EMS nurse performed at least 10 FIC blocks. The block was effective in 96 patients. The initial median (NRS)-pain score decreased after block performance to a score of 6 (after 10 minutes), 4 (after 20 minutes) and 3 (after 30 minutes). At arrival at the Emergency Department the median pain score was 3. Dynamic NRS-pain scores when transferring the patient from the accident scene to the ambulance stretcher, during transportation to the hospital and when transferring the patient to a hospital bed were, 4, 3 and 3.5 respectively. Patient satisfaction was very high. No complications were noted

  17. Perceptions on the effectiveness of treatment and the timeline of Buruli ulcer influence pre-hospital delay reported by healthy individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marike Alferink

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Delay in seeking treatment at the hospital is a major challenge in current Buruli ulcer control; it is associated with severe sequelae and functional limitations. Choosing alternative treatment and psychological, social and practical factors appear to influence delay. Objectives were to determine potential predictors for pre-hospital delay with Leventhal's commonsense model of illness representations, and to explore whether the type of available dominant treatment modality influenced individuals' perceptions about BU, and therefore, influenced pre-hospital delay. METHODOLOGY: 130 healthy individuals aged >18 years, living in BU-endemic areas in Benin without any history of BU were included in this cross-sectional study. Sixty four participants from areas where surgery was the dominant treatment and sixty six participants from areas where antibiotic treatment was the dominant treatment modality were recruited. Using a semi-structured interview we measured illness perceptions (IPQ-R, knowledge about BU, background variables and estimated pre-hospital delay. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The individual characteristics 'effectiveness of treatment' and 'timeline acute-chronic' showed the strongest association with pre-hospital delay. No differences were found between regions where surgery was the dominant treatment and regions where antibiotics were the dominant treatment modality. CONCLUSIONS: Individual characteristics, not anticipated treatment modality appeared predictors of pre-hospital delay.

  18. The efficacy of hydrogel dressings as a first aid measure for burn wound management in the pre-hospital setting: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Nicholas S; Spinks, Anneliese; Wasiak, Jason

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to determine the supporting evidence for the clinical use of hydrogel dressings as a first aid measure for burn wound management in the pre-hospital setting. Two authors searched three databases (Ovid Medline, Ovid Embase and The Cochrane Library) for relevant English language articles published through September 2014. Reference lists, conference proceedings and non-indexed academic journals were manually searched. A separate search was conducted using the Internet search engine Google to source additional studies from burns advisory agencies, first aid bodies, military institutions, manufacturer and paramedic websites. Two authors independently assessed study eligibility and relevance of non-traditional data forms for inclusion. Studies were independently assessed and included if Hydrogel-based burn dressings (HBD) were examined in first aid practices in the pre-hospital setting. A total of 129 studies were considered for inclusion, of which no pre-hospital studies were identified. The review highlights that current use of HBD in the pre-hospital setting appears to be driven by sources of information that do not reflect the paramedic environment. We recommend researchers in the pre-hospital settings undertake clinical trials in this field. More so, the review supports the need for expert consensus to identify key demographic, clinical and injury outcomes for clinicians and researchers undertaking further research into the use of dressings as a first aid measure.

  19. Prehospital Intubation in Patients with Isolated Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A 4-Year Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazin Tuma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To study the effect of prehospital intubation (PHI on survival of patients with isolated severe traumatic brain injury (ISTBI. Method. Retrospective analyses of all intubated patients with ISTBI between 2008 and 2011 were studied. Comparison was made between those who were intubated in the PHI versus in the trauma resuscitation unit (TRU. Results. Among 1665 TBI patients, 160 met the inclusion criteria (105 underwent PHI, and 55 patients were intubated in TRU. PHI group was younger in age and had lower median scene motor GCS (P=0.001. Ventilator days and hospital length of stay (P=0.01 and 0.006, resp. were higher in TRUI group. Mean ISS, length of stay, initial blood pressure, pneumonia, and ARDS were comparable among the two groups. Mortality rate was higher in the PHI group (54% versus 31%, P=0.005. On multivariate regression analysis, scene motor GCS (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.41–0.73 was an independent predictor for mortality. Conclusion. PHI did not offer survival benefit in our group of patients with ISTBI based on the head AIS and the scene motor GCS. However, more studies are warranted to prove this finding and identify patients who may benefit from this intervention.

  20. Prehospital Medication Administration: A Randomised Study Comparing Intranasal and Intravenous Routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cian McDermott

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Opioid overdose is an ever-increasing problem globally. Recent studies have demonstrated that intranasal (IN naloxone is a safe and effective alternative to traditional routes of naloxone administration for reversal of opioid overdose. Aims. This randomised controlled trial aimed to compare the time taken to deliver intranasal medication with that of intravenous (IV medication by advanced paramedic trainees. Methods. 18 advanced paramedic trainees administered either an IN or IV medication to a mannequin model in a classroom-based setting. The time taken for medication delivery was compared. End-user satisfaction was assessed using a 5-point questionnaire regarding ease of use and safety for both routes. Results. The mean time taken for the IN and IV group was 87.1 seconds and 178.2 seconds respectively. The difference in mean time taken was 91.1 seconds (95% confidence interval 55.2 seconds to 126.9 seconds, P≤0.0001. 89% of advanced paramedic trainees reported that the IN route was easier and safer to use than the IV route. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that, amongst advanced paramedic trainees, the IN route of medication administration is significantly faster, better accepted and perceived to be safer than using the IV route. Thus, IN medication administration could be considered more frequently when administering emergency medications in a pre-hospital setting.

  1. AToMS: A Ubiquitous Teleconsultation System for Supporting AMI Patients with Prehospital Thrombolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno S. P. M. Correa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The latest population-based studies in the medical literature worldwide indicate that acute myocardial infarction (AMI patients still experience prolonged delay to be rescued, which often results in morbidity and mortality. This paper reports from a technological standpoint a teleconsultation and monitoring system named AToMS. This system addresses the problem of prehospital delivery of thrombolysis to AMI patients by enabling the remote interaction of the paramedics and a cardiologist available at a Coronary Care Unit (CCU. Such interaction allows the diagnosis of the patient eligibility to the immediate application of thrombolysis, which is meant to reduce the delay between the onset of symptoms and the eventual application of proper treatment. Such delay reduction is meant to increase the AMI patient's chances of survival and decrease the risks of postinfarction sequels. The teleconsultation is held with the support of wireless and mobile technologies, which also allows the cardiologist to monitor the patient while he/she is being taken to the nearest CCU. All exchanged messages among paramedics and cardiologists are recorded to render an auditable system. AToMS has been deployed in a first stage in the city of Rio de Janeiro, where the medical team involved in the project has conducted commissioned tests.

  2. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus:An occupational health hazard in the prehospital setting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alaa Al Amiry

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a serious nosocomial infection within healthcare settings, and with its community version worldwide (i.e. community-acquired-MRSA), it is safe now to classify it as an epidemic. The aim of this paper is to build the logic for the reader to understand why this drug-resistant infection can impose an occupational hazard towards emergency health services personnel in the prehospital settings. This logic started with a model, the author conceptualizes as a cross-transmission continuum, in which the author explains the role of emergency medical service personnel in possibly contributing to the transmission of MRSA back and forth the community. A solution to interrupt this continuum, particularly surveillance systems within the emergency medical service field, is suggested and discussed. This is especially important in the light of bioterrorism as surveillance can become a necessity in preparation for biological disasters whether they are intentional (i.e. bioterrorism) or natural (i.e. outbreaks).

  3. Mobile prehospital emergency care: an analysis of implementation in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Gisele; Machado, Cristiani Vieira; Alves, Renan Paes; Salvador, Fernanda Gonçalves

    2016-06-01

    Mobile prehospital care is a key component of emergency care. The aim of this study was to analyze the implementation of the State of Rio de Janeiro's Mobile Emergency Medical Service (SAMU, acronym in Portuguese). The methodology employed included document analysis, visits to six SAMU emergency call centers, and semistructured interviews conducted with 12 local and state emergency care coordinators. The study's conceptual framework was based on Giddens' theory of structuration. Intergovernmental conflicts were observed between the state and municipal governments, and between municipal governments. Despite the shortage of hospital beds, the SAMUs in periphery regions were better integrated with the emergency care network than the metropolitan SAMUs. The steering committees were not very active and weaknesses were observed relating to the limited role played by the state government in funding, management, and monitoring. It was concluded that the SAMU implementation process in the state was marked by political tensions and management and coordination weaknesses. As a result, serious drawbacks remain in the coordination of the SAMU with the other health services and the regionalization of emergency care in the state.

  4. [Prehospital emergency care injuries from external causes in a region of Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Rafael; Bastidas, Daniel; Arteaga, Everilda; Bastidas, Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately 3 500 000 people die every year as a result of injuries from external causes, in Venezuela these arte the third leading cause of overall morbidity. Nevertheless, in the country there are no records of the defining aspects of prehospital emergency care as a tool to address this socio-health problem, the aim of this investigation. A descriptive, transversal, field study based on the information recorded daily for a year paramedics was performed. A total 1493 injured by external causes were reported, with a mean age of 29.5 ± 12 years, 84.5% male. Injuries mostly less-moderate (69.4%) were due to severe land transport accidents (70.9%) occurred during the day (75.9%), between monday and friday (72.9%), attended in 20 minutes or less, and transferred in 97.3% of cases. The economically productive young men in areas with higher population density and urbanism are mostly affected by injuries from external causes. In both genres land transport accidents are the most common causes of injury with lower-moderate severity. The care that paramedics provide can be considered adequate.

  5. Technology for trauma: testing the validity of a smartphone app for pre-hospital clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshwater, Eleanor S; Crouch, Robert

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of regional trauma networks in England, ambulance clinicians have been required to make triage decisions relating to severity of injury, and appropriate destination for the patient, which may require 'bypassing' the nearest Emergency Department. A 'Trauma Unit Bypass Tool' is utilised in this process. The Major Trauma Triage tool smartphone application (App) is a digital representation of a tool, available for clinicians to use on their smartphone. Prior to disseminating the application, validity and performance against the existing paper-based tool was explored. A case-based study using clinical scenarios was conducted. Scenarios, with appropriate triage decisions, were agreed by an expert panel. Ambulance clinicians were assigned to either the paper-based tool or smartphone app group and asked to make a triage decision using the available information. The positive predictive value (PPV) of each tool was calculated. The PPV of the paper tool was 0.76 and 0.86 for the smartphone app. User comments were mainly positive for both tools with no negative comments relating to the smartphone app. The smartphone app version of the Trauma Unit Bypass Tool performs at least as well as the paper version and can be utilised safely by pre-hospital clinicians in supporting triage decisions relating to potential major trauma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploration of key stakeholders' preferences for pre-hospital physiologic monitoring by emergency rescue services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mort, Alasdair J; Rushworth, Gordon F

    2013-12-01

    To gather preferences for novel pre-hospital physiologic monitoring technologies from emergency rescue services. Qualitative semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with three groups from UK Search and Rescue (SAR); (1) Extractors (e.g. SAR teams), (2) Transporters (personnel primarily responsible for casualty transport), and (3) Treaters (e.g. Emergency Department doctors). Three themes were defined; SAR casualty management, novel physiologic monitor potential, and physiologic monitor physical properties. Some SAR groups already employed physiologic monitoring but there was no consensus on which monitor(s) to carry or what to monitor and how frequently. Existing monitors also tended to be bulky and heavy and could be unreliable in an unstable environment or if the casualty was cold. Those performing monitoring tended to have only basic first-aid training, and their workload was often high particularly if there was more than one casualty. The potential benefits of employing a novel monitor were strategic and clinical; an opportunity for transmitting data off-scene in order to facilitate monitoring or generate advice (i.e. telemedicine) was also voiced. A range of more intuitive, physical properties was also raised (e.g. small/compact, lightweight). SAR-specific technology should be simple to operate by those with less medical training, which means that clinical data interpretation and presentation should be carefully considered. It would be beneficial if novel monitors carried out a majority of the interpretation, allowing rescuers to proceed with their priority task of removing the casualty to safety.

  7. Pre-hospital endotracheal intubation and positive pressure ventilation is associated with hypotension and decreased survival in hypovolemic trauma patients: an analysis of the National Trauma Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Shahid; Gentilello, Larry

    2005-11-01

    Studies of pre-hospital endotracheal intubation (ETI) from single EMS systems have shown contradictory results, which may represent local differences in paramedic training and experience. An alternative hypothesis is that positive pressure ventilation increases mortality because positive pressure ventilation causes hypotension in severely injured hypovolemic patients. A national sample (National Trauma Data Bank, 1994-2002) was used to minimize effects of local paramedic training and experience. All patients with pre-hospital GCS 16 (most likely to be hypovolemic) were included. Patients intubated in the field (pre-hospital group, n = 871) and in the emergency department (ED group, n = 6581) were compared. To determine whether pre-hospital ETI was an independent predictor of hypotension and mortality, logistic regression was used to control for potential confounders, including age, ISS, body region injured, AIS scores, pre-hospital IV fluids, and other variables. Physiologic variables were not used, as they may be influenced by ETI and positive pressure ventilation, and were therefore considered outcomes, rather than predictors. Groups were comparable in age, gender, anatomic distribution of injuries, likelihood of at least one severe injury (AIS >3) and other variables, except for head injury (ED 83%, pre-hospital 71%, p intubated in the field were more likely to be hypotensive upon arrival in the ED (SBP predictor of hypotension upon arrival in ED (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.46 -2.09, p endotracheal intubation in trauma patients is associated with hypotension and decreased survival. This may be mediated by the effect of positive pressure ventilation during hypovolemic states.

  8. The development and feasibility of a remote damage control resuscitation prehospital plasma transfusion protocol for warfarin reversal for patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Martin D; Smoot, Dustin L; Stubbs, James R; Jenkins, Donald H; Park, Myung S; Zietlow, Scott P

    2013-01-01

    The rapid reversal of warfarin in the setting of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been associated with improved outcomes. Until now, remote reversal of hypocoagulable states has not been possible in the prehospital environment. This manuscript describes the development and analysis of a prehospital plasma transfusion protocol to reverse warfarin at the earliest possible moment after TBI. A retrospective review of all TBI patients receiving plasma transfusion(s) in the prehospital environment for warfarin reversal between February 2009 and September 2010 was conducted. Thawed plasma was carried on every air ambulance flight centered at the main campus. A total of 2836 flights carried over 2500 units of thawed plasma throughout the study period. During this time, 16 patients received prehospital plasma resuscitation, five of who were on warfarin with a concurrent TBI. The median Injury Severity Score was 17 (8.5-27.5) with a median Glasgow Coma Score of 13 (8-15) and a mortality rate of 40%. A median of 2 (1.5-2.0) units of thawed plasma and 0 (0-0) units of RBCs were transfused en route. The pretransfusion point-of-care international normalized ratio improved from 3.1 (2.3-4.0) to 1.9 (1.3-3.6) upon trauma center admission (serum sample). One hundred percent of the transported, but unused, thawed plasma underwent subsequent transfusion prior to expiration. Remote prehospital plasma transfusions effectively reverse anticoagulation secondary to warfarin administration in TBI patients. It is feasible to transfuse thawed plasma in the prehospital setting via remote damage control techniques without increasing waste. Prospective studies are needed to determine if this practice can improve outcomes in this population. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  9. Availability and utilisation of physician-based pre-hospital critical care support to the NHS ambulance service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Rod; Ng, Gail; Reid, Cliff; Pearson, Gale

    2011-01-01

    Background Every day throughout the UK, ambulance services seek medical assistance in providing critically ill or injured patients with pre-hospital care. Objective To identify the current availability and utilisation of physician-based pre-hospital critical care capability across England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Design A postal and telephone survey was undertaken between April and December 2009 of all 13 regional NHS ambulance services, 17 air ambulance charities, 34 organisations affiliated to the British Association for Immediate Care and 215 type 1 emergency departments in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. The survey focused on the availability and use of physician-based pre-hospital critical care support. Results The response rate was 100%. Although nine NHS ambulance services recorded physician attendance at 6155 incidents, few could quantify doctor availability and utilisation. All but one of the British Association for Immediate Care organisations deployed ‘only when available’ and only 45% of active doctors could provide critical care support. Eleven air ambulance services (65%) operated with a doctor but only 5 (29%) operated 7 days a week. Fifty-nine EDs (27%) had a pre-hospital team but only 5 (2%) had 24 h deployable critical care capability and none were used regularly. Conclusion There is wide geographical and diurnal variability in availability and utilisation of physician-based pre-hospital critical care support. Only London ambulance service has access to NHS-commissioned 24 h physician-based pre-hospital critical care support. Throughout the rest of the UK, extensive use is made of volunteer doctors and charity sector providers of varying availability and capability. PMID:21427108

  10. 院前创伤急救进展:新研究带来的机遇与挑战%Advances in prehospital trauma care: the opportunity and challenge from the new studies in prehospital practices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    都定元

    2012-01-01

    Prehospital trauma care is an important component of all trauma care systems and developed par -allelly over the last decades in many countries . Many prehospital emergency medical service ( EMS) systems rely on experiences from military medicine and are often modeled from military procedures . The definite care of trauma patients needs to start early in the field. The key components to successful prehospital trauma care are the well -known ABCs of trauma care; Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Establishing and maintaining the airway , ventilation, fluid resuscitation, and the quick transport to the closed and appropriate hospital at the right time represented the pillars of trauma care in the field. The classic managements in prehospital trauma care have been challenged by the new stud ?ies. The new techniques , tools and procedures have been developed , which make trauma care easier for the prehospi -tal care provider and improve the outcome of trauma patients .%院前创伤急救是整个创伤救治体系的重要组成部分.大多数院前急救医疗服务(EMS)体系源自于军事医学经验和改进,对于创伤患者的确定性急救自现场就应尽快开始.院前创伤急救成功的关键在"创伤急救ABC":即气道、呼吸、循环,核心是建立并保证气道、通气、液体复苏和快速转运至就近的恰当医院.传统的院前处理面临着新的研究成果的挑战,同时新技术、新方法、新工具的应用也使院前创伤急救变得更加容易,创伤患者的救治结局也得以改善.

  11. Use of the GlideScope®-Ranger for pre-hospital intubations by anaesthesia trained emergency physicians – an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Sebastian G.; Nickel, Eike A.; Leissner, Kay B; Schwerdtfeger, Katrin; Bauer, Martin; Roessler, Markus S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pre-hospital endotracheal intubation is more difficult than in the operating room (OR). Therefore, enhanced airway management devices such as video laryngoscopes may be helpful to improve the success rate of pre-hospital intubation. We describe the use of the Glidescope®-Ranger (GS-R) as an alternative airway tool used at the discretion of the emergency physician (EP) in charge. Methods: During a 3.5 year period, the GS-R was available to be used either as the primary or backup to...

  12. 基因治疗非创伤性股骨头坏死的研究进展%Research progress of gene therapy in the treatment of non-traumatic osteonecrosis of femoral head

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周明旺; 李盛华; 郭铁峰

    2012-01-01

    There are many methods of conservative treatment for early non-traumatic osteonecrosis of femoral head, but still lack of a mature and effective treatment. Gene therapy is a new treatment method for non-traumatic osteonecrosis of femoral head in recent years. This article showed that the non-traumatic osteonecrosis of femoral head related to progress and problems on pathogenesy,molecular biology foundation,exogenous theoretical gene,carrier selection and so on,discussed some problems and countermeasure and future applications.%非创伤性股骨头坏死早期保守治疗方法甚多,但尚缺乏一种成熟有效的治疗方法.基因治疗非创伤性股骨头坏死是近年来新型的治疗方法,本文就该病的发病机制、分子生物学基础、外源性治疗基因与载体选择等方面研究的相关进展及存在问题展开综述,讨论了研究的有关问题及对策,并就研究前景进行了展望.

  13. Derivation and Validation of The Prehospital Difficult Airway IdentificationTool (PreDAIT): A Predictive Model for Difficult Intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jestin N; Hostler, David; Guyette, Francis X; Pinchalk, Mark; Martin-Gill, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Endotracheal intubation (ETI) in the prehospital setting poses unique challenges where multiple ETI attempts are associated with adverse patient outcomes. Early identification of difficult ETI cases will allow providers to tailor airway-management efforts to minimize complications associated with ETI. We sought to derive and validate a prehospital difficult airway identification tool based on predictors of difficult ETI in other settings. We prospectively collected patient and airway data on all airway attempts from 16 Advanced Life Support (ALS) ground emergency medical services (EMS) agencies from January 2011 to October 2014. Cases that required more than two ETI attempts and cases where an alternative airway strategy (e.g. supraglottic airway) was employed after one unsuccessful ETI attempt were categorized as "difficult." We used a random allocation sequence to split the data into derivation and validation subsets. Using backward elimination, factors with a p3 (2.15, 1.19-3.88), limited neck movement (2.24, 1.28-3.93), trismus/jaw clenched (2.24, 1.09-4.6), inability to palpate the landmarks of the neck (5.92, 2.77-12.66), and fluid in the airway such as blood or emesis (2.25, 1.51-3.36). This was the most parsimonious model and exhibited good fit (Hosmer-Lemeshow test p = 0.167) with an AUC of 0.68 (95% CI [0.64-0.73]). When applied to the validation set, the model had an AUC of 0.63 (0.58-0.68) with high specificity for identifying difficult ETI if ≥2 factors were present (87.7% (95% CI [84.1-90.8])). We have developed a simple tool using five factors that may aid prehospital providers in the identification of difficult ETI.

  14. Diagnosis and outcome in a prehospital cohort of patients with bundle branch block and suspected acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengaard, Carsten; Sørensen, Christina Ankjær; Thygesen, Kristian; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Thuesen, Leif; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl

    2013-01-01

    Background: Immediate revascularization is beneficial in patients with presumed new-onset bundle branch block myocardial infarction (BBBMI). In the prehospital setting, it is a challenge to diagnose new-onset BBBMI and triage accordingly. Methods: ECG, final diagnosis, and mortality were assessed in a prehospital cohort of 4905 consecutive patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Bundle branch block (BBB) was defined as QRS duration ≥120 ms caused by delayed intraventricular conduction. Mortality and angiography data were obtained from the Central Office of Civil Registration and the Western Denmark Heart Registry. Definite diagnosis of AMI and the onset of BBB were determined by expert consensus. Patients were divided into four groups: with or without AMI and with or without BBB. Mortality was evaluated by Kaplan–Meier plots and compared using log-rank statistics. Results: AMI was diagnosed in 954 patients, of whom 118 had BBB. In 3951 patients without AMI, 436 had BBB. Patients with BBBMI were less often revascularized than patients with AMI without BBB (24 vs. 54%, p<0.001). BBBMI was categorized as new onset in 43 patients of whom two were triaged for acute angioplasty. One-year mortality was 47.2, 17.5, 20.8, and 8.6% (log-rank <0.001) in patients with BBBMI, patients with AMI without BBB, patients with BBB without AMI, and patients without AMI or BBB, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with BBBMI have a high mortality. Less than 25% undergo revascularization and only very few patients with new-onset BBBMI are transferred for urgent revascularization. Focus on improving triage and prehospital identification of high-risk patients with BBB and chest pain could improve outcome. PMID:24222828

  15. Treatment of opioid overdose in a physician-based prehospital EMS: frequency and long-term prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina Skafte; Nielsen, Søren Louman; Siersma, Volkert Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Prehospital treatment of opioid overdose accounts for a significant proportion of the workload of the emergency system in most major cities. Treatment consists of basic life support and administering naloxone. In our physician-manned mobile emergency care unit (MECU), most patients are released...... and not admitted to hospital. In this study, we aimed to assess the pattern in the number of episodes with opioid overdose treated by MECU in Copenhagen during a 10-year period and to investigate risk factors for mortality of these patients beyond the initial contact....

  16. Evaluation of a thoracic ultrasound training module for the detection of pneumothorax and pulmonary edema by prehospital physician care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Vicki E; Lamhaut, Lionel; Capp, Roberta; Bosson, Nichole; Liteplo, Andrew; Marx, Jean-Sebastian; Carli, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background While ultrasound (US) has continued to expedite diagnosis and therapy for critical care physicians inside the hospital system, the technology has been slow to diffuse into the pre-hospital system. Given the diagnostic benefits of thoracic ultrasound (TUS), we sought to evaluate image recognition skills for two important TUS applications; the identification of B-lines (used in the US diagnosis of pulmonary edema) and the identification of lung sliding and comet tails (used in the US diagnosis of pneumothorax). In particular we evaluated the impact of a focused training module in a pre-hospital system that utilizes physicians as pre-hospital providers. Methods 27 Paris Service D'Aide Médicale Urgente (SAMU) physicians at the Hôpital Necker with varying levels of US experience were given two twenty-five image recognition pre-tests; the first test had examples of both normal and pneumothorax lung US and the second had examples of both normal and pulmonary edema lung US. All 27 physicians then underwent the same didactic training modules. A post-test was administered upon completing the training module and results were recorded. Results Pre and post-test scores were compared for both the pneumothorax and the pulmonary edema modules. For the pneumothorax module, mean test scores increased from 10.3 +/- 4.1 before the training to 20.1 +/- 3.5 after (p < 0.0001), out of 25 possible points. The standard deviation decreased as well, indicating a collective improvement. For the pulmonary edema module, mean test scores increased from 14.1 +/- 5.2 before the training to 20.9 +/- 2.4 after (p < 0.0001), out of 25 possible points. The standard deviation decreased again by more than half, indicating a collective improvement. Conclusion This brief training module resulted in significant improvement of image recognition skills for physicians both with and without previous ultrasound experience. Given that rapid diagnosis of these conditions in the pre-hospital system

  17. Teams and working conditions in mobile pre-hospital care services: an integrative review

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Study to identify, analyze and summarize the findings available in the literature on the composition of teams and working conditions in Mobile  Pre-Hospital Care Services  (PHC).  Integrative review to search the Base  de Dados  de  Enfermagem [Nursing Database] (BDEnf), the Cumulative  Index  to  Nursing  and  Allied  Health  Literature (CINAHL),  the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), PubMed,  SCOPUS,  Web  of  Science and the portal of journals from the Scien...

  18. Incidência de lesão musculoesquelética sem trauma em atletas de handebol Incidence of nontraumatic musculoskeletal injuries in handball athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Cavalcante de Sá

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O atleta competitivo muitas vezes apresenta lesões musculoesqueléticas, algumas de natureza não traumática. Habitualmente, tais lesões são atribuídas a fatores mecânicos. O presente estudo teve como objetivo estudar um grupo de atletas de handebol e verificar uma possível ação de fatores imune-inflamatórios e hormonais na gênese destas lesões. Procedeu-se à avaliação dos parâmetros laboratoriais, dosando-se a concentração plasmática de hormônios e neurotransmissores e a produção in vitro de citocinas e prostaglandina E2. Os resultados permitem afirmar que em 29% dos atletas estudados foi possível constatar a ocorrência de lesões musculoesqueléticas não traumáticas, que puderam ser relacionadas com o aumento da produção de citocinas pró-inflamatórias, com elevação das concentrações de IL-1, IL-2, TNF-α e IFN-α. Nesta mesma cultura foi possível demonstrar aumento da concentração de prostaglandina E2.Competitive athletes often present musculoskeletal injuries, some of these nontraumatic. Usually these injuries are attributed to mechanical factors. The present study aimed to investigate a group of handball players and check a possible action of immune-inflammatory and hormonal factors in the genesis of these lesions. Laboratory parameters were studied measuring in the plasma the concentration of plasma hormones and neurotransmitters, and production "in vitro" of cytokines and prostaglandin E2. The results indicate that in 29% of the athletes included in the study the occurrence of nontraumatic musculoskeletal injuries was observed. In this group there was an increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines assayed in the supernatant of culture of peripheral blood cells with increased concentrations of IL-1, IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-α, as well of prostaglandin E2.

  19. Emergency medical and health providers' perceptions of key issues in prehospital patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atack, Lynda; Maher, Janet

    2010-01-01

    To date, most patient safety studies have been conducted in relation to the hospital rather than the prehospital setting and data regarding emergency medical services (EMS)-related errors are limited. To address this gap, a study was conducted to gain an in-depth understanding of the views of highly experienced EMS practitioners, educators, administrators, and physicians on major issues pertaining to EMS patient safety. The intent of the study was to identify key issues to give direction to the development of best practices in education, policy, and fieldwork. A qualitative study was conducted using processes described by Lincoln and Guba (1985) to enhance the quality and credibility of data and analysis. Purposive sampling was used to identify informants with knowledge and expertise regarding policy, practice, and research who could speak to the issue of patient safety. Sixteen participants, the majority of whom were Canadian, participated in in-depth interviews. Two major themes were identified under the category of key issues: clinical decision making and EMS's focus and relationship with health care. An education gap has developed in EMS, and there is tension between the traditional stabilize-and-transport role and the increasingly complex role that has come about through "scope creep." If, as expected, EMS aligns increasingly with the health sector, then change is needed in the EMS educational structure and process to develop stronger clinical decision-making skills. The results of this study indicate that many individual organizations and health regions are addressing issues related to patient safety in EMS, and there are important lessons to be learned from these groups. The broader issues identified, however, are system-wide and best addressed through policy change from health regions and government.

  20. A citywide prehospital protocol increases access to stroke thrombolysis in Toronto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, David J; Rodan, Lance H; Sahlas, Demetrios J; Lee, Liesly; Murray, Brian J; Ween, Jon E; Perry, James R; Chenkin, Jordan; Morrison, Laurie J; Beck, Shann; Black, Sandra E

    2009-12-01

    Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator for ischemic stroke is approved for eligible patients who can be treated within a 3-hour window, but treatment rates remain disappointingly low, often protocol was implemented by the provincial government to transport acute stroke patients directly to one of 3 regional stroke centers, bypassing local hospitals. This comprised a paramedic screening tool, ambulance destination decision rule, and formal memorandum of understanding of system stakeholders. This report describes the initial impact of the activation protocol at our regional stroke center. We compared consecutive patients with stroke arriving to our stroke center during the first 4 months of this new triage protocol (February 14 to June 14, 2005) versus the same 4-month period in 2004. The protocol resulted in an immediate doubling in the number of patients with acute stroke arriving to our regional stroke center within 2.5 hours of symptom onset. We observed a 4-fold increase in patients who were eligible for and treated with tissue plasminogen activator. The tissue plasminogen activator treatment rate for ischemic stroke patients increased from 9.5% to 23.4% (P=0.01), and one in 2 patients with ischemic stroke arriving within 2.5 hours received thrombolysis during this period (one in 5 of patients with ischemic stroke overall). The median onset-to-needle time for tissue plasminogen activator-treated patients was significantly reduced. Many implementation challenges were identified and addressed. This prehospital triage was immediately successful in improving tissue plasminogen activator access for patients with ischemic stroke, enabling our center to achieve one of the highest tissue plasminogen activator treatment rates in North America and underscoring the need for coordinated systems of acute stroke care. Sustainability of such an initiative will be dependent on interdisciplinary teamwork, ongoing paramedic training, adequate hospital staffing, bed availability

  1. A pilot study of quality of life in German prehospital emergency care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sand

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quality of life in patients represents an important area of assessment. However, attention to health professionals should be equally important. The literature on the quality of life (QOL of emergency physicians is scarce. This pilot study investigated QOL in emergency physicians in Germany. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study from January to June in 2015. We approached the German Association of Emergency Medicine Physicians and two of the largest recruitment agencies for emergency physicians in Germany and invited their members to participate. We used the WHO Q-BREF to obtain QOL scores in four domains that included physical, mental, social, and environmental health. Results: The 478 German emergency physicians included in the study held board certifications in general medicine (n = 40; 8.4%, anesthesiology (n = 243; 50.8%, surgery (n = 63; 13.2%, internal medicine (n = 81; 17.0%, or others (n = 51; 10.7%. The women surveyed tended to report a better QOL but worse general health than the men. Regarding specific domains, women scored worse in physical health, particularly energy during everyday work (relative risk ratio [RRR]: 1.98 [1.21–3.24]. Both men and women scored worse in psychological health than general health, particularly young women. Women were also more likely to view their safety (RRR: 1.87 [1.07–3.28] and living place (RRR: 2.51 [1.10–5.73] as being poor than their male counterparts. Conclusion: QOL in German prehospital emergency care physicians is satisfactory for the included participants; however, there were some negative effects in the psychological health domain. This is particularly obvious in young female emergency physicians.

  2. Prehospital electronic patient care report systems: early experiences from emergency medical services agency leaders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Landman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As the United States embraces electronic health records (EHRs, improved emergency medical services (EMS information systems are also a priority; however, little is known about the experiences of EMS agencies as they adopt and implement electronic patient care report (e-PCR systems. We sought to characterize motivations for adoption of e-PCR systems, challenges associated with adoption and implementation, and emerging implementation strategies. METHODS: We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured in-depth interviews with EMS agency leaders. Participants were recruited through a web-based survey of National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP members, a didactic session at the 2010 NAEMSP Annual Meeting, and snowball sampling. Interviews lasted approximately 30 minutes, were recorded and professionally transcribed. Analysis was conducted by a five-person team, employing the constant comparative method to identify recurrent themes. RESULTS: Twenty-three interviewees represented 20 EMS agencies from the United States and Canada; 14 EMS agencies were currently using e-PCR systems. The primary reason for adoption was the potential for e-PCR systems to support quality assurance efforts. Challenges to e-PCR system adoption included those common to any health information technology project, as well as challenges unique to the prehospital setting, including: fear of increased ambulance run times leading to decreased ambulance availability, difficulty integrating with existing hospital information systems, and unfunded mandates requiring adoption of e-PCR systems. Three recurring strategies emerged to improve e-PCR system adoption and implementation: 1 identify creative funding sources; 2 leverage regional health information organizations; and 3 build internal information technology capacity. CONCLUSION: EMS agencies are highly motivated to adopt e-PCR systems to support quality assurance efforts; however, adoption and

  3. Prehospital emergency care training practices regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender patients in Maryland (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Sara; Levy, Matthew J; Tang, Nelson

    2015-04-01