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Sample records for prehistoric man workbooks

  1. Symbolism in prehistoric man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, F

    2000-12-01

    The aptitude for symbolization, characteristic of man, is revealed not only in artistic representations and funerary practices. It is exhibited by every manifestation of human activity or representation of natural phenomena that assumes or refers to a meaning. We can recognize functional symbolism (tool-making, habitative or food technology), social symbolism, (language and social communication) and spiritual symbolism (funerary practices and artistic expressions). On the basis of these concepts, research into symbolism in prehistoric man allows us to recognize forms of symbolism already in the manifestations of the most ancient humans, starting with Homo habilis (or rudolfensis). Toolmaking, social organization and organization of the territory are oriented toward survival and the life of the family group. They attest to symbolic behaviors and constitute symbolic systems by means of which man expresses himself, lives and transmits his symbolic world. The diverse forms of symbolism are discussed with reference to the different phases of prehistoric humanity.

  2. AUTO PARTS MAN, WORKBOOK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOVER, BUEL H.

    THE INFORMATION IN THIS STUDY GUIDE WAS DEVELOPED FOR USE IN THE RELATED TECHNICAL CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION PHASE OF THE AUTO PARTS MAN APPRENTICE TRAINING PROGRAM. THE MATERIAL WAS PLANNED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE STATE EDUCATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR THE AUTOMOTIVE TRADE. THE UNITS ARE (1) SCOPE AND OPPORTUNITY, (2) AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY,…

  3. [The evolutionist fallacy of early visitors. Analogies between 'primitive peoples' and prehistoric man in medical historiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchhausen, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Accounts of 'prehistoric medicine' and 'ethnomedicine' have sometimes led to conclusions by analogy in medical historiography that are seen as highly problematic in modern cultural anthropology. However, this review of medical historical writings of the last three centuries shows that evolutionist identifications of early with foreign medicine were not a permanent trait of medical historiography. This approach flourished mainly in the climate of certain movements or periods that were characterised by fanatical belief in progress and by social utopias: the French Revolution, Darwinism and the period of industrial expansion in Germany, and National Socialism. Medical historiography shared this problematic approach with contemporary (social and cultural) anthropology, and - despite this methodological misuse - both acknowledged the legitimacy or even requirement of studying also similarities in the development of different periods and cultures.

  4. Modern French Grammar Workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    An innovative new workbook of exercises and language tasks for intermediate and advanced learners of French. This Workbook can be used independently or alongside Modern French Grammar.This Workbook provides exercises in:* Essential grammatical structures* Everyday functions such as agreeing and disagreeing* Role-plays set in a wide range of different contextsIt is suitable for group or pair work and for private study.A comprehensive answer key at the back of the Workbook enables you to check on your progress.This Workbook is ideal for all learners who have a basic knowledge of French, includin

  5. Gerzeh, a prehistoric Egyptian meteorite

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, D.; Grady, Monica; Tyldesley, J.

    2011-01-01

    One of the earliest examples of iron used by man was discovered in a prehistoric Egyptian cemetery. The site of Gerzeh, 40 miles south of Cairo, was excavated in 1911-1912, over 300 graves dat-ing from around 3300 BCE were discovered [1]. A few of the graves contained rare and precious materials such as gold and lapis lazuli. Two graves, Tombs 67 and 133, were also found to contain iron beads; at the time of excavation these examples of Egyptian pre-dynastic culture were considered to be the ...

  6. Man Corn: Cannibalism and Violence in the Prehistoric American Southwest. Christy G. Turner and Jacqueline A. Turner. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C. Kolb

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Human sacrifice and cannibalism, the potential for institutionalized violence or warfare, witchcraft or sorcery, and ritual executions are emotionally charged issues; but some anthropologists and other learned scholars now suggest that these activities and behaviors occurred in the American Southwest, a region usually depicted for peace, harmony, tranquility, and spirituality. Christy Turner, Regents' Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Arizona State University, and his late wife, Jacqueline (1934-1996, are the co-authors of Man Corn. The book's title derives from the Nahuatl word tlacatlaolli, a "sacred meal of sacrificed human meat, cooked with corn." The Nahuatl and Mesoamerican connections are more than coincidental. The idea for this volume was conceived in 1958, and Christy dedicates the volume to the memory of his wife. They comment (p. 8 that "re­search on cannibalism has not been free of controversy or political and professional censuring" and they cite instances where their work has been disbelieved, dismissed, or admonished.

  7. Learning Perl Student Workbook

    CERN Document Server

    foy, brian

    2012-01-01

    This is an ebook-only workbook to accompany the 6th Edition of Learning Perl ("the Llama"). If you're just getting started with Perl, this is the book you want-whether you're a programmer, system administrator, or web hacker. This 6th edition of Learning Perl covers recent changes to the language up to version 5.14. Exercises are presented in the first half of the workbook, with the answers in the second. Topics include: Scalar DataLists and ArraysSubroutinesInput and OutputHashesIn the World of Regular ExpressionsMatching with Regular ExpressionsProcessing Text with Regular Expressions10.

  8. Library Skills Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Constance; And Others

    This self-paced library skills workbook provides incoming students with an introduction to the physical arrangement and use of the university libraries. Divided into two sections, the first contains explanations of the catalogs, classification system, and various library resources. The second consists of practical exercises keyed to the…

  9. Biology Library Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Constance; And Others

    A library skills workbook provides college biology students with an introduction to biological library resources. Divided into two sections, the first contains explanations of the various steps in the library research process. The second consists of exercises keyed to the explanatory chapters of the first section. (RAA)

  10. Basic Cake Decorating Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdany, Mel

    Included in this student workbook for basic cake decorating are the following: (1) Drawings of steps in a basic way to ice a layer cake, how to make a paper cone, various sizes of flower nails, various sizes and types of tin pastry tubes, and special rose tubes; (2) recipes for basic decorating icings (buttercream, rose paste, and royal icing);…

  11. A Strategic Planning Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, William

    This workbook outlines the Salem Community College's (New Jersey) Strategic Planning Initiative (SPI), which will enable the college to enter the 21st Century as an active agent in the educational advancement of the Salem community. SPI will allow college faculty, staff, students, and the local community to reflect on the vitality of the college…

  12. Marketing II Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Cheryl

    This combination curriculum and workbook, which was originally developed for use in a training workshop, is intended to assist adult educators in learning to market their adult literacy programs. The first chapter reviews basic marketing concepts (the definition of marketing, 10 truths about marketing, marketing versus promotion, steps in…

  13. Meatcutting Workbook, Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Publications.

    This document is a workbook for apprentices learning the meatcutting trade in California. It is divided into eight units covering the following areas: breaking and cutting meat; jobbing; sausage, cured meats, and convenience foods; mathematics; meat packaging and handling; market operation; safety and sanitation; and workers' legal rights and…

  14. Quality Assurance Program. QAP Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelavin Research Inst., Washington, DC.

    The Quality Assurance Program (QAP) workbook is intended to assist institutions of higher education conduct qualitative and quantitative evaluations of their financial aid operations in relation to requirements of Title IV of the Higher Education Act. The workbook provides a structured approach for incorporating a cyclical Title IV QA system into…

  15. AutoCAD workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Metherell, Phil

    1989-01-01

    AutoCAD Workbook helps new users learn the basics of AutoCad, providing guidance on most of the commonly used functions in which the program operates.This book discusses loading AutoCad and starting a drawing; drawing and erasing lines, circles, and arcs; and setting up the drawing environment. The topics on drawing and editing polylines; entering text and text styles; and layers, linetype, and color are also considered. This publication likewise covers creating and using blocks, hatching and extracting information, dimensioning drawings, 3D visualization, and plotting a drawing. Other

  16. Excel 2010 Workbook for Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Greg

    2010-01-01

    Reinforce your understanding of Excel with these Workbook exercises. Boost your knowledge of important Excel tasks by putting your skills to work in real-world situations. The For Dummies Workbook format provides more than 100 exercises that help you create actual results with Excel so you can gain proficiency. Perfect for students, people learning Excel on their own, and financial professionals who must plan and execute complex projects in Excel, Excel 2010 Workbook For Dummies helps you discover all the ways this program can work for you.: Excel is the world's most popular number-crunching p

  17. Quantum physics workbook for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Holzner, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Hands-on practice in solving quantum physics problems Quantum Physics is the study of the behavior of matter and energy at the molecular, atomic, nuclear, and even smaller microscopic levels. Like the other titles in our For Dummies Workbook series, Quantum Physics Workbook For Dummies allows you to hone your skills at solving the difficult and often confusing equations you encounter in this subject. Explains equations in easy-to-understand terms Harmonic Oscillator Operations, Angular Momentum, Spin, Scattering Theory Using a proven practice-and-review approach, Quantum Physics Workbook For Dummies is all you need to get up to speed in problem solving!

  18. The relaxation & stress reduction workbook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, Martha; Eshelman, Elizabeth Robbins; McKay, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    "The Relaxation & Stress Reduction Workbook broke new ground when it was first published in 1980, detailing easy, step-by-step techniques for calming the body and mind in an increasingly overstimulated world...

  19. Cambridge checkpoint English workbook 2

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, John

    2014-01-01

    Build confidence and understanding throughout the year with hundreds of additional practice questions. This Workbook supports our bestselling Checkpoint series, with exercises specifically matched to the Cambridge Progression tests and the Checkpoint tests. - Develops understanding and builds confidence ahead of assessment with exercises matched to the tests - Ensures a thorough understanding of all aspects of the course by following the structure of the relevant textbook - Saves planning time with exercises that are suitable for use in class or as homework This Workbook is

  20. Cambridge checkpoint English workbook 3

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, John

    2014-01-01

    Build confidence and understanding throughout the year with hundreds of additional practice questions. This Workbook supports our bestselling Checkpoint series, with exercises specifically matched to the Cambridge Progression tests and the Checkpoint tests. - Develops understanding and builds confidence ahead of assessment with exercises matched to the tests - Ensures a thorough understanding of all aspects of the course by following the structure of the relevant textbook - Saves planning time with exercises that are suitable for use in class or as homework This Workbook is

  1. Prehistoric sanctuaries in Daunia

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, E; Tunzi, A M; Zupone, M Lo

    2013-01-01

    Daunia is a region in northern Apulia with many interesting archaeological sites, particularly of the Neolithic and Bronze Age. Beginning from the fifth millennium BC, the farmers living in the wide plain of Daunia dug hypogea and holes in sites that could be considered prehistoric sanctuaries. The characteristics of the rows of holes indicate a ritual use, and the archaeologists tend to exclude other applications, such as post holes and cultivations. The rows have possibly an astronomical orientation, and in the sanctuary discovered near Ordona, some stars of the Centaurus-Crux group (may be alpha Centauri itself) could have been used as targets. In past centuries, astronomers and scholars have remarked this spectacular region of the sky, and its possible relevance for the ancient civilizations was pointed out for example by G.V. Schiaparelli in 1903. In his work on the astronomy in the Old Testament, he mentioned in particular the observations of the astronomer W.S. Jacob and of other scholars. It would be ...

  2. Solar Design Workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franta, G.; Baylin, F.; Crowther, R.; Dubin, F.; Grace, A., Griffith, J.W.; Holtz, M.; Kutscher, C.; Nordham, D.; Selkowitz, S.; Villecco, M.

    1981-06-01

    This Solar Design Workbook presents solar building design applications for commercial buildir^s. The book is divided into four sections. The first section describes the variety of solar applications in buildings including conservation aspects, solar fundamentals, passive systems, active systems, daylighting, and other solar options. Solar system design evaluation techniques including considerations for building energy requirements, passive systems, active systems, and economics are presented in Section II. The third section attempts to assist the designer in the building design process for energy conservation and solar applications including options and considerations for pre-design, design, and post-design phases. The information required for the solar design proee^ has not been fully developed at this time. Therefore, Section III is incomplete, but an overview of the considerations with some of the design proces elements is presented. Section IV illustrates ease studies that utilize solar applications in the building design.

  3. Foundry energy conservation workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The foundry industry is a significant user of energy, and therefore, a natural candidate for efforts to save energy and improve efficiency by both governmental agencies and technical/trade associations. These efforts are designed to both improve the national energy position and improve the industry's efficiency and profitability. Increased energy cost and the reduced availability of fossil fuels at certain times have provided the incentive to curb waste and to utilize purchased energy wisely. Energy costs now approach and sometimes exceed 10% of the sales dollar of many foundries. Although energy use by foundries has gradually decreased on a per/ton basis in recent years, the foundry industry must continue to find ways to utilize energy more efficiently. This workbook provides ways to achieve this goal.

  4. Cambridge checkpoint English workbook 1

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, John

    2013-01-01

    This Workbook supports our bestselling Checkpoint English series, with exercises specifically matched to the Cambridge Progression tests and the Checkpoint English tests. - Offers plenty of additional questions for use in class or as homework. - Includes clearly identified questions on grammar and punctuation, comprehension, use of language and essay planning. - Follows the structure of the relevant textbook to ensure a thorough understanding of all aspects of the course. - Provides a space for Students to write their answers. This Workbook is matched to the Cambridge Secondary 1 Curriculum Fr

  5. Algebra I Workbook For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Sterling, Mary Jane

    2011-01-01

    From signed numbers to story problems - calculate equations with ease Practice is the key to improving your algebra skills, and that's what this workbook is all about. This hands-on guide focuses on helping you solve the many types of algebra problems you'll encounter in a focused, step-by-step manner. With just enough refresher explanations before each set of problems, this workbook shows you how to work with fractions, exponents, factoring, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, graphs, and more! 100s of problems! Hundreds of practice exercises and helpful explanations Explanations mi

  6. English Grammar Workbook For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    Get some good grammar practice-and start speaking and writing well. Good grammar is important, whether you want to advance your career, boost your GPA, or increase your SAT or ACT score. Practice is the key to improving your grammar skills, and that's what this workbook is all about. Honing speaking and writing skills through continued practice translates into everyday situations, such as writing papers, giving presentations, and communicating effectively in the workplace or classroom. In English Grammar Workbook For Dummies you'll find hundreds of fun problems to help build your grammar muscl

  7. English Grammar Workbook For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    O'Sullivan, Nuala

    2010-01-01

    English Grammar Workbook For Dummies, UK Edition is grammar First Aid for anyone wanting to perfect their English and develop the practical skills needed to write and speak correctly. Each chapter focuses on key grammatical principles, with easy-to-follow theory and examples as well as practice questions and explanations. From verbs, prepositions and tenses, to style, expressions and tricky word traps, this hands-on workbook is essential for both beginners looking to learn and practise the basics of English grammar, and those who want to brush up skills they already have - quickly, easily, and

  8. Language Workbook for Power Sewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankoski, Linda

    Based on the student workbook entitled "Power Sewing", this manual is intended to aid aurally handicapped vocational students who are being trained in power sewing. The sequence of lessons closely follows the progression of sewing skills taught by the shop text, but covers the material from the standpoint of reading and communication skills. The…

  9. Homemaking. A Reading & Language Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankoski, Linda C.

    Developed for use in the academic communication classroom of a middle school for the deaf, this student workbook is designed to reinforce the vocabulary and skills presented by the pre-vocational teacher in three areas of home economics: basic cooking, home care, and basic sewing. Each section contains new word lists, short stories, comprehension…

  10. Supervisory Workbook on Behavior Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkin, Ronald; And Others

    This workbook is designed to be used with the trainer's manual in supervisory training sessions on behavior modification of employees. This is one of four manuals prepared to aid supervisors in training disadvantaged groups using social reinforcement techniques. Related documents are available as VT 018 031-VT 018 035 in this issue. (MF)

  11. Cambridge IGCSE computer science workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, David; Guinness, Paul; Nagle, Garrett

    2016-01-01

    Student workbook to support students throughout their Cambridge IGCSE Computer Science course, with plenty of extra practice questions and activities. Accompanies the Cambridge IGCSE Computer Science student text book, following the contents and chapter order. Students write their answers in the book and keep it for study in class or at home throughout their course.

  12. On the remains of some Carnivora found in a prehistoric site at Vlaardingen, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bree, van P.J.H.

    1961-01-01

    The excavation of a prehistoric site at Vlaardingen, about 10 km W. of Rotterdam, yielded among ceramics and other man-made objects, many remains of zoological origin (GLASBERGEN, 1960). Mr. P. J. VAN DER FEEN and Miss M. R. WALVIUS, who were in charge of the zoological material found at

  13. The Simulation of Prehistoric Hunting Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, John W.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses use of computer simulation as an archeological tool for research and teaching involving the remains of prehistoric game animals to aid in understanding effects of various strategies of prehistoric hunters on populations of game animals. A simulation involving possible vicuna hunting strategies is described. (MBR)

  14. Algebra II workbook for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Sterling, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    To succeed in Algebra II, start practicing now Algebra II builds on your Algebra I skills to prepare you for trigonometry, calculus, and a of myriad STEM topics. Working through practice problems helps students better ingest and retain lesson content, creating a solid foundation to build on for future success. Algebra II Workbook For Dummies, 2nd Edition helps you learn Algebra II by doing Algebra II. Author and math professor Mary Jane Sterling walks you through the entire course, showing you how to approach and solve the problems you encounter in class. You'll begin by refreshing your Algebr

  15. Sketching user experiences the workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, Saul; Marquardt, Nicolai; Buxton, Bill

    2012-01-01

    In Sketching User Experiences: The Workbook, you will learn, through step-by-step instructions and exercises, various sketching methods that will let you express your design ideas about user experiences across time. Collectively, these methods will be your sketching repertoire: a toolkit where you can choose the method most appropriate for developing your ideas, which will help you cultivate a culture of experience-based design and critique in your workplace. Features standalone modules detailing methods and exercises for practitioners who want to learn and develop their sketching skills E

  16. Clay: An important raw material for prehistoric man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, U.; Gebhard, R.; Grosse, G.; Hutzelmann, T.; Murad, E.; Riederer, J.; Shimada, I.; Wagner, F. E.

    1998-12-01

    Early techniques of making pottery can be investigated by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Iron is generally present in unpurified clays in concentrations of several percent. During firing, the iron undergoes characteristic changes of its chemical and physical state, depending on the kiln atmosphere and on the maximum firing temperature reached. These changes can be followed by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Firing techniques can often be reconstructed when spectra of laboratory and field fired samples are compared with those observed in ancient sherds.

  17. Clay: An important raw material for prehistoric man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, U. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department E15 (Germany); Gebhard, R. [Praehistorische Staatssammlung (Germany); Grosse, G.; Hutzelmann, T. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department E15 (Germany); Murad, E. [Bayerisches Geologisches Landesamt (Germany); Riederer, J. [Rathgen-Forschungslabor (Germany); Shimada, I. [Southern Illinois University (United States); Wagner, F.E. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department E15 (Germany)

    1998-12-15

    Early techniques of making pottery can be investigated by {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. Iron is generally present in unpurified clays in concentrations of several percent. During firing, the iron undergoes characteristic changes of its chemical and physical state, depending on the kiln atmosphere and on the maximum firing temperature reached. These changes can be followed by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Firing techniques can often be reconstructed when spectra of laboratory and field fired samples are compared with those observed in ancient sherds.

  18. Aspects of prehistoric astronomy in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N. Kameswara

    2005-12-01

    Some archeoastronomical aspects regarding the development of observational astronomy in India during prehistoric times are described. A plea is made for the preservation of megalithic monuments of possible astronomical significance.

  19. AQA GCSE English language workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Brindle, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Maximise your potential and build the skills needed to succeed with this exam-focused Workbook; packed with practice questions for every section of the AQA GCSE English Language exam papers. - Guides you through both exam papers with a unique question-by-question approach that helps you feel confident tackling terminal assessment - Provides a complete solution to exam preparation with over 200 practice questions that cover every element of Papers 1 and 2, plus answers for every activity online - Improves extended writing skills through formal exam-style tasks for every question type - Encourages rolling revision across the years as you progressively develop your skills in class and at home - Enables you to see how to target the top grades with easy-to-understand mark schemes - Offers unrivalled insider insight and practical advice from Keith Brindle, a bestselling English textbook author with decades of experience as a senior examiner, teacher and skills trainer.

  20. Prehistoric human colonization of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, V N

    2001-11-01

    Human colonization in India encompasses a span of at least half-a-million years and is divided into two broad periods, namely the prehistoric (before the emergence of writing) and the historic (after writing). The prehistoric period is divided into stone, bronze and iron ages. The stone age is further divided into palaeolithic, mesolithic and neolithic periods. As the name suggests, the technology in these periods was primarily based on stone. Economically, the palaeolithic and mesolithic periods represented a nomadic, hunting-gathering way of life, while the neolithic period represented a settled, food-producing way of life. Subsequently copper was introduced as a new material and this period was designated as the chalcolithic period. The invention of agriculture, which took place about 8000 years ago, brought about dramatic changes in the economy, technology and demography of human societies. Human habitat in the hunting-gathering stage was essentially on hilly, rocky and forested regions, which had ample wild plant and animal food resources. The introduction of agriculture saw it shifting to the alluvial plains which had fertile soil and perennial availability of water. Hills and forests, which had so far been areas of attraction, now turned into areas of isolation. Agriculture led to the emergence of villages and towns and brought with it the division of society into occupational groups. The first urbanization took place during the bronze age in the arid and semi-arid region of northwest India in the valleys of the Indus and the Saraswati rivers, the latter represented by the now dry Ghaggar-Hakra bed. This urbanization is known as the Indus or Harappan civilization which flourished during 3500-1500 B.C. The rest of India during this period was inhabited by neolithic and chalcolithic farmers and mesolithic hunter-gatherers. With the introduction of iron technology about 3000 years ago, the focus of development shifted eastward into the Indo-Gangetic divide and

  1. Prehistoric human colonization of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V N Misra

    2001-11-01

    Human colonization in India encompasses a span of at least half-a-million years and is divided into two broad periods, namely the prehistoric (before the emergence of writing) and the historic (after writing). The prehistoric period is divided into stone, bronze and iron ages. The stone age is further divided into palaeolithic, mesolithic and neolithic periods. As the name suggests, the technology in these periods was primarily based on stone. Economically, the palaeolithic and mesolithic periods represented a nomadic, hunting-gathering way of life, while the neolithic period represented a settled, food-producing way of life. Subsequently copper was introduced as a new material and this period was designated as the chalcolithic period. The invention of agriculture, which took place about 8000 years ago, brought about dramatic changes in the economy, technology and demography of human societies. Human habitat in the hunting-gathering stage was essentially on hilly, rocky and forested regions, which had ample wild plant and animal food resources. The introduction of agriculture saw it shifting to the alluvial plains which had fertile soil and perennial availability of water. Hills and forests, which had so far been areas of attraction, now turned into areas of isolation. Agriculture led to the emergence of villages and towns and brought with it the division of society into occupational groups. The first urbanization took place during the bronze age in the arid and semi-arid region of northwest India in the valleys of the Indus and the Saraswati rivers, the latter represented by the now dry Ghaggar–Hakra bed. This urbanization is known as the Indus or Harappan civilization which flourished during 3500–1500 B.C. The rest of India during this period was inhabited by neolithic and chalcolithic farmers and mesolithic hunter-gatherers. With the introduction of iron technology about 3000 years ago, the focus of development shifted eastward into the Indo-Gangetic divide

  2. Theory of load carriage by man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PL Kapur

    1949-01-01

    Full Text Available Carrying of load by man has been a necessity since pre-historic times. It was the sole means of transportation prior to the domestication of animals like ox, ass, horse, etc. Today with the advancement of mechanical transport, the art has disappeared except where Mechanical transport is beyond reach, impracticable or uneconomical

  3. Mythological and Prehistorical Origins of Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Anil; Filis, Andreas; Kalakoti, Piyush

    2016-05-01

    Mythology has a cultural appeal, and the description of some neurosurgical procedures in the Hindu, Greek, Egyptian, and Chinese mythology has a bearing to the origins of our professions. The traces to some of our modern-day practices also can be linked back to the ancient prehistoric eras of the Siberian, Persian, and the Andean region. In this historical perspective, we briefly dwell into individual accounts through the prism of different cultures to highlight the development of neurosurgery in mythology and prehistoric era.

  4. Pre-calculus workbook for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Kuang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Get the confidence and math skills you need to get started with calculus Are you preparing for calculus? This hands-on workbook helps you master basic pre-calculus concepts and practice the types of problems you'll encounter in the course. You'll get hundreds of valuable exercises, problem-solving shortcuts, plenty of workspace, and step-by-step solutions to every problem. You'll also memorize the most frequently used equations, see how to avoid common mistakes, understand tricky trig proofs, and much more. Pre-Calculus Workbook For Dummies is the perfect tool for anyone who wa

  5. Cosmetology Core. Teacher Workbook. Cosmetology Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher workbook, which is part of a series of publications designed to support instruction in Oklahoma vocational cosmetology programs, consists of 13 units of information and skills that are basic to all major instructional divisions of a cosmetology course of study. The unit topics are as follows: identifying cosmetology careers/displaying…

  6. Archaeogenomic evidence reveals prehistoric matrilineal dynasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, Douglas J.; Plog, Stephen; George, Richard J.; Culleton, Brendan J.; Watson, Adam S.; Skoglund, Pontus; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Stewardson, Kristin; Kistler, Logan; LeBlanc, Steven A.; Whiteley, Peter M.; Reich, David; Perry, George H.

    2017-01-01

    For societies with writing systems, hereditary leadership is documented as one of the hallmarks of early political complexity and governance. In contrast, it is unknown whether hereditary succession played a role in the early formation of prehistoric complex societies that lacked writing. Here we use an archaeogenomic approach to identify an elite matriline that persisted between 800 and 1130 CE in Chaco Canyon, the centre of an expansive prehistoric complex society in the Southwestern United States. We show that nine individuals buried in an elite crypt at Pueblo Bonito, the largest structure in the canyon, have identical mitochondrial genomes. Analyses of nuclear genome data from six samples with the highest DNA preservation demonstrate mother–daughter and grandmother–grandson relationships, evidence for a multigenerational matrilineal descent group. Together, these results demonstrate the persistence of an elite matriline in Chaco for ∼330 years. PMID:28221340

  7. Prehistoric iconography and dance: preliminary observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaudenzio Ragazzi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The oldest documentation on the dance consists of images produced with various techniques on a wide range of material supports (rock, ceramic, metal. Due to the nature of the document, in the search for the origins of the dance, the choreutic competence must proceed to the iconographic. The figurative language of prehistoric images is highly formalized, and expresses the limits imposed by the ritual to the rules of communication. Moreover, precisely to the value attributed to the sacral support, to represent an action, as a dance, rather than plowing, or something else, means to activate a mechanism that perpetually produces the effects for which the representation was produced. This mechanism reveals that there is a strong relationship between the representations of prehistoric dance and the cosmological context.

  8. Building an Interim Assessment System: A Workbook for School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    As someone with a stake in a school district's systems, a person probably does not have all the answers around what is necessary to build an effective interim assessment system. Neither does this workbook. But it is intended to have the right questions. More precisely, this workbook contains the vision, infrastructure, and resource questions…

  9. La ciudad: Libro de actividades, 1 (The City: Workbook 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Emiliano; And Others

    This workbook, designed to be used with a textbook of the same title, contains exercises, riddles, puzzles, coloring activities, and reinforcement of various word-perception skills and sentences. Included is a step-by-step procedure of phonetic analysis. The intention of the workbook is to enable students to apply their ability to get meaning from…

  10. Basic Research in Atkins Library. A Research Guide and Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noate, Judith

    This workbook is designed to help students at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte acquire basic research skills in using a university library. The workbook is divided into 10 sections: (1) Finding Books in Atkins Library; (2) Library of Congress Subject Headings; (3) Searching ALADDIN (the online catalog); (4) Searching a Subject; (5) Call…

  11. La ciudad: Libro de actividades, 1 (The City: Workbook 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Emiliano; And Others

    This workbook, designed to be used with a textbook of the same title, contains exercises, riddles, puzzles, coloring activities, and reinforcement of various word-perception skills and sentences. Included is a step-by-step procedure of phonetic analysis. The intention of the workbook is to enable students to apply their ability to get meaning from…

  12. A Workbook for Designing, Building, and Sustaining Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Janine; Schlesinger, Marissa R.; Kahn, Gabrielle; Singer, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    To address the professional development needs of learning community instructors at Kingsborough Community College, faculty coordinators and program directors developed a workbook for instructional teams. This workbook walks instructors through the collaborative process of creating and sustaining successful links and focuses on what we believe is…

  13. Radon Measurement in Schools: Self-Paced Training Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute for Disability Research and Training, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    This workbook is designed to educate school personnel in randon detection. The workbook is intended for an audience of school officials, including administrators, business officers, facility managers, and maintenance and operations staff. It is meant to provide trainees with experience in planning a radon test, interpreting test results,…

  14. Workbook: Community Action Program, Office of Economic Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Economic Opportunity, Washington, DC.

    The Community Action Program Workbook has been prepared as an aid to the many people now involved in establishing community action programs to combat poverty. It is designed to stimulate thinking rather than to prescribe given courses of action. Although it has many audiences, the workbook is intended principally for the local community groups who…

  15. Prehistoric disasters at Lajia Site, Qinghai, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiaoyan; XIA Zhengkai; YE Maolin

    2003-01-01

    Lajia Site, located near the upper reaches of the Yellow River and theborder of Qinghai Province and Gansu Province, is a large-scale site of the Qijia Culture. In 2000 and 2001, archaeologists excavated an unusual scene of prehistoric dramatic and miserable disasters. Lots of geologic-geographic evidences revealed that the Lajia Site was ruined by coinstantaneous disasters, mainly floods from the Yellow River and earthquakes, accompanying mountainous torrents. Study on these disasters and their driven forces could provide us not only the knowledge on the palaeoenvironment of the area, but also offer us a valuable site toassess the influence of the natural disasters on human civilization development.

  16. Capo Mannu Project 2011 - Prehistoric Pottery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giandaniele Castangia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors present the results of a study carried out on the prehistoric pottery from the 2011 survey of the Capo Mannu Project, central-western Sardinia. The chrono-typological analysis of ceramics clearly indicates the presence of different chronological phases of occupation of the area prior to the seventh century BC: Final Neolithic or Ozieri phase, Early, Middle and Recent Bronze Age. This confirms old reports, such as those concerning the presence of a Neolithic settlement on the hill of Monte Benei, but it also raises some important questions that will be investigated in the next campaigns.

  17. Pre-calculus workbook for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Gilman, Michelle Rose; Neal, Karina

    2009-01-01

    Get the confidence and the math skills you need to get started with calculus! Are you preparing for calculus? This easy-to-follow, hands-on workbook helps you master basic pre-calculus concepts and practice the types of problems you'll encounter in your cour sework. You get valuable exercises, problem-solving shortcuts, plenty of workspace, and step-by-step solutions to every problem. You'll also memorize the most frequently used equations, see how to avoid common mistakes, understand tricky trig proofs, and much more. 100s of Problems! Detailed, fully worked-out solutions to problem

  18. Classroom Instruction that Works with English Language Learners Participant's Workbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jane D.; Bjork, Cynthia Linnea

    2008-01-01

    Everyone who participates in your workshop on "Classroom Instruction That Works with English Language Learners" needs this participant's workbook to gain expertise in strategies that are effective with ELL (English Language Learners) students.

  19. Business partners a lower intermediate business English course : workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Pearson

    1993-01-01

    This is the workbook in a stimulating course which integrates presentation of language with exercises and activities. There are 15 ten-age unies, each incorporating wide grammar coverage, systematic vocabulary presentation, listening and reading skills, and pair-work role plays. The workbook is a self-study practice book with 15 varied units of supplementary material for class use, homework and private study.

  20. Prehistoric human settling on the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fahu; Zhang, Dongju; Dong, Guanghui

    2017-04-01

    When and where did human first settle down on the Tibetan Plateau is under hot debate among archaeologist, anthropologists, geneticist and paleo-geographers. Based on systematic archaeological, chronological and archaeo-botanical studies of 53 sites in Northeastern Tibetan Plateau, we propose that agriculture facilitated human permanent settlement on the Tibetan Plateau initially since 5200 years ago below 2500 masl and since 3600 years ago up to around 4000 masl, possibly assisted by domesticated animals (Chen et al. 2015). By studying hand- and footprints in Chusang, Meyer et al. (2016) argue that hunter-gatherers permanently occupied central Tibetan Plateau in early Holocene without the help of agriculture. However, we think the limited hand- and footprints evidence found in Chusang could indicate no more than prehistoric hunter-gatherers presence on the remote central Tibetan Plateau in the early Holocene. In addition, by reviewing all the published archaeological data, we propose that human migrated to the Tibetan Plateau from the last Deglacial period to late Holocene mainly from North China via Yellow River valley and its tributary valleys in the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau (NETP). This migration is constituted of four stages (Upper Paleolithic, Epi-Paleolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age) when human adapted to the high altitude environment and climate change with different strategies and techniques. Particularly, the prevail of microlithic technology in North China provoked hunter-gatherers' first visit to the NETP in relatively ameliorated last Deglacial period, and the the quick development of millet farming and subsequent mixed barley-wheat farming and sheep herding facilitated farmers and herders permanently settled in Tibetan Plateau, even above 3000 masl, during mid- and late Holocene. References: Chen et al., 2015. Agriculture facilitated permanent human occupation of the Tibetan Plateau after 3600 BP. Science, 347: 248-250. Meyer et al., 2016

  1. DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS CASE METHODOLOGY GUIDE & WORKBOOK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ken; Lawrie, Sean; Hart, Adam; Vlahoplus, Chris

    2014-09-01

    Performance advantages of the new digital technologies are widely acknowledged, but it has proven difficult for utilities to derive business cases for justifying investment in these new capabilities. Lack of a business case is often cited by utilities as a barrier to pursuing wide-scale application of digital technologies to nuclear plant work activities. The decision to move forward with funding usually hinges on demonstrating actual cost reductions that can be credited to budgets and thereby truly reduce O&M or capital costs. Technology enhancements, while enhancing work methods and making work more efficient, often fail to eliminate workload such that it changes overall staffing and material cost requirements. It is critical to demonstrate cost reductions or impacts on non-cost performance objectives in order for the business case to justify investment by nuclear operators. This Business Case Methodology approaches building a business case for a particular technology or suite of technologies by detailing how they impact an operator in one or more of the three following areas: Labor Costs, Non-Labor Costs, and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). Key to those impacts will be identifying where the savings are “harvestable,” meaning they result in an actual reduction in headcount and/or cost. The report consists of a Digital Technology Business Case Methodology Guide and an accompanying spreadsheet workbook that will enable the user to develop a business case.

  2. A GIS approach for predicting prehistoric site locations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuiper, J. A.; Wescott, K. L.

    1999-08-04

    Use of geographic information system (GIS)-based predictive mapping to locate areas of high potential for prehistoric archaeological sites is becoming increasingly popular among archaeologists. Knowledge of the environmental variables influencing activities of original inhabitants is used to produce GIS layers representing the spatial distribution of those variables. The GIS layers are then analyzed to identify locations where combinations of environmental variables match patterns observed at known prehistoric sites. Presented are the results of a study to locate high-potential areas for prehistoric sites in a largely unsurveyed area of 39,000 acres in the Upper Chesapeake Bay region, including details of the analysis process. The project used environmental data from over 500 known sites in other parts of the region and the results corresponded well with known sites in the study area.

  3. Estimating summary measures of health: a structured workbook approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Petit Christel

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Summary measures of health that combine mortality and morbidity into a single indicator are being estimated in the Canadian context for approximately 200 diseases and conditions. To manage the large amount of data and calculations for this many diseases, we have developed a structured workbook system with easy to use tools. We expect this system will be attractive to researchers from other countries or regions of Canada who are interested in estimating the health-adjusted life years (HALYs lost to premature mortality and year-equivalents lost to reduced functioning, as well as population attributable fractions (PAFs associated with risk factors. This paper describes the workbook system using cancers as an example, and includes the entire system as a free, downloadable package. Methods The workbook system was developed in Excel and runs on a personal computer. It is a database system that stores data on population structure, mortality, incidence, distributions of cases entering a multitude of health states, durations of time spent in health states, preference scores that weight for severity, life table estimates of life expectancies, and risk factor prevalence and relative risks. The tools are Excel files with embedded macro programs. The main tool generates workbooks that estimate HALY, one per disease, by copying data from the database into a pre-defined template. Other tools summarize the HALY results across diseases for easy analysis. Results The downloadable zip file contains the database files initialized with Canadian data for cancers, the tools, templates and workbooks that estimate PAF and a user guide. The workbooks that estimate HALY are generated from the system at a rate of approximately one minute per disease. The resulting workbooks are self-contained and can be used directly to explore the details of a particular disease. Results can be discounted at different rates through simple parameter modification

  4. The Workbook Service in a Learning Virtual Communities' Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colazzo, Luigi; Conte, Francesco; Molinari, Andrea; Villa, Nicola

    The paper describes the development of a new service within the collaboration platform "Online Communities", entirely designed and implemented by our working group at the University of Trento. The system is able to track the activities performed by each participant of a learning community. The service, called "workbook", represents the first of a series of innovations that we will introduce in the system to improve the collaboration level between its participants. The metaphor of virtual communities, in fact, allows us to develop and expand the services' scenarios. Even the workbook service itself benefits of this community approach.

  5. Asphalt and Wood Shingling. Roofing Workbook and Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Arthur

    This combination workbook and set of tests contains materials on asphalt and wood shingling that have been designed to be used by those studying to enter the roofing and waterproofing trade. It consists of seven instructional units and seven accompanying objective tests. Covered in the individual units are the following topics: shingling…

  6. Conducting Sanitary Surveys of Water Supply Systems. Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976

    This workbook is utilized in connection with a 40-hour course on sanitary surveys of water supply systems for biologists, chemists, and engineers with experience as a water supply evaluator. Practical training is provided in each of the 21 self-contained modules. Each module outlines the purpose, objectives and content for that section. The course…

  7. Ciencias 3. Caderno de Exercicios. (Science 3. Workbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, Lucilia

    This workbook contains 47 activities and exercises which reinforce lesson topics found in the grade 3 science textbook. These lesson topics, presented in nine sections in the textbook, focus on such areas as: (1) solar energy, electricity, and light; (2) solar system, planets, earth motions, and phases of the moon; (3) gravity, rocks, and erosion;…

  8. Lengua nacional: Fichas de trabajo 5 (National Language: Workbook 5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peniche Leger, Maria Elena, Ed.

    This consumable, graded workbook can be used for exercises, tests, and individualized learning. Each level contains 30 units divided into four groups of exercises: reading analysis, grammar, composition, and spelling. Ten general tests are also included. For the accompanying reader, see FL 004 051. (Author/SK)

  9. Lengua nacional: Fichas de trabajo 3 (National Language: Workbook 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peniche Leger, Maria Elena, Ed.

    This consumable, graded workbook can be used for exercises, tests, and individualized learning. Each level contains 30 units divided into four groups of exercises: reading analysis, grammar, composition, and spelling. Ten general tests are also included. For the accompanying reader, see FL 004 049. (Author/SK)

  10. Lengua Nacional: Fichas de trabajo 2 (National Language: Workbook 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peniche Leger, Maria Elena, Ed.

    This consumable, graded workbook can be used for exercises, tests, and individualized learning. Each level contains 30 units divided into four groups of exercises: reading analysis, grammar, composition, and spelling. Ten general tests are also included. For the accompanying reader, see FL 004 048. (Author/SK)

  11. Lengua nacional: Fichas de trabajo 4 (National Language: Workbook 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peniche Leger, Maria Elena, Ed.

    This consumable, graded workbook can be used for exercises, tests, and individualized learning. Each level contains 30 units divided into four groups of exercises: reading analysis, grammar, composition, and spelling. Ten general tests are also included. For the accompanying reader, see FL 004 050. (Author/SK)

  12. Lengua nacional: Fichas de trabajo 6 (National Language: Workbook 6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peniche Leger, Maria Elena, Ed.

    This consumable, graded workbook can be used for exercises, tests, and individualized learning. Each level contains 30 units divided into four groups of exercises: reading analysis, grammar, composition, and spelling. Ten general tests are also included. For the accompanying reader, see FL 004 052. (Author/SK)

  13. Developing Critical Thinking Skills: Assessing the Effectiveness of Workbook Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Elise D.; Jefferson, Renee N.

    2015-01-01

    To address the challenge of developing critical thinking skills in college students, this empirical study examines the effectiveness of cognitive exercises in developing those skills. The study uses Critical Thinking: Building the Basics by Walter, Knudsvig, and Smith (2003). This workbook is specifically designed to exercise and develop critical…

  14. Lengua nacional: Fichas de trabajo 4 (National Language: Workbook 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peniche Leger, Maria Elena, Ed.

    This consumable, graded workbook can be used for exercises, tests, and individualized learning. Each level contains 30 units divided into four groups of exercises: reading analysis, grammar, composition, and spelling. Ten general tests are also included. For the accompanying reader, see FL 004 050. (Author/SK)

  15. Lengua nacional: Fichas de trabajo 5 (National Language: Workbook 5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peniche Leger, Maria Elena, Ed.

    This consumable, graded workbook can be used for exercises, tests, and individualized learning. Each level contains 30 units divided into four groups of exercises: reading analysis, grammar, composition, and spelling. Ten general tests are also included. For the accompanying reader, see FL 004 051. (Author/SK)

  16. Lengua Nacional: Fichas de trabajo 2 (National Language: Workbook 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peniche Leger, Maria Elena, Ed.

    This consumable, graded workbook can be used for exercises, tests, and individualized learning. Each level contains 30 units divided into four groups of exercises: reading analysis, grammar, composition, and spelling. Ten general tests are also included. For the accompanying reader, see FL 004 048. (Author/SK)

  17. Lengua nacional: Fichas de trabajo 6 (National Language: Workbook 6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peniche Leger, Maria Elena, Ed.

    This consumable, graded workbook can be used for exercises, tests, and individualized learning. Each level contains 30 units divided into four groups of exercises: reading analysis, grammar, composition, and spelling. Ten general tests are also included. For the accompanying reader, see FL 004 052. (Author/SK)

  18. Lengua nacional: Fichas de trabajo 3 (National Language: Workbook 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peniche Leger, Maria Elena, Ed.

    This consumable, graded workbook can be used for exercises, tests, and individualized learning. Each level contains 30 units divided into four groups of exercises: reading analysis, grammar, composition, and spelling. Ten general tests are also included. For the accompanying reader, see FL 004 049. (Author/SK)

  19. La Gramatica Ingles: Libro de Trabajo (English Grammar: Workbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Paul

    This student workbook is designed for native Spanish-speaking learners of English as a second language, and presents instruction in basic English grammatical constructions and usage, as well as some vocabulary development. Lessons include basic descriptions of the constructions and rules in applying them, and a brief exercise reinforcing the…

  20. Microsoft SQL Server 6.0{reg_sign} Workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustenborg, E.C.

    1996-09-01

    This workbook was prepared for introductory training in the use of Microsoft SQL Server Version 6.0. The examples are all taken from the PUBS database that Microsoft distributes for training purposes or from the Microsoft Online Documentation. The merits of the relational database are presented.

  1. Albanian Basic Course: Workbook for Exercises in Grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This workbook in Albanian grammar requires students to fill in missing words following a particular grammatical pattern, selected from Exercises in Grammar used in the "Albanian Basic Course," prepared by the Defense Language Institute. Drills include: (1) interrogative pronouns, (2) demonstrative adjectives; (3) declension of nouns, possessive…

  2. La Familia: Student Workbook. Latino Family Life Education Curriculum Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiella, Ana Consuelo

    This workbook comprises eight lessons designed to enhance the self-esteem of Latino students, grades 5 through 8, through the exploration of family, family traditions and values, and the affirmation of family strengths. Each lesson begins with an illustration that reflects the content of the lesson and an introductory page. Each introductory page…

  3. Albanian Basic Course: Workbook for Exercises in Grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This workbook in Albanian grammar requires students to fill in missing words following a particular grammatical pattern, selected from Exercises in Grammar used in the "Albanian Basic Course," prepared by the Defense Language Institute. Drills include: (1) interrogative pronouns, (2) demonstrative adjectives; (3) declension of nouns, possessive…

  4. Neutron resonance capture applied to some prehistoric bronze axes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.; Butler, J. J.; Schillebeeckx, P.; van Eijk, C. W. E.

    2007-01-01

    The elemental analysis of materials and objects on the basis of neutron resonance capture by nuclei as a function of neutron energy is briefly explained. The feasibility of neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA) is demonstrated with five prehistoric '' bronze '' axes of different kinds and comple

  5. man enough

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐若炫

    2011-01-01

    Are you man enough? Are you brave enough? Can you pick me up when I fall down? 当这首《man enough》再一次在耳畔回鸣时,你想到些什么? 伊斯坦布尔奇迹、伯纳乌之夜、梅西的记录……亦或是一幕幕经典的画面——男人的画面.

  6. Joe Zhang, Party Man, Company Man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Kjeld Erik

    2014-01-01

    Book review of: Joe Zhang: Party Man, Company Man. Honolulu: Enrich Professional Publishing, 2014. 234 pp.......Book review of: Joe Zhang: Party Man, Company Man. Honolulu: Enrich Professional Publishing, 2014. 234 pp....

  7. Recovering prehistoric woodworking skills using spatial analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, K.; Hanke, K.

    2015-08-01

    Recovering of ancient woodworking skills can be achieved by the simultaneous documentation and analysis of the tangible evidences such as the geometry parameters of prehistoric hand tools or the fine morphological characteristics of well preserved wooden archaeological finds. During this study, altogether 10 different hand tool forms and over 60 hand tool impressions were investigated for the better understanding of the Bronze Age woodworking efficiency. Two archaeological experiments were also designed in this methodology and unknown prehistoric adzes could be reconstructed by the results of these studies and by the spatial analysis of the Bronze Age tool marks. Finally, the trimming efficiency of these objects were also implied and these woodworking skills could be quantified in the case of a Bronze Age wooden construction from Austria. The proposed GIS-based tool mark segmentation and comparison can offer an objective, user-independent technique for the related intangible heritage interpretations in the future.

  8. Mössbauer studies of prehistoric Cherokee pottery sherds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, K. M.; McKenzie, K. P.

    1994-12-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy is a very useful tool in the examination and characterization of ancient pottery sherds. In this study, Mössbauer spectra for sherds and clay from the Warren Wilson Site, a prehistoric Native American (Cherokee) settlement in western North Carolina, were measured. Data from one sherd and samples from two clay beds indicate that the sherd was not made from local clays and was originally fired to 350 ‡C.

  9. Modelling prehistoric populations : the case of Neolithic Brittany.

    OpenAIRE

    Scarre, Chris

    2001-01-01

    The study of prehistoric demography draws inevitably on evidence both imperfect and incomplete, yet is essential for a satisfactory understanding of past communities. It is particularly valuable in addressing controversial questions such as the nature of early farming communities in western Europe, in the period between the adoption of domestic plants and animals and the establishment, centuries or millennia later, of permanent villages and regular field systems. In this article the demograph...

  10. Prehistoric tuberculosis in America: adding comments to a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Gómez i Prat

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a prehistoric American human disease. This paper reviews the literature and discusses hypotheses for origins and epidemiological patterns of prehistoric tuberculosis. From the last decades, 24 papers about prehistoric tuberculosis were published and 133 cases were reviewed. In South America most are isolated case studies, contrary to North America where more skeletal series were analyzed. Disease was usually located at the deserts of Chile and Peru, Central Plains in USA, and Lake Ontario in Canada. Skeletal remains represent most of the cases, but 16 mummies have also been described. Thirty individuals had lung disease, 19 of them diagnosed by the ribs. More then 100 individuals had osseous tuberculosis and 26 also had it in other organs. As today, transmission of the infection and establishment of the disease were favored by cultural and life-style changes such as sedentarization, crowding, undernutrition, use of dark and insulated houses, and by the frequency of interpersonal contacts. The papers confirm that despite previous perceptions, tuberculosis seems to have occured in America for millennia. It only had epidemiological expression when special conditions favored its expansion. Occurring as epidemic bursts or low endemic disease, it had differential impact on groups or social segments in America for at least two millennia.

  11. The educational theory underpinning a clinical workbook for VERT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisbet, Heather, E-mail: heather.nisbet@orh.nhs.u [Department of Clinical Oncology, Churchill Hospital, Old Road, Headington, Oxford, Oxon OX3 7LJ (United Kingdom); Matthews, Sara [Department of Clinical Oncology, Churchill Hospital, Old Road, Headington, Oxford, Oxon OX3 7LJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    The introduction of VERT (Virtual Environment for Radiotherapy Training) into radiotherapy departments across England was in response to the National Radiotherapy Advisory Group's (NRAG) recommendation to the Department of Health that it may assist in enhancing the clinical learning experience of student radiotherapy radiographers. It was suggested that this may help to reduce the high attrition rate of students currently experienced, particularly in the first year of training. This paper investigates how VERT may be used in the clinical setting to develop the skills of students, in order to meet this vision. We argue that using an epistemological approach, i.e. using the theory of knowledge, to support the design of the learning resource, is key to enabling the educator to fulfil these expectations. We describe the design of a generic VERT workbook for use in the clinical departments that train students for the University of Hertfordshire. The use of educational theory to underpin the aims and inform the development of the workbook is examined. We then discuss the alignment of the workbook with the curriculum in order to enhance the students' learning experience and nurture their clinical competence. Finally, we will consider the teaching strategies used during the delivered sessions and discuss how we believe they will allow us to achieve these aims.

  12. Writing Workbook as Scaffolding Aid for Junior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima Melati Dewi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to develop a writing workbook as a supplementary material for the eighth graders of SMPN 3 Jember. The result of the preliminary study showed that there was only small portion of writing activities in the existing textbook. As a result, students got many difficulties in writing skills. The research and development (R&D procedure was employed in this study. The design used in developing the workbook was the adaptation model of development by Borg and Gall (1983. The procedures employed in this study were needs analysis, instructional goal, material de-velopment, expert validation, try-out, and final product. The information from teachers and students in needs analysis served as a basis for developing the materials. To evaluate the developed materials, expert validation by a material development expert and a subject matter expert was carried out. The information from the experts was used to improve the quality of the materials. After trying out the ma-terials, the teacher was given observation form and the students were given checklists to examine the acceptability and the utility of the product in the field. Based on the result of the data analysis, it can be concluded that the developed materials were categorized good and can be used as supplemen-tary writing materials for the eighth graders of SMPN 3 Jember. Key Words: developing, writing workbook, supplementary material, SMPN 3 Jember

  13. Nowhere Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯曼曼

    2008-01-01

    <正>He’s a real nowhere man,sitting in his nowhere land,making all his nowhere plans for nobody.时间晃晃悠悠地停留在我的十七岁,如同岁月里的河流,曲折轮回。我抬头看看那个让我感到苍白无力的天,回想着所有的故事。

  14. Aprendamos juntos: Cuaderno de trabajo. Segunda parte (Let's Learn Together: Workbook. Part Two).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos, Mexico City (Mexico).

    This workbook is part of a Mexican series of instructional materials designed for Spanish speaking adults who are in the process of becoming literate or have recently become literate in their native language. This workbook provides an introduction to grammar. It is designed to help students learn to write words, complete sentences, and paragraphs.…

  15. Aprendamos juntos: Cuaderno de trabajo. Primera parte (Let's Learn Together: Workbook. Part One).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos, Mexico City (Mexico).

    This workbook is part of a Mexican series of instructional materials designed for Spanish speaking adults who are in the process of becoming literate or have recently become literate in their native language. This workbook focuses on teaching initial sounds and letters and moves on to simple words and sentences. The unit on mathematics goes over…

  16. Basic CNC Operation. Training Workbook [and] Assessment and Training Guide [and] Hands-on Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoka-Hennepin Technical Coll., Minneapolis, MN.

    This workbook is intended for students taking a course in basic computer numerical control (CNC) operation that was developed during a project to retrain defense industry workers at risk of job loss or dislocation because of conversion of the defense industry. The workbook contains daily training guides for each of the course's 13 sessions. Among…

  17. Evaluating an Active Learning Approach to Teaching Introductory Statistics: A Classroom Workbook Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kieth A.; Winquist, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    The study evaluates a semester-long workbook curriculum approach to teaching a college level introductory statistics course. The workbook curriculum required students to read content before and during class and then work in groups to complete problems and answer conceptual questions pertaining to the material they read. Instructors spent class…

  18. Basic Reference Tools for Nursing Research. A Workbook with Explanations and Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Topsy N.

    This workbook is designed to introduce nursing students to basic concepts and skills needed for searching the literatures of medicine, nursing, and allied health areas for materials relevant to specific information needs. The workbook introduces the following research tools: (1) the National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE searches, including a…

  19. Trabaja y aprende: Libro de actividades, 3 (Work and Learn: Workbook 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Emiliano; And Others

    This workbook, designed to be used with the textbook of the same title (FL 004 273), contains exercises, riddles, puzzles, coloring activities, and reinforcement of various word-perception skills and sentences. Included is a step-by-step procedure of phonetic analysis. The intention of the workbook is to enable students to increase their ability…

  20. Mira y lee: Libro de actividades, 1 (Look and Read: Workbook 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Emiliano; And Others

    This workbook, designed to be used with the textbook of the same title (FL 004 271), contains exercises, riddles, puzzles, coloring activities, and reinforcement of various word-perception skills and sentences. Included is a step-by-step procedure of phonetic analysis. The intention of the workbook is to enable students to increase their ability…

  1. Lee y trabaja: Libro de actividades, 2 (Read and Work: Workbook 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Emiliano; And Others

    This workbook, designed to be used with the textbook of the same title (FL 004 272), contains exercises, riddles, puzzles, coloring activities, and reinforcement of various word-perception skills and sentences. Included is a step-by-step procedure of phonetic analysis. The intention of the workbook is to enable students to increase their ability…

  2. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings: student workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    This workbook parallels the basic manual, providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings consisting of three parts: understanding and practicing energy conservation in buildings; determining amount of energy lost or gained in a building; and determining which practices are most efficient and installing materials. A teacher guide is available to answer questions in the student workbook related to these subjects.

  3. Nutrition: Eating for Better Health. Student Workbook. Health Promotion for Adult Literacy Students: An Empowering Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson River Center for Program Development, Glenmont, NY.

    This workbook was developed to help adult literacy students learn about nutrition. It contains information sheets, student worksheets, and answers to the worksheets. The information sheets are coordinated with an available audiotape. Some of the topics covered in the workbook are the following: choosing good foods without spending a lot of money;…

  4. Comprehensive Instructional Management System (CIMS). A Cyclical Mathematics Curriculum. Workbook Part 1. Experimental. Level 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This document is part 1 of the workbook for grade 1 pupils in the Comprehensive Instructional Management System, a unified mathematics curriculum for kindergarten through grade 7. Each objective is developed by a variety of strategies, with mastery of objectives diagnosed through a testing component. The activities in the student workbook are…

  5. Comprehensive Instructional Management System (CIMS). A Cyclical Mathematics Curriculum. Workbook Part 1. Experimental. Level K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This document is part 1 of the workbook for kindergarten pupils in the Comprehensive Instructional Management System, a unified mathematics curriculum for kindergarten through grade 7. Each objective is developed by a variety of strategies, with mastery of objectives diagnosed through a testing component. The activities in the student workbook are…

  6. Comprehensive Instructional Management System (CIMS). A Cyclical Mathematics Curriculum. Workbook Part 2. Experimental. Level 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This document is part 2 of the workbook for grade 1 pupils in the Comprehensive Instructional Management System, a unified mathematics curriculum for kindergarten through grade 7. Each objective is developed by a variety of strategies, with mastery of objectives diagnosed through a testing component. The activities in the student workbook are…

  7. Implementing Common Core State Standards and Assessments: A Workbook for State and District Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alex; Rodriguez, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Achieve and the U.S. Education Delivery Institute have developed a practical Common Core Implementation Workbook for all states in the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC). This workbook uses a proven performance management methodology known as "delivery" to lay out clear action steps for states and districts. It…

  8. Implementing Common Core State Standards and Assessments: A Workbook for State and District Leaders. Updated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alex; Rodriguez, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Achieve and the U.S. Education Delivery Institute have developed a practical Common Core Implementation Workbook for all states in the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC). This workbook uses a proven performance management methodology known as "delivery" to lay out clear action steps for states and districts. It…

  9. Emergency Medical Care. A Manual for the Paramedic in the Field--Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This workbook is designed to accompany the text of the same name and to serve as an aid to both learning and review during the course of study. The workbook consists of 15 module self-tests and vocabulary lists that follow the modules of the text. Tests consist of objective questions (multiple choice, fill-in-the-blank, short answers, and…

  10. Lee y trabaja: Libro de actividades, 2 (Read and Work: Workbook 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Emiliano; And Others

    This workbook, designed to be used with the textbook of the same title (FL 004 272), contains exercises, riddles, puzzles, coloring activities, and reinforcement of various word-perception skills and sentences. Included is a step-by-step procedure of phonetic analysis. The intention of the workbook is to enable students to increase their ability…

  11. Mira y lee: Libro de actividades, 1 (Look and Read: Workbook 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Emiliano; And Others

    This workbook, designed to be used with the textbook of the same title (FL 004 271), contains exercises, riddles, puzzles, coloring activities, and reinforcement of various word-perception skills and sentences. Included is a step-by-step procedure of phonetic analysis. The intention of the workbook is to enable students to increase their ability…

  12. Trabaja y aprende: Libro de actividades, 3 (Work and Learn: Workbook 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Emiliano; And Others

    This workbook, designed to be used with the textbook of the same title (FL 004 273), contains exercises, riddles, puzzles, coloring activities, and reinforcement of various word-perception skills and sentences. Included is a step-by-step procedure of phonetic analysis. The intention of the workbook is to enable students to increase their ability…

  13. Project LMA: Learning Media Assessment of Students with Visual Impairments. Facilitator's Manual and Participant Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Alan J.; Holbrook, M. Cay

    This document is comprised of the facilitator's manual and the participant's workbook for a 1- or 2-day workshop for inservice and preservice teachers on the process of learning media assessment (LMA) for students with visual impairments. The manual and workbook are intended for use in a complete program that also includes videotapes and…

  14. Marketing for College Managers: A Workbook for the Effective Integration of Marketing into College Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Angela; Sedgmore, Lynne

    This workbook provides a practical approach to establishing and implementing a corporate marketing strategy within an educational environment and integrates this into the traditional college planning process. Organized in three stand-alone sections, the workbook examines the marketing challenge from three different management perspectives and…

  15. The Path towards Endangered Species: Prehistoric Fisheries in Southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Mariana Samôr; Bertucci, Thayse Cristina Pereira; Rapagnã, Luciano; Tubino, Rafael de Almeida; Monteiro-Neto, Cassiano; Tomas, Acácio Ribeiro Gomes; Tenório, Maria Cristina; Lima, Tânia; Souza, Rosa; Carrillo-Briceño, Jorge Domingo; Haimovici, Manuel; Macario, Kita; Carvalho, Carla; Aguilera Socorro, Orangel

    2016-01-01

    Brazilian shellmounds are archaeological sites with a high concentration of marine faunal remains. There are more than 2000 sites along the coast of Brazil that range in age from 8,720 to 985 cal BP. Here, we studied the ichthyoarchaeological remains (i.e., cranial/postcranial bones, otoliths, and teeth, among others) at 13 shellmounds on the southern coast of the state of Rio de Janeiro, which are located in coastal landscapes, including a sandy plain with coastal lagoons, rocky islands, islets and rocky bays. We identified patterns of similarity between shellmounds based on fish diversity, the ages of the assemblages, littoral geomorphology and prehistoric fisheries. Our new radiocarbon dating, based on otolith samples, was used for fishery characterization over time. A taxonomical study of the ichthyoarchaeological remains includes a diversity of 97 marine species, representing 37% of all modern species (i.e., 265 spp.) that have been documented along the coast of Rio de Janeiro state. This high fish diversity recovered from the shellmounds is clear evidence of well-developed prehistoric fishery activity that targeted sharks, rays and finfishes in a productive area influenced by coastal marine upwelling. The presence of adult and neonate shark, especially oceanic species, is here interpreted as evidence of prehistoric fisheries capacity for exploitation and possibly overexploitation in nursery areas. Various tools and strategies were used to capture finfish in seasonal fisheries, over rocky reef bottoms and in sandy littoral environments. Massive catches of whitemouth croaker, main target dermersal species of South Atlantic coast, show evidence of a reduction in body size of approximately 28% compared with modern fisheries. Fishery activity involving vulnerable species, especially in nursery areas, could mark the beginning of fish depletion along the southeastern Brazilian coast and the collapse of natural fish populations.

  16. The Path towards Endangered Species: Prehistoric Fisheries in Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Mariana Samôr; Bertucci, Thayse Cristina Pereira; Rapagnã, Luciano; Tubino, Rafael de Almeida; Monteiro-Neto, Cassiano; Tomas, Acácio Ribeiro Gomes; Tenório, Maria Cristina; Lima, Tânia; Souza, Rosa; Carrillo-Briceño, Jorge Domingo; Haimovici, Manuel; Macario, Kita; Carvalho, Carla; Aguilera Socorro, Orangel

    2016-01-01

    Brazilian shellmounds are archaeological sites with a high concentration of marine faunal remains. There are more than 2000 sites along the coast of Brazil that range in age from 8,720 to 985 cal BP. Here, we studied the ichthyoarchaeological remains (i.e., cranial/postcranial bones, otoliths, and teeth, among others) at 13 shellmounds on the southern coast of the state of Rio de Janeiro, which are located in coastal landscapes, including a sandy plain with coastal lagoons, rocky islands, islets and rocky bays. We identified patterns of similarity between shellmounds based on fish diversity, the ages of the assemblages, littoral geomorphology and prehistoric fisheries. Our new radiocarbon dating, based on otolith samples, was used for fishery characterization over time. A taxonomical study of the ichthyoarchaeological remains includes a diversity of 97 marine species, representing 37% of all modern species (i.e., 265 spp.) that have been documented along the coast of Rio de Janeiro state. This high fish diversity recovered from the shellmounds is clear evidence of well-developed prehistoric fishery activity that targeted sharks, rays and finfishes in a productive area influenced by coastal marine upwelling. The presence of adult and neonate shark, especially oceanic species, is here interpreted as evidence of prehistoric fisheries capacity for exploitation and possibly overexploitation in nursery areas. Various tools and strategies were used to capture finfish in seasonal fisheries, over rocky reef bottoms and in sandy littoral environments. Massive catches of whitemouth croaker, main target dermersal species of South Atlantic coast, show evidence of a reduction in body size of approximately 28% compared with modern fisheries. Fishery activity involving vulnerable species, especially in nursery areas, could mark the beginning of fish depletion along the southeastern Brazilian coast and the collapse of natural fish populations. PMID:27355355

  17. The Path towards Endangered Species: Prehistoric Fisheries in Southeastern Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Samôr Lopes

    Full Text Available Brazilian shellmounds are archaeological sites with a high concentration of marine faunal remains. There are more than 2000 sites along the coast of Brazil that range in age from 8,720 to 985 cal BP. Here, we studied the ichthyoarchaeological remains (i.e., cranial/postcranial bones, otoliths, and teeth, among others at 13 shellmounds on the southern coast of the state of Rio de Janeiro, which are located in coastal landscapes, including a sandy plain with coastal lagoons, rocky islands, islets and rocky bays. We identified patterns of similarity between shellmounds based on fish diversity, the ages of the assemblages, littoral geomorphology and prehistoric fisheries. Our new radiocarbon dating, based on otolith samples, was used for fishery characterization over time. A taxonomical study of the ichthyoarchaeological remains includes a diversity of 97 marine species, representing 37% of all modern species (i.e., 265 spp. that have been documented along the coast of Rio de Janeiro state. This high fish diversity recovered from the shellmounds is clear evidence of well-developed prehistoric fishery activity that targeted sharks, rays and finfishes in a productive area influenced by coastal marine upwelling. The presence of adult and neonate shark, especially oceanic species, is here interpreted as evidence of prehistoric fisheries capacity for exploitation and possibly overexploitation in nursery areas. Various tools and strategies were used to capture finfish in seasonal fisheries, over rocky reef bottoms and in sandy littoral environments. Massive catches of whitemouth croaker, main target dermersal species of South Atlantic coast, show evidence of a reduction in body size of approximately 28% compared with modern fisheries. Fishery activity involving vulnerable species, especially in nursery areas, could mark the beginning of fish depletion along the southeastern Brazilian coast and the collapse of natural fish populations.

  18. Prehistoric Archaeology and Poetic Wisdom%史前考古学与诗性智慧

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    户晓辉

    2001-01-01

    Archaeological remains of the prehistoric times are the results of poetic wisdom of the prehistoric people. They are spiritual rather than material remains. Thus archaeological studies need not only giving explanations on the materials but also understanding them in a multidiscipline background.

  19. Remeasuring man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Samuel George Morton (1799-1851) was the most highly regarded American scientist of the early and middle 19th century. Thanks largely to Stephen Jay Gould's book The Mismeasure of Man, Morton's cranial capacity measurements of different races is now held up as a prime example of and cautionary tale against scientific racism. A team of anthropologists recently reevaluated Morton's work and argued that it was Gould, not Morton, who was biased in his analysis. This article is a reexamination of the Morton and Gould controversy. It argues that most of Gould's arguments against Morton are sound. Although Gould made some errors and overstated his case in a number of places, he provided prima facia evidence, as yet unrefuted, that Morton did indeed mismeasure his skulls in ways that conformed to 19th century racial biases. Gould's critique of Morton ought to remain as an illustration of implicit bias in science.

  20. Geothermal Small Business Workbook [Geothermal Outreach and Project Financing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizabeth Battocletti

    2003-05-01

    Small businesses are the cornerstone of the American economy. Over 22 million small businesses account for approximately 99% of employers, employ about half of the private sector workforce, and are responsible for about two-thirds of net new jobs. Many small businesses fared better than the Fortune 500 in 2001. Non-farm proprietors income rose 2.4% in 2001 while corporate profits declined 7.2%. Yet not all is rosy for small businesses, particularly new ones. One-third close within two years of opening. From 1989 to 1992, almost half closed within four years; only 39.5% were still open after six years. Why do some new businesses thrive and some fail? What helps a new business succeed? Industry knowledge, business and financial planning, and good management. Small geothermal businesses are no different. Low- and medium-temperature geothermal resources exist throughout the western United States, the majority not yet tapped. A recent survey of ten western states identified more than 9,000 thermal wells and springs, over 900 low- to moderate-temperature geothermal resource areas, and hundreds of direct-use sites. Many opportunities exist for geothermal entrepreneurs to develop many of these sites into thriving small businesses. The ''Geothermal Small Business Workbook'' (''Workbook'') was written to give geothermal entrepreneurs, small businesses, and developers the tools they need to understand geothermal applications--both direct use and small-scale power generation--and to write a business and financing plan. The Workbook will: Provide background, market, and regulatory data for direct use and small-scale (< 1 megawatt) power generation geothermal projects; Refer you to several sources of useful information including owners of existing geothermal businesses, trade associations, and other organizations; Break down the complicated and sometimes tedious process of writing a business plan into five easy steps; Lead you

  1. STEM-based workbook: Enhancing students' STEM competencies on lever system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejati, Binar Kasih; Firman, Harry; Kaniawati, Ida

    2017-05-01

    Twenty-first century is a century of technology, a rapid development of scientific studies and technology make them relied heavily on each other. This research investigated about the effect of STEM-based workbook in enhancing students' STEM competencies in terms of knowledge understanding, problem solving skill, innovative abilities, and responsibility. The workbook was tried on 24 students that applied engineering design processes together with mathematics and science knowledge to design and create an egg cracker. The result showed that the implementation of STEM-based workbook on lever system in human body is effective to improve students' STEM competencies, it can be proven by students' result on their knowledge understanding improvement which can be seen from normalized gain () score is 0.41 and categorized as medium improvement, students' problem solving skill is also improving where it obtained a medium improvement with normalized gain as much as 0.45. Innovative abilities also encountered an the improvement, the workbook analysis obtained a higher score which means students can be more innovative after finishing their workbook. Last, students' responsibility is keep improving day by day, students' effort gain the highest score it means that the students become more responsible after implementation of STEM-based workbook. All of the results are supported with the response of students towards STEM-based workbook implementation which showed positive response in all indicators.

  2. The Historical Development of Italian Prehistoric Archaeology: A Brief Outline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allesandro Guidi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five years ago Marcel Desittere, a Belgian prehistorian who works and lives in northern Italy, published the first important monograph about the origins of Italian prehistoric archaeology (Desittere 1985. Beginning with the history of one of the main prehistory museums, Reggio Emilia, created in the second half of the nineteenth century, Desittere tried to reconstruct a socio-political and intellectual biography of the pioneers of the discipline. Over the following years since 1985, many scholars have dedicated monographs, articles, papers in congress proceedings and exhibition catalogues, to the subject of the history of Italian prehistoric archaeology (see, among others: Bernabò and Mutti 1994; Cuomo Di Caprio 1986; Desittere 1988, 1996; Del Lucchese 2008; Guidi 1987, 1988, 1996a, 1996b, 2000, 2008, forthcoming; Peroni 1992; Skeates 2000; Tarantini 1998–2000, 2000, 2000–2001, 2002a, 2002b, 2004, 2005. All of these works contributed to the profile of a discipline that, in our country, comprises some peculiar characteristics.

  3. 'A Sea of Small Boats': places and practices on the prehistoric seascape of western Britain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Robinson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last 20 years landscape archaeology in Britain has developed in many directions, providing increasingly sophisticated understandings of prehistoric people's sense of place. In contrast to the growing body of work considering landscape, little attention has been given to the sea. Some archaeologists have noted the significance of the sea to the settings of monuments, where the sea is interpreted as a symbolic or metaphorical backdrop to life, and death, on the land. But prehistoric coastal, and island communities did not just gaze across the sea, but physically engaged with it, through the daily practices of seafaring and fishing. This article argues that the sea was not merely a neutral backdrop for human action, but was an active medium through which prehistoric communities lived, experienced and ordered their world. It will be argued that a consideration of the social construction of prehistoric seascapes is central to an understanding of the archaeological record of island and coastal communities in British Prehistory. The article draws upon recent studies within landscape archaeology, maritime archaeology and maritime anthropology in order to construct a framework for exploring prehistoric seascapes. The archaeological evidence for the prehistoric use of the sea will be summarised for Western Britain and Ireland and key themes for further study identified. These themes will be examined through a detailed case study exploring the prehistoric archaeology of the Isles of Scilly. The case study will consider how we might begin to study the seascape and journeys made within it and how such journeys might be linked to the prehistoric archaeology of island and coastal landscapes. The social and symbolic meanings of the archaeological record will be investigated through an examination of their distribution, configuration and relationship to marine and terrestrial topography. It will be shown that the construction of the archaeological record

  4. Big Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑秀文

    2012-01-01

    <正>梁炳"Edmond"说他演唱会后会跟太太去旅行。无论飞机降落在地球的哪角,有伴在旁就是幸福。他的concert名字是big man,初时我看错是big mac演唱会:心想干吗是大汉堡演唱会?嘻!后来才知看错。但其实细想,在成长路上,谁不曾是活得像个傻傻的面包,一团面粉暴露在这大千世界,时间和各式人生经历就是酵母,多少年月日,你我都会发酵成长。友情也是激发彼此成长的酵母,看到对方早已经从男仔成了男人,我都原来一早已不再能够以"女仔"称呼自己。在我眼中,他的改变是大的,爱玩外向的个性收窄了,现在的我们,

  5. Freud, evolution, and the tragedy of man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, K R

    1983-01-01

    It is argued that Freud was not, as Sulloway (1979) contends, a "crypto-biologist" of the mind, but rather a cultural anthropologist of the mind. Freud's genetic conception of the psychic apparatus was neither exclusively nor critically derived from biology. Rather, it was based on an anthropogenetic approach to the archaic heritage of mind inspired in part by the moral philosophy of Nietzsche. The idea of tragedy was the unifying theme of Freud's cultural interpretation of evolutionary psychology. The historical search for the primal origins of neurosis led Freud to the unavoidable conclusion that neurosis was in the beginning a prehistoric moral dilemma which, over the course of mental evolution, eventually evolved into guilt, discontent, and neurosis as modern-day phylogenetically endowed facts of life. Freud (1930) made it clear that the source of man's biological and cultural evolutionary progress--self-denial--was also responsible for the tragedy of the human condition, namely, repression, eternal psychic ambivalence, and chronic mental illness. He believed that neurosis began, as Nietzsche (1887) exclaimed, with the "reduction of the beast of prey 'man' to a tame and civilized animal..." (p. 42). For both Freud and Nietzsche, the cause of the human tragedy was not merely the fall from Nature, but the inexorable knowledge that Man's denial of his biological heritage was the very basis for being human.

  6. Western Monarch and Milkweed Habitat Suitability Assessment Project- Species Occurence Excel Workbook Tool: Pacific Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — USFWS developed Milkweed and Monarch Occurrence Excel Workbook Tool to facilitate the capture and sharing of milkweed and Monarch observations. The database is...

  7. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Health Care Provider: A Workbook and Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  8. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Health Care Providers: A Workbook and Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  9. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with your Health Care Provider: A workbook and tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  10. Algebra and Trigonometry Review Workbook. Exercises with Hints and Complete Solutions in Algebra and Trigonometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman-Petrushka, Sharon

    This workbook is designed to be used as a review at the end of a college level course in algebra and trigonometry. Four review sheets containing 117 problems provide hints and detailed solutions for each problem. (YP)

  11. Back Facts: A Training Workbook to Prevent Back Injuries in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to prevent back injuries in nursing homes Back Facts - A training workbook to prevent back injuries in ... past 10 years? List three or four responses. Fact Sheet 1 Good news, bad news and back ...

  12. Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R Pace

    2007-04-01

    Over the past 13,500 years, human populations have lived in and productively utilized the natural resources offered by the cold desert environment of the northeastern Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho. Within an overall framework of hunting and gathering, groups relied on an intimate familiarity with the natural world and developed a variety of technologies to extract the resources that they needed to survive. Useful items were abundant and found everywhere on the landscape. Even the basaltic terrain and the rocks, themselves, were put to productive use. This paper presents a preliminary classification scheme for rock structures built on the Idaho National Laboratory landscape by prehistoric aboriginal populations, including discussions of the overall architecture of the structures, associated artifact assemblages, and topographic placement. Adopting an ecological perspective, the paper concludes with a discussion of the possible functions of these unique resources for the desert populations that once called the INL home.

  13. Prehistoric Packrats Piled Up Clues to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Kenneth L.

    2008-01-01

    Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and Northern Arizona University studying climate change in the Southwestern United States are getting a helping hand?or would that be paw??from prehistoric packrats. By hoarding parts of animals and plants, including seeds and leaves, in garbage piles or ?middens,? these bushy-tailed rodents preserved crucial ecological and environmental information about the past. From these middens, scientists are able to reconstruct plant communities and natural systems from as long ago as 50,000 years. The contents of middens allow scientists to understand how ecosystems responded to rapid, large-scale climate changes of the past. The insights gained from midden research could offer clues to future changes driven by rapid climate shifts.

  14. Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R Pace

    2007-04-01

    Over the past 13,500 years, human populations have lived in and productively utilized the natural resources offered by the cold desert environment of the northeastern Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho. Within an overall framework of hunting and gathering, groups relied on an intimate familiarity with the natural world and developed a variety of technologies to extract the resources that they needed to survive. Useful items were abundant and found everywhere on the landscape. Even the basaltic terrain and the rocks, themselves, were put to productive use. This paper presents a preliminary classification scheme for rock structures built on the Idaho National Laboratory landscape by prehistoric aboriginal populations, including discussions of the overall architecture of the structures, associated artifact assemblages, and topographic placement. Adopting an ecological perspective, the paper concludes with a discussion of the possible functions of these unique resources for the desert populations that once called the INL home.

  15. Beyond Virtual Replicas: 3D Modeling and Maltese Prehistoric Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Stanco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, computer graphics have become strategic for the development of projects aimed at the interpretation of archaeological evidence and the dissemination of scientific results to the public. Among all the solutions available, the use of 3D models is particularly relevant for the reconstruction of poorly preserved sites and monuments destroyed by natural causes or human actions. These digital replicas are, at the same time, a virtual environment that can be used as a tool for the interpretative hypotheses of archaeologists and as an effective medium for a visual description of the cultural heritage. In this paper, the innovative methodology and aims and outcomes of a virtual reconstruction of the Borg in-Nadur megalithic temple, carried out by Archeomatica Project of the University of Catania, are offered as a case study for a virtual archaeology of prehistoric Malta.

  16. 3D Recording methodology applied to the Grotta Scritta Prehistoric Rock-Shelter in Olmeta-Di-Capocorso (Corsica, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grussenmeyer, P.; Burens, A.; Guillemin, S.; Alby, E.; Allegrini Simonetti, F.; Marchetti, M.-L.

    2015-08-01

    The Grotta Scritta I prehistoric site is located on the west side of Cap Corse, in the territory of the municipality of Olmeta-di- Capocorso (Haute-Corse, France). This rock shelter is located on a western spur of the mountains La Serra, at 412 m height above sea level. In the regional context of a broad set of megalithic burial sites (regions Nebbiu and Agriates) and a rich insular prehistoric rock art with several engraved patterns (mainly geometric), the Grotta Scritta is the only site with painted depictions of Corsica. Around twenty parietal depictions are arranged in the upper part of the rock-shelter and takes advantage of the microtopography of the wall. Today, the Grotta Scritta is a vulnerable site, made fragile by the action of time and man. The 3D scanning of the rockshelter and paintings of the Grotta Scritta was carried out by surveyors and archaeologists from INSA Strasbourg and from UMR 5602 GEODE (Toulouse), by combining accurate terrestrial laser scanning and photogrammetry techniques. These techniques are based on a full 3D documentation without contact of the rock-shelter paintings. The paper presents the data acquisition methodology followed by an overview of data processing solutions based on both imaging and laser scanning. Several deliverables as point clouds, meshed models, textured models and orthoimages are proposed for the documentation. Beyond their usefulness in terms of valorization, communication and virtual restitution, the proposed models also provide support tools for the analysis and perception of the complexity of the volumes of the shelter (namely for the folded forms of the dome housing the paintings) as well as for the accuracy of the painted depictions recorded on the orthophotos processed from the 3D model.

  17. Heterogeneity of Taiwan's indigenous population: possible relation to prehistoric Mongoloid dispersals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M; Chu, C C; Lee, H L; Chang, S L; Ohashi, J; Tokunaga, K; Akaza, T; Juji, T

    2000-01-01

    Taiwan's 9 indigenous tribes (Tsou, Bunun, Paiwan, Rukai, Atayal, Saisiat, Ami, Puyuma, Yami) are highly homogeneous within each tribe, but diversified among the different tribes due to long-term isolation, most probably since Taiwan became an island about 12,000 years ago. Homogeneity of each tribe is evidenced by many HLA-A,B,C alleles having the world's highest ever reported frequencies, e.g. A24 (86.3%), A26 (18.8%), Cw10 (36.8%), Cw7 (66%), Cw8 (32.1%), B13 (27.9%), B62 (37.4%), B75 (18%), B39 (53.5%), B60 (33.3%), and B48 (24%). Also, all of these tribes have HLA class I haplotype frequencies greater than 10%, with A24-Cw7-B39 in Saisiat (44.5%) being the highest, suggesting Taiwan's indigenous tribes are probably the most homogeneous ( the "purest") population in the world. A24-Cw8-B48, A24-Cw10-B60 and A24-Cw9-B61 found common to many Taiwan indigenous tribes, have also been observed in Maori, Papua New Guinea Highlanders, Orochons, Mongolians, Inuit, Japanese, Man, Buryat, Yakut, Tlingit, Tibetans and Thais. These findings suggest Taiwan's indigenous groups are more or less genetically related to both northern and southern Asians. Principal component analysis and the phylogenetic tree (using the neighbor-joining method) showed close relationship between the indigenous groups and Oceanians. This relationship supports the hypothesis that Taiwan was probably on the route of prehistoric Mongoloid dispersals that most likely took place along the coastal lowland of the Asian continent (which is under the sea today). Cultural anthropology also suggests a relationship between Taiwan's indigenous tribes and southern Asians and to a lesser extent, northern Asians. However, the indigenous groups show little genetic relationship to current southern and northern Han Chinese.

  18. A Study on Generic Representation of Skeletal Remains Replication of Prehistoric Burial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, C.-W.; Chiu, H.-L.; Chang, S.-K.

    2015-08-01

    Generic representation of skeletal remains from burials consists of three dimensions which include physical anthropologists, replication technicians, and promotional educators. For the reason that archaeological excavation is irreversible and disruptive, detail documentation and replication technologies are surely needed for many purposes. Unearthed bones during the process of 3D digital scanning need to go through reverse procedure, 3D scanning, digital model superimposition, rapid prototyping, mould making, and the integrated errors generated from the presentation of colours and textures are important issues for the presentation of replicate skeleton remains among professional decisions conducted by physical anthropologists, subjective determination of makers, and the expectations of viewers. This study presents several cases and examines current issues on display and replication technologies for human skeletal remains of prehistoric burials. This study documented detail colour changes of human skeleton over time for the reference of reproduction. The tolerance errors of quantification and required technical qualification is acquired according to the precision of 3D scanning, the specification requirement of rapid prototyping machine, and the mould making process should following the professional requirement for physical anthropological study. Additionally, the colorimeter is adopted to record and analyse the "colour change" of the human skeletal remains from wet to dry condition. Then, the "colure change" is used to evaluate the "real" surface texture and colour presentation of human skeletal remains, and to limit the artistic presentation among the human skeletal remains reproduction. The"Lingdao man No.1", is a well preserved burial of early Neolithic period (8300 B.P.) excavated from Liangdao-Daowei site, Matsu, Taiwan , as the replicating object for this study. In this study, we examined the reproduction procedures step by step for ensuring the surface

  19. 'A Sea of Small Boats': places and practices on the prehistoric seascape of western Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Gary Robinson

    2013-01-01

    In the last 20 years landscape archaeology in Britain has developed in many directions, providing increasingly sophisticated understandings of prehistoric people's sense of place. In contrast to the growing body of work considering landscape, little attention has been given to the sea. Some archaeologists have noted the significance of the sea to the settings of monuments, where the sea is interpreted as a symbolic or metaphorical backdrop to life, and death, on the land. But prehistoric coas...

  20. The Problems of Dating Prehistoric Axe Factories and Neolithisation in Turkish Thrace:

    OpenAIRE

    Erdogu, Burçin

    2000-01-01

    Prehistoric axe factories or manufacturing areas have been found in the Sarköy region of turkish Thrace. So far, they are unique in the prehistoric record of the Balkans and Anatolia. A typological and petrological analysis of the stone axe factories and investigations of their distributions are in progress. Earlyresults show that all the axes are manufactured from the same rock - metabsit. The source of metabasite is the Western outcrops of Ganos Mountain. At the early neolithic settlement o...

  1. Pollen diagrams and prehistoric fields: the case of Bronze Age Haarlem, the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakels

    2000-05-01

    The excavation of a Bronze Age field surrounded by peat in the vicinity of the Dutch town of Haarlem afforded a good opportunity to study the pollen rain released by such prehistoric fields. Pollen analysis of a core obtained from a peat deposit at a distance of 10m from the field's border revealed only a weak signal of a possible field. The conclusion is that the presence of prehistoric fields is difficult to detect by means of pollen analysis alone.

  2. Basalt Pb isotope analysis and the prehistoric settlement of Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisler, M I; Woodhead, J D

    1995-03-14

    The prehistoric settlement of the Pacific Ocean has intrigued scholars and stimulated anthropological debate for the past two centuries. Colonized over a few millennia during the mid to late Holocene, the islands of the Pacific--displaying a wide diversity of geological and biotic variability--provided the stage for endless "natural experiments" in human adaptation. Crucial to understanding the evolution and transformation of island societies is documenting the relative degree of interisland contacts after island colonization. In the western Pacific, ideal materials for archaeologically documenting interisland contact--obsidian, pottery, and shell ornaments--are absent or of limited geographic distribution in Polynesia. Consequently, archaeologists have relied increasingly on fine-grained basalt artifacts as a means for documenting colonization routes and subsequent interisland contacts. Routinely used x-ray fluorescence characterization of oceanic island basalt has some problems for discriminating source rocks and artifacts in provenance studies. The variation in trace and major element abundances is largely controlled by near-surface magma-chamber processes and is broadly similar between most oceanic islands. We demonstrate that Pb isotope analysis accurately discriminates rock source and is an excellent technique for charting the scale, frequency, and temporal span of imported fine-grained basalt artifacts found throughout Polynesia. The technique adds another tool for addressing evolutionary models of interaction, isolation, and cultural divergence in the eastern Pacific.

  3. A Prehistorical Record of Cultural Eutrophication from Crawford Lake, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, E J; Teranes, J; Guilderson, T; Turton, C L; McAndrews, J H; Wittkop, C A; Stoermer, E F

    2004-08-05

    Cultural eutrophication--the process by which human activities increase nutrient input rates to aquatic ecosystems and thereby cause undesirable changes in surface-water quality--is generally thought to have begun with the start of the industrial era. The prehistoric dimension of human impacts on aquatic ecosystems remains relatively undescribed, particularly in North America. Here we present fossil plankton data (diatoms and rotifers), organic and inorganic carbon accumulations, and carbon isotope ratios from a 1000-yr sediment core record from Crawford Lake, Ontario, Canada. The data documents increased nutrient input to Crawford Lake caused by Iroquoian horticultural activity from A.D. 1268 to 1486 and shows how this increased nutrient input elevated lake productivity, caused bottom-water anoxia, and irreversibly altered diatom community structure within just a few years. Iroquoian settlement in the region declined in the fifteenth century, yet diatom communities and lake circulation never recovered to the predisturbance state. A second phase of cultural eutrophication starting in A.D. 1867, initiated by Canadian agricultural disturbance, increased lake productivity but had comparatively less of an impact on diatom assemblages and carbon-storage pathways than the initial Iroquoian disturbance. This study deepens our understanding of the impact of cultural eutrophication on lake systems, highlights the lasting influence of initial environmental perturbation, and contributes to the debate on the ecological impacts of density and agricultural practices of native North American inhabitants.

  4. Ageing of low-firing prehistoric ceramics in hydrothermal conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Zemenová

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Remains of a prehistoric ceramic object, a moon-shaped idol from the Bronze Age found in archaeological site Zdiby near Prague in the Czech Republic, were studied especially in terms of the firing temperature. Archaeological ceramics was usually fired at temperatures below 1000 °C. It contained unstable non-crystalline products, residua after calcination of clay components of a ceramic material. These products as metakaolinite can undergo a reverse rehydration to a structure close to kaolinite. The aim of this work was to prove whether the identified kaolinite in archaeological ceramics is a product of rehydration. The model compound containing high amount of kaolinite was prepared in order to follow its changes during calcination and hydrothermal treatment. Archaeological ceramics and the model compound were treated by hydrothermal ageing and studied by XRF, XRD and IR analyses. It was proved that the presence of kaolinite in the border-parts of the archaeological object was not a product of rehydration, but that it originated from the raw materials.

  5. Teeth size reduction in the prehistoric populations in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajević Tina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Anthropological studies show craniofacial changes with a reduction in teeth size during evolution of the human population. Objective. The objective was to measure and compare the sizes of teeth in the population of the Mesolithic-Neolithic sites in the Iron Gate Gorge and the population from the Early Bronze Age site of Mokrin. Methods. The study included teeth without advanced wear near the pulp. The material was divided according to the site of the skeletal population in two groups. Group 1 comprised 107 teeth from the Mesolithic-Neolithic sites Lepenski Vir and Vlasac. Group 2 included 158 teeth from the Mokrin graveyard dated in the Early Bronze Age. The mesio-distal diameter was measured in all teeth, while the vestibulo-oral diameter was measured in the molars only. Using the two-factor analysis of variance, the influence of sex, site and their interaction on the size of the teeth were investigated. Results. The vestibulo-oral diameter of the upper third molar was significantly higher in males compared to females. The comparison between the groups showed that the vestibulooral diameter of the lower first molar was significantly higher in group 1. Conclusion. The present difference in teeth size indicates the existence of reduction during the prehistoric times. However, the time period between the populations studied is probably too short to be manifested on a large number of teeth.

  6. Diet adaptation in dog reflects spread of prehistoric agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, M; Cairns, K M; Ballard, J W O; Savolainen, P; Axelsson, E

    2016-11-01

    Adaptations allowing dogs to thrive on a diet rich in starch, including a significant AMY2B copy number gain, constituted a crucial step in the evolution of the dog from the wolf. It is however not clear whether this change was associated with the initial domestication, or represents a secondary shift related to the subsequent development of agriculture. Previous efforts to study this process were based on geographically limited data sets and low-resolution methods, and it is therefore not known to what extent the diet adaptations are universal among dogs and whether there are regional differences associated with alternative human subsistence strategies. Here we use droplet PCR to investigate worldwide AMY2B copy number diversity among indigenous as well as breed dogs and wolves to elucidate how a change in dog diet was associated with the domestication process and subsequent shifts in human subsistence. We find that AMY2B copy numbers are bimodally distributed with high copy numbers (median 2nAMY2B=11) in a majority of dogs but no, or few, duplications (median 2nAMY2B=3) in a small group of dogs originating mostly in Australia and the Arctic. We show that this pattern correlates geographically to the spread of prehistoric agriculture and conclude that the diet change may not have been associated with initial domestication but rather the subsequent development and spread of agriculture to most, but not all regions of the globe.

  7. Some thoughts on the beginning of prehistoric archery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz Ibáñez, Francisco Javier

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the study of the possible origin of prehistoric archery during the Upper Solutrean in Mediterranean Iberia. From analysis of the light arrowheads of the Extracantabrian Solutrean (barbed and tanged point and the shouldered points of Mediterranean type are established the ballistics characteristic of this type of tool kit. These characteristics permit us to establish some hypothesis on the function in relation to their mounting and propulsion.

    En este trabajo se aborda el posible origen de la arquería prehistórica durante el Solutrense Superior en la vertiente mediterránea de la Península Ibérica. A partir del análisis de las puntas ligeras de proyectil del Solutrense Extracantábrico (punta de aletas y pedúnculo y punta de muesca de tipo mediterráneo se establecen las características balísticas de este tipo de utillaje. Estas características permiten establecer algunas hipótesis sobre su funcionalidad en relación a los sistemas de engaste y propulsión.

  8. 原始文化中的二元逻辑与史前考古艺术形象%Dual Logic in Primitive Culture and Artistic Figures in Prehistoric Archaeology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤惠生; 田旭东

    2001-01-01

    Using the theory of dual opposites, the present paper studies archaeological data incombination with early man's thinking and ideas. From the angle of Shaman cosmogony, the thought ofdual opposites and their cultural concepts, its puts forward new interpretations on numerous commonly-seen designs, such as the depiction of a bird pecking a fish, tao-tie mask, hooked-cloud pattern, birddesign, human face design, and the depiction of the Royal lord of the East and the Royal lady of theWest. Furthermore, the author summarizes the three developmental stages of dual logic and the significance of the thought of dual opposites in primitive culture and prehistoric archaeology.

  9. Shirataki obsidian exploitation and circulation in prehistoric northern Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyuki Yakushige

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Presently, the total number of archaeological obsidian sources in Japan is more than 80, and among them, 21 are in Hokkaido, northern part of the Japanese archipelago (Izuho and Sato 2007. Obsidian was the dominant of lithic raw material in the Upper Paleolithic Hokkaido (35-10 ka cal BP. Out of 21 archaeological obsidian sources in Hokkaido, 4 sources: Shirataki, Oketo, Tokachi, and Akaigawa are the major obsidian sources and the others are minor sources. Shirataki is one of the largest obsidian sources in Northeast Asia and it is well known that Shirataki obsidian was transported outside Hokkaido to Sakhalin and the Paleo-Honshu Island from the Late Upper Paleolithic period.We compiled data of obsidian source analyses conducted to artefacts from Paleolithic sites in Hokkaido, and it became clear that the ratio of Shirataki obsidian in all analyzed materials is more than half (Sato and Yakushige in press.We examined how far Shirataki obsidian was transported in each period: the Early Upper Paleolithic (35-25 ka cal BP and the Late Upper Paleolithic (25-10 ka cal BP. The Late Upper Paleolithic is divided into three stage, the early Early Microblade Industry (Stage 1: 25-21 ka cal BP, the late Early Microblade Industry (Stage 2: 19-16 ka cal BP, and the Late Microblade Industry (Stage 3: 16-10 ka cal BP. As a result, it is revealed that the distribution areas of Shirataki obsidian did not expand gradually over time, but are different in different lithic industries. In the background of this situation lay the difference of ecological adaptation strategies adopted by the prehistoric people of the time and their movement behavioral strategies.

  10. Crafting a new science: defining paleoanthropology and its relationship to prehistoric archaeology, 1860-1890.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrum, Matthew R

    2014-12-01

    Paleoanthropology emerged as a science during the late nineteenth century. The discovery of prehistoric artifacts in Pleistocene deposits soon led to the excavation of fossilized human bones. The archaeologists and geologists who unearthed them were primarily concerned with determining whether the human fossils and the artifacts found with them actually dated from the Pleistocene, thus offering evidence for the geological antiquity of humans. Prehistoric archaeologists reconstructed the way of life of prehistoric peoples through the artifacts found, while anthropologists examined the human fossils. They wanted primarily to identify the races of prehistoric humans. It was within this context that French anthropologists began to use the term "paléo-anthropologie" to refer to a new scientific discipline devoted to the study of prehistoric human races and human paleontology. This essay examines how paleoanthropology was defined as a science during the 1870s and 1880s. It shows that a tension existed between the objectives and methods of archaeologists and anthropologists. Paul Topinard criticized archaeologists and argued that a new type of scientist; the paleoanthropologist trained in anatomy or zoology, was needed to study human fossils properly.

  11. SONIC: workbook evaluations from students using web-based resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Carolyn; Currie, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) or enquiry-based learning (EBL) methods are frequently used within UK nursing curricula in order to support students in their learning. At the same time students are increasingly using electronic resources for information to support their learning. Following a successful Fund for the Development of Teaching (FDTL-phase 4) award, the Students Online in Nursing Integrated Curricula (SONIC) project ran from 2002 to 2005. This project developed and evaluated web-based resource-enriched scenarios to support students using PBL or EBL. This collaborative project across four institutions also included another six institutions in the evaluations. To facilitate evaluation a workbook was devised enabling data to be obtained from a total of 241 students from across different branches. Evaluations showed that they welcomed the open access and particular resources such as the animations, the hyperlinks, and the self-assessment quizzes. Whilst the evaluations did not ascertain the impact on students' learning, they nevertheless demonstrate that the students themselves regarded the resources as supplemental to, rather than substituting other approaches to learning. The development of these resources took place in nursing departments and interest has been demonstrated by a number of other professions nationally and internationally.

  12. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 Software Validation and Verification.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, David

    2014-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve stores crude oil in caverns solution-mined in salt domes along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Texas. The CaveMan software program has been used since the late 1990s as one tool to analyze pressure mea- surements monitored at each cavern. The purpose of this monitoring is to catch potential cavern integrity issues as soon as possible. The CaveMan software was written in Microsoft Visual Basic, and embedded in a Microsoft Excel workbook; this method of running the CaveMan software is no longer sustainable. As such, a new version called CaveMan Enter- prise has been developed. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 does not have any changes to the CaveMan numerical models. CaveMan Enterprise represents, instead, a change from desktop-managed work- books to an enterprise framework, moving data management into coordinated databases and porting the numerical modeling codes into the Python programming language. This document provides a report of the code validation and verification testing.

  13. Creating Your Strategic Plan A Workbook for Public and Nonprofit Organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Bryson, John M

    2011-01-01

    Creating Your Strategic Plan is the best-selling companion workbook to Bryson's landmark book, Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations. Whether used with the main text or by itself, this thoroughly revised third edition provides a step-by-step guide to putting strategic planning to work in public and nonprofit organizations. The workbook contains new and revised worksheets and additional material on readiness assessment, teamwork, stakeholder analysis, visioning, strategic issue identification, and implementation. Creating Your Strategic Plan covers each of the ten key steps

  14. Implementing and Sustaining Your Strategic Plan A Workbook for Public and Nonprofit Organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Bryson, John M; Alston, Farnum K

    2011-01-01

    Based on John Bryson's acclaimed comprehensive approach to strategic planning, the Implementing and Sustaining Your Strategic Plan workbook provides a step-by-step process, tools, techniques, and worksheets to help successfully implement, manage, and troubleshoot an organization's strategy over the long haul. This new and immensely practical workbook helps organizations work through the typical challenges of leading implementation for sustained change. It spotlights the importance of effective leadership for long-term successful strategic plan implementation. The authors include a wealth of to

  15. Radiocarbon-dating and ancient DNA reveal rapid replacement of extinct prehistoric penguins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Perry, George L. W.; Smith, Ian W. G.; Scofield, R. Paul; Tennyson, Alan J. D.; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth A.; Boessenkool, Sanne; Austin, Jeremy J.; Waters, Jonathan M.

    2015-03-01

    Prehistoric faunal extinctions dramatically reshaped biological assemblages around the world. However, the timing of such biotic shifts is often obscured by the fragmentary nature and limited temporal resolution of fossil records. We use radiocarbon-dating and ancient-DNA analysis of prehistoric (ca A.D. 1450-1834) Megadyptes penguin specimens to assess the time-frame of biological turnover in coastal New Zealand following human settlement. These data suggest that the final extirpation of the endemic Megadyptes waitaha, and subsequent replacement by the previously sub-Antarctic-limited Megadyptes antipodes, likely occurred within a narrow temporal window (e.g. a century or less). This transition represents one of the most rapid prehistoric faunal turnover events documented, and is likely linked to human demographic and cultural transitions during the 15th Century. Our results suggest that anthropogenic forces can trigger rapid biogeographic shifts.

  16. Operation of Oil Burning Equipment and Incinerators. An Air Pollution Control Workbook, Preliminary Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Jersey State Dept. of Environmental Protection, Trenton. Bureau of Air Pollution Control.

    This workbook has been prepared for use by persons charged with the burning of fuels and waste products in the State of New Jersey. It is written for building superintendents, custodians, porters, handymen and operating engineers of public, apartment, commercial and office buildings. The manual emphasizes operating procedures that will help meet…

  17. Having an Operation: An ESL Workbook. English as a Second Language Community Survival Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Myrna

    This workbook, written in simple English with pictographs, helps adult learners of English in British Columbia (Canada) deal with biological and medical needs and hospital patient visits. Lessons include parts of the body, nurses' and doctors' examination and instructions, general health problems, hospital items, hospital admissions, and pre- and…

  18. Fundamentals of Welding. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike; New, Larry

    Teacher and student editions and a student workbook for fundamentals of welding comprise the first of six in a series of competency-based instructional materials for welding programs. Introductory pages in the teacher edition are training and competency profile, instructional/task analysis, basic skills icons and classifications, basic skills…

  19. Oxyacetylene Welding and Oxyfuel Cutting. Third Edition. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, John; Harper, Eddie

    This Oklahoma curriculum guide, which includes a teacher edition, a student edition, and a student workbook, provides three units for a course on oxyacetylene welding, oxyfuel cutting, and cutting done with alternative fuels such as MAPP, propane, and natural gas. The three units are: "Oxyacetylene Welding"; "Oxyfuel Cutting";…

  20. Mi Libro: Initial Reading in Spanish--Pre-Reading Workbook, Teacher's Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Anthony R.; Bean, Shirley

    This workbook was designed to be used during the pre-reading stage of the "Initial Reading in Spanish" program. It may serve as a practice book, an initial primer, and a coloring book. The lessons emphasize two main areas of development: motor skills and the understanding of concepts such as color, size, shapes, numbers, and emotions. Muscular…

  1. Otros amigos, otras culturas: Libro de actividades, 2 (Other Friends, Other Cultures: Workbook 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Emiliano; And Others

    This workbook was designed for use with the textbook of the same name. It contains exercises for the recognition of sounds and letters, reading comprehension, oral expression, and the use of diphthongs, compound words, idioms, synonyms and antonyms, word families, and dictionaries. The presentation includes drawings, puzzles, and games with color…

  2. Instruction Workbook for Tracheostomy Suctioning and Misting in a School Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Karen McKinney; Roach, Antionette Andolfatto

    The handbook presents California guidelines for training school personnel to provide skilled nursing procedures such as tracheostomy suctioning and misting for students with special health needs. The workbook begins with an overview of the anatomy and function of the respiratory system, specifically breathing mechanics. Part 2 considers the…

  3. Assessing and Improving Student Organizations: Student Workbook. The Assessing and Improving Student Organization (AISO) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolfi, Tricia; Ruben, Brent D.

    2010-01-01

    This "Workbook" is intended for student participants during the AISO (Assessing and Improving Student Organization) assessment and planning sessions, and to be used in tandem with the "Guide for Students". Each page presents an action or reflection slide from the "Guide" with a space below for participants to note their own ideas, outcomes of…

  4. Barbering/Cosmetology, Module 6-10: Bilingual Vocational Language Development Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito.

    This vocabulary language development workbook accompanies modules 6-10 in the barbering/cosmetology course of the Bilingual Skills Training Program (CE 028 314-318). For each module the trade-related vocabulary to be learned and practiced is first presented in both English and Spanish. Various types of activities and exercises using both the…

  5. Linguistic Gender Sensitivity Strategies in Current South African Intermediate Phase English Workbooks: Feminisation or Degenderisation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Jabulani; Sibanda, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    This study extends research on manifestations of gender insensitivity in learners' reading materials by shifting attention to the linguistic strategies that authors of current texts employ for the realisation of gender sensitivity. We analysed the content of 12 current (2014) English workbooks (Grade 4-6) used in South African government and…

  6. Creating Interactive Student Workbook for Primary Education Social Studies Class and Researching Its Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulu Kalin, Özlem

    2017-01-01

    Student workbook is an education material including components that support learning, help ensuring knowledge and ability to students in line with the acquisitions stated in teaching programs. Students have different learning styles and necessities. Their needs should be satisfied by benefiting from some additional materials in order to make their…

  7. Otros amigos, otras culturas: Libro de actividades, 2 (Other Friends, Other Cultures: Workbook 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Emiliano; And Others

    This workbook was designed for use with the textbook of the same name. It contains exercises for the recognition of sounds and letters, reading comprehension, oral expression, and the use of diphthongs, compound words, idioms, synonyms and antonyms, word families, and dictionaries. The presentation includes drawings, puzzles, and games with color…

  8. Comprehensive Instructional Management System (CIMS). A Cyclical Mathematics Curriculum. Workbook Part 2. Experimental. Level 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Joan; And Others

    The activities in this workbook are designed to provide pupils with practice in mastering the performance objectives of the Comprehensive Instructional Management System in mathematics for Level 3, Part 2, in New York City schools. It follows the sequence of the teacher's manual, with the objective number listed on each page. Over 80 performance…

  9. Comprehensive Instructional Management System (CIMS). A Cyclical Mathematics Curriculum. Workbook Part 1. Experimental. Level 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Joan; And Others

    The activities in this workbook are designed to provide pupils with practice in mastering the performance objectives of the Comprehensive Instructional Management System in mathematics for Level 4, Part 1, in New York City schools. It follows the sequence of the teacher's manual, with the objective number listed on each page. Over 85 performance…

  10. Comprehensive Instructional Management System (CIMS). A Cyclical Mathematics Curriculum. Workbook Part 2. Experimental. Level 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Joan; And Others

    The activities in this workbook are designed to provide pupils with practice in mastering the performance objectives of the Comprehensive Instructional Management System in mathematics for Level 4, Part 2, in New York City schools. It follows the sequence of the teacher's manual, with the objective number listed on each page. Over 80 performance…

  11. Comprehensive Instructional Management System (CIMS). A Cyclical Mathematics Curriculum. Workbook Part 1, Experimental. Level 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The activities in this workbook are designed to provide pupils with practice in mastering the performance objectives of the Comprehensive Instructional Management System (CIMS) in Mathematics for Level 2, Part 1, in New York City schools. It follows the sequence of the teacher's manual, with the objective number listed on each page. The 85…

  12. Comprehensive Instructional Management System (CIMS). A Cyclical Mathematics Curriculum. Workbook Part 2, Experimental. Level 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The activities in this mathematics workbook are designed to provide pupils with practice in mastering the performance objectives of Level 2, Part 2, in the Comprehensive Instructional Management System (CIMS) for New York City schools. It follows the sequence of the teacher's manual, with the objective number listed on each page. The 128…

  13. Comprehensive Instructional Management System (CIMS). A Cyclical Mathematics Curriculum. Workbook Part 1. Experimental. Level 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Joan; And Others

    The activities in this workbook are designed to provide pupils with practice in mastering the performance objectives of the Comprehensive Instructional Management System in mathematics for Level 3, Part 1, in New York City schools. It follows the sequence of the teacher's manual, with the objective number listed on each page. Over 80 performance…

  14. English for Driving--Visuals for Use with Student Workbook and Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. Bryan

    Intended for use in conjunction with an accompanying student workbook and teacher's guide, this flip chart consists of illustrations of vocabulary items critical to understanding a driver education training class. A short explanation and a list of questions and responses for use with the visuals are also included. Among those items illustrated in…

  15. Que bonito es leer! III. Cuaderno de ejercicios (How Nice It Is to Read! III. Workbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    This is the third and last unit in a series designed to provide the Spanish-speaking child with a complete language arts and reading program for grades 1-3. It focuses on the development of decoding, encoding, comprehension, and interpretation skills. This third grade workbook, one component of the language arts unit, contains 22 chapters with…

  16. Aerobic Digestion. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopping, Paul H.

    This lesson is a basic description of aerobic digestion. Topics presented include a general process overview discussion of a typical digester's components, factors influencing performance, operational controls, and biological considerations for successful operation. The lesson includes an instructor's guide and student workbook. The instructor's…

  17. Linguistic Gender Sensitivity Strategies in Current South African Intermediate Phase English Workbooks: Feminisation or Degenderisation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Jabulani; Sibanda, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    This study extends research on manifestations of gender insensitivity in learners' reading materials by shifting attention to the linguistic strategies that authors of current texts employ for the realisation of gender sensitivity. We analysed the content of 12 current (2014) English workbooks (Grade 4-6) used in South African government and…

  18. Anaerobic Digestion II. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasmith, E. E.

    This lesson is the second of a two-part series on anaerobic digestion. Topics discussed include classification of digester by function, roof design, and temperature range, mixing systems, gas system components, operational control basics, and general safety considerations. The lesson includes an instructor's guide and student workbook. The…

  19. Anaerobic Digestion I. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasmith, E. E.

    This lesson is the first of a two-part series on anaerobic digestion. Topics discussed include the five basic functions of an anaerobic digester, basic theory of the biological processes involved, basic equipment necessary for digestion, and the products of digestion. The lesson includes an instructor's guide and student workbook. The instructor's…

  20. Grammaire francaise pour etudiants americains (French Grammar for American Students): Workbook and Answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giauque, Gerald S.

    This workbook in French grammar, intended for American college students, provides instruction and practice in French morphology, syntax, vocabulary, punctuation, and language style at the intermediate level. It is also designed to increase or reinforce the students' understanding of English grammar, based on the assumption that American students…

  1. The oldest man ever?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilmoth, J; Skytthe, A; Friou, D

    1996-01-01

    This article summarizes recent findings in a case study of exceptional longevity. CM, a resident of San Rafael, California, was 114 years old in August 1996. He is the first properly verified case of a 114-year-old man in human history (although a few women have been known to live longer). Our...... is accurate. Based on the available information, it also seems a reasonable conjecture that he may be the oldest man alive today and perhaps the oldest man who has ever lived. This study documents an extreme example of human longevity and records characteristics of the man's life that may provide clues about...

  2. The phenomenon of prehistoric ritual pits: Several examples from the central Balkans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulatović Aleksandar P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the phenomenon of pits with special deposits, i.e. ritual pits, seems to have, once again, attracted attention both in Europe and in the Balkans. In the central Balkans, scientific literature related to this topic is still deficient, hence one of the objectives of this paper is to change the current state and rekindle interest in the study of this form of manifestation of the spiritual culture of prehistoric man. It appears that one of the oldest reasons for sacrificial offerings is primal, instinctive fear. The fear of the transience of life or of death compelled our ancient ancestors to make some sort of “agreement” with the surrounding forces, bestowing particular sacrifices onto them. Sacrifice represents one of the rituals of prehistoric communities which could have been performed in a number of ways and in different circumstances. One of these are offerings placed in pits, in the form of specific objects, food, drink or living beings sacrificed to higher powers and accompanied by certain symbolic actions, for the purpose of gaining their favour or help. When interpreting pits, what should further be considered is that the fundamental difference between a discarded object and an object used for a ritual purpose lies in the fact that the object of ritual character is still meaningful to man, performing a symbolic function, unlike the former, whose role is lost after being disposed of. Aritual object, an item or a living being sacrificed in a pit, is no longer of common, worldly significance (food, drink, tools, etc., but rather possesses a symbolic, sacral meaning, intended for higher powers, to propitiate and appease them, that is to create some form of the oldest religious communication. Not only is it difficult to identify the pits used for ritual purposes in the course of fieldwork, but it is even more challenging to interpret them and practically impossible to accurately reconstruct the actions performed during the

  3. Reconstructing Sub-Saharan, Mayan, and Other Prehistoric Civilizations in Mathematical Macro-Theory of Civilizations

    CERN Document Server

    Blaha, S

    2003-01-01

    A study of the Great Zimbabwe Sub-Saharan civilization, Mayan civilization and other prehistoric civilizations within the framework of a mathematical macro theory of civilizations. We show these isolated and early civilizations conform to the general mathematical theory of civilizations in detail.

  4. Age of a prehistoric "Rodedian" cult site constrained by sediment and rock surface luminescence dating techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza; Murray, Andrew; Porat, N.

    2015-01-01

    The construction age of a pavement in a “Rodedian” prehistoric cult site in Negev desert, Israel, is established by determining the burial age of (i) a cobble used in the pavement, and (ii) the underlying sediment. The quartz OSL age and the K-feldspar corrected IR50 age from the sediment and the...

  5. Non-destructive provenance differentiation of prehistoric pigments by external PIXE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, L.; Salomon, H.; Lahlil, S.; Lebon, M.; Odin, G. P.; Coquinot, Y.; Pichon, L.

    2012-02-01

    The elemental analysis of minerals/rocks has been often used for the determination of their geological origin. When these natural rocks were exploited by prehistoric civilizations as objects, weapons, or pigments, the composition of the minerals can provide information on the mobility, the exchanges and the interaction between groups of population. In this paper, we will present results obtained from archaeological samples of prehistoric pigments, mainly iron and manganese oxides. PIXE analysis has been applied to samples of the prehistoric cave "La grotte du Renne" in Arcy-sur-Cure, France (Chatelperronian, 38,000-34,000 BP). Because most of the archaeological objects are decorated or display some use marks, it is not possible to take samples. Consequently, we have used a non-destructive technique thanks to the external beam of AGLAE (C2RMF, Paris). In order to improve the limits of detection (LOD less than 10 ppm from Cu to Sb), a metal absorber has been placed on the X-ray detector to preferentially filter the Fe-K or Mn-K lines. Based on the quantitative analysis of major and trace elements, we have obtained groups of compositions corresponding to different geological sources. We demonstrate in this study that it is possible to extend PIXE analysis to the characterization of prehistoric pigments such as iron and manganese oxides for differentiating potential sources of pigments in archaeological contexts.

  6. Trajectories and temporalities of later prehistoric embanked field systems in Northwestern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvschal, Mette; Arnoldussen, Stijn

    2017-01-01

    This paper offers the first systematic account of the development of late prehistoric landscape enclosure, in Northwestern Europe. The study provides groundbreaking core research in that it builds on an exceptionally large amount of dated sites as well as highly detailed micro scale evidence, com...

  7. A site for all seasons? Prehistoric coastal subsistence in northwest Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Mannino

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been much debate about the role of marine resources, including shellfish, in prehistoric human diets, but there have been few studies that combine archaeological and present-day ecological investigations of coastal sites. This dual approach is being applied in a new field- and laboratory-based project that focuses on a group of coastal sites in northwest Sicily.

  8. Prehistoric (Chalcolithic) Eastern Mediterranean tsunami deposit identified offshore central Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyuleneva, Natalia; Braun, Yael; Suchkov, Igor; Goodman-Tchernov, Beverly

    2017-04-01

    The shallow shelf area ( 15-30 m water depth) offshore Israel, bears great potential for paleo-tsunami studies. It was shown in the course of previous research that in these offshore marine deposits, tsunami generated sedimentary layers can be well preserved and readily identified; unlike in onshore sedimentary sequences, which experience continuous exogenous natural and anthropogenic influence. A sediment core, 219 cm long, was obtained from 15.3 m water depth, in about 4 km north of Caesarea. Grain size at 1 cm interval as well as XRD and XRF analyses at coarser resolution were performed. Previously carried out research allowed correlation of two anomalous layers in this core with well described sediment sequences offshore Caesarea. These two events correspond best with the proposed events of 749 AD and 1500 BC. Identified unusual layers in this core bear certain set of proxies that are characteristic for tsunami generated deposits and easily distinguished from the local normal marine setting. The latter is characterized by three dominating mineralogical components, such as carbonaceous sand derived either from biogenic material, namely shell fragments or from eroded limestones and dolomites that outcrop the mountains to the east; siliciclastic quartz for the sand fraction and mineral smectite for the clays. The supply of the two latter terrigenous sedimentary components comes from the Nile River, which has been a stable and predominant source of sediments for the past 8 ka. The aim of this study is to characterize the earliest unusual sedimentary layer found down core between 191 and 211 cm. This layer was attributed to a tsunami-generated sedimentary sequence in the studied core. Absolute age determination based on 14C gave the time frame from 5.6 to 6 ka BP, making this event the oldest identified in the Eastern Mediterranean to date. This tsunami corresponds to the Chalcolithic ('Copper Age') cultural period of the region. Prehistoric age of these sediments

  9. "Det man siger er man selv..."

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsby, Torben; Nørgaard, Britta; Uddholm, Mats

    forhold, der er hermeneutisk, strukturelt og relationelt bestemt. Praksisviden kan ikke være objektiv i gængs forstand, men det behøver ikke at diskvalificere denne viden. Forståelse er altid knyttet til den sag og bundet til den situation man står overfor og i som professionel og som menneske....

  10. The Green Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Newlin, Karen

    2010-01-01

    The Jolly Green Giant. Robin Hood. The Bamberg Cathedral. Tales of King Arthur. Ecology. What do they have in common? What legends and ancient myths are shrouded in the tales of the Green Man? Most often perceived as an ancient Celtic symbol as the god of spring and summer, the Green Man disappears and returns year after year, century after…

  11. Man of Fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Helene Juarez

    1993-01-01

    The themes of Jose Clemente Orozco's murals, several of which are found on U.S. college campuses, are as relevant today as they were during the Mexican Revolution. Orozco (1883-1949) painted the world as he saw it, portraying corruption, violence, and man's inhumanity to man. (LP)

  12. Man's Role in Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Roger Tory

    1975-01-01

    Presents a viewpoint that the civilized man, the humane man, accepts not only the humane ethic but also the conservationist's philosophy and the environmentalist's point of view because all these views are overlapping, interlocking and essential to a better and more civilized world. (BR)

  13. THE MAN NATIONALITY WOMEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    The Man nationality,with a population of 9,821,180,live in northeast China,mainly in Liaoning Province.They have their own language,but now most of the Man nationality people use Mandarin Chinese except for a few elderly people in the remote villages of Heilongjiang Province.

  14. The Green Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Newlin, Karen

    2010-01-01

    The Jolly Green Giant. Robin Hood. The Bamberg Cathedral. Tales of King Arthur. Ecology. What do they have in common? What legends and ancient myths are shrouded in the tales of the Green Man? Most often perceived as an ancient Celtic symbol as the god of spring and summer, the Green Man disappears and returns year after year, century after…

  15. An Excel Workbook for Identifying Redox Processes in Ground Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; McMahon, Peter B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    The reduction/oxidation (redox) condition of ground water affects the concentration, transport, and fate of many anthropogenic and natural contaminants. The redox state of a ground-water sample is defined by the dominant type of reduction/oxidation reaction, or redox process, occurring in the sample, as inferred from water-quality data. However, because of the difficulty in defining and applying a systematic redox framework to samples from diverse hydrogeologic settings, many regional water-quality investigations do not attempt to determine the predominant redox process in ground water. Recently, McMahon and Chapelle (2008) devised a redox framework that was applied to a large number of samples from 15 principal aquifer systems in the United States to examine the effect of redox processes on water quality. This framework was expanded by Chapelle and others (in press) to use measured sulfide data to differentiate between iron(III)- and sulfate-reducing conditions. These investigations showed that a systematic approach to characterize redox conditions in ground water could be applied to datasets from diverse hydrogeologic settings using water-quality data routinely collected in regional water-quality investigations. This report describes the Microsoft Excel workbook, RedoxAssignment_McMahon&Chapelle.xls, that assigns the predominant redox process to samples using the framework created by McMahon and Chapelle (2008) and expanded by Chapelle and others (in press). Assignment of redox conditions is based on concentrations of dissolved oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3-), manganese (Mn2+), iron (Fe2+), sulfate (SO42-), and sulfide (sum of dihydrogen sulfide [aqueous H2S], hydrogen sulfide [HS-], and sulfide [S2-]). The logical arguments for assigning the predominant redox process to each sample are performed by a program written in Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The program is called from buttons on the main worksheet. The number of samples that can be analyzed

  16. New evidence for the catastrophic demise of a prehistoric settlement (the Lajia Ruins) in the Guanting Basin, upper Yellow River, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Huang, Chun Chang; Zheng, Zixing; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Yuzhu; Guo, Yongqiang; Zhou, Qiang

    2017-09-01

    The Lajia Ruins in the Guanting Basin, NW China, are a product of the prehistoric Qijia Culture. Like Pompeii, they are a rare example of an archaeological site preserved by a natural disaster and are therefore important in archaeology, anthropology and geology. However, the nature of the disaster(s) responsible for the destruction of the site remains controversial. Most studies have focused on an earthquake and a red clay layer directly overlying the site and a detailed stratigraphic study of the mid-Holocene sedimentary strata combined with other intervals of red clay deposition (hence possible disasters) is lacking. We identified a mid-Holocene paleosol sequence (the Shanglajia section) at the site which contains two layers of red clay, dated to 3950 a BP and 3500 a BP, intercalated within the mid-Holocene paleosol (S0). Subsequent multi-proxy analysis indicated that the characteristics of the two red clay layers resemble those of typical Tertiary red clay deposits and the modern gully deposit at the foot of the Great Red Hills, but are distinctly different from those of the slackwater deposits of the Yellow River and the mid-Holocene paleosol. Our results suggest that, at 3950 a BP and 3500 a BP, two large-scale rainstorm-induced mudflow events, originating from the gullies to the north, flooded the Lajia area on the second terrace of the Yellow River, devastating and burying the human settlements. We infer that the intensified erosion and mass wasting were caused by human activity; in addition, natural factors such as rainstorms and earthquakes, may also have played an important role in triggering catastrophic mudflow events in the Tertiary Red Clay deposits. Overall, our results provide further insights into prehistoric man-land relationships in this environmentally sensitive region which may have implications for modern land use in this region of China and elsewhere.

  17. Manned Flight Simulator (MFS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Aircraft Simulation Division, home to the Manned Flight Simulator (MFS), provides real-time, high fidelity, hardware-in-the-loop flight simulation capabilities...

  18. Manned systems technology discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretoi, Remus

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on manned systems technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: crew-systems interfaces and interactions; crew training; on-board systems maintenance and support; habitability and environment; and computational human factors.

  19. Rekordhind Man Ray eest

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    Ameerika sürrealistliku fotograafi Man Ray 1926. a. Pariisis pildistatud foto 'Must ja valge, Pariis (positiiv ja negatiiv)', mis kujutab Ray armukese Kiki de Montparnasse'i portreed, maksis New Yorgi fotooksjonil 7, 3 miljonit Eesti krooni

  20. Rekordhind Man Ray eest

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    Ameerika sürrealistliku fotograafi Man Ray 1926. a. Pariisis pildistatud foto 'Must ja valge, Pariis (positiiv ja negatiiv)', mis kujutab Ray armukese Kiki de Montparnasse'i portreed, maksis New Yorgi fotooksjonil 7, 3 miljonit Eesti krooni

  1. The Development of Man and His Culture: Old World Prehistory. Grade 5. Teacher Guide [And] Pupil Text [And] Pupil Guide [And] Teacher Background Material [And] A Sequential Curriculum in Anthropology. Test Form 5, Composite Form for Pre- and Post-Test. Revised, January 1968. Publications No. 25, 31, 23, 24 and 43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potterfield, James E.; And Others

    This social studies unit includes a teaching guide, student text, study guide, teacher background material, and composite pretest/posttest covering archaeological methods, evolution, fossils and man, and development of culture during the prehistoric periods in the Old World. It is part of the Anthropology Curriculum Project and is designed for…

  2. Man & Sound Environment 2010.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Proceedings to the conference "Man and Sound Environment 2010" arranged by The sound Envirnment Center at Lund university. Ulf Landström, Swedish Noise Research Network & Frans Mossberg The Sound Environment Centre at Lund university. CONTENTS: Preface – Symposium “Man and Sound Environment 2010” The prevalence of noise problems. Gunn Marit Aasvang, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Department of Environmental Medicine, Nydalen, Oslo, Norway Effects of ...

  3. Phytoliths in pottery reveal the use of spice in European prehistoric cuisine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley Saul

    Full Text Available Here we present evidence of phytoliths preserved in carbonised food deposits on prehistoric pottery from the western Baltic dating from 6,100 cal BP to 5750 cal BP. Based on comparisons to over 120 European and Asian species, our observations are consistent with phytolith morphologies observed in modern garlic mustard seed (Alliaria petiolata (M. Bieb Cavara & Grande. As this seed has a strong flavour, little nutritional value, and the phytoliths are found in pots along with terrestrial and marine animal residues, these findings are the first direct evidence for the spicing of food in European prehistoric cuisine. Our evidence suggests a much greater antiquity to the spicing of foods than is evident from the macrofossil record, and challenges the view that plants were exploited by hunter-gatherers and early agriculturalists solely for energy requirements, rather than taste.

  4. Phytoliths in pottery reveal the use of spice in European prehistoric cuisine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, Hayley; Madella, Marco; Fischer, Anders; Glykou, Aikaterini; Hartz, Sönke; Craig, Oliver E

    2013-01-01

    Here we present evidence of phytoliths preserved in carbonised food deposits on prehistoric pottery from the western Baltic dating from 6,100 cal BP to 5750 cal BP. Based on comparisons to over 120 European and Asian species, our observations are consistent with phytolith morphologies observed in modern garlic mustard seed (Alliaria petiolata (M. Bieb) Cavara & Grande). As this seed has a strong flavour, little nutritional value, and the phytoliths are found in pots along with terrestrial and marine animal residues, these findings are the first direct evidence for the spicing of food in European prehistoric cuisine. Our evidence suggests a much greater antiquity to the spicing of foods than is evident from the macrofossil record, and challenges the view that plants were exploited by hunter-gatherers and early agriculturalists solely for energy requirements, rather than taste.

  5. The Lost Worlds of Messmore & Damon: Science, Spectacle & Prehistoric Monsters in early-twentieth century America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manias, Chris

    2016-09-01

    In 1924, the model-making company Messmore & Damon, Inc. of New York unleashed their masterpiece: the Amphibious Dinosaurus Brontosaurus, a moving, breathing, roaring animatronic dinosaur, based on displays in the American Museum of Natural History. Over the 1920s and 1930s, this became the focus of an ever-increasing publicity campaign, as Messmore & Damon exhibited prehistoric automata in department stores, the media, and the Chicago World Fair of 1933-34. These displays were hugely popular and widely discussed, drawing from the increasing public appeal of paleontology. Mixing commercial entertainment with invocations of scientific value, Messmore & Damon's prehistoric creations offer a window into the meaning and popularity of the deep time sciences in early-twentieth century America, and the links between science and spectacle in this period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Facile residue analysis of recent and prehistoric cook-stones using handheld Raman spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Short, Laura; Cao, Bin; Sinyukov, Alexander M; Joshi, Amitabh; Scully, Rob; Sanders, Virgil; Voronine, Dmitri V

    2013-01-01

    We performed food residue analysis of cook-stones from experimental and prehistoric earth ovens using a handheld Raman spectrometry. Progress in modern optical technology provides a facile means of rapid non-destructive identification of residue artifacts from archaeological sites. For this study spectral signatures were obtained on sotol (Dasylirion spp.) experimentally baked in an earth oven as well as sotol residue on an experimentally used processing tool. Inulin was the major residue component. The portable handheld Raman spectrometer also detected traces of inulin on boiling stones used to boil commercially obtained inulin. The Raman spectra of inulin and sotol may be useful as signatures of wild plant residues in archaeology. Spectroscopic analysis of millennia-old cook-stones from prehistoric archaeological sites in Fort Hood, TX revealed the presence of residues whose further identification requires improvement of current optical methods.

  7. A comparison of online versus workbook delivery of a self-help positive parenting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Matthew R; Dittman, Cassandra K; Farruggia, Susan P; Keown, Louise J

    2014-06-01

    A noninferiority randomized trial design compared the efficacy of two self-help variants of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program: an online version and a self-help workbook. We randomly assigned families of 193 children displaying early onset disruptive behavior difficulties to the online (N = 97) or workbook (N = 96) interventions. Parents completed questionnaire measures of child behavior, parenting, child maltreatment risk, personal adjustment and relationship quality at pre- and post-intervention and again at 6-month follow up. The short-term intervention effects of the Triple P Online program were not inferior to the workbook on the primary outcomes of disruptive child behavior and dysfunctional parenting as reported by both mothers and fathers. Both interventions were associated with significant and clinically meaningful declines from pre- to post-intervention in levels of disruptive child behavior, dysfunctional parenting styles, risk of child maltreatment, and inter-parental conflict on both mother and father report measures. Intervention effects were largely maintained at 6-month follow up, thus supporting the use of self-help parenting programs within a comprehensive population-based system of parenting support to reduce child maltreatment and behavioral problems in children.

  8. Impact of prehistoric cooking practices on paleoenvironmental proxies in shell midden constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Peter; Staudigel, Philip; Murray, Sean T.; Westphal, Hildegard; Swart, Peter K.

    2016-04-01

    Paleoenvironmental proxy records such as oxygen isotopes of calcareous skeletal structures like fish otoliths or mollusk shells provide highest-resolution information about environmental conditions experienced by the organism. Accumulations of such skeletal structures by ancient coastal populations in so called "shell midden" deposits provide us with sub-seasonally resolved paleoclimate records covering time spans up to several millennia. Given their high temporal resolution, these deposits are increasingly used for paleoclimate reconstructions and complement our understanding of ancient climate changes. However, gathered as comestibles, most of these skeletal remains were subject to prehistoric cooking methods prior to deposition. The associated alteration of the chemical proxy signatures as well as the subsequent error for paleoenvironmental reconstructions remained almost entirely neglected so far. Here, we present clumped isotope, conventional oxygen and carbon isotopes as well as element:Ca ratios measured in modern bivalve shells after exposing them to different prehistoric cooking methods. Our data show that most cooking methods considerably alter commonly used paleoclimate proxy systems which can lead to substantial misinterpretations of ancient climate conditions. Since the magnitude of chemical alteration is not distinguishable from natural temperature variability in most coastal settings, the alteration of shell midden constituents by prehistoric cooking remains likely unnoticed in most cases. Thus, depending on the cooking method, pre-depositional heating might have introduced considerable errors into previous paleoclimate studies. However, our data also show that clumped isotope thermometry represents a suitable diagnostic tool to detect such pre-depositional cooking events and also allows differentiating between the most commonly applied prehistoric cooking methods.

  9. GIS based reconstruction of the prehistoric communities' territories of the northern and central Velebit Mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedrana Glavaš

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A method for reconstructing prehistoric territories implementing the geographic information systems (GIS is presented in this article. We focused our research on Iron Age communities of northern and central Velebit Mountain (Croatia, but traces of their territorial extent are very scarce or nonexistent. Territories of the communities in question were modeled using GIS according to the relief characteristics and the time scale of a two-hour walk from the central hill forts using Tobler’s Hiking Equation.

  10. Diet of the prehistoric population of Rapa Nui (Easter Island, Chile) shows environmental adaptation and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarman, Catrine L; Larsen, Thomas; Hunt, Terry; Lipo, Carl; Solsvik, Reidar; Wallsgrove, Natalie; Ka'apu-Lyons, Cassie; Close, Hilary G; Popp, Brian N

    2017-10-01

    The Rapa Nui "ecocide" narrative questions whether the prehistoric population caused an avoidable ecological disaster through rapid deforestation and over-exploitation of natural resources. The objective of this study was to characterize prehistoric human diets to shed light on human adaptability and land use in an island environment with limited resources. Materials for this study included human, faunal, and botanical remains from the archaeological sites Anakena and Ahu Tepeu on Rapa Nui, dating from c. 1400 AD to the historic period, and modern reference material. We used bulk carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses and amino acid compound specific isotope analyses (AA-CSIA) of collagen isolated from prehistoric human and faunal bone, to assess the use of marine versus terrestrial resources and to investigate the underlying baseline values. Similar isotope analyses of archaeological and modern botanical and marine samples were used to characterize the local environment. Results of carbon and nitrogen AA-CSIA independently show that around half the protein in diets from the humans measured came from marine sources; markedly higher than previous estimates. We also observed higher δ(15) N values in human collagen than could be expected from the local environment. Our results suggest highly elevated δ(15) N values could only have come from consumption of crops grown in substantially manipulated soils. These findings strongly suggest that the prehistoric population adapted and exhibited astute environmental awareness in a harsh environment with nutrient poor soils. Our results also have implications for evaluating marine reservoir corrections of radiocarbon dates. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Craniometric variation and homogeneity in prehistoric/protohistoric Rapa Nui (Easter Island) regional populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V H

    1999-12-01

    Discrete cranial morphological traits of prehistoric/protohistoric Rapa Nui (Easter Island) inhabitants have been examined and have illustrated distinct regional or tribal differences; however, craniometric traits have not been as extensively evaluated to determine if similar regional population differences exist. This study examines the range of variability of Rapa Nui craniometrics and utilizes population genetic techniques to evaluate the level of homogeneity/heterogeneity within the island populations. The data consist of 50 cranio-facial measurements of Rapanui (Easter Islanders) skeletal material from the Late Prehistoric (1680-1722) and Protohistoric (1722-1868) periods. The sample was divided into five tribal regions: North, Northeast, South, Southwest, and West. General linear models (GLM) statistical analyses revealed one variable significant for males and 10 for females across tribal regions, totaling 11 regionally significant variables. Discriminant function analyses utilizing crossvalidation provided classification error rates of 55.8% males and 59.0% for females when utilizing those eleven significant variables. Minimum F(ST) values for males (0.06378) and females (0.09409) were calculated from unbiased Mahalanobis D(2) values. These values indicate that males have greater between-group homogeneity than females. The determinant ratio for the Northeast tribal region was the only significant ratio, yet all but one of the regional determinant ratios displayed a pattern of greater male than female mobility. These results indicate that significant craniometric differences between the tribal regions did not exist in prehistoric/protohistoric Rapa Nui populations, supporting the findings of previous research which has documented the homogeneity of the craniometrics of those tribal populations. The calculated minimum F(ST) values indicate the existence of different levels of heterogeneity between the male and female Rapa Nui regional populations resulting

  12. Det man hører, er man selv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svømmekjær, Heidi Frank

    2012-01-01

    Katalog til udstillingen "Det man hører, er man selv" på Mediemuseet i Odense 7. september 2012 - 15. januar 2013.......Katalog til udstillingen "Det man hører, er man selv" på Mediemuseet i Odense 7. september 2012 - 15. januar 2013....

  13. Hombres y Lugares. Que Bonito Es Leer, II. Libro IV. Cuaderno de Ejercicios (Men and Places. How Nice Reading Is, II. Book IV. Workbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    The exercises in the Spanish language workbook are intended to teach comprehension, interpretation, vocabulary, pronunciation, and study skills. The workbook provides one to five pages of reinforcement and follow-up work for each of the stories in the reader of the same title. Exercises stress sentence completion and construction, phonology,…

  14. Ch'al Dine K'eji Naaltsoos wolta Boho'aa'igii (Frog: Navajo Language Reader-Workbook). Book 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosier, Helen Cody; Benally, Louise

    The student reader-workbook, third part of the "Ch'al" series, presents activities to be done orally or by writing. Pages of the workbook are divided into two or three frames; each activity for a given frame should be completed before moving on to the next frame. A total of 23 words (14 consonants and 15 vowels) in the Navajo language are…

  15. Asi Aprendemos. Que Bonito Es Leer, II. Libro I. Cuaderno de Ejercicios (This Is How We Learn. How Nice Reading Is, II. Book I. Workbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    This workbook is intended to be used in connection with the reader of the same title, for bilingual Spanish-English reading instruction in the second grade. It is further supplemented by a teacher's manual. As a follow-up to the stories contained in the reader, the workbook provides drawing games, word games, punctuation exercises, and other…

  16. Hombres y Lugares. Que Bonito Es Leer, II. Libro IV. Cuaderno de Ejercicios (Men and Places. How Nice Reading Is, II. Book IV. Workbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    The exercises in the Spanish language workbook are intended to teach comprehension, interpretation, vocabulary, pronunciation, and study skills. The workbook provides one to five pages of reinforcement and follow-up work for each of the stories in the reader of the same title. Exercises stress sentence completion and construction, phonology,…

  17. Buscando Hallaras. Que Bonito Es Leer, II. Libro II. Cuaderno de Ejercicios (Looking You Will Find. How Nice Reading Is, II. Book II. Workbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    Designed for bilingual Spanish-English supplemental reading instruction for second grade students, this workbook is intended to be used with the reader of the same title. There is also a teacher's guide. The workbook provides about five pages of reinforcing exercises for each of the eight stories in the reader. The exercises are in the form of…

  18. Removing the Mask: A Workbook for Teachers Concerned about Sex-Role Stereotyping, with Program Notes to the Television Series "Jill and Jack/Fiction and Fact".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Anne; Sullivan, Pat

    This is a workbook for an inservice teacher training course on sex role stereotypes. The workbook is divided into eight workshop topics: the masculine mystique, the feminine mystique, language and textbooks, classroom practices, early childhood, athletics, career guidance, and cultural values. For each topic, suggestions as to the structure and…

  19. Man - Machine Communication

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Peter; Nielsen, Henning

    1984-01-01

    This report describes a Man-to-Machine Communication module which together with a STAC can take care of all operator inputs from the touch-screen, tracker balls and mechanical buttons. The MMC module can also contain a G64 card which could be a GPIB driver but many other G64 cards could be used. The soft-ware services the input devices and makes the results accessible from the CAMAC bus. NODAL functions for the Man Machine Communication is implemented in the STAC and in the ICC.

  20. Bulletproof Black Man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højer, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Netflix’ kommende serie om den sorte Marvel-helt Luke Cage lander snart – midt i de aktuelle racekonflikter i USA. I GIF-anatomien "Bulletproof Black Man" sætter Henrik Højer serien ind i dens amerikanske kontekst.......Netflix’ kommende serie om den sorte Marvel-helt Luke Cage lander snart – midt i de aktuelle racekonflikter i USA. I GIF-anatomien "Bulletproof Black Man" sætter Henrik Højer serien ind i dens amerikanske kontekst....

  1. Play the Man!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edelberg, Peter

    as opposites towards a heterosexual matrimonial ideal wherein men could try to establish a masculine identity. This tendency created new frontiers where homosexuals, 'perverts', 'misfits' and 'freaks' were seen as opposites of the 'real man' in the symbolic world of the early twentieth century....

  2. Hunting the Wild Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Scientists and volunteers plan a new Shennongjia exploration for Bigfoot After being shelved for many years, a plan to search for the wild man in the Shennongjia forestry district is once again under way. This time, scientists want to raise as much as 10 million yuan ($1.6 million) to employ advanced technology and recruit staff worldwide for the project.

  3. Ethology and Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biology and Human Affairs, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Reviews four texts and compilations of papers in an effort to assess the relevance of animal behavior studies to anthropology and sociology. Concludes that where a basic element of behavior occurs widely throughout the animal kingdom, especially in the higher mammals and primates, we may expect to find a manifestation in man." Limitations of the…

  4. Reference Man anatomical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, M.

    1994-10-01

    The 70-kg Standard Man or Reference Man has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s to represent adult males. It came into use in radiation protection in the late 1940s and was developed extensively during the 1950s and used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 2 in 1959. The current Reference Man for Purposes of Radiation Protection is a monumental book published in 1975 by the ICRP as ICRP Publication 23. It has a wealth of information useful for radiation dosimetry, including anatomical and physiological data, gross and elemental composition of the body and organs and tissues of the body. The anatomical data includes specified reference values for an adult male and an adult female. Other reference values are primarily for the adult male. The anatomical data include much data on fetuses and children, although reference values are not established. There is an ICRP task group currently working on revising selected parts of the Reference Man document.

  5. Man--Society--Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taxis, Linda A., Ed.

    The 32nd annual American Industrial Arts Association (AIAA) Convention was held in Louisville in 1970. Topics for the AIAA general session addresses were: (1) "Industrial Arts--The Blender Between Social Form and Technical Function," (2) "Technology and Society: Present and Future Challenges," (3) "A Student-Oriented Industrial Arts," (4) "Man:…

  6. Constructing EuroMan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandberg, Marie; Andersen, Dorte

    2008-01-01

    Regionalism. In the first two parts of the article, this connection is analysed in detail. In the last part, we will illustrate how EuroMan is enacted in the Spanish region Catalonia and in the border town Görlitz-Zgorzelec in the Polish-German borderland. These two examples have been made possible...

  7. Human migration patterns in Yemen and implications for reconstructing prehistoric population movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida T Miró-Herrans

    Full Text Available Population migration has played an important role in human evolutionary history and in the patterning of human genetic variation. A deeper and empirically-based understanding of human migration dynamics is needed in order to interpret genetic and archaeological evidence and to accurately reconstruct the prehistoric processes that comprise human evolutionary history. Current empirical estimates of migration include either short time frames (i.e. within one generation or partial knowledge about migration, such as proportion of migrants or distance of migration. An analysis of migration that includes both proportion of migrants and distance, and direction over multiple generations would better inform prehistoric reconstructions. To evaluate human migration, we use GPS coordinates from the place of residence of the Yemeni individuals sampled in our study, their birthplaces and their parents' and grandparents' birthplaces to calculate the proportion of migrants, as well as the distance and direction of migration events between each generation. We test for differences in these values between the generations and identify factors that influence the probability of migration. Our results show that the proportion and distance of migration between females and males is similar within generations. In contrast, the proportion and distance of migration is significantly lower in the grandparents' generation, most likely reflecting the decreasing effect of technology. Based on our results, we calculate the proportion of migration events (0.102 and mean and median distances of migration (96 km and 26 km for the grandparent's generation to represent early times in human evolution. These estimates can serve to set parameter values of demographic models in model-based methods of prehistoric reconstruction, such as approximate Bayesian computation. Our study provides the first empirically-based estimates of human migration over multiple generations in a developing

  8. Human migration patterns in Yemen and implications for reconstructing prehistoric population movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró-Herrans, Aida T; Al-Meeri, Ali; Mulligan, Connie J

    2014-01-01

    Population migration has played an important role in human evolutionary history and in the patterning of human genetic variation. A deeper and empirically-based understanding of human migration dynamics is needed in order to interpret genetic and archaeological evidence and to accurately reconstruct the prehistoric processes that comprise human evolutionary history. Current empirical estimates of migration include either short time frames (i.e. within one generation) or partial knowledge about migration, such as proportion of migrants or distance of migration. An analysis of migration that includes both proportion of migrants and distance, and direction over multiple generations would better inform prehistoric reconstructions. To evaluate human migration, we use GPS coordinates from the place of residence of the Yemeni individuals sampled in our study, their birthplaces and their parents' and grandparents' birthplaces to calculate the proportion of migrants, as well as the distance and direction of migration events between each generation. We test for differences in these values between the generations and identify factors that influence the probability of migration. Our results show that the proportion and distance of migration between females and males is similar within generations. In contrast, the proportion and distance of migration is significantly lower in the grandparents' generation, most likely reflecting the decreasing effect of technology. Based on our results, we calculate the proportion of migration events (0.102) and mean and median distances of migration (96 km and 26 km) for the grandparent's generation to represent early times in human evolution. These estimates can serve to set parameter values of demographic models in model-based methods of prehistoric reconstruction, such as approximate Bayesian computation. Our study provides the first empirically-based estimates of human migration over multiple generations in a developing country and these

  9. Human Migration Patterns in Yemen and Implications for Reconstructing Prehistoric Population Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró-Herrans, Aida T.; Al-Meeri, Ali; Mulligan, Connie J.

    2014-01-01

    Population migration has played an important role in human evolutionary history and in the patterning of human genetic variation. A deeper and empirically-based understanding of human migration dynamics is needed in order to interpret genetic and archaeological evidence and to accurately reconstruct the prehistoric processes that comprise human evolutionary history. Current empirical estimates of migration include either short time frames (i.e. within one generation) or partial knowledge about migration, such as proportion of migrants or distance of migration. An analysis of migration that includes both proportion of migrants and distance, and direction over multiple generations would better inform prehistoric reconstructions. To evaluate human migration, we use GPS coordinates from the place of residence of the Yemeni individuals sampled in our study, their birthplaces and their parents' and grandparents' birthplaces to calculate the proportion of migrants, as well as the distance and direction of migration events between each generation. We test for differences in these values between the generations and identify factors that influence the probability of migration. Our results show that the proportion and distance of migration between females and males is similar within generations. In contrast, the proportion and distance of migration is significantly lower in the grandparents' generation, most likely reflecting the decreasing effect of technology. Based on our results, we calculate the proportion of migration events (0.102) and mean and median distances of migration (96 km and 26 km) for the grandparent's generation to represent early times in human evolution. These estimates can serve to set parameter values of demographic models in model-based methods of prehistoric reconstruction, such as approximate Bayesian computation. Our study provides the first empirically-based estimates of human migration over multiple generations in a developing country and these

  10. Radiocarbon dates from Wairau Bar and their implications for the prehistoric colonisation of New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higham, T.F.G. [Waikato Univ., Hamilton (New Zealand); Anderson, A.J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    A set of thirteen moa eggshell samples from burial features at the Wairau Bar site were used for dating. The samples were obtained from the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch where they have been displayed as part of a permanent exhibition.Three marine shell samples were also analysed. Radiocarbon dating of the samples was carried out using conventional and AMS techniques. The results will be presented and the archaeological implications for the prehistoric colonization of New Zealand will be discussed. Paper no. 39; Extended abstract. 7 refs.

  11. Moroccan mitochondrial genetic background suggests prehistoric human migrations across the Gibraltar Strait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhouda, Taha; Martínez-Redondo, Diana; Gómez-Durán, Aurora; Elmtili, Noureddine; Idaomar, Mouhamed; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Montoya, Julio; López-Pérez, Manuel José; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2009-11-01

    Migrations into Africa from the Levant have greatly determined the mitochondrial genetic landscape of North Africa. After analyzing samples from North Morocco to Spain, we show that three fourths of the Moroccan individuals belong to Western Eurasian haplogroups and the frequencies of these are much more similar to those of the Iberian Peninsula than to those of the Middle East. This is particularly true for the mitochondrial haplogroups H1, H3 and V, which experienced a late-glacial expansion from this region, that repopulated much of Central and Northern Europe. Iberian Peninsula was also a source for prehistoric migrations to North Africa.

  12. Man Is a Paradox

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王茂娟

    2009-01-01

    In the poem "Always", the author Pablo Neruda employs the first person narration to incisively reveal the paradoxical traits in human nature by exploring man in relation to love. "I" play a role shifting from a calm narrator to a furious one, and the last recovering to a mild one, which offers a multiple visual angle to observe humanity. In sum, by means of continuous changes of my inner feelings in the poem, Pablo Neruda reveals the paradoxical humanity .

  13. First dose in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Du er blevet ansat som læge i et lægemiddelfirma med ansvar for planlægning og sikkerhed i fase 1 forsøg. Firmaet har udviklet tre dopamin D2-receptor antagonister til behandling af skizofreni. Lægemidlerne har undergået et omfattende farmakologisk, toksikologisk og farmaceutisk afprøvningsprogra...... fase 1 forsøg alias »First dose in man«....

  14. Biological Individuality of Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-01

    RECIPIENT’S CAT * LOO NUMBER Biological Individuality of Man 5 TlrPE OF REPORT a PERIOD COVERED Technical « PERFORMING ORO REPORT...Variability 13 A. Background , 13 B. Slatistictl Approaches to Biological Variability 13 C. Genetic Aspects of Biological Variability . 14 III...ioiological determinants of individuality. Only recently, have genetic infaienccs been investigated and the potentialities for future control of bio

  15. Santiago Remacha Esteras, Infotech Workbook. English for computer users

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Infotech workbook, publié en complément du manuel de l’étudiant Infotech English for Computer Users, comprend trente unités qui permettent un approfondissement pratique. Les unités sont corollaires de celles du manuel et peuvent servir de support ou de livre d’exercices en apprentissage autonome. Chaque unité se déroule selon un scénario présenté sur une double page. Les exercices de vocabulaire sont parfois ludiques (mots croisés, exercices d’appariement) et permettent de réviser le vocabula...

  16. On business and for pleasure again advanced self-study workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This workbook is called On Business and For Pleasure Again because it is a sequel to the previous book on Business English written by the same author. Although it has been designed to help students with the English they need for their work, it is hoped that the challenges it sets will, at the same time, prove to be enjoyable. An Answer Key has been included so the learners can check what they have done, and thus work independently, if that is what suits them best. And the exercises are of the kind of length that will enable students to work on them when they have relatively short periods of ti

  17. Correlations between radiometric analysis of Quaternary deposits and the chronology of prehistoric settlements from the southeastern Brazilian coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjos, R.M., E-mail: meigikos@if.uff.b [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza, s/no, Gragoata, 24210-346 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Macario, K.D. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza, s/no, Gragoata, 24210-346 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Lima, T.A. [Departamento de Antropologia, Museu Nacional, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Quinta da Boa Vista, s/no, Sao Cristovao, 20940-040 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Veiga, R.; Carvalho, C.; Fernandes, P.J.F.; Vezzone, M.; Bastos, J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza, s/no, Gragoata, 24210-346 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    Natural gamma radiation measurements of sand deposits were carried out in order to study the chronology of prehistoric colonization of the Brazilian coast during the Holocene. The method employs thorium, uranium and potassium as tracers of the geological provenance of Quaternary deposits, where artificial shellmounds are found. The so-called sambaquis are archaeological settlements, characteristic of fisher-gatherers, specialized in the exploitation of shellfish. Our results show a considerable positive correlation between the formation of coastal deposits, based on cross plots of eTh/eU and eTh/K, and the antiquity of its prehistoric human occupation.

  18. Petrology of the prehistoric lavas and dyke of the Barren Island, Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M A Alam; D Chandrasekharam; O Vaselli; B Capaccioni; P Manetti; P B Santo

    2004-12-01

    Although Barren Island (Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean) witnessed several volcanic eruptions during historic times, the eruptions that led to the formation of this volcanic island occurred mainly during prehistoric times. It is still active and currently in the fumarolic stage. Its volcanic evolution appears to be characterized by a constructive phase with the piling up of lava flows and scoria deposits and Strombolian activities, followed by a sudden collapse of the main cone. Deposits of a possible caldera-forming eruption were not recognized earlier. After a period of peri-calderic hydromagmatic activity, whose deposits presently mantle inner and outer caldera walls, a new phase of intracalderic Vulcanian activities took place. A prominent dyke in the SE inner side of the caldera wall was recognized. Petrographically the lava flows and dyke are similar but they differ in their chemical composition (viz., SiO2, MgO, Ni, Cr) significantly. Similarity in major, minor and trace element composition (viz., K/La, K/Nb, K/Rb, K/Ti ratios) of these rocks together with Chondrite normalized trace element (Rb, Ba, Sr, P, Zr, Ti and Nb) and REE (La, Ce, Nd and Y) patterns of the Barren Island prehistoric lava flows and dyke and low-K lavas of Sunda Arc indicates that Barren Island must have evolved from a source similar to that of Sunda Arc lavas during the Quaternary Period.

  19. The seasonal factor at the prehistoric site of Shag River Mouth, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higham, T.F.G. [Waikato Univ., Hamilton (New Zealand)

    1997-12-31

    This paper addresses moa hunters` seasonality at the Shag River Mouth site. A two meters section in layer 4 of the SM/C: Dune site was left as a baulk in 1988 to enable the stratigraphic profile ({approx}2m) to be more carefully investigated. Within the baulk, detailed lensing and microstrata could be identified. Claassen (1991) has suggested that one of the most important variables in determining seasonal and prehistoric shell-bearing site formation more accurately is emphasizing finer stratigraphic resolution and more rigorous attention to retrieving midden components. At Shag River Mouth, seven sub-layers, or spits, were excavated within the 2m baulk to refine the precision of subsequent seasonal analyses and enable a detailed assessment of the components of each and their season of deposition. A variety of seasonal methods were utilised including {sup 18}O analysis of blue mussel shell carbonate and growth ring analysis of estuarine bivalves. In addition, sagital otoliths of red cod excavated from the site were sectioned and the annual and seasonal growth rings formed during the fishes` life were analysed for seasonal information. This has enabled a detailed analysis of the seasonality of this discrete area of the Shag River Mouth site. The significance of the results for understanding the prehistoric seasonal round of activities within the site and its wider orbit is presented. Paper no.40; Extended abstract. 6 refs.

  20. Approaching prehistoric skills: experimental drilling in the context of bead manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gurova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available From the very Early Neolithic in the Balkans two categories of objects are recognized as having been involved in prehistoric drilling activities. The first is beads and other decorative and prestigious items made of bone, shell, pottery and various minerals. The second comprises toolkits of micro-perforators/borers found among the flint assemblages of several sites. This paper presents experiments in drilling different materials with the aim of testing several practical issues. A series of micro-borers were produced and used for manual and mechanical drilling (with a pump drill. Various samples (mainly prepared thin plates of minerals and rocks were used, ranging in hardness (on Mohs scale from 3 (marble, limestone, calcite to 6.5 (amazonite, nephrite. Biominerals were also used: aragonite (shells and apatite (bones. Actual bead production was approached by manufacturing 16 delicate beads of 5 different materials using fine sand and water abrasion. Though not conclusive, the experimental work was instructive in many of the parameters, procedures and technical details of prehistoric drilling.

  1. The Story of California. Student Workbook. Teacher's Edition = Libro de Trabajo de La Historia de California. Edicion del Maestro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray (Naomi) Associates, Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    The workbook is designed to accompany a textbook, "The Story of California," a Spanish-English bilingual history and geography of the state intended for classroom use by limited-English-proficient, native Spanish-speaking students in California's urban middle schools. The teacher's edition, presented here, consists of reproductions of 51…

  2. Liv and Lucky in Liverland. . . Color Us Healthy! A Workbook about Your Liver = Un Cuaderno de trabajo sobre tu higado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995

    This workbook/coloring book, on the liver and good health is designed for primary school students. The 21 line drawings illustrate different aspects of liver function, maintaining a healthy liver, and preventing liver disease. Each page is captioned in both English and Spanish. (ND)

  3. Liv and Lucky in Liverland. . . Color Us Healthy! A Workbook about Your Liver = Un Cuaderno de trabajo sobre tu higado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995

    This workbook/coloring book, on the liver and good health is designed for primary school students. The 21 line drawings illustrate different aspects of liver function, maintaining a healthy liver, and preventing liver disease. Each page is captioned in both English and Spanish. (ND)

  4. Gas Metal Arc Welding and Flux-Cored Arc Welding. Third Edition. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, John; Harper, Eddie

    This packet, containing a teacher's edition, a student edition, and a student workbook, introduces students to high deposition welding and processes for "shielding" a weld. In addition to general information, the teacher edition consists of introductory pages and teacher pages, as well as unit information that corresponds to the…

  5. The Story of California. Student Workbook. Teacher's Edition = Libro de Trabajo de La Historia de California. Edicion del Maestro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray (Naomi) Associates, Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    The workbook is designed to accompany a textbook, "The Story of California," a Spanish-English bilingual history and geography of the state intended for classroom use by limited-English-proficient, native Spanish-speaking students in California's urban middle schools. The teacher's edition, presented here, consists of reproductions of 51…

  6. Anger Management for Substance Abuse and Mental Health Clients: A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Manual [and] Participant Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Patrick M.; Shopshire, Michael S.; Durazzo, Timothy C.; Campbell, Torri A.

    This manual and workbook set focuses on anger management. The manual was designed for use by qualified substance abuse and mental health clinicians who work with substance abuse and mental health clients with concurrent anger programs. The manual describes a 12-week cognitive behavioral anger management group treatment. Each of the 12 90-minute…

  7. Stroke Survivors' Evaluations of a Stroke Workbook-Based Intervention Designed to Increase Perceived Control over Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joice, Sara; Johnston, Marie; Bonetti, Debbie; Morrison, Val; MacWalter, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To report stroke survivors' experiences and perceived usefulness of an effective self-help workbook-based intervention. Design: A cross-sectional study involving the intervention group of an earlier randomized controlled trial. Setting: At the participants' homes approximately seven weeks post-hospital discharge. Method: Following the…

  8. Solar Workbook. A Step by Step Procedure for Assessing Solar Opportunities in Existing Buildings in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Energy Office, Albany.

    Determining the feasibility of modifying existing buildings to take advantage of solar energy requires a formal technical study. This workbook is designed to help the reader perform a preliminary analysis to decide whether investing in such a formal study would be beneficial. The book guides the user through an exploration of the general…

  9. The Story of California. Student Workbook. Teacher's Edition = Libro de Trabajo de La Historia de California. Edicion del Maestro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray (Naomi) Associates, Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    The workbook is designed to accompany a textbook, "The Story of California," a Spanish-English bilingual history and geography of the state intended for classroom use by limited-English-proficient, native Spanish-speaking students in California's urban middle schools. The teacher's edition, presented here, consists of reproductions of 51 separate…

  10. First Season Catfish Farming. A Workbook for Beginning Pond and Cage Culture of Channel Catfish. Teacher Edition and Student Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This workbook, comprised of both the teacher and student editions, presents guidelines useful for first-year catfish farmers in Oklahoma using pond or cage cultures to raise channel catfish. The teacher edition is a set of unit guidelines only. Contents include a list of suggested readings, important addresses with types of information available…

  11. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Eddie; Knapp, John

    This packet of instructional materials for a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and plasma arc cutting course is comprised of a teacher edition, student edition, and student workbook. The teacher edition consists of introductory pages and teacher pages. Introductory pages include training and competency profile, state duty/task crosswalk,…

  12. The Cities for No Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat Nevlyutov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary urban concept asserts the need to create spaces for man. However, the idea of a "man" transformed radically from the moment of its appearance. The book by the famous Danish architect and consultant in urban design Jan Gehl, "Cities for people", is a key example to demonstrate the ambiguity of this position. The book focuses on the concept of "man", which was abandoned in modernism. And modernism is criticized by the author. But in reality, it is not about the return to the "man", but about designing "new man". Gehl describes a new urban ideology, in which his understanding of "man" coincides with the postmodernist understanding of its absence. The "man" is multiple functions, actors of the city, and it refers to the bodies that are indistinguishable in their anonymity.

  13. Time and man

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, LRB

    2014-01-01

    Time and Man focuses on the endeavors of humans to probe the mysteries of time and to elucidate its properties. The discussions are both philosophical and factual in nature and encompass science as well as the physical sciences, biology and related disciplines (for example, evolution), and the humanities (for example, religion). Factual information is presented to help the reader gain a better understanding of the concepts associated with time.Comprised of nine chapters, this volume first considers the passage of time and the experiences which humans associate with the concept of time before r

  14. Spider-man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路遇

    2002-01-01

    Spider-Man was first introduced in the comic(连环画) Amazing Fantasy #15(August 1962).Peter Parker,a Senior at Midtown High School,receives his powers when bitten by a exhibition(转基因) spider in a science demonstration(展览).This bite endowed(赋予) him with the proportional(相应的) strength and agility(敏捷) of a spider along with a keen “spider sense”.

  15. Time and man

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, L. R. B

    1978-01-01

    Time and Man focuses on the endeavors of humans to probe the mysteries of time and to elucidate its properties. The discussions are both philosophical and factual in nature and encompass science as well as the physical sciences, biology and related disciplines (for example, evolution), and the humanities (for example, religion). Factual information is presented to help the reader gain a better understanding of the concepts associated with time.Comprised of nine chapters, this volume first considers the passage of time and the experiences which humans associate with the concept of time before r

  16. Heathland and the palynology of prehistoric barrows. Reflections on the interrelation between soil formation and pollen infiltration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenman-van Waateringe, W; Spek, Mattheus

    2016-01-01

    In the sandy areas of the Netherlands, heather (Calluna vulgaris) played an important role in the construction of prehistoric barrows, although, as will be shown in this paper, not in all periods as was recently asserted by Doorenbosch (2013). Since the mineralogical composition and the texture of t

  17. Paraquat poisoning in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douze, J M; van Heyst, A N; van Dijk, A; Maes, R A; Drost, R H

    1975-10-20

    In three cases of intoxication by Gramoxone¿, the concentration of paraquat dichloride in blood, dialysate, feces, and urine was determined spectrophotometrically after a clean-up of the biological material by means of ion exchange chromatography (with Dowex 50W-X12 or Zeo-Karb 225). Although good results were obtained after clean-up with Dowex 50W-X12, Zeo-Karb was preferred as ion exchange resin, especially when large sample volumes were needed for the determination. The reported findings indicate that: only 5 to 10% of an ingested dose of paraquat dichloride is absorbed in man, Fullers' earth is very useful, and that primary, e.g. immediate, hemodialysis is necessary.

  18. Caribou and Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Couturier

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available From April 23 to 27, 2001, more than 230 caribou experts migrated to the 9th North American Caribou Workshop, held at the tree-line in the Inuit town of Kuujjuaq, Nunavik, Québec. This community of about 1800 people near Ungava Bay was chosen over larger cities in southern Québec following a survey of potential workshop participants. Holding the conference in such a particularly appropriate location was made possible by the sustained efforts of the Organizing and Scientific Committees, by the help of the sponsors, and, above all, by the tremendous support of the people of Kuujjuaq. Keeping in mind the importance of caribou to the local people and the fact that development and other fast-growing human activities have today reached the North—for many southerners, the last frontier—the theme chosen for the 9th North American Caribou Workshop was also particularly appropriate: Caribou and Man.

  19. Discoveries from La Manche: Five Years of Early Prehistoric Research in the Channel Island of Jersey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Pope

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Since 2010 a new field project drawn from major UK institutions including the UCL Institute of Archaeology, has focused research on the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic record of the Channel Island of Jersey. In this retrospective of five years of research the history of the project to date, its focus on the Middle Palaeolithic site of La Cotte de St Brelade and its growth into an international research team is charted. The formation of the La Manche Prehistorique research network in 2015 marks a new chapter in the development of this project. With its wider focus, but continued commitment to research in the Channel Islands, the research group are working towards a unified early prehistoric research framework for the English Channel region.

  20. The role of changing childhood diets in the prehistoric evolution of food production: An isotopic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, Mark R; Powell, Mary Lucas

    2005-03-01

    Earlier weaning has often been suggested as a cause for population growth after the evolution of food production. However, evidence for weaning-time reduction is largely circumstantial. Collagen stable nitrogen- and carbon-isotope ratios from juvenile and adult burials from four sites in eastern North America were measured to estimate weaning onsets and durations before and after the appearance of intensive food production. Two preagricultural Late Archaic sites (Indian Knoll and Carlston Annis) are compared with two highly agricultural Middle Mississippian sites (Angel and Tinsley Hill). Isotopic data and paleodemographic measures of birth rates provide no evidence for changes in weaning behavior or fertility with the development of food production in the prehistoric Lower Ohio Valley. Birth rates and weaning behavior appear to have been roughly the same at all four sites. These results indicate that models attributing population growth after the appearance of food production to earlier weaning are not universally applicable.

  1. Prehistorical and historical declines in Caribbean coral reef accretion rates driven by loss of parrotfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Katie L.; O'Dea, Aaron; Clark, Tara R.; Zhao, Jian-Xin; Norris, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Caribbean coral reefs have transformed into algal-dominated habitats over recent decades, but the mechanisms of change are unresolved due to a lack of quantitative ecological data before large-scale human impacts. To understand the role of reduced herbivory in recent coral declines, we produce a high-resolution 3,000 year record of reef accretion rate and herbivore (parrotfish and urchin) abundance from the analysis of sediments and fish, coral and urchin subfossils within cores from Caribbean Panama. At each site, declines in accretion rates and parrotfish abundance were initiated in the prehistorical or historical period. Statistical tests of direct cause and effect relationships using convergent cross mapping reveal that accretion rates are driven by parrotfish abundance (but not vice versa) but are not affected by total urchin abundance. These results confirm the critical role of parrotfish in maintaining coral-dominated reef habitat and the urgent need for restoration of parrotfish populations to enable reef persistence.

  2. [The mystery of prehistoric trepanations: Is neurosurgery the world eldest profession?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, D; Sainte-Rose, C; Boch, A-L

    2010-10-01

    Trepanation is known to be the first surgical procedure ever performed. Its origins date from the Neolithic Age in Europe and the operation was particularly performed in South America at the Pre-Colombian era, a few thousand years later. Based on many archeological studies on trepanned skulls, we compare the differences and similarities of these two periods through epidemiological, topographical, and technical approaches. Signs of bony regeneration are assessed in an attempt to understand the postoperative survival of trepanned patients. The literature in surgery and archeology does not mention the possible relation between trepanations and growing skull fractures. However, it is reasonable to think that these cranial holes, occurring after a pediatric skull fracture, could mimic real trepanation orifices. The possible connections between these two entities are discussed. The etiological hypotheses on prehistoric trepanation are reviewed.

  3. Ancient jades map 3,000 years of prehistoric exchange in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hsiao-Chun; Iizuka, Yoshiyuki; Bellwood, Peter; Nguyen, Kim Dung; Bellina, Bérénice; Silapanth, Praon; Dizon, Eusebio; Santiago, Rey; Datan, Ipoi; Manton, Jonathan H

    2007-12-11

    We have used electron probe microanalysis to examine Southeast Asian nephrite (jade) artifacts, many archeologically excavated, dating from 3000 B.C. through the first millennium A.D. The research has revealed the existence of one of the most extensive sea-based trade networks of a single geological material in the prehistoric world. Green nephrite from a source in eastern Taiwan was used to make two very specific forms of ear pendant that were distributed, between 500 B.C. and 500 A.D., through the Philippines, East Malaysia, southern Vietnam, and peninsular Thailand, forming a 3,000-km-diameter halo around the southern and eastern coastlines of the South China Sea. Other Taiwan nephrite artifacts, especially beads and bracelets, were distributed earlier during Neolithic times throughout Taiwan and from Taiwan into the Philippines.

  4. Ancient mitochondrial genome reveals trace of prehistoric migration in the east Pamir by pastoralists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Chao; Gao, Shizhu; Deng, Boping; Zheng, Hongxiang; Wei, Dong; Lv, Haoze; Li, Hongjie; Song, Li; Wu, Yong; Zhou, Hui; Cui, Yinqiu

    2016-02-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of one 700-year-old individual found in Tashkurgan, Xinjiang was target enriched and sequenced in order to shed light on the population history of Tashkurgan and determine the phylogenetic relationship of haplogroup U5a. The ancient sample was assigned to a subclade of haplogroup U5a2a1, which is defined by two rare and stable transversions at 16114A and 13928C. Phylogenetic analysis shows a distribution pattern for U5a2a that is indicative of an origin in the Volga-Ural region and exhibits a clear eastward geographical expansion that correlates with the pastoral culture also entering the Eurasian steppe. The haplogroup U5a2a present in the ancient Tashkurgan individual reveals prehistoric migration in the East Pamir by pastoralists. This study shows that studying an ancient mitochondrial genome is a useful approach for studying the evolutionary process and population history of Eastern Pamir.

  5. Growth and Stability Among Complex Societies in Prehistoric Lingnan, Southeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Allard

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available One significant advance in the field of Chinese archaeology over past decades has been the identification of numerous prehistoric societies characterized by unequal access to status and wealth (henceforth referred to a 'complex societies' in areas peripheral to the Yellow River valley, a region traditionally regarded as the cradle of Chinese civilization. Lingnan, an area which comprises the two modern provinces of Guangdong and Guanxi in Southeast China, also witnessed the emergence of small-scale complex societies prior to its incorporation into the unified Qin and Han states during the last centuries of the pre-Christian era (Allard 1995. This paper examines the circumstances and features of five instances of complex socio-political development in Lingnan over a period from the late Neolithic to the early Iron Age (ca. 3000-200 B.C. with each of these trajectories tested against recent models dealing with the issues of societal types, complexity, growth and stability.

  6. New evidence for prehistoric copper metallurgy in the vicinity of Bor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapuran Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The last three years of archaeological investigations at the site Ru`ana in Banjsko Polje, in the immediate vicinity of Bor, have provided new evidence regarding the role of non-ferrous metallurgy in the economy of the prehistoric communities of north-eastern Serbia. The remains of metallurgical furnaces and a large amount of metallic slags at two neighbouring sites in the mentioned settlement reveal that locations with many installations for the thermal processing of copper ore existed in the Bronze Age. We believe, judging by the finds of material culture, that metallurgical activities in this area also continued into the Iron Age and, possibly, into the 4th century AD. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177020: Archaeology of Serbia: Cultural identity, integration factors, technological processes and the role of the central Balkans in the development of European prehistory

  7. Evidence for prehistoric origins of Egyptian mummification in late Neolithic burials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Jones

    Full Text Available Traditional theories on ancient Egyptian mummification postulate that in the prehistoric period (i.e. the Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods, 5th and 4th millennia B.C. bodies were naturally desiccated through the action of the hot, dry desert sand. Although molding of the body with resin-impregnated linen is believed to be an early Pharaonic forerunner to more complex processes, scientific evidence for the early use of resins in artificial mummification has until now been limited to isolated occurrences during the late Old Kingdom (c. 2200 B.C., their use becoming more apparent during the Middle Kingdom (c. 2000-1600 BC. We examined linen wrappings from bodies in securely provenanced tombs (pit graves in the earliest recorded ancient Egyptian cemeteries at Mostagedda in the Badari region (Upper Egypt. Our investigations of these prehistoric funerary wrappings using a combination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS and thermal desorption/pyrolysis (TD/Py-GC-MS have identified a pine resin, an aromatic plant extract, a plant gum/sugar, a natural petroleum source, and a plant oil/animal fat in directly AMS-dated funerary wrappings. Predating the earliest scientific evidence by more than a millennium, these embalming agents constitute complex, processed recipes of the same natural products, in similar proportions, as those utilized at the zenith of Pharaonic mummification some 3,000 years later. The antibacterial properties of some of these ingredients and the localized soft-tissue preservation that they would have afforded lead us to conclude that these represent the very beginnings of experimentation that would evolve into the famous mummification practice of the Pharaonic period.

  8. Settlement-Size Scaling among Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherer Settlement Systems in the New World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, W Randall; Klink, Cynthia J; Maggard, Greg J; Aldenderfer, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Settlement size predicts extreme variation in the rates and magnitudes of many social and ecological processes in human societies. Yet, the factors that drive human settlement-size variation remain poorly understood. Size variation among economically integrated settlements tends to be heavy tailed such that the smallest settlements are extremely common and the largest settlements extremely large and rare. The upper tail of this size distribution is often formalized mathematically as a power-law function. Explanations for this scaling structure in human settlement systems tend to emphasize complex socioeconomic processes including agriculture, manufacturing, and warfare-behaviors that tend to differentially nucleate and disperse populations hierarchically among settlements. But, the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size variation requires such complex behaviors remains unclear. By examining the settlement patterns of eight prehistoric New World hunter-gatherer settlement systems spanning three distinct environmental contexts, this analysis explores the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size scaling depends on the aforementioned socioeconomic complexities. Surprisingly, the analysis finds that power-law models offer plausible and parsimonious statistical descriptions of prehistoric hunter-gatherer settlement-size variation. This finding reveals that incipient forms of hierarchical settlement structure may have preceded socioeconomic complexity in human societies and points to a need for additional research to explicate how mobile foragers came to exhibit settlement patterns that are more commonly associated with hierarchical organization. We propose that hunter-gatherer mobility with preferential attachment to previously occupied locations may account for the observed structure in site-size variation.

  9. Evidence for prehistoric origins of Egyptian mummification in late Neolithic burials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jana; Higham, Thomas F G; Oldfield, Ron; O'Connor, Terry P; Buckley, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Traditional theories on ancient Egyptian mummification postulate that in the prehistoric period (i.e. the Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods, 5th and 4th millennia B.C.) bodies were naturally desiccated through the action of the hot, dry desert sand. Although molding of the body with resin-impregnated linen is believed to be an early Pharaonic forerunner to more complex processes, scientific evidence for the early use of resins in artificial mummification has until now been limited to isolated occurrences during the late Old Kingdom (c. 2200 B.C.), their use becoming more apparent during the Middle Kingdom (c. 2000-1600 BC). We examined linen wrappings from bodies in securely provenanced tombs (pit graves) in the earliest recorded ancient Egyptian cemeteries at Mostagedda in the Badari region (Upper Egypt). Our investigations of these prehistoric funerary wrappings using a combination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and thermal desorption/pyrolysis (TD/Py)-GC-MS have identified a pine resin, an aromatic plant extract, a plant gum/sugar, a natural petroleum source, and a plant oil/animal fat in directly AMS-dated funerary wrappings. Predating the earliest scientific evidence by more than a millennium, these embalming agents constitute complex, processed recipes of the same natural products, in similar proportions, as those utilized at the zenith of Pharaonic mummification some 3,000 years later. The antibacterial properties of some of these ingredients and the localized soft-tissue preservation that they would have afforded lead us to conclude that these represent the very beginnings of experimentation that would evolve into the famous mummification practice of the Pharaonic period.

  10. Settlement-Size Scaling among Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherer Settlement Systems in the New World.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Randall Haas

    Full Text Available Settlement size predicts extreme variation in the rates and magnitudes of many social and ecological processes in human societies. Yet, the factors that drive human settlement-size variation remain poorly understood. Size variation among economically integrated settlements tends to be heavy tailed such that the smallest settlements are extremely common and the largest settlements extremely large and rare. The upper tail of this size distribution is often formalized mathematically as a power-law function. Explanations for this scaling structure in human settlement systems tend to emphasize complex socioeconomic processes including agriculture, manufacturing, and warfare-behaviors that tend to differentially nucleate and disperse populations hierarchically among settlements. But, the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size variation requires such complex behaviors remains unclear. By examining the settlement patterns of eight prehistoric New World hunter-gatherer settlement systems spanning three distinct environmental contexts, this analysis explores the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size scaling depends on the aforementioned socioeconomic complexities. Surprisingly, the analysis finds that power-law models offer plausible and parsimonious statistical descriptions of prehistoric hunter-gatherer settlement-size variation. This finding reveals that incipient forms of hierarchical settlement structure may have preceded socioeconomic complexity in human societies and points to a need for additional research to explicate how mobile foragers came to exhibit settlement patterns that are more commonly associated with hierarchical organization. We propose that hunter-gatherer mobility with preferential attachment to previously occupied locations may account for the observed structure in site-size variation.

  11. Rich Man, Poor Man: Developmental Differences in Attributions and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, Carol K.

    2012-01-01

    In an examination guided by cognitive developmental and attribution theory of how explanations of wealth and poverty and perceptions of rich and poor people change with age and are interrelated, 6-, 10-, and 14-year-olds (N = 88) were asked for their causal attributions and trait judgments concerning a rich man and a poor man. First graders, like…

  12. Rich Man, Poor Man: Developmental Differences in Attributions and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, Carol K.

    2012-01-01

    In an examination guided by cognitive developmental and attribution theory of how explanations of wealth and poverty and perceptions of rich and poor people change with age and are interrelated, 6-, 10-, and 14-year-olds (N = 88) were asked for their causal attributions and trait judgments concerning a rich man and a poor man. First graders, like…

  13. Reciprocal inhibition in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, C

    1993-11-01

    Reciprocal inhibition is the automatic antagonist alpha motor neurone inhibition which is evoked by contraction of the agonist muscle. This so-called natural reciprocal inhibition is a ubiquitous and pronounced phenomenon in man and must be suspected of playing a major role in the control of voluntary movements. The spinal pathways underlying this inhibitory phenomenon were studied. The disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibitory pathway between the tibial anterior muscle and the soleus alpha motor neurones was identified and described in man. It was shown that the inhibition can be evoked in most healthy subjects at rest, but the degree of inhibition varies considerably from one subject to another. It was concluded that it corresponds to the disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibitory pathway which has been extensively described in animal experiments. The disynaptic reciprocal inhibition was shown to increase during the dynamic phase of a dorsiflexion movement of the foot, but not during the tonic phase. However, when the peripheral afferent feedback from the contracting muscle was blocked by ischaemia, an increase of the inhibition was revealed also during the tonic phase of the dorsiflexion. The concealment of this increase during unrestrained peripheral feedback from the muscle was thought to be due to the post-activation depression mechanism; a mechanism which was described further and which probably involves reduced transmitter release at Ia afferent terminals as a result of previous activation of these afferent fibers. Hence the hypothesis was supported that alpha motor neurones and the corresponding inhibitory interneurones, which project reciprocal inhibition to the antagonist motor neurones, are activated in parallel during voluntary contraction of agonist muscles. An additional reciprocal inhibitory mechanism, the long latency reciprocal inhibition, was described between the tibial anterior muscle and the soleus alpha motor neurones. It was shown to be evoked by group I

  14. Light in man's environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J

    2016-02-01

    Light in the form of solar radiation influenced early civilisations and resulted in the independent development of a number of sun-worshipping dieties. These were of particular importance as hunter gatherers transformed into settled agricultural societies. All artificial light sources were synonymous with fire, and early civilisations began to expand their visual day by burning brands, oil, and candles. Fire-based light sources extended for thousands of years and were still present in the era of gas lighting. Light meant fire risk. The advent of incandescent bulbs and the era of electric lighting really only expanded in the early part of the twentieth century. Fluorescent lighting became available in the 1940s, and today the drive for low energy has resulted in a plethora of novel light sources-in particular, light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Evolution governed the development of the eye in relation to roughly 12 h of light gradually changing to 12 h of darkness. Today almost daylight levels can be achieved abruptly at the flick of a switch. Many studies have demonstrated the spectral dependence of eye health, with the retinal hazard zone associated with wavelengths in the blue, peaking at 441 nm- many of today's low-energy sources peak in this region. Given the increased longevity and artificial light sources emitting at biologically unfriendly wavelengths, attention has to be directed towards light in man's environment as a risk factor in age-related ocular diseases.

  15. Of Man and Matter

    CERN Multimedia

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    1962-01-01

    Filmed at Brookhaven. AGS and 20 inch bubble chamber. After a rather standard introduction, there is a 3 minute lecture by a man in a bow tie who is sitting in front of a chart with the names of particles. Presentation of Brookhaven and AGS. Explanation of how AGS works. Lecture continues for another 4 minutes. Explanation of separated beam transport system, to give particular particles to the experiments. 20 inch bubble chamber. Anti Psi minus particle discovered. Start of a "typical experiment". Nice verbal play between people in different control rooms to get the beam and images of the beam on oscilloscopes. Conversation among physicists at lunch about the anti-psi minus particle discovery at Brookhaven and at CERN "I guess someone really aught to write to them to compare notes." Discussion about the analysis. Explanation of how the analysis is done, for an event to go from a candidate to established fact. Scanning room. If a photo is of significant interest a pencil tracing is done. Measuring the interest...

  16. Who counts resilience and whose resilience counts? Reflections on applying the Resilience Assessment Workbook along a contested Amazonian frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy-Lin Bartels

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Amazon is a complex social-ecological system, the management of which includes diverse groups of social actors whose values and interests influence decision making and outcomes. Such management requires leaders who appreciate the multiple knowledge systems and historical land occupation trajectories that have shaped this region. Twenty-three emerging leaders from universities, government agencies, the private sector, and social movement organizations participated in a two-year Specialization Course in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. Course participants applied the Resilience Assessment (RA Workbook for Practitioners to analyze three livelihood sub-systems within the municipality of Cotriguaçu. This paper offers reflections on the utility of the RA workbook as a tool for bridging multiple stakeholders’ knowledge, identities, power and interests in collaborative social-ecological management. Our experience points to the risks of conducting expert-led RAs in regions dominated by historical legacies of oppression, weak institutions, and limited governance.

  17. "Det man hører, er man selv"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2015-01-01

    ”Det man hører, er man selv” er Danmarks Radios P3s yderst velkendte slogan. Det dukkede op i begyndelsen af (20)00erne som opfindsom og populær afspejling af en moderne forståelse af den rolle musik og medieforbrug spiller for den voksne dansker. Denne artikel handler ikke om P3 som musikkanal...

  18. "Det man hører, er man selv"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2015-01-01

    ”Det man hører, er man selv” er Danmarks Radios P3s yderst velkendte slogan. Det dukkede op i begyndelsen af (20)00erne som opfindsom og populær afspejling af en moderne forståelse af den rolle musik og medieforbrug spiller for den voksne dansker. Denne artikel handler ikke om P3 som musikkanal...

  19. Human induced prehistoric and historical soil erosion and landscape development in Southwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotterweich, Markus; Ivester, Andrew H.; Hanson, Paul R.; Daniel, Larsen; Dye, David H.; Foster, Thomas H., II

    2015-04-01

    The significance of soil erosion due to pre-historic land use and possible feedback mechanisms had been hardly recognized in the Southeastern USA. Here, the agricultural practices only began in the second half of the Holocene. Sedentary hunters and gatherers started to domesticate squash and sunflowers. Associated with the expansion of maize cultivation in the Mississippian period between AD 800 and 1100, significant forest clearings took place on the river floodplains. During this time, central settlements with up to 30,000 residences existed and the surrounding ridge and furrow fields extended to up to 30 ha. It is still open to question why these groups already declined in the 14/15th centuries already before the arrival of the Europeans. However, around AD 1540 the conquistador de Soto still reports extended fields with intensive cultivation of maize in the uplands of Northern Mississippi. Despite of this intensive land use by Native Americans, current research gives no indication that these activities had any significant impact on river channel form. Also, no clear evidence exists for distinct channel change occurring in response to any sort of middle Holocene Hypsithermal, Medieval warm period, or the Little Ice Age. We will present results of a project which aims to explore erosion forms, colluvial sediments and buried soils in selected 0-order and 1st-order watersheds in the southeastern USA in order to gain, solidify, and evaluate general data on soil erosion during the Native American land use period and its respective long-term effects on the environment. This will be achieved by 1) recording the stratigraphy of colluvial and alluvial sediments and buried soils, 2) mapping the extent of erosional and colluvial forms, 3) analyzing chemical and physical soil and sediment properties, 4) establishing chronological control using various dating techniques including radiocarbon and OSL dating, and 5) quantifying soil erosion using hillslope sediments. The

  20. Organic fertilization and sufficient nutrient status in prehistoric agriculture?--Indications from multi-proxy analyses of archaeological topsoil relicts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Lauer

    Full Text Available Neolithic and Bronze Age topsoil relicts revealed enhanced extractable phosphorus (P and plant available inorganic P fractions, thus raising the question whether there was targeted soil amelioration in prehistoric times. This study aimed (i at assessing the overall nutrient status and the soil organic matter content of these arable topsoil relicts, and (ii at tracing ancient soil fertilizing practices by respective stable isotope and biomarker analyses. Prehistoric arable topsoils were preserved in archaeological pit fillings, whereas adjacent subsoils served as controls. One Early Weichselian humic zone represented the soil status before the introduction of agriculture. Recent topsoils served as an additional reference. The applied multi-proxy approach comprised total P and micronutrient contents, stable N isotope ratios, amino acid, steroid, and black carbon analyses as well as soil color measurements. Total contents of P and selected micronutrients (I, Cu, Mn, Mo, Se, Zn of the arable soil relicts were above the limits for which nutrient deficiencies could be assumed. All pit fillings exhibited elevated δ15N values close to those of recent topsoils (δ15N>6 to 7‰, giving first hints for prehistoric organic N-input. Ancient legume cultivation as a potential source for N input could not be verified by means of amino acid analysis. In contrast, bile acids as markers for faecal input exhibited larger concentrations in the pit fillings compared with the reference and control soils indicating faeces (i.e. manure input to Neolithic arable topsoils. Also black carbon contents were elevated, amounting up to 38% of soil organic carbon, therewith explaining the dark soil color in the pit fillings and pointing to inputs of burned biomass. The combination of different geochemical analyses revealed a sufficient nutrient status of prehistoric arable soils, as well as signs of amelioration (inputs of organic material like charcoal and faeces

  1. Organic fertilization and sufficient nutrient status in prehistoric agriculture?--Indications from multi-proxy analyses of archaeological topsoil relicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Franziska; Prost, Katharina; Gerlach, Renate; Pätzold, Stefan; Wolf, Mareike; Urmersbach, Sarah; Lehndorff, Eva; Eckmeier, Eileen; Amelung, Wulf

    2014-01-01

    Neolithic and Bronze Age topsoil relicts revealed enhanced extractable phosphorus (P) and plant available inorganic P fractions, thus raising the question whether there was targeted soil amelioration in prehistoric times. This study aimed (i) at assessing the overall nutrient status and the soil organic matter content of these arable topsoil relicts, and (ii) at tracing ancient soil fertilizing practices by respective stable isotope and biomarker analyses. Prehistoric arable topsoils were preserved in archaeological pit fillings, whereas adjacent subsoils served as controls. One Early Weichselian humic zone represented the soil status before the introduction of agriculture. Recent topsoils served as an additional reference. The applied multi-proxy approach comprised total P and micronutrient contents, stable N isotope ratios, amino acid, steroid, and black carbon analyses as well as soil color measurements. Total contents of P and selected micronutrients (I, Cu, Mn, Mo, Se, Zn) of the arable soil relicts were above the limits for which nutrient deficiencies could be assumed. All pit fillings exhibited elevated δ15N values close to those of recent topsoils (δ15N>6 to 7‰), giving first hints for prehistoric organic N-input. Ancient legume cultivation as a potential source for N input could not be verified by means of amino acid analysis. In contrast, bile acids as markers for faecal input exhibited larger concentrations in the pit fillings compared with the reference and control soils indicating faeces (i.e. manure) input to Neolithic arable topsoils. Also black carbon contents were elevated, amounting up to 38% of soil organic carbon, therewith explaining the dark soil color in the pit fillings and pointing to inputs of burned biomass. The combination of different geochemical analyses revealed a sufficient nutrient status of prehistoric arable soils, as well as signs of amelioration (inputs of organic material like charcoal and faeces-containing manure).

  2. Pre-historic eating patterns in Latin America and protective effects of plant-based diets on cardiovascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C. Acosta Navarro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we present the contributions to nutrition science from Latin American native peoples and scientists, appreciated from a historic point of view since pre-historic times to the modern age. Additionally, we present epidemiological and clinical studies on the area of plant-based diets and their relation with the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases conducted in recent decades, and we discuss challenges and perspectives regarding aspects of nutrition in the region

  3. X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescent Analyses of Prehistoric Pottery Shards from Ulu Kelantan

    OpenAIRE

    Zuliskandar Ramli; Nik H.S.N. Abdul Rahman; Adnan Jusoh; Yunus Sauman

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-Ray Fluorescent (XRF) were used in order to obtain mineralogical and elemental composition of seven pottery shards that have been unearthed during the excavation at Peraling Cave and Cha Cave in Ulu Kelantan, Malaysia. Approach: Peraling Cave and Cha Cave were prehistoric sites dating from 10, 000 BC which were inhabited by Hoabinhian people and then continuously used by people of Neolithic culture around 3000 BC. Results: Mineralogical and ele...

  4. Recognizing and dating prehistoric liquefaction features: Lessons learned in the New Madrid seismic zone, central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, M.P.; Schweig, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    The New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), which experienced severe liquefaction during the great New Madrid, Missouri, earthquakes of 1811 and 1812 as well as during several prehistoric earthquakes, is a superb laboratory for the study of world-class, arthquake-induced liquefaction features and their use in paleoseismology. In seismically active regions like the NMSZ, frequent large earthquakes can produce a complex record of liquefaction events that is difficult to interpret. Lessons learned studying liquefaction features in the NMSZ may help to unravel the paleoseismic record in other seismically active regions. Soil characteristics of liquefaction features, as well as their structural and sratigraphic relations to Native American occupation horizons and other cultural features, an help to distinguish prehistoric liquefaction features from historic features. In addition, analyses of artifact assemblages and botanical content of cultural horizons can help to narrow the age ranges of liquefaction features. Future research should focus on methods for defining source areas and estimating magnitudes of prehistoric earthquakes from liquefaction features. Also, new methods for dating liquefaction features are needed.

  5. Combining ER and GPR surveys for evidence of prehistoric landscape construction: case study at Mound City, Ohio, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, B. B.; Mandel, R. D.; Tsoflias, G. P.; De Vore, S. L.; Lynott, M.

    2016-06-01

    Mound City, located at the Hopewell Culture National Historical Park in south-central Ohio, USA, is a prehistoric earthwork (200 BC-500 AD) that consists of 24 mounds enclosed in a square embankment wall and is surrounded by eight pits. Recent excavation of two of these pits resulted in the discovery of a clay loam liner that appears to have been placed on the floor of the pits by a prehistoric society known as the Hopewell. The aim of this study was to determine the spatial pattern of this liner in one of the pits using non-invasive geophysical techniques, specifically electrical resistivity and ground-penetrating radar. Minimally invasive soil augers and a test trench yielded information that was used to corroborate interpretations of the geophysical data. The geophysical methods proved to be useful in locating and defining the remnants of the prehistoric clay loam liner, and the results of our investigation indicate that almost 50% of the liner still remains in the pit today. This discovery supports a new interpretation that the Hopewell excavated and preserved the pits at the Mound City site because they served as cultural landscape features.

  6. Vancomycin induced Red Man Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drisyamol K.A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vancomycin is a glycoprotein antibiotic that has been associated with an anaphylactoid reaction termed the Red-man syndrome. It usually consists of erythema, flushing and pruritis of the face and upper torso and occasionally progresses to include dyspnoea, chest pain and hypotension. Red man syndrome (RMS is also known as “red neck syndrome. Discontinuation of the vancomycin infusion and administration of diphenhydramine can abort most of the reactions. Slow intravenous administration of vancomycin should minimize the risk of infusion-related adverse effects. Antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin, amphotericin B, rifampcin and teicoplanin can potentially cause red man syndrome. The effects of red man syndrome can be relieved by antihistamines.

  7. An open source workbook in Excel for viewing and analyzing demagnetization data from paleomagnetic discrete samples and u-channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagnotti, L.

    2012-12-01

    Modern rock magnetometers and stepwise demagnetization procedures result in the production of large datasets, which need a versatile and fast software for their display and analysis. Various software packages for paleomagnetic analyses have been recently developed to overcome the problems linked to the limited capability and the loss of operability of early codes written in obsolete computer languages and/or platforms, not compatible with modern 64 bit processors. Here I present a new software for viewing and analyzing demagnetization data from paleomagnetic discrete samples and u-channels, which consists of a workbook for Microsoft Excel. The widespread diffusion of Excel ensures multiplatform operability and offers guarantees for long term operability, independently form the development of new processors and operating systems. In order to reduce the problems linked to the rapid evolution of the programming environments, the workbook makes use of a few macros, written in Visual Basic and necessary only to automatically save the output data. The workbook is designed for an interactive operability and all the commands and choices can be entered by sliding menus associated to single cells. All the standard demagnetization diagrams (Zijderveld orthogonal projection diagrams, stereographic projection of unit vectors, decay of the remanence intensity) are featured and both the user-driven and the automatic computation of the remanence characteristic components by principal component analysis are allowed. In addition, various other common demagnetization parameters (MDF, deltaGRM) are computed. The whole workbook is free for use and modification. The program has the following features which may be valuable for various users: - Operability in nearly all the computers and platforms; - Easy inputs of demagnetization data by "copy and paste" from ASCII files. The required data consist of only 9 columns: (1) sample code, (2) demagnetization steps, (3-5) raw measurements from

  8. Ch'al Dinek'ehji saad bee'al'ini bini'doonish: dadiits'a'igii doo dabizhi'igii (Frog: Navajo Languages Workbook. Sounds and Symbols).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benally, Louise; And Others

    Part of the first book series of "Ch'al," the word workbook written in the Navajo language provides supplementary activities to the reading program. Illustrations are in reference to the 11 sound/symbol associations in the Navajo language introduced in the reader-workbook. Illustrated objects are captioned in the Navajo language using diacritical…

  9. Evaluation of the Families SHARE workbook: an educational tool outlining disease risk and healthy guidelines to reduce risk of heart disease, diabetes, breast cancer and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehly, Laura M; Morris, Bronwyn A; Skapinsky, Kaley; Goergen, Andrea; Ludden, Amanda

    2015-11-13

    Common diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer are etiologically complex with multiple risk factors (e.g., environment, genetic, lifestyle). These risk factors tend to cluster in families, making families an important social context for intervention and lifestyle-focused disease prevention. The Families Sharing Health Assessment and Risk Evaluation (SHARE) workbook was designed as an educational tool outlining family health history based risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer. The current paper describes the steps taken to develop and evaluate the workbook employing a user-centered design approach. The workbook was developed in four steps, culminating in an evaluation focusing on understanding and usability of the tool. The evaluation was based on two Phases of data collected from a sample of mothers of young children in the Washington, D.C., area. A baseline assessment and follow-up approximately two weeks after receipt of the workbook were conducted, as well as focus groups with participants. The design of the workbook was refined in response to participant feedback from the first evaluation Phase and subsequently re-evaluated with a new sample. After incorporating user-based feedback and revising the workbook, Phase 2 evaluation results indicated that understanding of the workbook components improved for all sections (from 6.26 to 6.81 on a 7-point scale). In addition, 100% of users were able to use the algorithm to assess their disease risk and over 60% used the algorithm to assess family members' disease risk. At follow-up, confidence to increase fruit, vegetable and fiber intake improved significantly, as well. The Families SHARE workbook was developed and evaluated resulting in a family health history tool that is both understandable and usable by key stakeholders. This educational tool will be used in intervention studies assessing the effectiveness of family genomics health educators who use the Families

  10. Radiocarbon dating of prehistoric rock paintings by selective oxidation of organic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, J.; Hyman, M.; Shafer, H.J.; Rowe, M.W. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA))

    1990-12-27

    Dating of prehistoric rock paintings (pictographs) has traditionally relied on indirect evidence. This includes inferences based on the archaeological context, such as superpositions of pictorial styles and the depiction of images that constrain their ages, as well as dating of deposits that either cover the art in situ or contain separated fragments of the painted surface. Migration of ions between the bulk rock and the natural coatings that form on a newly exposed surface has also been exploited to date petroglyphs (rock carvings) in desert regions. Until recently, however, direct dating (by radiocarbon techniques) of pictographs has not been possible, mainly because of the problem of separating inorganic carbon from the organic material in the pigments. Here we report on a new technique which allows this separation to be effected by using a low-temperature, low-pressure oxygen plasma to oxidize selectively the organic component; this may then be analysed using standard {sup 14}C methods. We have applied this technique to a portion of a pictograph from the Lower Pecos region of southwest Texas. The date obtained, 3,865{plus minus}100 yr BP (before present) is consistent with that expected on the basis of archaeological inference. As organic carbon is a ubiquitous component of pictograph paints, this technique should be applicable to rock paintings throughout the world. (author).

  11. Breast cancer surgery: an historical narrative. Part I. From prehistoric times to Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakorafas, George H; Safioleas, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Cancer was known as a disease since prehistoric times. Management of breast cancer evolved slowly through centuries in the ancient world up to the Renaissance. This period is marked by the absence of any scientifically verifiable understanding of the true nature of cancer and its natural history and consequently by a lack of effective treatment. Breast has been considered as a symbol of femininity, fertility and beauty. Hippocrates proposed that breast cancer, among other neoplasms, was a 'systemic disease' caused by an excess of black bile. The humoral theory was further supported by Galen and dominated for centuries in medicine. Fulguration and breast amputation by using various instruments to achieve a rapid operation were widely used up to the 18th century. The Renaissance was a revolutionary period, since it stimulated medical practice; at that time physicians started to scientifically study medicine. Vesalius greatly contributed in the advancement of surgery, and he vigorously opposed Galen's doctrines. Many great surgeons of that time (including Paré, Cabrol, Servetto, Scultetus, Tulp, Fabry von Hilded, etc.) advanced the science of surgery. Interestingly, Bartoleny Gabrol (1590) in Montpellier advocated radical mastectomy, which was popularised by Halsted, 300 years later. However, the lack of anaesthesia and the problem of wound infections (due to the lack of the aseptic techniques) generated significance and often problems for the surgeons of that time. Surgery was often 'heroic' but primitive and even inhumane by current standards. Therapeutic nihilism was the prevailing altitude regarding breast cancer, at least among the vast majority of surgeons.

  12. Environmental productivity predicts migration, demographic, and linguistic patterns in prehistoric California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codding, Brian F; Jones, Terry L

    2013-09-03

    Global patterns of ethnolinguistic diversity vary tremendously. Some regions show very little variation even across vast expanses, whereas others exhibit dense mosaics of different languages spoken alongside one another. Compared with the rest of Native North America, prehistoric California exemplified the latter. Decades of linguistic, genetic, and archaeological research have produced detailed accounts of the migrations that aggregated to build California's diverse ethnolinguistic mosaic, but there have been few have attempts to explain the process underpinning these migrations and why such a mosaic did not develop elsewhere. Here we show that environmental productivity predicts both the order of migration events and the population density recorded at contact. The earliest colonizers occupied the most suitable habitats along the coast, whereas subsequent Mid-Late Holocene migrants settled in more marginal habitats. Other Late Holocene patterns diverge from this trend, reflecting altered dynamics linked to food storage and increased sedentism. Through repeated migration events, incoming populations replaced resident populations occurring at lower densities in lower-productivity habitats, thereby resulting in the fragmentation of earlier groups and the development of one of the most diverse ethnolinguistic patterns in the Americas. Such a process may account for the distribution of ethnolinguistic diversity worldwide.

  13. Prehistoric land use and Neolithisation in Europe in the context of regional climate events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmen, C.; Wirtz, K. W.; Gronenborn, D.

    2009-04-01

    We present a simple, adaptation-driven, spatially explicit model of pre-Bronze age socio-technological change, called the Global Land Use and Technological Evolution Simulator (GLUES). The socio-technological realm is described by three characteristic traits: available technology, subsistence style ratio, and economic diversity. Human population and culture develop in the context of global paleoclimate and regional paleoclimate events. Global paleoclimate is derived from CLIMBER-2 Earth System Model anomalies superimposed on the IIASA temperature and precipitation database. Regional a forcing is provided by abrupt climate deteriorations from a compilation of 138 long-term high-resolution climate proxy time series from mostly terrestrial and near-shore archives. The GLUES simulator provides for a novel way to explore the interplay between climate, climate change, and cultural evolution both on the Holocene timescale as well as for short-term extreme event periods. We sucessfully simulate the migration of people and the diffusion of Neolithic technology from the Near East into Europe in the period 12000-4000 a BP. We find good agreement with recent archeological compilations of Western Eurasian Neolithic sites. No causal relationship between climate events and cultural evolution could be identified, but the speed of cultural development is found to be modulated by the frequency of climate events. From the demographic evolution and regional ressource consumption, we estimate regional land use change and prehistoric greenhouse gas emissions.

  14. Direct radiocarbon dates for prehistoric paintings at the Altamira, El Castillo and Niaux caves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valladas, H.; Cachier, H.; Maurice, P.; Arnold, M. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Quiros, F.B. de (Universidad de Leon (Spain). Area de Prehistoria); Clottes, J. (Ministere de la Culture et de la Communication, Foix (France)); Valdes, V.C. (UNED, Madrid (Spain). Departmento de Prehistoria e Historia Antigua); Uzquiano, P. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 34 -Montpellier (France). Laboratoire de Paleobotanique)

    1992-05-07

    Among things that most strikingly distinguish modern humans from other hominids and the rest of the animal kingdom is the ability to represent things and events pictorially. Complex paintings of the type discovered in the Altamira, El Castillo, Niaux and Lascaux caves represent an important stepping stone in the cultural evolution of humankind. Until now dates were derived from style or dated remains left by prehistoric visitors and could be biased by prolonged occupation or visits unrelated to painting activity. Here we report the first radiocarbon dates for the charcoal used to draw stylistically similar bisons in these caves: 14,000 {+-} 400 yr BP in the Spanish caves of Altamira, 12,990 {+-} 200 yr BP in El Castillo, and 12,890 {+-} 160 yr BP for a bison of different style in the French Pyrenean cave of Niaux. Our results demonstrate the imprecise nature of stylistic dating and show that painting dates derived from remains of human activities should be used with caution. (Author).

  15. Ochres from rituals of prehistoric human funerals at the Toca do Enoque site, Piaui, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte Cavalcante, Luis Carlos, E-mail: cavalcanteufpi@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Luz, Maria de Fatima da; Guidon, Niede [Fundacao Museu do Homem Americano (Brazil); Domingos Fabris, Jose [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Domingos Ardisson, Jose [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    The archaeological site known as Toca do Enoque (geographical coordinates, 09 Degree-Sign 14 Prime 65.3 Double-Prime S 43 Degree-Sign 55 Prime 62.5 Double-Prime W) is a rock shelter located in the Serra das Andorinhas (Serra das Confusoes National Park), rural area of the city of Guaribas, state of Piaui, Brazil. Several rupestrian paintings (anthropomorphic and zoomorphic motifs along with some pure graphisms), predominantly in red, are found on the sandstone walls. Charcoals, lithic materials, necklaces with teeth, animal bones, gastropod shells, ochres and human skeletons (dated from 6,220 {+-} 40 to 6,610 {+-} 40 years before present, BP) were identified in recent excavations in this shelter. Red and yellow ochre samples were collected from prehistoric funeral structures and analyzed with powder X-ray diffractometry, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and {sup 57}Fe transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy at 298 K and 80 K. Moessbauer data indicate that the red ochre do contain predominantly hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) whereas goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) is the major mineral in the yellow ochre.

  16. The Impact of Rapid Climate Change on Prehistoric Societies during the Holocene in the Eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Weninger

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we explore the impact of Rapid Climate Change (RCC on prehistoric communities in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Early and Middle Holocene. Our focus is on the social implications of the four major climate cold anomalies that have recently been identified as key time-windows for global RCC (Mayewski et al. 2004. These cooling anomalies are well-dated, with Greenland ice-core resolution, due to synchronicity between warm/cold foraminifera ratios in Mediterranean core LC21 as a proxy for surface water temperature, and Greenland GISP2 non sea-salt (nss [K+] ions as a proxy for the intensification of the Siberian High and for polar air outbreaks in the northeast Mediterranean (Rohling et al. 2002. Building on these synchronisms, the GISP2 agemodel supplies the following precise time-intervals for archaeological RCC research: (i 8.6–8.0 ka, (ii 6.0–5.2 ka, (iii 4.2–4.0 ka and (iv 3.1–2.9 ka calBP. For each of these RCC time intervals, based on detailed 14C-based chronological studies, we investigate contemporaneous cultural developments. From our studies it follows that RCC-related climatic deterioration is a major factor underlying social change, although always at work within a wide spectrum of social, cultural, economic and religious factors.

  17. Chemical Analysis of Pottery Demonstrates Prehistoric Origin for High-Altitude Alpine Dairying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrer, Francesco; Colonese, André Carlo; Lucquin, Alexandre; Petersen Guedes, Eduardo; Thompson, Anu; Walsh, Kevin; Reitmaier, Thomas; Craig, Oliver E

    2016-01-01

    The European high Alps are internationally renowned for their dairy produce, which are of huge cultural and economic significance to the region. Although the recent history of alpine dairying has been well studied, virtually nothing is known regarding the origins of this practice. This is due to poor preservation of high altitude archaeological sites and the ephemeral nature of transhumance economic practices. Archaeologists have suggested that stone structures that appear around 3,000 years ago are associated with more intense seasonal occupation of the high Alps and perhaps the establishment of new economic strategies. Here, we report on organic residue analysis of small fragments of pottery sherds that are occasionally preserved both at these sites and earlier prehistoric rock-shelters. Based mainly on isotopic criteria, dairy lipids could only be identified on ceramics from the stone structures, which date to the Iron Age (ca. 3,000-2,500 BP), providing the earliest evidence of this practice in the high Alps. Dairy production in such a marginal environment implies a high degree of risk even by today's standards. We postulate that this practice was driven by population increase and climate deterioration that put pressure on lowland agropastoral systems and the establishment of more extensive trade networks, leading to greater demand for highly nutritious and transportable dairy products.

  18. A South American Prehistoric Mitogenome: Context, Continuity, and the Origin of Haplogroup C1d

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sans, Mónica; Figueiro, Gonzalo; Hughes, Cris E.; Lindo, John; Hidalgo, Pedro C.; Malhi, Ripan S.

    2015-01-01

    Based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), it has been estimated that at least 15 founder haplogroups peopled the Americas. Subhaplogroup C1d3 was defined based on the mitogenome of a living individual from Uruguay that carried a lineage previously identified in hypervariable region I sequences from ancient and modern Uruguayan individuals. When complete mitogenomes were studied, additional substitutions were found in the coding region of the mitochondrial genome. Using a complete ancient mitogenome and three modern mitogenomes, we aim to clarify the ancestral state of subhaplogroup C1d3 and to better understand the peopling of the region of the Río de la Plata basin, as well as of the builders of the mounds from which the ancient individuals were recovered. The ancient mitogenome, belonging to a female dated to 1,610±46 years before present, was identical to the mitogenome of one of the modern individuals. All individuals share the mutations defining subhaplogroup C1d3. We estimated an age of 8,974 (5,748–12,261) years for the most recent common ancestor of C1d3, in agreement with the initial peopling of the geographic region. No individuals belonging to the defined lineage were found outside of Uruguay, which raises questions regarding the mobility of the prehistoric inhabitants of the country. Moreover, the present study shows the continuity of Native lineages over at least 6,000 years. PMID:26509686

  19. The relative stability of prehistorical geographic environment in China's tropics on the basis of archaeology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    According to archaeological data from about sixty samples the relative stability ofphysical and human geographical environment in the tropical zone of China is discussed in thispaper. Because of the superior natural environment, sufficient food resources and a sparsepopulation resulting in the absence of social requirement to transform the productive forces, theadvancement of economy and society was stagnated during prehistorical period in China's tropics.Compared with northern China, the appearance of ground stone tool stagnated about 3,000 years,the beginning of Bronze Age, about 1,000 years, and the agriculture, 2,500-3,000 years. The noceramics age continued till the early Neolithic Age and the appearance of colour or white ceramicswas 2,000 years later than that in northern China. The life form of migration to gather and to huntcontinued till the middle Neolithic Age, and the fixed settlement based on agriculture 1,000-2,000years stagnated. The clan commune just appeared at the end of the Neolithic Age which was 2,000-3,000 years later than that in northern China.

  20. Using seafaring simulations and shortest-hop trajectories to model the prehistoric colonization of Remote Oceania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Álvaro; Callaghan, Richard T; Fitzpatrick, Scott M

    2016-10-24

    The prehistoric colonization of islands in Remote Oceania that began ∼3400 B.P. represents what was arguably the most expansive and ambitious maritime dispersal of humans across any of the world's seas or oceans. Though archaeological evidence has provided a relatively clear picture of when many of the major island groups were colonized, there is still considerable debate as to where these settlers originated from and their strategies/trajectories used to reach habitable land that other datasets (genetic, linguistic) are also still trying to resolve. To address these issues, we have harnessed the power of high-resolution climatic and oceanographic datasets in multiple seafaring simulation platforms to examine major pulses of colonization in the region. Our analysis, which takes into consideration currents, land distribution, wind periodicity, the influence of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, and "shortest-hop" trajectories, demonstrate that (i) seasonal and semiannual climatic changes were highly influential in structuring ancient Pacific voyaging; (ii) western Micronesia was likely settled from somewhere around the Maluku (Molucca) Islands; (iii) Samoa was the most probable staging area for the colonization of East Polynesia; and (iv) although there are major differences in success rates depending on time of year and the occurrence of ENSO events, settlement of Hawai'i and New Zealand is possible from the Marquesas or Society Islands, the same being the case for settlement of Easter Island from Mangareva or the Marquesas.

  1. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of cave deposits at the Xiaogushan prehistoric site, northeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-Fu; Huang, Wei-Wen; Yuan, Bao-Yin; Fu, Ren-Yi; Zhou, Li-Ping

    2010-11-01

    The Xiaogushan cave site is one of the most important prehistoric sites in North China. The stone and bone artifacts found in the cave are similar to European contemporaneous artifacts. Cave deposits consist of five layers that have been dated from 46,353 ± 1179 to 4229 ± 135 cal. yr BP, using radiocarbon dating techniques on charcoal and bone samples collected from Layers 2-5. In this paper, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) techniques were applied to date six samples taken from Layers 1-3. The luminescence properties of the fine-grained and coarse-grained quartz extracts indicate that the materials are suitable for OSL dating using a single-aliquot regeneration-dose (SAR) protocol. The OSL ages obtained are broadly consistent with the stratigraphy and the associated calibrated radiocarbon ages. The dating results show that the cave was first occupied by humans about 70 ka. The human occupation of the cave may be related to climate change. An occupation hiatus is inferred to between ∼ 17 to ∼ 10 ka. The stone and bone artifacts found in Layers 2 and 3 may indicate the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transitions in the region.

  2. Lake sediments record prehistoric lead pollution related to early copper production in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeani, David P; Abbott, Mark B; Steinman, Byron A; Bain, Daniel J

    2013-06-04

    The mining and use of copper by prehistoric people on Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula is one of the oldest examples of metalworking. We analyzed the concentration of lead, titanium, magnesium, iron, and organic matter in sediment cores recovered from three lakes located near mine pits to investigate the timing, location, and magnitude of ancient copper mining pollution. Lead concentrations were normalized to lithogenic metals and organic matter to account for processes that can influence natural (or background) lead delivery. Nearly simultaneous lead enrichments occurred at Lake Manganese and Copper Falls Lake ∼8000 and 7000 years before present (yr BP), indicating that copper extraction occurred concurrently in at least two locations on the peninsula. The poor temporal coherence among the lead enrichments from ∼6300 to 5000 yr BP at each lake suggests that the focus of copper mining and annealing shifted through time. In sediment younger than ∼5000 yr BP, lead concentrations remain at background levels at all three lakes, excluding historic lead increases starting ∼150 yr BP. Our work demonstrates that lead emissions associated with both the historic and Old Copper Complex tradition are detectable and can be used to determine the temporal and geographic pattern of metal pollution.

  3. Man Corn: Cannibalism and Violence in the Prehistoric American Southwest. Christy G. Turner and Jacqueline A. Turner. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, 1999

    OpenAIRE

    Charles C. Kolb

    1999-01-01

    Human sacrifice and cannibalism, the potential for institutionalized violence or warfare, witchcraft or sorcery, and ritual executions are emotionally charged issues; but some anthropologists and other learned scholars now suggest that these activities and behaviors occurred in the American Southwest, a region usually depicted for peace, harmony, tranquility, and spirituality. Christy Turner, Regents' Professor in the ...

  4. The Effect of Constructive Instructional Activities in Student Workbooks on Developing Students’ Responsibility towards Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Nuri GÖMLEKSİZ

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this descriptive study is to determine the effects of instructional activities in students’ workbooks on developing learning responsibility of the students based on teachers’ views. For that aim, the teachers who teach at 3rd, 4th and 5th grades in primary schools in Ergani in 2010-2011 academic year were included in the study. A 24- item five-point Likert-style scale, developed by the researchers, was used in the study. Independent samples t test, One Way Anova, Levene, MWU, KWH and LSD tests were used to analyze the data. Teachers’ views were analyzed in terms of gender, seniority, grade level and socio-economic status of the school. Both male and female teachers stressed that instructional activities were effective to increase students’ active participation and develop responsibility in the teaching-learning process. No statistically significant difference was seen related to grade level. Results revealed that the teachers in all groups thought that instructional activities helped students increase their motivation towards learning, provided active participation, developed cooperation, learning skills and responsibility. The teachers working in good socioeconomic status reported that instructional activities were more effective in developing responsibility towards learning than those who work in schools with middle and low socioeconomic status.

  5. Minimum Energy Dwelling (MED) workbook: an investigation of techniques and materials for energy conscious design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    This workbook is based upon information gathered during the design phase of the Minimum Energy Dwelling. The objective of the project, sponsored by the Southern California Gas Co., Department of Energy, and Mission Viejo is to substantially reduce energy use by the incorporation of energy conservation and solar techniques in a single-family detached dwelling. The Project will demonstrate to builders, as well as to the general public, a number of technological innovations that can, at reasonable cost, be included in a dwelling design. The problem facing Southern California Gas Co., along with most other gas utilities, is ever-decreasing amounts of gas at increasing prices. The dwelling designed has approximately 1,150 ft/sup 2/, consistent with current home-building trends. Through the optimum use of energy-conserving appliances, insulation, window and wall shading, exterior coloring, and thermal mass, the yearly energy usage has been reduced by over 50%. Of the remaining 50% of the energy required for heating, cooling, and domestic hot water, the majority is supplied by the solar-energy system. Three hundred twenty square feet (270 effective) of evacuated tube collector are incorporated into the building structure. The hot water provided by the collectors is used to run an absorption chiller for cooling, the domestic hot water, and the heating system. The remaining energy requirements are met by an auxiliary natural gas energy system and a cool-air-economizer cycle.

  6. Economic man as model man: Ideal types, idealization and caricatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morgan, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Economics revolves around a central character: "economic man." As historians, we are all familiar with various episodes in the history of this character, and we appreciate his ever-changing aspect even while many of our colleagues in economics think the rational economic agent of neoclassical econom

  7. Rich man, poor man: developmental differences in attributions and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, Carol K

    2012-11-01

    In an examination guided by cognitive developmental and attribution theory of how explanations of wealth and poverty and perceptions of rich and poor people change with age and are interrelated, 6-, 10-, and 14-year-olds (N=88) were asked for their causal attributions and trait judgments concerning a rich man and a poor man. First graders, like older children, perceived the rich man as more competent than the poor man. However, they had difficulty in explaining wealth and poverty, especially poverty, and their trait perceptions were associated primarily with their attributions of wealth to job status, education, and luck. Fifth and ninth graders more clearly attributed wealth and poverty to the equity factors of ability and effort and based their trait perceptions on these attributions. Although the use of structured attribution questions revealed more understanding among young children than previous studies have suggested, the findings suggest a shift with age in the underlying bases for differential evaluation of rich and poor people from a focus on good outcomes associated with wealth (a good education and job) to a focus on personal qualities responsible for wealth (ability and effort).

  8. Pre-excavation studies of prehistoric cave sites by magnetic prospecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkis., Sonia; Matskevich, Zinovii; Meshveliani, Tengiz

    2014-05-01

    Detailed magnetic survey was performed for caves study in Israel (1995-1996) within the framework of the Beit Shemesh Regional Project (Judean Shephelah). The experience accumulated in Israel we applied later (2010) in two Georgian prehistoric cave sites: Cherula and Kotias-Klde. The magnetic method is based on the contrast in magnetic properties between a target object (e.g., buried archaeological feature) and the host medium (i.e, the surrounding bedrock and soil). The feasibility of the magnetic method for cave revealing was evaluated by magnetic susceptibility (κ) measurements of surrounding soil and rocks, and archaeological features: stones making up the walls, ceramic fragments and cave fill. According to data obtained, the κ of soil within caves (cave fill) is higher than that of surrounding soil. The enhancement of cave fill κ occurs because processes associated with human habitation: repeated heating and accumulation of organic debris. Both these processes provide good conditions for the conversion of the iron oxide found within the soil to a strongly ferromagnetic form (Mullins, 1977; Maher, 1986; Dalan and Banerjee, 1998, Itkis and Eppelbaum, 1999; Itkis, 2003) The presence of highly magnetic ceramics in caves also enhances magnetic contrast between practically non-magnetic bed rock (chalk in Ramat Beit Shemesh Site (Israel) and limestone (Georgian sites) and the cave fill, increasing the potential of the magnetic method to reveal caves (Itkis, 2011). Based on magnetic survey results, an excavation revealed a cave with a large amount of well preserved pottery and finds typical of the Early Bronze Age. Both studied cave sites in Georgia were located in Chiatura region of Imeretia province. Cherula site is a karstic rockshelter with a single chamber, ca 100 sq. m. The site was briefly tested in 1970s'. The area excavated in 2010 went to the depth of 60 cm below the present day surface; the limestone bedrock was not reached. The excavation revealed

  9. [Dietary habits and the state of the human oral cavity in the prehistoric age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, C D

    1990-06-01

    This is an age-by-age summation of literature on over 100 sites (of more than 250 excavated prehistoric ruins on the Korean Peninsula: about 160 places in South Korea--Paleolithic Age 15, Neolithic Age 21, Bronze Age 90 and Iron Age 35--and about 90 places in North Korea) which produced dietary-habit-related devices such as hunting tools, fishing instruments, farming equipments, tools of daily life, and human bones and teeth. 1) Various dietary-habit-related Old Stone-Age tools, instruments and other items were found. Among them were stone axes, stone hand axes, fish spears and hooks made of bone or horn, stone blades, stone scrapers and stone drills believed to have been used in daily life, and charcoal and sites of furnaces used for cooking. Furthermore, it was found that there were severe dental abrasions and dental caries among the inhabitants of the Korean Peninsula in the Old Stone Age. 2) Some evidences were found which lead us to believe that hunting was practiced with stone arrowheads in the New Stone Age. Stone net sinkers, which is the evidence of the use of fish nets, were also found. In addition, farming stone tools and charred cereals, both of which date back to the latter part of this period, were unearthed. Millstones, which began to be used in this age, and livestock bones were found. Where these items were discovered, 23 maxillae and mandibles with teeth and a total of 231 separate teeth of Neolithic period human beings were reported. However, there are no records indicating dental caries, but some records describe severe abrasion.

  10. Historical and Technical Notes on Aqueducts from Prehistoric to Medieval Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni De Feo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the evolution of aqueduct technologies through the millennia, from prehistoric to medieval times. These hydraulic works were used by several civilizations to collect water from springs and to transport it to settlements, sanctuaries and other targets. Several civilizations, in China and the Americas, developed water transport systems independently, and brought these to high levels of sophistication. For the Mediterranean civilizations, one of the salient characteristics of cultural development, since the Minoan Era (ca. 3200–1100 BC, is the architectural and hydraulic function of aqueducts used for the water supply in palaces and other settlements. The Minoan hydrologists and engineers were aware of some of the basic principles of water sciences and the construction and operation of aqueducts. These technologies were further developed by subsequent civilizations. Advanced aqueducts were constructed by the Hellenes and, especially, by the Romans, who dramatically increased the application scale of these structures, in order to provide the extended quantities of water necessary for the Roman lifestyle of frequent bathing. The ancient practices and techniques were not improved but survived through Byzantine and early medieval times. Later, the Ottomans adapted older techniques, reintroducing large-scale aqueducts to supply their emerging towns with adequate water for religious and social needs. The scientific approach to engineering matters during the Renaissance further improved aqueduct technology. Some of these improvements were apparently also implemented in Ottoman waterworks. Finally the industrial revolution established mechanized techniques in water acquisition. Water is a common need of mankind, and several ancient civilizations developed simple but practical techniques from which we can still learn. Their experience and knowledge could still play an important role for sustainable water supply

  11. 失败的Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    小兵

    2000-01-01

    搞不清楚你要赚多少钱才会满足为什么还觉得孤独 Oh oh oh失败的 Man 越弄越糊涂Peggy Sue Mary Sherry Ronda 跟 Lulu每个女孩你都想照顾 Oh oh oh失败的 MAN 走了很多路不太舒服又不想哭想种一棵大树有了种子没有泥土迷迷糊糊突然看到上帝跟耶酥笑说你再得不到保证 Oh oh oh

  12. Trees Are Useful to Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵明

    2005-01-01

    Trees are useful to man in three impor-tant ways. They provide him with wood and other products;they give him shade;they help prevent drought(干旱)and floods. Unfortunately,in many parts of the world, man has not realized that the third one is the most important. Two thousand years ago a rich and pow-erful country cut down its trees to build war-ships, with which to gain itself an empire. It gained the empire,however,without its trees, its soil became hard and poor. When the em-pire fell to pieces, the home c...

  13. Erratics and Re-cycled Stone: scholarly irrelevancies or fundamental utilities to lithic studies in prehistoric Britain and beyond?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stephen Briggs

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many theories explaining later prehistoric 'trade' and 'exchange systems' in stone artefacts. Evidence matching the petrographic information of transported implements with the country rock (local bedrock where 'factories' produced flaked stone axes is felt to be compelling. Consequently, across Europe it is widely believed that the only way 'factory' rock could have reached the places where artefacts have been found was by human carriage. The discovery of implement working floors, or 'factories' in montane areas (c. 1900-1970 on primary exposures of stone, lithologically almost identical to polished axes found considerable distances from them, has led to a belief in the industrial, economic or social processing and carriage of finished products. There are caveats to this proof of evidence, however. Natural processes constantly redistribute incalculable numbers of durable erratic pebble- to boulder-sized clasts, so why could these not have been used for making prehistoric artefacts? There is abundant evidence in the archaeological record that artefacts were crafted from such material. And although there is now an archive of petrographic thin-sections available to help to identify the origins of the artefacts, no comparable data are available on re-cycled stone. Implement provenancing is therefore unlikely to be of lasting scientific value until investigative programmes have accumulated far more accurate petrographic data on pebbles and erratics from superficial deposits. Comparisons between some British-Irish implement distribution patterns with those of glacial erratics suggests the available evidence already better fits an interpretation of deterministic and opportunistic stone procurement rather than one involving long-distance travel by prehistoric peoples. Extensive, long-term sampling and provenancing programmes are now needed to address this requirement.

  14. The Oncor Geodatabase for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program: Handbook of Data Reduction Procedures, Workbooks, and Exchange Templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sather, Nichole K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Borde, Amy B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Diefenderfer, Heida L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Serkowski, John A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coleman, Andre M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Gary E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    This Handbook of Data Reduction Procedures, Workbooks, and Exchange Templates is designed to support the Oncor geodatabase for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). The following data categories are covered: water-surface elevation and temperature, sediment accretion rate, photo points, herbaceous wetland vegetation cover, tree plots and site summaries, fish catch and density, fish size, fish diet, fish prey, and Chinook salmon genetic stock identification. The handbook is intended for use by scientists collecting monitoring and research data for the CEERP. The ultimate goal of Oncor is to provide quality, easily accessible, geospatial data for synthesis and evaluation of the collective performance of CEERP ecosystem restoration actions at a program scale.

  15. East Man,Global Winner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wind Blew; Bai Yifeng

    2007-01-01

    @@ "The Global Human Settlement Environment Green Building Materials Award is a special award with a special significance.My staff and I feel so excited with this award.It is a special honor that means our independent brand,East Man Heath Paint,has received recognition in the international community.

  16. Man, Controller of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olowin, R. P.

    2011-06-01

    The Man, Controller of the Universe painted by the renowned Mexican artist Diego Rivera in the gigantic mural of the Palace of Fine Arts in Mexico City is overlooked by a telescope. We acknowledge this instrument as the Plaskett Telescope at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory in Victoria, Canada.

  17. Man and Machines: Three Criticisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Edward F.

    As machines have become a more common part of daily life through the passage of time, the idea that the line separating man and machine is slowly fading has become more popular as well. This paper examines three critics of change through their most famous works. One of the most popular views of Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" is that it is a…

  18. Man...An Endangered Species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior, Washington, DC.

    The general theme of this 1968 yearbook is that man is a threatened species, facing overpopulation and unbridled technology - both self induced. The presentation is broad, relating to many aspects of conservation and natural resources in the United States in a descriptive, non-technical style. The yearbook is divided into major topics: Land…

  19. Man...An Endangered Species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior, Washington, DC.

    The general theme of this 1968 yearbook is that man is a threatened species, facing overpopulation and unbridled technology - both self induced. The presentation is broad, relating to many aspects of conservation and natural resources in the United States in a descriptive, non-technical style. The yearbook is divided into major topics: Land…

  20. New Manning System Field Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    our Analytic hodel (see Chapter 5, New Manning Svestem Field Evaluacion . Technical Revore No. I, RAJL-, November c t, e number or soldiers retaking...and meaningful performance measures are not only crucial to the WRAIR N Field Evaluacion but also to the Army. To know which unit does betzer than

  1. Bone trace element pattern in an 18th century population sample of Tenerife (Canary Islands): comparison with a prehistoric one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnay-de-la-Rosa, M; Gonzalez-Reimers, E; Velasco-Vazquez, J; Barros-Lopez, N; Galindo-Martin, L

    1998-10-01

    We have determined bone strontium (Sr), barium (Ba), calcium (Ca), and zinc (Zn) content in 24 samples belonging to adult individuals who died toward the end of the 18th century and were interred in a church's floor on the island of Tenerife, comparing the results with those obtained in 14 prehistoric samples of the same island and also with those of 7 modern controls. No differences were observed between the two ancient groups, which showed higher bone strontium and barium than the modern sample, and a slightly lower Ba/Sr ratio, thus pointing to consumption of marine sources.

  2. Etudes sociales 30. Sujet B: Interaction entre nations. Cahier de l'eleve. Edition finale = Social Studies 30. Subject B: Interaction between Nations. Student Workbook. Final Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Branch.

    In this Alberta (Canada) student workbook, four history units are presented for study. These are: (1) Between Two Wars (1919-1936); (2) World War II; (3) The Emergence and Interaction of the Superpowers; and (4) Contemporary World Interactions. Advice is offered to students in each unit along with information about key events and issues during…

  3. Raza de Tesoros. Programa de Lectura y Ensenanza del Lenguaje, Unidad B. Cuaderno de Trabajo (Race of Treasures. Reading and Language Learning Program, Unit B. Workbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    This workbook in Spanish accompanies the reader that is part of an ungraded language arts and reading program that can be used in classes from upper elementary through high school. The program is designed around reading selections which present aspects of history, culture, and present-day experiences of special relevance to the Mexican-American…

  4. Escaparate. Programa de lectura y ensenanza del lenguaje, Unidad C. Cuaderno de Trabajo (Show Window. Reading and Language Learning Program, Unit C. Workbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    Exercises, tests, puzzles, enrichment activities, maps, and games are included in this student workbook for "Escaparate," the third in a series of eight Spanish reading and language instruction units developed by the Bilingual Program of Edgewood School District, San Antonio, Texas. The publication can be used as ditto sheets for duplicating or in…

  5. Your Business Plan: A Workbook for Small Businesses in Oregon = Su Plan de Negocio: Un Libro de Trabajo Para Empresas Pequenas en Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Dennis J.; Chambers, Maynard N.

    Designed as an aid for those investigating the possibility of opening their first business, as well as business owners with many years experience who have never prepared a written business plan, this workbook guides the reader through the steps involved in the preparation of a business plan or feasibility study. After a general discussion of the…

  6. Escaparate. Programa de lectura y ensenanza del lenguaje, Unidad C. Cuaderno de Trabajo (Show Window. Reading and Language Learning Program, Unit C. Workbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    Exercises, tests, puzzles, enrichment activities, maps, and games are included in this student workbook for "Escaparate," the third in a series of eight Spanish reading and language instruction units developed by the Bilingual Program of Edgewood School District, San Antonio, Texas. The publication can be used as ditto sheets for duplicating or in…

  7. Raza de Tesoros. Programa de Lectura y Ensenanza del Lenguaje, Unidad B. Cuaderno de Trabajo (Race of Treasures. Reading and Language Learning Program, Unit B. Workbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    This workbook in Spanish accompanies the reader that is part of an ungraded language arts and reading program that can be used in classes from upper elementary through high school. The program is designed around reading selections which present aspects of history, culture, and present-day experiences of special relevance to the Mexican-American…

  8. Your Business Plan: A Workbook for Small Businesses in Oregon = Su Plan de Negocio: Un Libro de Trabajo Para Empresas Pequenas en Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Dennis J.; Chambers, Maynard N.

    Designed as an aid for those investigating the possibility of opening their first business, as well as business owners with many years experience who have never prepared a written business plan, this workbook guides the reader through the steps involved in the preparation of a business plan or feasibility study. After a general discussion of the…

  9. Lengua nacional: Fichas de trabajo 1. Metodo de lectura y escritura (National Language: Workbook 1. A Method of Reading and Writing).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peniche Leger, Maria Elena, Ed.

    This consumable, graded workbook can be used for exercises, tests, and individualized learning. Each level contains 30 units divided into four groups of exercises: reading analysis, grammar, composition, and spelling. Ten general tests are also included. For the accompanying reader, see FL 004 047. (Author/SK)

  10. Cooperative Project To Develop a Database of Discipline-Specific Workbook Exercises for Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Entomology, and Biological Sciences Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsbury, Susan H.; And Others

    A two-part text, "Science Resources: A Self-Paced Instructional Workbook," was designed to provide science students at Mississippi State University with: (1) instruction on basic library usage and reference tools common to most scientific disciplines; (2) materials adapted to specific disciplines; and (3) services available to them from the…

  11. Noche del Sol. Que Bonito Es Leer, II. Libro III. Cuaderno de Ejercicios (Night of the Sun. How Nice Reading Is, II. Book III. Workbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    The lessons, games and exercises in the workbook are follow-up work for the units in the reader of the same title. There are many vocabulary, punctuation, and grammar exercises, and spelling games and drills. Additionally, there is an incomplete story for the child to finish by using appropriate words to complete each sentence. These exercises are…

  12. An Analysis of Activities in Saudi Arabian Middle School Science Textbooks and Workbooks for the Inclusion of Essential Features of Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldahmash, Abdulwali H.; Mansour, Nasser S.; Alshamrani, Saeed M.; Almohi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    This study examines Saudi Arabian middle school science textbooks' coverage of the essential features of scientific inquiry. All activities in the middle school science textbooks and workbooks were analyzed by using the scientific inquiry "essential features" rubric. The results indicated that the essential features are included in about…

  13. Lengua nacional: Fichas de trabajo 1. Metodo de lectura y escritura (National Language: Workbook 1. A Method of Reading and Writing).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peniche Leger, Maria Elena, Ed.

    This consumable, graded workbook can be used for exercises, tests, and individualized learning. Each level contains 30 units divided into four groups of exercises: reading analysis, grammar, composition, and spelling. Ten general tests are also included. For the accompanying reader, see FL 004 047. (Author/SK)

  14. Preliminary results of the ground penetrating radar (GPR prospection in the area of the prehistoric flint mine Borownia, southeastern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieszkowski Radosław

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary results of GPR field prospection carried out in the area of the prehistoric mining field Borownia (Ćmielów, Ostrowiec Świętokrzyski District are presented. This mining field forms a belt (30-50 m wide and 700 m long, starting from the valley edge of the Kamienna River southeastwards. Southeastern and western parts of the site have preserved the original post-exploitation relief. Geology of the Borownia mining field was examined and acquired radiograms revealed three distinct zones of anomaly concentrations. The central zone (B is clearly a fragment of the prehistoric mining field, confirmed not only by the GPR sounding but also by archeological surveys. The other two zones have not yet been investigated in detail yet but their surface and archaeological examination may determine only whether their underground structures are natural or have been created by humans. Data obtained during the GPR prospection at the Borownia archaeological site confirmed usefulness of 100, 250 and 500 MHz antennas. The relatively large depth range and good resolution are due to favorable geological conditions.

  15. From Stone Graves to Churchyards. Burial traditions in the Late Prehistoric and Early Medieval Island of Saaremaa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika Mägi

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Even though pre-historic burials have been the favourite topic of research of Estonian archaeologists at least for the past century, the focus has been on their appearance, chronology, ethnic context and objects discovered in them. Burial tradition, as it reflects in the archaeological remnants, has hardly been studied. Research in the field over the past few years, as well as osteological analysis of bone material, which was first carried out in the 1990s, has introduced new findings in the funeral customs of our ancestors. The article examines funeral customs on the island of Saaremaa, and the ideology behind it. The main focus is on the final centuries of the prehistoric period and the beginning of the Middle Ages – more specifically, on changes brought along by Christianity, although the study also provides an overview of earlier customs. A separate chapter discusses the partial distribution of bones and objects in graves, objects determining the boundaries of graves, and traces of funeral rituals. This evidently reflects a set of traditions, and thus also conceptions about the otherworld, composed of multiple layers and differing considerably from the modern funeral tradition. Christianisation of the population of Saaremaa in the 13th century changed these conceptions beyond recognition over a very short period of time.

  16. Berber genealogy and the politics of prehistoric archaeology and craniology in French Algeria (1860s-1880s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effros, Bonnie

    2017-03-01

    Following the conquest of Algiers and its surrounding territory by the French army in 1830, officers noted an abundance of standing stones in this region of North Africa. Although they attracted considerably less attention among their cohort than more familiar Roman monuments such as triumphal arches and bridges, these prehistoric remains were similar to formations found in Brittany and other parts of France. The first effort to document these remains occurred in 1863, when Laurent-Charles Féraud, a French army interpreter, recorded thousands of dolmens and stone formations south-west of Constantine. Alleging that these constructions were Gallic, Féraud hypothesized the close affinity of the French, who claimed descent from the ancient Gauls, with the early inhabitants of North Africa. After Féraud's claims met with scepticism among many prehistorians, French scholars argued that these remains were constructed by the ancestors of the Berbers (Kabyles in contemporary parlance), whom they hypothesized had been dominated by a blond race of European origin. Using craniometric statistics of human remains found in the vicinity of the standing stones to propose a genealogy of the Kabyles, French administrators in Algeria thereafter suggested that their mixed origins allowed them to adapt more easily than the Arab population to French colonial governance. This case study at the intersection of prehistoric archaeology, ancient history and craniology exposes how genealogical (and racial) classification made signal contributions to French colonial ideology and policy between the 1860s and 1880s.

  17. Obesity in the ageing man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalakis, K; Goulis, D G; Vazaiou, A; Mintziori, G; Polymeris, A; Abrahamian-Michalakis, A

    2013-10-01

    As the population is ageing globally, both ageing and obesity are recognized as major public health challenges. The aim of this narrative review is to present and discuss the current evidence on the changes in body composition, energy balance and endocrine environment that occur in the ageing man. Obesity in the ageing man is related to changes in both body weight and composition due to alterations in energy intake and total energy expenditure. In addition, somatopenia (decreased GH secretion), late-onset hypogonadism (LOH), changes in thyroid and adrenal function, as well as changes in appetite-related peptides (leptin, ghrelin) and, most importantly, insulin action are related to obesity, abnormal energy balance, redistribution of the adipose tissue and sarcopenia (decreased muscle mass). A better understanding of the complex relationship of ageing-related endocrine changes and obesity could lead to more effective interventions for elderly men. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. RenderMan design principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Tony; Porter, Tom

    1989-01-01

    The two worlds of interactive graphics and realistic graphics have remained separate. Fast graphics hardware runs simple algorithms and generates simple looking images. Photorealistic image synthesis software runs slowly on large expensive computers. The time has come for these two branches of computer graphics to merge. The speed and expense of graphics hardware is no longer the barrier to the wide acceptance of photorealism. There is every reason to believe that high quality image synthesis will become a standard capability of every graphics machine, from superworkstation to personal computer. The significant barrier has been the lack of a common language, an agreed-upon set of terms and conditions, for 3-D modeling systems to talk to 3-D rendering systems for computing an accurate rendition of that scene. Pixar has introduced RenderMan to serve as that common language. RenderMan, specifically the extensibility it offers in shading calculations, is discussed.

  19. Teleoperators: Man's Machine Partners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, William R.

    1972-01-01

    This booklet is about teleoperators, a class of machines that augment man rather than replace him. Teleoperators have the ability to add to man's strength, his reach, and his ability to work in hostile environments.

  20. Yours ever... or who was Katherine Brown? Investigations of prehistoric Vinča and British influences during and after World War I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Vujović

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As the 110th anniversary of the beginning of the excavations at Vinča is nearing, the question arises as to how much we really know about the role and motives of a number of British subjects who in various ways played decisive roles in the research and the international affirmation of this important Late Neolithic site. It is possible, on the basis of archives and personal correspondence of Miloje M. Vasić, to view the investigations of Vinča in the wider context of political and military relations, influencing the general situation in the Kingdom of The Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, later Yugoslavia. John Lynton Myres was a professor at the universities in Oxford and Liverpool, the founder and editor of the Journal Man and the director of the British Archaeological School in Athens. During the World War I, between 1916 and 1919, he was an officer of the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve, first in the Navy Intelligence Service, and then in Military Control Office in Athens. The Browns, Alec and Catherine, also played an important role. Alec Brown, a left-oriented writer, translator and correspondent, arrived to Serbia as a Cambridge graduate, aiming at the post of an English language teacher in high schools. In the period from 1929 to 1931 he took part in the excavations at Vinča, taking this setting as the base for the plot of one of his books. His wife, Elsie Catherine Brown, whose life is very poorly documented, served in the British Embassy in Belgrade between the wars. Vasić dedicated the third volume of Prehistoric Vinča to her, for her devoted work in the British medical mission and the care she took of the Serbian soldiers near Thessalonica, but also for her part played in the establishment of the initial contact with Sir Charles Hyde. The life of Catherine Brown may be seen as one of the many exceptional stories about the noble British ladies, celebrated in Serbia for over a century. However, one should bear in mind that the events and

  1. 77 FR 23806 - Manning Rail, Inc.-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Manning Grain Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... Surface Transportation Board Manning Rail, Inc.--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Manning Grain... 1150.31 to acquire from Manning Grain Company (MGC) and operate a 7.1-mile rail line between its point... acquire the Line in Manning Grain Company--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Fillmore Western Railway...

  2. Oil-rich seeds from prehistoric contextsin southern Scandinavia – reflections on archaeobotanical records of fl ax, hemp, gold of pleasure, and corn spurrey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karg, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Plant oils are essential for human nutrition, as their seeds contain high concentrations of valuable fatty acids. Since prehistoric times plant oils have been used for many more purposes, such as lighting, medicines, and as a binding agent for cosmetics, colours, and putty, amongst other things...

  3. New Development in the Study of Pre-Qin Seismological Archaeology and Its Inspiration to Prehistoric Seismological Archaeology in the Longmen Mountain Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian

    2013-01-01

    In recent years , China has a-chieved series of new findings and new understand-ing about seismological archaeology in the prehis-toric and Shang Zhou periods .These findings pro-vide an important theoretical and methodological base, and a reference for the archaeological re-search on prehistoric seismology in the Longmen mountain area -an area , which has many earth-quake faults and a high rate of earthquakes .The archaeological research on prehistoric seismology in the area of the Longmen mountains should avoid the predicament of “liangzhangpi” or “two pieces of leather” ( meaning that although something re-fers to the same thing or same phenomenon , it nonetheless , can be s interpreted by two on more representations ) .Hence , field work and integrated research require multi -disciplinary participation and integration , including archaeology and geolo-gy.The scientific wisdom in settlement -site se-lection made by our prehistoric ancestors in the Longmen mountain areas is worthy of our learning and we can take them as a model today .

  4. Searching for long-term trends in prehistoric manuring practice. δ15N analyses of charred cereal grains from the 4th to the 1st millennium BC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Marie; Holst, M.K.; Jensen, Peter Mose

    2014-01-01

    investigation of long term trends in δ15N values of charred cereal grains, which previous research have proposed as an indicator for prehistoric manuring practice. Our study suggests a long-term (3900–500 BC) decrease of manuring intensity in emmer cropping. Conversely the long-term (2300 BC – AD 1) trend...

  5. Building and Applying "Insularity Theory": Review on Knapp's Prehistoric and Protohistoric Cyprus, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsarou-Tzeveleki, Stella

    Prehistoric and Protohistoric Cyprus by A. Bernard Knapp involves us in a highly creative reading. This is due mainly to the fact that the author engages in a holistic synthesis of Cyprus in the Bronze Age, not by emphasizing the events and descriptions of the material remains, but by concentrating upon the difficult question of the identity of the islanders of this period and the processes by which it was formed. The author's teaching of Mediterranean prehistory at the University of Glasgow fully accounts for his need to produce a comprehensive theoretical work of this kind: the basic questions asked by students give rise to theoretical concerns for any teacher aiming to 'distil' the essential synthesis that forms the starting point for any further detailed archaeological description. This essential answer seems to have troubled Knapp for some time, judging by the long list of his writings seeking to synthesize aspects of Cypriot economy, cult and society; the present book is thus the highly interesting outcome of the mature thinking of an experienced fieldworker as much as a theoretical archaeologist and teacher. What, then, is the essential question that Knapp seeks to answer through this book? His question focuses on the identity of the islanders of Cyprus during the 'most formative periods, from the village based culture to the international, town-centred, even state-level polity' (p. 1), the way in which this identity was formed, and how it is reflected in both any recorded event and the material culture of the island in this specific period. Moreover, he also explores more fully what the distinctive features of island identity in general are, how they are constituted and how they influence the material culture of any island population. In seeking the answers, the author avoids a number of the usual approaches to Cypriot archaeology and turns, instead, to new interpretive directions. The approaches he avoids are the citing of events of Cypriot prehistory, the

  6. New finds from the prehistoric sites in the surrounding of Leskovac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojić Milorad Č.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available New finds, mainly pottery, provide a more complete picture of cultural development in the Leskovac region, during the prehistoric period (localities Kale in Grdelica, Jeremište in Lipovica, Pusto Semče in Semče Sastanci in Bobište, Hisar-plateau in Leskovac, Gornji Guberevac and Grkinje. The pottery from the Aeneolithic period at the site Sastanci in Bobište, indicate that the Leskovac valley developed in the same way during the Copper Age as the nearby Niš valley. This site, for the time being, is the most southerly in the Morava valley where the Kostolac pottery can be found. It is characteristic that at every newly discovered Metal Age site in this region, pottery of the Vatin type, numerous and varied pottery of the Brnjica culture group, pottery of the phase Lanište II - Basarabi, as well as Greek type pottery and that of the Early Iron Age, is found. Among the pottery which is published in this study (Grdelica and Semče, the most typical autochthon pottery of Iron Age III from the Morava valley, east Serbia and the Serbian Danube valley, downstream from Novi Sad, is also included. New locations of the Brnjica cultural group in the Leskovac valley point to the population density in one of the regions of this community and its territorial organization. On the bases of number disposition and topography of the localities it is possible to presume not only the size of population, but its territorial organization as well. Namely, it is obvious that the people of the Brnjica cultural group based their defense on elevated settlements, like those on the plateaus of Hisar in Leskovac, Skobaljić Grad in Vučje, Kale in Grdelica, Pusto Semče in Semče and other similar sites, while the settlements like those in Bobište Lipovac, Gornji Grabovac and others in the valley, had an obvious agricultural character. Numerous sites in Gornja Jablanica, near one of the biggest mines of gold and other metals in the Lece area, where slag has been found

  7. GPR study of a prehistoric archaeological site near Point Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, R. B.; Jensen, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    A ground penetrating radar (GPR) study was performed on the prehistoric Thule cemetery site near Point Barrow, Alaska. The goals of this study were (a) to test this technology in this type of polar environment, and (b) to search for burials and other archaeological features in a location in imminent danger from ocean erosion. The Nuvuk site is currently eroding at an average rate measured at over 6 m/year. Prior archaeological work at the site had recovered over 80 burials with nearly 100 individuals represented, all of which were less than 1 m below surface, and detectable with small test pits. In addition, the first coastal Ipiutak occupation known north of Point Hope had been recently discovered, at a depth of nearly 2m below surface, in the erosion face. The occupation appeared to have been terminated by a large storm which overwashed the site, leaving a strandline immediately superimposed on the living surface. After that, approximately 1.5 m of sterile gravels had been deposited before the surface on which the Thule people were living formed. Both occupations are of considerable scientific interest. The matrix at the site consists of unconsolidated beach gravels, which necessitates opening large surface areas or use of shoring to test even small units to the depths of the Ipiutak deposit (approximately 8m x 8m at the surface to test 1m x 1m at 2m depth). Such excavations promote erosion, and are very costly in terms of time and labor, so a means to detect features buried at depths greater than those exposed by shovel test pits was desirable. GPR seemed a likely candidate, but it had not been used in such conditions before, and thus it was necessary to test it thoroughly prior to relying on GPR to eliminate areas from physical testing. The GPR imaged the subsurface to a depth of 3 meters at a frequency of 500MHz. Meter-deep test pits were placed at 2-meter intervals in the survey area in a grid pattern since the efficacy of the technology had yet to be shown

  8. Barometry of lavas from the 1951 eruption of Fogo, Cape Verde Islands: Implications for historic and prehistoric magma plumbing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildner, Elliot; Klügel, Andreas; Hansteen, Thor H.

    2012-03-01

    Fogo is one of the most active oceanic volcanoes in the world. The island was affected by a prehistoric giant lateral collapse that decapitated the summit of the former Monte Amarelo volcano. Subsequent volcanism has partly filled the collapse scar and built up the present-day Cha das Caldeiras plain and the Pico do Fogo stratovolcano. We have conducted a thermobarometric study of historic and prehistoric, basanitic to tephritic rocks in order to gain insight into Fogo's magma plumbing system and the impact of the collapse event on fractionation depths. A main focus was the penultimate 1951 eruption, which produced basanites to tephrites (5.0-8.2 wt.% MgO) at two sites south and northwest of Pico do Fogo. Clinopyroxene-melt barometry of phenocrysts yields a well-confined pressure range of 480-650 MPa for the final crystallization level. Microthermometric data of CO2-dominated fluid inclusions in olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts yield systematically lower pressures of 250-430 MPa. Inclusions in cumulate xenoliths yield pressures of 100-290 MPa. The combined data indicate pre-eruptive magma storage in the uppermost mantle between 17 and 22 km depth and syn-eruptive short-term magma stalling within the lower crust at 8-13 km depth. The lower pressures revealed by fluid inclusions in xenoliths may indicate that they originate from pre-1951 magma pulses that stalled and crystallized at variable levels in the crust. There is, however, no petrologic evidence for persistent crustal magma chambers. Clinopyroxene-melt barometric data of other historic and prehistoric eruptions indicate that magma storage and differentiation occurred in the uppermost mantle at pressures between 420 and 870 MPa (15-30 km depth) throughout the subaerial evolution of Fogo. Our data indicate that fractionation depths decreased significantly during a period of about 100 ka representing a strong growth phase of Fogo edifice leading up to the giant Monte Amarelo flank collapse at 123-62 ka

  9. Man-machine interactions 3

    CERN Document Server

    Czachórski, Tadeusz; Kozielski, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Man-Machine Interaction is an interdisciplinary field of research that covers many aspects of science focused on a human and machine in conjunction.  Basic goal of the study is to improve and invent new ways of communication between users and computers, and many different subjects are involved to reach the long-term research objective of an intuitive, natural and multimodal way of interaction with machines.  The rapid evolution of the methods by which humans interact with computers is observed nowadays and new approaches allow using computing technologies to support people on the daily basis, making computers more usable and receptive to the user's needs.   This monograph is the third edition in the series and presents important ideas, current trends and innovations in  the man-machine interactions area.  The aim of this book is to introduce not only hardware and software interfacing concepts, but also to give insights into the related theoretical background. Reader is provided with a compilation of high...

  10. [The man on the portrait].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrand, A

    1996-01-01

    Marie Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry 1911. During the preceding year a rumour had circulated in Stockholm that she had had an affaire with one of her assistants. She received a letter, in which she was told that there had been strong opposition to her election not on scientific but moral grounds, and that she should not go to Stockholm, because nobody could forsee what reactions her appearance at the prize ceremony could evoke. Emil Kleen, a man of violent temper and radical opinions, reacted strongly to these rumours. He wrote a paper, with a violent attack on Gustaf Retzius, previous professor of Histology at Karolinska Institutet. Rightly or wrongly he suspected him to be the author of the infamous letter. Retzius is described as a dilletant in scientific matters, as a "sexual hyena" and a garroulus old man. This portrait of Retzius is of course most unfair, but the portrait of Emil Kleen by the famous swedish artist Bruno Liljefors is a masterpiece and one of the most valuable of the Swedish Medical Association.

  11. Earthquake catalog for estimation of maximum earthquake magnitude, Central and Eastern United States: Part A, Prehistoric earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Computation of probabilistic earthquake hazard requires an estimate of Mmax, the maximum earthquake magnitude thought to be possible within a specified geographic region. This report is Part A of an Open-File Report that describes the construction of a global catalog of moderate to large earthquakes, from which one can estimate Mmax for most of the Central and Eastern United States and adjacent Canada. The catalog and Mmax estimates derived from it were used in the 2014 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey national seismic-hazard maps. This Part A discusses prehistoric earthquakes that occurred in eastern North America, northwestern Europe, and Australia, whereas a separate Part B deals with historical events.

  12. The Study of Prehistoric Artefacts in National Context: Belgian Archaeologists and the Problem of Ancient Stone Implements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Goodrum

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available During the early nineteenth century European archaeologists were formulating new ideas about the significance of ancient stone artefacts. Some, such as Christian Thomsen in Copenhagen, believed that in Scandinavia, a Stone Age had preceded the Bronze and Iron Ages. In France some excavations had retrieved stone artefacts from deep levels of peat and cave deposits that suggested that these objects were of very great antiquity. While the collection and study of stone artefacts occurred across much of Europe, there were regional variations in their interpretation. Assisted by local institutions and motivated by patriotism, Belgian archaeologists who participated in this research, had much in common with their colleagues elsewhere in Europe, but the nature of local archaeological sites and the ideas of local researchers had an impact on the development and contributions of Belgian prehistoric archaeology.

  13. The Entrance test of physics and Workbook in teaching of physics at secondary vocational school within long-term pedagogical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlínová, Věra

    2017-01-01

    Within the long-term pedagogical research ongoing since the school year 2008/2009 to 2015/2016 at the secondary vocational school in Bohumín was through of Entrance test of physics, which included curriculum of the sixth to ninth year of elementary school, regularly finding out, in which parts of Entrance test - Unit conversions, International System of Units, Properties of matter, Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Electricity and Magnetism, Optics, Atoms and Universe - pupils of the 1st years of secondary vocational school, technical and non-technical, reach a higher number of correct answers, in which dominates the wrong answers and which parts of the test pupils are better left out completely. It turned out that the results of these tests are very informative not only for theoretical and practical teaching, but also technical and other science subjects. The results of the Entrance tests are also a valuable source of information for continuous innovation Workbook of Physics - Mechanics for the 1st year of secondary vocational schools [1] - whose the first version began during the school year 2007/2008 and which was tested within pre-research in school years 2008/2009, 2009/2010 and within research in school year 2010/2011. On the basis of feedbacks getting from research the Workbook is regularly expanded, innovated and updated. The Workbook consists of parts dedicated to physical concepts, physical tasks, proposals to physical experiments, pupils comments from viewed video projection and documentary films, examples from the world of science and technology, examples from practice and real life, physical terminology in English, quizzes, competitions, interesting things and links related to discussed curriculum. The Workbook is divided into thematic sections, chapters and subchapters similar as physics textbooks for pupils of the 1st years of Secondary Schools in the Czech Republic. In the Workbook there are included tasks on fill in the words, polynomial tasks with

  14. Mitochondrial genome diversity at the Bering Strait area highlights prehistoric human migrations from Siberia to northern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryomov, Stanislav V; Nazhmidenova, Azhar M; Shalaurova, Sophia A; Morozov, Igor V; Tabarev, Andrei V; Starikovskaya, Elena B; Sukernik, Rem I

    2015-10-01

    The patterns of prehistoric migrations across the Bering Land Bridge are far from being completely understood: there still exists a significant gap in our knowledge of the population history of former Beringia. Here, through comprehensive survey of mitochondrial DNA genomes retained in 'relic' populations, the Maritime Chukchi, Siberian Eskimos, and Commander Aleuts, we explore genetic contribution of prehistoric Siberians/Asians to northwestern Native Americans. Overall, 201 complete mitochondrial sequences (52 new and 149 published) were selected in the reconstruction of trees encompassing mtDNA lineages that are restricted to Coastal Chukotka and Alaska, the Canadian Arctic, Greenland, and the Aleutian chain. Phylogeography of the resulting mtDNA genomes (mitogenomes) considerably extends the range and intrinsic diversity of haplogroups (eg, A2a, A2b, D2a, and D4b1a2a1) that emerged and diversified in postglacial central Beringia, defining independent origins of Neo-Eskimos versus Paleo-Eskimos, Aleuts, and Tlingit (Na-Dene). Specifically, Neo-Eskimos, ancestral to modern Inuit, not only appear to be of the High Arctic origin but also to harbor Altai/Sayan-related ancestry. The occurrence of the haplogroup D2a1b haplotypes in Chukotka (Sireniki) introduces the possibility that the traces of Paleo-Eskimos have not been fully erased by spread of the Neo-Eskimos or their descendants. Our findings are consistent with the recurrent gene flow model of multiple streams of expansions to northern North America from northeastern Eurasia in late Pleistocene-early Holocene.

  15. The rights of man and animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J

    1990-09-01

    Since emotions give contradictory signals about animal experimentation in medical science, man's relationship to animals must be based upon reason. Thomas Aquinas argues that man is essentially different from animals because man's intellectual processes show evidence of an abstract mechanism not possessed by animals. Man's rights arise in association with this essential difference. The consequence is that only man possesses true rights by Aquinas's definition; animals have them only by analogy. However, cruelty to animals is illicit and they should be protected, principally not because they have rights, but because he who is cruel to animals is more likely to be cruel to his fellowman. If there is a need for animal experimentation in science for the good of man, this approach gives philosophical justification for experimentation, since man's well-being must come before that of animals because of his unique possession of rights. However, those experiments should be carried out in the kindest way possible, to promote kindness towards man. To see man as solely part of a biological continuum in competition for rights with those beings close to him biologically, detracts from man's dignity.

  16. The rights of man and animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J

    1990-01-01

    Since emotions give contradictory signals about animal experimentation in medical science, man's relationship to animals must be based upon reason. Thomas Aquinas argues that man is essentially different from animals because man's intellectual processes show evidence of an abstract mechanism not possessed by animals. Man's rights arise in association with this essential difference. The consequence is that only man possesses true rights by Aquinas's definition; animals have them only by analogy. However, cruelty to animals is illicit and they should be protected, principally not because they have rights, but because he who is cruel to animals is more likely to be cruel to his fellowman. If there is a need for animal experimentation in science for the good of man, this approach gives philosophical justification for experimentation, since man's well-being must come before that of animals because of his unique possession of rights. However, those experiments should be carried out in the kindest way possible, to promote kindness towards man. To see man as solely part of a biological continuum in competition for rights with those beings close to him biologically, detracts from man's dignity. PMID:2135948

  17. The Socio-Technical Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Yamir

    In the last 20 years or so, the field of complexity science has entered a new age. The combination of new theoretical insights and the data revolution has prepared the ground for a number of conceptual milestones in many disciplines as diverse as biology, physics, engineering, and economic and social sciences. At the same time, we have been able to identify new challenges whose solutions will confer the science of complex systems an unprecedented applied dimension. Here I would like to focus on one of these challenges: the socio-technical man. With the ever-increasing growth of both the world population and new technologies, it is fundamental for the well-being of humanity and our society to understand how humans interact among them and with the new technological environment...

  18. Deformation of Man Made Objects

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrahim, Mohamed

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a framework for 3D object deformation with primary focus on man-made objects. Our framework enables a user to deform a model while preserving its defining characteristics. Moreover, our framework enables a user to set constraints on a model to keep its most significant features intact after the deformation process. Our framework supports a semi-automatic constraint setting environment, where some constraints could be automatically set by the framework while others are left for the user to specify. Our framework has several advantages over some state of the art deformation techniques in that it enables a user to add new features to the deformed model while keeping its general look similar to the input model. In addition, our framework enables the rotation and extrusion of different parts of a model.

  19. Tesla man out of time

    CERN Document Server

    Cheney, Margaret

    1981-01-01

    Called a madman by some, a genius by others, and an enigma by nearly everyone, Nikola Tesla created astonishing, world-transforming devises that were virtually without theoretical precedent. Tesla not only discovered the rotating magnetic field, the basis of most alternating current machinery, but also introduced the fundamentals of robotry, computers, and missile science and helped pave the way for such technologies as satellites, microwaves, beam weapons, and nuclear fusion. Almost supernaturally gifted, Tesla was also unusually erratic, flamboyant, and neurotic. He was J. P. Morgan's client, counted Mark Twain as a friend, and considered Thomas Edison an enemy. But above all, he was the hero and mentor to many of the last century's most famous scientists. In a meticulously researched, engagingly written biography, Margaret Cheney presents the many different dimensions of this extraordinary man, capturing his human qualities and quirks as she chronicles a lifetime of discoveries that continue to alter our ...

  20. Oedipus king: preparing man for the polis

    OpenAIRE

    José Joaquim Pereira Melo; Renan Willian Fernandes Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Having Sophoclean play Oedipus King as a frame of reference, the purpose of this paper is to discuss the educative proposal conceived to the Greek Man as preparation for life in the polis. Although not intentionally, Sophocles pointed out an ideal of Man which, in his perspective, would fulfill Greek societal demands of that time. Such society was divided between myth and rationality and, as a result, Man found Himself in conflict and lacking direction for His life. Given that, Oedipus’ chara...

  1. Sisters of The Iron Man Triathlon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    THE Iron Man Triathlon challenges even the most veteran athlete. Competitors swim 3,000 meters, followed by a 40 kilometer bike race and ending with a i0 kilometer cross-country run.The Iron Man allows athletes to display their utmost abilities. As of January 1997, triathlete Wang Dan had accumulated the highest number of points of Asian iron man triathletes, according to the Asian Iron Man Triathlon Federation. Following her lead is Chinese triathlete Xing Lin. Liu Xiaodan, Chinese third ranking triathlete, comes in 5th among Asian competitors. All three girls are just 17 years old and all natives of Shenyang, Liaoning

  2. Becoming and development of man: anthroposophistic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionova E.N.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthroposophistic orientated view of R.Shtayner to development of a man during all life is systematized. Anthroposophistic conception of development of a man is based on such substantive provisions: unity corporal-heartfelt-spiritual life; connection of component parts of psyche with physiological organization of man; an interconditionality of physiological, heartfelt and spiritual development is in the rhythm of seven years. It is rotined that a health, heartfelt rest and happiness, is the result of harmonic development. All three aspects are the legal certificates of constituents life of man.

  3. An evaluation on practicing of teacher’s book and student’s workbook based on music classes 2006 primary education teaching program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytekin Albuz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation was to evaluate practicing of teacher's book and student's workbook based on music classes 2006 primary education teaching program of sixth grade.Universe of this investigation consisted of Primary Schools of central districts of Ankara depended on Ministry of National Education. By choosing twenty Primary Schools depended on Çankaya, Etimesgut, Kazan, Keçiören, Yenimahalle districts, sample groups were formed.To analyze all data interview method was used and all data of interview were achieved with the partial intercourse analysis method.After collecting all data, results were acquired about practicing of teacher's book and student's workbook based on music classes 2006 primary education teaching program of sixth grade level taking part within the sample group. To the results, neccessary suggestions for failing sides were offered.

  4. An Analysis of Activities in Saudi Arabian Middle School Science Textbooks and Workbooks for the Inclusion of Essential Features of Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldahmash, Abdulwali H.; Mansour, Nasser S.; Alshamrani, Saeed M.; Almohi, Saeed

    2016-12-01

    This study examines Saudi Arabian middle school science textbooks' coverage of the essential features of scientific inquiry. All activities in the middle school science textbooks and workbooks were analyzed by using the scientific inquiry `essential features' rubric. The results indicated that the essential features are included in about 59 % of the analyzed science activities. However, feature 2, `making learner give priority to evidence in responding to questions' and feature 3, `allowing learner to formulate explanations from evidence' appeared more frequently than the other three features (feature 1: engaging learner in scientifically oriented questions, feature 4: helping learner connect explanations to scientific knowledge, and feature 5: helping learner communicate and justify explanations to others), whether in the activities as a whole, or in the activities included in each of the four science domains (physical science, Earth science, life science and chemistry). These features are represented in almost all activities. This means that almost all activities in the middle school science textbooks and the workbooks include features 2 and 3. Meanwhile, the mean level of inclusion of the five essential features of scientific inquiry found in the middle school science textbooks and workbooks as a whole is 2.55. However, results found for features 1, 4, 5 and for in-level inclusion of the inquiry features in each of the science domains indicate that the inclusion of the essential inquiry features is teacher-centred. As a result, neither science textbooks nor workbooks provide students with the opportunity or encouragement to develop their inquiry skills. Consequently, the results suggest important directions for educational administrators and policy-makers in the preparation and use of science educational content.

  5. An Analysis of Activities in Saudi Arabian Middle School Science Textbooks and Workbooks for the Inclusion of Essential Features of Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldahmash, Abdulwali H.; Mansour, Nasser S.; Alshamrani, Saeed M.; Almohi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    This study examines Saudi Arabian middle school science textbooks' coverage of the essential features of scientific inquiry. All activities in the middle school science textbooks and workbooks were analyzed by using the scientific inquiry `essential features' rubric. The results indicated that the essential features are included in about 59 % of the analyzed science activities. However, feature 2, `making learner give priority to evidence in responding to questions' and feature 3, `allowing learner to formulate explanations from evidence' appeared more frequently than the other three features (feature 1: engaging learner in scientifically oriented questions, feature 4: helping learner connect explanations to scientific knowledge, and feature 5: helping learner communicate and justify explanations to others), whether in the activities as a whole, or in the activities included in each of the four science domains (physical science, Earth science, life science and chemistry). These features are represented in almost all activities. This means that almost all activities in the middle school science textbooks and the workbooks include features 2 and 3. Meanwhile, the mean level of inclusion of the five essential features of scientific inquiry found in the middle school science textbooks and workbooks as a whole is 2.55. However, results found for features 1, 4, 5 and for in-level inclusion of the inquiry features in each of the science domains indicate that the inclusion of the essential inquiry features is teacher-centred. As a result, neither science textbooks nor workbooks provide students with the opportunity or encouragement to develop their inquiry skills. Consequently, the results suggest important directions for educational administrators and policy-makers in the preparation and use of science educational content.

  6. The man and the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejska, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    The universe has always aroused people's curiosity. It fascinates and at the same time scares in its vastness. Encourages us to reflect of the meaning of human life. This begs the questions: whether there is a life beyond Earth? Whether is it possible that the man is alone in such a large space? These questions still remain unanswered, and topics concerning "the cosmos" constantly evoke many emotions. It is especially fascinating for the youngest students. Quite often, preschoolers can flawlessly name the planets according to their order of appearance in relation to the sun. They are happy to take the fun inspired by journeys into space. Teaching through action is extremely important for the development of the child-man* (Piaget, 2006). The thinking originates primarily from the action. Therefore, students should undertake independent research activities, perform experiments and conduct observations and thus raise questions about the world, looking for meanings and solutions. Adults (a teacher, a person with a passion) are to be the support in the search for knowledge, its processing and cleaning. Its role is to ensure a proper development of environment that is conducive to research activity. The answer to these requirements was to create in the oldest technical school in Poland (Railway Technical College, now Technical College No. 7) the astronomical observatory, which can be used by pupils of Warsaw's kindergartens and schools. There are organized activities for children and youth in this school, as well as trainings for teachers. Younger students during such an interdisciplinary courses are, among others, the opportunity to get acquainted with the construction of the telescope, they can build their own rockets and organize their racing or create your own star constellations. Older students as a result of observations and experiments may confirm or refute the hypothesis that the universe is within each of us. The classes are enriched using applications on

  7. Marihuana in Man: Three Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Leo E.

    1971-01-01

    Reviews three years of research on the effects of marihuana in man. Previously known clinical mental and physical effects have been confirmed. Causes and mechanisms of these effects generally remain undetermined in man and animals. Social implications and long term effects require additional study, although usage appears detrimental. (JM)

  8. Alternative Frameworks for the Study of Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Ivana

    1979-01-01

    Two frameworks for the study of man are discussed. The Cartesian model views man as a physical object. A dialectic framework, with the emphasis on the self, grew out of nineteenth century romanticism and reflects the theories of Hegel. Both models have had an effect on social psychology and the study of interpersonal communication. (BH)

  9. Marihuana in Man: Three Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Leo E.

    1971-01-01

    Reviews three years of research on the effects of marihuana in man. Previously known clinical mental and physical effects have been confirmed. Causes and mechanisms of these effects generally remain undetermined in man and animals. Social implications and long term effects require additional study, although usage appears detrimental. (JM)

  10. Using Stochastically Downscaled Climate Models and Multiproxy Lake Sediment Data to Connect Climatic Variations Over the Past 1000 Years and the History of Prehistoric Maize Farming in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, M. J.; MacDonald, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    We are investigating the relationship between climatic variations over the past 1000 years and the history of prehistoric maize farming expansion and decline in the American Southwest, with a focus on Utah. We are examining both the downscaled climate models and high resolution analyses of lake cores and dendrochronological data matched with occupation information. We are testing the specific utility of stochastically downscaled general circulation models (viz. ECHO-G) to reconstruct local conditions for sites with documented prehistoric dryland farming through the so-called Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and transition to the Little Ice Age (LIA). We are testing our model-based reconstructions with proxies of temperature and aridity from three subalpine lake sediment cores transecting Utah. We compare the patterns of climate change from the downscaled models and the paleoclimate records to a database of 837 radiocarbon dates over 169 locations of archaeological Native American maize-farmer site occupations in Utah.

  11. Human capabilities in space. [man machine interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicogossian, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    Man's ability to live and perform useful work in space was demonstrated throughout the history of manned space flight. Current planning envisions a multi-functional space station. Man's unique abilities to respond to the unforeseen and to operate at a level of complexity exceeding any reasonable amount of previous planning distinguish him from present day machines. His limitations, however, include his inherent inability to survive without protection, his limited strength, and his propensity to make mistakes when performing repetitive and monotonous tasks. By contrast, an automated system does routine and delicate tasks, exerts force smoothly and precisely, stores, and recalls large amounts of data, and performs deductive reasoning while maintaining a relative insensitivity to the environment. The establishment of a permanent presence of man in space demands that man and machines be appropriately combined in spaceborne systems. To achieve this optimal combination, research is needed in such diverse fields as artificial intelligence, robotics, behavioral psychology, economics, and human factors engineering.

  12. The Pursuit of Identity in Invisible Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭佳

    2013-01-01

    Invisible Man is a representative work of black literature in America. In this novel, the writer Ralph Ellison depicts the hero’s growth experience in the white dominated society with his unique narrative techniques. As an individual in a society, the hero in this novel gradually realizes that he is an invisible man in the white dominated society and he doesn ’t have the social sta-tus which can be recognized by the white at all. To change this situation, the hero in this novel suffers many difficulties and hard-ships with an attempt to prove his existence in front of the white and the numerous black fellows and obtain his own identity as a black man which will be recognized by others. This paper tries to explore African American ’s pursuit of identity in Invisible Man by interpreting Ellison’s Invisible Man.

  13. Man Bites Python, Escapes Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王淀楼

    2001-01-01

    自古只有蛇咬人,而南非的这位57岁的Lucas Sibanda却演绎了一场“人咬蛇”的“活剧”,他的利嘴钢牙竟然让一条巨蟒逃之夭夭,从而拾回自己一条老命。文章虽然很短,却写得文采斐然。标题出现了Python(巨蟒),而在文章里,作者却分别换用monster和reptile的表达,以求遣词之新,这在英语中称为Elegant Variation(求雅换词),以下三句中的动词你是否觉得用得也很精彩:1/A South African man bit his way to freedom. 2/I froze for almost 10 seconds. 3/Sibanda sank his teeth into…】

  14. Microrecanalization after vasectomy in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, M J; Weidmann, J E; Goldstein, M; Marmar, J; Santulli, R; Oliveira, N

    1989-01-01

    Previously spermatozoa in the semen of vasectomized men were reported in 62 of 63 specimens from 24 men 2 to 31 years postvasectomy (Freund and Couture, 1982). A morphologic basis and term, "microrecanalization," was proposed for this observation. Serial sections (5 mu at 200-mu intervals) of 40 specimens removed at vasovasostomy from 20 men (2 to 14 years postvasectomy) were examined and microcanals (small epithelial-lined channels) were demonstrated in 27 specimens from 18 men. In nine of the 27 specimens, spermatozoa or sperm heads were found within the microcanals. Microcanals occurred in smooth muscle, connective tissue and scar tissue, in each segment, testicular, central and abdominal, in the presence or absence of the vas deferens. Microcanal continuity was traced for 200 to 1140 microns by computerized image analysis. Microrecanalization is characterized by the absence of inflammation or sperm extravasation and is histologically distinct from vasitis nodes or sperm granuloma. Microrecanalization provides morphologic and physiologic bases for the protection of the testis and maintenance of spermatogenesis in man after vasectomy.

  15. Demagnetization Analysis in Excel (DAIE) - An open source workbook in Excel for viewing and analyzing demagnetization data from paleomagnetic discrete samples and u-channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagnotti, Leonardo

    2013-04-01

    Modern rock magnetometers and stepwise demagnetization procedures result in the production of large datasets, which need a versatile and fast software for their display and analysis. Various software packages for paleomagnetic analyses have been recently developed to overcome the problems linked to the limited capability and the loss of operability of early codes written in obsolete computer languages and/or platforms, not compatible with modern 64 bit processors. The Demagnetization Analysis in Excel (DAIE) workbook is a new software that has been designed to make the analysis of demagnetization data easy and accessible on an application (Microsoft Excel) widely diffused and available on both the Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X operating systems. The widespread diffusion of Excel should guarantee a long term working life, since compatibility and functionality of current Excel files should be most likely maintained during the development of new processors and operating systems. DAIE is designed for viewing and analyzing stepwise demagnetization data of both discrete and u-channel samples. DAIE consists of a single file and has an open modular structure organized in 10 distinct worksheets. The standard demagnetization diagrams and various parameters of common use are shown on the same worksheet including selectable parameters and user's choices. The remanence characteristic components may be computed by principal component analysis (PCA) on a selected interval of demagnetization steps. Saving of the PCA data can be done both sample by sample, or in automatic by applying the selected choices to all the samples included in the file. The DAIE open structure allows easy personalization, development and improvement. The workbook has the following features which may be valuable for various users: - Operability in nearly all the computers and platforms; - Easy inputs of demagnetization data by "copy and paste" from ASCII files; - Easy export of computed parameters and

  16. On the identity of Dorylaimus robustus de Man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loof, P.A.A.

    1961-01-01

    The taxonomic position of Dorylaimus robustus de Man, 1876 is fully discussed. It is concluded that D. robustus de Man, 1876 is a synonym of D. stagnalis Dujardin, 1845; also included in this synonymy are D. robustus apud de Man, 1880, apud de Man, 1884 (male, partim) and Labronema robustum (de Man,

  17. Ochres from rituals of prehistoric human funerals at the Toca do Enoque site, Piauí, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Luis Carlos Duarte; da Luz, Maria De Fátima; Guidon, Niéde; Fabris, José Domingos; Ardisson, José Domingos

    2011-11-01

    The archaeological site known as Toca do Enoque (geographical coordinates, 09° 14' 65.3″ S 43° 55' 62.5″ W) is a rock shelter located in the Serra das Andorinhas (Serra das Confusões National Park), rural area of the city of Guaribas, state of Piauí, Brazil. Several rupestrian paintings (anthropomorphic and zoomorphic motifs along with some pure graphisms), predominantly in red, are found on the sandstone walls. Charcoals, lithic materials, necklaces with teeth, animal bones, gastropod shells, ochres and human skeletons (dated from 6,220 ± 40 to 6,610 ± 40 years before present, BP) were identified in recent excavations in this shelter. Red and yellow ochre samples were collected from prehistoric funeral structures and analyzed with powder X-ray diffractometry, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and 57Fe transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy at 298 K and 80 K. Mössbauer data indicate that the red ochre do contain predominantly hematite ( α-Fe2O3) whereas goethite ( α-FeOOH) is the major mineral in the yellow ochre.

  18. A Dynamical Analysis of the Suitability of Prehistoric Spheroids from the Cave of Hearths as Thrown Projectiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew D; Zhu, Qin; Barham, Lawrence; Stanistreet, Ian; Bingham, Geoffrey P

    2016-08-10

    Spheroids are ball-shaped stone objects found in African archaeological sites dating from 1.8 million years ago (Early Stone Age) to at least 70,000 years ago (Middle Stone Age). Spheroids are either fabricated or naturally shaped stones selected and transported to places of use making them one of the longest-used technologies on record. Most hypotheses about their use suggest they were percussive tools for shaping or grinding other materials. However, their size and spherical shape make them potentially useful as projectile weapons, a property that, uniquely, humans have been specialised to exploit for millions of years. Here we show (using simulations of projectile motions resulting from human throwing) that 81% of a sample of spheroids from the late Acheulean (Bed 3) at the Cave of Hearths, South Africa afford being thrown so as to inflict worthwhile damage to a medium-sized animal over distances up to 25 m. Most of the objects have weights that produce optimal levels of damage from throwing, rather than simply being as heavy as possible (as would suit other functions). Our results show that these objects were eminently suitable for throwing, and demonstrate how empirical research on behavioural tasks can inform and constrain our theories about prehistoric artefacts.

  19. The Pacific Rat Race to Easter Island: Tracking the Prehistoric Dispersal of Rattus exulans Using Ancient Mitochondrial Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina West

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The location of the immediate eastern Polynesian origin for the settlement of Easter Island (Rapa Nui, remains unclear with conflicting archeological and linguistic evidence. Previous genetic commensal research using the Pacific rat, Rattus exulans; a species transported by humans across Remote Oceania and throughout the Polynesian Triangle, has identified broad interaction spheres across the region. However, there has been limited success in distinguishing finer-scale movements between Remote Oceanic islands as the same mitochondrial control region haplotype has been identified in the majority of ancient rat specimens. To improve molecular resolution and identify a pattern of prehistoric dispersal to Easter Island, we sequenced complete mitochondrial genomes from ancient Pacific rat specimens obtained from early archeological contexts across West and East Polynesia. Ancient Polynesian rat haplotypes are closely related and reflect the widely supported scenario of a central East Polynesian homeland region from which eastern expansion occurred. An Easter Island and Tubuai (Austral Islands grouping of related haplotypes suggests that both islands were established by the same colonization wave, proposed to have originated in the central homeland region before dispersing through the south-eastern corridor of East Polynesia.

  20. Ecological Mapping for the Preventive Conservation of Prehistoric Mural Paintings in Rock Habitats: the Site of Filiano (Basilicata, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Caneva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodeterioration phenomena are of great relevance in rock settlements, due to favourable environmental conditions, such as the infiltration of rainwaters, condensation phenomena and abundance of salts and organic nutrients. Rinaldi’s rock shelter in Filiano, which is located in a natural forest of mixed oaks is of great value due to the important traces of prehistoric paintings. It is an emblematic case of the delicate balance, achieved throughout the centuries, between the environment and artwork. During the plurimillenarian history of the site, a portion of the ceiling that covered the shelter collapsed, leaving signs that are still visible today, together with traces of blackening left by the fires of ancient settlements. Several of the biodeteriogens typical of rocky habitats have already been detected and include algae, cyanobacteria, mosses, lichens, vascular plants and fungi, which form macroscopic communities.Each community has an ecological preference and the mapping of their distribution is a suitable tool for understanding variations in the environmental factors that most affect them. Relating ecological data to the taxonomical characterization of the species and to the spatial distribution of each community, a site map of the humidity and of the nutrients was obtained. Among the various communities, microcolonial fungi (MCF, which appear as little black spots, here, represent the most critical risk factor, due to their low water needs. An evaluation of the biological risk for the possible future attack of such a biological community was made, suggesting indirect mitigation measures, through modification of the microclimatic and local ventilation conditions.

  1. X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescent Analyses of Prehistoric Pottery Shards from Ulu Kelantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuliskandar Ramli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and X-Ray Fluorescent (XRF were used in order to obtain mineralogical and elemental composition of seven pottery shards that have been unearthed during the excavation at Peraling Cave and Cha Cave in Ulu Kelantan, Malaysia. Approach: Peraling Cave and Cha Cave were prehistoric sites dating from 10, 000 BC which were inhabited by Hoabinhian people and then continuously used by people of Neolithic culture around 3000 BC. Results: Mineralogical and elemental analyses were carried out to determine whether the pottery found in the archaeological sites was locally made or trading items. Several clay samples from rivers in Ulu Kelantan such as Perias River, Chai River, Peralon River, Nenggiri River, Betis River and Jenera River were taken to be analysed. Conclusion/Recommendations: Mineralogical and elemental content of the pottery shards showed that the pottery shards did not originate from the Ulu Kelantan area and one of the samples contained clinochlore mineral. Clinochlore forms from the metamorphic and hydrothermal alterations of other iron and magnesium silicate minerals and is usually found in igneus rock and metamorphic rock formation.

  2. How a Man's Diet Affects Fertility Too

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Facts Fitness Fitness Find out more Categories Sports and Performance Training and Recovery Exercise Topics Fueling Your Workout Benefits of Physical Activity Exercise Nutrition Top Articles Man running - Protein ...

  3. New Take on Man's Friendship with Fido

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Man's Friendship With Fido Surprising findings emerge about domestication To use the sharing features on this page, ... dog DNA samples, to learn more about dog domestication. SOURCE: Texas A&M University, news release HealthDay ...

  4. A young man with nonhealing venous ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vloedbeld, M. G.; Venema, A. W.; Smit, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with nonhealing ulcers at an atypical location on his left foot, caused by a combination of venous insufficiency (after deep venous thrombosis) and arterial insufficiency. The underlying cause was Buerger's disease.

  5. Man-made climate change: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holopainen, E. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Meteorology

    1995-12-31

    The first major man-made environmental problem was the soil acidification, caused primarily by the massive industrial emissions of sulphur dioxide. Then came the problem of ozone depletion, caused by the emissions of man-made halocarbons. More recently, the possibility of man-made climate change has received a lot of attention. These three man-made problems are interconnected in fundamental ways and require for their solution interdisciplinary and international approach. Narrowing of the scientific uncertainties connected with the problems mentioned above can be expected through international `Global Change` programmes such as the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) and the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP). Periodic assessments of the type produced by the IPCC will clearly be needed. Also in the future such assessments should form the scientific basis for international negotiations and conventions on the climate change issue

  6. Sex and the Man With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Sexual Side Effects in People with Cancer Sex and the Man With Cancer In this guide, ... you and your partner some information about cancer, sex, and sexuality. We cannot answer every question, but ...

  7. Cardiology Still a Man's Field, Survey Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162700.html Cardiology Still a Man's Field, Survey Finds Women less ... Dr. Claire Duvernoy, chair of the Women in Cardiology Council at the American College of Cardiology (ACC). ...

  8. One Man's Trash Is Another's Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_165988.html One Man's Trash Is Another's Fiber Wasted food in U.S. would reduce nutritional shortfalls, ... the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics . SOURCE: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, ...

  9. Fresh Efforts to Protect Peking Man Site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Haiyan; Zhao Baohua

    2002-01-01

    @@ CAS scientists have worked out a plan to further protect the Peking Man site at Zhoukoudian (ZKD) in Beijing, and to renovate research facilities at this internationally renowned paleoanthropological and paleolithic location.

  10. Development and Acceptability of the Simplified Text with Workbook in Differential Equations as an Instructional Material for Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Jan R. Terano, ECE, MET

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available – Instructional material is a very important tool in the teaching-learning process in a classroom situation. This is in a form of textbooks, reference texts, the chalk and blackboard, computer aided presentations and other materials that are important and useful during discussions and teachings. This study focused on the development and evaluation of an instructional material in Differential Equations for engineering programs. The simplified text with workbook in differential equations for engineering was developed for the purpose of giving the students quality material for their learning processes. The developed material was based in accordance with the minimum requirements of the Philippine Commission on Higher Education (CHED for engineering programs in the course Differential Equations. The acceptability of the material was evaluated in terms of its contents and structure and format. It was evaluated by two categories of evaluators namely, engineering professors and engineering students. The average weighted means are 4.85 in terms of the contents and 4.83 in terms of the structure and format. Based on these results, the researcher found out that the developed material is highly acceptable for use in engineering programs and responsive of the high requirement for engineering curriculum.

  11. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of neurotensin in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J H; Andersen, H O; Olsen, P S

    1989-01-01

    We studied the pharmacokinetics, arteriovenous extraction, and degradation sites of neurotensin (NT) in man during iv infusions of synthetic intact NT [NT-(1-13)] and the NH2-terminal metabolite NT-(1-8) during lipid ingestion and by catheterization of various vascular beds in normal subjects...... is present. Further studies are necessary to establish if the liver is a site of degradation of intact NT in man....

  12. A Post-colonial Reading of Man-Man by V.S.Nailpaul%A Post-colonial Reading of Man-Man by V.S. Nailpaul

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗媛

    2016-01-01

    A post-colonial reading of the story of Man-Man from Miguel Street by V.S. Nailpaul in the light of Homi K. Bhabha's views about mimicry reveals that to some extent mimicry in Naipaul's post-colonial writing reflects the double edged effect of mimicry discussed by Bhabha, but is more associated with the hopelessness and predicament suffered by the once colo?nized than the resistance to the authority of the colonizer.

  13. China's first deep manned submersible,JIAOLONG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Feng; CUI WeiCheng; LI XiangYang

    2010-01-01

    @@ A deep manned submersible is indispensable to deep ocean exploration.No other equipment can bring scientists to extreme sea floor depths to do research in situ.Marine geology, seafloor geophysics, marine biology, and oceanic chemistry are the fields that scientists are particularly eager to study [1-6].Chinese scientists have long dreamed of using their own submersible to probe the deep sea.China's recent fast development of a deep manned submersible has realized that dream.

  14. [Man and animal from the ethical view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teutsch, Gotthard M.

    1997-01-01

    This review over the books, articles in Journals and newspapers in 1996 and 1997 reports about the development in the field of man-animal- and man-nature-relations. The review considers the following themes: development, trends and perspectives, philosophy, theology, eco-ethics, legal questions, animal experimentation, freedom of research, teaching and conscience, farm animals, hunting and fishing, zoo and circus, bio-technology, violence, killing, vegetarism and dignity of creatures. The review includes a bibliography with about 300 quatoations.

  15. Crisis and Man: Literary Responses Across Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnaswami, Mallika

    2012-01-01

    Myth of Sisyphus exemplifies the situation man finds himself in irrespective of his ethnic and geographical background. Art and cultural forms gave expression to this situation and the intensity of the expression depended upon the political and social dimensions. War or peace, man is always condemned to struggle with his problems, moral or otherwise. Post war English writers focused on the social problems the British society found itself in and its helplessness in dealing with them. It was th...

  16. The future of oil and hydrocarbon man

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Colin

    1999-01-01

    Man appeared on the planet about four million years ago, and by 1850 numbered about one billion Ten came Hydrocarbon man. World population has since increased six-fold. After the oil price shocks of the 1970s, people asked "when will production peak?". It is not easy to answer this question because of the very poor database. Reserves and the many different hydrocarbon categories are poorly defined, reporting practices are ambiguous, revisions are not backdated...

  17. Comparative study of the work load between one-man buses and two-man buses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueno,Mitsuo

    1985-06-01

    Full Text Available The differences in physiological and safety conditions of one-man buses and two-man buses were examined from the view point of occupational fatigue. This survey consisted of a work load study which included a time study, study of subsidiary behavior, auditory task, memory test, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR and physiological function tests and a self-administered questionnaire which involved items concerning safety and subjective fatigue complaints. The visual and postural restrictions in the one-man bus were greater than in the two-man bus. The mental capacity of the one-man bus drivers was found to be less. Greater mental fatigue and stress were observed in the one-man bus. More subjective fatigue complaints were observed in the one-man bus. More cases of near accidents were observed in the one-man bus. From these results it was concluded that the one-man bus caused bus drivers a greater mental and physical work load.

  18. [Bilateral SLAC (scapholunate advanced collapse) wrist: an unusual entity. Apropos of a 7000-year-old prehistoric case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masmejean, E; Dutour, O; Touam, C; Oberlin, C

    1997-01-01

    SLAC (Scapho-Lunate Advanced Collapse) wrist is the most common form of osteoarthritis of the wrist. The main aetiology is ligamentous rotary subluxation of the scaphoid. The authors report on a case of bilateral SLAC wrist, identified on a prehistoric skeleton derived from the Hassi-el-Abiod site in the malian Sahara (Dutour, 1989). The paleopathological study consisted of macroscopic examination and radiological examination. Radiocarbon dating situated this human occupation to 7 thousand years ago. The diseases observed included bilateral radiocarpal lesions in an adult male individual. The degree of preservation of the carpal skeleton was 90%. Lesions were bilateral, but predominantly affected the right side. The radial styloid processes presented a lateral osteophytic cuff, giving a tapered "pen-nib" appearance. The scaphoid has a normal shape, but presented posterior and lateral osteophytes. The scaphoid surfaces of the two distal extremities of the radius and the corresponding parts of the scaphoid showed characteristic polishing. X-rays showed a band of condensation corresponding to the ivory region on the articular surfaces. In this case, the bilateral nature and the absence of any obvious macrotraumatic aetiology suggest that the only aetiology was progressive and bilateral ligamentous distension, due to repeated microtrauma analogous to that observed in sports disease (volley-ball) or in occupational diseases (jackhammer). The manufacture of stone tools (carved or polished) can be incriminated in the pathogenesis of these lesions. These lesions are therefore useful markers of repeated microtraumatic activities or "activity markers". The is the first paleopathological description and the oldest known case of bilateral SLAC wrist.

  19. Ancient DNA reveals prehistoric gene-flow from siberia in the complex human population history of North East Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Balanovsky, Oleg; Brandt, Guido; Khartanovich, Valery; Buzhilova, Alexandra; Koshel, Sergey; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Gronenborn, Detlef; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Kolpakov, Eugen; Shumkin, Vladimir; Alt, Kurt W; Balanovska, Elena; Cooper, Alan; Haak, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    North East Europe harbors a high diversity of cultures and languages, suggesting a complex genetic history. Archaeological, anthropological, and genetic research has revealed a series of influences from Western and Eastern Eurasia in the past. While genetic data from modern-day populations is commonly used to make inferences about their origins and past migrations, ancient DNA provides a powerful test of such hypotheses by giving a snapshot of the past genetic diversity. In order to better understand the dynamics that have shaped the gene pool of North East Europeans, we generated and analyzed 34 mitochondrial genotypes from the skeletal remains of three archaeological sites in northwest Russia. These sites were dated to the Mesolithic and the Early Metal Age (7,500 and 3,500 uncalibrated years Before Present). We applied a suite of population genetic analyses (principal component analysis, genetic distance mapping, haplotype sharing analyses) and compared past demographic models through coalescent simulations using Bayesian Serial SimCoal and Approximate Bayesian Computation. Comparisons of genetic data from ancient and modern-day populations revealed significant changes in the mitochondrial makeup of North East Europeans through time. Mesolithic foragers showed high frequencies and diversity of haplogroups U (U2e, U4, U5a), a pattern observed previously in European hunter-gatherers from Iberia to Scandinavia. In contrast, the presence of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups C, D, and Z in Early Metal Age individuals suggested discontinuity with Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and genetic influx from central/eastern Siberia. We identified remarkable genetic dissimilarities between prehistoric and modern-day North East Europeans/Saami, which suggests an important role of post-Mesolithic migrations from Western Europe and subsequent population replacement/extinctions. This work demonstrates how ancient DNA can improve our understanding of human population movements across

  20. Ancient DNA reveals prehistoric gene-flow from siberia in the complex human population history of North East Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clio Der Sarkissian

    Full Text Available North East Europe harbors a high diversity of cultures and languages, suggesting a complex genetic history. Archaeological, anthropological, and genetic research has revealed a series of influences from Western and Eastern Eurasia in the past. While genetic data from modern-day populations is commonly used to make inferences about their origins and past migrations, ancient DNA provides a powerful test of such hypotheses by giving a snapshot of the past genetic diversity. In order to better understand the dynamics that have shaped the gene pool of North East Europeans, we generated and analyzed 34 mitochondrial genotypes from the skeletal remains of three archaeological sites in northwest Russia. These sites were dated to the Mesolithic and the Early Metal Age (7,500 and 3,500 uncalibrated years Before Present. We applied a suite of population genetic analyses (principal component analysis, genetic distance mapping, haplotype sharing analyses and compared past demographic models through coalescent simulations using Bayesian Serial SimCoal and Approximate Bayesian Computation. Comparisons of genetic data from ancient and modern-day populations revealed significant changes in the mitochondrial makeup of North East Europeans through time. Mesolithic foragers showed high frequencies and diversity of haplogroups U (U2e, U4, U5a, a pattern observed previously in European hunter-gatherers from Iberia to Scandinavia. In contrast, the presence of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups C, D, and Z in Early Metal Age individuals suggested discontinuity with Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and genetic influx from central/eastern Siberia. We identified remarkable genetic dissimilarities between prehistoric and modern-day North East Europeans/Saami, which suggests an important role of post-Mesolithic migrations from Western Europe and subsequent population replacement/extinctions. This work demonstrates how ancient DNA can improve our understanding of human population

  1. Conservation of prehistoric caves and stability of their inner climate: lessons from Chauvet and other French caves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, F; Genthon, P; Genty, D; Lorblanchet, M; Mauduit, E; D'Hulst, D

    2014-09-15

    In the last 150 years, some prehistoric painted caves suffered irreversible degradations due to misperception of conservation issues and subsequent mismanagement. These sites presented naturally an exceptional stability of their internal climate allowing conservation in situ of outstanding fragile remains, some for nearly 40,000 years. This is for a large part due to exchanges of air, CO2, heat and water with the karstic system in which these caves are included. We introduce the concept of underground confinement, based on the stability of the inner cave climate parameters, especially its temperature. Confined caves present the best conservative properties. It is emphasized that this confined state implies slow exchanges with the surrounding karst and that a stable cave cannot be viewed as a closed system. This is illustrated on four case studies of French caves of various confinement states evidenced by long term continuous monitoring and on strategies to improve their conservation properties. The Chauvet cave presents optimal conservation properties. It is wholly confined as shown by the stability of its internal parameters since its discovery in 1994. In Marsoulas cave, archeological works removed the entrance scree and let a strong opening situation of the decorated zone. Remediation is expected by adding a buffer structure at the entrance. In Pech Merle tourist cave, recurrent painting fading was related to natural seasonal drying of walls. Improvement of the cave closure system restored a confined state insuring optimal visibility of the paintings. In Gargas tourist cave, optimization of closures, lighting system and number of visitors, allowed it to gradually reach a semi-confined state that improved the conservation properties. Conclusions are drawn on the characterization of confinement state of caves and on the ways to improve their conservation properties by restoring their initial regulation mechanisms and to avoid threats to their stability.

  2. Investigating the Spatial Extent of a Barely Prehistoric Earthquake on the Bear River Normal Fault, Wyoming and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, S.; Schwartz, D. P.; Cinti, F. R.; Civico, R.; West, M. W.; Stoller, A. R.; DeLong, S.; Pickering, A.

    2016-12-01

    To better constrain the length of a young prehistoric (significantly post-AD 1630) surface-rupturing earthquake recently discovered near the south end of the Bear River normal fault in Utah (Hecker and Schwartz, 2015), we excavated a trench on a strand of the fault 25 km to the north in Wyoming, where previous work had found clear evidence of two older late Holocene events (West, 1993). These two events, which have been identified to the south as well, were interpreted as comprising the entire history of this very young fault. The new trench across the 5-m-high scarp at the northern site exposed a 6-m-wide zone of faulting and two packages of colluvial-wedge deposits, each tabular and 0.5-1 m thick. The colluvial deposits, which bury Pleistocene alluvial deposits that in turn overlie Eocene bedrock, appear correlative with West's two-event stratigraphy. In the latest trench, however, both wedges are faulted, with strands extending to the ground surface, evidence of a third, younger event. The amount of displacement in the most recent event (MRE) in the trench is small (few 10s of cm at most) and distributed and has resulted in only minor colluviation. The event record is complicated by a shallow slope failure in the soil A-horizon on the scarp that we interpret as possibly occurring during the MRE. The slide formed a head scarp at a location underlain by MRE faulting and built a low bench at least 100 m long on the surface below the scarp. We sampled buried in-place soil below the slide for radiocarbon analysis, which should allow age comparison with the earthquake identified farther south. Ultra-high-resolution topography from balloon photography and terrestrial lidar enable detailed morphologic study of surface processes and deformation at the site.

  3. Change of PAHs with evolution of paddy soils from prehistoric to present over the last six millennia in the Yangtze River Delta region, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jin [School of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Agricultural and Forestry University, 88 North Huancheng Rd. of Lin' an, Hangzhou 311300 (China); Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Ludewig-Meyn-Str. 10, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Cornelia, Mueller-Niggemann [Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Ludewig-Meyn-Str. 10, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Wang, Minyan, E-mail: jz.zafu@gmail.com [Tianmu College of Zhejiang Agricultural and Forestry University, 252 Yijin Str.of Lin' an, Hangzhou 311300 (China); Cao, Zhihong [Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 71 East Beijing Rd., Nanjing 210008 (China); Luo, Xiping, E-mail: luoxpzj@yahoo.com.cn [School of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Agricultural and Forestry University, 88 North Huancheng Rd. of Lin' an, Hangzhou 311300 (China); Wong, Minghung [School of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Agricultural and Forestry University, 88 North Huancheng Rd. of Lin' an, Hangzhou 311300 (China); Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, 224 Waterloo Rd., Kln., Hong Kong (China); Chen, Wei [Department of Ecology and Evolution, Frankfurt University, Max-Von-Laue Str. 13, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of hydroponics management on soil organic components with evolution of paddy soil over the last six millennia, PAHs, as a biomarker, as well as total organic carbon content were used to explore changes of paddy soil organic carbon in two entirely buried ancient paddy soil profiles. The results showed that hydroponics management can cause organic carbon deposition in rice paddy. The changing of total PAH concentrations was not always in accordance with the changing of total organic carbon contents in layers of the buried ancient paddy soils. The PAHs in 6280 BP prehistoric paddy soil layer was 3-ring > 5-ring > 4-ring > 6-ring, while in layers of the present paddy soil and the prehistoric upland were 3-ring > 4-ring > 5-ring > 6-ring. The contribution of phenanthrene to total PAHs in two profiles and the increasing ratio of phenanthrene to alkylated PAHs from parent material/6280 BP prehistoric upland to 6280 BP paddy suggested substantial increase of the anthropogenic influence of hydroponics management on rice paddy soil. And in view of the {sup 14}C age and bioremains in the two profiles, it was only possible for PAHs to be derived from hydroponics management with evolution of the paddy soils form the Neolithic age. Cadalene could be used as an indicator for biological sources of PAHs released by rice plant residues, and benzo[g,h,i]fluoranthene and benzo[g,h,i]perylene for pyrogenic sources released by field vegetation fires. - Highlights: ► Soil hydroponics management can cause SOC deposition in rice paddy. ► PAHs in buried ancient paddy soil profiles were mainly derived from anthropogenic hydroponics management. ► PAH, as a biomarker, was not suitable for tracing SOC change with evolution of paddy soil from the Neolithic age.

  4. Present messages from the past: Archaeology didactics at the Museum of Prehistoric Art of Mação (Central Portugal and the example of the Andakatu Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Cura

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Heritage education, although still often set aside, has assumed an increasing role in current mindsets, regardless of the different realities in terms of geography and socio-cultural frame. The Andakatu Project based at the Museum of Prehistoric Art of Mação (Portugal is aimed at wide audience and presents a programme, activities and contents arising from multiple archaeological research programmes conducted at the Museum and its partners (namely universities and research centres. Archaeology, being the starting point, is intertwined with various scientific and artistic aspects in order to encourage questioning, learning and citizenship through a communication based on interactive experimentation.

  5. TracerLPM (Version 1): An Excel® workbook for interpreting groundwater age distributions from environmental tracer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; Böhlke, J.K.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    TracerLPM is an interactive Excel® (2007 or later) workbook program for evaluating groundwater age distributions from environmental tracer data by using lumped parameter models (LPMs). Lumped parameter models are mathematical models of transport based on simplified aquifer geometry and flow configurations that account for effects of hydrodynamic dispersion or mixing within the aquifer, well bore, or discharge area. Five primary LPMs are included in the workbook: piston-flow model (PFM), exponential mixing model (EMM), exponential piston-flow model (EPM), partial exponential model (PEM), and dispersion model (DM). Binary mixing models (BMM) can be created by combining primary LPMs in various combinations. Travel time through the unsaturated zone can be included as an additional parameter. TracerLPM also allows users to enter age distributions determined from other methods, such as particle tracking results from numerical groundwater-flow models or from other LPMs not included in this program. Tracers of both young groundwater (anthropogenic atmospheric gases and isotopic substances indicating post-1940s recharge) and much older groundwater (carbon-14 and helium-4) can be interpreted simultaneously so that estimates of the groundwater age distribution for samples with a wide range of ages can be constrained. TracerLPM is organized to permit a comprehensive interpretive approach consisting of hydrogeologic conceptualization, visual examination of data and models, and best-fit parameter estimation. Groundwater age distributions can be evaluated by comparing measured and modeled tracer concentrations in two ways: (1) multiple tracers analyzed simultaneously can be evaluated against each other for concordance with modeled concentrations (tracer-tracer application) or (2) tracer time-series data can be evaluated for concordance with modeled trends (tracer-time application). Groundwater-age estimates can also be obtained for samples with a single tracer measurement at one

  6. The Centauri project: Manned interstellar travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesla, Thomas M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of antimatter engines for spacecraft propulsion will allow man to expand to the nearest stellar neighbors such as the Alpha Centuri system. Compared to chemically powered rockets like the Apollo mission class which would take 50,000 years to reach the Centauri system, antimatter propulsion would reduce one way trip time to 30 years or less. The challenges encountered by manned interstellar travel are formidable. The spacecraft must be a combination of sublight speed transportation system and a traveling microplanet serving an expanding population. As the population expands from the initial 100 people to approximately 300, the terraformed asteroid, enclosed by a man-made shell will allow for expansion over its surface in the fashion of a small terrestrial town. All aspects of human life - birth; death; physical, emotional, and educational needs; and government and law must be met by the structure, systems, and institutions on-board.

  7. Quantum Man: Richard Feynman's Life in Science

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    It took a man who was willing to break all the rules to tame a theory that breaks all the rules. This talk will be based on my new book Quantum Man: Richard Feynman's life in science. I will try and present a scientific overview of the contributions of Richard Feynman, as seen through the arc of his fascinating life. From Quantum Mechanics to Antiparticles, from Rio de Janeiro to Los Alamos, a whirlwind tour will provide insights into the character, life and accomplishments of one of the 20th centuries most important scientists, and provide an object lesson in scientific integrity.

  8. Kan man måle lykken?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Gitte

    2017-01-01

    Det kan være svært at holde sig munter, når man nok en gang bliver præsenteret for resultater med decimaler fra en trivselsmåling eller - værre - bliver bedt om selv at deltage i en sådan. I sidstnævnte tilfælde kan man blandt andet komme ud for at blive stillet spørgsmål, der drejer sig om ens...

  9. Man-machine dialogue design and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Landragin, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    This book summarizes the main problems posed by the design of a man-machine dialogue system and offers ideas on how to continue along the path towards efficient, realistic and fluid communication between humans and machines. A culmination of ten years of research, it is based on the author's development, investigation and experimentation covering a multitude of fields, including artificial intelligence, automated language processing, man-machine interfaces and notably multimodal or multimedia interfaces. Contents Part 1. Historical and Methodological Landmarks 1. An Assessment of the Evolution

  10. A Man With Two Burned Ears

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范图雨

    2001-01-01

    Mr Smith was in troublethose days. He drove a car forMr Black, a rich business-man. He worked hard and theshopkeeper liked him. But hecouldn't work when he dranktoo much. And once he al-most fell into the river whenhe drove along the bridge. MrBlack became angry and wasgoing to send him away. Hehad a big family and wasafraid of that and promisedhe would stop drinking atonce. The man told him towait to be dealt with. OneMonday morning, Mr Smithcame into the office, with twobadly burned ears. “Whathappened to your ears?”asked Mr Black.

  11. Homo Tangens, or Man Touching and Tangible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mizinska

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of the concept sense of touch, which is considered in all its aspects and dimensions. The author's aim is to determine what is touch in terms of philosophy, what types it has and what traditional functions (i.e. prior to the emergence of virtual reality each of these functions performed. The conducted research allows the author to make a conclusion about the importance of perceiving the role and significance of man as a homo tangens - man touching and tangible.

  12. Otto Rank and man's urge to immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwert, M

    1985-04-01

    Otto Rank, one of Sigmund Freud's original followers, posited the existence of an "urge to immortality" as man's deepest drive. In his Psychology and the Soul, Rank traced the desire for immortality through four historical eras, with particular emphasis on the creativity of the hero and the artist. By the end of his life, Rank had not only repudiated orthodox psychoanalysis and developed then abandoned a psychology of the will, he had moved "beyond psychology" to a religious view of history and the nature of man.

  13. "Kan man studere en menneskelig praksis?"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oettingen, Alexander von

    2008-01-01

    Læser man bekendtgørelsen for faget pædagogik, lægger man mærke til, at faget har et dobbelt sigte. På den ene side repræsenterer pædagogik en indsigt, viden og refleksion i videnskabelige teorier og metoder, og på den anden side er det fagets opgave at kvalificere studerende til det konkrete...... pædagogiske arbejde og den pædagogiske praksis. Pædagogik er på mange måder et splittet fag....

  14. Partnering for Quality under the Workforce Investment Act: A Tool Kit for One-Stop System Building. Module 3: Collecting and Using Customer Feedback. Trainer Manual with Participant Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Deborah; Koller, Vinz; Kozumplik, Richalene; Lawrence, Mary Ann

    This document is part of a five-module training package to help employment and training service providers comply with the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 and develop a one-stop training and employment services system. It contains the participant workbook, trainer manual, and activity worksheets for a module on collecting and using customer…

  15. Chaa' Dine k'ehji Saad Bee'al'ini Bini' Doonish: Dadiits'a'igii Doo Dabizhi'igii (Beaver: Navajo Language Workbook. Sounds and Symbols). Book 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benally, Louise

    Second book in the "Chaa'" series, the word workbook allows the student to distinguish and identify similar consonants and vowel sounds in the Navajo language in supplementary oral and writing activities. Black line illustrations are accompanied with new words and symbols to give the student an idea of the association of symbol and sound. Space is…

  16. Look and Do Ancient Egypt. Teacher's Manual: Primary Program, Ancient Egypt Art & Architecture [and] Workbook: The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt [and] K-4 Videotape. History through Art and Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Ann Campbell

    This resource contains a teaching manual, reproducible student workbook, and color teaching poster, which were designed to accompany a 2-part, 34-minute videotape, but may be adapted for independent use. Part 1 of the program, "The Old Kingdom," explains Egyptian beliefs concerning life after death as evidenced in art, architecture and…

  17. Climate Impact and GIS Education Using Realistic Applications of Data.gov Thematic Datasets in a Structured Lesson-Based Workbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirazodi, S.; Griffin, R.; Bugbee, K.; Ramachandran, R.; Weigel, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    This project created a workbook which teaches Earth Science education undergraduate and graduate students through guided in-class activities and take-home assignments organized around climate topics which use GIS to teach key geospatial analysis techniques and cartography skills. The workbook is structured to the White House's Data.gov climate change themes, which include Coastal Flooding, Ecosystem Vulnerability, Energy Infrastructure, Arctic, Food Resilience, Human Health, Transportation, Tribal Nations, Water. Each theme provides access to framing questions, associated data, interactive tools, and further reading (e.g. the US Climate Resilience Toolkit and National Climate Assessment). Lessons make use of the respective theme's available resources. The structured thematic approach is designed to encourage independent exploration. The goal is to teach climate concepts and concerns, GIS techniques and approaches, and effective cartographic representation and communication of results; and foster a greater awareness of publically available resources and datasets. To reach more audiences more effectively, a two level approach was used. Level 1 serves as an introductory study and relies on only freely available interactive tools to reach audiences with fewer resources and less familiarity. Level 2 presents a more advanced case study, and focuses on supporting common commercially available tool use and real-world analysis techniques.

  18. Changes in physical activity and sedentary behavior in a randomized trial of an internet-based versus workbook-based family intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catenacci, Victoria A; Barrett, Christopher; Odgen, Lorraine; Browning, Ray; Schaefer, Christine Adele; Hill, James; Wyatt, Holly

    2014-02-01

    The America on the Move (AOM) Family Intervention Program has been shown to prevent excess weight gain in overweight children. Providing intervention materials via the internet would have the potential to reach more families but may increase sedentary behavior. The purpose was to evaluate whether delivering the AOM Family Intervention via the internet versus printed workbook would have a similar impact on sedentary behaviors in children. 131 children (age 8-12) were randomized to receive the AOM Family Intervention via the internet or workbook for 12 weeks. Changes in objectively measured sedentary time and moderate-to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) as well as self-reported screen time were compared between groups. There were no significant differences between groups in screen time, sedentary time, or MVPA at the end of the 12 week intervention. Families receiving the intervention via the internet were more likely to remain in the study (98% vs. 82%, P = .016). Using the internet to deliver the lifestyle intervention did not increase sedentary behavior in children. Attrition rates were lower when the program was delivered by internet versus via printed materials. These results provide support for using the internet to deliver healthy lifestyle programs for children.

  19. A methodological proposal to study the prehistorical metallurgy: the case of Gorny in the Kargaly Region (Orenburg, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovira, Salvador

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Archaeological field-work realised at the site of Gorny (occupied from 1700 to 1400 BC has furnished an important collection of materials related to metallurgical activities (ores, slags, by-products and copper objects. These have been analyzed by a variety of instrumental techniques (scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and metallography. The results show that metallurgy was a primitive one that worked oxidised copper ores by a non-slagging smelting process. Cast objects were finished by cold hammering and, on some occasions, annealing. A replication of the prehistoric technology has been achieved by means of on-site smelting experiments. Thus, economic variables such as the efficiency of copper recovery and charcoal consumption have been evaluated and, using them, theoretical models of copper production and its behavioural impact have been constructed.

    Los trabajos arqueológicos de campo en el sitio de Gorny (habitado durante los siglos XVII-XV AC han proporcionado una importante colección de materiales relacionados con actividades metalúrgicas (minerales, escorias, restos de fundición y objetos metálicos. En su estudio analítico se han empleado diversas técnicas de laboratorio (microscopía electrónica de barrido, espectrometría por fluorescencia de rayos x, metalografía cuyos resultados caracterizan una metalurgia de rasgos primitivos que parte de la fundición directa de minerales oxídicos de cobre. Los objetos de metal, fundidos en molde, eran terminados mediante trabajos de forja y aplicación, en ocasiones, de tratamientos térmicos. Con la ayuda de experimentos de fundición in situ se ha reproducido el proceso prehistórico, permitiendo de ese modo establecer variables económicas tales como el rendimiento en cobre de las fundiciones y el consumo de combustible, a partir de las cuales se elaboran modelos teóricos estimativos de la producción metalúrgica y su impacto en el medio

  20. Effects of tidal amplitude on intertidal resource availability and dispersal pressure in prehistoric human coastal populations: the Mediterranean Atlantic transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Darren Andrew

    2008-11-01

    In this paper I argue that there is a growing body of evidence supporting an increasingly central position of coastal environments in human evolution and dispersals, rather than as merely peripheral habitats. Eustatic fluctuations during glacial cycles have meant that most prehistoric coastlines are now underwater, and lack of evidence to date of a close relationship between people and the coast can be most plausibly ascribed to the limited studies so far on submerged sites. Coastal environments provide high diversity in food resources, consisting of multiple ecotones in close proximity, which reduces the need to forage widely. One of the richest and most easily exploited coastal resources by human populations living on the coast are molluscs from marine rocky intertidal communities, which recent evidence has highlighted as important as far back as the Middle Palaeolithic. However, the density of these resources is limited by a number of factors, and this varies geographically. One of the main large-scale factors limiting rocky intertidal mollusc densities is tidal amplitude, beyond which smaller-scale local factors such as exposure to wave action and shore aspect, further affect species distributions. The area around the Strait of Gibraltar is used as a case study of an area, which is affected by large variations in tidal amplitudes thus allowing for quantitative comparisons between taxonomically and climatically similar regions. Shorelines along the Mediterranean coast, with reduced tidal amplitudes, exhibit compressed zonations and harbour fewer macro-mollusc individuals, with the reverse being the case along the Atlantic coast, which has significantly larger tides. Data from Middle and Upper Palaeolithic sites along the Strait are used to establish harvested species and present-day data are used to model the potential distributions and associated variables such as calorific returns of key food species. An optimal foraging model is used to explore the effects of

  1. Teaching Rousseau: Natural Man and Present Existence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Daryl H.

    1989-01-01

    Offers an interpretation of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's "Discourse on the Origin and Foundations of Inequality" and provides examples of classroom exercises designed to make Rousseau's ideas and writings accessible to undergraduates. Stresses Rousseau's philosophy on natural man, language, ethics, and society. Includes interpretive…

  2. The ancestry and affiliations of Kennewick Man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Sikora, Martin; Albrechtsen, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    Kennewick Man, referred to as the Ancient One by Native Americans, is a male human skeleton discovered in Washington state (USA) in 1996 and initially radiocarbon dated to 8,340-9,200 calibrated years before present (BP). His population affinities have been the subject of scientific debate...

  3. Ergonomic ship brigde design supports minimum manning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punte, P.A.J.; Post, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Royal Netherlands Navy is planning to design a hydrographic survey vessel to replace the currently used vessels in order to extend the tasks of an Officer by reducing require manning. The design includes the arrangements of workspace and the detailed design of workplaces. Digital human models ar

  4. Elementary particles in the service of man

    CERN Multimedia

    1966-01-01

    This article was prepared by the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, and the Rutherford Laboratory in the U.K., for a Physics Exhibition in March of this year and is reproduced here with acknowledgement. It is an account of how some of the knowledge gained in the previous generation of our research has already been applied 'in the service of man'.

  5. Chairman Mao's Cigar Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    FAN Guorong, aged 84,is known in his hometown as “the Old CigarMan.” The moniker isa fitting one as he has spent most of his life making cigars. In his early teens, Fan served a three-year apprenticeship and became the youngest cigar maker of his time when he started his career in the late 1940s.

  6. Diffuse panbronchiolitis in a Samoan man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Justine; King, Harrison; Singh, Mahendra; Tran, Khoa

    2017-05-01

    Diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) is an idiopathic inflammatory disease which is predominantly recognised in the Japanese population with only isolated case reports in Western populations. This is the first reported case of DPB in a Samoan man with typical radiological and histopathological features. He had an excellent response to long-term erythromycin and this case highlights the importance of recognising this rare disease.

  7. Teaching Rousseau: Natural Man and Present Existence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Daryl H.

    1989-01-01

    Offers an interpretation of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's "Discourse on the Origin and Foundations of Inequality" and provides examples of classroom exercises designed to make Rousseau's ideas and writings accessible to undergraduates. Stresses Rousseau's philosophy on natural man, language, ethics, and society. Includes interpretive references to…

  8. [A young man with discoloured nails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schers, H.J.; Kleinpenning, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    A 23-year-old man consulted his general practitioner with discoloured nails. The nails showed the typical pattern of half and half nails or Lindsay's nails. This condition sometimes accompanies renal failure or thyroid disease and must be differentiated from Terry's nails, psoriatic nails and onycho

  9. The Language of Man. Book 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Joseph Fletcher, Ed.

    Book 4 of "The Language of Man" series contains articles which deal with semantics, levels of language (including informal, formal and technical language, jargon, and gobbledygook), the hidden persuaders (advertising of merchandise and political candidates), and communications of the future (including the computer and other mass media now being…

  10. The Language of Man. Book 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Joseph Fletcher, Ed.

    Book 3 from "The Language of Man" textbook series contains four sections, each of which includes several articles. The articles cover semantics, use of the dictionary and encyclopedia, use of figurative language, and coping with the mass media. The sections are augmented with humorous features, examples from real life, and graphics. The style is…

  11. Asher Brown Durand: "An Old Man's Reminiscences."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Ted

    1988-01-01

    Uses Durand's "An Old Man's Reminiscences" to introduce students in grades 4-6 to the effective use of nostalgia and memories in artwork. Presents lesson objectives, instructional strategies, evaluation criteria, and background information about the artist and the painting. (GEA)

  12. The ancestry and affiliations of Kennewick Man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Sikora, Martin; Albrechtsen, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    Kennewick Man, referred to as the Ancient One by Native Americans, is a male human skeleton discovered in Washington state (USA) in 1996 and initially radiocarbon dated to 8,340-9,200 calibrated years before present (BP). His population affinities have been the subject of scientific debate and le...

  13. Genetic Engineering: The Modification of Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsheimer, Robert L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes somatic and genetic manipulations of individual genotypes, using diabetes control as an example of the first mode that is potentially realizable be derepression or viral transduction of genes. Advocates the use of genetic engineering of the second mode to remove man from his biological limitations, but offers maxims to ensure the…

  14. Man's Search: English, Mythology. 5112.22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersheimer, Lenore C.

    A course which is an exploration of man's eternal search to understand himself and his world through the study of the mythology of the world is presented. Performance objectives include: (1) Students will recognize the content of the myths studied; (2) Students will identify the specific characteristics of the civilization studied; (3) Students…

  15. Direct Observation of "Pac-Man" Coarsening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X X; Gulec, A; Yoon, A; Zuo, J M; Voorhees, P W; Marks, L D

    2017-08-09

    We report direct observation of a "Pac-Man" like coarsening mechanism of a self-supporting thin film of nickel oxide. The ultrathin film has an intrinsic morphological instability due to surface stress leading to the development of local thicker regions at step edges. Density functional theory calculations and continuum modeling of the elastic instability support the model for the process.

  16. The Language of Man. Book 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Joseph Fletcher, Ed.

    This textbook, book 6 of "The Language of Man" series, covers semantics, the language of politics, language and race, the language of advertising, and the origins and growth of the English language. The material analyzed comes from many sources (advertisements, newspaper articles, poems, parodies) and attempts to demonstrate the effect of the…

  17. On Being an Angry Black Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaye, Stephen John

    2017-01-01

    Black men are often seen as problems, threats, and thugs. The mere existence of a Black body is often met with fear. Using autoethnographic mystory, I blend personal stories, poetry, song lyrics, and analysis to subvert the angry Black man mantra and explore the productive use of anger to stimulate change.

  18. Are You a Man or a Mouse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Janne Rothmar

    2008-01-01

    Are you a man or a mouse? This expression is used to encourage someone to be brave when they are frightened of doing something. It is also an expression which bears associations to John Steinbeck's novella Of Mice and Men, the title of which is taken from Robert Burns' poem To a Mouse, which is o...

  19. Manned Spaceflight Ancient Dream, Modern Attempt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    China was first in the world to invent rockets, and the first "astronaut" was also Chinese. In the late 14th century a man named Wanhu had himself tied to a special chair, the back of which was fitted with 47 prototype rockets, while he

  20. East Man:Health Lacquer of Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ As a kind of building material, lacquer is very necessarily used in the room fitment.In order to protect the indoor environment and avoid the emission of poisonous gas,people always choose those high-quality imported lacquer despite the high price.However, a new Chinese brand lacquer has been produced, it's called East Man.

  1. Estimator's electrical man-hour manual

    CERN Document Server

    Page, John S

    1999-01-01

    This manual's latest edition continues to be the best source available for making accurate, reliable man-hour estimates for electrical installation. This new edition is revised and expanded to include installation of electrical instrumentation, which is used in monitoring various process systems.

  2. Oxiuríase e migrações pré-históricas Oxyuriasis and prehistoric migrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adauto Araújo

    1995-06-01

    hosts in ancient times. These findings allow us to re-examine theories proposed at the beginning of the century concerning transpacific contacts that Asian populations may have had with South America. This has been the case, for example, with hookworm eggs found in archeological material dating up to 7,000 years before present. Because of the increase in scientific production in this area, it has now become necessary to undertake syntheses that assess the state of the art and propose workable paleoepidemological models of the prehistoric dispersion of human parasitoses. Based on findings of Enterobius vermicularis eggs in archeological material in the Americas, the present study is an effort in this direction. Unlike the hookworm, the pinworm does not require a soil cycle in order to be transmitted from one host to another, thereby meaning that its persistence in a given human population does not depend on climatic conditions. Thus, it could have been brought from the old to the new continent, possibly by human migrations across the Bering Strait. This may explain the greater geographical dispersion and dissemination of these findings in North America from 10,000 yrs B.P. till today. In South America, on the other hand, archeological findings have only confirmed existence of Enterobius vermicularis eggs within the Andean region, with findings located specifically in Chile and northern Argentina. Although a large number of samples have been examined, no such eggs have been found in coprolites in Brazil. The paper discusses models that account for the known distribution of this parasitosis in prehistoric populations.

  3. Discovery of Prehistoric Skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurshtein, A. A.

    1995-12-01

    It was Charles Francois Dupui, of France, who two centuries ago in his twelve-volume "Origine de tous les cults" (1795) worked out a proposition that all the different religious customs, stories, and dogmas will be found upon examination to have a cradle as one or another aspect of the natural, mainly, astronomical phenomena. It is absolutely correct but he and his spirited followers failed to develop a basic scientific quantitative argument focused on astronomy - chronological distribution of events. It is the first time that a combination of the up-to-date knowledge in archaic symbology and the professional astronomical data for precession and other regular astronomical events constitutes conditions for an absolutely new approach. An astronomical reconstruction of the evolution of the Zodiacal constellations was made, based on the Indo-european and Sumero-Akkadian religio-cultural data, including artifacts such as cult statuettes, cuneiform tablets, cylinder seals and boundary stones. It was argued that the development of 12 houses of the Zodiac in 3 groups of 4 over some six millennia was dictated by the changes made by precession in the positions of the vernal and autumnal equinoxes and the summer and winter solstices. The first quartet of the Zodiacal constellations (Gemini, Virgo, Sagittarius, Pisces) was recognized by the first agriculturists from the Fertile Crescent to learn the four most important Sun positions and to predict the ongoing seasons; it was done as far back as 5,600 B.C. (with a formal error of this determination about +/- 150 years). The second one (Taurus, Leo, Scorpio, Aquarius) was introduced in 2,700 +/- 250 years B.C. by Egyptians with their own animal symbolism that was the etymological root for the term the Zodiac (a circle of animals). This event was followed with the acquaintance of the new calendar and erection of the great pyramids as an eternal sanctuary for their mental triumph. In the first half of 14 century B.C. the Egyptian pharaoh Ekhnaton (Amenhotep 1V) attempted to inaugurate a new four constellation set to fixate the Sun track. The attempt was in vain but it seems the knowledge to go via Moses and the tribes left Egypt for Canaan. According our precessional dating the final design of the Zodiac with 12 houses appeared at 1,200 +/- 400 years B.C. In opposite to the figure 7 which was from the Paleolithic, the first great opus where figure 12 appeared as a sacred one was the Holy Bible. Many other details of the concept proposed are discussed.

  4. From the rights of man to the human rights: Man - nation - humanity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaharijević Adriana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The insistence on the fact that human rights and the rights of man (codified in The Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen, respectively are not one and the same, which could be deduced from the notion of man common to both terms, is the key thesis of this text. By developing this motive, I try to determine the following: that the notion of man, by definition inclusive and abstractly non-discriminative term, is in fact established on tacit exclusions in the time of its inception (Enlightenment revolutinary era, and it was only upon these exclusions that the term man could have signified "the free and equal". Although the parallel or simultaneous evolution and implementation of the rights of man and national rights might seem contradictory, I seek to demonstrate that this paradox is only ostensible, arguing that the notion of man is itself limited and exclusionary, and is therefore compatible with the exclusivity which is the conditio sine qua non of nation. The consequences of nationalism - World Wars, primarily - proved that the conception of liberty and equality, based on the conception of fraternity of men (white European males, and of partial democracy pretending to be universal, cannot be maintained any further. Codification of universal human rights represents a reaction to this internal discrepancy inasmuch as it is a reaction to the destructiveness of all kinds of nationalisms. The notion of life, developed in this text, corresponds to the fundamental requirement for the right to life (as the first and the most basic of all human rights, which no longer belongs to "man", but to everyone.

  5. Man-Man-Machine-Machine Etiquette: Towards an Environment to Investigate Behavioral Rules for Dynamic Man-Machine Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    simulation (compound and environment) Sensor Simulation Agents (Guards, decision support, sensor support) Man-Machine Interface Ground Truth ( RPR ) G...10]). It is desired to make this interface based on existing standards. HLA is chosen for the M4E interface. The HLA RPR FOM is a data exchange...Definitions For M4E we have define the following additional classes to the RPR FOM: Table 1: Additional FOM classes. Object Classes Interaction Classes

  6. Evidence on climatic variability and prehistoric human activities between 165 B.C. and A.D. 1400 derived from subfossil Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L. found in a lake in Utsjoki, northernmost Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zetterberg, P.

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Samples from 1265 subfossil pines have been collected from small lakes and peat deposits in the forest-limit zone of northern Fennoscandia in order to study past variations of climate. Many of the subfossils have been dated by dendrochronology and the chronology constructed from the measured ring-width data extends as a continuous master curve from the present back until 165 B.C. and after a short gap until about 7000 years before the present time. This material has greatly increased the number of dated pine megafossils in northern Finland which had previously been restricted only to radiocarbon-dated samples. In addition to the year-by-year information provided by tree-ring width data, the temporal distribution of pine megafossils found in the vicinity of the forest-limit zone also provides information on past climatic changes. The 102 pine subfossils collected from Lake Ailigas, in Utsjoki, form part of the above material. They provide information about past variations in pine growth caused, to a large degree, by changing climate at this one site, but they also give glimpses of the local activities of Prehistoric Man. The data from 90 of these trees have been successfully dated using dendrochronological techniques and the results show that all of them grew during the time period beginning 3000 years before present, and that 79 pines lived during the time span 165 B.C. to A.D. 1952. In several lakes in the forest-limit zone, some subfossil trees are much older than those in Lake Ailigas. The relatively young ages of the subfossils at this site indicates that the lake has been in existence probably only during the past 3000 years, forming when climate turned more humid than in earlier times. The present continuous master curve is about 600 years longer than the earlier published pine chronology for northern Sweden, though this has recently been extended to A.D. 1. In the present study, the life spans of individual dated pines are considered in

  7. The Somerton Man: An Unsolved History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Balint

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The case of the unknown man who died mysteriously at Somerton Beach in South Australia in 1948 remains an open police investigation, although the trail today has grown fairly cold. Revisiting the case, and the responses the mystery of his person have elicited, enables a special historical insight into Australia’s postwar society, and the ways in which the past is continually reshaped by the subjectivities of the present. Further, an unsolved case such as this provides for a unique kind of historical project. The limitations of a history without a coherent centre are myriad, yet so are the possibilities.  In this article, I explore the possibilities of an ‘unsolved history’, a history of dead ends, and argue that it is the very unknowable-ness of the Somerton Man that allows for a perception of history as multi-dimensional and complex.

  8. The shipping man adventures in ship finance

    CERN Document Server

    McCleery, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    When restless New York City hedge fund manager Robert Fairchild watches the Baltic Dry Cargo Index plunge 97%, registering an all-time high and a 25-year low within the span of just six months, he decides to buy a ship. Immediately fantasizing about naming a vessel after his wife, carrying a string of worry beads and being able to introduce himself as a "shipowner" at his upcoming college reunion, Fairchild immediately embarks on an odyssey into the most exclusive, glamorous and high stakes business in the world. From pirates off the coast of Somalia and on Wall Street to Greek and Norwegian shipping magnates, the education of Robert Fairchild is an expensive one. In the end, he loses his hedge fund, but he gains a life - as a Shipping Man. Part fast paced financial thriller, part ship finance text book, The Shipping Man is 310 pages of required reading for anyone with an interest in capital formation for shipping.

  9. Esquistossomose mansônica cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andyr Nazareth Andrade

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se um caso de neuroesquistossomose (NE mansônica cerebral forma granulomatosa pseudotumoral de localização no córtex do lobo parietal esquerdo determinando, hemiparesia direita e síndrome de hipertensão intracraniana, diagnosticado por biópsia cirúrgica. Fatores vasculares e imunológicos são considerados na fisiopatogenia da NE. Enfatiza-se a necessidade de melhor se estudar, diagnosticar e divulgar as várias formas de envolvimento do SN na esquistossomose mansônica, que parece ser mais freqüente do que se julga atualmente. O comprometimento cerebral com repercussão clínica nesta doença é raro, sendo a forma pseudotumoral limitada a poucos casos descritos na literatura.

  10. los servicios en redes E-MAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo de la Cruz Gámez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethernet, al evolucionar a través del tiempo, ha presentado la necesidad de un mejor desempeño en el tráfico de datos; propuestas como la implementación del protocolo 802.1p ofrecen hasta cierta medida un control de la calidad de los servicios (QoS, pero al crecer la red Ethernet a ambientes metropolitanos (e-man, surgen nuevos retos. Este trabajo evalúa los parámetros de desempeño necesarios para caracterizar la red e-man, y analiza un nuevo procedimiento para abordar los problemas de la calidad de los servicios; este trabajo también analiza el comportamiento del desempeño de un modelo de simulación basado en el núcleo de backbone de una red metropolitana rpr.

  11. [Man's place and anthropology in bioethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar Romero, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    From the analysis of its epistemological status, the article focuses on the philosophical fundament of bioethics, stressing the need for an authentic anthropology as a reference or starting point. Being an applied ethics, the first fundament of bioethics is in ethics. It shows how only personalistic ethics, which takes as reference the nature or essence of man, can offer objective and universal criteria. Philosophical anthropology studies man as a whole, in an integral manner, from the perspective of its nature or fundamental aspects of his being. It analyzes the distinction and relationship between the philosophical anthropology and the positive anthropologies, as well as with the physical, human and social sciences. Finally, it reflects on the current anthropological crisis and its ethical consequences.

  12. Man-machine collaboration using facial expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Katahera, S.; Cai, D.

    2002-09-01

    For realizing the flexible man-machine collaboration, understanding of facial expressions and gestures is not negligible. In our method, we proposed a hierarchical recognition approach, for the understanding of human emotions. According to this method, the facial AFs (action features) were firstly extracted and recognized by using histograms of optical flow. Then, based on the facial AFs, facial expressions were classified into two calsses, one of which presents the positive emotions, and the other of which does the negative ones. Accordingly, the facial expressions belonged to the positive class, or the ones belonged to the negative class, were classified into more complex emotions, which were revealed by the corresponding facial expressions. Finally, the system architecture how to coordinate in recognizing facil action features and facial expressions for man-machine collaboration was proposed.

  13. IMPACT OF SCIENCE AND SCIENTIFIC WORLDVIEW ON MAN: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ike Odimegwu

    outlines, therefore, the impact of science on man has moved in three stages: Physical; Intellectual ...... exterior intelligence having man in contemplation. The New ..... unguarded “burglaries” are: Artificial Insemination (AIS or AIH), use of sperm ...

  14. An Ecological Man-Machine Interface for Temporal Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter; Koch, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper concerns design of man-machine systems, especially the interface between man and machine (MMI). Three different models of human information processing are used to extract theoretical guidelines for designing MMI's to support human mental activity.....

  15. First multiphoton tomography of brain in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Kantelhardt, Sven R.; Kalasauskas, Darius; Kim, Ella; Giese, Alf

    2016-03-01

    We report on the first two-photon in vivo brain tissue imaging study in man. High resolution in vivo histology by multiphoton tomography (MPT) including two-photon FLIM was performed in the operation theatre during neurosurgery to evaluate the feasibility to detect label-free tumor borders with subcellular resolution. This feasibility study demonstrates, that MPT has the potential to identify tumor borders on a cellular level in nearly real-time.

  16. Generalized Leishmanides in an Immunodeprived Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Flores, Angel; Boada, Aram; Fernández-Figueras, Maria T

    2017-02-01

    Leishmanides have been rarely reported in the literature. In this study, the authors present a case of a 50-year-old HIV-positive man who developed a generalized cutaneous eruption of papules and plaques in which no microorganism was demonstrated by culture, microscopical examination, immunohistochemistry, or polymerase chain reaction. The patient was eventually diagnosed with laryngeal leishmaniasis, and when treated, the cutaneous lesions greatly improved.

  17. Feedback control system for walking in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, J S; Phillips, C A; Heaton, H H

    1984-01-01

    A computer control stimulation system is described which has been successfully tested by allowing a paraplegic subject to stand and walk through closed loop control. This system is a Z80 microprocessor system with eight channels of analog to digital and 16 channels of digital to analog control. Programming is written in CPM and works quite successfully for maintaining lower body postural control in paraplegics. Further expansion of this system would enable a feedback control system for multidirectional walking in man.

  18. Evidence of Extrapancreatic Glucagon Secretion in Man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Asger; Bagger, Jonatan I; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon is believed to be a pancreas-specific hormone and hyperglucagonemia has been shown to contribute significantly to the hyperglycemic state of patients with diabetes. This hyperglucagonemia has been thought to arise from alpha cell insensitivity to suppressive effects of glucose and insuli...... hyperglucagonemia in these patients. These findings emphasize the existence of extrapancreatic glucagon (perhaps originating from the gut) in man and suggest that it may play a role in diabetes secondary to total pancreatectomy....

  19. Man-machine interface for the MFTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speckert, G.C.

    1979-11-09

    In any complex system, the interesting problems occur at the interface of dissimilar subsystems. Control of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) begins with the US Congress, which controls the dollars, which control the people, who control the nine top-level minicomputers, which control the 65 microprocessors, which control the hardware that controls the physics experiment. There are many interesting boundaries across which control must pass, and the one that this paper addresses is the man-machine one. For the MFTF, the man-machine interface consists of a system of seven control consoles, each allowing one operator to communicate with one minicomputer. These consoles are arranged in a hierarchical manner, and both hardware and software were designed in a top-down fashion. This paper describes the requirements and the design of the console system as a whole, as well as the design and operation of the hardware and software of each console, and examines the possible form of a future man-machine interface.

  20. Manned spaceflight log II—2006–2012

    CERN Document Server

    Shayler, David J

    2013-01-01

    April 12, 1961 "Attention! This is Radio Moscow speaking...The world's first satellite spaceship, Vostock, with a man aboard, was put into orbit round the Earth." Soviet Union cosmonaut Yuri A. Gagarin becomes the first person to fly in space, completing one orbit in 108 minutes. April 5, 2001 As NASA prepares to fly the final Shuttle missions to the International Space Station, Russia launches Soyuz TMA 21 (code-named 'Yuri Gagarin') with the 28th ISS Expedition crew aboard, celebrating 50 years of manned spaceflight. Meanwhile, in China, preparations continue for launching the nation's first Space Station (called Tiangong 1 - or Heavenly Palace 1) later in the year. The sixth decade of manned spaceflight orbital operations has truly began. At this point in the history of human space exploration, it is timely to review the first five decades of adventure and look forward to the next decade and what it might bring. Several notable anniversaries celebrated in 2011 make it the right time to reflect and pay homa...

  1. An Ecological Man-Machine Interface for Temporal Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter; Koch, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper concerns design of man-machine systems, especially the interface between man and machine (MMI). Three different models of human information processing are used to extract theoretical guidelines for designing MMI's to support human mental activity........This paper concerns design of man-machine systems, especially the interface between man and machine (MMI). Three different models of human information processing are used to extract theoretical guidelines for designing MMI's to support human mental activity.....

  2. 32 CFR 707.2 - Man overboard lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Man overboard lights. 707.2 Section 707.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY NAVIGATION SPECIAL RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.2 Man overboard lights. Naval vessels may display, as a means of indicating man overboard, two...

  3. Man-systems distributed system for Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on man-systems distributed system for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics addressed include: description of man-systems (definition, requirements, scope, subsystems, and topologies); implementation (approach, tools); man-systems interfaces (system to element and system to system); prime/supporting development relationship; selected accomplishments; and technical challenges.

  4. The Ideal Man and Woman According to University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Laverghetta, Antonio V.; Peterson, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study determined if the ideal man has changed over the years and who and what the ideal woman is. We asked students at Cameron University to rate the importance of character traits that define the ideal man and woman. Subjects also provided examples of famous people exemplifying the ideal, good, average, and inferior man and woman. We…

  5. The Ideal Man and Woman According to University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Laverghetta, Antonio V.; Peterson, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study determined if the ideal man has changed over the years and who and what the ideal woman is. We asked students at Cameron University to rate the importance of character traits that define the ideal man and woman. Subjects also provided examples of famous people exemplifying the ideal, good, average, and inferior man and woman. We…

  6. TaxMan: a taxonomic database manager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaxter Mark

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic analysis of large, multiple-gene datasets, assembled from public sequence databases, is rapidly becoming a popular way to approach difficult phylogenetic problems. Supermatrices (concatenated multiple sequence alignments of multiple genes can yield more phylogenetic signal than individual genes. However, manually assembling such datasets for a large taxonomic group is time-consuming and error-prone. Additionally, sequence curation, alignment and assessment of the results of phylogenetic analysis are made particularly difficult by the potential for a given gene in a given species to be unrepresented, or to be represented by multiple or partial sequences. We have developed a software package, TaxMan, that largely automates the processes of sequence acquisition, consensus building, alignment and taxon selection to facilitate this type of phylogenetic study. Results TaxMan uses freely available tools to allow rapid assembly, storage and analysis of large, aligned DNA and protein sequence datasets for user-defined sets of species and genes. The user provides GenBank format files and a list of gene names and synonyms for the loci to analyse. Sequences are extracted from the GenBank files on the basis of annotation and sequence similarity. Consensus sequences are built automatically. Alignment is carried out (where possible, at the protein level and aligned sequences are stored in a database. TaxMan can automatically determine the best subset of taxa to examine phylogeny at a given taxonomic level. By using the stored aligned sequences, large concatenated multiple sequence alignments can be generated rapidly for a subset and output in analysis-ready file formats. Trees resulting from phylogenetic analysis can be stored and compared with a reference taxonomy. Conclusion TaxMan allows rapid automated assembly of a multigene datasets of aligned sequences for large taxonomic groups. By extracting sequences on the basis of

  7. The prehistoric mines of Gavà: an example of a comprehensive approach to the study and public presentation of an archaeological site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blasco, Mònica

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The Prehistoric Mines of Gavà used to provide variscite about 6000 years ago. This mineral was used for decorative purposes! For the last ten years, the Gavà Museum has been implementing a comprehensive intervention (research, conservation and information dissemination campaign for the mines. This programme is financed by many different institutions, such as the city hall, the Generalitat de Cataluña (the Catalan Government, the Diputación de Barcelona (the city council and lNEM (employment office. The museum leads and coordinates an interdisciplinary team and has established cooperation agreements with some universities. The Prehistoric Mines can be visited since 1993, and meet the visitors´ safety, mobility and understanding requirements, without affecting their conservation and scientific rigor Visits are guided and their goal is to make people experience emotions. Although they have got a varied target group, they are especially aimed at students. Thus, there is a number of activities planned only for them. The visits to the Prehistoric Mines have been considered an accepted educational resource in Barcelona and its metropolitan area. The main future project of the museum is the Archaeological Park of the Prehistoric Mines. It will be a centre aimed at interpreting the Neolithic period and the origin of the mining industry. Its objectives are to maintain intervention and to attract the cultural tourism in Barcelona.

    Las Minas Prehistóricas de Gavá proporcionaron variscita, un material ornamental, hace 6000 años. Desde hace diez años el Museo de Gavá impulsa una intervención integral (investigación, conservación y difusión, financiada por diversas instituciones (Ayuntamiento, Generalitat de Cataluña, Diputación de Barcelona e INEM, lidera y coordina un equipo interdisciplinar y mantiene convenios de colaboración con diferentes universidades. Las minas están abiertas al público desde 1993 y

  8. Reading of Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR Images of Prehistoric Flint Mine; Case Study from Krzemionki Opatowskie Archaeological Site In Central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welc Fabian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical surveys conducted in order to map tunnels and vertical shafts at the Neolithic chert mining field Krzemionki used a ground-penetrating radar(GPR to test hypotheses regarding orientation, depth and subsurface complexity of these voids.Using two-dimensional reflection profiles the vertical shafts, now mostly filled with lithic debris, were easily visible. Amplitude mapping visualized debris at shaft margins as well as a collapsed material inside the voids. Some shallower horizontal tunnels were also visible as sub-horizontal planar reflections generated from both ceiling and floors of these void spaces. Extension of these interpretations to un-mapped areas of the ancient mining district and complexity of these prehistoric mining features could be examined to determine excavation intensity and exploitation techniques used during the Neolithic.

  9. 青海民和喇家史前遗址的发掘%Excavation of the Prehistoric Lajia Site in Minhe,Qinghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    中国社会科学院考古研究所; 青海省文物考古研究所

    2002-01-01

    The excavation of the Lajia site in Minhe, Qinghai, preliminarily revealed a lot of previously-unknown phenomena. The results include the discovery of wide ditches, a small-sized square, and human sacrifices and victims, the ascertainment of the existence of a settlement consisting of cave dwellings, and the revelation of vestiges of the disasters caused by an earthquake and flood happening 4,000 years ago. These aspects combine to bring to light links of prehistoric disasters with a settlement of that time, which constitutes an unprecedented achievement. Providing new material for researching into the origin of ancient civilization, the work marks a great breakthrough in the study of the Qijia culture in the upper Yellow River valley, and calls for furthering multidisciplinary study in archaeology.

  10. Approaches and new data on the interpretation of prehistoric landscapes from the River Tagus sector of Extremadura (Spain: the Alconétar area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique CERRILLO CUENCA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Neolithic and Chalcolithic settlement of the inner area of Tagus at Extremadura region (Spain was often defined by the megalithic tombs spread along the region. In the present time some statements about the territorial behaviour of prehistoric societies are being revised, and consequently the landscape dimension of megalithic sites. In this context we present the preliminary results of a research project focused on the surface survey of the margins of Tagus River, where we have been working in two different, but near, sectors. In this paper we present an assessment of the first results of the surveys, that have varied the picture of an area just defined by the presence of megalithic tombs.

  11. Dating of prehistoric caves sediments and flints using {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al in quartz from Tabun Cave (Israel): Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boaretto, E. E-mail: elisa@wis.weizmann.ac.il; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hui, S.K.; Kaufman, A.; Paul, M.; Weiner, S

    2000-10-01

    There is an important need to develop additional dating methods beyond the {sup 14}C limit and independent of thermoluminescence (TL) and electron spin resonance (ESR). We propose to apply the method of burial dating to prehistoric sites using the decay of in situ produced radioisotopes {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al. The Tabun Cave, Mt. Carmel (Israel) has a sedimentary sequence which represents the type section for about the last 800,000 years in the Levant. The sediments in the cave are mainly of aeolian origin and are rich in quartz. Flint tools are also found in the sediments. Sediment samples and flint tools were selected from the same layer. Physical and chemical procedures to extract {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al atoms from the quartz fraction of the sediments and from the flint samples were developed, while measuring the natural Al levels as a monitor of the atmospheric component of the cosmogenic nuclides. AMS measurements were performed at the 14UD Pelletron Koffler Accelerator Laboratory, Weizmann Institute, and sensitivities of the order of 1x10{sup -14}, in isotopic abundances for both {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al respectively (corresponding to {approx}5 x 10{sup 5} atoms) were obtained. First, measurements of a number of Tabun Cave sediment samples and flints show that {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al analyses have the potential for dating prehistoric cave sediments, provided problems relating to the presence of relatively large amounts of stable Al can be solved, as well as obtaining a better understanding of the burial history of the flints prior to being brought into the cave.

  12. Dating of prehistoric caves sediments and flints using 10Be and 26Al in quartz from Tabun Cave (Israel): Progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaretto, E.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hui, S. K.; Kaufman, A.; Paul, M.; Weiner, S.

    2000-10-01

    There is an important need to develop additional dating methods beyond the 14C limit and independent of thermoluminescence (TL) and electron spin resonance (ESR). We propose to apply the method of burial dating to prehistoric sites using the decay of in situ produced radioisotopes 10Be and 26Al. The Tabun Cave, Mt. Carmel (Israel) has a sedimentary sequence which represents the type section for about the last 800,000 years in the Levant. The sediments in the cave are mainly of aeolian origin and are rich in quartz. Flint tools are also found in the sediments. Sediment samples and flint tools were selected from the same layer. Physical and chemical procedures to extract 10Be and 26Al atoms from the quartz fraction of the sediments and from the flint samples were developed, while measuring the natural Al levels as a monitor of the atmospheric component of the cosmogenic nuclides. AMS measurements were performed at the 14UD Pelletron Koffler Accelerator Laboratory, Weizmann Institute, and sensitivities of the order of 1×10 -14, in isotopic abundances for both 10Be and 26Al respectively (corresponding to ˜5 × 10 5 atoms) were obtained. First, measurements of a number of Tabun Cave sediment samples and flints show that 10Be and 26Al analyses have the potential for dating prehistoric cave sediments, provided problems relating to the presence of relatively large amounts of stable Al can be solved, as well as obtaining a better understanding of the burial history of the flints prior to being brought into the cave.

  13. Spatial and temporal variations in prehistoric human settlement and their influencing factors on the south bank of the Xar Moron River, Northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xin; Yi, Shuangwen; Sun, Yonggang; Wu, Shuangye; Lee, Harry F.; Wang, Lin; Lu, Huayu

    2017-03-01

    The West Liao River Basin is the hub of ancient civilizations as well as the birthplace of rain-fed agriculture in Northern China. In the present study, based on 276 archaeological sites on the south bank of the Xar Moron River, Northeastern China, we trace the changes in prehistoric cultures as well as the shifts in the spatial and temporal patterns of human settlement in the West Liao River Basin. Location information for those sites was obtained from fieldwork. Factors such as climate change, landform evolution of the Horqin Dunefield, and subsistence strategies practiced at the sites were extracted via the meta-analysis of published literature. Our results show that the Holocene Optimum promoted the emergence of Neolithic Culture on the south bank of the Xar Moron River. Monsoon failure might have caused the periodic collapse or transformation of prehistoric cultures at (6.5, 4.7, 3.9, and 3.0) kyr B.P., leaving spaces for new cultural types to develop after these gaps. The rise and fall of different cultures was also determined by subsistence strategies. The Xiaoheyan Culture, with mixed modes of subsistence, weakened after 4.7 kyr B.P., whereas the Upper Xiajiadian Culture, supported by sheep breeding, expanded after 3.0 kyr B.P. Global positioning system data obtained from the archaeological sites reveal that cultures with different subsistence strategies occupied distinct geographic regions. Humans who subsisted on hunting and gathering resided at higher altitudes during the Paleolithic Age (1074 m a.s.l.). Mixed subsistence strategies led humans to settle down at 600-1000 m a.s.l. in the Neolithic Age. Agricultural activities caused humans to migrate to 400-800 m a.s.l. in the early Bronze Age, whereas livestock production shifted human activities to 800-1200 m a.s.l. in the late Bronze Age.

  14. Spatial and temporal variations in prehistoric human settlement and their influencing factors on the south bank of the Xar Moron River, Northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xin; Yi, Shuangwen; Sun, Yonggang; Wu, Shuangye; Lee, Harry F.; Wang, Lin; Lu, Huayu

    2016-05-01

    The West Liao River Basin is the hub of ancient civilizations as well as the birthplace of rain-fed agriculture in Northern China. In the present study, based on 276 archaeological sites on the south bank of the Xar Moron River, Northeastern China, we trace the changes in prehistoric cultures as well as the shifts in the spatial and temporal patterns of human settlement in the West Liao River Basin. Location information for those sites was obtained from fieldwork. Factors such as climate change, landform evolution of the Horqin Dunefield, and subsistence strategies practiced at the sites were extracted via the meta-analysis of published literature. Our results show that the Holocene Optimum promoted the emergence of Neolithic Culture on the south bank of the Xar Moron River. Monsoon failure might have caused the periodic collapse or transformation of prehistoric cultures at (6.5, 4.7, 3.9, and 3.0) kyr B.P., leaving spaces for new cultural types to develop after these gaps. The rise and fall of different cultures was also determined by subsistence strategies. The Xiaoheyan Culture, with mixed modes of subsistence, weakened after 4.7 kyr B.P., whereas the Upper Xiajiadian Culture, supported by sheep breeding, expanded after 3.0 kyr B.P. Global positioning system data obtained from the archaeological sites reveal that cultures with different subsistence strategies occupied distinct geographic regions. Humans who subsisted on hunting and gathering resided at higher altitudes during the Paleolithic Age (1074 m a.s.l.). Mixed subsistence strategies led humans to settle down at 600-1000 m a.s.l. in the Neolithic Age. Agricultural activities caused humans to migrate to 400-800 m a.s.l. in the early Bronze Age, whereas livestock production shifted human activities to 800-1200 m a.s.l. in the late Bronze Age.

  15. Regional, holocene records of the human dimension of global change: sea-level and land-use change in prehistoric Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluyter, Andrew

    1997-02-01

    Regional, Holocene records hold particular relevance for understanding the reciprocal nature of global environmental change and one of its major human dimensions: "sustainable agriculture", i.e., food production strategies which entail fewer causes of and are less susceptible to environmental change. In an epoch of accelerating anthropogenic transformation, those records reveal the protracted regional causes and consequences of change (often agricultural) in the global system as well as informing models of prehistoric, intensive agriculture which, because of long tenures and high productivities, suggest strategies for sustainable agricultural in the present. This study employs physiographic analysis and the palynological, geochemical record from cores of basin fill to understand the reciprocal relation between environmental and land-use change in the Gulf of Mexico tropical lowland, focusing on a coastal basin sensitive to sea-level change and containing vestiges of prehistoric settlement and wetland agriculture. Fossil pollen reveals that the debut of maize cultivation in the Laguna Catarina watershed dates to ca. 4100 BC, predating the earliest evidence for that cultivar anywhere else in the lowlands of Middle America. Such an early date for a cultivar so central to Neotropical agroecology and environmental change, suggests the urgency of further research in the study region. Moreover, the longest period of continuous agriculture in the basin lasted nearly three millennia (ca. 2400 BC-AD 550) despite eustatic sea-level rise. Geochemical fluxes reveal the reciprocity between land-use and environmental change: slope destabilization, basin aggradation, and eutrophication. The consequent theoretical implications pertain to both applied and basic research. Redeploying ancient agroecologies in dynamic environments necessitates reconstructing the changing operational contexts of putative high productivity and sustainability. Adjusting land use in the face of global

  16. Small scattered fragments do not a dwarf make: biological and archaeological data indicate that prehistoric inhabitants of Palau were normal sized.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Fitzpatrick

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Current archaeological evidence from Palau in western Micronesia indicates that the archipelago was settled around 3000-3300 BP by normal sized populations; contrary to recent claims, they did not succumb to insular dwarfism. BACKGROUND: Previous and ongoing archaeological research of both human burial and occupation sites throughout the Palauan archipelago during the last 50 years has produced a robust data set to test hypotheses regarding initial colonization and subsequent adaptations over the past three millennia. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Close examination of human burials at the early (ca. 3000 BP and stratified site of Chelechol ra Orrak indicates that these were normal sized individuals. This is contrary to the recent claim of contemporaneous "small-bodied" individuals found at two cave sites by Berger et al. (2008. As we argue, their analyses are flawed on a number of different analytical levels. First, their sample size is too small and fragmentary to adequately address the variation inherent in modern humans within and outside of Palau. Second, the size and stature of all other prehistoric (both older and contemporaneous skeletal assemblages found in Palau fall within the normal parameters of modern human variation in the region, indicating this was not a case of insular dwarfism or a separate migratory group. Third, measurements taken on several skeletal elements by Berger et al. may appear to be from smaller-bodied individuals, but the sizes of these people compares well with samples from Chelechol ra Orrak. Last, archaeological, linguistic, and historical evidence demonstrates a great deal of cultural continuity in Palau through time as expected if the same population was inhabiting the archipelago. CONCLUSIONS: Prehistoric Palauan populations were normal sized and exhibit traits that fall within the normal variation for Homo sapiens-they do not support the claims by Berger et al. (2008 that there were smaller

  17. Hvor må man gå?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baaner, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    færdsel på anden mands grund kan også have hjemmel i en servitut. Reglerne giver anledning til en masse stridigheder og er vanskelige at følge for de fleste af os. I Sverige og Norge har man allemandsret, men ikke i Danmark. Her skal man som mountainbiker, hundelufter, nøgenbader eller kajakroer følge...... nogle ret detaljerede regler, når man færdes på veje og afveje i Guds natur. For at vurdere, om man må færdes på et givent areal, skal man bruge en række informationer. Nogle af dem fi ndes ude i landskabet, mens andre fi ndes ved computeren. Kan man lave en adgangs-app, så man kan se, hvor man må...... færdes? Eller bare en app, som giver en mulighed for at vurderee, hvor man må færdes? Hvilke informationer kan man se on location og hvilke online? Kan der skabes online adgang til den nødvendige information, eller må man skilte sig ud af problemerne? Reglerne er jo – ligesom hastighedsbegrænsninger på...

  18. The new V8 diesel engine from MAN; Der neue V8-Dieselmotor von MAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehler, Georg; Vogel, Werner; Moeller, Inge; Tuerk, Jens [MAN Nutzfahrzeuge Motorenwerk Nuernberg AG, Nuernberg (Germany); Raup, Markus [MAN Nutzfahrzeuge, Steyr (Austria)

    2008-09-15

    MAN has developed a new V8 engine for the 16-l class with an output of 500 kW and 3,000 Nm of torque for its TGX and TGS ranges of heavy trucks. To reduce NO{sub x}, MAN has applied an SCR system with AdBlue injection. This article describes the engine concept, the design of the main components, the development of vehicle-specific add-on parts and the work carried out to optimise the combustion system and exhaust aftertreatment. (orig.)

  19. Design and Construction of Manned Lunar Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijie

    2016-07-01

    Building manned lunar base is one of the core aims of human lunar exploration project, which is also an important way to carry out the exploitation and utilization of lunar in situ resources. The most important part of manned lunar base is the design and construction of living habitation and many factors should be considered including science objective and site selection. Through investigating and research, the scientific goals of manned lunar base should be status and characteristics ascertainment of lunar available in situ resources, then developing necessary scientific experiments and utilization of lunar in situ resources by using special environment conditions of lunar surface. The site selection strategy of manned lunar base should rely on scientific goals according to special lunar surface environment and engineering capacity constraints, meanwhile, consulting the landing sites of foreign unmanned and manned lunar exploration, and choosing different typical regions of lunar surface and analyzing the landform and physiognomy, reachability, thermal environment, sunlight condition, micro meteoroids protection and utilization of in situ resources, after these steps, a logical lunar living habitation site should be confirmed. This paper brings out and compares three kinds of configurations with fabricating processes of manned lunar base, including rigid module, flexible and construction module manned lunar base. 1.The rigid habitation module is usually made by metal materials. The design and fabrication may consult the experience of space station, hence with mature technique. Because this configuration cannot be folded or deployed, which not only afford limit working and living room for astronauts, but also needs repetitious cargo transit between earth and moon for lunar base extending. 2. The flexible module habitation can be folded in fairing while launching. When deploying on moon, the configuration can be inflatable or mechanically-deployed, which means under

  20. Dihydralazine induces marked cerebral vasodilation in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H

    1987-01-01

    Dihydralazine is widely used for acute control of hypertension. In experimental studies it seems to dilate cerebral resistance vessels and increase intracranial pressure. However, the effect on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in man has been little studied. Measurements of CBF were performed with the i.......v. xenon-133 technique in seven young, normotensive volunteers before and 15, 60 and 180 min after 6.25 mg i.v. dihydralazine, corresponding approximately to 0.1 mg kg-1 body weight. For comparison the CBF reactivity to inhalation of 5% CO2 in air was investigated. Dihydralazine increased CBF throughout...

  1. Optical medical imaging: from glass to man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Mark

    2016-11-01

    A formidable challenge in modern respiratory healthcare is the accurate and timely diagnosis of lung infection and inflammation. The EPSRC Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration (IRC) `Proteus' seeks to address this challenge by developing an optical fibre based healthcare technology platform that combines physiological sensing with multiplexed optical molecular imaging. This technology will enable in situ measurements deep in the human lung allowing the assessment of tissue function and characterization of the unique signatures of pulmonary disease and is illustrated here with our in-man application of Optical Imaging SmartProbes and our first device Versicolour.

  2. Electrophysiologic properties of ethacrynic acid in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, L; Gopalaswamy, C; Chandy, F; Abdou, O

    1983-11-01

    Ethacrynic acid is a potent oral diuretic and saluretic agent. It has been used extensively in the treatment of heart failure and its effects on cardiovascular dynamics are well established. The clinical relief of the symptoms of pulmonary congestion frequently precedes any demonstrable diuretic effect suggesting that extra renal factors may also be involved. In spite of ethacrynic acid's wide use in the treatment of heart failure and hypertension, there is no information on the electrophysiologic properties of the drug in man. The present study involving 10 human subjects was undertaken to determine what effect intravenously administered ethacrynic acid has on the human conduction system.

  3. The inescapable tale of tomahawk man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice Ribeiro Gabriel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the contemporary literary criticism The Man that was Used Up (1982, [1839] represents one of the most significant satires of Edgar Allan Poe. This burlesque suggests many references to the effects of magazine context upon literature in the first half of the nineteenth century. The aim of this study is to briefly describe the influence of Poe’s magazinist career in the field of fiction, precisely in this short story, based on the studies of J. Gerald Kennedy, Jonathan Auerbach, Leonard Cassuto and Stacey Margolis among others.

  4. Pantex Falling Man - Independent Review Panel Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brannon, Nathan Gregory; L. Bertolini, N. Brannon, J. Olsen, B. Price, M. Steinzig, R. Wardle, & M. Winfield

    2014-11-01

    Consolidated Nuclear Security (CNS) Pantex took the initiative to organize a Review Panel of subject matter experts to independently assess the adequacy of the Pantex Tripping Man Analysis methodology. The purpose of this report is to capture the details of the assessment including the scope, approach, results, and detailed Appendices. Along with the assessment of the analysis methodology, the panel evaluated the adequacy with which the methodology was applied as well as congruence with Department of Energy (DOE) standards 3009 and 3016. The approach included the review of relevant documentation, interactive discussion with Pantex staff, and the iterative process of evaluating critical lines of inquiry.

  5. Rules and Regulations for Manning of Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-07-01

    1.25 1 .8 111IL1 -_____ 16 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TESI CHART CC Q~2 Rules and Regulations For/ j Manning oF Vesselsv -1Ju177 iA55G-268 DEPARTMENT OF... quail - (a) The term "licensed officer" mean fled member of the engine department any person holding a license issued by the Issued by the Coast Guard...amended; 46 U.S.C. 243- to act as pilot in charge of a watch 247), the qualifications of staff officers on any steam vessel within the quail - engaged

  6. [Anaesthetic management of Stiff Man syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, T; Hernando, D; Kinast, N; Churruca, I; Sabate, S

    2015-04-01

    Stiff Man syndrome or stiff-person syndrome is a rare autoimmune disorder. It is characterized by increased axial muscular tone and limb musculature, and painful spasms triggered by stimulus. The case is presented of a 44-year-old man with stiff-person syndrome undergoing an injection of botulinum toxin in the urethral sphincter under sedation. Before induction, all the surgical team were ready in order to minimise the anaesthetic time. The patient was monitored by continuous ECG, SpO2 and non-invasive blood pressure. He was induced with fractional dose of propofol 150 mg, fentanyl 50 μg and midazolam 1mg. Despite careful titration, the patient had an O2 saturation level of 90%,which was resolved by manual ventilation. There was no muscle rigidity or spasm during the operation. Post-operative recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged 2 days later. A review of other cases is presented. The anaesthetic concern in patients with stiff-person syndrome is the interaction between the anaesthetic agents, the preoperative medication, and the GABA system. For a safe anaesthetic management, total intravenous anaesthesia is recommended instead of inhalation anaesthetics, as well as the close monitoring of the respiratory function and the application of the electrical nerve stimulator when neuromuscular blockers are used.

  7. Protection of man: the exposed individual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnstedt, A.; Knebel, J.U. [Programme Nuclear Safety Research, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Herrmann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Breustedt, B. [Institute for Radiation Research, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Herrmann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Present methods for quantifying radiation exposure rely on a standardized reference man (75 kg) with defined average anatomical and physiological data. But individual person actually exposed differs from this idealized standard man. Therefore the focus of investigations at the Institute for Radiation Research (Institut fuer Strahlenforschung, ISF) which was founded at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, KIT) in 2009 is based on the vision to place the exposed individual with its anatomical and physiological particularities, under consideration of age, gender, body height, body shape and environment, in the centre of an individual-related quantification of the external and internal radiation exposure. Research work at the ISF is aiming at quantifying radiation exposure by improved determination of doses essentially caused by external radiation fields and the intake of radionuclides into the body. The three main topics of the institute are - external dosimetry (e.g. using a (voxel) model of the hand to simulate skin dose distribution); - internal dosimetry (e.g. body size related efficiency calibration of in-vivo counting equipment); - numerical methods/modeling (e.g. development of a mathematical/voxel-hybrid model of the human body). (authors)

  8. Abstraction of man-made shapes

    KAUST Repository

    Mehra, Ravish

    2009-01-01

    Man-made objects are ubiquitous in the real world and in virtual environments. While such objects can be very detailed, capturing every small feature, they are often identified and characterized by a small set of defining curves. Compact, abstracted shape descriptions based on such curves are often visually more appealing than the original models, which can appear to be visually cluttered. We introduce a novel algorithm for abstracting three-dimensional geometric models using characteristic curves or contours as building blocks for the abstraction. Our method robustly handles models with poor connectivity, including the extreme cases of polygon soups, common in models of man-made objects taken from online repositories. In our algorithm, we use a two-step procedure that first approximates the input model using a manifold, closed envelope surface and then extracts from it a hierarchical abstraction curve network along with suitable normal information. The constructed curve networks form a compact, yet powerful, representation for the input shapes, retaining their key shape characteristics while discarding minor details and irregularities. © 2009 ACM.

  9. So Man-yee’s Design Work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    SO Man-yee started to learn Western painting in1971. In 1973 she graduated from the Linhai ArtSchool in Hong Kong after spending three yearsstudying commercial design. After leaving the schoolshe started work with advertisement agencies. Thatexperience prepared her for further development inthe design field. So founded her own design company in 1976 withher friend Han Binhua. Apart from this project, So isalso involved in art education. So is a member of theboard of the Hong Kong Zhengxing Design School,executive member of the Association of Designers inHong Kong, member of the board of Hong KongArtists, chief director of the board of Hong Kong’sKinggraphic Co. Ltd., and also chairperson of theHong Kong Women Painters Association. A famous watercolorist in Hong Kong, So has heldseveral eye-catching exhibitions there. Her exhibitionsinclude the one-woman show entitled "So Man-yee’sRhythm of Watercolors" held in 1987 at the HongKong Art Center. In 1996 a grand exhibition of HongKong artists hosted by the

  10. Radiation Shielding for Manned Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The arrival of the Expedition 1 Crew at the International Space Station represents the beginning of the continuous presence of man in space. Already we are deploying astronauts and cosmonauts for missions of approx. 6 months onboard the ISS. In the future we can anticipate that more people will be in space and they will be there for longer periods. Even with 6-months deployments to the ISS, the radiation exposure that crew members receive is approaching the exposure limits imposed by the governments of the space- faring nations. In the future we can expect radiation protection to be a dominant consideration for long manned missions. Recognizing this, NASA has expanded their research program on radiation health. This program has three components, bioastronautics, fundamental biology and radiation shielding materials. Bioastronautics is concerned with the investigating the effects of radiation on humans. Fundamental biology investigates the basic mechanisms of radiation damage to tissue. Radiation shielding materials research focuses on developing accurate computational tools to predict the radiation shielding effectiveness of materials. It also investigates new materials that can be used for spacecraft. The radiation shielding materials program will be described and examples of results from the ongoing research will be shown.

  11. Postural Control in Man: The Phylogenetic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Gramsbergen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Erect posture in man is a recent affordance from an evolutionary perspective. About eight million years ago, the stock from which modern humans derived split off from the ape family, and from around sixty-thousand years ago, modern man developed. Upright gait and manipulations while standing pose intricate cybernetic problems for postural control. The trunk, having an older evolutionary history than the extremities, is innervated by medially descending motor systems and extremity muscles by the more recent, laterally descending systems. Movements obviously require concerted actions from both systems. Research in rats has demonstrated the interdependencies between postural control and the development of fluent walking. Only 15 days after birth, adult-like fluent locomotion emerges and is critically dependent upon postural development. Vesttibular deprivation induces a retardation in postural development and, consequently, a retarded development of adult-like locomotion. The cerebellum obviously has an important role in mutual adjustments in postural control and extremity movements, or, in coupling the phyiogenetic older and newer structures. In the human, the cerebellum develops partly after birth and therefore is vulnerable to adverse perinatal influences. Such vulnerability seems to justify focusing our scientific research efforts onto the development of this structure.

  12. "A Man's Gotta Do What a Man's Gotta Do!" Masculinity and Manhood in Social Studies Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, William L.

    2004-01-01

    Men in the United States are products of society's assumptions about what it means to "be a man." Throughout American history, these assumptions have supported aggression, conflict, and war. Seeing American troops in Iraq conjures comparisons not only to past military ventures but also to the changing face of the masculine warrior. One might see…

  13. Foundry energy conservation workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses methods for promoting energy conservation in foundries. Use of electric power, natural gas, and coke are evaluated. Waste heat recovery systems are considered. Energy consumption in the specific processes of electric melting, natural gas melting, heat treatments, ladle melting, and coke fuel melting is described. An example energy analysis is included. (GHH)

  14. Barron's SAT math workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Leff MS, Lawrence S

    2016-01-01

    This completely revised edition reflects all of the new questions and question types that will appear on the new SAT, scheduled to be administered in Spring 2016. Includes hundreds of revised math questions and answer explanations, math strategies, test-taking tips, and much more.

  15. Geothermal Financing Workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battocletti, E.C.

    1998-02-01

    This report was prepared to help small firm search for financing for geothermal energy projects. There are various financial and economics formulas. Costs of some small overseas geothermal power projects are shown. There is much discussion of possible sources of financing, especially for overseas projects. (DJE-2005)

  16. Groundwater and Distribution Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, John E.

    Presented is a student manual designed for the Wisconsin Vocational, Technical and Adult Education Groundwater and Distribution Training Course. This program introduces waterworks operators-in-training to basic skills and knowledge required for the operation of a groundwater distribution waterworks facility. Arranged according to the general order…

  17. LAS HERRAMIENTAS PREHISTÓRICAS DE LAS MINAS DE VARISCITA DE PALAZUELO DE LAS CUEVAS (ZAMORA) Y PICO CENTENO (HUELVA). ANÁLISIS COMPARATIVO/Prehistoric mining tools of the variscite mines of Palazuelo de las Cuevas (Zamora) and Pico Centeno (Huelva). A comparative analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodrigo Villalobos García; Carlos P Odriozola Lloret

    2016-01-01

    ... (Aliste disctrict, Zamora) and Pico Centeno (Encinasola, Huelva). Knapped stone mining tools are not absent of the Iberian prehistoric mines, but they appear in low frequency and, probably for that reason, had not attracted scholars' attention...

  18. The Implementation of Madrasah-Based Management (MBM) at Man 1 and Man 2 Serang City, Banten, Indonesia--A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhajir

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to reveal how the real condition of management of Madrasah Aliyah Negeri (MAN) or Islamic Senior High School in Serang is, how the understanding of Madrasah-Based Management (MBM) for the people of MAN 2 and MAN 1 Serang is, and how the implementation of MBM in MAN 2 and MAN 1 Serang. This study has a substantial meaning, both…

  19. China's 'Iron Man'-an Undying Legend

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ An oil driller named Wang Jinxi has been reputed as China's "Iron Man" for more than four decades across the country.In September 2009,nearly 39 years after his death,Wang-who drilled the first well of China's largest oilfield in Daqing-was voted by the public one of the 100 most notable figures in New China's history.In January,Wang was selected as one of the country's 10 most influential figures in the past 100 years by China Comment,one of the country's leading magazines.Wang,as the first national role-model in China's industrial sector,inspired numerous people in China's vast work force.

  20. Dipolar interaction and the Manning formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Roberto Mercado-Escalante,

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work we want to show that the mathematical model of quantum mechanics, led to its classical approach, is able to reproduce as close macroscopic experimental results captured by the Manning formula, sufficiently verified through their diverse applications in hydraulics. Molecular interaction between the fluid and the wall of the vessel is studied decomposing the Hamiltonian in two parts: free, and interacting. Scaling process is considered from molecular to hydraulic. Participation of the symmetries of Saint-Venant equation in the hydraulic gradient is taken into account. Correlations between different variables are set. The magnitude of scale change is estimated. We conclude that the Compton wavelength induces to the Boussinesq viscosity concept and the characteristic length of the viscous sublayer.