WorldWideScience

Sample records for preheat combustion air

  1. Prediction of flame formation in highly preheated air combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jang Sik; Choi, Gyung Min; Kim, Duck Jool; Katsuki, Masashi

    2008-01-01

    Fundamental information about the ignition position and shape of a flame in highly preheated air combustion was obtained, and the suitability of the suggested reduced kinetic mechanism that reflects the characteristics of the highly preheated air combustion was demonstrated. Flame lift height and flame length with variations of premixed air temperature and oxygen concentration were measured by CH chemiluminescence intensity, and were computed with a reduced kinetic mechanism. Flame attached near a fuel nozzle started to lift when preheated air temperature became close to auto-ignition temperature and/or oxygen concentration reduced. The flame lift height increased but the flame length decreased with decreasing preheated air temperature and flame length reversed after a minimum value. Calculated results showed good agreement with those of experiment within tolerable error. Flame shape shifted from diffusion flame shape to partial premixed flame shape with increasing lift height and this tendency was also observed in the computation results

  2. Prediction of flame formation in highly preheated air combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jang Sik; Choi, Gyung Min; Kim, Duck Jool [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Katsuki, Masashi [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    Fundamental information about the ignition position and shape of a flame in highly preheated air combustion was obtained, and the suitability of the suggested reduced kinetic mechanism that reflects the characteristics of the highly preheated air combustion was demonstrated. Flame lift height and flame length with variations of premixed air temperature and oxygen concentration were measured by CH chemiluminescence intensity, and were computed with a reduced kinetic mechanism. Flame attached near a fuel nozzle started to lift when preheated air temperature became close to auto-ignition temperature and/or oxygen concentration reduced. The flame lift height increased but the flame length decreased with decreasing preheated air temperature and flame length reversed after a minimum value. Calculated results showed good agreement with those of experiment within tolerable error. Flame shape shifted from diffusion flame shape to partial premixed flame shape with increasing lift height and this tendency was also observed in the computation results

  3. Regenerative heat exchanger for cowper combustion air preheating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molenaar, R.; Otterbach, G.

    1986-01-13

    The waste gas leaving cowper units at a temperature of 200/sup 0/C to 300/sup 0/C was previously discharged unused into the atmosphere. By providing a suitable heat exchanger, the heat content of the waste gas can be used to preheat the combustion agents of cowpers to an extent allowing both to increase the efficiency of cowpers and to decrease the amount of rich gas required. The operating results confirm to a large extent the theoretical assumptions and calculations. One may therefore expect the entire investment to have been fully redeemed in a little more than two years. (orig.).

  4. Effects of preheated combustion air on laminar coflow diffusion flames under normal and microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi Yeganeh, Mohammad

    Global energy consumption has been increasing around the world, owing to the rapid growth of industrialization and improvements in the standard of living. As a result, more carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide are being released into the environment. Therefore, techniques for achieving combustion at reduced carbon dioxide and nitric oxide emission levels have drawn increased attention. Combustion with a highly preheated air and low-oxygen concentration has been shown to provide significant energy savings, reduce pollution and equipment size, and uniform thermal characteristics within the combustion chamber. However, the fundamental understanding of this technique is limited. The motivation of the present study is to identify the effects of preheated combustion air on laminar coflow diffusion flames. Combustion characteristics of laminar coflow diffusion flames are evaluated for the effects of preheated combustion air temperature under normal and low-gravity conditions. Experimental measurements are conducted using direct flame photography, particle image velocimetry (PIV) and optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics. Laminar coflow diffusion flames are examined under four experimental conditions: normal-temperature/normal-gravity (case I), preheated-temperature/normal gravity (case II), normal-temperature/low-gravity (case III), and preheated-temperature/low-gravity (case IV). Comparisons between these four cases yield significant insights. In our studies, increasing the combustion air temperature by 400 K (from 300 K to 700 K), causes a 37.1% reduction in the flame length and about a 25% increase in peak flame temperature. The results also show that a 400 K increase in the preheated air temperature increases CH concentration of the flame by about 83.3% (CH is a marker for the rate of chemical reaction), and also increases the C2 concentration by about 60% (C2 is a marker for the soot precursor). It can therefore be concluded that preheating the combustion air

  5. Effect of air preheat temperature on the MILD combustion of syngas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Mingming; Zhang, Zhedian; Shao, Weiwei; Xiong, Yan; Liu, Yan; Lei, Fulin; Xiao, Yunhan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • MILD combustion is achieved with reaction zone covering the entire combustion chamber. • Critical equivalence ratio for the occurrence of MILD combustion is identified. • MILD regime can be established for syngas fuel under air preheating conditions. - Abstract: The effect of air preheat temperature on MILD (Moderate or Intense Low-oxygen Dilution) combustion of coal-derived syngas was examined in parallel jet forward flow combustor. The results were presented on flow field using numerical simulations and on global flame signatures, OH ∗ radicals distribution and exhaust emissions using experiments. The discrete and high speed air/fuel injections into the combustor is necessary for the establishment of MILD conditions, because they cause strong gas recirculation and form large mixing region between the air and fuel jets. The critical equivalence ratio above which MILD combustion occurred was identified. The MILD regime was established for syngas fuel under air preheating conditions with lean operational limit and suppressed NO x and CO emissions. In the MILD combustion regime, the air preheating resulted in higher NO x but lower CO emissions, while the increase of equivalence ratio led to the increase of NO x and the decrease of CO emissions

  6. Computational fluid dynamic on the temperature simulation of air preheat effect combustion in propane turbulent flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwina; Yunardi; Bindar, Yazid

    2018-04-01

    this paper presents results obtained from the application of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code Fluent 6.3 to modelling of temperature in propane flames with and without air preheat. The study focuses to investigate the effect of air preheat temperature on the temperature of the flame. A standard k-ε model and Eddy Dissipation model are utilized to represent the flow field and combustion of the flame being investigated, respectively. The results of calculations are compared with experimental data of propane flame taken from literature. The results of the study show that a combination of the standard k-ε turbulence model and eddy dissipation model is capable of producing reasonable predictions of temperature, particularly in axial profile of all three flames. Both experimental works and numerical simulation showed that increasing the temperature of the combustion air significantly increases the flame temperature.

  7. Experimental study of a single fuel jet in conditions of highly preheated air combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lille, Simon; Blasiak, W. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Metallurgy

    2000-04-01

    Highly Preheated Air Combustion (HPAC) is a technique to reduce consumption of fuel and decrease NO{sub x} formation in furnaces. The main change that occur in the furnace chamber is that the flow pattern of flue gases changes dramatically resulting in a more uniform heat transfer. The usefulness of regenerative combustion is very clear, but the advantages have so far been accompanied by high levels of pollutants, such as NO{sub x}. The combination of the regeneration technique and internal flue gas recirculation, thus decreasing NO{sub x} and keeping the other advantages, has made HPAC a very attractive combustion technology with application to heat treatment reheating and melting processes. This work gives an introduction to regenerative combustion with diluted air, including theory on flame stabilization. Furthermore, a description of a new test furnace is given with results from a parametric study and from tests using schlieren color visualization, direct photography, and laser Doppler anemometry. In the parametric study NO{sub x}-emission, CO-emission, lift-off, fluctuations, and some flame characteristics are related to nozzle diameter, oxygen concentration, and preheat temperature. For the schlieren technique and direct photography, both still and high-speed cameras were used.

  8. Simple air collectors for preheating fresh air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensen, J.L.M.; Wit, de M.H.; Ouden, den C.

    1984-01-01

    In dwellings with mechanical ventilation systems the fresh air can easily be preheated by means of simple solar air systems. These can be an integral part of the building facade or roof and the costs are expected to be low. By means of computer experiments a large number of systems were evaluated.

  9. Corrosion on air preheaters and economisers; Korrosion hos luftfoervaermare och ekonomisrar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordling, Magnus

    2012-05-15

    Combustion plants in Sweden are exposed to considerable stress regarding low temperature corrosion, and failures due to low temperature corrosion occur regularly. Particularly common is corrosion problems connected to air preheaters and economisers. The number of combustion plants having air preheaters and economisers is however large, and the result of a collection of experiences regarding corrosion on air preheaters and economisers therefore has the potential to give a broad knowledge base. The summary of collection of experiences that has been done here, complemented with a literature survey, is expected to give plant owners and plant constructors a valuable tool to prevent corrosion on the flue gas side of air preheaters and economisers. The choice of plants for the inquiry was made using a list from the Swedish Naturvaardsverket (Environmental Protection Agency) indicating the emissions of NO{sub x}gases from Swedish combustion plants. From that list mainly the plants with the largest emissions were chosen, resulting in a number of 30 plants. Depending on that most of the plants have several boilers, and that the connected tubes often have several economisers and air preheaters, the number of economisers and air preheaters in this experience collection is at least 85. The study was however not limited to economisers and air preheaters, but also experiences connected to corrosion of other units were collected when mentioned, and the most interesting information here is also included in the report. Also a number of the plants were visited to improve the basis of the report, e.g. by photographing the most interesting parts. As the insight of the extension of the problem increased, renewed interview rounds were made, and the last one was made in August 2011.

  10. Analysis of pre-heated fuel combustion and heat-emission dynamics in a diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, S. A.; Kartashevich, A. N.; Buzikov, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    The article explores the feasibility of diesel fuel pre-heating. The research goal was to obtain and analyze the performance diagrams of a diesel engine fed with pre-heated fuel. The engine was tested in two modes: at rated RPMs and at maximum torque. To process the diagrams the authors used technique developed by the Central Diesel Research Institute (CDRI). The diesel engine’s heat emission curves were obtained. The authors concluded that fuel pre-heating shortened the initial phase of the combustion process and moderated the loads, thus making it possible to boost a diesel engine’s mean effective pressure.

  11. Hydrodynamic and thermal mechanisms of filtration combustion inclinational instability based on non-uniform distribution of initial preheating temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yongfang; Shi, Junrui; Xu, Youning; Ma, Rui

    2018-03-01

    Filtration combustion (FC) is one style of porous media combustion with inert matrix, in which the combustion wave front propagates, only downstream or reciprocally. In this paper, we investigate the FC flame front inclinational instability of lean methane/air mixtures flowing through a packed bed as a combustion wave front perturbation of the initial preheating temperature non-uniformity is assumed. The predicted results show that the growth rate of the flame front inclinational angle is proportional to the magnitude of the initial preheating temperature difference. Additionally, depending on gas inlet gas velocity and equivalence ratio, it is demonstrated that increase of gas inlet gas velocity accelerates the FC wave front deformation, and the inclinational instability evolves faster at lower equivalence ratio. The development of the flame front inclinational angle may be regarded as a two-staged evolution, which includes rapid increase, and approaching maximum value of inclinational angle due to the quasi-steady condition of the combustion system. The hydrodynamic and thermal mechanisms of the FC inclinational instability are analyzed. Consequently, the local propagation velocity of the FC wave front is non-uniform to result in the development of inclinational angle at the first stage of rapid increase.

  12. Exergy analysis on the irreversibility of rotary air preheater in thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongyue; Zhao Lingling; Zhou Qiangtai; Xu Zhigao; Kim, Hyung Taek

    2008-01-01

    Energy recovery devices can have a substantial impact on process efficiency and their relevance to the problem of conservation of energy resources is generally recognized to be beyond dispute. One type of such a device, which is commonly used in thermal power plants and air conditioning systems, is the rotary air preheater. A major disadvantage of the rotary air preheater is that there is an unavoidable leakage due to carry over and pressure difference. There are gas streams involved in the heat transfer and mixing processes. There are also irreversibilities, or exergy destruction, due to mixing, pressure losses and temperature gradients. Therefore, the purpose of this research paper is based from the second law of thermodynamics, which is to build up the relationship between the efficiency of the thermal power plant and the total process of irreversibility in the rotary air preheater using exergy analysis. For this, the effects of the variation of the principal design parameters on the rotary air preheater efficiency, the exergy efficiency, and the efficiency of the thermal power plant are examined by changing a number of parameters of rotary air preheater. Furthermore, some conclusions are reached and recommendations are made so as to give insight on designing some optimal parameters

  13. Experimental Investigation of Flow Resistance in a Coal Mine Ventilation Air Methane Preheated Catalytic Oxidation Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of experimental investigation of flow resistance in a coal mine ventilation air methane preheated catalytic oxidation reactor. The experimental system was installed at the Energy Research Institute of Shandong University of Technology. The system has been used to investigate the effects of flow rate (200 Nm3/h to 1000 Nm3/h and catalytic oxidation bed average temperature (20°C to 560°C within the preheated catalytic oxidation reactor. The pressure drop and resistance proportion of catalytic oxidation bed, the heat exchanger preheating section, and the heat exchanger flue gas section were measured. In addition, based on a large number of experimental data, the empirical equations of flow resistance are obtained by the least square method. It can also be used in deriving much needed data for preheated catalytic oxidation designs when employed in industry.

  14. Combustion analysis of preheated crude sunflower oil in an IDI diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canakci, Mustafa; Ozsezen, Ahmet Necati; Turkcan, Ali [Department of Mechanical Education, Kocaeli University, 41380 Izmit (Turkey); Alternative Fuels R and D Center, Kocaeli University, 41040 Izmit (Turkey)

    2009-05-15

    In this study, preheated crude sunflower oil (PCSO) was tested for combustion and emission properties against petroleum based diesel fuel (PBDF) in a naturally aspirated, indirect injection (IDI) engine. The cylinder gas pressure and heat release curves for PCSO at 75 C were similar to those of PBDF. The ignition delays for the PCSO were longer and the start of injection timing was earlier than for PBDF. The difference in the average brake torque was a decrease of 1.36% for PCSO though this was statistically insignificant. The brake specific fuel consumption increased by almost 5% more or less in proportion to the difference in calorific value, so that the 1.06% increase in thermal efficiency was again statistically insignificant. The emission test results showed that the decreases in CO{sub 2} emissions and smoke opacity 2.05% and 4.66%, respectively; however, this was not statistically significant, though in line with the apparent increase in thermal efficiency. There was a significant 34% improvement in the emissions of unburnt hydrocarbons. Carbon monoxide increased by 1.77% again the result was not statistically significant given the small number of repeat tests. The use of PCSO does not have any negative effects on the engine performance and emissions in short duration engine testing. (author)

  15. Experimental Investigation of Flow Resistance in a Coal Mine Ventilation Air Methane Preheated Catalytic Oxidation Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Bin; Liu, Yongqi; Liu, Ruixiang; Meng, Jian; Mao, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the results of experimental investigation of flow resistance in a coal mine ventilation air methane preheated catalytic oxidation reactor. The experimental system was installed at the Energy Research Institute of Shandong University of Technology. The system has been used to investigate the effects of flow rate (200 Nm3/h to 1000 Nm3/h) and catalytic oxidation bed average temperature (20°C to 560°C) within the preheated catalytic oxidation reactor. The pressure drop and res...

  16. Application of ground-to-air heat exchanger for preheating of supply air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokins, Juris; Borodinecs, Anatolijs; Zemitis, Jurgis

    2017-10-01

    This study focuses on assessing the contribution of the passive ground-coupled air heat exchanger system to decreasing the energy consumption of air conditioning and ventilation systems for office buildings in the Latvian climate conditions. The theoretical part of the thesis deals with methods of office building ventilation, supply air preheating and heat recovery as well as particularities of using ground-coupled air heat exchangers, their design parameters and their joint impact on the thermal performance. The engineering project part includes a ventilation system for an office building with an integrated ground-coupled air heat exchanger. By simulating energy consumption of the ventilation system for a duration of one year, the thesis analyzes the contribution of the heat exchanger to the overall energy consumption, which totals 9.53 MWh and 4.02 MWh a year, according to the desired parameters of the indoor climate. The possible alternative heat recovery solutions are investigated to reach by European Regional Development Fund project Nr.1.1.1.1/16/A/048 “NEARLY ZERO ENERGY SOLUTIONS FOR UNCLASSIFIED BUILDINGS”.

  17. Thermodynamic analysis and conceptual design for partial coal gasification air preheating coal-fired combined cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yue; Wu, Yining; Deng, Shimin; Wei, Shirang

    2004-02-01

    The partial coal gasification air pre-heating coal-fired combined cycle (PGACC) is a cleaning coal power system, which integrates the coal gasification technology, circulating fluidized bed technology, and combined cycle technology. It has high efficiency and simple construction, and is a new selection of the cleaning coal power systems. A thermodynamic analysis of the PGACC is carried out. The effects of coal gasifying rate, pre-heating air temperature, and coal gas temperature on the performances of the power system are studied. In order to repower the power plant rated 100 MW by using the PGACC, a conceptual design is suggested. The computational results show that the PGACC is feasible for modernizing the old steam power plants and building the new cleaning power plants.

  18. Instrumentation strategies for energy conservation in broiler barns with ventilation air solar pre-heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordeau, Sebastien; Barrington, Suzelle [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue, Quebec H9X 3V9 (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    At the present consumption rate, world fossil-fuel reserves are expected to be depleted by 2050 unless their consumption is optimized and supplemented with renewable energy sources. The objective of this project was to evaluate the performance of a simple data acquisition system installed to conduct an energy balance and identify energy saving strategies in two commercial broilers barns with ventilation air solar pre-heaters. Located near Montreal, Canada, the two identical barns were instrumented for inside and outside air conditions, ventilation rate and energy recovery by the solar air pre-heaters. Whereas the temperature, relative humidity and radiation sensors were reliable, inside air temperature stratification complicated energy balance analyses and broiler heat production rate calculations. Lack of room air mixing resulted in the loss of 25 and 15% of the generated heater load and recovered solar energy. The proper monitoring of all environmental conditions required their measurement every 5 rather than 20 min. Instead of using a data transmission service found to be unreliable in rural areas, all data loggers were downloaded onto a portable computer every 45 days during regular instrument maintenance. Accordingly, room air mixing is recommended to facilitate energy balance studies and improve the efficient use of heating energies. (author)

  19. Potential of roof-integrated solar collectors for preheating air at drying facilities in Northern Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, Franz; Nagle, Marcus; Leis, Hermann; Mueller, Joachim [Institute of Agricultural Engineering 440e, University of Hohenheim, Garbenstrasse 9, 70599 Stuttgart (Germany); Janjai, Serm [Department of Physics, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom (Thailand); Mahayothee, Busarakorn [Department of Food Technology, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom (Thailand); Haewsungcharoen, Methinee [Department of Food Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2009-07-15

    Longan is one of the most widely cropped fruits in Northern Thailand, where a significant amount of the annual harvest is commercially dried and exported as a commodity. Liquefied petroleum gas is generally used as the energy source for heating the drying air, but concern is growing as fuel prices are expected to increase for the foreseeable future. Meanwhile, with the ample solar radiation in Thailand, the roofs of drying facilities could be adapted to serve as solar collectors to preheat the drying air, thus reducing the energy requirement from fossil fuels. In this study, a simulation program for a flat-plate solar air heater was used to estimate the potential to preheat drying air given the conditions of several longan drying facilities. Results showed that solar collectors can replace up to 19.6% of the thermal energy demand during the drying season. Bigger collectors and smaller air channels result in more useful heat, but attention has to be paid to costs and pressure drop, respectively. Annual monetary savings can reach up to THB 56,000 ({approx}US$ 1800 at US$ 1 THB 31). (author)

  20. AIR EMISSIONS FROM SCRAP TIRE COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses air emissions from two types of scrap tire combustion: uncontrolled and controlled. Uncontrolled sources are open tire fires, which produce many unhealthful products of incomplete combustion and release them directly into the atmosphere. Controlled combustion...

  1. Gasifier selection, design and gasification of oil palm fronds with preheated and unheated gasifying air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangul, Fiseha M; Sulaiman, Shaharin A; Ramli, Anita

    2012-12-01

    Oil palm frond biomass is abundantly available in Malaysia, but underutilized. In this study, gasifiers were evaluated based on the available literature data and downdraft gasifiers were found to be the best option for the study of oil palm fronds gasification. A downdraft gasifier was constructed with a novel height adjustment mechanism for changing the position of gasifying air and steam inlet. The oil palm fronds gasification results showed that preheating the gasifying air improved the volumetric percentage of H(2) from 8.47% to 10.53%, CO from 22.87% to 24.94%, CH(4) from 2.02% to 2.03%, and higher heating value from 4.66 to 5.31 MJ/Nm(3) of the syngas. In general, the results of the current study demonstrated that oil palm fronds can be used as an alternative energy source in the energy diversification plan of Malaysia through gasification, along with, the resulting syngas quality can be improved by preheating the gasifying air. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Experimental and Modeling Investigation of the Effect of Air Preheat on the Formation of NOx in an RQL Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, G. S.; Brouwer, J.; Vardakas, M. A.; Holderman, J. D.

    2012-01-01

    The Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor concept has been proposed to minimize the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in gas turbine systems. The success of this low-NOx combustor strategy is dependent upon the links between the formation of NOx, inlet air preheat temperature, and the mixing of the jet air and fuel-rich streams. Chemical equilibrium and kinetics modeling calculations and experiments were performed to further understand NOx emissions in an RQL combustor. The results indicate that as the temperature at the inlet to the mixing zone increases (due to preheating and/or operating conditions) the fuel-rich zone equivalence ratio must be increased to achieve minimum NOx formation in the primary zone of the combustor. The chemical kinetics model illustrates that there is sufficient residence time to produce NOx at concentrations that agree well with the NOx measurements. Air preheat was found to have very little effect on mixing, but preheating the air did increase NOx emissions significantly. By understanding the mechanisms governing NOx formation and the temperature dependence of key reactions in the RQL combustor, a strategy can be devised to further reduce NOx emissions using the RQL concept.

  3. FAILURE ANALYSIS IN TUBING OF AIR PREHEATER OF BOILER FROM A SUGARCANE MILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joner Oliveira Alves

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The increased demand for energy from sugarcane bagasse has made the sugar and alcohol mills search alternatives to reduce maintenance of the boilers, releasing more time to the production. The stainless steel use has become one of the main tools for such reduction. However, specification errors can lead to premature failures. This work reports the factors that led tubes of AISI 409 stainless steel fail after half season when applied in a air preheater of boiler from a sugarcane mill. In such application, the AISI 304 lasts about 15 seasons and the carbon steel about 3. A tube sent by the sugar mill was characterized by wet chemical analysis, optical microscopy and EDS. Results indicated chloride formation on the internal walls of the tube, which combined with the environment, accelerated the corrosion process. The carbon steel showed high lifetime due to a 70% higher thickness. Due to the work condictions is recommended the use of stainless steels with higher corrosion resistance, such as the traditional AISI 304 or the ferritic AISI 444, the last presents better thermal exchange.

  4. Design of a DCS Based Model for Continuous Leakage Monitoring System of Rotary Air Preheater of a Thermal Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madan BHOWMICK

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The leakage in rotary air preheater makes a considerable contribution to the reduced overall efficiency of fossil-fuel-fired thermal power plants and increase the effect on environment. Since it is normal phenomenon, continuous monitoring of leakage is generally omitted in most power plants. But for accurate analysis of the operation of the thermal power plant, this leakage monitoring plays a vital role. In the present paper, design of a DCS based model for continuous leakages monitoring of rotary air preheater has been described. In the proposed model, the existing DCS based instrumentation system has been modified and online leakage monitoring system has been developed. This model has been installed in a captive power plant with high capacity boilers and very much satisfactory operation of this system has been observed. The observed online data along with their analysis results are presented in this paper.

  5. Experimental investigation of wood combustion in a fixed bed with hot air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, Miladin, E-mail: m.markovic@utwente.nl; Bramer, Eddy A.; Brem, Gerrit

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Upward combustion is a new combustion concept with ignition by hot primary air. • Upward combustion has three stages: short drying, rapid devolatilization and char combustion. • Variation of fuel moisture and inert content have little influence on the combustion. • Experimental comparison between conventional and upward combustion is presented. - Abstract: Waste combustion on a grate with energy recovery is an important pillar of municipal solid waste (MSW) management in the Netherlands. In MSW incinerators fresh waste stacked on a grate enters the combustion chamber, heats up by radiation from the flame above the layer and ignition occurs. Typically, the reaction zone starts at the top of the waste layer and propagates downwards, producing heat for drying and devolatilization of the fresh waste below it until the ignition front reaches the grate. The control of this process is mainly based on empiricism. MSW is a highly inhomogeneous fuel with continuous fluctuating moisture content, heating value and chemical composition. The resulting process fluctuations may cause process control difficulties, fouling and corrosion issues, extra maintenance, and unplanned stops. In the new concept the fuel layer is ignited by means of preheated air (T > 220 °C) from below without any external ignition source. As a result a combustion front will be formed close to the grate and will propagate upwards. That is why this approach is denoted by upward combustion. Experimental research has been carried out in a batch reactor with height of 4.55 m, an inner diameter of 200 mm and a fuel layer height up to 1 m. Due to a high quality two-layer insulation adiabatic conditions can be assumed. The primary air can be preheated up to 350 °C, and the secondary air is distributed via nozzles above the waste layer. During the experiments, temperatures along the height of the reactor, gas composition and total weight decrease are continuously monitored. The influence of

  6. Combustion-driven oscillation in a furnace with multispud-type gas burners. 4th Report. Effects of position of secondary air guide sleeve and openness of secondary air guide vane on combustion oscillation condition; Multispud gata gas turner ni okeru nensho shindo. 4. Nijigen kuki sleeve ichi oyobi nijigen kuki vane kaido no shindo reiki ni oyobosu eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, I.; Okiura, K.; Baba, A.; Orimoto, M. [Babcock-Hitachi K.K., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-07-25

    Effects of the position of a secondary air guide sleeve and the openness of a secondary air guide vane on combustion oscillation conditions were studied experimentally for multispud-type gas burners. Pressure fluctuation in furnaces was analyzed with the previously reported resonance factor which was proposed as an index to represent the degree of combustion oscillation. As a result, the combustion oscillation region was largely affected by both position of a guide sleeve and openness of a guide vane. As the openness having large effect on the ratio of primary and secondary air/tertiary air and the position hardly having effect on the ratio were adjusted skillfully, the burner with no combustion oscillation region was achieved in its normal operation range. In addition, as the effect of preheating combustion air was arranged with a standard flow rate or mass flow flux of air, it was suggested the combustion oscillation region due to preheating can be described with the same manner as that due to no preheating. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Combustion engine. [for air pollution control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An arrangement for an internal combustion engine is provided in which one or more of the cylinders of the engine are used for generating hydrogen rich gases from hydrocarbon fuels, which gases are then mixed with air and injected into the remaining cylinders to be used as fuel. When heavy load conditions are encountered, hydrocarbon fuel may be mixed with the hydrogen rich gases and air and the mixture is then injected into the remaining cylinders as fuel.

  8. The Effect of Air Preheat at Atmospheric Pressure on the Formation of NO(x) in the Quick-Mix Sections of an Axially Staged Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardakas, M. A.; Leong, M. Y.; Brouwer, J.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor concept has been proposed to minimize the formation of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) in gas turbine systems. The success of this combustor strategy is dependent upon the efficiency of the mixing section bridging the fuel-rich and fuel-lean stages. Note that although these results were obtained from an experiment designed to study an RQL mixer, the link between mixing and NOx signatures is considerably broader than this application, in that the need to understand this link exists in most advanced combustors. The experiment reported herein was designed to study the effects of inlet air temperature on NO(x) formation in a mixing section. The results indicate that NO(x) emission is increased for all preheated cases compared to non-preheated cases. When comparing the various mixing modules, the affect of jet penetration is important, as this determines where NO(x) concentrations peak, and affects overall NO(x) production. Although jet air comprises 70 percent of the total airflow, the impact that jet air preheat has on overall NO(x) emissions is small compared to preheating both main and jet air flow.

  9. A computer simulation of the transient response of a 4 cylinder Stirling engine with burner and air preheater in a vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    A series of computer programs are presented with full documentation which simulate the transient behavior of a modern 4 cylinder Siemens arrangement Stirling engine with burner and air preheater. Cold start, cranking, idling, acceleration through 3 gear changes and steady speed operation are simulated. Sample results and complete operating instructions are given. A full source code listing of all programs are included.

  10. 24 CFR 3280.710 - Venting, ventilation and combustion air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venting, ventilation and combustion... Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.710 Venting, ventilation and combustion air. (a) The venting as required by... appliance listing and the appliance manufacturer's instructions. (b) Venting and combustion air systems...

  11. Multi-stage combustion using nitrogen-enriched air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.

    2004-09-14

    Multi-stage combustion technology combined with nitrogen-enriched air technology for controlling the combustion temperature and products to extend the maintenance and lifetime cycles of materials in contact with combustion products and to reduce pollutants while maintaining relatively high combustion and thermal cycle efficiencies. The first stage of combustion operates fuel rich where most of the heat of combustion is released by burning it with nitrogen-enriched air. Part of the energy in the combustion gases is used to perform work or to provide heat. The cooled combustion gases are reheated by additional stages of combustion until the last stage is at or near stoichiometric conditions. Additional energy is extracted from each stage to result in relatively high thermal cycle efficiency. The air is enriched with nitrogen using air separation technologies such as diffusion, permeable membrane, absorption, and cryogenics. The combustion method is applicable to many types of combustion equipment, including: boilers, burners, turbines, internal combustion engines, and many types of fuel including hydrogen and carbon-based fuels including methane and coal.

  12. Progress Toward Analytic Predictions of Supersonic Hydrocarbon-Air Combustion: Computation of Ignition Times and Supersonic Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Scott Michael

    Combustion in scramjet engines is faced with the limitation of brief residence time in the combustion chamber, requiring fuel and preheated air streams to mix and ignite in a matter of milliseconds. Accurate predictions of autoignition times are needed to design reliable supersonic combustion chambers. Most efforts in estimating non-premixed autoignition times have been devoted to hydrogen-air mixtures. The present work addresses hydrocarbon-air combustion, which is of interest for future scramjet engines. Computation of ignition in supersonic flows requires adequate characterization of ignition chemistry and description of the flow, both of which are derived in this work. In particular, we have shown that activation energy asymptotics combined with a previously derived reduced chemical kinetic mechanism provides analytic predictions of autoignition times in homogeneous systems. Results are compared with data from shock tube experiments, and previous expressions which employ a fuel depletion criterion. Ignition in scramjet engines has a strong dependence on temperature, which is found by perturbing the chemically frozen mixing layer solution. The frozen solution is obtained here, accounting for effects of viscous dissipation between the fuel and air streams. We investigate variations of thermodynamic and transport properties, and compare these to simplified mixing layers which neglect these variations. Numerically integrating the mixing layer problem reveals a nonmonotonic temperature profile, with a peak occurring inside the shear layer for sufficiently high Mach numbers. These results will be essential in computation of ignition distances in supersonic combustion chambers.

  13. Proceedings of the 1999 international joint power generation conference (FACT-vol. 23). Volume 1: Fuels and combustion technologies; Gas turbines; and Nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfield, S.R. Jr.; Moussa, N.A.

    1999-01-01

    Papers are arranged under the following topical sections: Gas turbine combustion; Advanced energy conversion; Low NOx solutions; Burner developments; Alternative fuels combustion; Advanced energy conversion technologies; Numerical modeling of combustion; Fluidized bed combustion; Coal combustion; Combustion research; Gasification systems; Mercury emissions; Highly preheated air combustion; Selective catalytic reduction; Special topics in combustion research; Gas turbines and advanced energy; and How can the nuclear industry become more efficient? Papers within scope have been processed separately for inclusion on the database

  14. 75 FR 51569 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ... Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol... for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines AGENCY: Environmental... hazardous air pollutants for existing stationary spark ignition reciprocating internal combustion engines...

  15. Waste heat recovery at the glass industry with the intervention of batch and cullet preheating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolianitis Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A promising option to reduce the specific energy consumption and CO2 emissions at a conventional natural gas fired container glass furnace deals with the advanced utilization of the exhaust gases downstream the air regenerators by means of batch and cullet preheating. A 3-dimensional computational model that simulates this process using mass and heat transfer equations inside a preheater has been developed. A case study for an efficient small-sized container glass furnace is presented dealing with the investigation of the impact of different operating and design configurations on specific energy consumption, CO2 emissions, flue gas energy recovery, batch temperature and preheater efficiency. In specific, the effect of various parameters is studied, including the preheater’s dimensions, flue gas temperature, batch moisture content, glass pull, combustion air excess and cullet fraction. Expected energy savings margin is estimated to 12-15%.

  16. 78 FR 54606 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... Combustion Engines; New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Internal Combustion Engines AGENCY... hazardous air pollutants for stationary reciprocating internal combustion engines and the standards of performance for stationary internal combustion engines. Subsequently, the EPA received three petitions for...

  17. 75 FR 37732 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines... hazardous air pollutants for existing stationary compression ignition reciprocating internal combustion... combustion engines. 40 CFR 63.6590 was amended by revising paragraphs (b)(1) and (3). Inadvertently...

  18. 77 FR 33811 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... 63 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Internal Combustion Engines; Proposed Rule #0;#0... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source...

  19. 77 FR 37361 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Internal Combustion Engines AGENCY: Environmental Protection... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source Performance...

  20. Air-steam hybrid engine : an alternative to internal combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    In this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 1 project, an energy-efficient air-steam propulsion system has been developed and patented, and key performance attributes have been demonstrated to be superior to those of internal combustion e...

  1. Preliminary investigation of aluminum combustion in air and steam.

    OpenAIRE

    Hallenbeck, Amos Edward.

    1983-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution in unlimited. The goal of the experiment is to understand the role of metal-steam combustion in the explosion of underwater shaped cnarges. An apparatus was constructed to investigate combustion of aluminum in stes.m. For background information, aluminum wires (1 mm diameter, 50 mm length) were ignited in air by high current (480 amperes) . Tests in air and steam were photographed using 35 mm color slides and 16 mm movies (4300 fr...

  2. Influence of the Steam Addition on Premixed Methane Air Combustion at Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Steam-diluted combustion in gas turbine systems is an effective approach to control pollutant emissions and improve the gas turbine efficiency. The primary purpose of the present research is to analyze the influence of steam dilution on the combustion stability, flame structures, and CO emissions of a swirl-stabilized gas turbine model combustor under atmospheric pressure conditions. The premixed methane/air/steam flame was investigated with three preheating temperatures (384 K/434 K/484 K and the equivalence ratio was varied from stoichiometric conditions to the flammability limits where the flame was physically blown out from the combustor. In order to represent the steam dilution intensity, the steam fraction Ω defined as the steam to air mass flow rate ratio was used in this work. Exhaust gases were sampled with a water-cooled emission probe which was mounted at the combustor exit. A 120 mm length quartz liner was used which enabled the flame visualization and optical measurement. Time-averaged CH chemiluminescence imaging was conducted to characterize the flame location and it was further analyzed with the inverse Abel transform method. Chemical kinetics calculation was conducted to support and analyze the experimental results. It was found that the LBO (lean blowout limits were increased with steam fraction. CH chemiluminescence imaging showed that with a high steam fraction, the flame length was elongated, but the flame structure was not altered. CO emissions were mapped as a function of the steam fraction, inlet air temperature, and equivalence ratios. Stable combustion with low CO emission can be achieved with an appropriate steam fraction operation range.

  3. Development of a NO/x/-free combustion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadakata, M.; Furusawa, T.; Kunii, D.; Imagawa, M.; Nawada, M.

    1980-04-01

    The development of a NO(x)-free combustion-heating system realizing both pollution control and energy savings is described. An experiment was carried out by using a small model plant. The system consists of a combustion furnace and a new-type multifunctional heat exchanger. The heat exchanger is a rotary continuous type designed for soot collection and for catalytic combustion of CO and H2 as well as for preheating combustion air.

  4. Mathematical modelling of NO emissions from high-temperature air combustion with nitrous oxide mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Weihong; Blasiak, Wlodzimierz

    2005-01-01

    A study of the mathematical modelling of NO formation and emissions in a gas-fired regenerative furnace with high-preheated air was performed. The model of NO formation via N 2 O-intermediate mechanism was proposed because of the lower flame temperature in this case. The reaction rates of this new model were calculated basing on the eddy-dissipation-concept. This model accompanied with thermal-NO, prompt-NO and NO reburning models were used to predict NO emissions and formations. The sensitivity of the furnace temperature and the oxygen availability on NO generation rate has been investigated. The predicted results were compared with experimental values. The results show that NO emission formed by N 2 O-intermediate mechanism is of outstanding importance during the high-temperature air combustion (HiTAC) condition. Furthermore, it shows that NO models with N 2 O-route model can give more reasonable profile of NO formation. Additionally, increasing excess air ratio leads to increasing of NO emission in the regenerative furnace. (author)

  5. LES and RANS modeling of pulverized coal combustion in swirl burner for air and oxy-combustion technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warzecha, Piotr; Boguslawski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Combustion of pulverized coal in oxy-combustion technology is one of the effective ways to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. The process of transition from conventional combustion in air to the oxy-combustion technology, however, requires a thorough investigations of the phenomena occurring during the combustion process, that can be greatly supported by numerical modeling. The paper presents the results of numerical simulations of pulverized coal combustion process in swirl burner using RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations) and LES (large Eddy simulation) methods for turbulent flow. Numerical simulations have been performed for the oxyfuel test facility located at the Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer at RWTH Aachen University. Detailed analysis of the flow field inside the combustion chamber for cold flow and for the flow with combustion using different numerical methods for turbulent flows have been done. Comparison of the air and oxy-coal combustion process for pulverized coal shows significant differences in temperature, especially close to the burner exit. Additionally the influence of the combustion model on the results has been shown for oxy-combustion test case. - Highlights: • Oxy-coal combustion has been modeled for test facility operating at low oxygen ratio. • Coal combustion process has been modeled with simplified combustion models. • Comparison of oxy and air combustion process of pulverized coal has been done. • RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations) and LES (large Eddy simulation) results for pulverized coal combustion process have been compared

  6. Efficient energy recovering air inlet system for an internal combustion engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    An air inlet system (10) for an internal combustion engine (200) is provided. The air inlet system comprises an air intake port (20), an air output port (30) for providing air for a combustion chamber (202) of the combustion engine (200), and a turbine (40). The turbine (40) is situated in between

  7. Efficient energy recovering air inlet system for an international combustion engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2013-01-01

    An air inlet system (10) for an internal combustion engine (200) is provided. The air inlet system comprises an air intake port (20), an air output port (30) for providing air for a combustion chamber (202) of the combustion engine (200), and a turbine (40). The turbine (40) is situated in between

  8. Numerical study of effect of wall parameters on catalytic combustion characteristics of CH4/air in a heat recirculation micro-combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Yunfei; Wang, Haibo; Pan, Wenli; Zhang, Li; Li, Lixian; Yang, Zhongqing; Lin, Changhai

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Combustion in heat recuperation micro-combustors with different materials was studied. • Heat concentration is more obvious with thermal conductivity decreasing. • Combustor with copper baffles has uniform temperature distribution and best preheating effectiveness. • Influence of wall thermal conductivity is negligible on OH(s) coverage. • Methane conversion rate firstly increases and then decreases with h increasing. - Abstract: Premixed combustion of methane/air mixture in heat recuperation micro-combustors made of different materials (corundum, quartz glass, copper and ferrochrome) was investigated. The effects of wall parameters on the combustion characters of a CH 4 /air mixture under Rhodium catalyst as well as the influence of wall materials and convection heat transfer coefficients on the stable combustion limit, temperature field, and free radicals was explored using numerical analysis methodology. The results show that with a decrease of thermal conductivity of wall materials, the temperature of the reaction region increases and hot spots becomes more obvious. The combustor with copper baffles has uniform temperature distribution and best preheating effectiveness, but when inlet velocity is too small, the maximum temperature in the combustor with copper or ferrochrome baffles is well beyond the melting point of the materials. With an increase in thermal conductivity, the preheat zone for premixed gas increases, but the influence of thermal conductivity on OH(s) coverage is negligible. With an increase of the wall convection heat transfer coefficient, the methane conversion rate firstly increases, then decreases reaching a maximum value at h = 8.5 W/m 2 K, however, the average temperature of both the axis and exterior surface of the combustor decrease.

  9. The reduction of air pollution by improved combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchill, S.W. [Pennsylvania Univ., Chemical Engineering Dept., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The contributions of combustion to air pollution and possible remedies are discussed. Control and reduction of air pollution from combustion is more feasible than from other sources because of its discrete localization. The gaseous products of combustion inevitably include H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, NO and/or NO{sub 2} and may include N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3} and unburned and partially burned hydrocarbons. Soot, ash and other dispersed solids may also be present, but are not considered herein. Unburned and partially burned hydrocarbons are prima facie evidence of poor mechanics of combustion and should not be tolerated. On the other hand, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} are unavoidable if the fuel contains nitrogen and sulfur. The best remedy in this latter case is to remove these species from the fuel. Otherwise their products of combustion must be removed by absorption, adsorption or reaction. NO{sub x} from the fixation of N{sub 2} in the air and CO may be minimized by advanced techniques of combustion. One such method is described in some detail. If CO{sub 2} must be removed this can be accomplished by absorption, adsorption or reaction, but precooling is necessary and the quantity is an order of magnitude greater than that of any of the other pollutants. (Author)

  10. EMISIONES AL AIRE DE LA COMBUSTION DE LLANTAS USADAS (SPANISH VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses air emissions from two types of scrap tire combustion: uncontrolled and controlled. Uncontrolled sources are open tire fires, which produce many unhealthful products of incomplete combustion and release them directly into the atmosphere. Controlled combustion...

  11. 75 FR 75937 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines... internal combustion engines. Subsequently, the Administrator received two petitions for reconsideration... Any industry using a stationary 2211 Electric power reciprocating internal generation, combustion...

  12. 76 FR 12923 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines... pollutants for existing stationary spark ignition reciprocating internal combustion engines. The final rule... reciprocating internal combustion generation, engine. transmission, or distribution. 622110 Medical and surgical...

  13. 77 FR 60341 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Internal Combustion Engines AGENCY: Environmental Protection... Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines to solicit comment on specific issues...

  14. Low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newson, E; Roth, F von; Hottinger, P; Truong, T B [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - air mixtures would allow the development of no-NO{sub x} burners for heating and power applications. Using commercially available catalysts, the room temperature ignition of methane-propane-air mixtures has been shown in laboratory reactors with combustion efficiencies over 95% and maximum temperatures less than 700{sup o}C. After a 500 hour stability test, severe deactivation of both methane and propane oxidation functions was observed. In cooperation with industrial partners, scaleup to 3 kW is being investigated together with startup dynamics and catalyst stability. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  15. Experimental study on the influence of oxygen content in the combustion air on the combustion characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bělohradský, Petr; Skryja, Pavel; Hudák, Igor

    2014-01-01

    This study was focused on the experimental investigation of the very promising combustion technology called as the oxygen-enhanced combustion (OEC), which uses the oxidant containing higher proportion of oxygen than in the atmospheric air, i.e. more than 21%. The work investigated and compared the characteristics of two OEC methods, namely the premix enrichment and air-oxy/fuel combustion, when the overall oxygen concentration was varied from 21% to 46%. The combustion tests were performed with the experimental two-gas-staged burner of low-NO x type at the burner thermal input of 750 kW for two combustion regimes – one-staged and two-staged combustion. The oxygen concentration in the flue gas was maintained in the neighborhood of 3% vol. (on dry basis). The aim of tests was to assess the impact of the oxidant composition, type of OEC method and fuel-staging on the characteristic combustion parameters in detail. The investigated parameters included the concentration of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) in the flue gas, flue gas temperature, heat flux to the combustion chamber wall, and lastly the stability, shape and dimensions of flame. It was observed that NO x emission is significantly lower when the air-oxy/fuel method is used compared to the premix enrichment method. Moreover, when the fuel was staged, NO x emission was below 120 mg/Nm 3 at all investigated oxygen flow rates. Increasing oxygen concentration resulted in higher heating intensity due to higher concentrations of CO 2 and H 2 O. The available heat at 46% O 2 was higher by 20% compared with that at 21% O 2 . - Highlights: • Premix-enrichment and air-oxy/fuel combustion methods were experimentally studied. • NO x increased sharply as oxygen concentration increased during PE tests. • NO x was below 120 mg/Nm 3 for all investigated oxygen flow rates in AO tests. • Radiative heat transfer was enhanced ca. 20% as O 2 concentration was increased. • OEC flames were observed stable, more luminous and

  16. Combustion performance evaluation of air staging of palm oil blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Jaafar, Mohammad Nazri; Eldrainy, Yehia A; Mat Ali, Muhammad Faiser; Wan Omar, W Z; Mohd Hizam, Mohd Faizi Arif

    2012-02-21

    The problems of global warming and the unstable price of petroleum oils have led to a race to develop environmentally friendly biofuels, such as palm oil or ethanol derived from corn and sugar cane. Biofuels are a potential replacement for fossil fuel, since they are renewable and environmentally friendly. This paper evaluates the combustion performance and emission characteristics of Refined, Bleached, and Deodorized Palm Oil (RBDPO)/diesel blends B5, B10, B15, B20, and B25 by volume, using an industrial oil burner with and without secondary air. Wall temperature profiles along the combustion chamber axis were measured using a series of thermocouples fitted axially on the combustion chamber wall, and emissions released were measured using a gas analyzer. The results show that RBDPO blend B25 produced the maximum emission reduction of 56.9% of CO, 74.7% of NOx, 68.5% of SO(2), and 77.5% of UHC compared to petroleum diesel, while air staging (secondary air) in most cases reduces the emissions further. However, increasing concentrations of RBDPO in the blends also reduced the energy released from the combustion. The maximum wall temperature reduction was 62.7% for B25 at the exit of the combustion chamber.

  17. Indoor air quality environmental information handbook: Combustion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This environmental information handbook was prepared to assist both the non-technical reader (i.e., homeowner) and technical persons (such as researchers, policy analysts, and builders/designers) in understanding the current state of knowledge regarding combustion sources of indoor air pollution. Quantitative and descriptive data addressing the emissions, indoor concentrations, factors influencing indoor concentrations, and health effects of combustion-generated pollutants are provided. In addition, a review of the models, controls, and standards applicable to indoor air pollution from combustion sources is presented. The emphasis is on the residential environment. The data presented here have been compiled from government and privately-funded research results, conference proceedings, technical journals, and recent publications. It is intended to provide the technical reader with a comprehensive overview and reference source on the major indoor air quality aspects relating to indoor combustion activities, including tobacco smoking. In addition, techniques for determining potential concentrations of pollutants in residential settings are presented. This is an update of a 1985 study documenting the state of knowledge of combustion-generated pollutants in the indoor environment. 191 refs., 51 figs., 71 tabs.

  18. Straw Combustion in a Grate Furnace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lans, Robert Pieter Van Der

    1998-01-01

    Fixed-bed combustion of straw has been conducted in a 15 cm diameter and 137 cm long cylindrical reactor. Air, which could be preheated, was introduced through the bottom plate. The straw was ignited at the top with a radiation heater. After ignition, when a self-sustaining reaction front...

  19. Challenges in assessing air pollution from residential wood combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Helge Rørdam

    2016-01-01

    The paper highlights a number of important challenges in quantifying the impact of residential wood combustion on air quality. The fact that real life emissions are controlled by the behaviour of the users makes it a challenge to determine representative emission factors. Further, in respect...

  20. Low NOx combustion technologies for high-temperature natural gas combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamme, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Because of the high process temperature which is required for some processes like glass melting and the high temperature to which the combustion air is preheated, NOx emission are extremely high. Even at these high temperatures, NOx emissions could be reduced drastically by using advanced combustion techniques such as staged combustion or flame-less oxidation, as experimental work has shown. In the case of oxy-fuel combustion, the NOx emission are also very high if conventional burners are used. The new combustion techniques achieve similar NOx reductions. (author)

  1. CFD analysis of premixed hydrogen/air combustion in an upright, rectangular shaped combustion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gera, B.; Singh, R.K.; Vaze, K.K.

    2014-01-01

    Premixed hydrogen/air combustion in an upright, rectangular shaped combustion chamber has been performed numerically using commercial CFD code CFD-ACE+. The combustion chamber had dimensions 1 m X 0.024 m X 1 m. Simulations were carried out for 10% (v/v) hydrogen concentration for which experimental results were available. Effect of different boundary condition and ignition position on flame propagation was studied. Time dependent flame propagation in the chamber was predicted by CFD code. The computed transient flame propagation in the chamber was in good agreement with experimental results. The present work demonstrated that the available commercial CFD codes are capable of modeling hydrogen deflagration in a realistic manner. (author)

  2. Emission of toxic air pollutants from biomass combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houck, J.E.; Barnett, S.G.; Roholt, R.B.; Rock, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    Combustion of biomass for power generation, home heating, process steam generation, and waste disposal constitutes a major source of air pollutants nationwide. Emissions from hog-fueled boilers, demolition wood-fired power plants, municipal waste incinerators, woodstoves, fireplaces, pellet stoves, agricultural burning, and forestry burning have been characterized for a variety of purposes. These have included risk assessment, permitting, emission inventory development, source profiling for receptor modeling, and control technology evaluations. From the results of the source characterization studies a compilation of emission factors for criteria and non-criteria pollutants are presented here. Key among these pollutants are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, priority pollutant metals, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxides, and PM 10 particles. The emission factors from the biomass combustion processes are compared and contrasted with other pollutant sources. In addition, sampling and analysis procedures most appropriate for characterizing emissions from the biomass combustion sources are also discussed

  3. COMBUSTION SIMULATION IN A SPARK IGNITION ENGINE CYLINDER: EFFECTS OF AIR-FUEL RATIO ON THE COMBUSTION DURATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nureddin Dinler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion is an important subject of internal combustion engine studies. To reduce the air pollution from internal combustion engines and to increase the engine performance, it is required to increase combustion efficiency. In this study, effects of air/fuel ratio were investigated numerically. An axisymmetrical internal combustion engine was modeled in order to simulate in-cylinder engine flow and combustion. Two dimensional transient continuity, momentum, turbulence, energy, and combustion equations were solved. The k-e turbulence model was employed. The fuel mass fraction transport equation was used for modeling of the combustion. For this purpose a computational fluid dynamics code was developed by using the finite volume method with FORTRAN programming code. The moving mesh was utilized to simulate the piston motion. The developed code simulates four strokes of engine continuously. In the case of laminar flow combustion, Arrhenius type combustion equations were employed. In the case of turbulent flow combustion, eddy break-up model was employed. Results were given for rich, stoichiometric, and lean mixtures in contour graphs. Contour graphs showed that lean mixture (l = 1.1 has longer combustion duration.

  4. Combustion physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. R.

    1985-11-01

    Over 90% of our energy comes from combustion. By the year 2000 the figure will still be 80%, even allowing for nuclear and alternative energy sources. There are many familiar examples of combustion use, both domestic and industrial. These range from the Bunsen burner to large flares, from small combustion chambers, such as those in car engines, to industrial furnaces for steel manufacture or the generation of megawatts of electricity. There are also fires and explosions. The bountiful energy release from combustion, however, brings its problems, prominent among which are diminishing fuel resources and pollution. Combustion science is directed towards finding ways of improving efficiency and reducing pollution. One may ask, since combustion is a chemical reaction, why physics is involved: the answer is in three parts. First, chemicals cannot react unless they come together. In most flames the fuel and air are initially separate. The chemical reaction in the gas phase is very fast compared with the rate of mixing. Thus, once the fuel and air are mixed the reaction can be considered to occur instantaneously and fluid mechanics limits the rate of burning. Secondly, thermodynamics and heat transfer determine the thermal properties of the combustion products. Heat transfer also plays a role by preheating the reactants and is essential to extracting useful work. Fluid mechanics is relevant if work is to be performed directly, as in a turbine. Finally, physical methods, including electric probes, acoustics, optics, spectroscopy and pyrometry, are used to examine flames. The article is concerned mainly with how physics is used to improve the efficiency of combustion.

  5. Increasing energy efficiency by in-situ oxygen measurement in combustion gas and optimized fuel-air-ratio control; Effizienzsteigerung durch in-situ Sauerstoffmessung im Verbrennungsgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boltz, Yvonne [Marathon Sensors Inc., West Chester, OH (United States); Winter, Karl-Michael [PROCESS-ELECTRONIC GmbH, Heiningen (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    High energy costs as well as the necessity to minimize exhaust emissions require a most efficient usage of fossil primary energy resources. In heat treating but also in power generation natural gas is mostly used. Efficient burner systems and preheating combustion air using recuperators or regenerators minimize exhaust losses to a high extent. Another well known but seldom used optimization method controls the excess oxygen percentage in the exhaust gas. Already partially in use in households and state-of-the-art in the combustion control of car engines this technique is still not widely used in industrial sized systems. For closed burners there are few sensor options available that can be integrated into the burner. This article presents a variety of measuring and control systems that have been tailored to this particular task, able to increase the efficiency of both, existing older installations and new burner systems. (orig.)

  6. 76 FR 12863 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines... combustion engines. The final rule was published on August 20, 2010. This direct final action amends certain... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines...

  7. Emissions of organic hazardous air pollutants during Chinese coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, R.; Zhu, H.J.; Zheng, C.G.; Xu, M.H. [Environmental Technology Institute, Singapore (Singapore). Innovative Center

    2002-05-01

    The emissions of organic hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) during the combustion of several typical Chinese coals were investigated. First, the distribution of four types of HAP, i.e., aliphatics, cyclic hydrocarbons, monoaromatic compounds and PAHs, in the CH{sub 2}C{sub l2} extracts of six Chinese coals were studied and the influences of the extractive times and coal varieties were also evaluated. Second, the partitioning of these HAPs in the flue gas during coal combustion in a small-scale reactor were investigated, depending on oven temperatures (500, 600, 700, 800, 900{sup o}C) and coal varieties. The behaviors of HAP in the combustion flue gas were compared with those in the CH{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}, extracts. Finally, combustion was conducted at given conditions in two laboratory-scale reactors: a fluidized bed and a fixed bed. Two coals (Shengmu bituminous coal and Xunhuan anthracite coal) and one coke were considered. The HAP partitioning both in flue gases and in ashes were evaluated and compared between the two combustors.

  8. Gravity mediated preheating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maity, Debaprasad

    2015-01-01

    In this work we propose a mechanism of natural preheating of our universe induced by the inflation field dependent effective mass term for the gravitational wave. For any single field inflationary model, the inflation must go through the oscillatory phase after the end of inflation. As has recently been shown, if the gravitational fluctuation has inflation dependent mass term, there will be a resonant amplification of the amplitude of the gravitational wave during the oscillatory phase of inflation though parametric resonance. Because of this large enhancement of the amplitude of the gravitational wave, we show that universe can be naturally pre-heated through a minimally coupled matter field with gravity. Therefore, during the pre-heating phase, there is no need to introduce any arbitrary coupling between the matter field and the inflation. (author)

  9. Soot, organics, and ultrafine ash from air- and oxy-fired coal combustion

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Pulverized bituminous coal was burned in a 10W externally heated entrained flow furnace under air-combustion and three oxy-combustion inlet oxygen conditions (28,...

  10. Combustion characteristics and air pollutant formation during oxy-fuel co-combustion of microalgae and lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Tahmasebi, Arash; Dou, Jinxiao; Yu, Jianglong

    2016-05-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels is seen as one of the key technologies for carbon capture to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The combustion characteristics of lignite coal, Chlorella vulgaris microalgae, and their blends under O2/N2 and O2/CO2 conditions were studied using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer-Mass Spectroscopy (TG-MS). During co-combustion of blends, three distinct peaks were observed and were attributed to C. vulgaris volatiles combustion, combustion of lignite, and combustion of microalgae char. Activation energy during combustion was calculated using iso-conventional method. Increasing the microalgae content in the blend resulted in an increase in activation energy for the blends combustion. The emissions of S- and N-species during blend fuel combustion were also investigated. The addition of microalgae to lignite during air combustion resulted in lower CO2, CO, and NO2 yields but enhanced NO, COS, and SO2 formation. During oxy-fuel co-combustion, the addition of microalgae to lignite enhanced the formation of gaseous species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Premixer assembly for mixing air and fuel for combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, William David; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2016-12-13

    A premixer assembly for mixing air and fuel for combustion includes a plurality of tubes disposed at a head end of a combustor assembly. Also included is a tube of the plurality of tubes, the tube including an inlet end and an outlet end. Further included is at least one non-circular portion of the tube extending along a length of the tube, the at least one non-circular portion having a non-circular cross-section, and the tube having a substantially constant cross-sectional area along its length

  12. Effects of air jet duration and timing on the combustion characteristics of high-pressure air jet controlled compression ignition combustion mode in a hybrid pneumatic engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Wuqiang; Meng, Xiangyu; Tian, Jiangping; Tian, Hua; Cui, Jingchen; Feng, Liyan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A 3-D CFD model of the power cylinder in HPE was developed. • High-pressure air JCCI combustion mode includes two-stage high-temperature reaction. • The combustion phasing of the pre-mixture is controllable via the SOJ timing. • There exists an optimum SOJ timing for obtaining the highest combustion efficiency and shortest burning duration. - Abstract: The high-pressure air jet controlled compression ignition (JCCI) combustion mode was employed to control the premixed diesel compression ignition combustion phasing by using the compound thermodynamic cycle under all operating conditions, which is accomplished in a hybrid pneumatic engine (HPE). A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulation coupled with reduced n-heptane chemical kinetics mechanism has been applied to investigate the effects of high-pressure air jet duration and the start of jet (SOJ) timing on the combustion characteristics in the power cylinder of HPE. By sweeping the high-pressure air jet durations from 6 to 14 °CA and SOJ timings from −12 °CA ATDC to the top dead center (TDC) under the air jet temperatures of 400 and 500 K, respectively, the low- and high-temperature reactions, combustion efficiency, as well as the combustion phasing and burning duration have been analyzed in detail. The results illustrated that a longer air jet duration results in a higher peak in the first-stage high-temperature reaction, and the short air jet duration of 6 °CA can lead to a higher combustion efficiency. The SOJ timing sweep results showed that there exists an optimum timing for obtaining the highest combustion efficiency and shortest burning duration.

  13. Inflation After Preheating

    CERN Document Server

    Felder, G; Linde, Andrei D; Tkachev, Igor I; Felder, Gary; Kofman, Lev; Linde, Andrei; Tkachev, Igor

    2000-01-01

    Preheating after inflation may lead to nonthermal phase transitions with symmetry restoration. These phase transitions may occur even if the total energy density of fluctuations produced during reheating is relatively small as compared with the vacuum energy in the state with restored symmetry. As a result, in some inflationary models one encounters a secondary, nonthermal stage of inflation due to symmetry restoration after preheating. We review the theory of nonthermal phase transitions and make a prediction about the expansion factor during the secondary inflationary stage. We then present the results of lattice simulations which verify these predictions, and discuss possible implications of our results for the theory of formation of topological defects during nonthermal phase transitions.

  14. Nuclear fuel preheating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, C.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear reactor new fuel handling system which conveys new fuel from a fuel preparation room into the reactor containment boundary is described. The handling system is provided with a fuel preheating station which is adaptd to heat the new fuel to reactor refueling temperatures in such a way that the fuel is heated from the top down so that fuel element cladding failure due to thermal expansions is avoided. (U.S.)

  15. Combustion of lean hydrogen-air mixtures in the connected compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Liu; Yoshio Yoshizawa; Akio Miyori; Kenya Kubota

    1997-01-01

    A study of combustion experiments with premixed lean hydrogen-air mixtures was conducted in a vessel consisting of two compartments connected by a diameter-variable vent. Effects of various parameters (hydrogen concentration, vent diameter and initial pressure) on mechanical loads of the combustion processes including mainly the peak pressures and the rates of pressure rise were investigated. Relation of flow and combustion was approached. Ignition-combustion processes were discussed, and the combustion types were classified into three patterns according to the pressure-time histories and the flow characteristics in main combustion compartment

  16. Preheating in new inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desroche, Mariel; Felder, Gary N.; Kratochvil, Jan M.; Linde, Andrei

    2005-01-01

    During the last ten years a detailed investigation of preheating was performed for chaotic inflation and for hybrid inflation. However, nonperturbative effects during reheating in the new inflation scenario remained practically unexplored. We investigate preheating in new inflation, using a combination of analytical and numerical methods. We find that the decay of the homogeneous component of the inflaton field and the resulting process of spontaneous symmetry breaking in the simplest models of new inflation usually occurs almost instantly: for the new inflation on the GUT scale it takes only about 5 oscillations of the field distribution. The decay of the homogeneous inflaton field is so efficient because of a combined effect of tachyonic preheating and parametric resonance. At that stage, the homogeneous oscillating inflaton field decays into a collection of waves of the inflaton field, with a typical wavelength of the order of the inverse inflaton mass. This stage usually is followed by a long stage of decay of the inflaton field into other particles, which can be described by the perturbative approach to reheating after inflation. The resulting reheating temperature typically is rather low

  17. New Compressor Added to Glenn's 450- psig Combustion Air System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    In September 1999, the Central Process Systems Engineering Branch and the Maintenance and the Central Process Systems Operations Branch, released for service a new high pressure compressor to supplement the 450-psig Combustion Air System at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The new compressor, designated C-18, is located in Glenn s Central Air Equipment Building and is remotely operated from the Central Control Building. C-18 can provide 40 pounds per second (pps) of airflow at pressure to our research customers. This capability augments our existing system capacity (compressors C 4 at 38 pps and C-5 at 32 pps), which is generated from Glenn's Engine Research Building. The C-18 compressor was originally part of Glenn's 21-Inch Hypersonic Tunnel, which was transferred from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to Glenn in the mid-1980's. With the investment of construction of facilities funding, the compressor was modified, new mechanical and electrical support equipment were purchased, and the unit was installed in the basement of the Central Air Equipment Building. After several weeks of checkout and troubleshooting, the new compressor was ready for long-term, reliable operations. With a total of 110 pps in airflow now available, Glenn is well positioned to support the high-pressure air test requirements of our research customers.

  18. Clean Air Act Standards and Guidelines for Energy, Engines, and Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains the stationary sources of air pollution for the energy, engines, and combustion industries, and their corresponding air pollution regulations. To learn more about the regulations for each industry, just click on the links below.

  19. Experimental investigation and optimisation of burner systems for glass melting ends with regenerative air preheating. Final report; Experimentelle Untersuchung und Optimierung von Brennersystemen fuer Glasschmelzwannen mit regenerativer Luftvorwaermung. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherello, A.; Flamme, M.; Kremer, H.

    2000-02-15

    The project comprised experiments on burner systems for glass melting ends with regenerative air preheating for the purpose of optimisation. The experimental set-up was to reflect realistic conditions. In the first stage of the investigations, modern burner systems were installed in a GWI test facility and investigated. [German] Ziel des oben genannten Forschungsvorhabens war die Durchfuehrung experimenteller Untersuchungen von Brennersystemen fuer Glasschmelzwannen mit regenerativer Luftvorwaermung sowie deren Optimierung. Dazu war es notwendig, einen experimentellen Aufbau zu realisieren, mit dessen Hilfe die Stroemungs-, Mischungs- und Umsetzungsphaenomene von Glasschmelzoefen realistisch nachgestellt und aussagekraeftige Untersuchungen durchgefuehrt werden koennen. In einem ersten Untersuchungsschritt wurden moderne Brennerlanzen an der GWI-Versuchsanlage installiert und untersucht. (orig.)

  20. Preheating with extra dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujikawa, S.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate preheating in a higher-dimensional generalized Kaluza-Klein theory with a quadratic inflaton potential V(/φ) = /frac12 m 2 /φ 2 including metric perturbations explicitly. The system we consider is the multi-field model where there exists a dilaton field /σ which corresponds to the scale of compactifications and another scalar field /χ coupled to inflaton with the interaction frac12 g 2 /φ 2 /χ 2 +/g-tilde 2 /φ 3 /χ. In the case of g-tilde=0, we find that the perturbation of dilaton does not undergo parametric amplification while the χ field fluctuation can be enhanced in the usual manner by parametric resonance. In the presence of the /g-tilde 2 /φ 3 /χ coupling, the dilaton fluctuation in sub-Hubble scales is modestly amplified by the growth of metric perturbations for the large coupling g-tilde. In super-Hubble scales, the enhancement of the dilaton fluctuation as well as metric perturbations is weak, taking into account the backreaction effect of created /χ particles. We argue that not only is it possible to predict the ordinary inflationary spectrum in large scales but extra dimensions can be held static during preheating in our scenario. (author)

  1. A REVIEW OF MILD COMBUSTION AND OPEN FURNACE DESIGN CONSIDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Noor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Combustion is still very important to generate energy. Moderate or Intense Low-oxygen Dilution (MILD combustion is one of the best new technologies for clean and efficient combustion. MILD combustion has been proven to be a promising combustion technology in industrial applications with decreased energy consumption due to the uniformity of its temperature distribution. It is clean compared to traditional combustion due to producing low NOx and CO emissions. This article provides a review and discussion of recent research and developments in MILD. The issue and applications are summarized, with some suggestions presented on the upgrading and application of MILD in the future. Currently MILD combustion has been successfully applied in closed furnaces. The preheating of supply air is no longer required since the recirculation inside the enclosed furnace already self-preheats the supply air and self-dilutes the oxygen in the combustion chamber. The possibility of using open furnace MILD combustion will be reviewed. The design consideration for open furnace with exhaust gas re-circulation (EGR was discussed.

  2. Estimated contribution from wood combustion to air pollution in Hamar, Lillehammer and Gjoevik

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schjoldager, J.

    1996-07-01

    The report analyses the level of air pollution from wood combustion in urban areas in Norway. From the analysis of potassium and soot in samples from January 1992, there were large uncertainties in the estimation of particle contributions from the combustion. Concentration estimates of formaldehyde from wood combustion were comparable to measurements, while estimated PAH (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) concentrations were lower than measurements. 18 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  3. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1987-01-01

    Combustion, Second Edition focuses on the underlying principles of combustion and covers topics ranging from chemical thermodynamics and flame temperatures to chemical kinetics, detonation, ignition, and oxidation characteristics of fuels. Diffusion flames, flame phenomena in premixed combustible gases, and combustion of nonvolatile fuels are also discussed. This book consists of nine chapters and begins by introducing the reader to heats of reaction and formation, free energy and the equilibrium constants, and flame temperature calculations. The next chapter explores the rates of reactio

  4. Thermogravimetric analysis of rice and wheat straw catalytic combustion in air- and oxygen-enriched atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zhaosheng; Ma Xiaoqian; Liu Ao

    2009-01-01

    By thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) study, the influences of different catalysts on the ignition and combustion of rice and wheat straw in air- and oxygen-enriched atmospheres have been investigated in this paper. Straw combustion is divided into two stages. One is the emission and combustion of volatiles and the second is the combustion of fixed carbon. The existence of catalysts in the first step enhances the emission of volatiles from the straw. The action of catalysts in the second step of straw combustion may be as a carrier of oxygen to the fixed carbon. Two parameters have been used to compare the characteristics of ignition and combustion of straw under different catalysts and in various oxygen concentrations. One is the temperature when the conversion degree combustible (CDC) of straw is 5%, the other is the CDC when the temperature is 900 deg. C. By comparing the different values of the two parameters, the different influences of the catalysts and oxygen concentration on the ignition and combustion of straw have been studied, the action of these catalysts for straw ignition and combustion in air and oxygen-enriched atmosphere is effective except the oxygen-enriched catalytic combustion of wheat straw fixed carbon

  5. Combustion of stratified hydrogen-air mixtures in the 10.7 m3 Combustion Test Facility cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehouse, D.R.; Greig, D.R.; Koroll, G.W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results from hydrogen concentration gradient combustion experiments in a 10.7 m 3 cylinder. These gradients, also referred to as stratified mixtures, were formed from dry mixtures of hydrogen and air at atmospheric temperature. Combustion pressures, burn fractions and flame speeds in concentration gradients were compared with combustion of well-mixed gases containing equivalent amounts of hydrogen. The studied variables included the quantity of hydrogen in the vessel, the steepness of the concentration gradient, the igniter location, and the initial concentration of hydrogen at the bottom of the vessel. Gradients of hydrogen and air with average concentrations of hydrogen below the downward propagation limit produced significantly greater combustion pressures when ignited at the top of the vessel than well-mixed gases with the same quantity of hydrogen. This was the result of considerably higher burn fractions in the gradients than in the well-mixed gas tests. Above the downward propagation limit, gradients of hydrogen ignited at the top of the vessel produced nearly the same combustion pressures as under well-mixed conditions; both gradients and well-mixed gases had high burn fractions. Much higher flame speeds were observed in the gradients than the well-mixed gases. Gradients and well-mixed gases containing up to 14% hydrogen ignited at the bottom of the vessel produced nearly the same combustion pressures. Above 14% hydrogen, gradients produced lower combustion pressures than well-mixed gases having the same quantity of hydrogen. This can be attributed to lower burn fractions of fuel from the gradients compared with well-mixed gases with similar quantities of hydrogen. When ignited at the bottom of the vessel, 90% of a gradient's gases remained unburned until several seconds after ignition. The remaining gases were then consumed at a very fast rate. (orig.)

  6. Mechanism of influence water vapor on combustion characteristics of propane-air mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionov, V. M.; Mitrofanov, G. A.; Sachovskii, A. V.; Kozar, N. K.

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the results of an experimental study of the effect of water vapor at the flame temperature. Propane-butane mixture with air is burning on a modified Bunsen burner. Steam temperature was varied from 180 to 260 degrees. Combustion parameters changed by steam temperature and its proportion in the mixture with the fuel. The fuel-air mixture is burned in the excess air ratio of 0.1. It has been established that the injection of steam changes the characteristics of combustion fuel-air mixture and increase the combustion temperature. The concentration of CO in the combustion products is substantially reduced. Raising the temperature in the combustion zone is associated with increased enthalpy of the fuel by the added steam enthalpy. Reducing the concentration of CO is caused by decrease in the average temperature in the combustion zone by applying steam. Concentration of active hydrogen radicals and oxygen increases in the combustion zone. That has a positive effect on the process of combustion.

  7. 78 FR 14457 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 60 and 63 [EPA-HQ-OAR-2008-0708, FRL-9756-4] RIN 2060-AQ58 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Internal Combustion Engines Correction In rule...

  8. 75 FR 80761 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 63 [EPA-HQ-OAR-2008-0708, FRL-9244-2] RIN 2060-AP36 National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines... combustion engines and requesting public comment on one issue arising from the final rule. Specifically, EPA...

  9. Analysis of the effects of combining air separation with combustion in a zero emissions (ZEITMOP) cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foy, Kirsten; McGovern, Jim

    2007-01-01

    The ZEITMOP cycle is a zero emissions (oxyfuel) power plant cycle proposed by Evgeny Yantovski that uses oxygen ion transport membranes to extract the oxygen required for combustion from air. A current proposed configuration of the cycle requires an oxygen ion transport membrane air separation unit operating at 920 deg. C and a separate combustion chamber operating at 1400 deg. C. If oxygen is consumed by a chemical reaction on the permeate side of an oxygen transport membrane, the oxygen flux is larger, so the air separation unit can be physically smaller. In addition, if this reaction is exothermic, the air separation unit is heated by the reaction, requiring no additional heating. Combustion fulfils both of these requirements, so combustion in the oxygen transport membrane air separation unit would allow a smaller air separation unit, which would also act as a combustion chamber. Unfortunately, a combustion temperature of 1400 deg. C will damage most oxygen transport membranes available today. However, new materials are continually being developed and investigated, so it may be possible to have an oxygen transport membrane chamber operating at 1400 deg. C in the short to medium term future. Alternatively the combustion chamber may be cooled, allowing it to operate at more realistic temperatures for currently available oxygen transport membranes. Controlling the operation temperature of the combined unit requires changing the mass flow rates of various streams of fluid in the cycle. This will have an effect on the work and heat transfers in the cycle. It is possible to calculate the theoretical effects of these changes in temperature. This paper presents an analysis investigating the impact of combining the air separator and the combustion chamber. The efficiency of the cycle was calculated at various operation temperatures for the combined oxygen transport membrane combustion chamber. The results were compared to the efficiency of the current cycle. The changes

  10. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    2008-01-01

    Combustion Engineering, a topic generally taught at the upper undergraduate and graduate level in most mechanical engineering programs, and many chemical engineering programs, is the study of rapid energy and mass transfer usually through the common physical phenomena of flame oxidation. It covers the physics and chemistry of this process and the engineering applications-from the generation of power such as the internal combustion automobile engine to the gas turbine engine. Renewed concerns about energy efficiency and fuel costs, along with continued concerns over toxic and particulate emissions have kept the interest in this vital area of engineering high and brought about new developments in both fundamental knowledge of flame and combustion physics as well as new technologies for flame and fuel control. *New chapter on new combustion concepts and technologies, including discussion on nanotechnology as related to combustion, as well as microgravity combustion, microcombustion, and catalytic combustion-all ...

  11. Air fuel ratio detector corrector for combustion engines using adaptive neurofuzzy networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Arora

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A perfect mix of the air and fuel in internal combustion engines is desirable for proper combustion of fuel with air. The vehicles running on road emit harmful gases due to improper combustion. This problem is severe in heavy vehicles like locomotive engines. To overcome this problem, generally an operator opens or closes the valve of fuel injection pump of locomotive engines to control amount of air going inside the combustion chamber, which requires constant monitoring. A model is proposed in this paper to alleviate combustion process. The method involves recording the time-varying flow of fuel components in combustion chamber. A Fuzzy Neural Network is trained for around 40 fuels to ascertain the required amount of air to form a standard mix to produce non-harmful gases and about 12 fuels are used for testing the network’s performance. The network then adaptively determines the additional/subtractive amount of air required for proper combustion. Mean square error calculation ensures the effectiveness of the network’s performance.

  12. Development of rapid mixing fuel nozzle for premixed combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuki, Masashi; Chung, Jin Do; Kim, Jang Woo; Hwang, Seung Min; Kim, Seung Mo; Ahn, Chul Ju

    2009-01-01

    Combustion in high-preheat and low oxygen concentration atmosphere is one of the attractive measures to reduce nitric oxide emission as well as greenhouse gases from combustion devices, and it is expected to be a key technology for the industrial applications in heating devices and furnaces. Before proceeding to the practical applications, we need to elucidate combustion characteristics of non-premixed and premixed flames in high-preheat and low oxygen concentration conditions from scientific point of view. For the purpose, we have developed a special mixing nozzle to create a homogeneous mixture of fuel and air by rapid mixing, and applied this rapidmixing nozzle to a Bunsen-type burner to observe combustion characteristics of the rapid-mixture. As a result, the combustion of rapid-mixture exhibited the same flame structure and combustion characteristics as the perfectly prepared premixed flame, even though the mixing time of the rapid-mixing nozzle was extremely short as a few milliseconds. Therefore, the rapid-mixing nozzle in this paper can be used to create preheated premixed flames as far as the mixing time is shorter than the ignition delay time of the fuel

  13. Final Rule to Reduce Hazardous Air Emissions from Newly Built Stationary Combustion Turbines: Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains an August 2003 fact sheet with information regarding the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Stationary Combustion Turbines. This document provides a summary of the information for this NESHAP.

  14. Experimental validation of large-eddy simulation for swirling methane-air non-premixed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, L.Y.; Luo, Y.H.; Xu, C.S. [Shanghai Jiaotong Univ. (China). School of Mechanical Engineering; Zhou, L.X. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Engineering Mechanics

    2013-07-01

    Large-eddy simulation of swirling methane-air non-premixed combustion was carried out using a Smagorinsky-Lilly subgrid scale stress model and a presumed-PDF fast-chemistry combustion model. The LES statistical results are validated by PIV, temperature and species concentration measurements made by the present authors. The results indicate that in the present case the presumed-PDF fast-chemistry combustion model is a fairish one. The instantaneous vorticity and temperature maps show clearly the development and the interaction between coherent structures and combustion.

  15. Preheating curvaton perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastero-Gil, M.; Di Clemente, V.; King, S.F.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the potentially important role played by preheating in certain variants of the curvaton mechanism in which isocurvature perturbations of a D-flat (and F-flat) direction become converted to curvature perturbations during reheating. We discover that parametric resonance of the isocurvature components amplifies the superhorizon fluctuations by a significant amount. As an example of these effects we develop a particle physics motivated model which involves hybrid inflation with the waterfall field N being responsible for generating the μ term, the right-handed neutrino mass scale, and the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale. The role of the curvaton field can be played either by usual Higgs field, or the lightest right-handed sneutrino. Our new results show that it is possible to achieve the correct curvature perturbations for initial values of the curvaton fields of order the weak scale. In this model we show that the prediction for the spectral index of the final curvature perturbation only depends on the mass of the curvaton during inflation, where consistency with current observational data requires the ratio of this mass to the Hubble constant to be 0.3

  16. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1997-01-01

    This Third Edition of Glassman's classic text clearly defines the role of chemistry, physics, and fluid mechanics as applied to the complex topic of combustion. Glassman's insightful introductory text emphasizes underlying physical and chemical principles, and encompasses engine technology, fire safety, materials synthesis, detonation phenomena, hydrocarbon fuel oxidation mechanisms, and environmental considerations. Combustion has been rewritten to integrate the text, figures, and appendixes, detailing available combustion codes, making it not only an excellent introductory text but also an important reference source for professionals in the field. Key Features * Explains complex combustion phenomena with physical insight rather than extensive mathematics * Clarifies postulates in the text using extensive computational results in figures * Lists modern combustion programs indicating usage and availability * Relates combustion concepts to practical applications.

  17. The effect of fan-induced turbulence on the combustion of hydrogen-air mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.K.; Tamm, H.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of fan-induced turbulence on the combustion of hydrogen-air mixtures has been studied in a 2.3-m diameter sphere over a hydrogen concentration range of 4 to 42% (by volume). Two fans were used to produce the turbulence, which was measured at various lacations by hot-wire anemometry. For low hydrogen concentrations (< 7%), turbulence increases the rate and extent of combustion; for large turbulence intensities the extent of combustion approaches 100%, and combustion times are reduced by factors of 8 to 10 from those observed under quiescent conditions. At high hydrogen concentrations, the effect of turbulence on combustion time is less pronounced than at low hydrogen concentrations. Flame-generated turbulence has a significant effect on the combustion rate. (orig.)

  18. Measure Guideline: Combustion Safety for Natural Draft Appliances Using Indoor Air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, L.

    2014-04-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  19. Combustion Velocity of Benzine-Benzol-Air Mixtures in High-Speed Internal-Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnauffer, Kurt

    1932-01-01

    The present paper describes a device whereby rapid flame movement within an internal-combustion engine cylinder may be recorded and determined. By the aid of a simple cylindrical contact and an oscillograph the rate of combustion within the cylinder of an airplane engine during its normal operation may be measured for gas intake velocities of from 30 to 35 m/s and for velocities within the cylinder of from 20 to 25 m/s. With it the influence of mixture ratios, of turbulence, of compression ratio and kind of fuel on combustion velocity may be determined. Besides the determination of the influence of the above factors on combustion velocity, the degree of turbulence may also be determined. As a unit of reference in estimating the degree of turbulence, the intake velocity of the charge is chosen.

  20. The role of primary and secondary air on wood combustion in cookstoves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirch, Thomas; Birzer, Cristian H.; Medwell, Paul R.; Holden, Liam

    2018-03-01

    A two-stage solid fuel research furnace was used to examine the claim that through forced draught greater mixing and more complete combustion could be achieved. By varying the primary air (PA) and secondary air (SA) flow the influence on the combustion process was investigated. In the first part of the combustion, when the release of volatile compounds predominates, the variation of neither PA nor SA had a significant influence. In the second part when mainly char is oxidised an increase in both PA and SA lead to a rising nominal combustion efficiency (?)), with a greater impact observed with SA. Furthermore higher air flows caused the heat transfer, to a pot above the furnace, to decline. Therefore forced draught does lead to greater mixing and mitigation of emissions, but in the presented configuration a trade-off between a higher NCE and a lower heat transfer needs consideration.

  1. Sources of Combustion Products: An Introduction to Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    In addition to environmental tobacco smoke, other sources of combustion products are unvented kerosene and gas space heaters, woodstoves, fireplaces, and gas stoves. The major pollutants released are carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and particles.

  2. Natural gas combustion and indoor air quality in domestic premises; Combustion du gaz naturel et qualite de l'air a l'interieur des habitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Occhio, L.; Riva, A. [Snam, (Italy); Canci, F.; Scevarolli, V. [Italgas, Torino (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Indoor air quality depends on many factors; combustion appliances are one of the sources of emissions inside dwellings. Their installation is regulated by UNI-CIG standards which also establish the ventilation and aeration requirements needed to guarantee the safety and healthiness of the environment. In order to critically evaluate the effect on indoor air quality of using gas appliances under different operational regimes and in different types of building, Snam and Italgas have developed a research project in co-operation with Enitecnologie and Turin Polytechnic, even to provide theoretical and experimental support for standardisation activities. The results of the presented research include experimental measurements made in real buildings, mathematical modelling and analysis of Italian and international literature. The results show that use of combustion appliances has little influence on indoor air quality and does not affect people's health. (authors)

  3. Combustion of a high-velocity hydrogen microjet effluxing in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, V. V.; Grek, G. R.; Korobeinichev, O. P.; Litvinenko, Yu. A.; Shmakov, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    This study is devoted to experimental investigation of hydrogen-combustion modes and the structure of a diffusion flame formed at a high-velocity efflux of hydrogen in air through round apertures of various diameters. The efflux-velocity range of the hydrogen jet and the diameters of nozzle apertures at which the flame is divided in two zones with laminar and turbulent flow are found. The zone with the laminar flow is a stabilizer of combustion of the flame as a whole, and in the zone with the turbulent flow the intense mixing of fuel with an oxidizer takes place. Combustion in these two zones can occur independently from each other, but the steadiest mode is observed only at the existence of the flame in the laminar-flow zone. The knowledge obtained makes it possible to understand more deeply the features of modes of microjet combustion of hydrogen promising for various combustion devices.

  4. Catalytically stabilized combustion of lean methane-air-mixtures: a numerical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogwiler, U; Benz, P; Mantharas, I [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The catalytically stabilized combustion of lean methane/air mixtures has been studied numerically under conditions closely resembling the ones prevailing in technical devices. A detailed numerical model has been developed for a laminar, stationary, 2-D channel flow with full heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction mechanisms. The computations provide direct information on the coupling between heterogeneous-homogeneous combustion and in particular on the means of homogeneous ignitions and stabilization. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  5. Large Eddy simulation of turbulent hydrogen-fuelled supersonic combustion in an air cross-flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenito, A.; Cecere, D.; Giacomazzi, E.

    2013-09-01

    The main aim of this article is to provide a theoretical understanding of the physics of supersonic mixing and combustion. Research in advanced air-breathing propulsion systems able to push vehicles well beyond is of interest around the world. In a scramjet, the air stream flow captured by the inlet is decelerated but still maintains supersonic conditions. As the residence time is very short , the study of an efficient mixing and combustion is a key issue in the ongoing research on compressible flows. Due to experimental difficulties in measuring complex high-speed unsteady flowfields, the most convenient way to understand unsteady features of supersonic mixing and combustion is to use computational fluid dynamics. This work investigates supersonic combustion physics in the Hyshot II combustion chamber within the Large Eddy simulation framework. The resolution of this turbulent compressible reacting flow requires: (1) highly accurate non-dissipative numerical schemes to properly simulate strong gradients near shock waves and turbulent structures away from these discontinuities; (2) proper modelling of the small subgrid scales for supersonic combustion, including effects from compressibility on mixing and combustion; (3) highly detailed kinetic mechanisms (the Warnatz scheme including 9 species and 38 reactions is adopted) accounting for the formation and recombination of radicals to properly predict flame anchoring. Numerical results reveal the complex topology of the flow under investigation. The importance of baroclinic and dilatational effects on mixing and flame anchoring is evidenced. Moreover, their effects on turbulence-scale generation and the scaling law are analysed.

  6. Soot, organics, and ultrafine ash from air- and oxy-fired coal combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Andersen, Myrrha E.

    2016-10-19

    Pulverized bituminous coal was burned in a 10. W externally heated entrained flow furnace under air-combustion and three oxy-combustion inlet oxygen conditions (28, 32, and 36%). Experiments were designed to produce flames with practically relevant stoichiometric ratios (SR. =1.2-1.4) and constant residence times (2.3. s). Size-classified fly ash samples were collected, and measurements focused on the soot, elemental carbon (EC), and organic carbon (OC) composition of the total and ultrafine (<0.6. μm) fly ash. Results indicate that although the total fly ash carbon, as measured by loss on ignition, was always acceptably low (<2%) with all three oxy-combustion conditions lower than air-combustion, the ultrafine fly ash for both air-fired and oxy-fired combustion conditions consists primarily of carbonaceous material (50-95%). Carbonaceous components on particles <0.6. μm measured by a thermal optical method showed that large fractions (52-93%) consisted of OC rather than EC, as expected. This observation was supported by thermogravimetric analysis indicating that for the air, 28% oxy, and 32% oxy conditions, 14-71% of this material may be OC volatilizing between 100. C and 550. C with the remaining 29-86% being EC/soot. However, for the 36% oxy condition, OC may comprise over 90% of the ultrafine carbon with a much smaller EC/soot contribution. These data were interpreted by considering the effects of oxy-combustion on flame attachment, ignition delay, and soot oxidation of a bituminous coal, and the effects of these processes on OC and EC emissions. Flame aerodynamics and inlet oxidant composition may influence emissions of organic hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from a bituminous coal. During oxy-coal combustion, judicious control of inlet oxygen concentration and placement may be used to minimize organic HAP and soot emissions.

  7. Ventilated Double Window for the Preheating of the Ventilation Air Comparison of Its Performance in a Northern and a Southern European Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge S. Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keeping the indoor air quality within the reference levels requires that the polluted indoor air be replaced by fresh air coming from the outside. This paper presents a sensitivity analysis and a series of simulations where the performance of this passive system is studied. The influence of each relevant factor, like the wind, the solar radiation, and the outdoor air temperature, is assessed. Two different local sets of climatic data were chosen, a mild and a cold winter.

  8. Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, Richard Sterling; Bechtel, II, William Theodore; Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur; Black, Stephen Hugh; Bland, Robert James; DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne; Meyer, Stefan Martin; Taura, Joseph Charles; Battaglioli, John Luigi

    2002-01-01

    A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

  9. Gravitational-wave mediated preheating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Stephon [Center for Cosmic Origins and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Cormack, Sam, E-mail: samuel.c.cormack.gr@dartmouth.edu [Center for Cosmic Origins and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Marcianò, Antonino [Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics & Department of Physics, Fudan University, 200433 Shanghai (China); Yunes, Nicolás [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2015-04-09

    We propose a new preheating mechanism through the coupling of the gravitational field to both the inflaton and matter fields, without direct inflaton–matter couplings. The inflaton transfers power to the matter fields through interactions with gravitational waves, which are exponentially enhanced due to an inflation–graviton coupling. One such coupling is the product of the inflaton to the Pontryagin density, as in dynamical Chern–Simons gravity. The energy scales involved are constrained by requiring that preheating happens fast during matter domination.

  10. Process and device for automatic control of air ratio in combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohr, F J; Holick, H

    1976-06-24

    The device concerns a process for the automatic control of the air ratio in combustion, by setting the fuel-air mixture for combustion depending on the air number lambda. The control of the air ratio of combustion engines is carried out using a zirconium dioxide measuring probe, which is situated in the exhaust gas. It is a disadvantage that this is only sensitive for an air number lambda of 1. In order to achieve control of the air ratio for air numbers greater or smaller than 1, according to the invention an auxiliary gas is mixed with the hot exhaust gas, or a component of the gas is withdrawn, so that a corrected exhaust gas flow is produced, whose air number is detected by the measuring sensor and controlled to a value of about 1. The auxiliary gas flow is chosen so that an air ratio differing from lambda equals 1 is formed when the air number of the corrected exhaust gas flow is regulated to a value of lambda equals 1 approximately. In order to keep the demand for auxiliary gas low, only part of the exhaust gas flow is used for the measurement. The exhaust gas part flow is kept constant while the auxiliary gas flow or the removed component of gas flow are altered. Hydrogen or oxygen are used as auxiliary gases, depending whether excess or reduced air is required. Instead of hydrogen, fuel or its combustion products can be used. According to the invention, the hydrogen or oxygen can be produced electrolytically. Dosing takes place by the current used for electrolysis.

  11. Mercury speciation in air-coal and oxy-coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui; Duan, Yufeng; Mao, Yongqiu [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment

    2013-07-01

    To study the effect of air-coal and oxy-coal combustion on mercury emission, Xuzhou bituminous coal was burnt in a 6 kWth fluidized bed at 800 and 850 C in four atmospheres: air, 21%O{sub 2}/79%CO{sub 2}, 30%O{sub 2}/70%CO{sub 2}, 40%O{sub 2}/60%CO{sub 2} analysed with an online flue gas analyzer. Ontario Hydro method (OHM) was employed to measure mercury speciation in flue gas. The result indicated that more elemental mercury and oxidized mercury are released when burned in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} atmosphere than in air at 800 C, while the situation is just opposite, when coal was burnt at 850 C, less Hg{sup 0} and Hg{sup 2+} in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} atmosphere than in air. The concentration of Hg{sup 0} rises as temperature increases both in the conditions of the air combustion and oxy-coal combustion, but the concentration of Hg{sup 2+} increases with the increase of temperature only in the condition of air combustion and decreases in the oxy-coal combustion. With the increase of the oxygen concentration which is in the range of 21-40%, the concentrations of Hg{sup 0} and Hg{sup 2+} decrease first and then increase. When excess air coefficient increases, the oxygen content is higher and the vaporization rate of Hg{sup 0} and Hg{sup 2+} decrease.

  12. Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion of Sewage Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshizo; Nojima, Tomoyuki; Kakuta, Akihiko; Moritomi, Hiroshi

    A conceptual design of an energy recovering system from sewage sludge was proposed. This system consists of a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, a gas turbine, and a heat exchanger for preheating of combustion air. Thermal efficiency was estimated roughly as 10-25%. In order to know the combustion characteristics of the sewage sludge under the elevated pressure condition, combustion tests of the dry and wet sewage sludge were carried out by using laboratory scale pressurized fluidized bed combustors. Combustibility of the sewage sludge was good enough and almost complete combustion was achieved in the combustion of the actual wet sludge. CO emission and NOx emission were marvelously low especially during the combustion of wet sewage sludge regardless of high volatile and nitrogen content of the sewage sludge. However, nitrous oxide (N2O) emission was very high. Hence, almost all nitrogen oxides were emitted as the form of N2O. From these combustion tests, we judged combustion of the sewage sludge with the pressurized fluidized bed combustor is suitable, and the conceptual design of the power generation system is available.

  13. NEDO project reports. High performance industrial furnace development project - High temperature air combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-21

    For the purpose of reducing energy consumption, a NEDO project 'Developmental research on high efficiency industrial furnaces' was carried out from FY 1993 to FY 1999 by The Japan Industrial Furnaces Manufacturers Association, and the paper outlined the details of the project. Industrial furnaces handled in this R and D can bring 30% reduction of the energy consumption and approximately 50% NOx reduction, and were given the 9th Nikkei global environmental technology prize. In the study of combustion phenomena of high temperature air combustion, the paper arranged characteristics of flame, the base of gaseous fuel flame, the base of liquid fuel flame, the base of solid fuel flame, etc. Concerning high temperature air combustion models for simulation, fluid dynamics and heat transfer models, and reaction and NOx models, etc. As to impacts of high temperature air combustion on performance of industrial furnaces, energy conservation, lowering of pollution, etc. In relation to a guide for the design of high efficiency industrial furnaces, flow charts, conceptual design, evaluation method for heat balance and efficiency using charts, combustion control system, applicability of high efficiency industrial furnaces, etc. (NEDO)

  14. NEDO project reports. High performance industrial furnace development project - High temperature air combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-21

    For the purpose of reducing energy consumption, a NEDO project 'Developmental research on high efficiency industrial furnaces' was carried out from FY 1993 to FY 1999 by The Japan Industrial Furnaces Manufacturers Association, and the paper outlined the details of the project. Industrial furnaces handled in this R and D can bring 30% reduction of the energy consumption and approximately 50% NOx reduction, and were given the 9th Nikkei global environmental technology prize. In the study of combustion phenomena of high temperature air combustion, the paper arranged characteristics of flame, the base of gaseous fuel flame, the base of liquid fuel flame, the base of solid fuel flame, etc. Concerning high temperature air combustion models for simulation, fluid dynamics and heat transfer models, and reaction and NOx models, etc. As to impacts of high temperature air combustion on performance of industrial furnaces, energy conservation, lowering of pollution, etc. In relation to a guide for the design of high efficiency industrial furnaces, flow charts, conceptual design, evaluation method for heat balance and efficiency using charts, combustion control system, applicability of high efficiency industrial furnaces, etc. (NEDO)

  15. Numerical simulations of the industrial circulating fluidized bed boiler under air- and oxy-fuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamczyk, Wojciech P.; Kozołub, Paweł; Klimanek, Adam; Białecki, Ryszard A.; Andrzejczyk, Marek; Klajny, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Measured and numerical results of air-fuel combustion process within large scale industrial circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler is presented in this paper. For numerical simulations the industrial compact CFB boiler was selected. Numerical simulations were carried out using three-dimensional model where the dense particulate transport phenomenon was simultaneously modelled with combustion process. The fluidization process was modelled using the hybrid Euler-Lagrange approach. The impact of the geometrical model simplification on predicted mass distribution and temperature profiles over CFB boiler combustion chamber two kinds of geometrical models were used, namely the complete model which consist of combustion chamber, solid separators, external solid super-heaters and simplified boiler geometry which was reduced to the combustion chamber. The evaluated temperature and pressure profiles during numerical simulations were compared against measured data collected during boiler air-fuel operation. Collected data was also used for validating numerical model of the oxy-fuel combustion model. Stability of the model and its sensitivity on changes of several input parameters were studied. The comparison of the pressure and temperature profiles for all considered cases gave comparable trends in contrary to measured data. Moreover, some additional test was carried out the check the influence of radiative heat transfer on predicted temperature profile within the CFB boiler. - Highlights: • Hybrid Euler-Lagrange approach was used for modelling particle transport, air- and oxy-fuel combustion process. • Numerical results were validated against measured data. • The influence of different boiler operating conditions on calculated temperature profile was investigated. • New strategy for resolving particle transport in circulating fluidized bed was shown

  16. Numerical modeling of straw combustion in a fixed bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Haosheng; Jensen, Anker; Glarborg, Peter

    2005-01-01

    . The straw combustion processes include moisture evaporation, straw pyrolysis, gas combustion, and char combustion. The model provides detailed information of the structure of the ignition flame front. Simulated gas species concentrations at the bed surface, ignition flame front rate, and bed temperature......Straw is being used as main renewable energy source in grate boilers in Denmark. For optimizing operating conditions and design parameters, a one-dimensional unsteady heterogeneous mathematical model has been developed and experiments have been carried out for straw combustion in a fixed bed...... are in good agreement with measurements at different operating conditions such as primary air-flow rate, pre-heating of the primary air, oxygen concentration, moisture content in straw, and bulk density of the straw in the fixed bed. A parametric study indicates that the effective heat conductivity, straw...

  17. Filter for underground mining for suction of preferably full cut and part cut machines, to be provided with preheated air, to avoid dropping below the dew point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelter, H.

    1976-10-28

    Particularly when cutting hard rock, the cutting room to be provided with suction is wetted with water from nozzles, which, when sucking out air containing dust with high humidity leads to encrustation in the filter cloth. In order to avoid this, it is proposed that the air should be heated, using heat from the motor driving the ventilator, so that one avoids dropping below the dew point in the filter.

  18. HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF AN EMULSIFIED HEAVY FUEL OIL IN A FIRETUBE BOILER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of measuring emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from the combustion flue gases of a No. 6 fuel oil, both with and without an emulsifying agent, in a 2.5 million Btu/hr (732 kW) firetube boiler with the purpose of determining the impacts of the e...

  19. Proceedings of the 1998 international joint power generation conference (FACT-Vol.22). Volume 1: Fuels and combustion technologies; Gas turbines; Environmental engineering; Nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.; Natole, R.; Sanyal, A.; Veilleux, J.

    1998-01-01

    Papers are arranged under the following topical sections: Fuels and combustion technologies; Low NOx burner applications; Low cost solutions to utility NOx compliance issues; Coal combustion--Retrofit experiences, low NOx, and efficiency; Highly preheated air combustion; Combustion control and optimization; Advanced technology for gas fuel combustion; Spray combustion and mixing; Efficient power generation using gas turbines; Safety issues in power industry; Efficient and environmentally benign conversion of wastes to energy; Artificial intelligence monitoring, control, and optimization of power plants; Combustion modeling and diagnostics; Advanced combustion technologies and combustion synthesis; Aero and industrial gas turbine presentations IGTI gas turbine division; NOx/SO 2 ; Plant cooling water system problems and solutions; Issues affecting plant operations and maintenance; and Costs associated with operating and not operating a nuclear power plant. Papers within scope have been processed separately for inclusion on the database

  20. System and method for conditioning intake air to an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellnau, Mark C.

    2015-08-04

    A system for conditioning the intake air to an internal combustion engine includes a means to boost the pressure of the intake air to the engine and a liquid cooled charge air cooler disposed between the output of the boost means and the charge air intake of the engine. Valves in the coolant system can be actuated so as to define a first configuration in which engine cooling is performed by coolant circulating in a first coolant loop at one temperature, and charge air cooling is performed by coolant flowing in a second coolant loop at a lower temperature. The valves can be actuated so as to define a second configuration in which coolant that has flowed through the engine can be routed through the charge air cooler. The temperature of intake air to the engine can be controlled over a wide range of engine operation.

  1. Effect of secondary air injection on the combustion efficiency of sawdust in a fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. N. Srinivasa Rao

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural wastes like bagasse, paddy husks, sawdust and groundnut shells can be effectively used as fuels for fluidized bed combustion; otherwise these biomass fuels are difficult to handle due to high moisture and fines content. In the present work the possibility of using sawdust in the fluidized bed combustor, related combustion efficiencies and problems encountered in the combustion process are discussed. The temperature profiles for sawdust with an increase in fluidizing velocity along the vertical height above the distributor plate indicate that considerable burning of fuel particles is taking place in the freeboard zone rather than complete burning within the bed. Therefore, an enlarged disengagement section is provided to improve the combustion of fines. The temperature profiles along the bed height are observed at different feed rates. The feed rate of sawdust corresponding to the maximum possible temperature was observed to be 10.2 kg/h. It is observed that 50-60% excess air is optimal for reducing carbon loss during the burning of sawdust. The maximum possible combustion efficiency with sawdust is 99.2% and is observed with 65% excess air.

  2. An innovative system for supplying air and fuel mixture to a combustion chamber of an engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikumar, G. R. Bharath

    2018-04-01

    Conventional carburetors are being used since decades to ensure that the desired ratio of air and fuel enters the combustion chamber for combustion for the purpose of generating power in an Spark Ignition(SI) internal combustion engine. However to increase the efficiency, the carburetor system is gradually being replaced by fuel injection systems. Fuel injection systems use injectors to supply pressurized fuel into the combustion chamber. Owing to the high initial and maintenance cost, carburetors are still ruling in the low cost vehicle domain. An innovative concept is conceived, which is an alternative method to the carburetor system to supply the air and fuel mixture to a combustion chamber of an engine. This system comprises of an inner hollow cylinder with minute holes drilled along its length with an outer cylinder capable of sliding along its length or its longitudinal axis. This system is placed in the venturi instead of the conventional carburetor system. Fuel enters from the bottom inlet of the inner cylinder and flows out through the holes provided along its length. The fuel flow from the inner cylinder is dependent on the size and the number of holes exposed at that instance by the sliding outer cylinder which in turn is connected to the throttle or accelerator.

  3. Numerical Study of Contaminant Effects on Combustion of Hydrogen, Ethane, and Methane in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, H. T.; Thomas, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to assess the effects of vitiated air on the chemical kinetics of hydrogen, ethane, and methane combustion with air. A series of calculations in static reacting systems was performed, where the initial temperature was specified and reactions occurred at constant pressure. Three different types of test flow contaminants were considered: NP, H2O, and a combustion of H2O and CO2. These contaminants are present in the test flows of facilities used for hypersonic propulsion testing. The results were computed using a detailed reaction mechanism and are presented in terms of ignition and reaction times. Calculations were made for a wide range of contaminant concentrations, temperatures and pressures. The results indicate a pronounced kinetic effect over a range of temperatures, especially with NO contamination and, to a lesser degree, with H2O contamination. In all cases studied, CO2 remained kinetically inert, but had a thermodynamic effect on results by acting as a third body. The largest effect is observed with combustion using hydrogen fuel, less effect is seen with combustion of ethane, and little effect of contaminants is shown with methane combustion.

  4. Characterisation of laser ignition in hydrogen-air mixtures in a combustion bomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Dhananjay Kumar; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar [Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur-208016 (India); Weinrotter, Martin; Wintner, Ernst [Photonics Institute, Vienna University of Technology, Gusshausstrasse 27, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Iskra, Kurt [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2009-03-15

    Laser-induced spark ignition of lean hydrogen-air mixtures was experimentally investigated using nanosecond pulses generated by Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1064 nm) at initial pressure of 3 MPa and temperature 323 K in a constant volume combustion chamber. Laser ignition has several advantages over conventional ignition systems especially in internal combustion engines, hence it is necessary to characterise the combustion phenomena from start of plasma formation to end of combustion. In the present experimental investigation, the formation of laser plasma by spontaneous emission technique and subsequently developing flame kernel was measured. Initially, the plasma propagates towards the incoming laser. This backward moving plasma (towards the focusing lens) grows much faster than the forward moving plasma (along the direction of laser). A piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the pressure rise in the combustion chamber. Hydrogen-air mixtures were also ignited using a spark plug under identical experimental conditions and results are compared with the laser ignition ones. (author)

  5. An investigation of turbulent catalytically stabilized channel flow combustion of lean hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantzaras, I; Benz, P; Schaeren, R; Bombach, R [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The catalytically stabilised thermal combustion (CST) of lean hydrogen-air mixtures was investigated numerically in a turbulent channel flow configuration using a two-dimensional elliptic model with detailed heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions. Comparison between turbulent and laminar cases having the same incoming mean properties shows that turbulence inhibits homogeneous ignition due to increased heat transport away from the near-wall layer. The peak root-mean-square temperature and species fluctuations are always located outside the extent of the homogeneous reaction zone indicating that thermochemical fluctuations have no significant influence on gaseous combustion. (author) 4 figs., 6 refs.

  6. Enhancement of exergy efficiency in combustion systems using flameless mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ehsan; Wahid, Mazlan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Exergy efficiency in flameless combustion mode is 13% more than conventional combustion. • The maximum exergy efficiency in flameless combustion mode is achieved when oxidizer contains 10% oxygen. • Exergy destruction of flameless combustion is maximized when CO 2 is used for dilution of oxidizer. - Abstract: An exergitic-based analysis of methane (CH 4 ) conventional and flameless combustion in a lab-scale furnace is performed to determine the rate of pollutant formation and the effective potential of a given amount of fuel in the various combustion modes. The effects of inlet air temperature on exergy efficiency and pollutant formation of conventional combustion in various equivalence ratios are analyzed. The rate of exergy destruction in different conditions of flameless combustion (various equivalence ratios, oxygen concentration in the oxidizer and the effects of diluent) are computed using three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD). Fuel consumption reduction and exergy efficiency augmentation are the main positive consequences of using preheated air temperature in conventional combustion, however pollutants especially NO x formation increases dramatically. Low and moderate temperature inside the chamber conducts the flameless combustion system to low level pollutant formation. Fuel consumption and exergy destruction reduce drastically in flameless mode in comparison with conventional combustion. Exergy efficiency of conventional and flameless mode is 75% and 88% respectively in stoichiometric combustion. When CO 2 is used for dilution of oxidizer, chemical exergy increases due to high CO 2 concentration in the combustion products and exergy efficiency reduces around 2% compared to dilution with nitrogen (N 2 ). Since the rate of irreversibilities in combustion systems is very high in combined heat and power (CHP) generation and other industries, application of flameless combustion could be effective in terms of pollutant

  7. Effect of excess air on second-generation PFB combustion plant performance and economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, A.; Garland, R.; Newby, R.; Rehmat, A.; Rubow, L.; Bonk, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual design of a 1.4-MPa (14-atm) coal-fired second-generation pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) combustion plant and identifies the performance and economic changes that result as the excess air and thus gas turbine-to-steam turbine power ratio, is changed. The performance of these plants, another second- generation PFB combustion plant, and a conventional pulverized-coal (PC)-fired plant with wet limestone flue gas desulfurization is compared. Depending upon the conditions selected, the PFB combustion plant can achieve a 45 percent efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the coal used as fuel) and a cost of electricity at least 20 percent lower than that of the conventional PC-fired plant

  8. Effect of primary air content on formation of nitrogen oxides during combustion of Ehkibastuz coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.; Imankulov, Eh.R.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations are discussed carried out in a pilot plant at the Kaz. Power Engineering Scientific Research Institute into the effect of the amount of primary air in coal-dust flame on the final concentration of nitrogen oxides in flue gases. The tests were carried out in a 7500 mm high, 1600 mm dia vertical cylindrical combustion chamber having type P-57 burner, and air dispersed fuel plus additional air supplies located at the top. Amounts of coal dust fed by a drum feeder along the air pipe varied from 100-600 kg/h. The required air was supplied by 5000 m/sup 3//h Type TK-700/5 blowers at 0.04 MPa. Ehkibastuz coal samples contained: 1.3% moisture; 48.1% ash; 38.02% carbon; 2.56% hydrogen; 0.73% sulfur; 0.60% nitrogen; heat of combustion was 14.3 MJ/kg. Results obtained indicate that variations in the amount of primary air in swirl flow burners affect formation of fuel nitrogen; there is an optimum volume at which minimum quantities of nitrogen oxides are formed. Either an increase or decrease in the primary air results in a rise in nitrogen oxide concentration. 3 references.

  9. Experimental investigation on the effect of intake air temperature and air-fuel ratio on cycle-to-cycle variations of HCCI combustion and performance parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurya, Rakesh Kumar; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar [Engine Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2011-04-15

    Combustion in HCCI engines is a controlled auto ignition of well-mixed fuel, air and residual gas. Since onset of HCCI combustion depends on the auto ignition of fuel/air mixture, there is no direct control on the start of combustion process. Therefore, HCCI combustion becomes unstable rather easily, especially at lower and higher engine loads. In this study, cycle-to-cycle variations of a HCCI combustion engine fuelled with ethanol were investigated on a modified two-cylinder engine. Port injection technique is used for preparing homogeneous charge for HCCI combustion. The experiments were conducted at varying intake air temperatures and air-fuel ratios at constant engine speed of 1500 rpm and P-{theta} diagram of 100 consecutive combustion cycles for each test conditions at steady state operation were recorded. Consequently, cycle-to-cycle variations of the main combustion parameters and performance parameters were analyzed. To evaluate the cycle-to-cycle variations of HCCI combustion parameters, coefficient of variation (COV) of every parameter were calculated for every engine operating condition. The critical optimum parameters that can be used to define HCCI operating ranges are 'maximum rate of pressure rise' and 'COV of indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP)'. (author)

  10. Air toxic emissions from the combustion of coal: Identifying and quantifying hazardous air pollutants from US coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szpunar, C.B.

    1992-09-01

    This report addresses the key air toxic emissions likely to emanate from continued and expanded use of domestic coal. It identifies and quantifies those trace elements specified in the US 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, by tabulating selected characterization data on various source coals by region, state, and rank. On the basis of measurements by various researchers, this report also identifies those organic compounds likely to be derived from the coal combustion process (although their formation is highly dependent on specific boiler configurations and operating conditions).

  11. Air toxic emissions from the combustion of coal: Identifying and quantifying hazardous air pollutants from US coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szpunar, C.B.

    1992-09-01

    This report addresses the key air toxic emissions likely to emanate from continued and expanded use of domestic coal. It identifies and quantifies those trace elements specified in the US 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, by tabulating selected characterization data on various source coals by region, state, and rank. On the basis of measurements by various researchers, this report also identifies those organic compounds likely to be derived from the coal combustion process (although their formation is highly dependent on specific boiler configurations and operating conditions)

  12. Impact of CO_2-enriched combustion air on micro-gas turbine performance for carbon capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Best, Thom; Finney, Karen N.; Ingham, Derek B.; Pourkashanian, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Power generation is one of the largest anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission sources; although it is now reducing in carbon intensity due to switching from coal to gas, this is only part of a bridging solution that will require the utilization of carbon capture technologies. Gas turbines, such as those at the UK Carbon Capture Storage Research Centre's Pilot-scale Advanced CO_2 Capture Technology (UKCCSRC PACT) National Core Facility, have high exhaust gas mass flow rates with relatively low CO_2 concentrations; therefore solvent-based post-combustion capture is energy intensive. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) can increase CO_2 levels, reducing the capture energy penalty. The aim of this paper is to simulate EGR through enrichment of the combustion air with CO_2 to assess changes to turbine performance and potential impacts on complete generation and capture systems. The oxidising air was enhanced with CO_2, up to 6.29%vol dry, impacting mechanical performance, reducing both engine speed by over 400 revolutions per minute and compression temperatures. Furthermore, it affected complete combustion, seen in changes to CO and unburned hydrocarbon emissions. This impacted on turbine efficiency, which increased specific fuel consumption (by 2.9%). CO_2 enhancement could therefore result in significant efficiency gains for the capture plant. - Highlights: • Experimental investigation of the impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on GT performance. • Combustion air was enhanced with CO_2 to simulate EGR. • EGR impact was ascertained by CO and unburned hydrocarbon changes. • Primary factor influencing performance was found to be oxidiser temperature. • Impact of CO_2 enhancement on post-combustion capture efficiency.

  13. Studies of MHD generator performance with oxygen enriched coal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormhoudt, J.; Yousefian, V.; Kolb, C. E.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.

    1980-07-01

    This paper presents calculations made using the Aerodyne PACKAGE (Plasma Analysis, Chemical Kinetics, and Generator Efficiency) computer code which bear on two questions which arise in connection with choices between oxygen enrichment and air preheating to attain the high combustion temperatures needed for open-cycle, coal-fired MHD power generation. The first question is which method produces the highest enthalpy extraction per unit channel length. The second is, in test facilities intended to study tradeoffs between oxygen enrichment and preheated air, can good generator performance be obtained from the same physical channel for different combustor compositions. The answer to the first question is found to depend on what combustor conditions are taken to be comparable. As for the second question, it is found that operation with channel input from off-design combustor conditions can cause serious problems, which can be partially alleviated by changing the channel load factors.

  14. Multiple Threats to Child Health from Fossil Fuel Combustion: Impacts of Air Pollution and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Frederica P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Approaches to estimating and addressing the risk to children from fossil fuel combustion have been fragmented, tending to focus either on the toxic air emissions or on climate change. Yet developing children, and especially poor children, now bear a disproportionate burden of disease from both environmental pollution and climate change due to fossil fuel combustion. Objective: This commentary summarizes the robust scientific evidence regarding the multiple current and projected health impacts of fossil fuel combustion on the young to make the case for a holistic, child-centered energy and climate policy that addresses the full array of physical and psychosocial stressors resulting from fossil fuel pollution. Discussion: The data summarized here show that by sharply reducing our dependence on fossil fuels we would achieve highly significant health and economic benefits for our children and their future. These benefits would occur immediately and also play out over the life course and potentially across generations. Conclusion: Going beyond the powerful scientific and economic arguments for urgent action to reduce the burning of fossil fuels is the strong moral imperative to protect our most vulnerable populations. Citation: Perera FP. 2017. Multiple threats to child health from fossil fuel combustion: impacts of air pollution and climate change. Environ Health Perspect 125:141–148; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP299 PMID:27323709

  15. Multiple Threats to Child Health from Fossil Fuel Combustion: Impacts of Air Pollution and Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Frederica P

    2017-02-01

    Approaches to estimating and addressing the risk to children from fossil fuel combustion have been fragmented, tending to focus either on the toxic air emissions or on climate change. Yet developing children, and especially poor children, now bear a disproportionate burden of disease from both environmental pollution and climate change due to fossil fuel combustion. This commentary summarizes the robust scientific evidence regarding the multiple current and projected health impacts of fossil fuel combustion on the young to make the case for a holistic, child-centered energy and climate policy that addresses the full array of physical and psychosocial stressors resulting from fossil fuel pollution. The data summarized here show that by sharply reducing our dependence on fossil fuels we would achieve highly significant health and economic benefits for our children and their future. These benefits would occur immediately and also play out over the life course and potentially across generations. Going beyond the powerful scientific and economic arguments for urgent action to reduce the burning of fossil fuels is the strong moral imperative to protect our most vulnerable populations. Citation: Perera FP. 2017. Multiple threats to child health from fossil fuel combustion: impacts of air pollution and climate change. Environ Health Perspect 125:141-148; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP299.

  16. Numerical comparison of hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for unsteady shockinduced combustion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P. Pradeep; Kim, Kui Soon; Oh, Se Jong; Choi, Jeong Yeol [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    An unsteady shock-induced combustion (SIC) is characterized by the regularly oscillating combustion phenomenon behind the shock wave supported by the blunt projectile flying around the speed of Chapman-Jouguet detonation wave. The SIC is the coupling phenomenon between the hypersonic flow and the chemical kinetics, but the effects of chemical kinetics have been rarely reported. We compared hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for the shock-induced combustion to demonstrate the importance of considering the reaction mechanisms for such complex flows. Seven hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms were considered, those available publically and used in other researches. As a first step in the comparison of the hydrogen combustion, ignition delay time of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures was compared at various initial conditions. Laminar premixed flame speed was also compared with available experimental data and at high pressure conditions. In addition, half-reaction length of ZND (Zeldovich-Neumann-Doering) detonation structure accounts for the length scale in SIC phenomena. Oscillation frequency of the SIC is compared by running the time-accurate 3rd-order Navier-Stokes CFD code fully coupled with the detailed chemistry by using four levels of grid resolutions.

  17. Numerical comparison of hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for unsteady shockinduced combustion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, P. Pradeep; Kim, Kui Soon; Oh, Se Jong; Choi, Jeong Yeol

    2015-01-01

    An unsteady shock-induced combustion (SIC) is characterized by the regularly oscillating combustion phenomenon behind the shock wave supported by the blunt projectile flying around the speed of Chapman-Jouguet detonation wave. The SIC is the coupling phenomenon between the hypersonic flow and the chemical kinetics, but the effects of chemical kinetics have been rarely reported. We compared hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for the shock-induced combustion to demonstrate the importance of considering the reaction mechanisms for such complex flows. Seven hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms were considered, those available publically and used in other researches. As a first step in the comparison of the hydrogen combustion, ignition delay time of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures was compared at various initial conditions. Laminar premixed flame speed was also compared with available experimental data and at high pressure conditions. In addition, half-reaction length of ZND (Zeldovich-Neumann-Doering) detonation structure accounts for the length scale in SIC phenomena. Oscillation frequency of the SIC is compared by running the time-accurate 3rd-order Navier-Stokes CFD code fully coupled with the detailed chemistry by using four levels of grid resolutions.

  18. Emission characteristics of kerosene-air spray combustion with plasma assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjian Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A plasma assisted combustion system for combustion of kerosene-air mixtures was developed to study emission levels of O2, CO2, CO, and NOx. The emission measurement was conducted by Testo 350-Pro Flue Gas Analyzer. The effect of duty ratio, feedstock gas flow rate and applied voltage on emission performance has been analyzed. The results show that O2 and CO emissions reduce with an increase of applied voltage, while CO2 and NOx emissions increase. Besides, when duty ratio or feedstock gas flow rate decreases, the same emission results would appear. The emission spectrum of the air plasma of plasma assisted combustion actuator was also registered to analyze the kinetic enhancement effect of plasma, and the generation of ozone was believed to be the main factor that plasma makes a difference in our experiment. These results are valuable for the future optimization of kerosene-fueled aircraft engine when using plasma assisted combustion devices to exert emission control.

  19. Modelling and simulation of wood chip combustion in a hot air generator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajika, J K A T; Narayana, Mahinsasa

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on modelling and simulation of horizontal moving bed/grate wood chip combustor. A standalone finite volume based 2-D steady state Euler-Euler Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model was developed for packed bed combustion. Packed bed combustion of a medium scale biomass combustor, which was retrofitted from wood log to wood chip feeding for Tea drying in Sri Lanka, was evaluated by a CFD simulation study. The model was validated by the experimental results of an industrial biomass combustor for a hot air generation system in tea industry. Open-source CFD tool; OpenFOAM was used to generate CFD model source code for the packed bed combustion and simulated along with an available solver for free board region modelling in the CFD tool. Height of the packed bed is about 20 cm and biomass particles are assumed to be spherical shape with constant surface area to volume ratio. Temperature measurements of the combustor are well agreed with simulation results while gas phase compositions have discrepancies. Combustion efficiency of the validated hot air generator is around 52.2 %.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of a ferrous compound material obtained by combustion of ferroboron and ferrotitanium mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejar, M.A; Fuenzalida, J.L

    2008-01-01

    A ferrous compound material was synthesized in this work, by the air auto-combustion of mixtures of powdered ferroboron and ferrotitanium, compacted under pressures of 79 and 93 MPa and preheated to a temperature of about 1000 o C. The synthesized compounds were characterized by XRD analysis, and macro and micro-hardness tests. The formation of titanium diboride was found in all the synthesized test pieces (au)

  1. Investigations on oxy-fuel combustion in glass melting furnaces; Untersuchungen zur Oxy-Fuel-Feuerung in Glasschmelzwannen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leicher, Joerg; Giese, Anne [Gaswaerme-Institut e.V., Essen (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Glass melting requires process temperatures of more than 1600 C which are usually achieved using intensive air preheating and near-stoichiometric combustion. This often leads to high nitrous oxide emissions (NO{sub x}). Oxy-fuel technology offers an interesting alternative since high combustion temperatures can be achieved using pure oxygen as oxidizer while obtaining low NO{sub x} emissions. In the course of the AiF research project ''O2-Glaswanne'' (IGF-Nr.: 15987 N), Gaswaerme- Institut e.V. Essen investigates this combustion process by experimental and numerical means in order to determine potential optimization approaches for glass melting furnaces.

  2. Air to fuel ratio sensor for internal combustion engine control system; Nainen kikan no nensho seigyoyo kunen hi sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuzuki, M.; Kawai, T.; Yamada, T.; Nishio [NGK Spark Plug Co. Ltd., Aichi (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    Air to fuel ratio sensor is used for emission control system of three-way catalyst, and constitutes the important functional part of combustion control system. For further precise combustion control application, universal air to fuel ratio heated exhaust gas oxygen sensor (UEGO sensor) has been developed. This paper introduces heater control system for constant element temperature of UEGO sensor. By the heater wattage feedback control of sensing cell impedance, the change of sensor element temperature is decreased. 9 refs., 13 figs.

  3. Aerosols from biomass combustion. Particle formation, relevance on air quality, and measures for particle reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaumer, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Biomass combustion is a relevant source of particle emissions. In Switzerland, wood combustion contributes with 2% to the energy supply but with more than 4% to Particulate Matter smaller 10 microns (PM 10) in the ambient air. In areas with high density of residential wood heating (e.g. in the south of Chile), wood particles are the dominant source of PM 10 resulting in heavy local smog situations. Since combustion particles are regarded as health relevant and since immission limit values on PM 10 are widely exceeded, measures for particle reduction from biomass combustion are of high priority. With respect to aerosols from biomass combustion, two sources of particles are distinguished: 1. an incomplete combustion can lead to soot and organic matter contained in the particles, 2. ash constituents in the fuel lead to the formation of inorganic fly ash particles mainly consisting of salts such as chlorides and oxides. The theory of aerosol formation from fuel constituents is described and two hypotheses to reduce inorganic particles from biomass combustion are proposed: 1. a reduced oxygen content in the solid fuel conversion zone (glow bed in a fixed bed combustion) is assumed to reduce the particle mass concentration due to three mechanisms: a) reduced oxidation of fuel constituents to compounds with higher volatility, b) reduced local temperature for solid fuel conversion, c) a reduced entrainmed of fuel constituents 2. a reduced total excess air can reduce the particle number due to enhanced coagulation. The proposed low-particle concept has been implemented for an automatic furnace for wood pellets in the size range from 100 kW to 500 kW. Furthermore, the furnace design was optimised to enable a part load operation without increased emissions of carbon monoxide (CO) and particles. In a 100 kW prototype furnace the low-particle conditions resulted in particle emissions between 6 mg/m n 3 to 11 mg/m n 3 at 13 vol.-% O2 and CO emissions below 70 mg/m n 3 in the

  4. Co-combustion of low rank coal/waste biomass blends using dry air or oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S.

    2013-01-01

    Biomass species such as the rice husk and the olive milling residue, and a low quality Turkish coal, Soma Denis lignite, were burned in a thermal analyzer under pure oxygen and dry air up to 900 °C, and differential thermal analysis (DTA) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) analysis profiles were obtained. Co-combustion experiments of lignite/biomass blends containing 5–20 wt% of biomass were also performed. The effects of the oxidizer type and the blending ratio of biomass were evaluated considering some thermal reactivity indicators such as the maximum burning rate and its temperature, the maximum heat flow temperature, and the burnout levels. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) were used to characterize the samples, and the variations in the combustion characteristics of the samples were interpreted based on the differences in the intrinsic properties of the samples. - Highlights: ► Co-combustion of lignite/biomass blends. ► The effects of the oxidizer type and the blending ratio. ► Effects of intrinsic properties on combustion characteristics.

  5. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John C. Wagner

    2004-03-31

    High-temperature, natural gas-fired furnaces, especially those fired with preheated air, produce large quantities of NO{sub x} per ton of material processed. Regulations on emissions from industrial furnaces are becoming increasingly more stringent. In addition, competition is forcing operators to make their furnaces more productive and/or efficient. Switching from preheated air to industrial oxygen can increase efficiency and reduce NO{sub x}, but oxygen is significantly more costly than air and may not be compatible with the material being heated. What was needed, and what was developed during this project, is a technology that reduces NO{sub x} emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxy-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace. Heat transfer from the flame to the load increases due to the more luminous fuel-rich zones, a longer overall flame length, and the breakup of the thermal boundary layer. The increased heat transfer shortens heat up times, thereby increasing furnace productivity, and reduces the heat going up the stack, thereby increasing efficiency. The fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones also produce substantially less NO{sub x} than firing at a constant excess air level. The longer flames and higher heat transfer rate reduces overall peak flame temperature and thus reduces additional NO{sub x} formation from the eventual mixing of the zones and burnout of combustibles from the rich zones. This project involved the development of hardware to implement oscillating combustion on an industrial scale, the laboratory testing of oscillating combustion on various types of industrial burners, and the field testing of oscillating combustion on several types of industrial furnace. Before laboratory testing began, a market study was conducted, based on the

  6. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Institute of Gas Technology

    2004-01-30

    High-temperature, natural gas-fired furnaces, especially those fired with preheated air, produce large quantities of NO{sub x} per ton of material processed. Regulations on emissions from industrial furnaces are becoming increasingly more stringent. In addition, competition is forcing operators to make their furnaces more productive and/or efficient. Switching from preheated air to industrial oxygen can increase efficiency and reduce NO{sub x}, but oxygen is significantly more costly than air and may not be compatible with the material being heated. What was needed, and what was developed during this project, is a technology that reduces NO{sub x} emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxy-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace. Heat transfer from the flame to the load increases due to the more luminous fuel-rich zones, a longer overall flame length, and the breakup of the thermal boundary layer. The increased heat transfer shortens heat up times, thereby increasing furnace productivity, and reduces the heat going up the stack, thereby increasing efficiency. The fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones also produce substantially less NO{sub x} than firing at a constant excess air level. The longer flames and higher heat transfer rate reduces overall peak flame temperature and thus reduces additional NO{sub x} formation from the eventual mixing of the zones and burnout of combustibles from the rich zones. This project involved the development of hardware to implement oscillating combustion on an industrial scale, the laboratory testing of oscillating combustion on various types of industrial burners, and the field testing of oscillating combustion on several types of industrial furnace. Before laboratory testing began, a market study was conducted, based on the

  7. Waste heat recovery at the glass industry with the intervention of batch and cullet preheating

    OpenAIRE

    Dolianitis Ioannis; Giannakopoulos Dionysios; Hatzilau Christina-Stavrula; Karellas Sotirios; Kakaras Emmanuil; Nikolova Evelina; Skarpetis Georgios; Christodoulou Nikolaos; Giannoulas Nikolaos; Zitounis Theodoros

    2016-01-01

    A promising option to reduce the specific energy consumption and CO2 emissions at a conventional natural gas fired container glass furnace deals with the advanced utilization of the exhaust gases downstream the air regenerators by means of batch and cullet preheating. A 3-dimensional computational model that simulates this process using mass and heat transfer equations inside a preheater has been developed. A case study for an efficient small-sized containe...

  8. Air pollution emission reduction techniques in combustion plants; Technique de reduction des emissions de polluants atmospheriques dans les installations de combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouscaren, R. [CITEPA, Centre Interprofessionnel Technique d`Etudes de la Pollution Atmospherique, 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    Separating techniques offer a large choice between various procedures for air pollution reduction in combustion plants: mechanical, electrical, filtering, hydraulic, chemical, physical, catalytic, thermal and biological processes. Many environment-friendly equipment use such separating techniques, particularly for dust cleaning and fume desulfurizing and more recently for the abatement of volatile organic pollutants or dioxins and furans. These processes are briefly described

  9. Hybrid preheat/recirculating steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilly, G.P.

    1985-01-01

    The patent describes a hybrid preheat/recirculating steam generator for nuclear power plants. The steam generator utilizes recirculated liquid to preheat incoming liquid. In addition, the steam generator incorporates a divider so as to limit the amount of recirculating water mixed with the feedwater. (U.K.)

  10. Methane combustion in various regimes: First and second thermodynamic-law comparison between air-firing and oxyfuel condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yaming; Chen, Sheng; Liu, Shi; Feng, Yongxin; Xu, Kai; Zheng, Chuguang

    2016-01-01

    MILD oxyfuel combustion has been attracting increasing attention as a promising clean combustion technology. How to design a pathway to reach MILD oxyfuel combustion regime and what can provide a theoretical guide to design such a pathway are two critical questions that need to be answered. So far there has been no open literature on these issues. A type of combustion regime classification map proposed in our previous work, based on the so-called ”Hot Diluted Diffusion Ignition” (HDDI) configuration, is adopted here as a simple but useful tool to solve these problems. Firstly, we analyze comprehensively the influences of various dilution atmosphere and fuel type on combustion regimes. The combustion regime classification maps are made out according to the analyses. In succession, we conduct a comparison between the map in air-firing condition and its oxyfuel counterpart. With the aid of the second thermodynamic-law analysis on the maps, it is easy to identify the major contributors to entropy generation in various combustion regimes in advance, which is crucial for combustion system optimization. Moreover, we find that, for the first time, a combustion regime classification map also may be used as a safety indicator. With the aid of these maps, some conclusions in previous publications can be explained more straightforwardly. - Highlights: • Analyze the influences of different fuels and dilution atmosphere on combustion regimes for the first time. • Provide a theoretical guide for practical operation to establish MILD oxyfuel combustion for the first time. • A new finding to expand the purposes of combustion regime maps for practical operation and combustion optimization.

  11. Historical releases of mercury to air, land, and water from coal combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streets, David G; Lu, Zifeng; Levin, Leonard; Ter Schure, Arnout F H; Sunderland, Elsie M

    2018-02-15

    Coal combustion is one of the largest contemporary sources of anthropogenic mercury (Hg). It releases geologically sequestered Hg to the atmosphere, and fly ash can contaminate terrestrial and aquatic systems. We estimate that coal combustion has released a cumulative total of 38.0 (14.8-98.9, 80% C.I.) Gg (gigagrams, 10 9 g or thousand tonnes) of Hg to air, land, and water up to the year 2010, most of which (97%) has occurred since 1850. The rate of release has grown by two orders of magnitude from 0.01Ggyr -1 in 1850 to 1Ggyr -1 in 2010. Geographically, Asia and Europe each account for 32% of cumulative releases and an additional 18% is from North America. About 26.3 (10.2-68.3) Gg, 71% of the total, were directly emitted to the atmosphere, mostly from the industrial (45%) and power generation (36%) sectors, while the remainder was disposed of to land and water bodies. While Europe and North America were the major contributing regions until 1950, Asia has surpassed both in recent decades. By 2010, Asia was responsible for 69% of the total releases of Hg from coal combustion to the environment. Control technologies installed on major emitting sources capture mainly particulate and divalent Hg, and therefore the fraction of elemental Hg in emissions from coal combustion has increased over time from 0.46 in 1850 to 0.61 in 2010. About 11.8 (4.6-30.6) Gg of Hg, 31% of the total, have been transferred to land and water bodies through the disposal or utilization of Hg-containing combustion waste and collected fly ash/FGD waste; approximately 8.8Gg of this Hg have simply been discarded to waste piles or ash ponds or rivers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental study of combustion characteristics of isolated pockets of hydrogen-air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manoubi, M.; LaFleche, M. [Univ. of Ottawa, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Liang, Z., E-mail: zhe.liang@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Radulescu, M. [Univ. of Ottawa, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    This paper examines the dynamics of unconfined hydrogen-air flames and the criterion for flame propagation between neighbouring pockets of reactive gas separated by air using the soap bubble technique. The combustion events were visualized using high-speed schlieren or large-scale shadowgraph systems. It was revealed that for sufficiently lean hydrogen-air mixtures characterized by low flame speeds, buoyancy effects become important at small scales. The critical radius of hemispherical flame that will rise due to buoyancy is highly sensitive to the hydrogen concentration. The test results demonstrate that for transition of a flame between neighbouring pockets, the separation distance between the bubbles is mainly determined by the expansion ratio for near stoichiometric mixture, but it becomes much smaller for leaner mixtures because the flame kernel rises due to buoyant effects before the flame can reach the second bubble, thus the separation distance is no longer governed by the expansion ratio. (author)

  13. Optimal combustor dimensions for the catalytic combustion of methane-air mixtures in micro-channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Junjie; Song, Wenya; Xu, Deguang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The effect of combustor dimensions on the combustion stability was elucidated. • Wall thermal properties are important for optimizing combustor dimensions. • The optimal wall thickness increases with flow velocity. • The optimal combustor length depends on the wall thermal conductivity. • Stability diagrams were constructed and design recommendations were made. - Abstract: This paper addresses the question of choosing appropriate combustor dimensions for the self-sustained catalytic combustion in parallel plate micro-channels. The combustion characteristics and stability of methane-air mixtures over platinum in catalytic micro-combustors were studied, using a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model with detailed chemistry and transport. The effects of gap size, wall thickness, and combustor length on the combustion stability and combustor performance were explored to provide guidelines for optimal design of combustor dimensions. Combustion stability diagrams were constructed, and design recommendations were made. The effect of wall thermal conductivity on the mechanisms of extinction and blowout, and its implications on optimal combustor geometry were studied. It was shown that combustor dimensions are vital in determining the combustion stability of the system. The choice of appropriate combustor dimensions is crucial in achieving stable combustion, due to a rather narrow operating space determined by stability, material, and conversion constraints. The optimal gap size depends on whether the flow velocity or flow rate is kept constant. For most practical wall materials in the range of metals to highly conductive ceramics, larger combustors are more stable at a fixed flow velocity, whereas smaller combustors are recommended for a fixed flow rate at the expense of hot spots. The optimal wall thickness increases with flow velocity. Higher flow velocities can be sustained in combustors with low-conductivity materials using

  14. Starved air combustion-solidification/stabilization of primary chemical sludge from a tannery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swarnalatha, S. [Department of Environmental Technology, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai-600 020, Tamil Nadu (India); Ramani, K. [Department of Environmental Technology, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai-600 020, Tamil Nadu (India); Karthi, A. Geetha [Department of Environmental Technology, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai-600 020, Tamil Nadu (India); Sekaran, G. [Department of Environmental Technology, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai-600 020, Tamil Nadu (India)]. E-mail: ganesansekaran@hotmail.com

    2006-09-01

    The high concentration of trivalent chromium along with organic/inorganic compounds in tannery sludge causes severe ground water contamination in the case of land disposal and chronic air pollution during incineration. In the present investigation, the sludge was subjected to flow-through column test to evaluate the concentration of leachable organics (tannin, COD and TOC) and heavy metal ions (Cr{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 2+}) present in it. The dried sludge was incinerated at 800 deg. C in an incinerator under starved oxygen supply (starved-air combustion) to prevent the conversion of Cr{sup 3+} to Cr{sup 6+}. The efficiency of starved air combustion was studied under different loading rates of sludge. The calcined sludge was solidified/stabilized using fly ash and Portland cement/gypsum. The solidified bricks were tested for unconfined compressive strength and heavy metal leaching. Unconfined compressive strength of the blocks was in the range of 83-156 kg/cm{sup 2}. The stabilization of chromium (III) in the cement gel matrix was confirmed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX). Leachability studies on solidified bricks were carried out to determine the metal fixation and dissolved organic (as COD) concentration in the leachate.

  15. Refined weighted sum of gray gases model for air-fuel combustion and its impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2013-01-01

    Radiation is the principal mode of heat transfer in utility boiler furnaces. Models for radiative properties play a vital role in reliable simulations of utility boilers and simulation-based design and optimization. The weighted sum of gray gases model (WSGGM) is one of the most widely used models...... in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of air-fuel combustion processes. It represents a reasonable compromise between an oversimplified gray gas model and a comprehensive approach addressing high-resolution dependency of radiative properties and intensity upon wavelength. The WSGGM coefficients...

  16. Effects of ashes in solid fuels on fuel particle charging during combustion in an air stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharov, A.G.; Fialkov, B.S.; Mel' nichuk, A.Yu.; Khvan, L.A.

    1982-09-01

    Black coal from the Karaganda basin is mixed with sodium chloride and graphite. Coal characteristics are given in a table (density, ashes, content of silica, aluminium oxides, iron oxides, calcium oxides, potassium oxides and magnesium oxides). Effects of ash fluctuations on electric potential of fuel particles during combustion are analyzed. Analyses show that with increasing ash content electric potential of fuel particles decreases and reaches the minimum when ash content ranges from 70 to 80 %. Particles with electric potential are generated during chemical processes between carbon and oxygen when coal is burned in an air stream. (5 refs.) (In Russian)

  17. Numerical study of aerodynamics and brown coal combustion in the vortex furnace with air excess variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasinsky Denis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of numerical modelling of 3D turbulent two-phase reacting flow with account for all the principal heat and mass transfer processes during the pulverized brown coal combustion in the vortex furnace of a power plant boiler unit have been presented. For two computational cases where air excess coefficient α was varied (set to 1.15 and 1.25, the detailed aerothermochemical 3D structure of reacting flow in the furnace volume has been revealed. The comparison of integral heat engineering parameters and NOx emissions obtained in the two cases has shown a slightly improved vortex furnace performance in the case α=1.25.

  18. Vibration survey of internal combustion engines for use on unmanned air vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duanis, B.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the method, the procedure and data results of engine vibration test which is carried out on engines for use on unmanned air vehicles. The paper focuses on the testing of rotating propulsion systems powered by an internal combustion engine which is composed of main rotating components such as the alternator, gearbox, propeller , dampers and couplings. Three measurement methods for measuring torsional and lateral vibrations are presented: a. Gear tooth pulse signal. b. Shaft Strain Gage. c. Laser Displacement Sensors The paper also presents data from tests which were performed using each method and discusses the applications, the advantages and disadvantages of each method

  19. Optimal Substrate Preheating Model for Thermal Spray Deposition of Thermosets onto Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Palmese, G. R.; Tsurikov, A.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed, functionally graded polyimide/WC-Co composite coatings on polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are being investigated for applications in turbine engine technologies. This requires that the polyimide, used as the matrix material, be fully crosslinked during deposition in order to maximize its engineering properties. The rapid heating and cooling nature of the HVOF spray process and the high heat flux through the coating into the substrate typically do not allow sufficient time at temperature for curing of the thermoset. It was hypothesized that external substrate preheating might enhance the deposition behavior and curing reaction during the thermal spraying of polyimide thermosets. A simple analytical process model for the deposition of thermosetting polyimide onto polymer matrix composites by HVOF thermal spray technology has been developed. The model incorporates various heat transfer mechanisms and enables surface temperature profiles of the coating to be simulated, primarily as a function of substrate preheating temperature. Four cases were modeled: (i) no substrate preheating; (ii) substrates electrically preheated from the rear; (iii) substrates preheated by hot air from the front face; and (iv) substrates electrically preheated from the rear and by hot air from the front.

  20. Preheat operating experiences at the FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    The rather extensive test program performed on the FFTF preheat control system resulted in successful sodium fill of one secondary heat transport loop on July 2, 1978. The data obtained during testing and the attendant operating experience gained resulted in some design changes and provided the information necessary to fully characterize system performance. Temperature excursions and deviations from preset limits of only a minor nature were encountered during preheat for sodium fill. The addition of the rate alarm feature was beneficial to operation of the preheat system and allowed early detection and correction of impending excursions

  1. Combustion of Methanol Droplets in Air-Diluent Environments with Reduced and Normal Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Shaw

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reduced and normal gravity combustion experiments were performed with fiber-supported methanol droplets with initial diameters in the 1 mm size range. Experiments were performed with air-diluent mixtures at about 0.101 MPa and 298 K, where carbon dioxide, helium, or xenon was separately used as the diluent gas. Results indicate that ambient gas transport properties play an important role in determining flammability and combustion behaviors including burning rates and radiant heat output histories of the droplets. Droplets would burn with significantly higher mole fractions of xenon than helium or carbon dioxide. In reduced gravity, droplets would burn steadily with a xenon mole fraction of 0.50 but would not burn steadily if helium or carbon dioxide mole fractions were 0.50. Comparison with previous experimental data shows that ignitability and combustion characteristics of droplets are influenced by the fuel type and also the gravitational level. Burning rates were about 40% to 70% higher in normal gravity than in reduced gravity. Methanol droplets also had burning rates that were typically larger than 1-propanol burning rates by about 20% in reduced gravity. In normal gravity, however, burning rate differences between the two fuels were significantly smaller.

  2. Trends of multiple air pollutants emissions from residential coal combustion in Beijing and its implication on improving air quality for control measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yifeng; Zhou, Zhen; Nie, Teng; Wang, Kun; Nie, Lei; Pan, Tao; Wu, Xiaoqing; Tian, Hezhong; Zhong, Lianhong; Li, Jing; Liu, Huanjia; Liu, Shuhan; Shao, Panyang

    2016-10-01

    Residential coal combustion is considered to be an important source of air pollution in Beijing. However, knowledge regarding the emission characteristics of residential coal combustion and the related impacts on the air quality is very limited. In this study, we have developed an emission inventory for multiple hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) associated with residential coal combustion in Beijing for the period of 2000-2012. Furthermore, a widely used regional air quality model, the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality model (CMAQ), is applied to analyze the impact of residential coal combustion on the air quality in Beijing in 2012. The results show that the emissions of primary air pollutants from residential coal combustion have basically remained the same levels during the past decade, however, along with the strict emission control imposed on major industrial sources, the contribution of residential coal combustion emissions to the overall emissions from anthropogenic sources have increased obviously. In particular, the contributions of residential coal combustion to the total air pollutants concentrations of PM10, SO2, NOX, and CO represent approximately 11.6%, 27.5%, 2.8% and 7.3%, respectively, during the winter heating season. In terms of impact on the spatial variation patterns, the distributions of the pollutants concentrations are similar to the distribution of the associated primary HAPs emissions, which are highly concentrated in the rural-urban fringe zones and rural suburb areas. In addition, emissions of primary pollutants from residential coal combustion are forecasted by using a scenario analysis. Generally, comprehensive measures must be taken to control residential coal combustion in Beijing. The best way to reduce the associated emissions from residential coal combustion is to use economic incentive means to promote the conversion to clean energy sources for residential heating and cooking. In areas with reliable energy supplies, the coal used

  3. Hazardous air pollutant emissions from gas-fired combustion sources: emissions and the effects of design and fuel type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    England, G.C.; McGrath, T.P. [GE-Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Irvine, CA (United States); Gilmer, L. [Equilon Enterprises, Bellaire, TX (United States); Seebold, J.G. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States); Lev-On, M. [ARCO, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hunt, T. [American Petroleum Institute, Washington, DC (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Air emissions from gas-fired combustion devices such as boilers, process heaters, gas turbines and stationary reciprocating engines contain hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) subjected to consideration under the federal clean air act (CAA). This work presents a recently completed major research project to develop an understanding of HAP emissions from gas-fired boilers and process heaters and new HAP emission factors based on field emission tests of gas-fired external combustion devices used in the petroleum industry. The effect of combustion system design and operating parameters on HAP emissions determined by both field and research tests are discussed. Data from field tests of gas-fired petroleum industry boilers and heaters generally show very low emission levels of organic HAPs. A comparison of the emission data for boilers and process heaters, including units with and without various forms of NO{sub x} emission controls, showed no significant difference in organic HAP emission characteristics due to process or burner design. This conclusion is also supported by the results of research tests with different burner designs. Based on field tests of units fired with natural gas and various petroleum industry process gases and research tests in which gas composition was intentionally varied, organic HAP emissions were not determined to be significantly affected by the gas composition. Research data indicate that elevated organic HAP emission levels are found only under extreme operating conditions (starved air or high excess air combustion) associated with poor combustion. (author)

  4. Flame kernel characterization of laser ignition of natural gas-air mixture in a constant volume combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Dhananjay Kumar; Dharamshi, Kewal; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, laser-induced ignition was investigated for compressed natural gas-air mixtures. Experiments were performed in a constant volume combustion chamber, which simulate end of the compression stroke conditions of a SI engine. This chamber simulates the engine combustion chamber conditions except turbulence of air-fuel mixture. It has four optical windows at diametrically opposite locations, which are used for laser ignition and optical diagnostics simultaneously. All experiments were conducted at 10 bar chamber pressure and 373 K chamber temperature. Initial stage of combustion phenomena was visualized by employing Shadowgraphy technique using a high speed CMOS camera. Flame kernel development of the combustible fuel-air mixture was investigated under different relative air-fuel ratios ( λ=1.2-1.7) and the images were interrogated for temporal propagation of flame front. Pressure-time history inside the combustion chamber was recorded and analyzed. This data is useful in characterizing the laser ignition of natural gas-air mixture and can be used in developing an appropriate laser ignition system for commercial use in SI engines.

  5. Hazardous air pollutant emissions from gas-fired combustion sources: emissions and the effects of design and fuel type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, G.C.; McGrath, T.P.; Gilmer, L.; Seebold, J.G.; Lev-On, M.; Hunt, T.

    2001-01-01

    Air emissions from gas-fired combustion devices such as boilers, process heaters, gas turbines and stationary reciprocating engines contain hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) subjected to consideration under the federal clean air act (CAA). This work presents a recently completed major research project to develop an understanding of HAP emissions from gas-fired boilers and process heaters and new HAP emission factors based on field emission tests of gas-fired external combustion devices used in the petroleum industry. The effect of combustion system design and operating parameters on HAP emissions determined by both field and research tests are discussed. Data from field tests of gas-fired petroleum industry boilers and heaters generally show very low emission levels of organic HAPs. A comparison of the emission data for boilers and process heaters, including units with and without various forms of NO x emission controls, showed no significant difference in organic HAP emission characteristics due to process or burner design. This conclusion is also supported by the results of research tests with different burner designs. Based on field tests of units fired with natural gas and various petroleum industry process gases and research tests in which gas composition was intentionally varied, organic HAP emissions were not determined to be significantly affected by the gas composition. Research data indicate that elevated organic HAP emission levels are found only under extreme operating conditions (starved air or high excess air combustion) associated with poor combustion. (author)

  6. Products cooked in preheated versus non-preheated ovens. Baking times, calculated energy consumption, and product quality compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odland, D; Davis, C

    1982-08-01

    Plain muffins, yellow cake, baked custard, apple pie, tuna casserole, frozen tuna casserole, cheese soufflé, and meat loaf were baked in preheated and non-preheated standard gas, continuous-clean gas, standard electric, and self-cleaning electric ovens. Products generally required 5 min. or less extra baking time when cooked in non-preheated rather than in preheated ovens. The variability in baking times often was less between preheated and non-preheated ovens than among oven types. Calculated energy consumption values showed that usually less energy was required to bake products in non-preheated than in preheated ovens; savings averaged about 10 percent. Few significant differences were found in physical measurements or eating quality either between preheated and non-preheated ovens or among oven types. Overall, for the products tested, findings confirmed that preheating the oven is not essential for good product quality and, therefore, is an unnecessary use of energy.

  7. Modeling of electron behaviors under microwave electric field in methane and air pre-mixture gas plasma assisted combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Haruaki; Sasaki, K.; Yoshinaga, T.

    2011-10-01

    Recently, plasma-assisted combustion has been focused on for achieving more efficient combustion way of fossil fuels, reducing pollutants and so on. Shinohara et al has reported that the flame length of methane and air premixed burner shortened by irradiating microwave power without increase of gas temperature. This suggests that electrons heated by microwave electric field assist the combustion. They also measured emission from 2nd Positive Band System (2nd PBS) of nitrogen during the irradiation. To clarify this mechanism, electron behavior under microwave power should be examined. To obtain electron transport parameters, electron Monte Carlo simulations in methane and air mixture gas have been done. A simple model has been developed to simulate inside the flame. To make this model simple, some assumptions are made. The electrons diffuse from the combustion plasma region. And the electrons quickly reach their equilibrium state. And it is found that the simulated emission from 2nd PBS agrees with the experimental result. Recently, plasma-assisted combustion has been focused on for achieving more efficient combustion way of fossil fuels, reducing pollutants and so on. Shinohara et al has reported that the flame length of methane and air premixed burner shortened by irradiating microwave power without increase of gas temperature. This suggests that electrons heated by microwave electric field assist the combustion. They also measured emission from 2nd Positive Band System (2nd PBS) of nitrogen during the irradiation. To clarify this mechanism, electron behavior under microwave power should be examined. To obtain electron transport parameters, electron Monte Carlo simulations in methane and air mixture gas have been done. A simple model has been developed to simulate inside the flame. To make this model simple, some assumptions are made. The electrons diffuse from the combustion plasma region. And the electrons quickly reach their equilibrium state. And it is found

  8. Prediction of air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion through a generic gas radiation property model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Chungen

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A gas radiation model for general combustion CFD presented, programmed & verified. • Its general applicability/practical accuracy demonstrated in air-fuel and oxy-fuel. • Useful guidelines for air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion CFD suggested. • Important to include the impact of CO in gas radiation for oxy-fuel combustion CFD. - Abstract: Thermal radiation plays an important role in heat transfer in combustion furnaces. The weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model (WSGGM), representing a good compromise between computational efficiency and accuracy, is commonly used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of combustion processes for evaluating gaseous radiative properties. However, the WSGGMs still have some limitations in practical use, e.g., unable to naturally accommodate different combustion environments, difficult to accurately address the variations in species concentrations in a flame, and inconvenient to account for the impacts of participating species other than H_2O and CO_2. As a result, WSGGMs with different coefficients have been published for specific applications. In this paper, a reliable generic model for gaseous radiation property calculation, which is a computationally efficient exponential wide band model (E-EWBM) applicable to combustion CFD and able to naturally solve all the practical limitations of the WSGGMs, is presented, programmed and verified. The model is then implemented to CFD simulation of a 300 kW air-fuel and a 0.8 MW oxy-fuel combustion furnace, respectively, to demonstrate its computational applicability to general combustion CFD and its capability in producing reliable CFD results for different combustion environments. It is found that the usefulness of the WSGGMs in oxy-fuel combustion CFD is compromised if the important impacts of high levels of CO under oxy-fuel combustion cannot be accounted for. The E-EWBM that appropriately takes the impacts of H_2O, CO_2, CO and CH_4 into account is a good replacement

  9. Megacity and country emissions from combustion sources-Buenos Aires-Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowski, L.; Gomez, D.; Matranga, M.; D'Angiola, A.; Oreggioni, G.

    2010-12-01

    Historic time series (1970-2006) emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants arising from stationary and mobile combustion sources were estimated at national level for Argentina and at regional level for the metropolitan area of Buenos Aires (MABA). All emissions were estimated using a bottom-up approach following the IPCC good practice guidance. For mobile sources, national emissions include all transport categories. Regional emissions account thus far only for on-road. For national emissions, methodologies and guidance by the IPCC were employed, applying the highest possible tier and using: i)country-specific emission factors for carbon and sulphur and technology-based information for other species, ii)activity data from energy balance series (1970-2007), and iii)complementary information concerning the non-energy use of fuels. Regional emissions in 2006 were estimated in-depth using a technology-based approach for the city of Buenos Aires (CBA) and the 24 neighboring districts composing the MABA. A regional emissions factors database was developed to better characterize Latin American fleets and driving conditions employing COPERT III-IV algorithms and emission factors measured in dynamometers and circulating vehicles in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Colombia. Past emissions were back estimated from 2005 to 1970 using the best available information, which differs greatly among categories, spatial disaggregation and time periods. The time series of stationary and mobile combustion sources at the national and regional level allowed the identification of distinct patterns. National greenhouse gas emissions in 2006 amounted to ~ 150 million ton CO2-equivalent, 70% of which were contributed by stationary sources. On-road transport was the major contributor within mobile sources (28.1 %). The increasing emissions trends are dominated by on-road transport, agriculture and residential categories while the variability is largely associated with energy industries

  10. Dynamics of Symmetry Breaking and Tachyonic Preheating

    CERN Document Server

    Felder, G; Greene, P B; Kofman, L A; Linde, Andrei D; Tkachev, Igor I; Felder, Gary; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Greene, Patrick B.; Kofman, Lev; Linde, Andrei; Tkachev, Igor

    2001-01-01

    We reconsider the old problem of the dynamics of spontaneous symmetry breaking using 3d lattice simulations, and develop a theory of tachyonic preheating, which occurs due to the spinodal instability of the scalar field. Tachyonic preheating is so efficient that symmetry breaking typically completes within a single oscillation of the field distribution as it rolls towards the minimum of its effective potential. As an application of this theory we consider preheating in the hybrid inflation scenario, including SUSY-motivated F-term and D-term inflationary models. We show that preheating in hybrid inflation is typically tachyonic and the stage of oscillations of a homogeneous component of the scalar fields driving inflation ends after a single oscillation. Our results may also be relevant for the theory of the formation of disoriented chiral condensates in heavy ion collisions.

  11. Trace impurities analysis of aluminum nanopowder and its air combustion product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanov, Denis V.; Merkulov, Viktor G.; Mostovshchikov, Andrey V.; Ilyin, Alexander P.

    2018-03-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) allows estimating micro-concentrations of chemicals and analyzes tens of elements at one measurement. In this paper we have used NAA to examine metal impurities in the electroexplosive aluminum nanopowder (ANP) and its air-combustion products produced by burning in crucibles in an electric and magnetic field and without application of fields. It has been revealed that in the air-combustion products impurities content is reduced. The presence of impurities in the ANP is associated with electric explosion technology (erosion of electrode and chamber materials) and with the previous development of various nanopowders in the composition of this electric explosive device. NAA is characterized by a high sensitivity and reproducibility to elements content and low metering error. According to the obtained results it has been concluded that NAA metering error does not exceed 10% in the wide concentration range, from 0.01 to 2100 ppm, particularly. Besides, there is high reproducibility of the method that has been proved on macro-elements of Ca (>1000 ppm), Fe (>2000 ppm), and micro-elements as Sm, U, Ce, Sb, Th, etc. (<0.9 ppm). It is recommended to use an individual unit for the production of pure metal powders for electric explosion and production of nanopowders, which is possible with mass production of nanopowders.

  12. Burnout behaviour of bituminous coals in air-staged combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluger, F.; Spliethoff, H.; Hein, K.R.G. [University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. of Process Engineering and Power Plant (IVD)

    2001-07-01

    In order to determine the influence on burnout by the combustion conditions and the coal preparation, three bituminous coals sold on the world market, from three different locations in Poland, South Africa, and Australia, were studied more closely. For this purpose, the coals were ground in two different particle size ranges, which, besides the influence of the combustion conditions, such a temperature, residence time, and stoichiometry, made it possible to also investigate the impact on burnout by the coal preparation. The experiments were carried out in an electrically heated entrained-flow reactor with a thermal input of 8.5 kW. The parameters for the experiments are wall temperature (1000-1350{degree}C), air ratio (0.6-1.15) and two particle sizes (70% {lt} 75 {mu}m, 90% {lt} 75 {mu}m). The results show that in general, for increasing temperatures, the burnout quality will improve. For the Australian Illawara coal, another outcome is increased NOx emissions. Lowering the air ratio in the reduction zone leads to less NOx emission but to increased unburnt matter in ash. For the smaller particle size fraction, the analysis of the different particle sizes shows an improvement of the burnout without a change in NOx emissions. 10 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Preheating Mechanism in F-term SUSY Hybrid Inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumdar, Arindam

    2012-01-01

    Supersymmetric F-term hybrid inflation is one of the most popular models of inflation. Preheating process occurs in this model via two different mechanism. Firstly the standard parametric resonance and secondly, the tachyonic preheating. Generally tachyonic preheating dominates the parametric resonance for this type of models. For different values of the parameters of the theory dominance of tachyonic preheating can vary.

  14. Legionella bacteria in combustion air humidifiers; Legionella i luftuppfuktare foer foerbraenningsluft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeppesen, Jessica; Hansson, Helen; Cederfeldt, Ola; Axby, Fredrik

    2007-10-15

    Over the last couple of years several outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease has occurred around the world. The source of infection varies, but in many cases the bacteria has been traced back to cooling towers. The common denominator for most of the sources of infection has been water systems with high oxygen levels and a system temperature ranging from 20 to 40 deg C. If a water system furthermore has high levels of other bacteria/microorganisms, then it is also probable that favorable conditions for legionella bacteria exist within the system. These conditions consist well with conditions in combustion air humidifiers in district heating plants and therefore it can be suspected that legionella may thrive also in these types of air humidifiers. In order to examine if legionella bacteria exists in combustion air humidifiers, and in what quantity, ten different district heating plants where selected for a survey. The goal of the survey is to get a general picture of the extent of the occurrence of legionella bacteria in different types of air humidifiers. This was done by taking legionella tests in three different types of air humidifiers in district heating plants. The first step of the testing was conducted by measuring the level of legionella bacteria in water samples from the air humidifiers in the different plants. The water samples were taken from water that circulates in the air humidifiers. A few months later another water sample was taken from the same location. Two district heating plants, where legionella bacteria had been detected, were selected for further testing after compiling the results from the first two tests. The further testing involved fuel gas analysis to see if any of the plants fuel gas contained legionella bacteria. The test results show that a major part of the district heating plants in the survey have heterotrophic bacteria in their water systems, which implies the possibility of growth of legionella bacteria. About half of the plants

  15. A parametric study of the microwave plasma-assisted combustion of premixed ethylene/air mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Che A.; Wu, Wei; Wang, Chuji

    2017-11-01

    A parametric study of microwave argon plasma assisted combustion (PAC) of premixed ethylene/air mixtures was carried out using visual imaging, optical emission spectroscopy and cavity ringdown spectroscopy as diagnostic tools. The parameters investigated included the plasma feed gas flow rate, the plasma power, the fuel equivalence ratio and the total flow rate of the fuel/air mixture. The combustion enhancement effects were characterized by the minimum ignition power, the flame length and the fuel efficiency of the combustor. It was found that: (1) increasing the plasma feed gas flow rate resulted in a decrease in the flame length, an increase in the minimum ignition power for near stoichiometric fuel equivalence ratios and a corresponding decrease in the minimum ignition power for ultra-lean and rich fuel equivalence ratios; (2) at a constant plasma power, increasing the total flow rate of the ethylene/air mixture from 1.0 slm to 1.5 slm resulted in an increase in the flame length and a reduction in the fuel efficiency; (3) increasing the plasma power resulted in a slight increase in flame length as well as improved fuel efficiency with fewer C2(d) and CH(A) radicals present downstream of the flame; (4) increasing the fuel equivalence ratio caused an increase in flame length but at a reduced fuel efficiency when plasma power was kept constant; and (5) the ground state OH(X) number density was on the order of 1015 molecules/cm3 and was observed to drop downstream along the propagation axis of the flame at all parameters investigated. Results suggest that each of the parameters independently influences the PAC processes.

  16. Desempenho de misturas pré-aquecidas de óleo de soja cru e diesel como combustível para motores agrícolas Performance of preheated crude soybean oil-diesel blends as fuel in agricultural engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fernando Schlosser

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available O óleo de soja é um dos óleos vegetais que têm potencial de uso como combustível para motores diesel, pois é renovável, seguro e de fácil utilização. Em temperatura ambiente, o óleo cru apresenta uma viscosidade cerca de dez vezes maior que a do óleo diesel. Para reduzir a viscosidade do óleo de soja a níveis aceitáveis, é necessária uma temperatura de aquecimento em torno de aproximadamente 60°C ou misturá-lo com óleo diesel. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o desempenho do óleo de soja cru e suas misturas com óleo diesel, pré-aquecidas antes da bomba injetora entre 57°C e 68°C, como combustível para motores diesel. O desempenho das misturas combustíveis foi avaliado num motor monocilíndrico de injeção indireta e comparado com o obtido pelo óleo diesel. Os ensaios de curta duração foram conduzidos entre 1.800 e 2.800rpm, sob condição de plena carga em dinamômetro hidráulico. Ensaios realizados a 68°C apresentaram sempre os melhores valores para torque, potência e consumo específico de combustível do que a 57°C. Uma mistura composta por 70% de óleo de soja e 30% de óleo diesel, aquecida a 68°C, apresentou os melhores resultados.Crude soybean oil is one of the vegetable oils that have potential for use as fuel for diesel engines. Soybean oil is renewable, and is safe and easy to handle. At room temperature crude oil has a viscosity about ten times higher than that of diesel oil. To lower soybean oil's viscosity to the acceptable levels a heating temperature at least 60°C is needed or blending with diesel fuel. The objective of this study was evaluating the soybean oil and blends performance as a fuel for diesel engines. On both crude soybean oil and soybean oil blends were used pre-heating temperature levels on the range between 57°C and 68°C, before fuel pump. The performance of the fuel blends were evaluated in a single cylinder indirect injection diesel engine and compared with the performance

  17. Importance of small-scale wood combustion for the air quality at Lycksele and Vaexjoe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, C.; Hansson, H.C.; Stroem, Johan; Hedberg, Emma; Olivares, Gustavo; Karlsson, Hans; Wideqvist, Ulla

    2005-02-01

    from Forsdala are however not entirely conclusive in this respect. A more stable method to quantify the contribution of wood smoke to PM concentrations is likely to be a source-receptor modelling based on a number of elements. These elemental concentrations may be derived from a PIXE analysis of filter samples, as in this report. In Teleborg, the TEOM measured PM 1 , but not PM 2.5 . The PM 2.5 concentrations were instead derived from the observed number size distributions. PMF models for measured PM 1 (TEOM), estimated PM 1 (DMPS), and PM 2.5 (DMPS+APS) showed fairly similar results regarding the source apportionment. In Teleborg, a distinct source representing local combustion (wood, oil) could be discerned. The source strength was definitely connected to the local heat demand and outdoor temperature, and was only significant for temperatures below 0 deg C. The other sources do not display this behaviour. The source profile is characteristic of wood combustion, but with a clear contamination from oil combustion. The contribution from the local combustion source (wood, oil) to PM concentrations in Teleborg (4-5.5 pg/m 3 ) was estimated to be approximately the same as that from domestic wood combustion in Forsdala, Lycksele (3-4 μg/m 3 ). While this may not be entirely unrealistic considering the large number of wood stoves in the residential area surrounding the measurement site in Teleborg, it is seemingly contradicted by the estimates made of the energy consumption in the area, and the relatively low concentrations of levoglucosan. A comparison between the concentrations of PM 2.5 in background air with the PM concentrations in Vaexjoe show that there is not much room for any strong local sources in Vaexjoe. The various PM measurements in background air and Vaexjoe respectively are however not directly comparable, and may be reconciled with a local PM source of 4-5.5 μg/m 3

  18. Effect of air-excess on blends of RON70 partially premixed combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, S.; Bakker, P.C.; Somers, L.M.T.; de Goey, L.P.H.

    Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) is a combustion concept that aims to provide combustion with low smoke and NOx emissions and a high thermal efficiency. Extending the ignition delay to enhance premixing, avoiding spray-driven combustion, and controlling temperature at an optimum level through use

  19. Effect of oxygen enrichment in air on acid gas combustion under Claus conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrahim, Salisu

    2013-09-01

    Results are presented to examine the combustion of acid gas (H2S and CO2) in hydrogen-fueled flames using a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen under Claus conditions (Φ = 3). Specifically the effect of oxygen enrichment in the above flames is examined. The compositions of acid gas examined are100% H2S and 50% H2S/50% CO2 with different percentages of oxygen enrichment (0%, 19.3% and 69.3%) in the oxygen/nitrogen mixtures. The results revealed that combustion of acid gas formed SO2 wherein the mole fraction of SO2 increased to an asymptotic value at all the oxygen concentrations examined. In addition, increase in oxygen enrichment of the air resulted in increased amounts of SO2 rather than the formation of more desirable elemental sulfur. In case of 50% H2S/50% CO2 acid gas, carbon monoxide mole fraction increased with oxygen enrichment which is an indicator to the availability of additional amounts of oxygen into the reaction pool. This gas mixture resulted in the formation of other sulfurous–carbonaceous compounds (COS and CS2) due to the presence of carbon monoxide. The results showed that the rate of COS formation increased with oxygen enrichment due to the availability of higher amounts of CO while that of CS2 reduced. The global reactions responsible for this observed phenomenon are presented.

  20. Comparison of Fuel-Nox Formation Characteristics in Conventional Air and Oxy fuel Combustion Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Mino; Park, Kweon Ha; Choi, Byung Chul

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO x ) formation characteristics in non-premixed diffusion flames of methane fuels have been investigated experimentally and numerically by adding 10% ammonia to the fuel stream, according to the variation of the oxygen ratio in the oxidizer with oxygen/carbon dioxide and oxygen/nitrogen mixtures. In an experiment of co flow jet flames, in the case of an oxidizer with oxygen/carbon dioxide, the NO x emission increased slightly as the oxygen ratio increased. On the other hand, in case of an oxygen/nitrogen oxidizer, the NO x emission was the maximum at an oxygen ratio of 0.7, and it exhibited non-monotonic behavior according to the oxygen ratio. Consequently, the NO x emission in the condition of oxy fuel combustion was overestimated as compared to that in the condition of conventional air combustion. To elucidate the characteristics of NO x formation for various oxidizer compositions, 1a and 2a numerical simulations have been conducted by adopting one kinetic mechanism. The result of 2 simulation for an oxidizer with oxygen/nitrogen well predicted the trend of experimentally measured NO x emissions

  1. Modelling the effects of heat loss and fuel/air mixing on turbulent combustion in gas turbine combustion systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gövert, S.

    2016-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the development and validation of a simulation framework for the accurate prediction of turbulent reacting flows at reduced computational costs. Therefore, a combustion model based on the tabulation of laminar premixed flamelets is employed. By compilation of

  2. Indoor air quality scenario in India-An outline of household fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohra, Himanshi; Taneja, Ajay

    2016-03-01

    Most of the research around the world has been on outdoor air pollution, but in India we have a more severe problem of Indoor Air Pollution (IAP). The foremost factor cited for is burning of fossil fuels for cooking. Among the 70% of the country's rural population, about 80% households rely on biomass fuel making India to top the list of countries with largest population lacking access to cleaner fuel for cooking. 4 million deaths and 5% disability-adjusted life-years is an upshot of exposure to IAP from unhealthy cooking making it globally the most critical environmental risk factor. India alone bears the highest burden (28% needless deaths) among developing countries. Moreover, about ¼ of ambient PM2.5 in the country comes from household cookfuels. These considerations have prompted the discussion of the present knowledge on the disastrous health effects of pollutants emitted by biomass combustion in India. Additionally, Particulate Matter as an indoor air pollutant is highlighted with main focus on its spatial temporal variation and some recent Indian studies are further explored. As there are no specific norms for IAP in India, urgent need has arisen for implementing the strategies to create public awareness. Moreover improvement in ventilation and modification in the pattern of fuel will also contribute to eradicate this national health issue.

  3. Supersonic Combustion in Air-Breathing Propulsion Systems for Hypersonic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urzay, Javier

    2018-01-01

    Great efforts have been dedicated during the last decades to the research and development of hypersonic aircrafts that can fly at several times the speed of sound. These aerospace vehicles have revolutionary applications in national security as advanced hypersonic weapons, in space exploration as reusable stages for access to low Earth orbit, and in commercial aviation as fast long-range methods for air transportation of passengers around the globe. This review addresses the topic of supersonic combustion, which represents the central physical process that enables scramjet hypersonic propulsion systems to accelerate aircrafts to ultra-high speeds. The description focuses on recent experimental flights and ground-based research programs and highlights associated fundamental flow physics, subgrid-scale model development, and full-system numerical simulations.

  4. Projections of air toxic emissions from coal-fired utility combustion: Input for hazardous air pollutant regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szpunar, C.B.

    1993-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is required by the 1990 CAAA to promulgate rules for all ''major'' sources of any of these HAPs. According to the HAPs section of the new Title III, any stationary source emitting 10 tons per year (TPY) of one HAP or 25 TPY of a combination of HAPs will be considered and designated a major source. In contrast to the original National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), which were designed to protect public health to ''an ample margin of safety,'' the new Title III, in its first phase, will regulate by industrial category those sources emitting HAPs in excess of the 10/25-TPY threshold levels, regardless of health risks. The trace elements normally associated with coal mineral matter and the various compounds formed during coal combustion have the potential to produce hazardous air toxic emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. Under Title III, the EPA is required to perform certain studies, prior to any regulation of electric utilities; these studies are currently underway. Also, the US Department of Energy (DOE) maintains a vested interest in addressing those energy policy questions affecting electric utility generation, coal mining, and steel producing critical to this country's economic well-being, where balancing the costs to the producers and users of energy with the benefits of environmental protection to the workers and the general populace remains of significant concern

  5. Computer program for obtaining thermodynamic and transport properties of air and products of combustion of ASTM-A-1 fuel and air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippensteele, S. A.; Colladay, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program for determining desired thermodynamic and transport property values by means of a three-dimensional (pressure, fuel-air ratio, and either enthalpy or temperature) interpolation routine was developed. The program calculates temperature (or enthalpy), molecular weight, viscosity, specific heat at constant pressure, thermal conductivity, isentropic exponent (equal to the specific heat ratio at conditions where gases do not react), Prandtl number, and entropy for air and a combustion gas mixture of ASTM-A-1 fuel and air over fuel-air ratios from zero to stoichiometric, pressures from 1 to 40 atm, and temperatures from 250 to 2800 K.

  6. chemical kinetic study of nitrogen oxides formation in methane flameless combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado T, Pedro N; Cadavid S, Francisco; Mondragon, P Fanor; Ruiz, Wilson

    2009-01-01

    The present paper deals with the nitrogen oxides formation in a flameless combustion process characterized for using air highly diluted and preheated at high temperatures. The combustion model used in this study was the one dimensional counterflow methane air diffusion flame. The NOx production rate analysis showed that the thermal and prompt mechanisms are the most important for the formation and consumption of NO under dilution conditions for the oxidant in N 2 and combustion products. These mechanisms are related since the starting reaction for NO formation (N2 molecular dissociation) belongs to the prompt mechanism while the NO formation is reported mainly for the thermal mechanism reactions. On the other hand, the NO - NO 2 equilibrium showed that the reaction rates are comparable to that obtained by the thermal and prompt mechanisms, but its global contribution to NO formation are almost insignificant due to the oxidation reaction with radicals HO 2 .

  7. Two-stage combustion for reducing pollutant emissions from gas turbine combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R. M.; Lewis, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Combustion and emission results are presented for a premix combustor fueled with admixtures of JP5 with neat H2 and of JP5 with simulated partial-oxidation product gas. The combustor was operated with inlet-air state conditions typical of cruise power for high performance aviation engines. Ultralow NOx, CO and HC emissions and extended lean burning limits were achieved simultaneously. Laboratory scale studies of the non-catalyzed rich-burning characteristics of several paraffin-series hydrocarbon fuels and of JP5 showed sooting limits at equivalence ratios of about 2.0 and that in order to achieve very rich sootless burning it is necessary to premix the reactants thoroughly and to use high levels of air preheat. The application of two-stage combustion for the reduction of fuel NOx was reviewed. An experimental combustor designed and constructed for two-stage combustion experiments is described.

  8. Elevated temperature forming method and preheater apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Paul E; Hammar, Richard Harry; Singh, Jugraj; Cedar, Dennis; Friedman, Peter A; Luo, Yingbing

    2013-06-11

    An elevated temperature forming system in which a sheet metal workpiece is provided in a first stage position of a multi-stage pre-heater, is heated to a first stage temperature lower than a desired pre-heat temperature, is moved to a final stage position where it is heated to a desired final stage temperature, is transferred to a forming press, and is formed by the forming press. The preheater includes upper and lower platens that transfer heat into workpieces disposed between the platens. A shim spaces the upper platen from the lower platen by a distance greater than a thickness of the workpieces to be heated by the platens and less than a distance at which the upper platen would require an undesirably high input of energy to effectively heat the workpiece without being pressed into contact with the workpiece.

  9. Gravitational radiation from preheating with many fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jr, John T. Giblin; Price, Larry R.; Siemens, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Parametric resonances provide a mechanism by which particles can be created just after inflation. Thus far, attention has focused on a single or many inflaton fields coupled to a single scalar field. However, generically we expect the inflaton to couple to many other relativistic degrees of freedom present in the early universe. Using simulations in an expanding Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime, in this paper we show how preheating is affected by the addition of multiple fields coupled to the inflaton. We focus our attention on gravitational wave production — an important potential observational signature of the preheating stage. We find that preheating and its gravitational wave signature is robust to the coupling of the inflaton to more matter fields

  10. Gravitational radiation from preheating with many fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jr, John T. Giblin [Department of Physics, Kenyon College, 201 North College Road, Gambier, OH 43022 (United States); Price, Larry R.; Siemens, Xavier, E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu, E-mail: larry@gravity.phys.uwm.edu, E-mail: siemens@gravity.phys.uwm.edu [Center for Gravitation and Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Parametric resonances provide a mechanism by which particles can be created just after inflation. Thus far, attention has focused on a single or many inflaton fields coupled to a single scalar field. However, generically we expect the inflaton to couple to many other relativistic degrees of freedom present in the early universe. Using simulations in an expanding Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime, in this paper we show how preheating is affected by the addition of multiple fields coupled to the inflaton. We focus our attention on gravitational wave production — an important potential observational signature of the preheating stage. We find that preheating and its gravitational wave signature is robust to the coupling of the inflaton to more matter fields.

  11. Report on research achievement in relation with developing fundamental combustion control technologies in fiscal 1998. Research and development of high-performance industrial furnaces; 1998 nendo nensho seigyo kiban gijutsu no kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho. Koseino kogyoro nado ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Development is intended to be made on fundamental combustion control technologies applicable to high-performance industrial furnaces that can reduce energy consumption and respond to environment preservation requirements. With an intention to achieve reduction in combustion exhaust gases such as carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides, fundamental studies will be made on factors to decide flame shapes as represented by high-temperature combustion and flame shape control by utilizing microgravity environment, and researches will be made on combustion systems. Devices required for the experiments were fabricated to evaluate critical combustion characteristics of flames in furnaces including industrial furnaces, analyze and evaluate flame control parameters, and study low-pollution combustion technologies. Experimental methods acquired by 1997 were used for the experiments under the microgravity environment. Evaluation experiments were performed on flame shape control technologies and flame radiation characteristics, and basic experiments on the low-pollution combustion technologies. With these experiments, elucidation of the combustion mechanisms was launched by analyzing and evaluating the acquired data. A flame experimenting device for high-temperature preheated air completed by fiscal 1997 was used to acquire such combustion characteristics data as NOx discharge characteristics when the high-temperature preheated air is used. Based on the result thereof, verification was carried out on simulation models. (NEDO)

  12. Effects of dissipation and fluctuation in preheating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vartuli, Rodrigo; Ramos, Rudnei de O.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of dissipation and fluctuation in preheating after inflation. The effective equation of motion for a scalar field χ interacting with lighter fields is derived using the field theoretical method of closed time path due to Schwinger, winch is suitable to study nonequilibrium and time dependent process. In this derivation the emergent equation is intrinsically dissipative and stochastic in nature. The resulting dynamics is then studied both analytically and numerically. The results obtained are then discussed for then relevance for the reheating epoch right after an inflationary phase(preheating) for the case of the evolution of the scalar field χ and its decay into fermion. (author)

  13. Combustion of hydrogen/air/steam mixtures in a repeated obstacle field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.K.; Bowles, E.M.; Koroll, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    Combustion experiments with hydrogen/air/steam mixtures were performed in a cylindrical vessel of 1.5-m internal diameter and 5.7-m height in a repeated obstacle field. The investigations included hydrogen concentrations in the range of 10 to 20% and steam concentrations of up to 30%. For the mixtures investigated, the flame accelerated very rapidly in the vessel, reached a peak value, and decelerated equally rapidly For hydrogen/air mixtures with hydrogen concentrations above 15%, the flame speeds reached values well in excess of the sonic velocity in the mixture. Addition of steam reduced the flame speed and the peak pressure, however, the reduction was significant only for steam concentrations >20%. Experiments performed with different obstacle spacings and flow blockages indicated that flame speed decreased with increased spacing and increased with increased blockage. The effect of initial pressure on flame speed was found to be small. For a given mixture, the peak flame speed was found to be independent of the igniter location. Simple empirical correlations have been proposed to calculate the flame speeds and peak pressures in a closed vessel with closely spaces repeated obstacles. (author)

  14. Transient combustion modeling of an oscillating lean premixed methane/air flam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withag, J.A.M.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.; Syed, Khawar

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the present study is to demonstrate accurate low frequency transient turbulent combustion modeling. For accurate flame dynamics some improvements were made to the standard TFC combustion model for lean premixed combustion. With use of a 1D laminar flamelet code, predictions

  15. Analysis of Chemical Reaction Kinetics Behavior of Nitrogen Oxide During Air-staged Combustion in Pulverized Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Xia Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Because the air-staged combustion technology is one of the key technologies with low investment running costs and high emission reduction efficiency for the pulverized boiler, it is important to reveal the chemical reaction kinetics mechanism for developing various technologies of nitrogen oxide reduction emissions. At the present work, a three-dimensional mesh model of the large-scale four corner tangentially fired boiler furnace is established with the GAMBIT pre-processing of the FLUENT software. The partial turbulent premixed and diffusion flame was simulated for the air-staged combustion processing. Parameters distributions for the air-staged and no the air-staged were obtained, including in-furnace flow field, temperature field and nitrogen oxide concentration field. The results show that the air-staged has more regular velocity field, higher velocity of flue gas, higher turbulence intensity and more uniform temperature of flue gas. In addition, a lower negative pressure zone and lower O2 concentration zone is formed in the main combustion zone, which is conducive to the NO of fuel type reduced to N2, enhanced the effect of NOx reduction. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 5th November 2015; Revised: 14th January 2016; Accepted: 16th January 2016  How to Cite: Zhang, J.X., Zhang, J.F. (2016. Analysis of Chemical Reaction Kinetics Behavior of Nitrogen Oxide During Air-staged Combustion in Pulverized Boiler. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (1: 100-108. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.1.431.100-108 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.1.431.100-108

  16. Experimental and numerical study of premixed hydrogen/air flame propagating in a combustion chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Huahua; Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Peng

    2014-03-15

    An experimental and numerical study of dynamics of premixed hydrogen/air flame in a closed explosion vessel is described. High-speed shlieren cinematography and pressure recording are used to elucidate the dynamics of the combustion process in the experiment. A dynamically thickened flame model associated with a detailed reaction mechanism is employed in the numerical simulation to examine the flame-flow interaction and effect of wall friction on the flame dynamics. The shlieren photographs show that the flame develops into a distorted tulip shape after a well-pronounced classical tulip front has been formed. The experimental results reveal that the distorted tulip flame disappears with the primary tulip cusp and the distortions merging into each other, and then a classical tulip is repeated. The combustion dynamics is reasonably reproduced in the numerical simulations, including the variations in flame shape and position, pressure build-up and periodically oscillating behavior. It is found that both the tulip and distorted tulip flames can be created in the simulation with free-slip boundary condition at the walls of the vessel and behave in a manner quite close to that in the experiments. This means that the wall friction could be unimportant for the tulip and distorted tulip formation although the boundary layer formed along the sidewalls has an influence to a certain extent on the flame behavior near the sidewalls. The distorted tulip flame is also observed to be produced in the absence of vortex flow in the numerical simulations. The TF model with a detailed chemical scheme is reliable for investigating the dynamics of distorted tulip flame propagation and its underlying mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Secondary drive of an internal combustion engine for an air presser. Nebenantrieb einer Brennkraftmaschine fuer einen Luftpresser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubis, H.

    1990-04-19

    The invention concerns an air presser propelled by a gearwheel and designed as a piston compressor. The drive gearwheel on the air presser crankshaft meshes with a gearwheel on the camshaft of the internal combustion engine. In the case of these drives, a negative torque of the air presser results when the top dead centre of the air presser piston is reached. This is accompanied by an unpleasant noise. In addition, the driving torque of the camshaft often has negative fractions. If the negative torque of the air presser is superposed by small or negative torques of the camshaft in the re-expansion phase additionally to the air presser wheel there will be a backward acceleration of the camshaft gear which propagates as impact into the rest of the gear drive. The invention prevents the backward acceleration of the camshaft wheel and minimizes stroke momentum and noise in the mesh of the camshaft wheel.

  18. 7 CFR 58.919 - Pre-heat, pasteurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pre-heat, pasteurization. 58.919 Section 58.919... Procedures § 58.919 Pre-heat, pasteurization. When pasteurization is intended or required by either the vat... requirements outlined in § 58.128. Pre-heat temperatures prior to ultra pasteurization will be those that have...

  19. Energy Converter with Inside Two, Three, and Five Connected H2/Air Swirling Combustor Chambers: Solar and Combustion Mode Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Minotti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the performance of an energy converter characterized by an emitting parallelepiped element with inside two, three, or five swirling connected combustion chambers. In particular, the idea is to adopt the heat released by H2/air combustion, occurring in the connected swirling chambers, to heat up the emitting surfaces of the thermally-conductive emitting parallelepiped brick. The final goal consists in obtaining the highest emitting surface temperature and the highest power delivered to the ambient environment, with the simultaneous fulfillment of four design constraints: dimension of the emitting surface fixed to 30 × 30 mm2, solar mode thermal efficiency greater than 20%, emitting surface peak temperature T > 1000 K, and its relative ∆T < 100 K in the combustion mode operation. The connected swirling meso-combustion chambers, inside the converter, differ only in their diameters. Combustion simulations are carried out adopting 500 W of injected chemical power, stoichiometric conditions, and detailed chemistry. All provide high chemical efficiency, η > 99.9%, and high peak temperature, but the emitting surface ∆T is strongly sensitive to the geometrical configuration. The present work is related to the “EU-FP7-HRC-Power” project, aiming at developing micro-meso hybrid sources of power, compatible with a thermal/electrical conversion by thermo-photovoltaic cells.

  20. Modes of reaction front propagation and end-gas combustion of hydrogen/air mixtures in a closed chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Xian

    2017-01-05

    Modes of reaction front propagation and end-gas combustion of hydrogen/air mixtures in a closed chamber are numerically investigated using an 1-D unsteady, shock-capturing, compressible and reacting flow solver. Different combinations of reaction front propagation and end-gas combustion modes are observed, i.e., 1) deflagration without end-gas combustion, 2) deflagration to end-gas autoignition, 3) deflagration to end-gas detonation, 4) developing or developed detonation, occurring in the sequence of increasing initial temperatures. Effects of ignition location and chamber size are evaluated: the asymmetric ignition is found to promote the reactivity of unburnt mixture compared to ignitions at center/wall, due to additional heating from asymmetric pressure waves. End-gas combustion occurs earlier in smaller chambers, where end-gas temperature rise due to compression heating from the deflagration is faster. According to the ξ−ε regime diagram based on Zeldovich theory, modes of reaction front propagation are primarily determined by reactivity gradients introduced by initial ignition, while modes of end-gas combustion are influenced by the total amount of unburnt mixture at the time when autoignition occurs. A transient reactivity gradient method is provided and able to capture the occurrence of detonation.

  1. Modes of reaction front propagation and end-gas combustion of hydrogen/air mixtures in a closed chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Xian; Ryu, Je Ir; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Dibble, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    Modes of reaction front propagation and end-gas combustion of hydrogen/air mixtures in a closed chamber are numerically investigated using an 1-D unsteady, shock-capturing, compressible and reacting flow solver. Different combinations of reaction front propagation and end-gas combustion modes are observed, i.e., 1) deflagration without end-gas combustion, 2) deflagration to end-gas autoignition, 3) deflagration to end-gas detonation, 4) developing or developed detonation, occurring in the sequence of increasing initial temperatures. Effects of ignition location and chamber size are evaluated: the asymmetric ignition is found to promote the reactivity of unburnt mixture compared to ignitions at center/wall, due to additional heating from asymmetric pressure waves. End-gas combustion occurs earlier in smaller chambers, where end-gas temperature rise due to compression heating from the deflagration is faster. According to the ξ−ε regime diagram based on Zeldovich theory, modes of reaction front propagation are primarily determined by reactivity gradients introduced by initial ignition, while modes of end-gas combustion are influenced by the total amount of unburnt mixture at the time when autoignition occurs. A transient reactivity gradient method is provided and able to capture the occurrence of detonation.

  2. Historical and future emission of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from gas-fired combustion in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yifeng; Nie, Lei; Zhou, Zhen; Tian, Hezhong; Yan, Jing; Wu, Xiaoqing; Cheng, Linglong

    2017-07-01

    The consumption of natural gas in Beijing has increased in the past decade due to energy structure adjustments and air pollution abatement. In this study, an integrated emission inventory of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) emitted from gas-fired combustion in Beijing was developed for the period from 2000 to 2014 using a technology-based approach. Future emission trends were projected through 2030 based on current energy-related and emission control policies. We found that emissions of primary HAPs exhibited an increasing trend with the rapid increase in natural gas consumption. Our estimates indicated that the total emissions of NO X , particulate matter (PM) 10 , PM 2.5 , CO, VOCs, SO 2 , black carbon, Pb, Cd, Hg, As, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, and benzo[a]pyrene from gas-fired combustion in Beijing were approximately 22,422 t, 1042 t, 781 t, 19,097 t, 653 t, 82 t, 19 t, 0.6 kg, 0.1 kg, 43 kg, 52 kg, 0.3 kg, 0.03 kg, 4.3 kg, 0.6 kg, 216 μg, and 242 g, respectively, in 2014. To mitigate the associated air pollution and health risks caused by gas-fired combustion, stricter emission standards must be established. Additionally, combustion optimization and flue gas purification system could be used for lowering NO X emissions from gas-fired combustion, and gas-fired facilities should be continuously monitored based on emission limits. Graphical abstract Spatial distribution and typical live photos of gas-fired boiler in Beijing.

  3. The Energy Efficiency of Hot Water Production by Gas Water Heaters with a Combustion Chamber Sealed with Respect to the Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Czerski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents investigative results of the energy efficiency of hot water production for sanitary uses by means of gas-fired water heaters with the combustion chamber sealed with respect to the room in single-family houses and multi-story buildings. Additionally, calculations were made of the influence of pre-heating the air for combustion in the chimney and air supply system on the energy efficiency of hot water production. CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics software was used for calculation of the heat exchange in this kind of system. The studies and calculations have shown that the use of gas water heaters with a combustion chamber sealed with respect to the room significantly increases the efficiency of hot water production when compared to traditional heaters. It has also been proven that the pre-heating of combustion air in concentric chimney and air supply ducts essentially improves the energy efficiency of gas appliances for hot water production.

  4. Analysis of combustion turbine inlet air cooling systems applied to an operating cogeneration power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacartegui, R.; Jimenez-Espadafor, F.; Sanchez, D.; Sanchez, T.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, combustion turbine inlet air cooling (CTIAC) systems are analyzed from an economic outlook, their effects on the global performance parameters and the economic results of the power plant. The study has been carried out on a combined cogeneration system, composed of a General Electric PG 6541 gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator. The work has been divided into three parts. First, a revision of the present CTIAC technologies is shown, their effects on power plant performance and evaluation of the associated investment and maintenance costs. In a second phase of the work, the cogeneration plant was modelled with the objective of evaluating the power increase and the effects on the generated steam and the thermal oil. The cogeneration power plant model was developed, departing from the recorded operational data of the plant in 2005 and the gas turbine model offered by General Electric, to take into consideration that, in 2000, the gas turbine had been remodelled and the original performance curves should be corrected. The final objective of this model was to express the power plant main variables as a function of the gas turbine intake temperature, pressure and relative humidity. Finally, this model was applied to analyze the economic interest of different intake cooling systems, in different operative ranges and with different cooling capacities

  5. Research on a Household Dual Heat Source Heat Pump Water Heater with Preheater Based on ASPEN PLUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Gou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a dual heat source heat pump bathroom unit with preheater which is feasible for a single family. The system effectively integrates the air source heat pump (ASHP and wastewater source heat pump (WSHP technologies, and incorporates a preheater to recover shower wastewater heat and thus improve the total coefficient of performance (COP of the system, and it has no electric auxiliary heating device, which is favorable to improve the security of the system operation. The process simulation software ASPEN PLUS, widely used in the design and optimization of thermodynamic systems, was used to simulate various cases of system use and to analyze the impact of the preheater on the system. The average COP value of a system with preheater is 6.588 and without preheater it is 4.677. Based on the optimization and analysis, under the standard conditions of air at 25 °C, relative humidity of 70%, wastewater at 35 °C, wastewater flow rate of 0.07 kg/s, tap water at 15 °C, and condenser outlet water temperature at 50 °C, the theoretical COP of the system can reach 9.784 at an evaporating temperature of 14.96 °C, condensing temperature of 48.74 °C, and preheated water temperature of 27.19 °C.

  6. Internal combustion engine cylinder-to-cylinder balancing with balanced air-fuel ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ralph E.; Bourn, Gary D.; Smalley, Anthony J.

    2006-01-03

    A method of balancing combustion among cylinders of an internal combustion engine. For each cylinder, a normalized peak firing pressure is calculated as the ratio of its peak firing pressure to its combustion pressure. Each cylinder's normalized peak firing pressure is compared to a target value for normalized peak firing pressure. The fuel flow is adjusted to any cylinder whose normalized peak firing pressure is not substantially equal to the target value.

  7. Metric preheating and limitations of linearized gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, Bruce A.; Tamburini, Fabrizio; Kaiser, David I.; Maartens, Roy

    1999-01-01

    During the preheating era after inflation, resonant amplification of quantum field fluctuations takes place. Recently it has become clear that this must be accompanied by resonant amplification of scalar metric fluctuations, since the two are united by Einstein's equations. Furthermore, this 'metric preheating' enhances particle production, and leads to gravitational rescattering effects even at linear order. In multi-field models with strong preheating (q>>1), metric perturbations are driven non-linear, with the strongest amplification typically on super-Hubble scales (k→0). This amplification is causal, being due to the super-Hubble coherence of the inflaton condensate, and is accompanied by resonant growth of entropy perturbations. The amplification invalidates the use of the linearized Einstein field equations, irrespective of the amount of fine-tuning of the initial conditions. This has serious implications on all scales - from large-angle cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies to primordial black holes. We investigate the (q,k) parameter space in a two-field model, and introduce the time to non-linearity, t nl , as the timescale for the breakdown of the linearized Einstein equations. t nl is a robust indicator of resonance behavior, showing the fine structure in q and k that one expects from a quasi-Floquet system, and we argue that t nl is a suitable generalization of the static Floquet index in an expanding universe. Backreaction effects are expected to shut down the linear resonances, but cannot remove the existing amplification, which threatens the viability of strong preheating when confronted with the CMB. Mode-mode coupling and turbulence tend to re-establish scale invariance, but this process is limited by causality and for small k the primordial scale invariance of the spectrum may be destroyed. We discuss ways to escape the above conclusions, including secondary phases of inflation and preheating solely to fermions. The exclusion principle

  8. The model for calculation of emission and imisson of air pollutants from vehicles with internal combustion engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashevski, Done; Dimitrovski, Mile

    1994-01-01

    The model for calculation of emission and immision of air pollutants from vehicles with internal combustion engine on the crossroads in urban environments, with substitution of a great number of exhaust-pipes with one chimney in the centre of the crossroad has been made. The whole calculation of the pollution sources mentioned above is, in the fact, the calculation of the emission and imisson of pollutants from point sources of pollution. (author)

  9. Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of Coal Combustion By-Product Disposal and Utilizaton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher; Mei Xin; Mae Sexauer Gustin; Rob Jung

    2007-03-31

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a multiyear study to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements (ATEs) on the management of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). The ATEs evaluated in this project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, and selenium. The study included laboratory tasks to develop measurement techniques for mercury and ATE releases, sample characterization, and release experiments. A field task was also performed to measure mercury releases at a field site. Samples of fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials were collected preferentially from full-scale coal-fired power plants operating both without and with mercury control technologies in place. In some cases, samples from pilot- and bench-scale emission control tests were included in the laboratory studies. Several sets of 'paired' baseline and test fly ash and FGD materials collected during full-scale mercury emission control tests were also included in laboratory evaluations. Samples from mercury emission control tests all contained activated carbon (AC) and some also incorporated a sorbent-enhancing agent (EA). Laboratory release experiments focused on measuring releases of mercury under conditions designed to simulate CCB exposure to water, ambient-temperature air, elevated temperatures, and microbes in both wet and dry conditions. Results of laboratory evaluations indicated that: (1) Mercury and sometimes selenium are collected with AC used for mercury emission control and, therefore, present at higher concentrations than samples collected without mercury emission controls present. (2) Mercury is stable on CCBs collected from systems both without and with mercury emission controls present under most conditions tested, with the exception of vapor-phase releases of mercury exposed to elevated temperatures. (3) The presence of carbon either from added AC or from unburned coal can result in mercury

  10. Are black holes overproduced during preheating?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Teruaki; Tanaka, Takahiro; Bassett, Bruce; Kudoh, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    We provide a simple but robust argument that primordial black hole production generically does not exceed astrophysical bounds during the resonant preheating phase after inflation. This conclusion is supported by fully nonlinear lattice simulations of various models in two and three dimensions which include rescattering but neglect metric perturbations. We examine the degree to which preheating amplifies density perturbations at the Hubble scale and show that, at the end of the parametric resonance, power spectra are universal, with no memory of the power spectrum at the end of inflation. In addition, we show how the probability distribution of density perturbations changes from exponential on very small scales to Gaussian when smoothed over the Hubble scale - the crucial length for studies of primordial black hole formation - hence justifying the standard assumption of Gaussianity

  11. Influence of preheating on grindability of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, J.; Choi, N.; Prisbrey, K.

    1992-01-01

    Enormous quantities of coal must be ground as feed to power generation facilities. The energy cost of grinding is significant at 5 to 15 kWh/ton. If grindability could be increased by preheating the coal with waste heat, energy costs could be reduced. The objective of this work was to determine how grindability was affected by preheating. The method was to use population balance grinding models to interpret results of grinding coal before and after a heat treatment. Simulation of locked cycle tests gave a 40% increase in grindability. Approximately 40% grinding energy saving can be expected. By using waste heat for coal treatment, the targeted energy savings would be maintained. ?? 1992.

  12. Nuclear reactor insulation and preheat system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wampole, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    An insulation and preheat system is disclosed for preselected components of a fluid cooled nuclear reactor. A gas tight barrier or compartment of thermal insulation surrounds the selected components and includes devices to heat the internal atmosphere of the ocmpartment. An external surface of the compartment of enclosure is cooled, such as by a circulating fluid. The heating devices provide for preheating of the components, as well as maintenance of a temperature sufficient to ensure that the reactor coolant fluid will not solidify during shutdown. The external cooling limits the heat transferred to other plant structures, such as supporting concrete and steel. The barrier is spaced far enough from the surrounded components so as to allow access for remote or manual inspection, maintenance, and repair

  13. Preheating of tap water with solar collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granum, H; Raaen, H

    1992-05-05

    In 1991 SINTEF Architecture and Building Technology won the second prize in 'The Nordic Competition for Low Energy Buildings' with a project proposal named 'LOWe'. The paper gives a description of the energy-saving features of this project, particularly the use of a solar collector for preheating of tap water. Compared with the economic profitability of other saving efforts in the project, such as good thermal insulation and efficient heat recovering system, the system for solar preheating of tap water does not seem very attractive for the time being. Loose estimates indicate a cost of close of NOK 1.00 per kWh for the produced energy in the solar collector, while the present price for electricity in Norway is about NOK 0.50 per kWh. Compared with a heat pump solution however the energy cost is not unreasonable.

  14. Oxidative potential of gas phase combustion emissions - An underestimated and potentially harmful component of air pollution from combustion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanovic, S.; Vaughan, A.; Hedayat, F.; Salimi, F.; Rahman, M. M.; Zare, A.; Brown, R. A.; Brown, R. J.; Wang, H.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, X.; Bottle, S. E.; Yang, I. A.; Ristovski, Z. D.

    2017-06-01

    The oxidative potential (OP) of the gas phase is an important and neglected aspect of environmental toxicity. Whilst prolonged exposure to particulate matter (PM) associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to lead to negative health effects, the potential for compounds in gas phase to cause similar effects is yet to be understood. In this study we describe: the significance of the gas phase OP generated through vehicle emissions; discuss the origin and evolution of species contributing to measured OP; and report on the impact of gas phase OP on human lung cells. The model aerosol for this study was exhaust emitted from a Euro III Common-rail diesel engine fuelled with different blends of diesel and biodiesel. The gas phase of these emissions was found to be potentially as hazardous as the particle phase. Fuel oxygen content was found to negatively correlate with the gas phase OP, and positively correlate with particle phase OP. This signifies a complex interaction between reactive species present in gas and particle phase. Furthermore, this interaction has an overarching effect on the OP of both particle and gas phase, and therefore the toxicity of combustion emissions.

  15. Pre-heating mitigates composite degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jessika Calixto da; Rogério Vieira, Reges; Rege, Inara Carneiro Costa; Cruz, Carlos Alberto dos Santos; Vaz, Luís Geraldo; Estrela, Carlos; Castro, Fabrício Luscino Alves de

    2015-01-01

    Dental composites cured at high temperatures show improved properties and higher degrees of conversion; however, there is no information available about the effect of pre-heating on material degradation. Objectives This study evaluated the effect of pre-heating on the degradation of composites, based on the analysis of radiopacity and silver penetration using scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). Material and Methods Thirty specimens were fabricated using a metallic matrix (2x8 mm) and the composites Durafill VS (Heraeus Kulzer), Z-250 (3M/ESPE), and Z-350 (3M/ESPE), cured at 25°C (no pre-heating) or 60°C (pre-heating). Specimens were stored sequentially in the following solutions: 1) water for 7 days (60°C), plus 0.1 N sodium hydroxide (NaOH) for 14 days (60°C); 2) 50% silver nitrate (AgNO3) for 10 days (60°C). Specimens were radiographed at baseline and after each storage time, and the images were evaluated in gray scale. After the storage protocol, samples were analyzed using SEM/EDS to check the depth of silver penetration. Radiopacity and silver penetration data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=5%). Results Radiopacity levels were as follows: Durafill VSZ-350>Z-250 (pheated specimens presented higher radiopacity values than non-pre-heated specimens (pheated specimens (pheating at 60°C mitigated the degradation of composites based on analysis of radiopacity and silver penetration depth.

  16. Numerical investigation of biogas flameless combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ehsan; Bagheri, Ghobad; Wahid, Mazlan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fuel consumption decreases from 3.24 g/s in biogas conventional combustion to 1.07 g/s in flameless mode. • The differences between reactants and products temperature intensifies irreversibility in traditional combustion. • The temperature inside the chamber is uniform in biogas flameless mode and exergy loss decreases in this technique. • Low O 2 concentration in the flameless mode confirms a complete and quick combustion process in flameless regime. - Abstract: The purpose of this investigation is to analyze combustion characteristics of biogas flameless mode based on clean technology development strategies. A three dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study has been performed to illustrate various priorities of biogas flameless combustion compared to the conventional mode. The effects of preheated temperature and wall temperature, reaction zone and pollutant formation are observed and the impacts of combustion and turbulence models on numerical results are discussed. Although preheated conventional combustion could be effective in terms of fuel consumption reduction, NO x formation increases. It has been found that biogas is not eligible to be applied in furnace heat up due to its low calorific value (LCV) and it is necessary to utilize a high calorific value fuel to preheat the furnace. The required enthalpy for biogas auto-ignition temperature is supplied by enthalpy of preheated oxidizer. In biogas flameless combustion, the mean temperature of the furnace is lower than traditional combustion throughout the chamber. Compared to the biogas flameless combustion with uniform temperature, very high and fluctuated temperatures are recorded in conventional combustion. Since high entropy generation intensifies irreversibility, exergy loss is higher in biogas conventional combustion compared to the biogas flameless regime. Entropy generation minimization in flameless mode is attributed to the uniform temperature inside the chamber

  17. INVESTIGATION OF COMBUSTION, PERFORMANCE AND EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF SPARK IGNITION ENGINE FUELLED WITH BUTHANOL – GASOLINE MIXTURE AND A HYDROGEN ENRICHED AIR

    OpenAIRE

    Alfredas Rimkus; Mindaugas Melaika; Jonas Matijošius; Šarūnas Mikaliūnas; Saugirdas Pukalskas

    2016-01-01

    In this study, spark ignition engine fuelled with buthanol-gasoline mixture and a hydrogen-enriched air was investigated. Engine performance, emissions and combustion characteristics were investigated with different buthanol (10% and 20% by volume) gasoline mixtures and additionally supplied oxygen and hydrogen (HHO) gas mixture (3.6 l/min) in the sucked air. Hydrogen, which is in the HHO gas, improves gasoline and gasoline-buthanol mixture combustion, increases indicated pressure during comb...

  18. Comparison of char structural characteristics and reactivity during conventional air and oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaowei; Xu, Minghou; Yao, Hong; Gu, Ying; Si, Junping; Xiong, Chao [Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Combustion

    2013-07-01

    The capture and sequestration of CO{sub 2} generated from large- scale stationary power plants is considered to be one of the leading technologies that could potentially have a significant impact on reducing greenhouse emissions. Among these emerging technologies, the oxy-fuel combustion is a near-zero emission technology that can be adapted to both new and existing pulverized coal-fired power stations. The goal of this work is to make a comparative study on char structural characteristics (including char yield, swelling ratio, BET surface area, pore distribution, morphology) and reactivity during conventional air and oxy-fuel combustion. Specific experimental designs include two series. One is carried out in pure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} (pyrolysis experiments), and another is prepared in N{sub 2} + 5%O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} + 5%O{sub 2}. Coal samples included raw coal, low density fraction coal and medium density fraction coal in all experiments. The present study is a further effort to extend our knowledge about physical and chemical structural characteristics and reactivity of char in the presence of high concentration CO{sub 2}. Combustion and pyrolysis of a density fractionated China coal at drop tube furnace yielded the following conclusions. Compared to oxy-chars obtained under pure CO{sub 2} atmosphere, the swelling ratios of char obtained in pure N{sub 2} atmosphere are higher. When adding 5%O{sub 2}, experimental results are completely different with those of the pyrolysis experiment. In comparison with the oxy-chars obtained under CO{sub 2} + 5%O{sub 2} atmosphere, the swelling ratios of the char obtained in N{sub 2} + 5%O{sub 2} atmosphere are lower. In the pyrolysis experiment, the BET surfaces Area of the oxy-chars are about 10-20 times as much as chars. When adding 5%O{sub 2}, the BET surfaces Area of the oxy-chars are about two to four times as much as chars. During pyrolysis experiment, the total pore volumes of the oxy-chars obtained under pure CO

  19. Experimental investigation of wood combustion in a fixed bed with hot air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markovic, Miladin; Bramer, Eduard A.; Brem, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    Waste combustion on a grate with energy recovery is an important pillar of municipal solid waste (MSW) management in the Netherlands. In MSW incinerators fresh waste stacked on a grate enters the combustion chamber, heats up by radiation from the flame above the layer and ignition occurs. Typically,

  20. Soot, organics and ultrafine ash from air- and oxy-fired coal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper is concerned with determining the effects of oxy-combustion of coal on the composition of the ultrafine fly ash. To this end, a 10 W externally heated entrained flow furnace was modified to allow the combustion of pulverized coal in flames under practically relevant s...

  1. Spectroscopic Measurements of Target Preheating on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elton, R.C.; Griem, H.R.; Iglesias, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    The preheating of laser-heated microballoon targets has been measured by time-resolved x-ray and extreme ultraviolet (euv) spectroscopy on the 30 kJ, 351 nm, 60-beam laser-fusion system at the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Thin coatings of aluminum overcoated with magnesium served as indicators. both the sequence of the x-ray line emission and the intensity of euv radiation were used to determine a preheating peaking at ∼ 10 ns prior to onset of the main laser pulse, with a power density ≅1% of the main pulse. The measurements are supported by numerical modeling. Further information is provided by absorption spectra from the aluminum coating, backlighted by continuum from the heated surface. The exact source of the preheating energy remains unknown at present, but most likely arrives from early laser leakage through the system. The present target diagnostic is particularly useful when all beams cannot be monitored directly at all laser wavelengths

  2. Study and application of measures for prevention of spontaneous combustion of coal in goaf induced by air leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.; Tang, H.; Zou, S.; Shi, S. [Xiangtan Mining Institute (China)

    1996-12-01

    To prevent spontaneous ignition of coal due to air leakage in the goaf, air stoppings were built periodically in a U-shaped air leakage area based on computer simulation and site experience. The measure had reduced remarkably the quantity and extent of air leakage in the mined-out area and expanded the extent of non-spontaneous combustion area, thus prevented effectively the risk of spontaneous ignition and gas explosion. Application of this method in Mugang Mine of Liuzhi Bureau for more than two years had reduced the economic loss by over 3 million Yuan RMB. This method is characterized by simple operation, low cost, etc. It is suitable for mines in under developed area and mines with complicated conditions which are prone to spontaneous ignition. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Correlation between air flow rate and pollutant concentrations during two-stage oak log combustion in a 25 KW residential boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juszczak Marek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available It can be expected that there is a considerable correlation between combustion air flow rate and the concentrations of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxide in the flue gas. The influence of temperature and oxygen concentration in the combustion zone on the concentrations of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxide in the flue gas, for high and low combustion air flow, was analysed. Oxygen concentration for which the concentration of carbon monoxide is the lowest was determined, as well as the mutual relation between carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide concentration.

  4. Thermodynamic and transport properties of air and its products of combustion with ASTMA-A-1 fuel and natural gas at 20, 30, and 40 atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poferl, D. J.; Svehla, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The isentropic exponent, molecular weight, viscosity, specific heat at constant pressure, thermal conductivity, Prandtl number, and enthalpy were calculated for air, the combustion products of ASTM-A-1 jet fuel and air, and the combustion products of natural gas and air. The properties were calculated over a temperature range from 300 to 2800 K in 100 K increments and for pressures of 20, 30 and 40 atmospheres. The data for natural gas and ASTM-A-1 were calculated for fuel-air ratios from zero to stoichiometric in 0.01 increments.

  5. Utilization of biogas released from palm oil mill effluent for power generation using self-preheated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ehsan; Wahid, Mazlan Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A lab-scale reactor called self-preheating flameless combustion (SPFC) system is experimented. • Feasibility of power generation by POME biogas is modeled using SPFC system. • 4 MW power is available by POME biogas utilization in a typical palm oil mill with 300,000 tons production. • The rate of power generation increases when 2% hydrogen is added to POME biogas ingredients. - Abstract: In palm oil mills, for one ton crude palm oil (CPO) production, 70 m"3 biogas is released from palm oil mill effluent (POME) which can endanger the environment. Palm oil mills without appropriate strategies for biogas collection can participate in greenhouse gases (GHGs) generation actively. In this paper, a typical palm oil mill with annual capacity of 300,000 ton oil palm production and 3 MW electricity demand is considered as a pilot plant and feasibility of power generation by POME biogas is modeled by Aspen Plus considering flameless mode in combustion system. A new design of lab-scale flameless reactor called self-preheated flameless combustion (SPFC) system is presented and employed in power generation modeling. In SPFC system, the flameless chamber is employed as a heater to preheat an oxidizer over the self-ignition temperature of the fuel. A helical stainless steel pipe (called self-preheating pipe) is installed inside the chamber to conduct the oxidizer from exhaust zone to the combustion zone inside the chamber and preheat oxidizer. In the flameless mode, the diluted oxidizer is injected to the helical pipe from the exhaust zone and the preheated oxidizer at the burner is conducted to the flameless furnace through a distributor. In SPFC system external heater for preheating oxidizer is removed and the rate of power generation increases. The results show that 10.8 MW power could be generated in ultra-lean POME biogas SPFC. However, the rate of pollutant especially CO_2 and NO_x is high in this circumstances. In stoichiometric condition, 4 MW power

  6. Coal fired air turbine cogeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster-Pegg, R. W.

    Fuel options and generator configurations for installation of cogenerator equipment are reviewed, noting that the use of oil or gas may be precluded by cost or legislation within the lifetime of any cogeneration equipment yet to be installed. A coal fueled air turbine cogenerator plant is described, which uses external combustion in a limestone bed at atmospheric pressure and in which air tubes are sunk to gain heat for a gas turbine. The limestone in the 26 MW unit absorbs sulfur from the coal, and can be replaced by other sorbents depending on types of coal available and stringency of local environmental regulations. Low temperature combustion reduces NOx formation and release of alkali salts and corrosion. The air heat is exhausted through a heat recovery boiler to produce process steam, then can be refed into the combustion chamber to satisfy preheat requirements. All parts of the cogenerator are designed to withstand full combustion temperature (1500 F) in the event of air flow stoppage. Costs are compared with those of a coal fired boiler and purchased power, and it is shown that the increased capital requirements for cogenerator apparatus will yield a 2.8 year payback. Detailed flow charts, diagrams and costs schedules are included.

  7. Experimental study on premixed CH{sub 4}/air mixture combustion in micro Swiss-roll combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Bei-Jing; Wang, Jian-Hua [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Excess enthalpy combustion is a promising approach to stabilize flame in micro-combustors. Using a Swiss-roll combustor configuration, excess enthalpy combustion can be conveniently achieved. In this work, three types of Swiss-roll combustors with double spiral-shaped channels were designed and fabricated. The combustors were tested using methane/air mixtures of various equivalence ratios. Both temperature distributions and extinction limits were determined for each combustor configuration at different methane mass flow rates. Results indicate that the Swiss-roll combustors developed in the current study greatly enhance combustion stability in center regions of the combustors. At the same time, excess enthalpy combustors of the Swiss-roll configuration significantly extend the extinction limits of methane/air mixtures. In addition, the effects of combustor configurations and thermal insulation arrangements on temperature distributions and extinction limits were evaluated. With heat losses to the environment being significant, the use of thermal insulations further enhances the flame stability in center regions of the Swiss-roll combustors and extends flammable ranges. (author)

  8. Modeling and optimization of processes for clean and efficient pulverized coal combustion in utility boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belošević Srđan V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulverized coal-fired power plants should provide higher efficiency of energy conversion, flexibility in terms of boiler loads and fuel characteristics and emission reduction of pollutants like nitrogen oxides. Modification of combustion process is a cost-effective technology for NOx control. For optimization of complex processes, such as turbulent reactive flow in coal-fired furnaces, mathematical modeling is regularly used. The NOx emission reduction by combustion modifications in the 350 MWe Kostolac B boiler furnace, tangentially fired by pulverized Serbian lignite, is investigated in the paper. Numerical experiments were done by an in-house developed three-dimensional differential comprehensive combustion code, with fuel- and thermal-NO formation/destruction reactions model. The code was developed to be easily used by engineering staff for process analysis in boiler units. A broad range of operating conditions was examined, such as fuel and preheated air distribution over the burners and tiers, operation mode of the burners, grinding fineness and quality of coal, boiler loads, cold air ingress, recirculation of flue gases, water-walls ash deposition and combined effect of different parameters. The predictions show that the NOx emission reduction of up to 30% can be achieved by a proper combustion organization in the case-study furnace, with the flame position control. Impact of combustion modifications on the boiler operation was evaluated by the boiler thermal calculations suggesting that the facility was to be controlled within narrow limits of operation parameters. Such a complex approach to pollutants control enables evaluating alternative solutions to achieve efficient and low emission operation of utility boiler units. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-33018: Increase in energy and ecology efficiency of processes in pulverized coal-fired furnace and optimization of utility steam boiler air preheater by using in

  9. Simulation Investigation on Combustion Characteristics in a Four-Point Lean Direct Injection Combustor with Hydrogen/Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the combustion characteristics in multi-point lean direct injection (LDI combustors with hydrogen/air, two swirl–venturi 2 × 2 array four-point LDI combustors were designed. The four-point LDI combustor consists of injector assembly, swirl–venturi array and combustion chamber. The injector, swirler and venturi together govern the rapid mixing of hydrogen and air to form the mixture for combustion. Using clockwise swirlers and anticlockwise swirlers, the co-swirling and count-swirling swirler arrays LDI combustors were achieved. Using Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS code for steady-state reacting flow computations, the four-point LDI combustors with hydrogen/air were simulated with an 11 species and 23 lumped reaction steps H2/Air reaction mechanism. The axial velocity, turbulence kinetic energy, total pressure drop coefficient, outlet temperature, mass fraction of OH and emission of pollutant NO of four-point LDI combustors, with different equivalence ratios, are here presented and discussed. As the equivalence ratios increased, the total pressure drop coefficient became higher because of increasing heat loss. Increasing equivalence ratios also corresponded with the rise in outlet temperature of the four-point LDI combustors, as well as an increase in the emission index of NO EINO in the four-point LDI combustors. Along the axial distance, the EINO always increased and was at maximum at the exit of the dump. Along the chamber, the EINO gradually increased, maximizing at the exit of chamber. The total temperature of four-point LDI combustors with different equivalence ratios was identical to the theoretical equilibrium temperature. The EINO was an exponential function of the equivalence ratio.

  10. Stationary Combustion Turbines: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the NESHAP for stationary combustion turbines by reading the rule history, the rule summary, additional resources, docket folder documents, the economic impact analysis, fact sheet and more

  11. Sintering uranium oxide using a preheating step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, N.J.; Nivas, Y.; Packard, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Compacted pellets of uranium oxide or uranium oxide with one or more additives are heated in a kiln in a process having a preheating step, a sintering step, a reduction step, and a cooling step in a controlled atmosphere. The process is practiced to give a range of temperature and atmosphere conditions for obtaining optimum fluoride removal from the compacted pellets along with optimum sintering in a single process. The preheating step of this process is conducted in a temperature range of about 600 0 to about 900 0 C and the pellets are held for at least twenty min, and preferably about 60 min, in an atmosphere having a composition in the range of about 10 to about 75 vol % hydrogen with the balance being carbon dioxide. The sintering step is conducted at a temperature in the range of about 900 0 C to 1500 0 C in the presence of an atmosphere having a composition in the range of about 0.5 to about 90 vol % hydrogen with the balance being carbon dioxide. The reduction step reduces the oxygen to metal ratio of the pellets to a range of about 1.98 to 2.10:1 and this is accomplished by gradually cooling the pellets for about 30 to about 120 min from the temperature of the sintering step to about 1100 0 C in an atmosphere of about 10 to 90 vol % hydrogen with the balance being carbon dioxide. Thereafter the pellets are cooled to about 100 0 C under a protective atmosphere, and in one preferred practice the same atmosphere used in the reduction step is used in the cooling step. The preheating, sintering and reduction steps may also be conducted with their respective atmospheres having an initial additional component of water vapor and the water vapor can comprise up to about 20 vol %

  12. From (p)reheating to nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jedamzik, Karsten

    2002-01-01

    This paper gives a brief qualitative description of the possible evolution of the early universe between the end of an inflationary epoch and the end of big-bang nucleosynthesis. After a general introduction, establishing the minimum requirements cosmologists impose on this cosmic evolutionary phase, namely, successful baryogenesis, the production of cosmic dark matter and successful light-element nucleosynthesis, a more detailed discussion on some recent developments follows. This latter includes the physics of preheating, the putative production of (alternative) dark matter and the current status of big bang nucleosynthesis

  13. When can preheating affect the CMB?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujikawa, Shinji; Bassett, Bruce A.

    2002-05-01

    We discuss the principles governing the selection of inflationary models for which preheating can affect the CMB. This is a (fairly small) subset of those models which have nonnegligible entropy/isocurvature perturbations on large scales during inflation. We study new models which belong to this class-two-field inflation with negative nonminimal coupling and hybrid/double/supernatural inflation models where the tachyonic growth of entropy perturbations can lead to the variation of the curvature perturbation, /R, on super-Hubble scales. Finally, we present evidence against recent claims for the variation of /R in the absence of substantial super-Hubble entropy perturbations.

  14. Advanced CFD modelling of air and recycled flue gas staging in a waste wood-fired grate boiler for higher combustion efficiency and greater environmental benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajh, Boštjan; Yin, Chungen; Samec, Niko; Hriberšek, Matjaž; Kokalj, Filip; Zadravec, Matej

    2018-07-15

    Grate-fired boilers are commonly used to burn biomass/wastes for heat and power production. In spite of the recent breakthrough in integration of advanced secondary air systems in grate boilers, grate-firing technology needs to be advanced for higher efficiency and lower emissions. In this paper, innovative staging of combustion air and recycled flue gas in a 13 MW th waste wood-fired grate boiler is comprehensively studied based on a numerical model that has been previously validated. In particular, the effects of the jet momentum, position and orientation of the combustion air and recycled flue gas streams on in-furnace mixing, combustion and pollutant emissions from the boiler are examined. It is found that the optimized air and recycled flue gas jets remarkably enhance mixing and heat transfer, result in a more uniform temperature and velocity distribution, extend the residence time of the combustibles in the hot zone and improve burnout in the boiler. Optimizing the air and recycled flue gas jet configuration can reduce carbon monoxide emission from the boiler by up to 86%, from the current 41.0 ppm to 5.7 ppm. The findings of this study can serve as useful guidelines for novel design and optimization of the combustion air supply and flue gas recycling for grate boilers of this type. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Numerical simulation of pulverized coal combustion to reduce pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad Bagher Ayani; Behnam Rahmanian

    2010-01-01

    Full text: In this research, the numerical simulation of pollutant reduction and in a pulverized coal combustion at 2D combustion chamber have been studied. Finite volume method using structured grid arrangement was utilized for modeling the pulverized coal combustion. The pressure base algorithm and implicit solver has been employed to simulate non-premix combustion model. The air was diluted by some participative gaseous such as whose percentages varied from 0 % to 20 %. Participative gases and air were preheated by a high-temperature gas generator, and the preheated oxidizer temperature could achieve. The combustion simulation with the generalized finite rate chemistry model, referred to as the Magnussen model and the reacting flow with the mixture fraction PDF/ equilibrium chemistry model, referred to as the PDF model are studied. Quick scheme was adopted for the discretization of all convective terms of the advective transport equations. So, as a result of addition participative gases into oxidizer the rate of formation of pollutants as well as NO x suppressed. The addition only a few percent of halogen components can make some systems nonflammable. The effects of addition halogen components and non-reaction gaseous such as Helium and Argon are fuel dilution and its acts as catalysts in reducing the H atom concentration necessary for the chain branching reaction sequence. Moreover, they act like surface and they make the increment of surface ratio versus volume. Because of this, the number of radical conflicts and hence destruction them will be increase. Furthermore, the rate of formation of pollutants will be decreased if the halogen components and non-reaction gaseous injection will be increased. However, as a result of this research, in the case of injection in pulverized coal combustion the flame temperature is lower than Steam, Argon and Helium. So, the emission levels of carbon dioxide is significantly lower than other participative gases, but in this

  16. Spray and Combustion Characteristics of a Novel Multi-circular Jet Plate in Air-assisted Atomizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Amirnordin Shahrin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomization of liquid fuel in air-assisted atomizer is highly dependent on air mixing, which can be enhanced using turbulent generators, such as multi-circular jet (MCJ plates and swirler. This study aims to determine the effects of novel MCJ plates on the spray and combustion characteristics of an air-assisted atomizer by evaluating spray and flame parameters, such as penetration length, cone angle, and cone area. MCJ 30 and MCJ 45, with inclined jets at 30° and 45°, respectively, were used in the experiment. A swirler was also used for comparison. The spray and flame images were recorded at different equivalence ratios through direct photography and analyzed using image J software. Flame temperature was determined using a thermal infrared camera, and burning chamber and flue gas temperatures were measured using thermocouples. The spray and flame characteristics of MCJ 30 exhibited performance comparable with those of the MCJ 45 and swirler. The integration of turbulence and swirling motion concept into the novel MCJ plates can enhance the mixing formation and thus improve the performance of burner combustion.

  17. Low-NO{sub x}, wood chip combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saastamoinen, J.; Oravainen, H.; Haemaelaeinen, J.; Paakkinen, K. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The regulations for nitrogen oxide emissions vary in different countries, but the general trend in the future will probably be that the emissions limits will be lowered also for wood combustion plants, which are small or medium size units. Thus, the development of wood chip burning furnaces (grate furnaces, fluidized bed combustors, stoker furnaces) with lower nitrogen oxide emissions, is important. The wood used in the combustor, its particle size, moisture and fuel properties (nitrogen content) affect the nitrogen emissions. The nitrogen oxide release is also much affected by the design and operation of the combustor (air staging, fuel air preheat, flue gas circulation, air to fuel mass ratio). The fate of nitrogen compounds originally in the virgin wood depends much on the design of the combustor system and by proper planning it is possible to reduce the emission of nitrogen oxides. Basic knowledge of the release of nitrogen compounds from single wood particles is attained. The release of gaseous nitrogen compounds from wood particles during pyrolysis and combustion is studied experimentally and by modelling. Nitrogen release is studied experimentally by two ways, by analysing the gas and by quenching the particle and analysing the char residue. Formation of nitrogen oxide emissions in a fuel bed is studied by modelling and by combustion experiments with a pot furnace. This research gives general information of nitrogen oxide formation in wood bunting especially in fixed beds. The development of a horizontal stoker burner for wood chips with low emissions is the practical aim of the research. (orig.)

  18. The effect of low-NOx combustion on residual carbon in fly ash and its adsorption capacity for air entrainment admixtures in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Hougaard; Jensen, Anker Degn; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2010-01-01

    been combusted in an entrained flow reactor to test the impact of changes in operating conditions and fuel type on the AEA adsorption of ash and NOx formation. Increased oxidizing conditions, obtained by improved fuel-air mixing or higher excess air, decreased the AEA requirements of the produced ash......Fly ash from pulverized coal combustion contains residual carbon that can adsorb the air-entraining admixtures (AEAs) added to control the air entrainment in concrete. This is a problem that has increased by the implementation of low-NOx combustion technologies. In this work, pulverized fuel has...... by up to a factor of 25. This was due to a lower carbon content in the ash and a lower specific AEA adsorptivity of the carbon. The latter was suggested to be caused by changes in the adsorption properties of the unburned char and a decreased formation of soot, which was found to have a large AEA...

  19. Combustion of hydrogen-air jets in local chemical equilibrium: A guide to the CHARNAL computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, D. B.; Launder, B. E.; Morse, A. P.; Maples, G.

    1974-01-01

    A guide to a computer program, written in FORTRAN 4, for predicting the flow properties of turbulent mixing with combustion of a circular jet of hydrogen into a co-flowing stream of air is presented. The program, which is based upon the Imperial College group's PASSA series, solves differential equations for diffusion and dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy and also of the R.M.S. fluctuation of hydrogen concentration. The effective turbulent viscosity for use in the shear stress equation is computed. Chemical equilibrium is assumed throughout the flow.

  20. Combustion characteristics of porous media burners under various back pressures: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The porous media combustion technology is an effective solution to stable combustion and clean utilization of low heating value gas. For observing the combustion characteristics of porous media burners under various back pressures, investigating flame stability and figuring out the distribution laws of combustion gas flow and resistance loss, so as to achieve an optimized design and efficient operation of the devices, a bench of foamed ceramics porous media combustion devices was thus set up to test the cold-state resistance and hot-state combustion characteristic of burners in working conditions without back pressures and with two different back pressures. The following results are achieved from this experimental study. (1 The strong thermal reflux of porous media can preheat the premixed air effectively, so the flame can be kept stable easily, the combustion equivalent ratio of porous media burners is lower than that of traditional burners, and its pollutant content of flue gas is much lower than the national standard value. (2 The friction coefficient of foamed ceramics decreases with the increase of air flow rate, and its decreasing rate slows down gradually. (3 When the flow rate of air is low, viscosity is the dominant flow resistance, and the friction coefficient is in an inverse relation with the flow rate. (4 As the flow rate of air increases, inertia is the dominant flow resistance, and the friction coefficient is mainly influenced by the roughness and cracks of foamed ceramics. (5 After the introduction of secondary air, the minimum equivalent ratio of porous media burners gets much lower and its range of equivalent ratio is much larger than that of traditional burners.

  1. Experimental and numerical investigation of hetero-/homogeneous combustion-based HCCI of methane–air mixtures in free-piston micro-engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Junjie; Liu, Baofang; Gao, Xuhui; Xu, Deguang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Single-shot experiments and a transient model of micro-engine were presented. • Coupled combustion can significantly improve in-cylinder temperatures. • Coupled combustion can reduce mass losses and compression ratios. • Heterogeneous reactions cause earlier ignition. • Heat losses result in higher mass losses. - Abstract: The hetero-/homogenous combustion-based HCCI (homogeneous charge compression ignition) of fuel–lean methane–air mixtures over alumina-supported platinum catalysts was investigated experimentally and numerically in free-piston micro-engines without ignition sources. Single-shot experiments were carried out in the purely homogeneous and coupled hetero-/homogeneous combustion modes, involved temperature measurements, capturing the visible combustion image sequences, exhaust gas analysis, and the physicochemical characterization of catalysts. Simulations were performed with a two-dimensional transient model that includes detailed hetero-/homogeneous chemistry and transport, leakage, and free-piston motion to gain physical insight and to explore the hetero-/homogeneous combustion characteristics. The micro-engine performance concerning combustion efficiency, mass loss, energy density, and free-piston dynamics was investigated. The results reveal that both purely homogeneous and coupled hetero-/homogeneous combustion of methane–air mixtures in a narrow cylinder with a diameter of 3 mm and a height of approximately 0.3 mm are possible. The coupled hetero-/homogeneous mode can not only significantly improve the combustion efficiency, in-cylinder temperature and pressure, output power and energy density, but also reduce the mass loss because of its lower compression ratio and less time spent around TDC (top dead center) and during the expansion stroke, indicating that this coupled mode is a promising combustion scheme for micro-engine. Heat losses result in higher mass losses. Heterogeneous reactions cause earlier ignition

  2. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown.

  3. Super-adiabatic combustion in Al2O3 and SiC coated porous media for thermoelectric power conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Kyle T.; Waters, Oliver; Bubnovich, Valeri; Orlovskaya, Nina; Chen, Ruey-Hung

    2013-01-01

    The combustion of ultra-lean fuel/air mixtures provides an efficient way to convert the chemical energy of hydrocarbons and low-calorific fuels into useful power. Matrix-stabilized porous medium combustion is an advanced technique in which a solid porous medium within the combustion chamber conducts heat from the hot gaseous products in the upstream direction to preheat incoming reactants. This heat recirculation extends the standard flammability limits, allowing the burning of ultra-lean and low-calorific fuel mixtures and resulting a combustion temperature higher than the thermodynamic equilibrium temperature of the mixture (i.e., super-adiabatic combustion). The heat generated by this combustion process can be converted into electricity with thermoelectric generators, which is the goal of this study. The design of a porous media burner coupled with a thermoelectric generator and its testing are presented. The combustion zone media was a highly-porous alumina matrix interposed between upstream and downstream honeycomb structures with pore sizes smaller than the flame quenching distance, preventing the flame from propagating outside of the central section. Experimental results include temperature distributions inside the combustion chamber and across a thermoelectric generator; along with associated current, voltage and power output values. Measurements were obtained for a catalytically inert Al 2 O 3 medium and a SiC coated medium, which was tested for the ability to catalyze the super-adiabatic combustion. The combustion efficiency was obtained for stoichiometric and ultra-lean (near the lean flammability limit) mixtures of CH 4 and air. - Highlights: • Design of a porous burner coupled with a thermoelectric module. • Super-adiabatic combustion in a highly-porous ceramic matrix was investigated. • Both alumina and silicon carbide ceramic surfaces were used as porous media. • Catalytic properties of Al 2 O 3 and SiC ceramic surfaces were studied

  4. Numerical analysis of the air chemical non-equilibrium effect in combustion for a semi-sphere with opposing jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fa-Ming; Wang, Jiang-Feng; Li, Long-Fei

    2018-05-01

    The air chemical non-equilibrium effect (ACNEE) on hydrogen-air combustion flow fields at Mach number of 10 is numerically analyzed for a semi-sphere with a sonic opposing-hydrogen jet. The 2D axisymmetric multi-components N-S equations are solved by using the central scheme with artificial dissipation and the S-A turbulence model. Numerical results show that as compared to the result without ACNEE, the ACNEE has little influence on the structure of flow field, but has a considerable impact on fluid characteristics which reduces the maximum value of mass fraction of water in the flow field and increases the maximum value of mass fraction of water on solid surface, as well as the maximum surface temperature.

  5. Soot, organics, and ultrafine ash from air- and oxy-fired coal combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Andersen, Myrrha E.; Modak, Nabanita; Winterrowd, Christopher K.; Lee, Chun Wai; Roberts, William L.; Wendt, Jost O L; Linak, William P.

    2016-01-01

    -fired combustion conditions consists primarily of carbonaceous material (50-95%). Carbonaceous components on particles <0.6. μm measured by a thermal optical method showed that large fractions (52-93%) consisted of OC rather than EC, as expected. This observation

  6. Numerical study of combustion initiation in a supersonic flow of H2-air mixture by resonance laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezgin, L V; Kopchenov, V I; Kuleshov, P S; Titova, N S; Starik, A M

    2012-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the efficiency of approaches based on the exposure of reacting gas to resonance laser radiation to enhance combustion in a supersonic flow of H 2 -air mixture is conducted. The kinetic processes responsible for the intensification of chain reactions in premixed and non-premixed H 2 -air flows upon photodissociation of O 2 molecules by 193.3 nm laser radiation, excitation of these molecules to the singlet sigma state by laser photons with 762.346 nm wavelength and heating the mixture by laser radiation are analysed in a detailed manner. It is shown that both photochemical methods, photodissociation and excitation of O 2 molecules, are much more effective in shortening the ignition delay length than merely heating the mixture. For the premixed flow, the photodissociation of O 2 molecules ensures a slightly higher reduction in the ignition delay than the laser-induced excitation of molecular oxygen to the singlet sigma state. However, in the non-premixed flow the situation is inverted. The analysis shows that both photochemical methods make it possible to raise the efficiency of conversion of reactant chemical energy to thermal energy released during combustion compared with the method of heating the mixtures. (paper)

  7. Large-volume excitation of air, argon, nitrogen and combustible mixtures by thermal jets produced by nanosecond spark discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyan, Sergey; Hayashi, Jun; Salmon, Arthur; Stancu, Gabi D.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2017-04-01

    This work presents experimental observations of strong expanding thermal jets following the application of nanosecond spark discharges. These jets propagate in a toroidal shape perpendicular to the interelectrode axis, with high velocities of up to 30 m s-1 and over distances of the order of a cm. Their propagation length is much larger than the thermal expansion region produced by the conventional millisecond sparks used in car engine ignition, thus greatly improving the volumetric excitation of gas mixtures. The shape and velocity of the jets is found to be fairly insensitive to the shape of the electrodes. In addition, their spatial extent is found to increase with the number of nanosecond sparks and with the discharge voltage, and to decrease slightly with the pressure between 1 and 7 atm at constant applied voltage. Finally, this thermal jet phenomenon is observed in experiments conducted with many types of gas mixtures, including air, nitrogen, argon, and combustible CH4/air mixtures. This makes nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges particularly attractive for aerodynamic flow control or plasma-assisted combustion because of their ability to excite large volumes of gas, typically about 100 times the volume of the discharge.

  8. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Measurements of Velocity in a H2-air Combustion-Heated Supersonic Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.; Gaffney, Richard L.; Baurle, Robert a.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents simultaneous measurements at multiple points of two orthogonal components of flow velocity using a single-shot interferometric Rayleigh scattering (IRS) technique. The measurements are performed on a large-scale Mach 1.6 (Mach 5.5 enthalpy) H2-air combustion jet during the 2007 test campaign in the Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The measurements are performed simultaneously with CARS (Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Spectroscopy) using a combined CARS-IRS instrument with a common path 9-nanosecond pulsed, injection-seeded, 532-nm Nd:YAG laser probe pulse. The paper summarizes the measurements of velocities along the core of the vitiated air flow as well as two radial profiles. The average velocity measurement near the centerline at the closest point from the nozzle exit compares favorably with the CFD calculations using the VULCAN code. Further downstream, the measured axial velocity shows overall higher values than predicted with a trend of convergence at further distances. Larger discrepancies are shown in the radial profiles.

  9. Numerical study of radiation effect on the municipal solid waste combustion characteristics inside an incinerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingfu, E-mail: jfwang@bjut.edu.cn; Xue, Yanqing; Zhang, Xinxin; Shu, Xinran

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A 3-D model for the MSW incinerator with preheated air was developed. • Gas radiative properties were obtained from a statistical narrow-band model. • Non-gray body radiation model can provide more accurate simulation results. - Abstract: Due to its advantages of high degree volume reduction, relatively stable residue, and energy reclamation, incineration becomes one of the best choices for Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) disposal. However, detailed measurements of temperature and gas species inside a furnace are difficulty by conventional experimental techniques. Therefore, numerical simulation of MSW incineration in the packed bed and gas flow field was applied. In this work, a three dimensional (3-D) model of incinerator system, including flow, heat transfer, detailed chemical mechanisms, and non-gray gas models, was developed. Radiation from the furnace wall and the flame formed above the bed is of importance for drying and igniting the waste. The preheated air with high temperature is used for the MSW combustion. Under the conditions of high temperature and high pressure, MSW combustion produces a variety of radiating gases. The wavelength-depend radiative properties of flame adopted in non-gray radiation model were obtained from a statistical narrow-band model. The influence of radiative heat transfer on temperature, flow field is researched by adiabatic model (without considering radiation), gray radiation model, and non-gray radiation model. The simulation results show that taking into account the non-gray radiation is essential.

  10. Preheating the universe in hybrid inflation

    CERN Document Server

    García-Bellido, J

    1998-01-01

    One of the fundamental problems of modern cosmology is to explain the origin of all the matter and radiation in the Universe today. The inflationary model predicts that the oscillations of the scalar field at the end of inflation will convert the coherent energy density of the inflaton into a large number of particles, responsible for the present entropy of the Universe. The transition from the inflationary era to the radiation era was originally called reheating, and we now understand that it may consist of three different stages: preheating, in which the homogeneous inflaton field decays coherently into bosonic waves (scalars and/or vectors) with large occupation numbers; backreaction and rescattering, in which different energy bands get mixed; and finally decoherence and thermalization, in which those waves break up into particles that thermalize and acquire a black body spectrum at a certain temperature. These three stages are non-perturbative, non-linear and out of equilibrium, and we are just beginning ...

  11. Ignition of combustible/air mixtures by small radiatively heated surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, M M; Schenk, S; Hau, M; Cammenga, H K; Bothe, H

    2000-02-01

    Optical radiation as an ignition source in potentially explosive atmospheres was investigated for a number of explosive mixtures with respect to the most important case occurring in practice, i.e., absorption of the radiation by a solid target. Iron oxide was used as the target material. The combustibles were selected in compliance with the well-known temperature classes and apparatus groups to allow a useful graduation of the power limits to be applied.

  12. 14th congress of combustion by-products and their health effects-origin, fate, and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidemann, Eva; Andersson, Patrik L; Bidleman, Terry; Boman, Christoffer; Carlin, Danielle J; Collina, Elena; Cormier, Stephania A; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra C; Gullett, Brian K; Johansson, Christer; Lucas, Donald; Lundin, Lisa; Lundstedt, Staffan; Marklund, Stellan; Nording, Malin L; Ortuño, Nuria; Sallam, Asmaa A; Schmidt, Florian M; Jansson, Stina

    2016-04-01

    The 14th International Congress on Combustion By-Products and Their Health Effects was held in Umeå, Sweden from June 14th to 17th, 2015. The Congress, mainly sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program and the Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, focused on the "Origin, fate and health effects of combustion-related air pollutants in the coming era of bio-based energy sources". The international delegates included academic and government researchers, engineers, scientists, policymakers and representatives of industrial partners. The Congress provided a unique forum for the discussion of scientific advances in this research area since it addressed in combination the health-related issues and the environmental implications of combustion by-products. The scientific outcomes of the Congress included the consensus opinions that: (a) there is a correlation between human exposure to particulate matter and increased cardiac and respiratory morbidity and mortality; (b) because currently available data does not support the assessment of differences in health outcomes between biomass smoke and other particulates in outdoor air, the potential human health and environmental impacts of emerging air-pollution sources must be addressed. Assessment will require the development of new approaches to characterize combustion emissions through advanced sampling and analytical methods. The Congress also concluded the need for better and more sustainable e-waste management and improved policies, usage and disposal methods for materials containing flame retardants.

  13. Thermodynamic analysis of an absorption refrigeration system used to cool down the intake air in an Internal Combustion Engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novella, R.; Dolz, V.; Martín, J.; Royo-Pascual, L.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Enough power in the exhaust gases is available to operate the absorption cycle. • Three engine operating points are presented in the article. • Improvement potential up to 4% is possible in the engine indicated efficiency. • Engine indicated efficiency benefit was experimentally confirmed by direct testing. - Abstract: This paper deals with the thermodynamic analysis of an absorption refrigeration cycle used to cool down the temperature of the intake air in an Internal Combustion Engine using as a heat source the exhaust gas of the engine. The solution of ammonia-water has been selected due to the stability for a wide range of operating temperatures and pressures and the low freezing point. The effects of operating temperatures, pressures, concentrations of strong and weak solutions in the absorption refrigeration cycle were examined to achieve proper heat rejection to the ambient. Potential of increasing Internal Combustion Engine efficiency and reduce pollutant emissions was estimated by means of theoretical models and experimental tests. In order to provide boundary conditions for the absorption refrigeration cycle and to simulate its effect on engine performance, a 0D thermodynamic model was used to reproduce the engine performance when the intake air is cooled. Furthermore, a detailed experimental work was carried out to validate the results in real engine operation. Theoretical results show how the absorption refrigeration system decreases the intake air flow temperature down to a temperature around 5 °C and even lower by using the bottoming waste heat energy available in the exhaust gases in a wide range of engine operating conditions. In addition, the theoretical analysis estimates the potential of the strategy for increasing the engine indicated efficiency in levels up to 4% also at the operating conditions under evaluation. Finally, this predicted benefit in engine indicated efficiency has been experimentally confirmed by direct

  14. Experimental investigation of laminar LPG-H{sub 2} jet diffusion flame with preheated reactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.P. Mishra; P. Kumar [Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India). Combustion Laboratory, Department of Aerospace Engineering

    2008-10-15

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of the effect of H{sub 2} addition on flame length, soot free length fraction (SFLF), flame radiant fraction, gas temperature and emission level in LPG-H{sub 2} composite fuel jet diffusion flame for two preheated cases namely, (i) preheated air and (ii) preheated air and fuel. Results show that the H{sub 2} addition leads to a reduction in flame length which may be caused due to an increased gas temperature. Besides this, the flame length is also observed to be reduced with increasing reactants temperature. The soot free length fraction (SFLF) increases as H{sub 2} is added to fuel stream. This might have been caused by decrease in the C/H ratio in the flame and is favorable to attenuate PAH formation rate. Interestingly, the SFLF is observed to be reduced with increasing reactants temperature that may be due to reduction in induction period of soot formation caused by enhanced flame temperature. Moreover, the decreased radiant heat fraction with hydrogen addition is pertinent with the reduction in soot concentration level. The reduction in NOx emission level with H{sub 2} addition to the fuel stream is also observed. On the contrary, NOx emission level is found to be enhanced significantly with reactant temperature that can be attributed to the increase in thermal NOx through Zeldovich mechanism. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The Effect of Hydrogen Addition on the Combustion Characteristics of RP-3 Kerosene/Air Premixed Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zeng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the effects of hydrogen addition on the combustion characteristics of Chinese No.3 jet fuel (RP-3 kerosene/air premixed flames. Experiments were carried out in a constant volume chamber and the influences of the initial temperatures of 390 and 420 K, initial pressures of 0.1 and 0.3 MPa, equivalence ratios of 0.6–1.6 and hydrogen additions of 0.0–0.5 on the laminar burning velocities, and Markstein numbers of Hydrogen (H2/RP-3/air mixtures were investigated. The results show that the flame front surfaces of RP-3/air mixtures remain smooth throughout the entire flame propagation process at a temperature of 390 K, pressure of 0.3 MPa, equivalence ratio of 1.3 and without hydrogen addition, but when the hydrogen addition increases from 0.0 to 0.5 under the same conditions, flaws and protuberances occur at the flame surfaces. It was also found that with the increase of the equivalence ratio from 0.9 to 1.5, the laminar burning velocities of the mixtures increase at first and then decrease, and the highest laminar burning velocity was measured at an equivalence ratio of 1.2. Meanwhile, with the increase of hydrogen addition, laminar burning velocities of H2/RP-3/air mixtures increase. However, the Markstein numbers of H2/RP-3/air mixtures decrease with the increase of hydrogen addition, which means that the flames of H2/RP-3/air mixtures become unstable with the increase of hydrogen addition.

  16. INVESTIGATION OF COMBUSTION, PERFORMANCE AND EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF SPARK IGNITION ENGINE FUELLED WITH BUTHANOL – GASOLINE MIXTURE AND A HYDROGEN ENRICHED AIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredas Rimkus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, spark ignition engine fuelled with buthanol-gasoline mixture and a hydrogen-enriched air was investigated. Engine performance, emissions and combustion characteristics were investigated with different buthanol (10% and 20% by volume gasoline mixtures and additionally supplied oxygen and hydrogen (HHO gas mixture (3.6 l/min in the sucked air. Hydrogen, which is in the HHO gas, improves gasoline and gasoline-buthanol mixture combustion, increases indicated pressure during combustion phase and decreases effective specific fuel consumption. Buthanol addition decreases the rate of heat release, the combustion temperature and pressure are lower which have an influence on lower nitrous oxide (NOx emission in exhaust gases. Buthanol lowers hydrocarbon (HC formation, but it increases carbon monoxide (CO concentration and fuel consumption. Combustion process analysis was carried out using AVL BOOST software. Experimental research and combustion process numerical simulation showed that using balanced buthanol and hydrogen addition, optimal efficient and ecological parameters could be achieved when engine is working with optimal spark timing, as it would work on gasoline fuel.

  17. The role of CFD combustion modeling in hydrogen safety management – IV: Validation based on non-homogeneous hydrogen–air experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiah, Pratap, E-mail: pratap.sathiah78@gmail.com [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Komen, Ed, E-mail: komen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Roekaerts, Dirk, E-mail: d.j.e.m.roekaerts@tudelft.nl [Delft University of Technology, Department of Process and Energy, Section Fluid Mechanics, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • TFC combustion model is further extended to simulate flame propagation in non-homogeneous hydrogen–air mixtures. • TFC combustion model results are in good agreement with large-scale non-homogeneous hydrogen–air experiments. • The model is further extended to account for the non-uniform hydrogen–air–steam mixture for the presence of PARs on hydrogen deflagration. - Abstract: The control of hydrogen in the containment is an important safety issue in NPPs during a loss of coolant accident, because the dynamic pressure loads from hydrogen combustion can be detrimental to the structural integrity of the reactor safety systems and the reactor containment. In Sathiah et al. (2012b), we presented a computational fluid dynamics based method to assess the consequence of the combustion of uniform hydrogen–air mixtures. In the present article, the extension of this method to and its validation for non-uniform hydrogen–air mixture is described. The method is implemented in the CFD software ANSYS FLUENT using user defined functions. The extended code is validated against non-uniform hydrogen–air experiments in the ENACCEF facility. It is concluded that the maximum pressure and intermediate peak pressure were predicted within 12% and 18% accuracy. The eigen frequencies of the residual pressure wave phenomena were predicted within 4%. It is overall concluded that the current model predicts the considered ENACCEF experiments well.

  18. Effects of combustion temperature on air emissions and support fuel consumption in full scale fluidized bed sludge incineration: with particular focus on nitrogen oxides and total organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löschau, Margit

    2018-04-01

    This article describes a pilot test at a sewage sludge incineration plant and shows its results considering the impacts of reducing the minimum combustion temperature from 850°C to 800°C. The lowering leads to an actual reduction of the average combustion temperature by 25 K and a significant reduction in the fuel oil consumption for support firing. The test shall be used for providing evidence that the changed combustion conditions do not result in higher air pollutant emissions. The analysis focusses on the effects of the combustion temperature on nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and total organic carbon emissions. The evaluation of all continuously monitored emissions shows reduced emission levels compared to the previous years, especially for NO x .

  19. Effects of increased small-scale biomass combustion on local air quality - A theoretical dispersion modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boman, C.

    1997-01-01

    The decided phasing out of nuclear power and the goal of reducing CO 2 emissions from fossil fuels causes a substantial estimated increase in the use of biomass fuels for energy production. Thus, a significant shift from small scale heating generated by electricity or fuel oil to biomass fuels is desirable. If a drastic deterioration of the local air quality is to be avoided, a reduction of today's emission limits is necessary. The objective of this report was therefore to describe the use of biomass fuels and small scale pellet fuel combustion, to make a theoretical study of the effects of increased pellets heating on the air quality in a residential area, and to discuss necessary emission limits for small biomass fuel plants. The general description is based on literature studies. In the theoretical study, several different dispersion model calculations were performed using the computer program Dispersion 1.1.0. The contents of tar and total hydrocarbons (THC) in the air were calculated for different scenarios with conversion from electricity to pellets and with different pellet plant performance. A sensitivity analysis was performed with additional variables and dispersion calculations according to an underlying statistical experimental design. The modeling and design computer program MODDE was used to facilitate design, evaluation and illustration of the calculated results. The results show that a substantial increase in the use of small scale pellets heating with worst calculated plant performance, will lead to a drastic increase of the content of hydrocarbons in the air. Thus, with best available performance, the content only increases marginally. Conversion from electricity to pellets, plant performance and time of year were the most influential variables. Also conversion from wood to pellets showed a significant effect, despite the small number of wood heated houses within the studied area. If a significant deterioration of the air quality is to be avoided

  20. Surface kinetics for catalytic combustion of hydrogen-air mixtures on platinum at atmospheric pressure in stagnation flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, H.; Sato, J.; Williams, F. A.

    1995-03-01

    Experimental studies of the combustion of premixed hydrogen-air mixtures impinging on the surface of a heated platinum plate at normal atmospheric pressure were performed and employed to draw inferences concerning surface reaction mechanisms and rate parameters applicable under practical conditions of catalytic combustion. Plate and gas temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and concentration profiles of major stable species in the gas were measured by gas-chromatographic analyses of samples withdrawn by quartz probes. In addition, ignition and extinction phenomena were recorded and interpreted with the aid of a heat balance at the surface and a previous flow-field analysis of the stagnation-point boundary layer. From the experimental and theoretical results, conclusions were drawn concerning the surface chemical-kinetic mechanisms and values of the elementary rate parameters that are consistent with the observations. In particular, the activation energy for the surface oxidation step H + OH → H 2O is found to be appreciably less at these high surface coverages than in the low-coverage limit.

  1. The source apportionment of carbonaceous combustion products by micro-radiocarbon measurements for the integrated air cancer project (IACP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klouda, G.A.; Currie, L.A.; Sheffield, A.E.; Wise, S.A.; Benner, B.A.; Stevens, R.K.; Merrill, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric particle samples were collected during the winter of 1984-1985 in Albuquerque, NM and Raleigh, NC by the EPA for the Integrated Air Cancer Project (IACP). Selected chemical fractions were analyzed for /sup 14/C to apportion mobile (motor vehicles) and stationary (residential wood combustion) sources. In addition, these results were used to validate the EPA Single Tracer Regression Model (STRM), also a technique for the source apportionment of aerosols. Preliminary /sup 14/C results for the Albuquerque residential site at night showed 79% Contemporary Carbon (CC) compared to 95% CC for Raleight at night for the total carbon; 88% and 94% of the total-C was organic, respectively. The Albuquerque traffic site during the day showed 1.4 to 3.9 times less CC compared to the daytime residential site for total-C. The elemental carbon fraction in all cases showed a lower percentage of contemporary carbon than the total carbon, which indicates that this chemical fraction may be an excellent tracer of mobile sources. These results are consistent with a daytime mobile source at the traffic site and a nighttime Residential Wood Combustion (RWC) source at the residential site. Also, the results from the EPA STRM technique for this study were in good agreement with those obtained by the /sup 14/C Direct Tracer (/sup 14/C-DT) technique for source apportionment of these aerosols

  2. Experimental study of slight temperature rise combustion in trapped vortex combustors for gas turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.C.; Fan, W.J.; Xing, F.; Song, S.W.; Shi, Q.; Tian, G.H.; Tan, W.L.

    2015-01-01

    Interstage turbine combustion used for improving efficiency of gas turbine was a new type of combustion mode. Operating conditions and technical requirements for this type of combustor were different from those of traditional combustor. It was expected to achieve engineering application in both ground-based and aviation gas turbine in the near future. In this study, a number of modifications in a base design were applied and examined experimentally. The trapped-vortex combustion technology was adopted for flame stability under high velocity conditions, and the preheating-fuel injection technology was used to improve the atomization and evaporation performance of liquid fuel. The experimental results indicated that stable and efficient combustion with slight temperature-rise can be achieved under the high velocity conditions of combustor inlet. Under all experimental conditions, the excess air coefficients of ignition and lean blow-out were larger than 7 and 20, respectively; pollutant emission index of NO x and the maximum wall temperature were below 2.5 g/(kg fuel) and 1050 K, respectively. Moreover, the effects of fuel injection and overall configuration on the combustion characteristics were analyzed in detail. The number increase, area increase and depth increase of fuel injectors had different influences on the stability, combustion characteristic and temperature distribution. - Highlights: • The combustion mode of slight temperature-rise (200 K) was achieved. • Effect of fuel and air injection on stability characteristic was investigated. • Impact of overall configuration on combustion performance was analyzed. • The feasibility of scheme was determined.

  3. Isothermal Oxidation of Magnetite to Hematite in Air and Cyclic Reduction/Oxidation Under Carbon Looping Combustion Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Tegan; Hayes, Peter C.

    2017-12-01

    In the carbon looping combustion process the oxygen carrier is regenerated through oxidation in air; this process has been simulated by the oxidation of dense synthetic magnetite for selected temperatures and times. The oxidation of magnetite in air is shown to occur through the formation of dense hematite layers on the particle surface. This dense hematite forms through lath type shear transformations or solid-state diffusion through the product layer. Cyclic reduction in CO-CO2/oxidation in air of hematite single crystals has been carried out under controlled laboratory conditions at 1173 K (900 °C). It has been shown that the initial reduction step is critical to determining the product microstructure, which consists of gas pore dendrites in the magnetite matrix with blocky hematite formed on the pore surfaces. The progressive growth of the magnetite layer with the application of subsequent cycles appears to continue until no original hematite remains, after which physical disintegration of the particles takes place.

  4. Advanced air staging techniques to improve fuel flexibility, reliability and emissions in fluidized bed co-combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aamand, Lars-Erik; Leckner, Bo [Chalmers Technical Univ., Goeteborg (Sweden); Luecke, Karsten; Werther, Joachim [Technical Univ. of Hamburg-Harburg (Germany)

    2001-12-01

    A joint research project between the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg and Chalmers Technical University. For operation under co-combustion the following results should be considered: The high ash content of the sewage sludge results in significantly increased ash flows. Although high alkali metal concentrations are found in the sewage sludge ash, no critical concentrations were reached and tendencies to fouling were not observed. The trace metal input rises with increased sludge fraction. However, emissions of metal compounds were well below legal limits. The trace metals tend to accumulate on the fly ash. In general, very low fuel nitrogen conversions to NO and N{sub 2}O of 2 - 4 % are achievable. With coal as a base fuel alternative air staging with secondary air supply after solids separation attains even lower NO emissions than normal staging without strongly affecting CO and SO{sub 2} emissions. Alternative staging also reduces N{sub 2}O emissions. An optimum for the excess air ratio in the riser of 1.05 was found for a total excess air ratio of 1.2. The higher the volatile content of the fuel is, the less effective the NO reduction due to air staging becomes. The measurements suggest that the optimum gas residence time regarding the emissions in CFB combustors is around 6 to 7 s. These times are achieved in commercial scale plants due to their large cyclones that perhaps partly can replace a large afterburner chamber. The circulating fluidized bed boiler can be operated in a very flexible way with various fuel mixtures up to an energy fraction of sludge of 25% without exceeding legal emission limits.

  5. Experimental investigation of pressure and blockage effects on combustion limits in H2-air-steam mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, M.P.; Berman, M.; Beyer, R.F.

    1993-06-01

    Experiments with hydrogen-air-steam mixtures, such as those found within a containment system following a reactor accident, were conducted in the Heated Detonation Tube (43 cm diameter and 12 m long) to determine the region of benign combustion; i.e., the region between the flammability limits and the deflagration-to-detonation transition limits. Obstacles were used to accelerate the flame; these include 30% blockage ratio annular rings, and alternate rings and disks of 60% blockage ratio. The initial conditions were 110 degree C and one or three atmospheres pressure. A benign burning region exists for rich mixtures, but is generally smaller than for lean mixtures. Effects of the different obstacles and of the different pressures are discussed

  6. Design and testing of a heat pipe gas combustion system for the STM4-120 Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, K.; Godett, T. M.; Meijer, R. J.; Verhey, R. P.

    Evaporators of a novel geometry, designed to have a more compact size yet the same output as larger, conventional heat pipes, have been fabricated and tested. A technique was developed to calculate capillary pressure required inside the heat pipe. Several quarter- and full-scale evaporators were designed and successfully tested. The burner, film-cooled combustion chamber, and preheater were designed and tested separately. A complete heat pipe gas combustion system (HPGC) was tested, showing an efficiency of 89 percent was measured at 20 kWth. A film-cooled combustion chamber was tested with flame temperatures of 2200 C and wall temperatures below 1000 C using preheated air for film cooling. Also, a full-scale HPGC was tested at an excess of 95 kWth, showing efficiency in the range of 85 to 90 percent under steady-state conditions. Results of transient and startup tests, carried out to evaluate the performance of the heat pipe, all also reported.

  7. Retrofit MHB Hamm. Process-related optimization of the combustion air system MHB Hamm; Retrofit MHB Hamm. Prozess- und verfahrenstechnische Optimierung des Verbrennungsluftsystems MHB Hamm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, Frank [SC Schumacher Consulting handelnd fuer Xervon Energy GmbH, Ritterhude (Germany); Lindke, Carsten [MHB Hamm Betriebsfuehrungsgesellschaft mbH, Hamm (Germany); Auel, Werner [Xervon Energy GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The authors of the contribution under consideration report on a process-related optimization of the combustion air system of the waste incinerator Hamm. Subsequently to the historical aspects of this waste incinerator and the development of its calorific values, the authors describe the tender Retrofit, its implementation as well as the first practical experiences.

  8. The role of CFD combustion modeling in hydrogen safety management-II: Validation based on homogeneous hydrogen-air experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiah, Pratap, E-mail: sathiah@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Haren, Steven van, E-mail: vanharen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Komen, Ed, E-mail: komen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Roekaerts, Dirk, E-mail: d.j.e.m.roekaerts@tudelft.nl [Department of Multi-Scale Physics, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5, 2600 AA Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A CFD based method is proposed for the simulation of hydrogen deflagration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A dynamic grid adaptation method is proposed to resolve turbulent flame brush thickness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The predictions obtained using this method is in good agreement with the static grid method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TFC model results are in good agreement with large-scale homogeneous hydrogen-air experiments. - Abstract: During a severe accident in a PWR, large quantities of hydrogen can be generated and released into the containment. The generated hydrogen, when mixed with air, can lead to hydrogen combustion. The dynamic pressure loads resulting from hydrogen combustion can be detrimental to the structural integrity of the reactor safety systems and the reactor containment. Therefore, accurate prediction of these pressure loads is an important safety issue. In a previous article, we presented a CFD based method to determine these pressure loads. This CFD method is based on the application of a turbulent flame speed closure combustion model. The validation analyses in our previous paper demonstrated that it is of utmost importance to apply successive mesh and time step refinement in order to get reliable results. In this article, we first determined to what extent the required computational effort required for our CFD approach can be reduced by the application of adaptive mesh refinement, while maintaining the accuracy requirements. Experiments performed within a small fan stirred explosion bomb were used for this purpose. It could be concluded that adaptive grid adaptation is a reliable and efficient method for usage in hydrogen deflagration analyses. For the two-dimensional validation analyses, the application of dynamic grid adaptation resulted in a reduction of the required computational effort by about one order of magnitude. In a second step, the considered CFD approach including adaptive

  9. Gravitational wave production from preheating: parameter dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Daniel G. [Theory Division, CERN, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Torrentí, Francisco, E-mail: daniel.figueroa@cern.ch, E-mail: f.torrenti@csic.es [Instituto de Física Teórica IFT-UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco 28049 Madrid, Spain. (Spain)

    2017-10-01

    Parametric resonance is among the most efficient phenomena generating gravitational waves (GWs) in the early Universe. The dynamics of parametric resonance, and hence of the GWs, depend exclusively on the resonance parameter q . The latter is determined by the properties of each scenario: the initial amplitude and potential curvature of the oscillating field, and its coupling to other species. Previous works have only studied the GW production for fixed value(s) of q . We present an analytical derivation of the GW amplitude dependence on q , valid for any scenario, which we confront against numerical results. By running lattice simulations in an expanding grid, we study for a wide range of q values, the production of GWs in post-inflationary preheating scenarios driven by parametric resonance. We present simple fits for the final amplitude and position of the local maxima in the GW spectrum. Our parametrization allows to predict the location and amplitude of the GW background today, for an arbitrary q . The GW signal can be rather large, as h {sup 2Ω}{sub GW}( f {sub p} ) ∼< 10{sup −11}, but it is always peaked at high frequencies f {sub p} ∼> 10{sup 7} Hz. We also discuss the case of spectator-field scenarios, where the oscillatory field can be e.g. a curvaton, or the Standard Model Higgs.

  10. A New Laser Preheat Protocol For Maglif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, M. R.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Geissel, M.; Jennings, C. A.; Peterson, K. J.; Glinsky, M. E.; Awe, T. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Gomez, M. R.; Harding, E. C.; Hansen, S. B.; Kimmel, M. W.; Knapp, P. F.; Lewis, S. M.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A.; Schollmeier, M.; Schwarz, J.; Shores, J. E.; Slutz, S. A.; Sinars, D. B.; Smith, I. C.; Speas, C. S.

    2017-10-01

    Previous Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments at Sandia National Labs have preheated the fuel with the unsmoothed 2 ω Z-Beamlet Laser. A new low intensity laser configuration, using phase plate smoothing and a low-power pulse shape, improved laser propagation and reduced stimulated Brillouin scattering in offline laser experiments. This allows for more efficient use of laser energy and better spot reproducibility. The new laser protocol is estimated to couple at least 650 J to the fuel, sufficient to produce comparable neutron yields with the previous unsmoothed configuration. Mid-Z dopants were also fielded on the underside of the window. Observation of these dopants provided evidence of window material mixing into the fuel with both the unsmoothed and smoothed beam, consistent with MHD simulation predictions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by NTESS, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-NA0003525.

  11. Staged fuel and air injection in combustion systems of gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael John; Berry, Jonathan Dwight

    2018-04-17

    A gas turbine that includes a working fluid flowpath extending aftward from a forward injector in a combustor. The combustor may include an inner radial wall, an outer radial wall, and, therebetween, a flow annulus. A staged injector may intersect the flow annulus so to attain an injection point within the working fluid flowpath by which aftward and forward annulus sections are defined. Air directing structure may include an aftward intake section that corresponds to the aftward annulus section and a forward intake section that corresponds to the forward annulus section. The air directing structure may be configured to: direct air entering through the aftward intake section through the aftward annulus section in a forward direction to the staged injector; and direct air entering through the forward intake section through the forward annulus section in a forward direction to the forward injector.

  12. Numerical Investigation of Methane Combustion under Mixed Air-Steam Turbine Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skevis, G.; Chrissanthopoulos, A.; Goussis, D.A.; Mastorakos, E.; Derksen, M.A.F.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    2004-01-01

    Lowering emissions from power generating gas turbines, while retaining efficiency and power output, constitutes a formidable task, both at fundamental and technical levels. Combined gas turbine cycles involving air humidification are particularly attractive, since they provide additional power with

  13. Numerical Simulation of Anisotropic Preheating Ablative Rayleigh–Taylor Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Feng, Wang; Wen-Hua, Ye; Ying-Jun, Li

    2010-01-01

    The linear growth rate of the anisotropic preheating ablative Rayleigh–Taylor instability (ARTI) is studied by numerical simulations. The preheating model κ(T) = κ SH [1 + f(T)] is applied, where f(T) is the preheating function interpreting the preheating tongue effect in the cold plasma ahead of the ablative front. An arbitrary coefficient D is introduced in the energy equation to study the influence of transverse thermal conductivity on the growth of the ARTI. We find that enhancing diffusion in a plane transverse to the mean longitudinal flow can strongly reduce the growth of the instability. Numerical simulations exhibit a significant stabilization of the ablation front by improving the transverse thermal conduction. Our results are in general agreement with the theory analysis and numerical simulations by Masse [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 (2007) 245001]. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  14. Numerical simulation of anisotropic preheating ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lifeng; Ye Wenhua; Li Yingjun

    2010-01-01

    The linear growth rate of the anisotropic preheating ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability (ARTI) is studied by numerical simulations. The preheating model κ(T)=κ SH [1+f(T)] is applied, where f(T) is the preheating function interpreting the preheating tongue effect in the cold plasma ahead of the ablative front. An arbitrary coefficient D is introduced in the energy equation to study the influence of transverse thermal conductivity on the growth of the ARTI. We find that enhancing diffusion in a plane transverse to the mean longitudinal flow can strongly reduce the growth of the instability. Numerical simulations exhibit a significant stabilization of the ablation front by improving the transverse thermal conduction. Our results are in general agreement with the theory analysis and numerical simulations by Masse. (authors)

  15. Liquid-phase synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes and related nanomaterials on preheated alloy substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagiwa, Kiyofumi

    2018-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and related nanocarbons were selectively synthesized on commercially available alloy substrates by a simple liquid-phase technique. Fe- and Ni-rich stainless-steel (JIS SUS316L and Inconel®600, respectively) and Ni-Cu alloy (Monel®400) substrates were used for the synthesis, and each substrate was preheated in air to promote the self-formation of catalyst nanolayers on the surface. The substrates were resistance heated in ethanol without any addition of catalysts to grow CNTs. The yield of the CNTs effectively increased when the preheating process was employed. Highly aligned CNT arrays grew on the SUS316L substrate, while non-aligned CNTs and distinctive twisted fibers were observed on the other substrates. An Fe oxide layer was selectively formed on the preheated SUS316L substrate promoting the growth of the CNT arrays. Characterizations including cyclic voltammetry for the arrays revealed that the CNTs possess a comparatively defect-rich surface, which is a desirable characteristic for its application such as electrode materials for capacitors.

  16. Fuel combustion, air pollution exposure, and health: The situation in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    There are a number of recent studies of air pollution in developing-country cities, each of necessity relying heavily on the one available source of comparative international ambient monitoring data, Global Environment Monitoring System (GEMS). In this review, therefore, rather than simply reproduce the GEMS data. The author chose to examine developing-country air pollution from the standpoint of a useful analysis technique that has been under development in recent years: Basically the review is composed of four parts: (1) a brief description of the historical and current relationship between energy use and air pollution; (2) an explanation of the idea of exposure assessment and the power that it can bring to analyses of the health impacts of air pollution; (3) focusing on developing countries, a global exposure assessment, combining demographic data with GEMS outdoor data and less-developed country (LDC) indoor air-monitoring studies; (4) a review of the health effects literature relevant to the micro-environments found to harbor the largest human exposures. 104 refs

  17. Effect of inflation on parametric resonance during preheating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, Shiro

    2002-01-01

    The effect of inflation on parametric resonance during preheating is investigated. The behaviour of the preheating scalar field during inflation is investigated and is found to become squeezed in cases ranging from small-scale cases to large-scale cases. However, the positive-frequency solution is usually adopted in the initial condition of the scalar field at preheating. Although large squeezing occurs during inflation, the difference in the comoving occupation number of particles n k between two initial conditions is shown to be not so large. Rather, the ratio n k varies from 0.2 to 5.0, depending on k. In order to clarify this situation, we introduce the squeeze formulation. The squeeze parameters r and φ are calculated not only in preheating, but also in inflation. Since the squeeze parameters are calculated from inflation to preheating, we can clarify the behaviour of the parametric resonance. In preheating, the behaviour of r is shown to remain relatively unchanged with respect to k; however, the squeeze angle φ displays different behaviour for large-scale cases and small-scale cases

  18. Behavior of the turbine - regenerating preheaters functional assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, Melania; Nita, Iulian Pavel; Tenescu, Mircea

    2004-01-01

    In the classical calculation of pressure distribution in the turbine-regenerating heaters' assembly a uniform distribution of feedwater enthalpy rise at each regenerating preheating step is usually assumed. This is accurately enough as a basis of designing of the preheating installation operating at rated power regime. But at partial regimes this is not totally valid since the preheaters are already shaped and the quasi-equal distribution does not satisfy the equation system describing the heat transfer correlations in these installations. A more detailed analysis shows that pressure in the feeding line preheaters and the bleeding steam flow rates at the turbine outlets are described physically by solving simultaneously the equations of hydrodynamic flow through the turbine and the equations of the heat transfer in the preheaters of the feedwater preheating line. This work approaches this more accurate solving method at least from a theoretical standing point; two cases are illustrated in the annexes of the work: a case of a secondary circuit with a single regenerating inlet and a case with two regenerating inlets. A classical - Panzer method of transformation of a many regenerative stages scheme may lead to one or another of the above cases. (authors)

  19. Combustión de mezclas ricas de etano-aire en medios porosos inertes Combustion of rich ethane-air mixtures in inert porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khriscia Utria S

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo tiene por objetivo analizar teórica-experimentalmente la combustión de mezclas ricas de etano-aire en medios porosos inertes (MPI para evaluar la producción de hidrógeno y gas de síntesis. Se analizan los perfiles de temperatura, las velocidades de propagación de llama y los productos principales de la combustión, como son el hidrógeno (H2 y el monóxido de carbono (CO, mediante el uso de cromatografía gaseosa, para relaciones de equivalencia en el rango de 1,0 a 2,5 y dos diámetros de esferas de alúmina que componen el medio poroso. Se simula numéricamente el proceso de combustión mediante el uso del programa PREMIX utilizando dos mecanismos de reacción, como son el GRI-MECH 1.2 y GRI-MECH 3.0. Con GRI-MECH 3.0 se obtienen resultados numéricos que predicen correctamente los resultados experimentales para todo el rango de relaciones de equivalencia con un medio poroso compuesto por esferas de alúmina de 3,5 mm. La máxima generación de hidrógeno H2 y CO presentes en los productos de combustión son de 14,3% y 18,0%, respectivamente. El porcentaje de conversión de etano en H2 (61,3% y en CO (81% muestra el potencial de este combustible como generador de gas de síntesis.This research develops the theoretical and experimental analysis of ethane-air combustion in inert porous media (IPM to evaluate hydrogen and syngas production. Temperature profiles, flame propagation rates and major combustion products such as hydrogen (H2 and carbon monoxide (CO, through gas chromatography, are analysed at a range of equivalence ratios between 1.0 and 2.5, with two different alumina sphere diameters composing the porous media. Combustion of ethane-air mixture in IPM is simulated numerically using the PREMIX program with two reaction mechanisms, such as GRI-MECH 1.2 and GRI-MECH 3.0. GRI-MECH 3.0 numerical results predict correctly experimental results for a porous media with 3.5 mm alumina spheres along the range of

  20. Staged fuel and air injection in combustion systems of gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Michael John; Berry, Jonathan Dwight

    2018-04-10

    A gas turbine including a working fluid flowpath extending aftward from a forward injector in a combustor. The combustor may include an inner radial wall, an outer radial wall, and, therebetween, a flow annulus, and a third radial wall formed about the outer radial wall that forms an outer flow annulus. A staged injector may intersect the flow annulus so to attain an injection point within the working fluid flowpath by which aftward and forward annulus sections are defined. Air directing structure may include an aftward intake section corresponding to the aftward annulus section and a forward intake section corresponding to the forward annulus section. The air directing structure may include a switchback coolant flowpath to direct air from the compressor discharge cavity to the staged injector. The switchback coolant flowpath may include an upstream section through the flow annulus, and a downstream section through the outer flow annulus.

  1. The role of CFD combustion modeling in hydrogen safety management – V: Validation for slow deflagrations in homogeneous hydrogen-air experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiah, Pratap [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Holler, Tadej, E-mail: tadej.holler@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kljenak, Ivo [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Komen, Ed [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Validation of the modeling approach for hydrogen deflagration is presented. • Modeling approach is based on two combustion models implemented in ANSYS Fluent. • Experiments with various initial hydrogen concentrations were used for validation. • The effects of heat transfer mechanisms selection were also investigated. • The grid sensitivity analysis was performed as well. - Abstract: The control of hydrogen in the containment is an important safety issue following rapid oxidation of the uncovered reactor core during a severe accident in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), because dynamic pressure loads from eventual hydrogen combustion can be detrimental to the structural integrity of the reactor safety systems and the reactor containment. In the set of our previous papers, a CFD-based method to assess the consequence of fast combustion of uniform hydrogen-air mixtures was presented, followed by its validation for hydrogen-air mixtures with diluents and for non-uniform hydrogen-air mixtures. In the present paper, the extension of this model for the slow deflagration regime is presented and validated using the hydrogen deflagration experiments performed in the medium-scale experimental facility THAI. The proposed method is implemented in the CFD software ANSYS Fluent using user defined functions. The paper describes the combustion model and the main results of code validation. It addresses questions regarding turbulence model selection, effect of heat transfer mechanisms, and grid sensitivity, as well as provides insights into the importance of combustion model choice for the slow deflagration regime of hydrogen combustion in medium-scale and large-scale experimental vessels mimicking the NPP containment.

  2. Plasma igniter for internal-combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breshears, R. R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hot ionized gas (plasma) ignites air/fuel mixture in internal combustion engines more effectively than spark. Electromagnetic forces propel plasma into combustion zone. Combustion rate is not limited by flame-front speed.

  3. 78 FR 6673 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ..., Energy and Economic Impacts A. What are the air quality impacts? B. What are the cost impacts? C. What... will assist in stabilizing the grid during periods of instability, preventing electrical blackouts and... important programs that protect the reliability and stability of the national electric service grid. The use...

  4. Hydrogen preheating through waste heat recovery of an open-cathode PEM fuel cell leading to power output improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, W.A.N.W.; Kamikl, M. Haziq M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A study on the effect of hydrogen preheating using waste heat for low temperature PEM fuel cells. • Theoretical, experimental and analytical framework was established. • The maximum electrical power output increases by 8–10% under specific operating conditions. • Open loop hydrogen supply gives a better performance than closed loop. • The waste heat utilization is less than 10% due to heat capacity limitations. - Abstract: The electrochemical reaction kinetics in a Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is highly influenced by the reactants supply pressures and electrode temperatures. For an open cathode PEM fuel cell stack, the power output is constrained due to the use of air simultaneously as reactant and coolant. Optimal stack operation temperatures are not achieved especially at low to medium power outputs. Based on the ideal gas law, higher reactant temperatures would lead to higher pressures and subsequently improve the reaction kinetics. The hydrogen supply temperature and its pressure can be increased by preheating; thus, slightly offsetting the limitation of low operating stack temperatures. The exit air stream offers an internal source of waste heat for the hydrogen preheating purpose. In this study, a PEM open-cathode fuel cell was used to experimentally evaluate the performance of hydrogen preheating based on two waste heat recovery approaches: (1) open-loop and (2) closed loop hydrogen flow. The stack waste heat was channelled into a heat exchanger to preheat the hydrogen line before it is being supplied (open loop) or resupplied (closed loop) into the stack. At a constant 0.3 bar hydrogen supply pressure, the preheating increases the hydrogen temperature in the range of 2–13 °C which was dependant on the stack power output and cathode air flow rates. The achievable maximum stack power was increased by 8% for the closed loop and 10% for the open loop. Due to the small hydrogen flow rates, the waste heat utilization

  5. Indoor air pollution from solid biomass fuels combustion in rural agricultural area of Tibet, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X; Yu, Q; Gu, Q; Chen, Y; Ding, K; Zhu, J; Chen, L

    2009-06-01

    In this study, we are trying to investigate the indoor air pollution and to estimate the residents' pollution exposure reduction of energy altering in rural Tibet. Daily PM(2.5) monitoring was conducted in indoor microenvironments like kitchen, living-room, bedroom, and yard in rural Tibet from December 2006 to March 2007. For kitchen air pollution, impact of two fuel types, methane and solid biomass fuels (SBFs), were compared. Questionnaire survey on the domestic energy pattern and residents' daily activity pattern was performed in Zha-nang County. Daily average PM(2.5) concentrations in kitchen, living-room, bedroom, and yard were 134.91 microg/m(3) (mean, n = 45, 95%CI 84.02, 185.80), 103.61 microg/m(3) (mean, n = 21, 95%CI 85.77, 121.45), 76.13 microg/m(3) (mean, n = 18, 95%CI 57.22, 95.04), and 78.33 microg/m(3) (mean, n = 34, 95%CI 60.00, 96.65) respectively. Using SBFs in kitchen resulted in higher indoor pollution than using methane. PM(2.5) concentrations in kitchen with dung cake, fuel wood and methane use were 117.41 microg/m(3) (mean, n = 18, 95%CI 71.03, 163.79), 271.11 microg/m(3) (mean, n = 12, 95%CI 104.74, 437.48), and 46.96 microg/m(3) (mean, n = 15, 95%CI 28.10, 65.82) respectively. Family income has significant influence on cooking energy choice, while the lack of commercial energy supply affects the energy choice for heating more. The effects of two countermeasures to improve indoor air quality were estimated in this research. One is to replace SBFs by clean energy like methane, the other is to separate the cooking place from other rooms and by applying these countermeasures, residents' exposure to particulate matters would reduce by 25-50% (methane) or 20-30% (separation) compared to the present situation. Indoor air pollution caused by solid biomass fuels is one of the most important burdens of disease in the developing countries, which attracts the attention of environment and public health researchers, as well as policy makers. This paper

  6. Investigation of Methane Oxy-Fuel Combustion in a Swirl-Stabilised Gas Turbine Model Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available CO2 has a strong impact on both operability and emission behaviours in gas turbine combustors. In the present study, an atmospheric, preheated, swirl-stabilised optical gas turbine model combustor rig was employed. The primary objectives were to analyse the influence of CO2 on the fundamental characteristics of combustion, lean blowout (LBO limits, CO emission and flame structures. CO2 dilution effects were examined with three preheating temperatures (396.15, 431.15, and 466.15 K. The fundamental combustion characteristics were studied utilising chemical kinetic simulations. To study the influence of CO2 on the operational range of the combustor, equivalence ratio (Ф was varied from stoichiometric conditions to the LBO limits. CO emissions were measured at the exit of the combustor using a water-cooled probe over the entire operational range. The flame structures and locations were characterised by performing CH chemiluminescence imaging. The inverse Abel transformation was used to analyse the CH distribution on the axisymmetric plane of the combustor. Chemical kinetic modelling indicated that the CO2 resulted in a lower reaction rate compared with the CH4/air flame. Fundamental combustion properties such as laminar flame speed, ignition delay time and blowout residence time were found to be affected by CO2. The experimental results revealed that CO2 dilution resulted in a narrower operational range for the equivalence ratio. It was also found that CO2 had a strong inhibiting effect on CO burnout, which led to a higher concentration of CO in the combustion exhaust. CH chemiluminescence showed that the CO2 dilution did not have a significant impact on the flame structure.

  7. Means of decreasing air pollution in towns by fuel combustion products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Styrikovich, M A; Minaev, E V; Troitskii, A A; Vnukov, A K

    1976-01-01

    The main sources of pollution of city air by CO, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/ are stationary and mobile plants consuming fossil fuel for power generting and manufacturing purposes. The participation of individual sources and of branches of industry in the formation of the general background of pollutant concentration in the air of the city is not directly related to the mass of pollutant emissions by these sources. In particular, for the considered city the power stations and heating plants contribute only a few percent of the average background with respect to SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/ and take virtually no part in the formation of the background CO. The effectiveness of equal investments in gas cleaning in the different branches of the municipal economy with regard to improving the general background of city air pollution can differ by a very great amount. In this connection the planning of measures for reducing the background should be carried out by means of interdepartmental optimization of sizes and distribution of investment between plants. Figures are given and the procedures are used of an evaluating nature are regarded as initial premises for the formulation of appropriate detailed investigations.

  8. Thermal energy analysis of a lime production process: Rotary kiln, preheater and cooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahin, Hamed; Hassanpour, Saeid; Saboonchi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The integrated model for lime production unit which includes cooler, preheater and rotary kiln is developed. • The effect of residence time in each section on efficiency is investigated. • Influence of material feed rate and excess air on specific fuel consumption is analyzed. • The significant effect of particle size on efficiency and specific fuel consumption is shown. - Abstract: In this paper, thermal energy analysis of three zones of a lime production process, which are preheater, rotary kiln and cooler, is performed. In order to perform a proper quantitative estimation, the system was modeled using energy balance equations including coupled heat transfer and chemical reaction mechanisms. A mathematical model was developed, and consequently, the thermal and chemical behavior of limestone was investigated. The model was verified using empirical data. After model confirmation, the variation of Specific Fuel Consumption (SFC) versus production rate was predicted and the optimum condition was determined. Subsequently, fuel consumption was calculated regarding to altered residence time inside each zone of lime production process, for a constant output. Results indicate that increasing the residence time inside each zone of lime production process, will enhance thermal efficiency and saves fuel consumption. Relative enhancement will be the same for different sizes of limestone. It was found that a 10-min increase in material residence time inside the preheater or rotary kiln can reduce fuel consumption by around two percent. Whereas, a 5-min increase in material residence time inside the cooler would be enough to obtain a similar result. Finally, the ratio of air-to-fuel and production rate are changed in such a way that the same product is achieved. The model predicts that lowering excess air from 15% to 10% leads to a 2.5% reduction of Specific Fuel Consumption (SFC).

  9. Susceptibility of CANDU steam generator preheater to cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroche, S.L.; Sun, L.; Pietralik, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Darlington Steam Generator (SG) tube inspections revealed some tubes had degraded in the preheater. The tube degradation occurred at the clearance gap between the tube and the preheater baffle and reached up to 50% through-wall depth at the baffles in the middle portion of the preheater. The general pattern of the damage and the elemental composition analysis suggested that the degradation was the result of a hydrodynamic process, such as cavitation erosion. Cavitation erosion occurs when vapour bubbles exist or form in the flowing liquid and then these bubbles collapse violently in the vicinity of the wall. These bubbles collapse when steam bubbles contact water that is sufficiently subcooled, below the saturation temperature. In the gap between the tube and the preheater baffle, low flow will exist due to the pressure difference across the baffle plate. In addition, heat transfer occurs from the primary-side fluid to the secondary-side fluid within this clearance gap that is driven by the primary-to-secondary temperature difference. Factors, such as the tube position in the baffle hole and fouling, influence the local conditions and can cause subcooled boiling that result in cavitation. This paper presents a study of flow and heat transfer phenomena to determine the factors contributing to cavitation erosion in SG preheaters. The analysis used the THIRST1 code for a 3-dimensional thermalhydraulic simulation of the steam generators and the ANSYS FLUENT®2 code for detailed calculations of flow and heat transfer in the clearance gaps. This study identifies that tubes in the preheater region are susceptible to cavitation erosion and indicates that this area should be part of the station inspection program because, regardless of preheater design, some tubes may experience the thermalhydraulic conditions and undergo degradations similar to those observed for the tubes in Darlington SGs. (author)

  10. Development of flameless combustion; Desarrollo de la combustion sin flama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Sauceda, M. Leonardo; Cervantes de Gortari, Jaime Gonzalo [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: 8344afc@prodigy.net.mx; jgonzalo@servidor.unam.mx

    2010-11-15

    The paper intends contribute to global warming mitigation joint effort that develops technologies to capture the CO{sub 2} produced by fossil fuels combustion and to reduce emission of other greenhouse gases like the NO{sub x}. After reviewing existing combustion bibliography is pointed out that (a) touches only partial aspects of the collective system composed by Combustion-Heat transfer process-Environment, whose interactions are our primary interest and (b) most specialists think there is not yet a clearly winning technology for CO{sub 2} capture and storage. In this paper the study of combustion is focused as integrated in the aforementioned collective system where application of flameless combustion, using oxidant preheated in heat regenerators and fluent gas recirculation into combustion chamber plus appropriated heat and mass balances, simultaneously results in energy saving and environmental impact reduction. [Spanish] El trabajo pretende contribuir al esfuerzo conjunto de mitigacion del calentamiento global que aporta tecnologias para capturar el CO{sub 2} producido por la combustion de combustibles fosiles y para disminuir la emision de otros gases invernadero como NOx. De revision bibliografica sobre combustion se concluye que (a) trata aspectos parciales del sistema compuesto por combustion-proceso de trasferencia de calor-ambiente, cuyas interacciones son nuestro principal interes (b) la mayoria de especialistas considera no hay todavia una tecnologia claramente superior a las demas para captura y almacenaje de CO{sub 2}. Se estudia la combustion como parte integrante del mencionado sistema conjunto, donde la aplicacion de combustion sin flama, empleando oxidante precalentado mediante regeneradores de calor y recirculacion de gases efluentes ademas de los balances de masa y energia adecuados, permite tener simultaneamente ahorros energeticos e impacto ambiental reducido.

  11. Air quality and residential wood combustion - application of the model system SIMAIRrwc for some Swedish municipalities; Luftkvalitet och smaaskalig biobraensleeldning. Tillaempningar av SIMAIRved foer naagra kommuner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omstedt, Gunnar; Andersson, Stefan; Johansson, Christer; Loefgren, Bengt-Erik

    2008-11-15

    SIMAIRrwc is a Web based evaluation tool for meeting the EU directive on air pollution limits in residential areas using wood combustion. The background is a four-year research program (2001-2004) called Biomass Combustion Health and Environment. Some conclusions from this program were that emissions from small scale wood combustion can influence human health mainly due to high emitting old wood stoves during cold weather conditions and that the air quality in such areas can improve significantly if old wood stoves were replaced by modern wood boilers attached to a storage tank or with a pellet boiler. SIMAIRrwc is based on the same principles as SIMAIRroad, which is a Web based evaluation tool for road traffic i.e. coupled model system using different models on local, urban and regional geographical scales, best available emission data, but at the same time presented in a very simplified way. In this project SIMAIRrwc has been applied in five different Swedish municipalities. The aim has been to apply and improve the model in cooperation with the municipalities. The conclusions from the project are: Small scale wood combustions in residential areas are local problems which sometimes include only a few houses and/or wood-burners. Air quality problems related to the EU directive are mainly due to particles. Combinations of residential areas with wood combustion and emissions from nearby dense traffic roads might give rise to bad air quality. Actions require knowledge about individual equipment which needs information from the local chimney sweeps. The best way to identify problem areas is to use model calculations. If model calculations indicate risks of exceeding air quality limits, then new calculations should be made with improved input data taking into account for example information of district heating or other installations that can effect the emissions. Before actions are taken it may also be useful to make measurements. The measurement site can then be

  12. Amine-based post-combustion CO2 capture in air-blown IGCC systems with cold and hot gas clean-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuffrida, A.; Bonalumi, D.; Lozza, G.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Hot fuel gas clean-up is a very favorable technology for IGCC concepts. • IGCC net efficiency reduces to 41.5% when realizing post-combustion CO 2 capture. • Complex IGCC layouts are necessary if exhaust gas recirculation is realized. • IGCC performance does not significantly vary with exhaust gas recirculation. - Abstract: This paper focuses on the thermodynamic performance of air-blown IGCC systems with post-combustion CO 2 capture by chemical absorption. Two IGCC technologies are investigated in order to evaluate two different strategies of coal-derived gas clean-up. After outlining the layouts of two power plants, the first with conventional cold gas clean-up and the second with hot gas clean-up, attention is paid to the CO 2 capture station and to issues related to exhaust gas recirculation in combined cycles. The results highlight that significant improvements in IGCC performance are possible if hot coal-derived gas clean-up is realized before the syngas fuels the combustion turbine, so the energy cost of CO 2 removal in an amine-based post-combustion mode is less strong. In particular, IGCC net efficiency as high as 41.5% is calculated, showing an interesting potential if compared to the one of IGCC systems with pre-combustion CO 2 capture. Thermodynamic effects of exhaust gas recirculation are investigated as well, even though IGCC performance does not significantly vary against a more complicated plant layout

  13. Low-level coal combustion as an important problem related to air pollution in Silesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fudala, J.

    1994-01-01

    Statistical analyses of pollutants from the Katowice District for many years have attributed to the poor air quality to industrial emission sources. Among the source categories for which pollutant emissions into the atmosphere have not been recognized in detail so far, municipal heat sources are worth mentioning. These sources include local boiler houses, residual space heating plants, and individual ceramic furnaces. The problem was investigated by the Institute of Environmental Protection in cooperation with the Regional Design Office at Zabrze. The inventory covered three heat sources: (1) local boiler houses, (2) individual furnaces in multiple-family houses, and (3) individual ceramic furnaces in private houses. For each administrative unit within the district, concentration levels for boiler house and individual household furnaces have been calculated for both local sources and external sources. the calculations have shown that more than 80% of the local concentration levels come from individual furnaces. It also has been found that emissions within a given administrative unit are considerably affected by similar source types in the neighboring units. This relationship has been used to evaluate the administrative units in the Katowice District. In light of the analyses performed, the general conclusion can be drawn the improvement in the sanitary quality of the air depends not only on local emission abatement, but also on integrated activity within the heat and gas supply for old flats and individual private house in the Katowice District

  14. Modeling random combustion of lycopodium particles and gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bidabadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The random modeling combustion of lycopodium particles has been researched by many authors. In this paper, we extend this model and we also generate a different method by analyzing the effect of random distributed sources of combustible mixture. The flame structure is assumed to consist of a preheat-vaporization zone, a reaction zone and finally a post flame zone. We divide the preheat zone to different parts. We assumed that there is different distribution of particles in sections which are really random. Meanwhile, it is presumed that the fuel particles vaporize first to yield gaseous fuel. In other words, most of the fuel particles are vaporized at the end of the preheat zone. It is assumed that the Zel’dovich number is large; therefore, the reaction term in preheat zone is negligible. In this work, the effect of random distribution of particles in the preheat zone on combustion characteristics such as burning velocity, flame temperature for different particle radius is obtained.

  15. Heavy-duty diesel engine NO{sub x} reduction with nitrogen-enriched combustion air. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, S.; Energy Systems

    2010-07-28

    The concept of engine emissions control by modifying intake combustion gas composition from that of ambient air using gas separation membranes has been developed during several programs undertaken at Argonne. These have led to the current program which is targeted at heavy-duty diesel truck engines. The specific objective is reduction of NO{sub x} emissions by the target engine to meet anticipated 2007 standards while extracting a maximum of 5 percent power loss and allowing implementation within commercial constraints of size, weight, and cost. This report includes a brief review of related past programs, describes work completed to date during the current program, and presents interim conclusions. Following a work schedule adjustment in August 2002 to accommodate problems in module procurement and data analysis, activities are now on schedule and planned work is expected to be completed in September, 2004. Currently, we believe that the stated program requirements for the target engine can be met, based upon extrapolation of the work completed. Planned project work is designed to experimentally confirm these projections and result in a specification for a module package that will meet program objectives.

  16. Patterns and predictors of personal exposure to indoor air pollution from biomass combustion among women and children in rural China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, J. (Univ. of Minnesota. Institute on the Environment, St. Paul, MN (United States)); Patz, J.; Bautista, L.E. (Univ. of Wisconsin. Dept. of Population Health Sciences, Madison, WI (United States)); Schauer, J.J. (Univ. of Wisconsin. Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, Madison, WI (United States)); Ezzati, M. (MRC-HPA Center for Environment and Health, Dept. of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)); Lu, L.; Cheng, C. (Yunnan Provincial Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Yunnan (China))

    2011-12-15

    Indoor air pollution (IAP) from domestic biomass combustion is an important health risk factor, yet direct measurements of personal IAP exposure are scarce. We measured 24-h integrated gravimetric exposure to particles <2.5 mum in aerodynamic diameter (particulate matter, PM{sub 2.5}) in 280 adult women and 240 children in rural Yunnan, China. We also measured indoor PM{sub 2.5} concentrations in a random sample of 44 kitchens. The geometric mean winter PM{sub 2.5} exposure among adult women was twice that of summer exposure [117 mug/m3 (95% CI: 107, 128) vs. 55 mug/m3 (95% CI: 49, 62)]. Children's geometric mean exposure in summer was 53 mug/m3 (95% CI: 46, 61). Indoor PM{sub 2.5} concentrations were moderately correlated with women's personal exposure (r = 0.58), but not for children. Ventilation during cooking, cookstove maintenance, and kitchen structure were significant predictors of personal PM{sub 2.5} exposure among women primarily cooking with biomass. These findings can be used to develop exposure assessment models for future epidemiologic research and inform interventions and policies aimed at reducing IAP exposure. (Author)

  17. Air pollution from residential wood combustion in a Danish village. Measuring campaign and analysis of results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waahlin, P.; Roerdam Olesen, H.; Bossi, R.; Stubkjaer, J.

    2010-05-15

    A campaign took place in the winter 2006/2007 comprising measurements of many air pollution components at two sites: a wood smoke exposed site within the village Slagslunde, and a background site 500 m outside of the village. The report describes the campaign and its results. A central result is a so-called 'wood smoke source profile', which relates several measures of wood smoke pollution to each other. This is based on a 'cleaned' data set, for which the effect of other sources than wood smoke was small. The wood smoke profile links the measures PM2.5, particle volume, soot, monosaccharide anhydrides (levoglucosan and mannosan) and different PAHs to each other. Particle number N does not have a close link to the other measures. (author)

  18. Air pollution from residential wood combustion in a Danish village. Measuring campaign and analysis of results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waahlin, P; Roerdam Olesen, H; Bossi, R; Stubkjaer, J

    2010-05-15

    A campaign took place in the winter 2006/2007 comprising measurements of many air pollution components at two sites: a wood smoke exposed site within the village Slagslunde, and a background site 500 m outside of the village. The report describes the campaign and its results. A central result is a so-called 'wood smoke source profile', which relates several measures of wood smoke pollution to each other. This is based on a 'cleaned' data set, for which the effect of other sources than wood smoke was small. The wood smoke profile links the measures PM2.5, particle volume, soot, monosaccharide anhydrides (levoglucosan and mannosan) and different PAHs to each other. Particle number N does not have a close link to the other measures. (author)

  19. Effects of preheating of crude palm oil (CPO) on injection system, performance and emission of a diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, S.; Lim, T.H.; Yu, C.W.

    2002-01-01

    Crude palm oil (CPO) is one of the vegetable oils that have potential for use as fuels for diesel engines. CPO is renewable, and is safe and easy to handle. However, at room temperature (30-32 deg C) CPO has a viscosity about 10 times higher than that of diesel. To lower CPO's viscosity to the level of diesel's viscosity, a heating temperature of at least 92 deg C is needed. At this temperature, there is a concern that the close-fitting parts of the injection system might be affected. This study focused on finding out the effects of preheating of fuel on the injection system utilising a modified method of friction test, which involves injecting fuel outside the combustion chamber during motoring. Results show that preheating of CPO lowered CPO's viscosity and provided smooth fuel flow, but did not affect the injection system, even heating up to 100 deg C. Nevertheless, heating up to such a high temperature offered no benefits in terms of engine performance. However, heating is necessary for smooth flow and to avoid fuel filter clogging. Both can be achieved by heating CPO to 60 deg C. Combustion analyses comparisons between CPO and diesel found that CPO produced a higher peak pressure of 6%, a shorter ignition delay of 2.6 deg, a lower maximum heat release rate and a longer combustion period. Over the entire load range, CPO combustion produced average CO and NO emissions that were 9.2 and 29.3% higher, respectively, compared with those from diesel combustion. (Author)

  20. Scale Effect of Premixed Methane-Air Combustion in Confined Space Using LES Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas explosion is the most hazardous incident occurring in underground airways. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD techniques are sophisticated in simulating explosions in confined spaces; specifically, when testing large-scale gaseous explosions, such as methane explosions in underground mines. The dimensions of a confined space where explosions could occur vary significantly. Thus, the scale effect on explosion parameters is worth investigating. In this paper, the impact of scaling on explosion overpressures is investigated by employing two scaling factors: The Gas-fill Length Scaling Factor (FLSF and the Hydraulic Diameter Scaling Factor (HDSF. The combinations of eight FLSFs and five HDSFs will cover a wide range of space dimensions where flammable gas could accumulate. Experiments were also conducted to evaluate the selected numerical models. The Large Eddy Simulation turbulence model was selected because it shows accuracy compared to the widely used Reynolds’ averaged models for the scenarios investigated in the experiments. Three major conclusions can be drawn: (1 The overpressure increases with both FLSF and HDSF within the deflagration regime; (2 In an explosion duct with a length to diameter ratio greater than 54, detonation is more likely to be triggered for a stoichiometric methane/air mixture; (3 Overpressure increases as an increment hydraulic diameter of a geometry within deflagration regime. A relative error of 7% is found when predicting blast peak overpressure for the base case compared to the experiment; a good agreement for the wave arrival time is also achieved.

  1. The effect of preheating on the IRSL signal from feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, A.S.; Buylaert, J.P.; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2009-01-01

    between the loss of blue IRSL and TL signals with preheating, and the effect of prior IRSL on the TL signal. Using IRSL measured at 50 °C and a SAR protocol, we then examine the dependence on preheat temperature of equivalent dose (De), laboratory fading rate (g), and the resulting luminescence age, from...... is consistent with a kinetic analysis of sensitivity-corrected IRSL data. The corollary to our observations is that shallow (unstable) traps do not give rise to a significant IRSL signal....

  2. Effects of Preheat on Weldments of NICOP Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    percent Nital solution (nitric acid (HNO3) ,* and ethanol (C2HsOH) which revealed the weld area, heat affected zone and base metal. A section 25.2mm (1 inch...electrolyte, consisting of 10% per- cloric acid (HC104 ) and 90% methanal (CH30H) was maintained at a temperature of -450C (-49 0 F). The Polipower was set...Preheated Weidment. N on Non-Preheated Weidment. Figre3. Loaton o McrhadnssTrvese I17 ~.4. .9 G° s s E 43 C 0 CL 44’ 00 Hda *SBUPJQH Figure 4. Comparison

  3. Feed water pre-heater with two steam spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tratz, H.; Kelp, F.; Netsch, E.

    1976-01-01

    A feed water pre-heater for the two stage heating of feed water by condensing steam, having a low installed height is described, which can be installed in the steam ducts of turbines of large output, as in LWRs in nuclear power stations. The inner steam space is closed on one side by the water vessel, while the tubes of the inner steam space go straight from the water vessel, and the tubes of the outer steam space are bent into a U shape and open out into the water vessel. The two-stage preheater is thus surrounded by feedwater in two ways. (UWI) [de

  4. Gravity waves from tachyonic preheating after hybrid inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufaux, Jean-Francois [Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Felder, Gary [Department of Physics, Clark Science Center, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 (United States); Kofman, Lev [CITA, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Navros, Olga, E-mail: jeff.dufaux@uam.es, E-mail: gfelder@email.smith.edu, E-mail: kofman@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: navros@email.unc.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, CB3250 Philips Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    We study the stochastic background of gravitational waves produced from preheating in hybrid inflation models. We investigate different dynamical regimes of preheating in these models and we compute the resulting gravity wave spectra using analytical estimates and numerical simulations. We discuss the dependence of the gravity wave frequencies and amplitudes on the various potential parameters. We find that large regions of the parameter space leads to gravity waves that may be observable in upcoming interferometric experiments, including Advanced LIGO, but this generally requires very small coupling constants.

  5. Study of nanosecond discharges in H2-air mixtures at atmospheric pressure for plasma assisted combustion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Sumire; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Tholin, Fabien; Popov, Nikolay A.; Bourdon, Anne

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents 2D simulations of nanosecond discharges between two point electrodes for four different H2-air mixtures defined by their equivalence ratios ϕ (i.e. φ =0, air, φ =0.3, lean mixture, φ =1, stoichiometric mixture and φ =1.5, rich mixture) at atmospheric pressure and at an initial temperature of 1000 K. In a first step, we have shown that the mixture composition has only a very small influence on the discharge dynamics and structure during the streamer phase and up to the formation of the plasma channel between the two point electrodes in H2-air mixtures with φ \\in [0,1.5]. However, as the plasma channel is formed slightly earlier as the equivalence ratio increases, for a given voltage pulse, the duration of the nanosecond spark phase increases as the equivalence ratio increases. As expected, we have shown that excited states of N2 (and in particular N2(A)) and radicals (and in particular O(D), O(P), H and OH) are very efficiently produced during the voltage pulse after the start of the spark phase. After the voltage pulse, and up to 100 ns, the densities of excited states of N2 and of O(D) decrease. Conversely, most of the O(P), H and OH radicals are produced after the voltage pulse due to the dissociative quenching of electronically excited N2. As for radicals, the gas temperature starts increasing after the start of the spark phase. For all studied mixtures, the density of O(P) atoms and the gas temperature reach their maxima after the end of the voltage pulse and the densities of O(P), H and OH radicals and the maximal gas temperature increase as the equivalence ratio increases. We have shown that the production of radicals is the highest on the discharge axis and the distribution of species after the voltage pulse and up to 100 ns has a larger diameter between the electrodes than close to both electrode tips. As for species, the temperature distribution presents two hot spots close to the point electrode tips. The non

  6. Problematic issues of air protection during thermal processes related to the energetic uses of sewage sludge and other waste. Case study: Co-combustion in peaking power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroncová, Emília; Ladomerský, Juraj; Musil, Juraj

    2018-03-01

    Currently, it is necessary to deal with issues related to the emissions as there is a constantly increasing interest in combusting sludge from sewage treatment plants in the boilers for wood. An analysis of the energetic importance of the combustion of sewage sludge has already been carried out, but the effects of various treatments of the sludge are not always clear, e.g. composting and subsequent combustion to the air pollution. Investments in other thermal processes of energetic utilisation of sewage sludge and organic waste are not always successfully implemented. The objective of this paper is to point out some problematic cases for acceptance of thermal processes related to energetic use of waste in terms of the air protection. The other aim is to mention the experience with solutions of such issues in Slovakia. There are mentioned first results of the operational validation experiments during the energy generation in circulating fluidized bed boiler in peaking power plant (Power 110MW) with the addition of the so-called alternative fuel based on wood and sewage sludge to the main fuel - black coal (anthracite). And there has already been achieved the highest share of 12.4%w. (dry matter) of sewage sludge in form of compost in blend with black coal, which is technologically viable. Moreover analyzed the problems of the authorization and operation of the co-combustion of sewage sludge and of combustion of products of various kinds of pyrolysis waste - pyrolysis gas and pyrolysis oil are analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of CFD combustion modelling in hydrogen safety management – VI: Validation for slow deflagration in homogeneous hydrogen-air-steam experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutrono Rakhimov, A., E-mail: cutrono@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Visser, D.C., E-mail: visser@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Holler, T., E-mail: tadej.holler@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Komen, E.M.J., E-mail: komen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Deflagration of hydrogen-air-steam homogeneous mixtures is modeled in a medium-scale containment. • Adaptive mesh refinement is applied on flame front positions. • Steam effect influence on combustion modeling capabilities is investigated. • Mean pressure rise is predicted with 18% under-prediction when steam is involved. • Peak pressure is evaluated with 5% accuracy when steam is involved. - Abstract: Large quantities of hydrogen can be generated during a severe accident in a water-cooled nuclear reactor. When released in the containment, the hydrogen can create a potential deflagration risk. The dynamic pressure loads resulting from hydrogen combustion can be detrimental to the structural integrity of the reactor. Therefore, accurate prediction of these pressure loads is an important safety issue. In previous papers, we validated a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based method to determine the pressure loads from a fast deflagration. The combustion model applied in the CFD method is based on the Turbulent Flame Speed Closure (TFC). In our last paper, we presented the extension of this combustion model, Extended Turbulent Flame Speed Closure (ETFC), and its validation against hydrogen deflagration experiments in the slow deflagration regime. During a severe accident, cooling water will enter the containment as steam. Therefore, the effect of steam on hydrogen deflagration is important to capture in a CFD model. The primary objectives of the present paper are to further validate the TFC and ETFC combustion models, and investigate their capability to predict the effect of steam. The peak pressures, the trends of the flame velocity, and the pressure rise with an increase in the initial steam dilution are captured reasonably well by both combustion models. In addition, the ETFC model appeared to be more robust to mesh resolution changes. The mean pressure rise is evaluated with 18% under-prediction and the peak pressure is evaluated with 5

  8. Numerical modeling of combustion of low-calorific-producer-gas from Mangium wood within a late mixing porous burner (LMPB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanokkarn Jirakulsomchok

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a numerical study of combustion of low-calorific-producer-gas from Mangium wood within a late mixing porous burner (LMPB. The LMPB consists of four main components, i.e., the fuel preheating porous (FP, the porous combustor (PC, the air jacket, and the mixing chamber. Interestingly, this LMPB was able to highly preheated and it still maintained high safety in operation. A single-step global reaction, steady state approach and a one-dimensional model were considered. The necessary information for burner characteristics, i.e., temperature profile, flame location and maximum temperature were also presented. The results indicated that stable combustion of a low-calorific-producer-gas within LMPB was possible achieved. Increasing equivalence ratio resulted in increasing in the flame temperature. Meanwhile, increasing the firing rate caused slightly decrease in flame temperature. The flame moved to downstream zone of the PC when the firing rate increased. Finally, it was found that the equivalence ratio did not affect the flame location.

  9. Prediction of air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion through a generic gas radiation property model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2017-01-01

    Thermal radiation plays an important role in heat transfer in combustion furnaces. The weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model (WSGGM), representing a good compromise between computational efficiency and accuracy, is commonly used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of combustion processes...

  10. Energy, exergy, environmental and economic analysis of industrial fired heaters based on heat recovery and preheating techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekarchian, M.; Zarifi, F.; Moghavvemi, M.; Motasemi, F.; Mahlia, T.M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • 4-E analysis of a typical industrial grade fired heater unit is studied. • This analysis is accomplished for the first time in this study. • Heat recovery and air preheating lead to substantial reduction in the fuel consumption. • The company’s current costs are tremendously reduced by these methods. • The methods lead to mitigation in GHG emission and to reduction in the associated taxes. - Abstract: Fired heaters are ubiquitous in both the petroleum and petrochemical industries, due to it being vital in their day to day operations. They form major components in petroleum refineries, petrochemical facilities, and processing units. This study was commissioned in order to analyze the economic benefits of incorporating both heat recovery and air preheating methods into the existing fired heater units. Four fired heater units were analyzed from the energy and environmental point of views. Moreover, the second law efficiency and the rate of irreversibility were also analyzed via the exergy analysis. Both analyses was indicative of the fact that the heat recovery process enhances both the first and second law efficiencies while simultaneously assisting in the production of high and low pressure water steam. The implementation and usage of the process improves the thermal and exergy efficiencies from 63.4% to 71.7% and 49.4%, to 54.8%, respectively. Additionally, the heat recovery and air preheating methods leads to a substantial reduction in fuel consumption, in the realm of up to 7.4%, while also simultaneously decreasing heat loss and the irreversibility of the unit. Nevertheless, the results of the economic analysis posits that although utilizing an air preheater unit enhances the thermal performance of the system, due to the air preheater’s capital and maintenance costs, incorporating an air preheater unit to an existing fired heater is not economically justifiable. Furthermore, the results of the sensitivity analysis and payback period

  11. Flow blurring atomization for combustion of viscous (bio)fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof; Bouma, Wilmer; Ratering, Martijn; Brem, Gerrit

    2017-01-01

    In order to achieve efficient combustion of liquid fuel a proper atomization of the fuel is needed. In case of many biomass fuels the atomization process is obstructed and hindered by high viscosity of the fuel. Preheating to reduce the viscosity in many cases is not possible because of fuel

  12. Combustion synthesis of inorganic materials; Muki zairyo no nensho gose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyanagi, M. [Ryukoku University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    Combustion synthesis of porous titan carbide is outlined. In combustion synthesis, exothermic chain reaction, which is induced by igniting at one point of the simple substance mixture, propagates the combustion wave, and the compound is synthesized, which can be sintered by it. By this method, to this day intermetallic compounds, ceramics and high melting point composite materials have been synthesized, and synthetics can be made compact by adding pressure during or just after the reaction. Recently, applying the induction heating jointly, preheating before the reaction and heat treatment after the reaction can be controlled, accordingly, many high melting point inorganic compounds and composite materials can be made by combustion synthesis under pressure. (NEDO)

  13. Estimation of the in-cylinder air/fuel ratio of an internal combustion engine by the use of pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunestaal, Per

    2000-03-01

    This thesis investigates the use of cylinder pressure measurements for estimation of the in-cylinder air/fuel ratio in a spark ignited internal combustion engine. An estimation model which uses the net heat release profile for estimating the cylinder air/fuel ratio of a spark ignition engine is developed. The net heat release profile is computed from the cylinder pressure trace and quantifies the conversion of chemical energy of the reactants in the charge into thermal energy. The net heat release profile does not take heat- or mass transfer into account. Cycle-averaged air/fuel ratio estimates over a range of engine speeds and loads show an RMS error of 4.1% compared to measurements in the exhaust. A thermochemical model of the combustion process in an internal combustion engine is developed. It uses a simple chemical combustion reaction, polynominal fits of internal energy as function of temperature, and the first law of thermodynamics to derive a relationship between measured cylinder pressure and the progress of the combustion process. Simplifying assumptions are made to arrive at an equation which relates the net heat release to the cylinder pressure. Two methods for estimating the sensor offset of a cylinder pressure transducer are developed. Both methods fit the pressure data during the pre-combustion phase of the compression stroke to a polytropic curve. The first method assumes a known polytropic exponent, and the other estimates the polytropic exponent. The first method results in a linear least-squares problem, and the second method results in a nonlinear least-squares problem. The nonlinear least-squares problem is solved by separating out the nonlinear dependence and solving the single-variable minimization problem. For this, a finite difference Newton method is derived. Using this method, the cost of solving the nonlinear least-squares problem is only slightly higher than solving the linear least-squares problem. Both methods show good statistical

  14. Combustion of Solids in Microgravity: Results from the BASS-II Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkul, Paul V.; Bhattacharjee, Subrata; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Miller, Fletcher; Olson, Sandra L.; Takahashi, Fumiaki; T’ien, James S.

    2014-01-01

    The Burning and Suppression of Solids-II (BASS-II) experiment was performed on the International Space Station. Microgravity combustion tests burned thin and thick flat samples, acrylic slabs, spheres, and cylinders. The samples were mounted inside a small wind tunnel which could impose air flow speeds up to 53 cms. The wind tunnel was installed in the Microgravity Science Glovebox which supplied power, imaging, and a level of containment. The effects of air flow speed, fuel thickness, fuel preheating, and oxygen concentration on flame appearance, growth, spread rate, and extinction were examined in both the opposed and concurrent flow configuration. The flames are quite sensitive to air flow speed in the range 0 to 5 cms. They can be sustained at very low flow speeds of less than 1 cms, when they become dim blue and stable. In this state they are not particularly dangerous from a fire safety perspective, but they can flare up quickly with a sudden increase in air flow speed. Including earlier BASS-I results, well over one hundred tests have been conducted of the various samples in the different geometries, flow speeds, and oxygen concentrations. There are several important implications related to fundamental combustion research as well as spacecraft fire safety. This work was supported by the NASA Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications Division (SLPSRA).

  15. Method for pre-heating lmfbr type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokozawa, Atsushi; Kataoka, Hajime.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To enable pre-heating for the inside of the reactor container and the inside of the coolant recycling system with no additional facilities. Method: The coolant recycling system is composed of a heat exchanger, a mechanical pump, a check valve, a flow meter or the like and it is connected in series by way of a pipe line to a reactor container. The mechanical pump is used as a gas recycling device upon pre-heating and it is designed so that a blower such as a fan can be replaced for the impeller of the pump. The inside of the reactor container and the inside of the coolant recycling system is at first filled with an inert gas such as for use with cover gas. Then, nuclear fuels are loaded to attain criticality. Simultaneously, the blower is started and the control rods are operated while cooling the nuclear fuel with the inert gas thus to obtain heat required for pre-heating the pipe line or the like from the nuclear fuels. After the completion of the pre-heating, the liquid metal is charged. (Ikeda, J.)

  16. Constraints on variations in inflaton decay rate from modulated preheating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumdar, Arindam [Theory Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-64 (India); Modak, Kamakshya Prasad, E-mail: arindam.mazumdar@saha.ac.in, E-mail: kamakshya.modak@saha.ac.in [Astroparticle Physics and Cosmology Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-64 (India)

    2016-06-01

    Modulated (p)reheating is thought to be an alternative mechanism for producing super-horizon curvature perturbations in CMB. But large non-gaussianity and iso-curvature perturbations produced by this mechanism rule out its acceptability as the sole process responsible for generating CMB perturbations. We explore the situation where CMB perturbations are mostly generated by usual quantum fluctuations of inflaton during inflation, but a modulated coupling constant between inflaton and a secondary scalar affects the preheating process and produces some extra curvature perturbations. If the modulating scalar field is considered to be a dark matter candidate, coupling constant between the fields has to be unnaturally fine tuned in order to keep the local-form non-gaussianity and the amplitude of iso-curvature perturbations within observational limit; otherwise parameters of the models have to be tightly constrained. Those constraints imply that the curvature perturbations generated by modulated preheating should be less than 15% of the total observed CMB perturbations. On the other hand if the modulating scalar field is not a dark matter candidate, parameters of the models could not be constrained, but the constraints on the maximum amount of the curvature perturbations coming from modulated preheating remain valid.

  17. Constraints on variations in inflaton decay rate from modulated preheating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumdar, Arindam; Modak, Kamakshya Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Modulated (p)reheating is thought to be an alternative mechanism for producing super-horizon curvature perturbations in CMB. But large non-gaussianity and iso-curvature perturbations produced by this mechanism rule out its acceptability as the sole process responsible for generating CMB perturbations. We explore the situation where CMB perturbations are mostly generated by usual quantum fluctuations of inflaton during inflation, but a modulated coupling constant between inflaton and a secondary scalar affects the preheating process and produces some extra curvature perturbations. If the modulating scalar field is considered to be a dark matter candidate, coupling constant between the fields has to be unnaturally fine tuned in order to keep the local-form non-gaussianity and the amplitude of iso-curvature perturbations within observational limit; otherwise parameters of the models have to be tightly constrained. Those constraints imply that the curvature perturbations generated by modulated preheating should be less than 15% of the total observed CMB perturbations. On the other hand if the modulating scalar field is not a dark matter candidate, parameters of the models could not be constrained, but the constraints on the maximum amount of the curvature perturbations coming from modulated preheating remain valid.

  18. Gauge-preheating and the end of axion inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adshead, Peter; Sfakianakis, Evangelos I. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Giblin, John T. Jr.; Scully, Timothy R., E-mail: adshead@illinois.edu, E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu, E-mail: tscully2@illinois.edu, E-mail: esfaki@illinois.edu [Department of Physics, Kenyon College, 201 North College Rd, Gambier, Ohio 43022 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We study the onset of the reheating epoch at the end of axion-driven inflation where the axion is coupled to an Abelian, U(1), gauge field via a Chern-Simons interaction term. We focus primarily on m{sup 2φ2} inflation and explore the possibility that preheating can occur for a range of coupling values consistent with recent observations and bounds on the overproduction of primordial black holes. We find that for a wide range of parameters preheating is efficient. In certain cases the inflaton transfers all of its energy to the gauge fields within a few oscillations. In most cases, we find that the gauge fields on sub-horizon scales end preheating in an unpolarized state due to the existence of strong rescattering between the inflaton and gauge-field modes. We also present a preliminary study of an axion monodromy model coupled to U(1) gauge fields, seeing a similarly efficient preheating behavior as well as indications that the coupling strength has an effect on the creation of oscillons.

  19. Gauge-preheating and the end of axion inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adshead, Peter; Sfakianakis, Evangelos I.; Giblin, John T. Jr.; Scully, Timothy R.

    2015-01-01

    We study the onset of the reheating epoch at the end of axion-driven inflation where the axion is coupled to an Abelian, U(1), gauge field via a Chern-Simons interaction term. We focus primarily on m 2φ2 inflation and explore the possibility that preheating can occur for a range of coupling values consistent with recent observations and bounds on the overproduction of primordial black holes. We find that for a wide range of parameters preheating is efficient. In certain cases the inflaton transfers all of its energy to the gauge fields within a few oscillations. In most cases, we find that the gauge fields on sub-horizon scales end preheating in an unpolarized state due to the existence of strong rescattering between the inflaton and gauge-field modes. We also present a preliminary study of an axion monodromy model coupled to U(1) gauge fields, seeing a similarly efficient preheating behavior as well as indications that the coupling strength has an effect on the creation of oscillons

  20. Theory and numerics of gravitational waves from preheating after inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufaux, Jean-Francois; Kofman, Lev; Bergman, Amanda; Felder, Gary; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Preheating after inflation involves large, time-dependent field inhomogeneities, which act as a classical source of gravitational radiation. The resulting spectrum might be probed by direct detection experiments if inflation occurs at a low enough energy scale. In this paper, we develop a theory and algorithm to calculate, analytically and numerically, the spectrum of energy density in gravitational waves produced from an inhomogeneous background of stochastic scalar fields in an expanding universe. We derive some generic analytical results for the emission of gravity waves by stochastic media of random fields, which can test the validity/accuracy of numerical calculations. We contrast our method with other numerical methods in the literature, and then we apply it to preheating after chaotic inflation. In this case, we are able to check analytically our numerical results, which differ significantly from previous works. We discuss how the gravity-wave spectrum builds up with time and find that the amplitude and the frequency of its peak depend in a relatively simple way on the characteristic spatial scale amplified during preheating. We then estimate the peak frequency and amplitude of the spectrum produced in two models of preheating after hybrid inflation, which for some parameters may be relevant for gravity-wave interferometric experiments

  1. Numerical Modeling of MILD Combustion at High Pressure to Predict the Optimal Operating Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Vanteru, Mahendra Reddy; Roberts, William L.

    2017-01-01

    This Chapter presents numerical simulation on MILD combustion operating at high pressure. Influence of preheat and dilution of oxidizer and operating pressure on stabilization of MILD combustion are presented. Three different preheat temperatures (1100, 1300 and 1500 K) and three different dilution levels (3, 6 and 9% O2) are simulated over an operating pressure variation from 1 atm to 16 atm. A classical jet in hot coflow burner is considered for this study. Total of 45 cases are simulated and analyzed. Essential characteristics of MILD combustion, i.e., maximum temperature (Tmax), temperature rise (ΔT) and temperature distributions, are analyzed. The distribution of emissions OH and CO are also studied and presented. Well-stabilized MILD combustion is observed for all cases except for two cases with high preheated (1500 K). Peak temperature is observed to decrease with increasing operating pressure for a given level of preheat and dilution. OH mass faction is reduced with increasing pressure. The CO emissions show little sensitivity to operating pressure. However, CO mass fraction is slightly higher at 1 atm operating pressure as compared to 4 to 16 atm. Since the residence time of reactants increases as the operating pressure increases, well-stabilized MILD combustion is observed for all highly diluted and low temperature preheat cases (3% O2 and 1100 K).

  2. Numerical Modeling of MILD Combustion at High Pressure to Predict the Optimal Operating Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Vanteru, Mahendra Reddy

    2017-02-01

    This Chapter presents numerical simulation on MILD combustion operating at high pressure. Influence of preheat and dilution of oxidizer and operating pressure on stabilization of MILD combustion are presented. Three different preheat temperatures (1100, 1300 and 1500 K) and three different dilution levels (3, 6 and 9% O2) are simulated over an operating pressure variation from 1 atm to 16 atm. A classical jet in hot coflow burner is considered for this study. Total of 45 cases are simulated and analyzed. Essential characteristics of MILD combustion, i.e., maximum temperature (Tmax), temperature rise (ΔT) and temperature distributions, are analyzed. The distribution of emissions OH and CO are also studied and presented. Well-stabilized MILD combustion is observed for all cases except for two cases with high preheated (1500 K). Peak temperature is observed to decrease with increasing operating pressure for a given level of preheat and dilution. OH mass faction is reduced with increasing pressure. The CO emissions show little sensitivity to operating pressure. However, CO mass fraction is slightly higher at 1 atm operating pressure as compared to 4 to 16 atm. Since the residence time of reactants increases as the operating pressure increases, well-stabilized MILD combustion is observed for all highly diluted and low temperature preheat cases (3% O2 and 1100 K).

  3. Investigation of Spark Ignition and Autoignition in Methane and Air Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Chemical Reaction Kinetics. A numerical Study of Ignition Processes in Internal Combustion Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordrik, R.

    1993-12-01

    The processes in the combustion chamber of internal combustion engines have received increased attention in recent years because their efficiencies are important both economically and environmentally. This doctoral thesis studies the ignition phenomena by means of numerical simulation methods. The fundamental physical relations include flow field conservation equations, thermodynamics, chemical reaction kinetics, transport properties and spark modelling. Special attention is given to the inclusion of chemical kinetics in the flow field equations. Using his No Transport of Radicals Concept method, the author reduces the computational efforts by neglecting the transport of selected intermediate species. The method is validated by comparison with flame propagation data. A computational method is described and used to simulate spark ignition in laminar premixed methane-air mixtures and the autoignition process of a methane bubble surrounded by hot air. The spark ignition simulation agrees well with experimental results from the literature. The autoignition simulation identifies the importance of diffusive and chemical processes acting together. The ignition delay times exceed the experimental values found in the literature for premixed ignition delay, presumably because of the mixing process and lack of information on low temperature reactions in the skeletal kinetic mechanism. Transient turbulent methane jet autoignition is simulated by means of the KIVA-II code. Turbulent combustion is modelled by the Eddy Dissipation Concept. 90 refs., 81 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Development, testing, and evaluation of MHD materials and component designs, Volume 3: Electrical properties of coal combustion product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, W. E.; Lempert, J.

    1980-11-01

    Laboratory apparatus was assembled to produce a plasma identical in composition and properties to that resulting in an MHD system when coal and air are burned. This was accomplished with a combustion chamber in which benzene, char, sulfur, and seed mixtures were burned with electrically preheated air. The plasma entered a measuring section where temperatures were measured with iridium versus iridium-rhodium thermocouples, with pyrometers, and by means of line reversal. Measurements of electrical conductivity were made with current and voltage probes. Many difficulties were experienced in the operation and calibration of the equipment, however, some readings were obtained in the 19000 C to 20000 C range, averaging 10 to 20 mhos/meter - much higher than predicted theoretically, probably due to electrical leakage. Electrical measurements were made on the Waltz Mill passage during operation. Readings less than 1.0 mhos/meter were obtained which was not unexpected because the plasma temperature approximated 21000 C.

  5. Engineering design and exergy analyses for combustion gas turbine based power generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sue, D.-C.; Chuang, C.-C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the engineering design and theoretical exergetic analyses of the plant for combustion gas turbine based power generation systems. Exergy analysis is performed based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics for power generation systems. The results show the exergy analyses for a steam cycle system predict the plant efficiency more precisely. The plant efficiency for partial load operation is lower than full load operation. Increasing the pinch points will decrease the combined cycle plant efficiency. The engineering design is based on inlet air-cooling and natural gas preheating for increasing the net power output and efficiency. To evaluate the energy utilization, one combined cycle unit and one cogeneration system, consisting of gas turbine generators, heat recovery steam generators, one steam turbine generator with steam extracted for process have been analyzed. The analytical results are used for engineering design and component selection

  6. An investigation of co-combustion municipal sewage sludge with biomass in a 20kW BFB combustor under air-fired and oxygen-enriched condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Ravi Inder

    2017-12-01

    The behavior of municipal sewage sludge (MSS) with biomass (Guar stalks (GS), Mustard Husk (MH), Prosopis Juliflora Wood (PJW)) has been investigated in a 20kW bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) combustor under both air-fired (A-F) and oxygen-enriched (O-E) conditions. The work presented is divided into three parts, first part cover the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), second part cover the experimental investigation of BFB combustor, and third part covers the ash analysis. TGA was performed with a ratio of 50%MSS/50%biomass (GS, MH, PJW) and results show that 50%MSS/50%GS has highest combustion characteristic factor (CCF). The experimental investigation of BFB combustor was performed for two different ratios of MSS/biomass (50%/50% and 25%/75%) and the combustion characteristics of blends were distinctive under both A-F and O-E condition. Despite 50%MSS/50%GS showing the highest combustion performance in TGA analysis, it formed agglomerates during burning in BFB. Due to this formation of large amount of agglomerates, de-fluidization was observed in the combustor bed after 65-75min in A-F conditions. The rate of de-fluidization increased under O-E condition. The de-fluidization problem disappeared when the share of MSS was reduced to 25%, but small amounts of the agglomerate were still present in the bed. With oxygen enhancement, the combustion efficiency of BFB combustor was improved and flue gasses were found within permissible limit. The maximum conceivable combustion efficiency (97.1%) for BFB combustor was accomplished by using 50% MSS/50%PJW under O-E condition. Results show that a ratio of 25%MSS/75%biomass combusted successfully inside the BFB combustor and extensive work is required for efficient utilization of significant share of MSS with biomass. SEM/EDS analyses were performed for agglomerate produced and for the damaged heater to study the surface morphology and compositions. The elemental heterogeneity of fly ash generated during MSS/biomass combustion

  7. Influence of the overfire air ratio on the NO(x) emission and combustion characteristics of a down-fired 300-MW(e) utility boiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Feng; Li, Zhengqi; Chen, Zhichao; Fan, Subo; Liu, Guangkui

    2010-08-15

    Down-fired boilers used to burn low-volatile coals have high NO(x) emissions. To find a way of solving this problem, an overfire air (OFA) system was introduced on a 300 MW(e) down-fired boiler. Full-scale experiments were performed on this retrofitted boiler to explore the influence of the OFA ratio (the mass flux ratio of OFA to the total combustion air) on the combustion and NO(x) emission characteristics in the furnace. Measurements were taken of gas temperature distributions along the primary air and coal mixture flows, average gas temperatures along the furnace height, concentrations of gases such as O(2), CO, and NO(x) in the near-wall region and carbon content in the fly ash. Data were compared for five different OFA ratios. The results show that as the OFA ratio increases from 12% to 35%, the NO(x) emission decreases from 1308 to 966 mg/Nm(3) (at 6% O(2) dry) and the carbon content in the fly ash increases from 6.53% to 15.86%. Considering both the environmental and economic effect, 25% was chosen as the optimized OFA ratio.

  8. The Effects of Combustion Parameters on Pollutant Emissions in a Porous Burner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Moallemi Khiavi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a two-dimensional numerical prediction of premixed methane/air combustion in inert porous media. The two dimensional Navier-stokes equations, the two separate energy equations for solid and gas and conservation equations for chemical species are solved using finite volume method based on SIMPLE algorithm. The burner under study is a rectangular one with two different regions. First region is a preheating zone (low porosity matrix that followed by the actual combustion region (high porosity matrix. For simulating the chemical reactions, skeletal mechanism (26 species and 77 reactions is used. For studying the pollutant emissions in this porous burner, the effects of porous matrix properties, excess air ratio and inlet velocity are studied. The predicted gas temperature contour and pollutant formations are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The results indicate that the downstream of the burner should be constructed from materials with high conductivity, high convective heat transfer coefficient and high porosity in order to decrease the CO and NO emissions. Also, with increasing the inlet velocity of gas mixture and the excess air ratio, the pollutant emissions are decreased.

  9. An experimental investigation into combustion and performance characteristics of an HCCI gasoline engine fueled with n-heptane, isopropanol and n-butanol fuel blends at different inlet air temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uyumaz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Combustion was retarded with the increase of the amount of isopropanol and n-butanol in the test fuels. • Combustion was advanced with the increase of air inlet temperature on HCCI combustion. • Isopropanol seems more suitable fuel due to controlling the HCCI combustion and preventing knocking. • Almost zero NO emissions were measured when alcohol used except for n-heptane and B20 test fuels. - Abstract: An experimental study was conducted in a single cylinder, four stroke port injection Ricardo Hydra test engine in order to determine the effects of pure n-heptane, the blends of n-heptane and n-butanol fuels B20, B30, B40 (including 20%, 30%, 40% n-butanol and 80%, 70%, 60% n-heptane by vol. respectively) and the blends of n-heptane and isopropanol fuels P20, P30, P40 (including 20%, 30%, 40% isopropanol and 80%, 70%, 60% n-heptane by vol. respectively) on HCCI combustion. Combustion and performance characteristics of n-heptane, n-butanol and isopropanol were investigated at constant engine speed of 1500 rpm and λ = 2 in a HCCI engine. The effects of inlet air temperature were also examined on HCCI combustion. The test results showed that the start of combustion was advanced with the increasing of inlet air temperature for all test fuels. Start of combustion delayed with increasing percentage of n-butanol and isopropanol in the test fuels. Knocking combustion was seen with B20 and n-heptane test fuels. Minimum combustion duration was observed in case of using B40. Almost zero NO emissions were measured with test fuels apart from n-heptane and B20. The test results also showed that CO and HC emissions decreased with the increase of inlet air temperature for all test fuels. Isopropanol showed stronger resistance for knocking compared to n-butanol in HCCI combustion due to its higher octane number. It was determined that n-butanol was more advantageous according to isopropanol as thermal efficiency. As a result it was found that the HCCI

  10. On the generation of a non-gaussian curvature perturbation during preheating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Lyth, David H. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Valenzuela-Toledo, Cesar A., E-mail: k.kohri@lancaster.ac.uk, E-mail: d.lyth@lancaster.ac.uk, E-mail: cavalto@ciencias.uis.edu.co [Escuela de Física, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Ciudad Universitaria, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2010-02-01

    The perturbation of a light field might affect preheating and hence generate a contribution to the spectrum and non-gaussianity of the curvature perturbation ζ. The field might appear directly in the preheating model (curvaton-type preheating) or indirectly through its effect on a mass or coupling (modulated preheating). We give general expressions for ζ based on the δN formula, and apply them to the cases of quadratic and quartic chaotic inflation. For the quadratic case, curvaton-type preheating is ineffective in contributing to ζ, but modulated preheating can be effective. For quartic inflation, curvaton-type preheating may be effective but the usual δN formalism has to be modified. We see under what circumstances the recent numerical simulation of Bond et al. [0903.3407] may be enough to provide a rough estimate for this case.

  11. On the generation of a non-gaussian curvature perturbation during preheating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Lyth, David H.; Valenzuela-Toledo, Cesar A.

    2010-01-01

    The perturbation of a light field might affect preheating and hence generate a contribution to the spectrum and non-gaussianity of the curvature perturbation ζ. The field might appear directly in the preheating model (curvaton-type preheating) or indirectly through its effect on a mass or coupling (modulated preheating). We give general expressions for ζ based on the δN formula, and apply them to the cases of quadratic and quartic chaotic inflation. For the quadratic case, curvaton-type preheating is ineffective in contributing to ζ, but modulated preheating can be effective. For quartic inflation, curvaton-type preheating may be effective but the usual δN formalism has to be modified. We see under what circumstances the recent numerical simulation of Bond et al. [0903.3407] may be enough to provide a rough estimate for this case

  12. Incidencia del tipo de gasolinas, aditivos y equipos optimizadores de combustible comercializados en la ciudad de Cuenca, sobre las emisiones contaminantes emitidas al aire

    OpenAIRE

    Encalada Cajisaca, Franklin Rafael; Ñauta Uzhca, Pablo Gustavo

    2010-01-01

    El cantón Cuenca ubicado en la provincia del Azuay al sur de Ecuador, a una cota media de 2.550 msnm, es la tercera ciudad más grande del país y al igual que otras ciudades del Ecuador y del Mundo, registra altos índices de contaminación de su medio ambiente a causa de la emisión de gases nocivos al aire, por su creciente parque automotor, las industrias y otros sectores de actividad que utilizan combustibles fósiles como los derivados del petróleo, es decir gasolina, diesel y bunker en sus a...

  13. Production of gravitational waves during preheating with nonminimal coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chengjie; Wu, Puxun; Yu, Hongwei

    2018-04-01

    We study the preheating and the in-process production of gravitational waves (GWs) after inflation in which the inflaton is nonminimally coupled to the curvature in a self-interacting quartic potential with the method of lattice simulation. We find that the nonminimal coupling enhances the amplitude of the density spectrum of inflaton quanta, and as a result, the peak value of the GW spectrum generated during preheating is enhanced as well and might reach the limit of detection in future GW experiments. The peaks of the GW spectrum not only exhibit distinctive characteristics as compared to those of minimally coupled inflaton potentials but also imprint information on the nonminimal coupling and the parametric resonance, and thus the detection of these peaks in the future will provide us a new avenue to reveal the physics of the early universe.

  14. Thermographic study of the preheating plugs in diesel engines

    OpenAIRE

    Royo Pastor, Rafael; Albertos Arranz, M.A.; CÁRCEL CUBAS, JUAN ANTONIO; Payá Herrero, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The use of direct injection diesel engines has been widely applied during the past ten years. In such engines, the preheating plugs are a key element which has a significant contribution in the pollutant emissions. In this paper, two different plug designs from Renault are analyzed. The new plug reduces substantially the required electrical consumption. Nevertheless, the pollutant emissions are higher (fundamentally CO and HCs) and hereby a thorough analysis is required to underst...

  15. 3D DNS of MILD combustion : a detailed analysis of heat loss effects, preferential diffusion, and flame formation mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goktolga, M.U.; Oijen, van J.A.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2015-01-01

    Moderate or intense low oxygen dilution (MILD) combustion is a relatively new technology which combines low emissions with high efficiency. As the name suggests, it requires high degrees of dilution in addition to preheating of the reactants using the combustion products. It has been applied to

  16. A practical approach to estimate emission rates of indoor air pollutants due to the use of personal combustible products based on small-chamber studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulejko, Jan E; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    As emission rates of airborne pollutants are commonly measured from combusting substances placed inside small chambers, those values need to be re-evaluated for the possible significance under practical conditions. Here, a simple numerical procedure is investigated to extrapolate the chamber-based emission rates of formaldehyde that can be released from various combustible sources including e-cigarettes, conventional cigarettes, or scented candles to their concentration levels in a small room with relatively poor ventilation. This simple procedure relies on a mass balance approach by considering the masses of pollutants emitted from source and lost through ventilation under the assumption that mixing occurs instantaneously in the room without chemical reactions or surface sorption. The results of our study provide valuable insights into re-evaluation procedure of chamber data to allow comparison between extrapolated and recommended values to judge the safe use of various combustible products in confined spaces. If two scented candles with a formaldehyde emission rate of 310 µg h(-1) each were lit for 4 h in a small 20 m(3) room with an air change rate of 0.5 h(-1), then the 4-h (candle lit) and 8-h (up to 8 h after candle lighting) TWA [FA] were determined to be 28.5 and 23.5 ppb, respectively. This is clearly above the 8-h NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL) time weighted average of 16 ppb. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of fractal grid on emissions in burner combustion by using fuel-water-air premix injector derived from biodiesel crude palm oil (CPO base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suardi Mirnah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The alternative fuel is attracted good attention from worldwide especially for renewable and prevention energy such as biodiesel. Biodiesel is one of the hydrocarbon fuels and it has potential for external combustion. As one of the different solutions to these problems, rapid mixing of biodiesel-water-air technique is one of the most significant approaches to improve the combustion and reduce the emissions. The gas emission can be reduced by two methods. First is by improving an injector with fractal and the other is by using a biodiesel-water mixture as an alternative fuel. Mixing of water with fuel in the combustion process is a low cost and effective way. This research used biodiesel Crude Palm Oil (CPO as fuels in which blended with diesel. This study investigated the effects of water content and equivalence ratio on emissions with the rapid mixing injector. Fuels used are diesel, CPO5, CPO10 and CPO15 and the exhausts gaseous tested are CO, CO2, HC and NOX. The gas emissions processes are tested by using the gas analyzer. In this research, water premix of percentage up to 15vol% and blending biodiesel ratio was varied from 5vom% - 15vol%. The result shows that increasing of water content will effected decrement of CO, CO2 and HC emissions but increasing the NOX emissions.

  18. DEFROST: a new code for simulating preheating after inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, Andrei V

    2008-01-01

    At the end of inflation, dynamical instability can rapidly deposit the energy of homogeneous cold inflaton into excitations of other fields. This process, known as preheating, is rather violent, inhomogeneous and non-linear, and has to be studied numerically. This paper presents a new code for simulating scalar field dynamics in an expanding universe written for that purpose. Compared to available alternatives, it significantly improves both the speed and the accuracy of calculations, and is fully instrumented for 3D visualization. We reproduce previously published results on preheating in simple chaotic inflation models, and further investigate non-linear dynamics of the inflaton decay. Surprisingly, we find that the fields do not 'want' to thermalize in quite the way that one would think. Instead of directly reaching equilibrium, the evolution appears to be stuck in a rather simple but quite inhomogeneous state. In particular, a one-point distribution function of total energy density appears to be universal among various two-field preheating models, and is exceedingly well described by a log-normal distribution. It is tempting to attribute this state to scalar field turbulence

  19. CFD modeling of fouling in crude oil pre-heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayat, Mahmoud; Aminian, Javad; Bazmi, Mansour; Shahhosseini, Shahrokh; Sharifi, Khashayar

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A conceptual CFD-based model to predict fouling in industrial crude oil pre-heaters. ► Tracing fouling formation in the induction and developing continuation periods. ► Effect of chemical components, shell-side HTC and turbulent flow on the fouling rate. - Abstract: In this study, a conceptual procedure based on the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technique has been developed to predict fouling rate in an industrial crude oil pre-heater. According to the developed CFD concept crude oil was assumed to be composed of three pseudo-components comprising of petroleum, asphaltene and salt. The binary diffusion coefficients were appropriately categorized into five different groups. The species transport model was applied to simulate the mixing and transport of chemical species. The possibility of adherence of reaction products to the wall was taken into account by applying a high viscosity for the products in competition with the shear stress on the wall. Results showed a reasonable agreement between the model predictions and the plant data. The CFD model could be applied to new operating conditions to investigate the details of the crude oil fouling in the industrial pre-heaters.

  20. Direct numerical simulations of ignition of a lean n-heptane/air mixture with temperature and composition inhomogeneities relevant to HCCI and SCCI combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Luong, Minh Bau

    2015-12-01

    The effects of temperature and composition stratifications on the ignition of a lean n-heptane/air mixture at three initial mean temperatures under elevated pressure are investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNSs) with a 58-species reduced mechanism. Two-dimensional DNSs are performed by varying several key parameters: initial mean temperature, T0, and the variance of temperature and equivalence ratio (T\\' and φ\\') with different T-φcorrelations. It is found that for cases with φ\\' only, the overall combustion occurs more quickly and the mean heat release rate (HRR) increases more slowly with increasing φ\\' regardless of T0. For cases with T\\' only, however, the overall combustion is retarded/advanced in time with increasing T\\' for low/high T0 relative to the negative-temperature coefficient (NTC) regime resulting from a longer/shorter overall ignition delay of the mixture. For cases with uncorrelated T-φfields, the mean HRR is more distributed over time compared to the corresponding cases with T\\' or φ\\' only. For negatively-correlated cases, however, the temporal evolution of the overall combustion exhibits quite non-monotonic behavior with increasing T\\' and φ\\' depending on T0. All of these characteristics are found to be primarily related to the 0-D ignition delays of initial mixtures, the relative timescales between 0-D ignition delay and turbulence, and the dominance of the deflagration mode during the ignition. These results suggest that an appropriate combination of T\\' and φ\\' together with a well-prepared T-φdistribution can alleviate an excessive pressure-rise rate (PRR) and control ignition-timing in homogeneous charge compression-ignition (HCCI) combustion. In addition, critical species and reactions for the ignition of n-heptane/air mixture through the whole ignition process are estimated by comparing the temporal evolution of the mean mass fractions of important species with the overall reaction pathways of n

  1. Permitting Considerations for Installation of Inlet Air Foggers on Simple Cycle Combustion Turbines at the Duke Power Lincoln Combustion Turbine Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  2. Considering the future of anthropogenic gas-phase organic compound emissions and the increasing influence of non-combustion sources on urban air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Peeyush; Gentner, Drew R.

    2018-04-01

    Decades of policy in developed regions has successfully reduced total anthropogenic emissions of gas-phase organic compounds, especially volatile organic compounds (VOCs), with an intentional, sustained focus on motor vehicles and other combustion-related sources. We examine potential secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and ozone formation in our case study megacity (Los Angeles) and demonstrate that non-combustion-related sources now contribute a major fraction of SOA and ozone precursors. Thus, they warrant greater attention beyond indoor environments to resolve large uncertainties in their emissions, oxidation chemistry, and outdoor air quality impacts in cities worldwide. We constrain the magnitude and chemical composition of emissions via several bottom-up approaches using chemical analyses of products, emissions inventory assessments, theoretical calculations of emission timescales, and a survey of consumer product material safety datasheets. We demonstrate that the chemical composition of emissions from consumer products as well as commercial and industrial products, processes, and materials is diverse across and within source subcategories. This leads to wide ranges of SOA and ozone formation potentials that rival other prominent sources, such as motor vehicles. With emission timescales from minutes to years, emission rates and source profiles need to be included, updated, and/or validated in emissions inventories with expected regional and national variability. In particular, intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (IVOCs and SVOCs) are key precursors to SOA, but are excluded or poorly represented in emissions inventories and exempt from emissions targets. We present an expanded framework for classifying VOC, IVOC, and SVOC emissions from this diverse array of sources that emphasizes a life cycle approach over longer timescales and three emission pathways that extend beyond the short-term evaporation of VOCs: (1) solvent evaporation, (2

  3. FY 1999 Report on research and development project. Research and development of high-temperature air combustion technology; 1999 nendo koon kuki nensho seigyo gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The high-temperature air combustion technology recently developed greatly advances combustion technology. The technology, when applied to the other areas, may expand its applicable areas and contribute to environmental preservation, e.g., abatement of CO2 emissions. This is the motivation for promotion of this project. The combustion technology, developed by improving functions of industrial furnaces, cannot be directly applied to the other combustion heaters. This project is aimed at extraction of the problems involved, finding out the solutions, and thereby smoothly transferring the technology to commercialization. This project covers boilers firing finely pulverized coal, waste incineration processes and high-temperature chemical reaction processes, to which the new technology is applied. It is also aimed at establishment of advanced combustion control basic technology, required when the high-temperature air combustion technology is applied to these processes. In addition to application R and D efforts for each area, the basic phenomena characteristic of each combustion heater type are elucidated using microgravity and the like, to support the application R and D efforts from the basic side. This project also surveys reduction of environmental pollutants, e.g., NOx and dioxins. This report presents the results obtained in the first year. (NEDO)

  4. Data for modern boilers used in co-combustion; Moderna panndata inom samfoerbraenning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorson, Ola [S.E.P. Scandinavian Energy Project AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2004-04-01

    superheater in an internal circulating fluidized bed, ICFB. The methods for increasing the load range are mainly: Build two boilers in parallel; Increase the refractory lined part of the boiler; Dividing the furnace; Air pre-heating.

  5. Capturing energy from ventilation air methane a preliminary design for a new approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluff, D.L.; Kennedy, G.A.; Bennett, J.G.; Foster, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG), discharged to the atmosphere by coalmining, the natural gas industry and natural biological processes, second only to carbon dioxide; thus, any reduction in atmospheric methane would be globally beneficial. The capture or use of ventilation air methane (VAM) is challenging because it is a high volume low concentration methane source. This results in the routine discharge of methane into the atmosphere. A review of VAM mitigation technologies is provided and the main disadvantages of the existing technologies are discussed. In the proposed VamTurBurner © system, the heat from the combustion chamber is transferred to the preheating zone either by a heat exchanger or by redirecting the combustion products to mix with the ventilation air stream from a coalmine. Gas turbines (GT) are used to produce electricity with the exhaust gases directed to mix with the incoming ventilation airflow. The turbulence introduced by the GT exhaust assists with mixing of the incoming ventilation airflow and the return flow of combustion products from the combustion chamber. The combustion products are a source of heat, which increases the temperature of the incoming ventilation air to a value high enough for the methane to undergo flameless combustion upon encountering the igniters. The high temperature combustion products enter a multi-generation system. The multi-generation system is based on mature engineering technology such as heat exchangers and steam turbines. The residual heat provides additional heat based products such as industrial scale drying, chilling by an absorption chiller or simply hot water. The VamTurBurner © uses the energy from the GT, igniters and VAM to provide clean efficient energy while mitigating the atmospheric emissions of methane. The opportunity to collect carbon credits may improve the economics. Since the VAM is a free energy source, the output of the system is greater than the purchased energy. - Highlights:

  6. Study on the combustion characteristics of a premixed combustion system with exhaust gas recirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Byeonghun; Kum, Sung-Min; Lee, Chang-Eon; Lee, Seungro

    2013-01-01

    The boiler of a premixed combustion system with EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) is investigated to explore the potential for increasing thermal efficiency and lowering pollutant emissions. To achieve this purpose, a thermodynamic analysis is performed to predict the effect of EGR on the thermodynamic efficiency for various equivalence ratios. Experiments of a preheated air condensing boiler with EGR were conducted to measure the changes in the thermal efficiency and the characteristics of the pollutant emission. Finally, a 1-D premixed code was calculated to understand the effect of the EGR method on the NO reduction mechanism. The results of the thermodynamic analysis show that the thermodynamic efficiency is not changed because the temperature and the amount of the exhaust gas are unchanged, even though the EGR method is implemented in the system. However, when the EGR method is used with an equivalence ratio near 1.00, it is experimentally verified that the thermal efficiency increases and the NO x concentration decreases. Based on the results from numerical calculations, it is shown that the NO production rates of N + O 2 ↔ NO + O and N + OH ↔ NO + H are remarkably changed due to the decrease in the flame temperature and the NO mole fraction is decreased. - Highlights: • Premixed combustion system with EGR is studied for a high efficiency and low NO x . • All research is performed with various EGR and equivalence ratios. • It verified that efficiency increases and the NO x emission decreases with EGR method. • NO production rates are remarkably changed by N + O 2 ↔ NO + O and N + OH ↔ NO + H with EGR

  7. Experimental and numerical study of the accuracy of flame-speed measurements for methane/air combustion in a slot burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selle, L.; Ferret, B. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT, Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, Toulouse (France); Poinsot, T. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT, Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, Toulouse (France); CERFACS, Toulouse (France)

    2011-01-15

    Measuring the velocities of premixed laminar flames with precision remains a controversial issue in the combustion community. This paper studies the accuracy of such measurements in two-dimensional slot burners and shows that while methane/air flame speeds can be measured with reasonable accuracy, the method may lack precision for other mixtures such as hydrogen/air. Curvature at the flame tip, strain on the flame sides and local quenching at the flame base can modify local flame speeds and require corrections which are studied using two-dimensional DNS. Numerical simulations also provide stretch, displacement and consumption flame speeds along the flame front. For methane/air flames, DNS show that the local stretch remains small so that the local consumption speed is very close to the unstretched premixed flame speed. The only correction needed to correctly predict flame speeds in this case is due to the finite aspect ratio of the slot used to inject the premixed gases which induces a flow acceleration in the measurement region (this correction can be evaluated from velocity measurement in the slot section or from an analytical solution). The method is applied to methane/air flames with and without water addition and results are compared to experimental data found in the literature. The paper then discusses the limitations of the slot-burner method to measure flame speeds for other mixtures and shows that it is not well adapted to mixtures with a Lewis number far from unity, such as hydrogen/air flames. (author)

  8. Regulating low-NOx and high-burnout deep-air-staging combustion under real-furnace conditions in a 600 MWe down-fired supercritical boiler by strengthening the staged-air effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Min; Wang, Zhihua; Zhu, Yanqun; Ling, Zhongqian; Li, Zhengqi

    2014-10-21

    A 600 MW(e) down-fired pulverized-coal supercritical boiler, which was equipped with a deep-air-staging combustion system for reducing the particularly high NOx emissions, suffered from the well-accepted contradiction between low NOx emissions and high carbon in fly ash, in addition to excessively high gas temperatures in the hopper that jeopardized the boiler's safe operations. Previous results uncovered that under low-NOx conditions, strengthening the staged-air effect by decreasing the staged-air angle and simultaneously increasing the staged-air damper opening alleviated the aforementioned problems to some extent. To establish low-NOx and high-burnout circumstances and control the aforementioned hopper temperatures, a further staged-air retrofit with horizontally redirecting staged air through an enlarged staged-air slot area was performed to greatly strengthen the staged-air effect. Full-load industrial-size measurements were performed to confirm the availability of this retrofit. The present data were compared with those published results before the retrofit. High NOx emissions, low carbon in fly ah, and high hopper temperatures (i.e., levels of 1036 mg/m(3) at 6% O2, 3.72%, and about 1300 °C, respectively) appeared under the original conditions with the staged-air angle of 45° and without overfire air (OFA) application. Applying OFA and reducing the angle to 20° achieved an apparent NOx reduction and a moderate hopper temperature decrease while a sharp increase in carbon in fly ash (i.e., levels of 878 mg/m(3) at 6% O2, about 1200 °C, and 9.81%, respectively). Fortunately, the present staged-air retrofit was confirmed to be applicable in regulating low-NOx, high-burnout, and low hopper temperature circumstances (i.e., levels of 867 mg/m(3) at 6% O2, 5.40%, and about 1100 °C, respectively).

  9. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-08-17

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  10. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  11. Air pollution from wood combustion. Measurements at Elverum, Norway during the winters 1981 and 1982. Luftforurensning fra vedfyring. Maalinger i Elverum, Norge vintrene 1981 og 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramdahl, T; Schjoldager, J; Hanssen, J E; Moeller, M

    1983-01-01

    Ambient sampling and anlysis of air pollutants related to wood combustion have been carried out at the town of Elverum, Norway during the winters of 1981 and 1982. Two measurement sites were selected, Elverum (within the town) and Strandfossen. The concentration of fine particles, PAH and benzene on cold days in Elverum was similar to average winter concentrations in central parts of Oslo. The concentrations in Elverum were highest during a cold period in January, second highest during a cold period in February, and lowest during a mild period between the two cold periods. The same variation was found for mutagenicity. The concentration at the site Elverum was considerably higher than at the site Stranfossen. Organic compounds characteristic of wood smoke have been found in the ambient particulate samples, especially on cold days. The concentration of total particulate carbon and carbon from biomass showed similar variations as fine particles and PAH. The average fraction of carbon from biomass relative to the total carbon concentration was 70 percent, and the fraction was highest on cold days. The average fraction corresponded quite well with an emission estimate of PAH giving an average PAH contribution from wood combustion of 60-70 percent in the winter season. The analyses of lead indicated a contribution of 3-6 percent from gasoline cars to the fine particle concentreration, which corresponds well with the emission estimate of PAH, giving an average PAH contribution from automobile traffic of 4-5 percent in the winter season. The study claerly indicates that the combustion of wood contrubutes significantly to the concentration of air pollutants in Elverum on cold days, especially fine particles, PAH and other carbonaceous compounds.

  12. Long term analysis of the biomass content in the feed of a waste-to-energy plant with oxygen-enriched combustion air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellner, Johann; Cencic, Oliver; Zellinger, Günter; Rechberger, Helmut

    2011-10-01

    Thermal utilization of municipal solid waste and commercial wastes has become of increasing importance in European waste management. As waste materials are generally composed of fossil and biogenic materials, a part of the energy generated can be considered as renewable and is thus subsidized in some European countries. Analogously, CO(2) emissions of waste incinerators are only partly accounted for in greenhouse gas inventories. A novel approach for determining these fractions is the so-called balance method. In the present study, the implementation of the balance method on a waste-to-energy plant using oxygen-enriched combustion air was investigated. The findings of the 4-year application indicate on the one hand the general applicability and robustness of the method, and on the other hand the importance of reliable monitoring data. In particular, measured volume flows of the flue gas and the oxygen-enriched combustion air as well as corresponding O(2) and CO(2) contents should regularly be validated. The fraction of renewable (biogenic) energy generated throughout the investigated period amounted to between 27 and 66% for weekly averages, thereby denoting the variation in waste composition over time. The average emission factor of the plant was approximately 45 g CO(2) MJ(-1) energy input or 450 g CO(2) kg(-1) waste incinerated. The maximum error of the final result was about 16% (relative error), which was well above the error (<8%) of the balance method for plants with conventional oxygen supply.

  13. EPA's Air Quality Rules for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (RICE) and their Application to CHP (Webinar) – June 24, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    This webinar discusses the effect of EPA's air quality regulations on CHP facilities and stationary RICE, and describes how CHP systems can comply with air quality regulations by using stationary RICE.

  14. Ultra-low pollutant emission combustion method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khinkis, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method for ultra-low pollutant emission combustion of fossil fuel. It comprises: introducing into a primary combustion chamber a first fuel portion of about 1 percent to about 20 percent of a total fuel to be combusted; introducing primary combustion air into the primary combustion chamber; introducing a first portion of water into the primary combustion chamber, having a first water heat capacity equivalent to a primary combustion air heat capacity of one of a primary combustion air amount of about 10 percent to about 60 percent of the first stoichiometirc requirement for complete combustion of the first fuel portion and an excess primary combustion air amount of about 20 percent to about 150 percent of the first stoichiometric requirement for complete combustion of the first fuel portion; burning the first fuel portion with the primary combustion air in the primary combustion chamber at a temperature abut 2000 degrees F to about 2700 degrees F producing initial combustion products; passing the initial combustion products into a secondary combustion chamber; introducing into the secondary combustion chamber a second fuel portion of about 80 percent to about 99 percent of the total fuel to be combusted; introducing secondary combustion air into the secondary combustion chamber in an amount of about 105 percent to about 130 percent of a second stoichiometric requirement for complete combustion of the second fuel portion; introducing a second portion of water into the secondary combustion chamber; burning the second fuel portion and any remaining fuel in the initial combustion products; passing the final combustion products into a dilution chamber; introducing dilution air into the dilution chamber; discharging the ultra-low pollutant emission vitiated air form the dilution chamber

  15. Development of a small air-cooled ``midnight sun'' thermophotovoltaic electric generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraas, Lewis M.; Xiang, Huang Han; Hui, She; Ferguson, Luke; Samaras, John; Ballantyne, Russ; Seal, Michael; West, Ed

    1996-02-01

    A natural gas fired thermophotovoltaic generator using infrared-sensitive GaSb cells and a silicon carbide emitter is described. The emitter is designed to operate at 1400 °C. Twelve GaSb receivers surround the emitter. Each receiver contains a string of series connected cells. Special infrared filters are bonded to each cell. These filters transmit short wavelength useful IR to the cells while reflecting longer wavelength IR back to the emitter. Combustion air is supplied to the burner through a counterflow heat exchanger where the air is preheated by the exhaust from the burner. The unit is air cooled and designed to produce approximately 100 Watts of electric power.

  16. A high-pressure plug flow reactor for combustion chemistry investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Zhewen; Cochet, Julien; Leplat, Nicolas; Yang, Yi; Brear, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    A plug flow reactor (PFR) is built for investigating the oxidation chemistry of fuels at up to 50 bar and 1000 K. These conditions include those corresponding to the low temperature combustion (i.e. the autoignition) that commonly occurs in internal combustion engines. Turbulent flow that approximates ideal, plug flow conditions is established in a quartz tube reactor. The reacting mixture is highly diluted by excess air to reduce the reaction rates for kinetic investigations. A novel mixer design is used to achieve fast mixing of the preheated air and fuel vapour at the reactor entrance, reducing the issue of reaction initialization in kinetic modelling. A water-cooled probe moves along the reactor extracting gases for further analysis. Measurement of the sampled gas temperature uses an extended form of a three-thermocouple method that corrects for radiative heat losses from the thermocouples to the enclosed PFR environment. Investigation of the PFR’s operation is first conducted using non-reacting flows, and then with isooctane oxidation at 900 K and 10 bar. Mixing of the non-reacting temperature and species fields is shown to be rapid. The measured fuel consumption and CO formation are then closely reproduced by kinetic modelling using an extensively validated iso-octane mechanism from the literature and the corrected gas temperature. Together, these results demonstrate the PFR’s utility for chemical kinetic investigations. (paper)

  17. A high-pressure plug flow reactor for combustion chemistry investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhewen; Cochet, Julien; Leplat, Nicolas; Yang, Yi; Brear, Michael J.

    2017-10-01

    A plug flow reactor (PFR) is built for investigating the oxidation chemistry of fuels at up to 50 bar and 1000 K. These conditions include those corresponding to the low temperature combustion (i.e. the autoignition) that commonly occurs in internal combustion engines. Turbulent flow that approximates ideal, plug flow conditions is established in a quartz tube reactor. The reacting mixture is highly diluted by excess air to reduce the reaction rates for kinetic investigations. A novel mixer design is used to achieve fast mixing of the preheated air and fuel vapour at the reactor entrance, reducing the issue of reaction initialization in kinetic modelling. A water-cooled probe moves along the reactor extracting gases for further analysis. Measurement of the sampled gas temperature uses an extended form of a three-thermocouple method that corrects for radiative heat losses from the thermocouples to the enclosed PFR environment. Investigation of the PFR’s operation is first conducted using non-reacting flows, and then with isooctane oxidation at 900 K and 10 bar. Mixing of the non-reacting temperature and species fields is shown to be rapid. The measured fuel consumption and CO formation are then closely reproduced by kinetic modelling using an extensively validated iso-octane mechanism from the literature and the corrected gas temperature. Together, these results demonstrate the PFR’s utility for chemical kinetic investigations.

  18. Transient flow combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacina, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Non-steady combustion problems can result from engine sources such as accelerations, decelerations, nozzle adjustments, augmentor ignition, and air perturbations into and out of the compressor. Also non-steady combustion can be generated internally from combustion instability or self-induced oscillations. A premixed-prevaporized combustor would be particularly sensitive to flow transients because of its susceptability to flashback-autoignition and blowout. An experimental program, the Transient Flow Combustion Study is in progress to study the effects of air and fuel flow transients on a premixed-prevaporized combustor. Preliminary tests performed at an inlet air temperature of 600 K, a reference velocity of 30 m/s, and a pressure of 700 kPa. The airflow was reduced to 1/3 of its original value in a 40 ms ramp before flashback occurred. Ramping the airflow up has shown that blowout is more sensitive than flashback to flow transients. Blowout occurred with a 25 percent increase in airflow (at a constant fuel-air ratio) in a 20 ms ramp. Combustion resonance was found at some conditions and may be important in determining the effects of flow transients.

  19. Bruce NGS A Unit 4 preheater divider plate failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landridge, M.; McInnes, D.

    1995-01-01

    On May 19, 1995, without any prior operational indications, Bruce A discovered preheater divider plate damage in Unit 4 that had the potential to have a major impact on the continued safe operation of the station. Further investigations indicated that Unit 4 may have been operating with this damage for as long as ten years. In the two months following the discovery, Bruce A has procured and replaced the 4 divider plates, located most of the missing pieces, retrieved pieces from the PHT system, investigated historical operational information, performed detailed analytical investigations, investigated root cause, performed in-situ and mock-up testing, updated operational procedures and installed DP monitoring equipment

  20. Air pollution from wood combustion. Measurements at Elverum, Norway during the winters 1981 and 1982. Luftforurensning fra vedfyring. Maalinger i Elverum, Norge vintrene 1981 og 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramdahl, T; Schjoldager, J; Hanssen, J E; Moeller, M

    1983-01-01

    Ambient sampling and analysis of air pollutants related to wood combustion have been carried out at the town of Elverum, Norway during the winters of 1981 and 1982. Two measurement sites were selected, Elverum (within the town) and Strandfossen. The concentration of fine particles, PAH and benzene on cold days in Elverum was similar to average winter concentrations in central parts of Oslo. The concentrations in Elverum were highest during a cold period in January, second highest during a cold period in February, and lowest during a mild period between the two cold periods. The same variation was found for mutagenicity. The concentration at the site Elverum was considerably higher than at the site Stranfossen. Organic compounds characteristic of wood smoke have been found in the ambient particulate samples, especially on cold days. The concentration of total particulate carbon and carbon from biomass showed similar variations as fine particles and PAH. The average fraction of carbon from biomass relative to the total carbon concentration was 70 percent, and the fraction was highest on cold days. The average fraction corresponded quite well with an emission estimate of PAH giving an average PAH contribution from wood combustion of 60-70 percent in the winter season. The analyses of lead indicated a contribution of 3-6 percent from gasoline cars to the fine particle concentreration.

  1. Study on thermal comfort, air quality and energy savings using bioenergy via gasification/combustion for space heating of a broiler house

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jadir Nogueira da; Zanatta, Fabio Luiz; Tinoco, Ilda de Fatima F.; Martin, Samuel [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (DEA/UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola], E-mail: jadir@ufv.br; Scholz, Volkhard [Leibniz Institut fuer Agrartechnik- ATB, Potsdam (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The annual production of chicken meat is increasing throughout the world and Brazil is the world leader regarding exportation, a prediction indicates about 2.7 millions tons to be exported in 2007. A key to this performance is the low production costs, however, the costs of space heating necessary during the first 3 weeks of the chick's life and is increasing significantly. For this reason, it is always necessary to search for most efficient systems for this purpose. In addition to that, the use of bioenergy is gaining importance since it is renewable and ecologically correct. A close coupled gasification/combustion system, using eucalyptus firewood (Eucalyptus grandis and/or Eucalyptus urophylla) as fuel, was tested with the objective of providing thermal comfort for the birds during their first 3 weeks after birth. An experiment was set up for this purpose in an industrial scale production facility. The results indicated that the gasification/combustion system is viable for space heating for chicks, does not alters significantly the air quality, regarding CO, CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} concentration inside poultry house, provides the best thermal comfort as compared to indirect fired furnaces and accounts for a 35% energy savings, leading to lower production costs. (author)

  2. The range of ambient air pollution by effluents arising by coal combustion in different types of furnaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konieczynski, J.; Pason, A.; Zelinski, J.

    1994-01-01

    The range of ambient air contamination caused by coal incineration in different furnace types was analysed. Application of the integrated emission coefficient enabled to determine domestic stoves as the main source of air pollutants in Gliwice. (Author). 7 refs, 2 tabs

  3. Fresh fuel pre-heating device in reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Asakuni.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To simplify the structure of a fresh nuclear fuel pre-heating device and improve the reliability to gas supply. Constitution: Fresh fuels taken out from a fresh fuel stredge rack and contained in a fuel strage pipe of a fuel transportation cask are pre-heated at the pre-stage of transfer by sending heating gases from the outside. Gas outlet pipes of the device are led out from the lower portion of the strage pipe, disposed side by side at the top of the strage pipe and opened upwardly. Further, gas supply pipes are connected to the inside of a movable guiding cylinder on the side of the floor surface and the opening end of return pipes are opposed to the exit opening end of the strage pipe. In such a constitution, a gas recycling loop can be formed between the strage pipe and the gas heating device by way of the movable guiding cylinder only by the operation of combining the fuel strage pipe of the transportation cask and the movable guiding pipe disposed on the side of the floor surface. Thus, the coupling structure is facilitated, the connection operation can surely be conducted to improve the reliability as compared with the conventional case. (Horiuchi, T.)

  4. An empirical investigation of air pollution from fossil fuel combustion and its impact on health in India during 1973-1974 to 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Kakali; Forssell, Osmo

    2005-01-01

    Many air pollution studies examine impacts on global climate warming in the future, but impacts on health of population are more actual and concrete. The aim of this paper is to evaluate air pollution (CO 2 , SO 2 , and NO x ) from fossil fuel combustion in India. Input-Output Structural Decomposition Analysis approach is used to find out their sources of changes. We also estimate the emissions of CO 2 , SO 2 and NO x for the year 2001-2002 and 2006-2007. A link between emission of pollutants and their impact on human health is finally analysed. The study categorizes the changes in the amount of CO 2 , SO 2 and NO x emissions into four factors: the pollution intensity or eco-efficiency, technology or input-mix, composition of final demand, and the level of final demand. The main factors for these changes were the pollution intensity, technology, and the volume of final demand. Changes in the pollution intensity and technology were in most periods increasing air pollution. These results are quite different to those observed in some other studies. Pollution and health impacts have a close linear relationship and the main factors for the changes are the same as for the pollution

  5. Detonation cell size measurements in high-temperature hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at the BNL high-temperature combustion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.L.

    1997-11-01

    The High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) was designed and constructed with the objective of studying detonation phenomena in mixtures of hydrogen-air-steam at initially high temperatures. The central element of the HTCF is a 27-cm inner-diameter, 21.3-m long cylindrical test vessel capable of being heating to 700K ± 14K. A unique feature of the HTCF is the 'diaphragmless' acetylene-oxygen gas driver which is used to initiate the detonation in the test gas. Cell size measurements have shown that for any hydrogen-air-steam mixture, increasing the initial mixture temperature, in the range of 300K to 650K, while maintaining the initial pressure of 0.1 MPa, decreases the cell size and thus makes the mixture more detonable. The effect of steam dilution on cell size was tested in stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric (e.g., equivalence ratio of 0.5) hydrogen-air mixtures. Increasing the steam dilution in hydrogen-air mixtures at 0.1 MPa initial pressure increases the cell size, irrespective of initial temperature. It is also observed that the desensitizing effect of steam diminished with increased initial temperature. A 1-dimensional, steady-state Zel'dovich, von Neumann, Doring (ZND) model, with full chemical kinetics, has been used to predict cell size for hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at different initial conditions. Qualitatively the model predicts the overall trends observed in the measured cell size versus mixture composition and initial temperature and pressure. It was found that the proportionality constant used to predict detonation cell size from the calculated ZND model reaction zone varies between 10 and 100 depending on the mixture composition and initial temperature. 32 refs., 35 figs

  6. A Simulation of the Effects of Varying Repetition Rate and Pulse Width of Nanosecond Discharges on Premixed Lean Methane-Air Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Soo Bak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional kinetic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of repetition rate and pulse width of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on stabilizing premixed lean methane-air combustion. The repetition rate and pulse width are varied from 10 kHz to 50 kHz and from 9 ns to 2 ns while the total power is kept constant. The lower repetition rates provide larger amounts of radicals such as O, H, and OH. However, the effect on stabilization is found to be the same for all of the tested repetition rates. The shorter pulse width is found to favor the production of species in higher electronic states, but the varying effects on stabilization are also found to be small. Our results indicate that the total deposited power is the critical element that determines the extent of stabilization over this range of discharge properties studied.

  7. Mock-up tests on the combustion of hydrogen-air mixture in the vertical tube simulating the CNS channel of the CARR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingfeng; Feng Quanke; Kawai, Takeshi; Xu Jian

    2007-01-01

    A two-phase thermo-siphon loop for removing nuclear heating and maintaining the stable liquid level in the moderator cell was adopted for the cold neutron source (CNS) of the China advanced research reactor (CARR). The moderator is liquid hydrogen. The two-phase thermo-siphon loop consists of the crescent-shape moderator cell, the moderator transfer tube, and the condenser. The hydrogen is supplied from the buffer tank to the condenser. The main feature of the loop is that the moderator cell is covered by the helium sub-cooling system. The cold helium gas from the helium refrigerator is firstly introduced into the helium sub-cooling system and then flows up through the tube covering the moderator transfer tube into the condenser. The main part of this system is installed in the CNS vertical channel made of aluminum alloy 6061 T6 (Al-6061-T6) of 6 mm in thickness, 270 mm in outer diameter and about 6 m in height. For confirming the safety of the CNS channel, the combustion tests using a tube compatible with the CNS channel were carried out using the hydrogen-air mixture under which air is introduced into the tube at 1 atmosphere, and then hydrogen gas is supplied from the gas cylinder up to the test pressures. And maximum test pressure is 0.14 MPa G. This condition is involved with the maximum design basis accident of the CARR-CNS. The peak pressure due to combustion was 1.09 MPa, and the design pressure of the CNS channel is 3 MPa. The safety of the CNS was thus verified even if the maximum design basis accident occurs. The pressure and stress distributions along the axial direction and the displacement of the tube were also measured

  8. CATALYTIC COMBUSTION OF METHANE OVER Pt/γ-Al2O3 IN MICRO-COMBUSTOR WITH DETAILED CHEMICAL KINETIC MECHANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUNJIE CHEN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Micro-scale catalytic combustion characteristics and heat transfer processes of preheated methane-air mixtures (φ = 0.4 in the plane channel were investigated numerically with detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms. The plane channel of length L = 10.0 mm, height H =1.0 mm and wall thickness δ = 0.1 mm, which inner horizontal surfaces contained Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst washcoat. The computational results indicate that the presence of the gas phase reactions extends mildly the micro-combustion stability limits at low and moderate inlet velocities due to the strong flames establishment, and have a more profound effect on extending the high-velocity blowout limits by allowing for additional heat release originating mainly from the incomplete CH4 gas phase oxidation in the plane channel. When the same mass flow rate (ρin × Vin is considered, the micro-combustion stability limits at p: 0.1 MPa are much narrower than at p: 0.6 MPa due to both gas phase and catalytic reaction activities decline with decreasing pressure. Catalytic micro-combustor can achieve stable combustion at low solid thermal conductivity ks < 0.1 W∙m-1•K-1, while the micro-combustion extinction limits reach their larger extent for the higher thermal conductivity ks = 20.0-100.0 W∙m-1•K-1. The existence of surface radiation heat transfers significantly effects on the micro-combustion stability limits and micro-combustors energy balance. Finally, gas phase combustion in catalytic micro-combustors can be sustained at the sub-millimeter scale (plane channel height of 0.25 mm.

  9. Influence of declivitous secondary air on combustion characteristics of a down-fired 300-MWe utility boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhengqi Li; Feng Ren; Zhichao Chen; Zhao Chen; Jingjie Wang [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Energy Science and Engineering

    2010-02-15

    Industrial experiments were performed with a 300-MWe full-scale down-fired boiler. New data is reported for (i) gas temperature distributions within the primary air and coal mixture flows, (ii) gas compositions, such as O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2} and NOx, and (iii) gas temperatures within the near-wall region. The data complements previously-obtained data from the same utility boiler before being modified by declination of the F-tier secondary air. By directing secondary air under the arches, the region where the primary air and pulverized coal mixture is ignited is brought forward within the boiler. Gas temperatures rose in the fuel-burning zone and fell in the fuel-burnout zone. As a result the quantity of unburned carbon in fly ash and the gas temperature at the furnace outlet were both lowered. 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Effects of substrate preheating during direct energy deposition on microstructure, hardness, tensile strength, and notch toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Gyeong Yun; Lee, Ki Yong; Park, Sang Hu; Shim, Do Sik

    2017-11-01

    This study examined the effects of substrate preheating for the hardfacing of cold-press dies using the high-speed tool steel AISI M4. The preheating of the substrate is a widely used technique for reducing the degree of thermal deformation and preventing crack formation. We investigated the changes in the metallurgical and mechanical properties of the high-speed tool steel M4 deposited on an AISI D2 substrate with changes in the substrate preheating temperature. Five preheating temperatures (100-500 °C; interval of 100 °C) were selected, and the changes in the temperature of the substrate during deposition were observed. As the preheating temperature of the substrate was increased, the temperature gradient between the melting layer and the substrate decreased; this prevented the formation of internal cracks, owing to thermal stress relief. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy showed that a dendritic structure was formed at the interface between the deposited layer and the substrate while a cellular microstructure was formed in the deposited layer. As the preheating temperature was increased, the sizes of the cells and precipitated carbides also increased. Furthermore, the hardness increased slightly while the strength and toughness decreased. Moreover, the tensile and impact properties deteriorated rapidly at excessively high preheating temperatures (greater than 500 °C). The results of this study can be used as preheating criteria for achieving the desired mechanical properties during the hardfacing of dies and molds.

  11. Reduced chemical kinetic model of detonation combustion of one- and multi-fuel gaseous mixtures with air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, P. A.

    2018-03-01

    Two-step approximate models of chemical kinetics of detonation combustion of (i) one hydrocarbon fuel CnHm (for example, methane, propane, cyclohexane etc.) and (ii) multi-fuel gaseous mixtures (∑aiCniHmi) (for example, mixture of methane and propane, synthesis gas, benzene and kerosene) are presented for the first time. The models can be used for any stoichiometry, including fuel/fuels-rich mixtures, when reaction products contain molecules of carbon. Owing to the simplicity and high accuracy, the models can be used in multi-dimensional numerical calculations of detonation waves in corresponding gaseous mixtures. The models are in consistent with the second law of thermodynamics and Le Chatelier's principle. Constants of the models have a clear physical meaning. The models can be used for calculation thermodynamic parameters of the mixture in a state of chemical equilibrium.

  12. Electrically controlled fuel injection device for internal combustion engines with air quantity meter. Elektrisch gesteuerte Kraftstoffeinspritzeinrichtung fuer Brennkraftmaschinen mit Luftmengenmesser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, B; Soell, W

    1980-12-11

    The invention concerns an electrically controlled preferably intermittently working fuel injection device for internal combustion engines with a throttle valve, a solenoid operated injection valve and a transistor circuit, which supplies electrical pulses used to open the injection valve synchronously to the revolution of the crankshaft. The invention is characterized by the fact that an electrical control device is provided, which extends the individual opening pulses in thrust operation (with the throttle valve closed or nearly closed and with a working speed above the speed). The extension produced by the control device decreases from a value at about 20% for the maximum speed to a value of 0 for the tickover speed. Details of the transistor control are made clear by detailed circuit diagrams and 5 patent claims.

  13. Reducing residential solid fuel combustion through electrified space heating leads to substantial air quality, health and climate benefits in China's Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Mauzerall, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    public health benefits of using electrified space heating. In particular, we find air source heat pumps could bring more climate and health benefits than direct resistance heaters. Our results also support policies to integrate renewable energy sources with the reduction of solid fuel combustion for residential space heating.

  14. Combustion from basics to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lackner, Maximilian; Winter, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Combustion, the process of burning, is defined as a chemical reaction between a combustible reactant (the fuel) and an oxidizing agent (such as air) in order to produce heat and in most cases light while new chemical species (e.g., flue gas components) are formed. This book covers a gap on the market by providing a concise introduction to combustion. Most of the other books currently available are targeted towards the experienced users and contain too many details and/or contain knowledge at a fairly high level. This book provides a brief and clear overview of the combustion basics, suitable f

  15. Reheating the D-brane universe via instant preheating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panda, Sudhakar; Sami, M.; Thongkool, I.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate a possibility of reheating in a scenario of D-brane inflation in a warped deformed conifold background which includes perturbative corrections to throat geometry sourced by a chiral operator of dimension 3/2 in the conformal field theory. The effective D-brane potential, in this case, belongs to the class of nonoscillatory models of inflation for which the conventional reheating mechanism does not work. We find that gravitational particle production is inefficient and leads to reheating temperature of the order of 10 8 GeV. We show that instant preheating is quite suitable to the present scenario and can easily reheat the universe to a temperature which is higher by about 3 orders of magnitude than its counterpart associated with gravitational particle production. The reheating temperature is shown to be insensitive to a particular choice of inflationary parameters suitable to observations.

  16. Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Craig D [Rochester Hills, MI; Reitz, Rolf D [Madison, WI

    2003-12-30

    During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

  17. Combustion 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

    2001-06-30

    . To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization

  18. Environmental control implications of generating electric power from coal. 1977 technology status report. Appendix D. Assessment of NO/sub x/ control technology for coal fired utility boilers. [Low-excess-air, staged combustion, flu gas recirculation and burner design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    An NOx control technology assessment study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of low-excess-air firing, staged combustion, flue gas recirculation, and current burner/boiler designs as applied to coal-fired utility boilers. Significant variations in NOx emissions exist with boiler type, firing method, and coal type, but a relative comparison of emissions control performance, cost, and operational considerations is presented for each method. The study emphasized the numerous operational factors that are of major importance to the user in selecting and implementing a combustion modification technique. Staged combustion and low-excess-air operation were identified as the most cost-effective methods for existing units. Close control of local air/fuel ratios and rigorous combustion equipment maintenance are essential to the success of both methods. Flue gas recirculation is relatively ineffective and has the added concern of tube erosion. More research is needed to resolve potential corrosion concerns with low-NOx operating modes. Low-NOx burners in conjunction with a compartmentalized windbox are capable of meeting a 0.6-lb/million Btu emission level on new units. Advanced burner designs are being developed to meet research emission goals of approximately 0.25 lb/MBtu.

  19. CIRCULATING MOVING BED COMBUSTION PROOF OF CONCEPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jukkola, Glen

    2010-06-30

    Circulating Moving Bed (CMB) combustion technology has its roots in traditional circulating fluidized bed technology and involves a novel method of solid fuel combustion and heat transfer. CMB technology represents a step change in improved performance and cost relative to conventional PC and FBC boilers. The CMB heat exchanger preheats the energy cycle working fluid, steam or air, to the high temperature levels required in systems for advanced power generation. Unique features of the CMB are the reduction of the heat transfer surfaces by about 60% as a result of the enhanced heat transfer rates, flexibility of operation, and about 30% lower cost over existing technology. The CMB Phase I project ran from July 2001 through March 2003. Its objective was to continue development of the CMB technology with a series of proof of concept tests. The tests were conducted at a scale that provided design data for scale up to a demonstration plant. These objectives were met by conducting a series of experiments in ALSTOM Power’s Multi-use Test Facility (MTF). The MTF was modified to operate under CMB conditions of commercial interest. The objective of the tests were to evaluate gas-to-solids heat transfer in the upper furnace, assess agglomeration in the high temperature CMB bubbling bed, and evaluate solids-to-tube heat transfer in the moving bed heat exchanger. The Phase I program results showed that there are still some significant technical uncertainties that needed to be resolved before the technology can be confidently scaled up for a successful demonstration plant design. Work remained in three primary areas: • scale up of gas to solid heat transfer • high temperature finned surface design • the overall requirements of mechanical and process design. The CMB Phase II workscope built upon the results of Phase I and specifically addressed the remaining technical uncertainties. It included a scaled MTF heat transfer test to provide the necessary data to scale up gas

  20. Numerical study with experimental comparison of pressure waves in the air intake system of an internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcao, Carlos E.G.; Vielmo, Horacio A. [Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Mechanical Engineering Dept.], E-mails: vielmoh@mecanica.ufrgs.br; Hanriot, Sergio M. [Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais (PUC-Minas), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Mechanical Engineering Dept.], E-mail: hanriot@pucminas.br

    2010-07-01

    The work investigates the pressure waves behavior in the intake system of an internal combustion engine. For the purpose of examining this problem, it was chosen an experimental study in order to validate the results of the present simulation. At the literature there are several experimental studies, and some numerical simulations, but the most of the numerical studies treat the problem only in one dimension in practical problems, or two dimensions in specific problems. Using a CFD code it is possible to analyze more complex systems, including tridimensional effects. The pulsating phenomenon is originated from the periodic movement of the intake valve, and produces waves that propagate within the system. The intake system studied was composed by a straight pipe connected to a 1000 cc engine with a single operating cylinder. The experiments were carried out in a flow bench. In the present work, the governing equations was discretized by Finite Volumes Method with an explicit formulation, and the time integration was made using the multi-stage Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme. The solution is independent of mesh or time step. The numerical analysis presents a good agreement with the experimental results. (author)

  1. Combustion engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ragland, Kenneth W

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Combustion Engineering The Nature of Combustion Combustion Emissions Global Climate Change Sustainability World Energy Production Structure of the Book   Section I: Basic Concepts Fuels Gaseous Fuels Liquid Fuels Solid Fuels Problems Thermodynamics of Combustion Review of First Law Concepts Properties of Mixtures Combustion StoichiometryChemical EnergyChemical EquilibriumAdiabatic Flame TemperatureChemical Kinetics of CombustionElementary ReactionsChain ReactionsGlobal ReactionsNitric Oxide KineticsReactions at a Solid SurfaceProblemsReferences  Section II: Combustion of Gaseous and Vaporized FuelsFlamesLaminar Premixed FlamesLaminar Flame TheoryTurbulent Premixed FlamesExplosion LimitsDiffusion FlamesGas-Fired Furnaces and BoilersEnergy Balance and EfficiencyFuel SubstitutionResidential Gas BurnersIndustrial Gas BurnersUtility Gas BurnersLow Swirl Gas BurnersPremixed-Charge Engine CombustionIntroduction to the Spark Ignition EngineEngine EfficiencyOne-Zone Model of Combustion in a Piston-...

  2. Gas turbines with complete continuous combustion of the fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, C

    1976-10-21

    The invention concerns a gas turbine plant with complete continuous combustion of the fuel. The fuel is taken to a gas generator in which the preheated fuel is catalytically converted at high temperature in a fuel mixture using an oxygen carrier. Heating of the fuel takes place in a heat exchanger which is situated in the outlet pipe of the turbine. The efficiency is increased and the emission of noxious gas is kept as low as possible using the heat exchanger as a fuel evaporator and by using part of the waste formed in the combustion chamber to carry oxygen to the gas generator via an outlet pipe.

  3. A comparative thermodynamic, economic and risk analysis concerning implementation of oxy-combustion power plants integrated with cryogenic and hybrid air separation units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorek-Osikowska, Anna; Bartela, Łukasz; Kotowicz, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Mathematical model of an integrated oxy-combustion power plant. • Comparison of a hybrid membrane–cryogenic oxygen generation plant with a cryogenic plant. • Thermodynamic analysis of the modeled cases of the plant. • Comparative economic analysis of the power plant with cryogenic and hybrid ASU. • Comparative risk analysis using a Monte Carlo method and sensitivity analysis. - Abstract: This paper presents a comparison of two types of oxy-combustion power plant that differ from each other in terms of the method of oxygen separation. For the purpose of the analysis, detailed thermodynamic models of oxy-fuel power plants with gross power of approximately 460 MW were built. In the first variant (Case 1), the plant is integrated with a cryogenic air separation unit (ASU). In the second variant (Case 2), the plant is integrated with a hybrid membrane–cryogenic installation. The models were built and optimized using the GateCycle, Aspen Plus and Aspen Custom Modeller software packages and with the use of our own computational codes. The results of the thermodynamic evaluation of the systems, which primarily uses indicators such as the auxiliary power and efficiencies of the whole system and of the individual components that constitute the unit, are presented. Better plant performance is observed for Case 2, which has a net efficiency of electricity generation that is 1.1 percentage points greater than that of Case 1. For the selected structure of the system, an economic analysis of the solutions was made. This analysis accounts for different scenarios of the functioning of the Emission Trading Scheme and includes detailed estimates of the investment costs in both cases. As an indicator of profitability, the break-even price of electricity was used primarily. The results of the analysis for the assumptions made are presented in this paper. A system with a hybrid air separation unit has slightly better economic performance. The break-even price

  4. Powertrain preheating system of tracked hybrid electric vehicle in cold weather

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Yichun; Feng, Chaoqing; Zhang, Xilong

    2015-01-01

    In order to make sure that the heavy duty tracked vehicle can work in various conditions, especially severe cold weather, preheating system of powertrain should be adopted, and a novel preheating system is presented for the tracked hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) in which heat is generated by the low-speed drive motor. The new preheating system can meet the need of cold start without adding any additional device. The characteristic of heat generation by motor is tested when the rotor of motor is rotated in very low speed. The heat loss from power cabin to external environment has been simulated, and the relevant test has been done to verify the simulation results. Combining the characteristic of heat generation and heat loss situation about preheating system, the heat transfer model of preheating system was implemented by MATLAB. The total energy required for preheating in different ambient temperature was calculated by this model. The results showed that: the minimum heating power was 70 kW and energy required was about 180 MJ when the HEV worked in −46 °C. If lithium ferrous phosphate (LFP) battery was used in power system, the minimum battery capacity is about 290 A h. - Highlights: • A novel preheating method was proposed for heavy duty tracked HEV. • Thermal energy in preheating system is produced by the PMSM in driving system. • This method can achieve preheating target by its own components without any adding. • Analyzing low temperature performance of power battery and select its capacity.

  5. Preliminary studies of using preheated carrier gas for on-line membrane extraction of semivolatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyu; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, we present results for the on-line determination of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in air using membrane extraction with a sorbent interface-ion mobility spectrometry (MESI-IMS) system with a preheated carrier (stripping) gas. The mechanism of the mass transfer of SVOCs across a membrane was initially studied. In comparison with the extraction of volatile analytes, the mass transfer resistance that originated from the slow desorption from the internal membrane surface during the SVOC extraction processes should be taken into account. A preheated carrier gas system was therefore built to facilitate desorption of analytes from the internal membrane surface. With the benefit of a temperature gradient existing between the internal and external membrane surfaces, an increase in the desorption rate of a specific analyte at the internal surface and the diffusion coefficient within the membrane could be achieved while avoiding a decrease of the distribution constant on the external membrane interface. This technique improved both the extraction rate and response times of the MESI-IMS system for the analysis of SVOCs. Finally, the MESI-IMS system was shown to be capable of on-site measurement by monitoring selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons emitted from cigarette smoke.

  6. Measurement of preheat in aluminium target in indirect drive using the SGIII prototype facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, C; Zheng, J; Wang, Z B; Liu, H; Peng, X S; Wang, F; Ding, Y K

    2016-01-01

    The velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) is used to demonstrate preheat effect in aluminium in indirect drive. The rear surface motion prior to shock front was observed and compared with a multi-group calculation. By properly adjusting the hard x-ray portion of the radiation source, the calculated rear surface motion fits well with the experimental results, which gives us confidence to predict the preheated temperature of the sample by hard x-rays. Further, the effect of hohlraum geometry is compared and discussed experimentally. The result suggests gas-filled hohlraum or hohlraum with low Z substrates should be considered to further reduce preheating. (paper)

  7. Effect of pre-heat treatment on a Fischer-Tropsch iron catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.E.; Ganguly, B.; Mahajan, V.; Huffman, G.P.; Davis, B.; O'Brien, R.J.; Xu Liguang; Rao, V.U.S.

    1994-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to investigate the effect of heating the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/24 SiO 2 in two different atmospheres while ramping the temperature of the catalyst from room temperature to 280 C in 5.5 h prior to pretreatment of the catalyst. Preheating in H 2 /CO = 0.7 gave rise to an iron (Fe 2+ ) silicate, while preheating in helium resulted in the formation of ε'-carbide Fe 2.2 C. Iron oxides and χ-carbide Fe 5 C 2 were also formed in both preheat treatments. (orig.)

  8. Calculation and design of natural gas preheater equipments. Berechnung und Auslegung von Erdgas-Vorwaermeanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasold, H G [Ruhrgas AG, Essen (Germany); Wahle, H N [Ruhrgas AG, Essen (Germany)

    1994-04-01

    A greatly simplified model of a regulating station - consisting of the station components ''preheater'' and ''control unit'' - is used for the calculation and design of natural gas preheating plants. It is hereby possible to calculate the Joule-Thomson effect which occurs on the expansion of natural gas in the controller, the resulting drop in temperature and the thermal output required to compensate this which is to be supplied to the gas flow by the preheating plant. The calculation method and procedure are explained using a programming flowchart. The computational model presented was converted into a personal computer program, whose functioning is elucidated using a numerical example. (orig.)

  9. Influence of transport from urban sources and domestic biomass combustion on the air quality of a mountain area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracchini, Francesco; Romagnoli, Paola; Paciucci, Lucia; Vichi, Francesca; Imperiali, Andrea; Paolini, Valerio; Liotta, Flavia; Cecinato, Angelo

    2017-02-01

    The environmental influence of biomass burning for civil uses was investigated through the determination of several air toxicants in the town of Leonessa and its surroundings, in the mountain region of central Italy. Attention was focussed on PM 10 , polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and regulated gaseous pollutants (nitrogen dioxide, ozone and benzene). Two in-field campaigns were carried out during the summer 2012 and the winter 2013. Contemporarily, air quality was monitored in Rome and other localities of Lazio region. In the summer, all pollutants, with the exception of ozone, were more abundant in Rome. On the other hand, in the winter, PAH concentration was higher in Leonessa (15.8 vs. 7.0 ng/m 3 ), while PM 10 was less concentrated (22 vs. 34 μg/m 3 ). Due to lack of other important sources and to limited impact of vehicle traffic, biomass burning was identified as the major PAH source in Leonessa during the winter. This hypothesis was confirmed by PAH molecular signature of PM 10 (i.e. concentration diagnostic ratios and 206 ion mass trace in the chromatograms). A similar phenomenon (i.e. airborne particulate levels similar to those of the capital city but higher PAH loads) was observed in other locations of the province, suggesting that uncontrolled biomass burning contributed to pollution across the Rome metropolitan area.

  10. Experimental study on a comparison of typical premixed combustible gas-air flame propagation in a horizontal rectangular closed duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kaiqiang; Duan, Qiangling; Liew, K M; Peng, Zhongjing; Gong, Liang; Sun, Jinhua

    2017-04-05

    Research surrounding premixed flame propagation in ducts has a history of more than one hundred years. Most previous studies focus on the tulip flame formation and flame acceleration in pure gas fuel-air flame. However, the premixed natural gas-air flame may show different behaviors and pressure dynamics due to its unique composition. Natural gas, methane and acetylene are chosen here to conduct a comparison study on different flame behaviors and pressure dynamics, and to explore the influence of different compositions on premixed flame dynamics. The characteristics of flame front and pressure dynamics are recorded using high-speed schlieren photography and a pressure transducer, respectively. The results indicate that the compositions of the gas mixture greatly influence flame behaviors and pressure. Acetylene has the fastest flame tip speed and the highest pressure, while natural gas has a faster flame tip speed and higher pressure than methane. The Bychkov theory for predicting the flame skirt motion is verified, and the results indicate that the experimental data coincide well with theory in the case of equivalence ratios close to 1.00. Moreover, the Bychkov theory is able to predict flame skirt motion for acetylene, even outside of the best suitable expansion ratio range of 6

  11. Modeling and simulating combustion and generation of NOx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaroiu, Gheorghe

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the modeling and simulation of combustion processes and generation of NO x in a combustion chamber and boiler, with supplementary combustion in a gas turbine installation. The fuel burned in the combustion chamber was rich gas with a chemical composition more complex than natural gas. Pitcoal was used in the regenerative boiler. From the resulting combustion products, 17 compounds were retained, including nitrogen and sulphur compounds. Using the developed model, the simulation resulted in excess air for a temperature imposed at the combustion chamber exhaust. These simulations made it possible to determine the concentrations of combustion compounds with a variation in excess combustion. (author)

  12. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2017-03-28

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON = 46). The motored pressure at TDC is maintained at 35 bar and fuelMEP is kept constant at 5.1 bar to account for the difference in fuel properties between naphtha and diesel. Single injection strategy is employed and the fuel is injected at a pressure of 800 bar. Photron FASTCAM SA4 that captures in-cylinder combustion at the rate of 10000 frames per second is employed. The captured high speed video is processed to study the combustion homogeneity based on an algorithm reported in previous studies. Starting from late fuel injection timings, combustion stratification is investigated by advancing the fuel injection timings. For late start of injection (SOI), a direct link between SOI and combustion phasing is noticed. At early SOI, combustion phasing depends on both intake air temperature and SOI. In order to match the combustion phasing (CA50) of diesel, the intake air temperature is increased to 90°C for naphtha. The combustion stratification from CI to PPC is also investigated for various level of dilution by displacing oxygen with nitrogen in the intake. The start of combustion (SOC) was delayed with the increase in dilution and to compensate for this, the intake air temperature is increased. The mixture homogeneity is enhanced for higher dilution due to longer ignition delay. The results show that high speed image is initially blue and then turned yellow, indicating soot formation and oxidation. The luminosity of combustion images decreases with early SOI and increased dilution. The images are processed to generate the level of stratification based on the image intensity. The level of stratification is same for diesel and naphtha at various SOI. When O concentration in the intake is decreased to 17.7% and 14

  13. Analysis of an integrated cryogenic air separation unit, oxy-combustion carbon dioxide power cycle and liquefied natural gas regasification process by exergoeconomic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrpooya, Mehdi; Zonouz, Masood Jalali

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Exergoeconomic analyses is done on an integrated cryogenic air separation unit. • Liquefied natural gas cold energy is used in the process. • The main multi stream heat exchanger is the worst device based on the results. - Abstract: Exergoeconomic and sensitivity analyses are performed on the integrated cryogenic air separation unit, oxy-combustion Carbon dioxide power cycle and liquefied natural gas regasification process. Exergy destruction, exergy efficiency, cost rate of exergy destruction, cost rate of capital investment and operating and maintenance, exergoeconomic factor and relative cost difference have been calculated for the major components of the process. The exergy efficiency of the process is around 67.1% and after mixers, tees, tank and expansion valves the multi-stream heat exchanger H-3 have the best exergy efficiency among all process components. Total exergy destruction rate of the process is 1.93 × 10"7 kW. Results of exergoeconomic analysis demonstrates that maximum exergy destruction and capital investment operating and maintenance cost rate are related to the multi-stream heat exchanger H-1 and pump P-1 with the values of 335,144 ($/h) and 12,838 ($/h), respectively. In the sensitivity analysis section the effects of the varying economic parameters, such as interest rate and plant life time are investigated on the trend of the capital investment operating and maintenance cost rate of the major components of the process and in another cases the effect of the gas turbine isentropic efficiency on the exergy and exergoeconomic parameters are studied.

  14. Ways to achieve optimum utilization of waste gas heat in cement kiln plants with cyclone preheaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbiss, E

    1986-02-01

    Kiln exit gases and the exhaust gases from clinker coolers often cannot be fully utilized in drying plants. In such cases a part of the heat content of the gases should be utilized for water heating. In addition, it is possible to utilize the waste gas heat in conventional steam boilers, with which, depending on design, it is possible to generate electricity at a rate of between 10-30 kWh/t (net output). A new and promising method of utilization of waste gas heat is provided by precalcining systems with bypass, in which up to 100% of the kiln exit gases can be economically bypassed and be utilized in a steam boiler, without requiring any cooling. A development project, already started, gives information on the operational behaviour of such a plant and on the maximum energy recoverable. Alternatively, the bypass gases may, after partial cooling with air or preheater exit gas, be dedusted and then utilized in a grinding/drying plant. Furthermore, they can be used in the cement grinding process for the drying of wet granulated blastfurnace slag or other materials. For this it is not necessary to dedust the bypass gases.

  15. Useful work and the thermal efficiency in the ideal Lenolr cycle with regenerative preheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Demos P.

    2000-11-01

    In the existing thermal engine concepts negative work transfer (usually needed to drive a compression process) is supplied by the work produced by the engine itself. The remaining difference (i.e., the net work transfer) becomes the useful work, since it is available for external consumption. The thermal efficiency is the parameter that compares this against the heat input into the system. It forms the main optimization parameter in any engine design. The objective of the present study is to show that for the case of the Lenoir cycle with regenerative preheating the entire positive work is available for external consumption, since the negative (i.e., the compression) work is supplied by the atmospheric air. Not only this, but, during the compression process and due to the pressure difference across the two sides of the moving piston, an additional (useful) work transfer may be generated. Thus, the proposed power plant may be considered as a combination of a thermal engine and a wind turbine. In the ideal cycle limit (at least), the total amount of useful work exceeds the heat entering the system. This leads to the definition of a new parameter for the efficiency (called the technical efficiency), which compares the combined positive work transfer (i.e., the useful one) against the heat entering the system and which may exceed the 100% level.

  16. Demonstration of Air-Power-Assist Engine Technology for Clean Combustion and Direct Energy Recovery in Heavy Duty Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyungsuk Kang; Chun Tai

    2010-05-01

    The first phase of the project consists of four months of applied research, starting from September 1, 2005 and was completed by December 31, 2005. During this time, the project team heavily relied on highly detailed numerical modeling techniques to evaluate the feasibility of the APA technology. Specifically, (i) A GT-Power{sup TM}engine simulation model was constructed to predict engine efficiency at various operating conditions. Efficiency was defined based on the second-law thermodynamic availability. (ii) The engine efficiency map generated by the engine simulation was then fed into a simplified vehicle model, which was constructed in the Matlab/Simulink environment, to predict fuel consumption of a refuse truck on a simple collection cycle. (iii) Design and analysis work supporting the concept of retrofitting an existing Sturman Industries Hydraulic Valve Actuation (HVA) system with the modifications that are required to run the HVA system with Air Power Assist functionality. A Matlab/Simulink model was used to calculate the dynamic response of the HVA system. Computer aided design (CAD) was done in Solidworks for mechanical design and hydraulic layout. At the end of Phase I, 11% fuel economy improvement was predicted. During Phase II, the engine simulation group completed the engine mapping work. The air handling group made substantial progress in identifying suppliers and conducting 3D modelling design. Sturman Industries completed design modification of the HVA system, which was reviewed and accepted by Volvo Powertrain. In Phase II, the possibility of 15% fuel economy improvement was shown with new EGR cooler design by reducing EGR cooler outlet temperature with APA engine technology from Air Handling Group. In addition, Vehicle Simulation with APA technology estimated 4 -21% fuel economy improvement over a wide range of driving cycles. During Phase III, the engine experimental setup was initiated at VPTNA, Hagerstown, MD. Air Handling system and HVA

  17. Numerical study of methanol–steam reforming and methanol–air catalytic combustion in annulus reactors for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chein, Reiyu; Chen, Yen-Cho; Chung, J.N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Performance of mini-scale integrated annulus reactors for hydrogen production. ► Flow rates fed to combustor and reformer control the reactor performance. ► Optimum performance is found from balance of flow rates to combustor and reformer. ► Better performance can be found when shell side is designed as combustor. -- Abstract: This study presents the numerical simulation on the performance of mini-scale reactors for hydrogen production coupled with liquid methanol/water vaporizer, methanol/steam reformer, and methanol/air catalytic combustor. These reactors are designed similar to tube-and-shell heat exchangers. The combustor for heat supply is arranged as the tube or shell side. Based on the obtained results, the methanol/air flow rate through the combustor (in terms of gas hourly space velocity of combustor, GHSV-C) and the methanol/water feed rate to the reformer (in terms of gas hourly space velocity of reformer, GHSV-R) control the reactor performance. With higher GHSV-C and lower GHSV-R, higher methanol conversion can be achieved because of higher reaction temperature. However, hydrogen yield is reduced and the carbon monoxide concentration is increased due to the reversed water gas shift reaction. Optimum reactor performance is found using the balance between GHSV-C and GHSV-R. Because of more effective heat transfer characteristics in the vaporizer, it is found that the reactor with combustor arranged as the shell side has better performance compared with the reactor design having the combustor as the tube side under the same operating conditions.

  18. arXiv Gravitational wave production from preheating -- parameter dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Figueroa, Daniel G.

    2017-10-31

    Parametric resonance is among the most efficient phenomena generating gravitational waves (GWs) in the early Universe. The dynamics of parametric resonance, and hence of the GWs, depend exclusively on the resonance parameter q. The latter is determined by the properties of each scenario: the initial amplitude and potential curvature of the oscillating field, and its coupling to other species. Previous works have only studied the GW production for fixed value(s) of q. We present an analytical derivation of the GW amplitude dependence on q, valid for any scenario, which we confront against numerical results. By running lattice simulations in an expanding grid, we study for a wide range of q values, the production of GWs in post-inflationary preheating scenarios driven by parametric resonance. We present simple fits for the final amplitude and position of the local maxima in the GW spectrum. Our parametrization allows to predict the location and amplitude of the GW background today, for an arbitrary q. The GW si...

  19. Low cost bare-plate solar air collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maag, W. L.; Wenzler, C. J.; Rom, F. E.; Vanarsdale, D. R.

    1980-09-01

    A low cost, bare plate solar collector for preheating ambient air was developed. This type of solar heating system would be applicable for preheating ventilation air for public buildings or other commercial and industrial ventilation requirements. Two prototype collectors were designed, fabricated and installed into an instrumented test system. Tests were conducted for a period of five months. Results of the tests showed consistent operating efficiencies of 60 percent or greater with air preheat temperature uses up to 20 degrees for one of the prototypes. The economic analyses indicated that this type of solar system was economically viable. For the materials of construction and the type of fabrication and installation perceived, costs for the bare plate solar collector are attainable. Applications for preheating ventilation air for schools were evaluated and judged to be economically viable.

  20. Some Factors Affecting Combustion in an Internal-Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, A M; Cohn, Mildred

    1936-01-01

    An investigation of the combustion of gasoline, safety, and diesel fuels was made in the NACA combustion apparatus under conditions of temperature that permitted ignition by spark with direct fuel injection, in spite of the compression ratio of 12.7 employed. The influence of such variables as injection advance angle, jacket temperature, engine speed, and spark position was studied. The most pronounced effect was that an increase in the injection advance angle (beyond a certain minimum value) caused a decrease in the extent and rate of combustion. In almost all cases combustion improved with increased temperature. The results show that at low air temperatures the rates of combustion vary with the volatility of the fuel, but that at high temperatures this relationship does not exist and the rates depend to a greater extent on the chemical nature of the fuel.

  1. Preheat-induced signal enhancement in the infrared stimulated luminescence of young and bleached sediment samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, C.A.

    2000-01-01

    Natural and laboratory bleached surface and young samples of potassium feldspar sand separates and polymineral silt had their infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signal measured before and after preheating at 220 deg. C for 10 min or 160 deg. C for 16 h. For both preheats, the laboratory bleached sand samples underwent a signal enhancement which was stable with laboratory storage. The youngest samples also showed natural signal enhancement. The silt sample showed no recuperation of bleached signal on preheating, but some in the natural signal. A range of filtered bleaches was applied to one surface sand sample. Signal levels before and after preheating were reduced by filtering out the UV from the bleaching spectrum. The unfiltered bleach, however, most closely reproduced the behaviour of the natural sample

  2. Reducing air pollution from electricity-generating large combustion plants in the European Union. An assessment of potential emission reductions of NO{sub X}, SO{sub 2} and dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodewijks, P.; Pieper, H.; Van Wortswinkel, L. [ETC partner Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO) (Belgium); Boyce, B.; Adams, M.; Goossens, E. [EEA, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-06-15

    An assessment of potential emission reductions of NO{sub X}, SO{sub 2} and dust - This report presents an assessment of the hypothetical emission reduction potential of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and dust from more than 1 500 of Europe's large combustion plants that operated in 2009. Emissions of these air pollutants could be significantly lower if all plants were to meet the emission limit values as set out in European Union legislation. (Author)

  3. Improved combustion performance of waste-fired FB-boilers -The influence of the dynamics of the bed on the air-/fuel interaction; Foerbaettrad foerbraenningsprestanda vid avfallsfoerbraenning i FB-pannor -Baeddynamikens inverkan paa luft-/braensleomblandningen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Johanna (Hoegskolan i Boraas (Sweden)); Pallares, David; Thunman, Henrik; Johnsson, Filip (Chalmers (Sweden)); Andersson, Bengt-Aake (E.on/Hoegskolan i Boraas (Sweden)); Victoren, Anders (Metso Power AB (Sweden)); Johansson, Andreas (SP, Boraas (Sweden))

    2010-07-01

    One of the key benefits of fluidized bed combustion is that the bed - through mixing of fuel and air and accumulated heat - facilitates combustion at low stoichiometry and with low emissions. Even so, it is not unusual that waste-fired FB-boilers are operated at 6-8% oxygen that corresponds to 30-40% higher flows of gas than theoretically needed. In addition to that and in comparison to grate furnaces, FB-boiler can cause high pressure drop losses because of the fluidization of the bottom bed, which in turn are associated with high costs for power (fans). This work aims therefore at increasing the knowledge for how the dynamics of the bed affects the air and fuel mixture. Methods to explain and characterize the phenomenon have been derived within this work showing: - Distribution of air in a bed for various cases and the influence of pressure drop, bed height and fluidization velocity - A semi-empiric method to calculate an even bubble distribution - The relation between fluidization and fuel distribution for various fluidization flows and fuels - Dispersion rates for various fuels - Volatilization rates for waste in relation to biomass The result can be useful when optimizing units, for instance through finding as low pressure drops as possible with an even bubble distribution, low risk for sintering and unwanted emissions. The work has thereby reached its ultimate goal of increasing the generic knowledge about waste combustion in FB-boiler

  4. Microwave pre-heating of natural rubber using a rectangular wave guide (MODE: TE10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doo-ngam, N.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an application of microwave radiation for pre-heating of natural rubbercompounding with various sulphur contents. The natural rubber-compounding was pre-heated by microwave radiation using a rectangular wave guide system (MODE: TE10 operating at frequency of 2.45 GHz in which the power can vary from 0 to 1500 W. In the present work, the influence of power input, sample thickness, and sulphur content were examined after applying microwave radiation to the rubber samples. Results are discussed regarding the thermal properties, 3-D network, dielectric properties and chemical structures. From the result, firstly, it was found that microwave radiation can be applied to pre-heating natural rubber-compounding before the vulcanization process. Secondly, microwave radiation was very useful for pre-heating natural rubber-compounding that has a thickness greater than 5mm. Thirdly, crosslinking in natural rubber-compounding may occurs after pre-heating by microwave radiation though Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy(FTIR. Finally, there a little effect of sulphur content on temperature profiles after applying microwave radiation to the natural rubber-compounding. Moreover, natural rubber-compounding without carbon black showed a lower heat absorption compared with natural rubbercompounding filled carbon black. This is due to the difference in dielectric loss factor. This preliminary result will be useful information in terms of microwave radiation for pre-heating natural rubber-compounding and rubber processing in industry.

  5. Large eddy simulation of premixed and non-premixed combustion in a Stagnation Point Reverse Flow combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undapalli, Satish

    some ad hoc adjustments to account these effects accurately (TF). The results from LEMLES, using a reduced chemical mechanism, have been analyzed in the premixed mode. The results show that mass entrainment occurs along the shear layer in the combustor. The entrained mass carries products into the reactant stream and provides reactant preheating. Thus, product entrainment enhances the reaction rates and help stabilize the flame even at very lean conditions. These products have been shown to enter into the flame through local extinction zones present on the flame surface. The flame structure has been further analyzed, and the combustion mode was found to be primarily in thin reaction zones. Closer to the injector, there are isolated regions, where the combustion mode is in broken reaction zones, while the downstream flame structure is closer to a flamelet regime. The emissions in the combustor have been studied using simple global mechanisms for NO x. Computations have shown extremely low NOx values, comparable to the measured emissions. These low emissions have been shown to be primarily due to the low temperatures in the combustor. LEMLES computations have also been performed with a detailed chemistry to capture more accurate flame structure. The flame in the detailed chemistry case shows more extinction zones close to the injector than that in the reduced chemical mechanism. The LEMLES approach has also been used to resolve the combustion mode in the non-premixed case. The studies have indicated that the mixing of the fuel and air close to the injector controls the combustion process. The predictions in the near field have been shown to be very sensitive to the inflow conditions. Analysis has shown that the fuel and air mixing occurs to lean proportions in the combustor before any burning takes place. The flame structure in the non-premixed mode was very similar to the premixed mode. Along with the fuel air mixing, the products also mixed with the reactants and

  6. Air pollutants conversion study of combustion gas generating by oil fueled thermoelectric power plant to fertilizer byproduct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Omar Fernandes

    2001-01-01

    This study concerns the development and application of a SO 2 and NO x simultaneous gas treatment through a 135 MW electron beam flue gas treatment demonstration plant at Piratininga Power Plant located at Sao Paulo, the biggest city in Brazil, around 16 million inhabitants, with serious problems concerning air pollution. This power plant belongs to a service electric utility necessary for the supply of energy to more than 5,800,000 customers, covering an area of 21,168 km 2 where approximately 20,2 million people live. This plant is a 470 MW, 2x100 MW built in 1954 and 2x135 MW erected in 1960, oil fueled (at full load, 2,800 ton per day). The oil is low sulfur content 3 /h for 135 MW generated by the plant. This process aims to reduce SO 2 and NO x gas pollutant emissions attending the Brazilian environmental laws including the expecting future law for NO x levels. The process consists in high energy electron beam irradiation (above 0,8 MeV) of burning gas from the plant at ammonia presence forming as reaction product ammonium sulfate and nitrate that are collecting as dry dust at an electrostatic precipitator. This is economically useful to the plant and to Brazil, a mainly agricultural country. The Feasibility Study for a 135 MW pilot plant installation at Piratininga Power Plant allows the data collection to optimize and to develop this process, the operation and maintenance costs evaluation for the country . After the process implementation, the human resources training aiming the all plant extension of this process and also the technology know how transfer to another industrial process plants like coal fired thermoelectrical power plants, siderurgical , incinerators and chemical industries. (author)

  7. Indoor air pollution from biomass combustion and its adverse health effects in central India: An exposure-response study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam D Sukhsohale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some of the highest exposures to air pollutants in developing countries occur inside homes where biofuels are used for daily cooking. Inhalation of these pollutants may cause deleterious effects on health. Objectives: To assess the respiratory and other morbidities associated with use of various types of cooking fuels in rural area of Nagpur and to study the relationship between the duration of exposure (exposure index [EI] and various morbidities. Materials and Methods: A total of 760 non-smoking, non-pregnant women aged 15 years and above (mean age 32.51 ΁ 14.90 years exposed to domestic smoke from cooking fuels from an early age, working in poorly ventilated kitchen were selected and on examination presented with various health problems. Exposure was calculated as the average hours spent daily for cooking multiplied by the number of years. Symptoms were enquired by means of a standard questionnaire adopted from that of the British Medical Research Council. Lung function was assessed by the measurement of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR. PEFR less than 80% of the predicted was considered as abnormal pulmonary function. Results and Conclusions: Symptoms like eye irritation, headache, and diminution of vision were found to be significantly higher in biomass users (P < 0.05. Abnormal pulmonary function, chronic bronchitis, and cataract in biomass users was significantly higher than other fuel users (P < 0.05. Moreover an increasing trend in prevalence of symptoms/morbid conditions was observed with increase in EI. The presence of respiratory symptoms/morbid conditions was associated with lower values of both observed and percent predicted PEFR (P < 0.05 to 0.001. Thus women exposed to biofuels smoke suffer more from health problems and respiratory illnesses when compared with other fuel users.

  8. Gradual combustion - method for nitrogen oxide suppression during brown coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.P.; Verzakov, V.N.; Lobov, T.V.

    1990-10-01

    Discusses combustion of brown coal in BKZ-500-140-1 boilers and factors that influence emission of nitrogen oxides. Temperature distribution in the furnace was evaluated. Effects of burner position, burner number and burner type as well as air excess ratio on chemical reactions during brown coal combustion, formation of nitrogen oxides and their emission were comparatively evaluated. Analyses showed that by optimum arrangement of burners and selecting the optimum air excess ratio a part of nitrogen oxides formed during the initial phase of combustion was reduced to molecular nitrogen in the second phase. On the basis of evaluations the following recommendations for furnace design are made: use of straight-flow burners characterized by a reduced mixing ratio with secondary air, parallel arrangement of burners which guarantees mixing of the combustion products from the burners with stable and unstable combustion (products of incomplete coal combustion), reducing the air excess ratio to below 1.0. 5 refs.

  9. Fluidised bed combustion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion systems that facilitates the maintenance of the depth of the bed are described. A discharge pipe projects upwardly into the bed so that bed material can flow into its upper end and escape downwardly. The end of the pipe is surrounded by an enclosure and air is discharged into the enclosure so that material will enter the pipe from within the enclosure and have been cooled in the enclosure by the air discharged into it. The walls of the enclosure may themselves be cooled

  10. Pulsating combustion - Combustion characteristics and reduction of emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, Annika

    1999-11-01

    In the search for high efficiency combustion systems pulsating combustion has been identified as one of the technologies that potentially can meet the objectives of clean combustion and good fuel economy. Pulsating combustion offers low emissions of pollutants, high heat transfer and efficient combustion. Although it is an old technology, the interest in pulsating combustion has been renewed in recent years, due to its unique features. Various applications of pulsating combustion can be found, mainly as drying and heating devices, of which the latter also have had commercial success. It is, however, in the design process of a pulse combustor, difficult to predict the operating frequency, the heat release etc., due to the lack of a well founded theory of the phenomenon. Research concerning control over the combustion process is essential for developing high efficiency pulse combustors with low emissions. Natural gas fired Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been the experimental objects of this study. In order to investigate the interaction between the fluid dynamics and the chemistry in pulse combustors, laser based measuring techniques as well as other conventional measuring techniques have been used. The experimental results shows the possibilities to control the combustion characteristics of pulsating combustion. It is shown that the time scales in the large vortices created at the inlet to the combustion chamber are very important for the operation of the pulse combustor. By increasing/decreasing the time scale for the large scale mixing the timing of the heat release is changed and the operating characteristics of the pulse combustor changes. Three different means for NO{sub x} reduction in Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been investigated. These include exhaust gas recirculation, alteration of air/fuel ratio and changed inlet geometry in the combustion chamber. All used methods achieved less than 10 ppm NO{sub x} emitted (referred to stoichiometric

  11. Biofuels combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Charles K

    2013-01-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  12. Experimental and theoretical analysis of effects of atomic, diatomic and polyatomic inert gases in air and EGR on mixture properties, combustion, thermal efficiency and NOx emissions of a pilot-ignited NG engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Weifeng; Liu, Zhongchang; Wang, Zhongshu; Dou, Huili

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The specific heat ratio of the mixture increases with increasing Ar. • The thermal efficiency increases first and then decreases with increasing Ar. • Mechanisms of reducing NOx emissions are different for different dilution gases. • A suitable inert gas should be used to meet different requirements. - Abstract: Argon (Ar), nitrogen (N_2) and carbon dioxide (CO_2), present in exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and air, are common atomic, diatomic and polyatomic inert gases, separately. As dilution gases, they are always added into the intake charge to reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions, directly or along with EGR and air. This paper presents the effects of Ar, N_2 and CO_2 on mixture properties, combustion, thermal efficiency and NOx emissions of pilot-ignited natural gas engines. Thermodynamic properties of the air-dilution gas mixture with increasing dilution gases, including density, gas constant, specific heat ratio, specific heat capacity, heat capacity and thermal diffusivity, were analyzed theoretically using thermodynamic relations and ideal gas equations based on experimental results. The thermal and diluent effects of dilution gases on NOx emissions were investigated based on Arrhenius Law and Zeldovich Mechanism, experimentally and theoretically. The experiments were arranged based on an electronically controlled heavy-duty, 6-cylinder, turbocharged, pilot-ignited natural gas engine. The resulted show that adding different inert gases into the intake charge had different influences on the thermodynamic properties of the air-dilution gas mixture. No great change in combustion phase was found with increasing dilution ratio (DR) of Ar, while the flame development duration increased significantly and CA50 moved far away from combustion top dead center (TDC) obviously with increasing DR for both of N_2 and CO_2. Adding Ar was superior in maintaining high thermal efficiencies than CO_2 and N_2, but adding CO_2 was superior in maintaining

  13. Investigation the performance of 0-D and 3-d combustion simulation softwares for modelling HCCI engine with high air excess ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Coşkun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, performance of zero and three dimensional simulations codes that used for simulate a homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI engine fueled with Primary Reference Fuel PRF (85% iso-octane and 15% n-heptane were investigated. 0-D code, called as SRM Suite (Stochastic Reactor Model which can simulate engine combustion by using stochastic reactor model technique were used. Ansys-Fluent which can simulate computational fluid dynamics (CFD was used for 3-D engine combustion simulations. Simulations were evaluated for both commercial codes in terms of combustion, heat transfer and emissions in a HCCI engine. Chemical kinetic mechanisms which developed by Tsurushima including 33 species and 38 reactions for surrogate PRF fuel were used for combustion simulations. Analysis showed that both codes have advantages over each other.

  14. Active Control Strategies to Optimize Supersonic Fuel-Air Mixing for Combustion Associated with Fully Modulated Transverse Jet in Cross Flow

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghenai, C; Philippidis, G. P; Lin, C. X

    2005-01-01

    ... (subsonic- supersonic) combustion studies. A high-speed imaging system was used for the visualization of pure liquid jet, aerated liquid jet and pulsed aerated jet injection into a supersonic cross flow at Mach number 1.5...

  15. Flexural Strength of Preheated Resin Composites and Bonding Properties to Glass-Ceramic and Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Richard Kramer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the impact of preheating (25, 37, 54, or 68 °C of TetricEvoCeram (TEC, FiltekSupremeXT (FSXT, and Venus (V on flexural strength (FS, shear bond strength (SBS and interfacial tension (IFT. FS was tested with TEC and FSXT. For SBS, glass-ceramic and human dentin substrate were fabricated and luted with the preheated resin composite (RC. SBSs of 1500 thermal cycled specimens were measured. For IFT, glass slides covered with the non-polymerized RC were prepared and contact angles were measured. Data were analyzed using 2/1-way ANOVA with Scheffé-test, and t-test (p < 0.05. Preheated TEC (37–68 °C showed higher FS compared to the control-group (25 °C (p < 0.001. FSXT presented higher FS than TEC (p < 0.001. For SBS to dentin higher values for FSXT than TEC were found. The preheating temperature showed no impact on SBS to dentin. SBS to glass-ceramic revealed a positive influence of temperature for TEC 25–68 °C (p = 0.015. TEC showed higher values than V and FSXT (p < 0.001. IFT values increased with the preheating temperature. A significant difference could be observed in every RC group between 25 and 68 °C (p < 0.001.

  16. Effect of pre-heating on the viscosity and microhardness of a resin composite.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lucey, S

    2010-04-01

    The effect of pre-heating resin composite on pre-cured viscosity and post-cured surface hardness was evaluated. Groups of uncured specimens were heated to 60 degrees C and compared with control groups (24 degrees C) with respect to viscosity and surface hardness. Mean (SD) viscosities of the pre-heated specimens (n = 15) were in the range of 285 (13)-377 (11) (Pa) compared with 642 (35)-800 (23) (Pa) at ambient temperature. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.001). Mean (SD) Vickers microhardness (VHN) of the pre-heated group (n = 15) was 68.6 (2.3) for the top surface and 68.7 (1.8) for the bottom surface measured at 24 h post curing (specimen thickness = 1.5 mm). The corresponding values for the room temperature group were 60.6 (1.4) and 59.0 (3.5). There was a statistically significant difference between corresponding measurements taken at the top and bottom for the pre-heated and room temperature groups (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between top and bottom measurements within each group. Pre-heating resin composite reduces its pre-cured viscosity and enhances its subsequent surface hardness. These effects may translate as easier placement together with an increased degree of polymerization and depth-of-cure.

  17. Efficiency of the pre-heater against flow rate on primary the beta test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edy Sumarno; Kiswanta; Bambang Heru; Ainur R; Joko P

    2013-01-01

    Calculation of efficiency of the pre-heater has been carried out against the flow rate on primary the BETA Test Loop. BETA test loop (UUB) is a facilities of experiments to study the thermal hydraulic phenomenon, especially for thermal hydraulic post-LOCA (Lost of Coolant Accident). Sequences removal on the BETA Test Loop contained a pre-heater that serves as a getter heat from the primary side to the secondary side, determination of efficiency is to compare the incoming heat energy with the energy taken out by a secondary fluid. Characterization is intended to determine the performance of a pre-heater, then used as tool for analysis, and as a reference design experiments. Calculation of efficiency methods performed by operating the pre-heater with fluid flow rate variation on the primary side. Calculation of efficiency on the results obtained that the efficiency change with every change of flow rate, the flow rate is 71.26% on 163.50 ml/s and 60.65% on 850.90 ml/s. Efficiency value can be even greater if the pre-heater tank is wrapped with thermal insulation so there is no heat leakage. (author)

  18. Molten salt combustion of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantham, L.F.; McKenzie, D.E.; Richards, W.L.; Oldenkamp, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    The Atomics International Molten Salt Combustion Process reduces the weight and volume of combustible β-γ contaminated transuranic waste by utilizing air in a molten salt medium to combust organic materials, to trap particulates, and to react chemically with any acidic gases produced during combustion. Typically, incomplete combustion products such as hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide are below detection limits (i.e., 3 ) is directly related to the sodium chloride vapor pressure of the melt; >80% of the particulate is sodium chloride. Essentially all metal oxides (combustion ash) are retained in the melt, e.g., >99.9% of the plutonium, >99.6% of the europium, and >99.9% of the ruthenium are retained in the melt. Both bench-scale radioactive and pilot scale (50 kg/hr) nonradioactive combustion tests have been completed with essentially the same results. Design of three combustors for industrial applications are underway

  19. WHO indoor air quality guidelines on household fuel combustion: Strategy implications of new evidence on interventions and exposure-risk functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Nigel; Pope, Dan; Rehfuess, Eva; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Adair-Rohani, Heather; Dora, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Background: 2.8 billion people use solid fuels as their primary cooking fuel; the resulting high levels of household air pollution (HAP) were estimated to cause more than 4 million premature deaths in 2012. The people most affected are among the world's poorest, and past experience has shown that securing adoption and sustained use of effective, low-emission stove technologies and fuels in such populations is not easy. Among the questions raised by these challenges are (i) to what levels does HAP exposure need to be reduced in order to ensure that substantial health benefits are achieved, and (ii) what intervention technologies and fuels can achieve the required levels of HAP in practice? New WHO air quality guidelines are being developed to address these issues. Aims: To address the above questions drawing on evidence from new evidence reviews conducted for the WHO guidelines. Methods: Discussion of key findings from reviews covering (i) systematic reviews of health risks from HAP exposure, (ii) newly developed exposure-response functions which combine combustion pollution risk evidence from ambient air pollution, second-hand smoke, HAP and active smoking, and (iii) a systematic review of the impacts of solid fuel and clean fuel interventions on kitchen levels of, and personal exposure to, PM2.5 and carbon monoxide (CO). Findings: Evidence on health risks from HAP suggest that controlling this exposure could reduce the risk of multiple child and adult health outcomes by 20-50%. The new integrated exposure-response functions (IERs) indicate that in order to secure these benefits, HAP levels require to be reduced to the WHO IT-1 annual average level (35 μg/m3 PM2.5), or below. The second review found that, in practice, solid fuel 'improved stoves' led to large percentage and absolute reductions, but post-intervention kitchen levels were still very high, at several hundreds of μg/m3 of PM2.5, although most solid fuel stove types met the WHO 24-hr average guideline

  20. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, Antoni K.; Maxson, James A.; Hensinger, David M.

    1993-01-01

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

  1. Experimental studies of thermal preparation of internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnaukhov, N. N.; Merdanov, Sh M.; V, Konev V.; Borodin, D. M.

    2018-05-01

    In conditions of autonomous functioning of road construction machines, it becomes necessary to use its internal sources. This can be done by using a heat recovery system of an internal combustion engine (ICE). For this purpose, it is proposed to use heat accumulators that accumulate heat of the internal combustion engine during the operation of the machine. Experimental studies have been carried out to evaluate the efficiency of using the proposed pre-start thermal preparation system, which combines a regular system based on liquid diesel fuel heaters and an ICE heat recovery system. As a result, the stages of operation of the preheating thermal preparation system, mathematical models and the dependence of the temperature change of the antifreeze at the exit from the internal combustion engine on the warm-up time are determined.

  2. Compressed air energy storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Frederick W.; Kartsounes, George T.

    1981-01-01

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  3. Techniques de combustion Combustin Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perthuis E.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available L'efficacité d'un processus de chauffage par flamme est étroitement liée à la maîtrise des techniques de combustion. Le brûleur, organe essentiel de l'équipement de chauffe, doit d'une part assurer une combustion complète pour utiliser au mieux l'énergie potentielle du combustible et, d'autre part, provoquer dans le foyer les conditions aérodynamiques les plus propices oux transferts de chaleur. En s'appuyant sur les études expérimentales effectuées à la Fondation de Recherches Internationales sur les Flammes (FRIF, au Groupe d'Étude des Flammes de Gaz Naturel (GEFGN et à l'Institut Français du Pétrole (IFP et sur des réalisations industrielles, on présente les propriétés essentielles des flammes de diffusion aux combustibles liquides et gazeux obtenues avec ou sans mise en rotation des fluides, et leurs répercussions sur les transferts thermiques. La recherche des températures de combustion élevées conduit à envisager la marche à excès d'air réduit, le réchauffage de l'air ou son enrichissement à l'oxygène. Par quelques exemples, on évoque l'influence de ces paramètres d'exploitation sur l'économie possible en combustible. The efficiency of a flame heating process is closely linked ta the mastery of, combustion techniques. The burner, an essential element in any heating equipment, must provide complete combustion sa as to make optimum use of the potential energy in the fuel while, at the same time, creating the most suitable conditions for heat transfers in the combustion chamber. On the basis of experimental research performed by FRIF, GEFGN and IFP and of industrial achievements, this article describesthe essential properties of diffusion flames fed by liquid and gaseous fuels and produced with or without fluid swirling, and the effects of such flames on heat transfers. The search for high combustion temperatures means that consideration must be given to operating with reduced excess air, heating the air or

  4. Combustion modeling in waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.; Unal, C.; Travis, J.R.; Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    1997-01-01

    This paper has two objectives. The first one is to repeat previous simulations of release and combustion of flammable gases in tank SY-101 at the Hanford reservation with the recently developed code GASFLOW-II. The GASFLOW-II results are compared with the results obtained with the HMS/TRAC code and show good agreement, especially for non-combustion cases. For combustion GASFLOW-II predicts a steeper pressure rise than HMS/TRAC. The second objective is to describe a so-called induction parameter model which was developed and implemented into GASFLOW-II and reassess previous calculations of Bureau of Mines experiments for hydrogen-air combustion. The pressure time history improves compared with the one-step model, and the time rate of pressure change is much closer to the experimental data

  5. Study of mechanically activated coal combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burdukov Anatolij P.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion and air gasification of mechanically activated micro-ground coals in the flux have been studied. Influence of mechanically activated methods at coals grinding on their chemical activeness at combustion and gasification has been determined. Intense mechanical activation of coals increases their chemical activeness that enables development of new highly boosted processing methods for coals with various levels of metamorphism.

  6. An experimental and numerical study of confined non-reacting and reacting turbulent jets to facilitate homogeneous combustion in industrial furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Insu

    Confined non-reacting turbulent jets are ideal for recirculating the hot flue gas back into the furnace from an external exhaust duct. Such jets are also used inside the furnace to internally entrain and recirculate the hot flue gas to preheat and dilute the reactants. Both internal and external implementation of confined turbulent jets increase the furnace thermal efficiency. For external implementation, depending on the circumstances, the exhaust gas flow may be co- or counter-flow relative to the jet flow. Inside the furnaces, fuel and air jets are injected separately. To create a condition which can facilitate near homogeneous combustion, these jets have to first mix with the burned gas inside the furnace and simultaneously being heated and diluted prior to combustion. Clearly, the combustion pattern and emissions from reacting confined turbulent jets are affected by jet interactions, mixing and entrainment of hot flue gas. In this work, the flow and mixing characteristics of a non-reacting and reacting confined turbulent jet are investigated experimentally and numerically. This work consists of two parts: (i) A study of flow and mixing characteristics of non-reacting confined turbulent jets with co- or counter-flowing exhaust/flue gas. Here the axial and radial distributions of temperature, velocity and NO concentration (used as a tracer gas) were measured. FLUENT was used to numerically simulate the experimental results. This work provides the basic understanding of the flow and mixing characteristics of confined turbulent jets and develops some design considerations for recirculating flue gas back into the furnace as expressed by the recirculation zone and the stagnation locations. (ii) Numerical calculations of near homogeneous combustion are performed for the existing furnace. The exact geometry of the furnace in the lab is used and the real dimensional boundary conditions are considered. The parameters such as air nozzle diameter (dair), fuel nozzle

  7. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilik, Gregory K.; Boehman, Andre L. [The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhang, Hedan; Haworth, Daniel C. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Herreros, Jose Martin [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla La-Mancha, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was investigated on a DDC/VM Motori 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine, with a focus on exhaust emissions. Hydrogen was substituted for diesel fuel on an energy basis of 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10% and 15% by aspiration of hydrogen into the engine's intake air. Four speed and load conditions were investigated (1800 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output and 3600 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output). A significant retarding of injection timing by the engine's electronic control unit (ECU) was observed during the increased aspiration of hydrogen. The retarding of injection timing resulted in significant NO{sub X} emission reductions, however, the same emission reductions were achieved without aspirated hydrogen by manually retarding the injection timing. Subsequently, hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was examined, with the pilot and main injection timings locked, to study the effects caused directly by hydrogen addition. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion resulted in a modest increase of NO{sub X} emissions and a shift in NO/NO{sub 2} ratio in which NO emissions decreased and NO{sub 2} emissions increased, with NO{sub 2} becoming the dominant NO{sub X} component in some combustion modes. Computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD) of the hydrogen assisted diesel combustion process captured this trend and reproduced the experimentally observed trends of hydrogen's effect on the composition of NO{sub X} for some operating conditions. A model that explicitly accounts for turbulence-chemistry interactions using a transported probability density function (PDF) method was better able to reproduce the experimental trends, compared to a model that ignores the influence of turbulent fluctuations on mean chemical production rates, although the importance of the fluctuations is not as strong as has been reported in some other recent modeling studies. The CFD results confirm

  8. Solar pre-heating of water for steam generation in the friendship textile mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sid -Ahmed, M.O.; Hussien, T.

    1994-01-01

    The technology of solar water heating is simple and can be used for pre-heating of water entering a boiler. In this paper the economics of solar pre-heating of water was calculated. The calculations were based on the performance and cost of a locally-made flat plate collector, and the performance and fuel consumption of a boiler in a textile mill. The results showed that a collector area of about 800 meter square with initial cost of about LS 5,000,000, could save annually about 130 tons of furnace oil. ( Author )

  9. EFFECT OF PRE-HEAT TREATMENT ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF Ti-6Al-4V WELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnofam Jacques TCHEIN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The work presented here is related to the optimization of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW process. The objective is to study the influence of some parameters used in the production of welded joints by FSW. The most important parameters are the welding speed and the rotational speed of the tool. The effect of pre-heat treatment on the plates to be welded is also studied by the design of experimental methods. These pre-heat treatments result not only in a change of mechanical properties of plates to be welded, but also of their microstructure. The experiments were performed following a 16 lines fractional Taguchi table.

  10. Application of the FIRST Combustion model to Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, B.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    2004-01-01

    Liquid fuel is of interest to apply to gas turbines. The large advantage is that liquids are easily storable as compared to gaseous fuels. Disadvantage is that liquid fuel has to be sprayed, vaporized and mixed with air. Combustion occurs at some stage of mixing and ignition. Depending on the

  11. Volatiles and char combustion rates of demineralised lignite and wood blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilgin, Melek; Pehlivan, Dursun

    2009-01-01

    Today, much interest is given to the utilisation of materials of plant origin as substitutions of fossil fuels in meeting energy needs to reduce the level of atmospheric pollutant emissions and global warming threat, and emphasis has been placed on the co-combustion of coal and biomass. In this study, volatiles and char combustion behaviour of the fuel pellets composed from demineralised lignite and poplar wood sawdust, were investigated in a cylindrical wire mesh basket placed in a preheated tube furnace. The results have shown that ignition times of the pellets decreased with the burning temperature and shortened further due to demineralisation of lignite. Volatiles combustion rates of the samples did not correlate well with combustion times. However, they can be correlated with their respective proximate volatile matter contents. Char burnout times decreased with increasing combustion rates and correlated well with the respective proximate fixed carbon contents of the samples. Deviations were more considerable in the case of rate data. (author)

  12. Space Station Freedom combustion research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    spread of liquids, drop combustion, and quenching of panicle-air flames. Unfortunately, the same features that make microgravity attractive for fundamental combustion experiments, introduce new fire and explosion hazards that have no counterpart on earth. For example, microgravity can cause broader flammability limits, novel regimes of flame spread, enhanced effects of flame radiation, slower fire detector response, and enhanced combustion upon injecting fire extinguishing agents, among others. On the other hand, spacecraft provide an opportunity to use 'fire-safe' atmospheres due to their controlled environment. Investigation of these problems is just beginning, with specific fire safety experiments supplementing the space based fundamental experiments listed earlier; thus, much remains to be done to develop an adequate technology base for fire and explosion safety considerations for spacecraft.

  13. FY 1999 Report on research results. Research and development of high-temperature air combustion technology (Attachments); 1999 nendo koon kuki nensho seigyo gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Shiryoshu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This project surveys the actual conditions of dioxins emissions discharged from the waste incinerators in commercial service, in order to establish the database for evaluating the effects when the (high-temperature air combustion technology) is applied to waste incinerators. The survey covers 1018 totally continuous incinerators and 724 quasi-continuous incinerators in service in Japan, and the data are analyzed by incinerator types and items for correlating each element with one another, based on The Waste Incinerator Register issued by The Wastes Research Foundation and Dioxins Concentrations in Flue Gases from General Waste Incinerators issued by Health and Welfare Ministry. For 1105 mechanized batch type combustion furnaces and 159 stationary batch type combustion furnaces, only discharged dioxins concentrations are analyzed by incineration capacity. The attachments include (1) report on the survey results of the actual conditions of dioxins emissions, (2) report on the survey results of the actual conditions of dioxins concentrations in flue gases discharged from general waste incinerators, (3) report on the survey results of the actual conditions of NO emissions discharged from sewer sludge incinerators, and (4) and (5) report on the survey results of the actual conditions of NO emissions discharged from fluidized bed type general waste incinerators. (NEDO)

  14. Tubular combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    Tubular combustors are cylindrical tubes where flame ignition and propagation occur in a spatially confined, highly controlled environment, in a nearly flat, elongated geometry. This allows for some unique advantages where extremely even heat dispersion is required over a large surface while still maintaining fuel efficiency. Tubular combustors also allow for easy flexibility in type of fuel source, allowing for quick changeover to meet various needs and changing fuel pricing. This new addition to the MP sustainable energy series will provide the most up-to-date research on tubular combustion--some of it only now coming out of private proprietary protection. Plentiful examples of current applications along with a good explanation of background theory will offer readers an invaluable guide on this promising energy technology. Highlights include: * An introduction to the theory of tubular flames * The "how to" of maintaining stability of tubular flames through continuous combustion * Examples of both small-scal...

  15. Advanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  16. Influence of Powder Bed Preheating on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of H13 Tool Steel SLM Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, R.; Vrancken, B.; Holmstock, N.; Kinds, Y.; Kruth, J.-P.; Van Humbeeck, J.

    Powder bed preheating is a promising development in selective laser melting (SLM), mainly applied to avoid large thermal stresses in the material. This study analyses the effect of in-process preheating on microstructure, mechanical properties and residual stresses during SLM of H13 tool steel. Sample parts are produced without any preheating and are compared to the corresponding parts made with preheating at 100°, 200°, 300°, and 400°C. Interestingly, internal stresses at the top surface of the parts evolve from compressive (-324MPa) without preheating to tensile stresses (371MPa) with preheating at 400°C. Nevertheless, application of powder bed preheating results in a more homogeneous microstructure with better mechanical properties compared to H13 SLM parts produced without preheating. The fine bainitic microstructure leads to hardness values of 650-700Hv and ultimate tensile strength of 1965MPa, which are comparable to or even better than those of conventionally made and heat treated H13 tool steel.

  17. Numerical investigation of spray combustion towards HITAC conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Shanglong

    2017-01-01

    The features of High Temperature Air Combustion (HiTAC), i.e. high-efficiency combustion processes creating a uniform temperature distribution with low NOX and CO emissions, lend itself ideally for the combustion of all sorts of "difficult” fuels, ranging from low-calorific gases such as

  18. Combustion synthesis of ceramic matrices for immobilization of 14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosc-Rouessac, F.; Marin-Ayral, R.M.; Haidoux, A.; Massoni, N.; Bart, F.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the use of combustion synthesis for immobilization of 14 C was considered. Ceramic matrices have been prepared by this method using two different devices: one non-conventional with preheating of the samples and the other conventional device where ignition was produced thanks to tungsten filament. These two devices gave rise to different mechanisms of reactions involving different amounts of unreacted carbon graphite inside the matrix. The SHS samples were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD)

  19. Influence of staged-air on airflow, combustion characteristics and NO(x) emissions of a down-fired pulverized-coal 300 MW(e) utility boiler with direct flow split burners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqi; Kuang, Min; Zhang, Jia; Han, Yunfeng; Zhu, Qunyi; Yang, Lianjie; Kong, Weiguang

    2010-02-01

    Cold airflow experiments were conducted to investigate the aerodynamic field in a small-scale furnace of a down-fired pulverized-coal 300 MW(e) utility boiler arranged with direct flow split burners enriched by cyclones. By increasing the staged-air ratio, a deflected flow field appeared in the lower furnace; larger staged-air ratios produced larger deflections. Industrial-sized experiments on a full-scale boiler were also performed at different staged-air damper openings with measurements taken of gas temperatures in the burner region and near the right-side wall, wall heat fluxes, and gas components (O(2), CO, and NO(x)) in the near-wall region. Combustion was unstable at staged-air damper openings below 30%. For openings of 30% and 40%, late ignition of the pulverized coal developed and large differences arose in gas temperatures and heat fluxes between the regions near the front and rear walls. In conjunction, carbon content in the fly ash was high and boiler efficiency was low with high NO(x) emission above 1200 mg/m(3) (at 6% O(2) dry). For fully open dampers, differences in gas temperatures and heat fluxes, carbon in fly ash and NO(x) emission decreased yielding an increase in boiler efficiency. The optimal setting is fully open staged-air dampers.

  20. Effect of air ingress on the energy performance of coal fired thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddhartha Bhatt, M.

    2007-01-01

    Ingress of air in boilers leads to drops in energy efficiency. This paper presents the effects of air ingress in the combustion zone, post-combustion zone and air pre-heater (APH) on the energy efficiency and loading capacity of a coal fired thermal power plant operating on fuel with high ash (35-45%). The optimal O 2 in the flue gas for a pulverized coal fired system is 3.5% (corresponding to 20% excess air). The operating values are in the range of 4.2-6.0% in membrane type boilers and up to 10% in refractory type boilers (after sustained periods of operation). The leakage rate of boilers (up to the entrance of the APH) is designed at 0.2% while the average operating values are 7.25% for membrane type enclosures and 33.61% for refractory enclosures. The leakage rate of the APH is designed at 5.0% while the operating values range from 13.66% to 20.13% for rotary and tubular APHs. When the O 2 in the combustion zone varies from 3.5% to 8.0%, efficiency drops of 2.0% points are experienced in the boiler and turbine separately, and the gross overall efficiency drop is ∼3.0% points. The units do not experience any capacity drop up to an O 2 in the flue gas of 6.0% before the APH. At an O 2 in the flue gas (before APH) of 7.2%, a mild limitation on the unit capacity of around 2-3% is experienced. When O 2 in the flue gas (before APH) reaches a level of 9.0%, 20% capacity drop of the unit is experienced due to which the plant load cannot be raised higher than 80%. Beyond the level of 9.0% (rare occurrence), the unit is quite difficult to operate and has to be taken off for overhaul

  1. Experimental validation for combustion analysis of GOTHIC code in 2-dimensional combustion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. W.; Yang, S. Y.; Park, K. C.; Jung, S. H.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the prediction capability of GOTHIC code for hydrogen combustion phenomena was validated with the results of two-dimensional premixed hydrogen combustion experiment executed by Seoul National University. The experimental chamber has about 24 liter free volume (1x0.024x1 m 3 ) and 2-dimensional rectangular shape. The test were preformed with 10% hydrogen/air gas mixture and conducted with combination of two igniter positions (top center, top corner) and two boundary conditions (bottom full open, bottom right half open). Using the lumped parameter and mechanistic combustion model in GOTHIC code, the SNU experiments were simulated under the same conditions. The GOTHIC code prediction of the hydrogen combustion phenomena did not compare well with the experimental results. In case of lumped parameter simulation, the combustion time was predicted appropriately. But any other local information related combustion phenomena could not be obtained. In case of mechanistic combustion analysis, the physical combustion phenomena of gas mixture were not matched experimental ones. In boundary open cases, the GOTHIC predicted very long combustion time and the flame front propagation could not simulate appropriately. Though GOTHIC showed flame propagation phenomenon in adiabatic calculation, the induction time of combustion was still very long compare with experimental results. Also, it was found that the combustion model of GOTHIC code had some weak points in low concentration of hydrogen combustion simulation

  2. Abstracts. 1978 AFOSR Contractors Meeting on Air-Breathing Combustion Dynamics and Kinetics, Ramada Inn-Downtown Dayton, Ohio, 10 - 13 October 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-13

    Combustion in G.D. Smith, C.E. Peters High Speed Flows AEDC/ARO (PO-78-0012) 5:00 ADJOURN 6:30 Social Hour (Cash Bar) Ramada Inn Banquet 12 Oct. 78...which would sustain the instability structures observed in a number of problemA . During the initial phase of the development of the instabilities, the

  3. Effects of stepwise gas combustion on NOx generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woperane Seredi, A.; Szepesi, E.

    1999-01-01

    To decrease NO x emission from gas boilers, the combustion process of gas has been modified from continuous combustion to step-wise combustion. In this process the combustion temperature, the temperature peaks in the flame, the residence time of combustion products in the high-temperature zone and the oxygen partial pressure are changed advantageously. Experiments were performed using multistage burners, and the NO x emission was recorded. It was found that the air factor of the primary combustion space has a determining effect on the NO x reduction. (R.P.)

  4. Coal combustion aerothermochemistry research. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, A.B.; Gat, N.; Denison, M.R.; Cohen, L.M.

    1980-12-15

    On the basis of extensive aerothermochemistry analyses, laboratory investigations, and combustor tests, significant headway has been made toward improving the understanding of combustion phenomena and scaling of high swirl pulverized coal combustors. A special attempt has been made to address the gap between scientific data available on combustion and hardware design and scaling needs. Both experimental and theoretical investigations were conducted to improve the predictive capability of combustor scaling laws. The scaling laws derived apply to volume and wall burning of pulverized coal in a slagging high-swirl combustor. They incorporate the findings of this investigation as follows: laser pyrolysis of coal at 10/sup 6/ K/sec and 2500K; effect of coal particle shape on aerodynamic drag and combustion; effect of swirl on heat transfer; coal burnout and slag capture for 20 MW/sub T/ combustor tests for fine and coarse coals; burning particle trajectories and slag capture; particle size and aerodynamic size; volatilization extent and burnout fraction; and preheat level. As a result of this work, the following has been gained: an increased understanding of basic burning mechanisms in high-swirl combustors and an improved model for predicting combustor performance which is intended to impact hardware design and scaling in the near term.

  5. Area 3, SRC-II coal slurry preheater studies report for the technical data analysis program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-08-01

    This report reviews the raw data gathered from the Preheater B test runs at Ft. Lewis, and also the Preheater B results presented in the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) Process Final Report, Volumes 1 and 2 of Slurry Preheater Design, SRC-II Process and the Ft. Lewis Slurry Preheater Data Analysis, 1 1/2 Inch Coil by Gulf Science and Technology Corporation of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. attempts were made to correlate several variables not previously considered with slurry viscosity and thermal conductivity. Only partial success was realized. However, in the process of attempting to correlate these variables an understanding of why some variables could not be correlated was achieved. An attempt was also made, using multiple linear regression, to correlate coal slurry viscosity and thermal conductivity with several independent variables among which were temperature, coal concentration, total solids, coal type, slurry residence time, shear rate, and unit size. The final correlations included some, but not all, of these independent variables. This report is not a stand alone document and should be considered a supplement to work already done. It should be read in conjunction with the reports referenced above.

  6. Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Concrete Alkalinity on Tensile Properties of Preheated Structural GFRP Rebar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwasung Roh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of preexposure to high temperature and alkalinity on the tensile performance of structural GFRP reinforcing bars are experimentally investigated. A total of 105 GFRP bar specimens are preexposed to high temperature between 120°C and 200°C and then immersed into pH of 12.6 alkaline solution for 100, 300, and 660 days. From the test results, the elastic modulus obtained at 300 immersion days is almost the same as those of 660 immersion days. For all alkali immersion days considered in the test, the preheated specimens provide slightly lower elastic modulus than the unpreheated specimens, showing only 8% maximum difference. The tensile strength decreases for all testing cases as the increase of the alkaline immersing time, regardless of the prehearing levels. The tensile strength of the preheated specimens is about 90% of the unpreheated specimen for 300 alkali immersion days. However, after 300 alkali immersion days the tensile strengths are almost identical to each other. Such results indicate that the tensile strength and elastic modulus of the structural GFRP reinforcing bars are closely related to alkali immersion days, not much related to the preheating levels. The specimens show a typical tensile failure around the preheated location.

  7. Preheating to around 100°C under endcap blocks before welding at KHI.

    CERN Multimedia

    Loveless, D

    2000-01-01

    The 600mm thick sector blocks of the CMS endcaps are made from three layers of 200mm plates welded together. During the manufacture at KHI, the blocks are preheated to around 100°C to prevent cracks in the welds.

  8. Enhanced preheating after multi-field inflation: on the importance of being special

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battefeld, Thorsten; Eggemeier, Alexander; Giblin, John T. Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss preheating after multi-field inflation in the presence of several preheat matter fields that become light in the vicinity of (but not at) the inflatons' VEV, at distinct extra-species-points (ESP); this setup is motivated by inflationary models that include particle production during inflation, e.g. trapped inflation, grazing ESP encounters or modulated trapping, among others. While de-phasing of inflatons tends to suppress parametric resonance, we find two new effects leading to efficient preheating: particle production during the first in-fall (efficient if many preheat matter fields are present) and a subsequent (narrow) resonance phase (efficient if an ESP happens to be at one of several distinct distances from the inflatons' VEV). Particles produced during the first in-fall are comprised of many species with low occupation number, while the latter are made up of a few species with high occupation number. We provide analytic descriptions of both phases in the absence of back-reaction, which we test numerically. We further perform lattice simulations to investigate the effects of back-reaction. We find resonances to be robust and the most likely cause of inflaton decay in multi-field trapped inflation if ESP distributions are dense

  9. Diagnostics of electron-heated solar flare models. III - Effects of tapered loop geometry and preheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. G.; Li, Peng; Mariska, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of hydrodynamic numerical simulations of nonthermal electron-heated solar flare atmospheres and their corresponding soft X-ray Ca XIX emission-line profiles, under the conditions of tapered flare loop geometry and/or a preheated atmosphere, is presented. The degree of tapering is parameterized by the magnetic mirror ratio, while the preheated atmosphere is parameterized by the initial upper chromospheric pressure. In a tapered flare loop, it is found that the upward motion of evaporated material is faster compared with the case where the flare loop is uniform. This is due to the diverging nozzle seen by the upflowing material. In the case where the flare atmosphere is preheated and the flare geometry is uniform, the response of the atmosphere to the electron collisional heating is slow. The upward velocity of the hydrodynamic gas is reduced due not only to the large coronal column depth, but also to the increased inertia of the overlying material. It is concluded that the only possible electron-heated scenario in which the predicted Ca XIX line profiles agree with the BCS observations is when the impulsive flare starts in a preheated dense corona.

  10. Effect of pre-heating on the thermal decomposition kinetics of cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of pre-heating at low temperatures (160-280°C) on the thermal decomposition kinetics of scoured cotton fabrics was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis under nonisothermal conditions. Isoconversional methods were used to calculate the activation energies for the pyrolysis after one-...

  11. Enhanced preheating after multi-field inflation: on the importance of being special

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battefeld, Thorsten; Eggemeier, Alexander [Institute for Astrophysics, University of Goettingen, Friedrich Hund Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Giblin, John T. Jr., E-mail: tbattefe@astro.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: a.eggemeier@stud.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu [Department of Physics, Kenyon College, Gambier, OH 43022 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    We discuss preheating after multi-field inflation in the presence of several preheat matter fields that become light in the vicinity of (but not at) the inflatons' VEV, at distinct extra-species-points (ESP); this setup is motivated by inflationary models that include particle production during inflation, e.g. trapped inflation, grazing ESP encounters or modulated trapping, among others. While de-phasing of inflatons tends to suppress parametric resonance, we find two new effects leading to efficient preheating: particle production during the first in-fall (efficient if many preheat matter fields are present) and a subsequent (narrow) resonance phase (efficient if an ESP happens to be at one of several distinct distances from the inflatons' VEV). Particles produced during the first in-fall are comprised of many species with low occupation number, while the latter are made up of a few species with high occupation number. We provide analytic descriptions of both phases in the absence of back-reaction, which we test numerically. We further perform lattice simulations to investigate the effects of back-reaction. We find resonances to be robust and the most likely cause of inflaton decay in multi-field trapped inflation if ESP distributions are dense.

  12. Symbiotic potential: the integration of preheating and dry cooling in cokemaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, J E

    1978-06-01

    In the USSR and Japan, heat recovered from the dry cooling of coke is used to raise steam for power generation or process use. This heat could be used to dry and preheat coal to improve both coke quality and oven productivity.

  13. Combustion measurements in an industrial gas-fired flat-glass furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newbold, J; Webb, B W; McQuay, M Q [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Huber, A M [Ford Motor Co., Glass Div., Dearborn, MI (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Profiles of velocity, species concentration (O{sub 2}, CO and CO{sub 2}), wall incident radiative heat flux and temperature are reported in the combustion space of a regenerative, side-port, 550t/day, gas-fired flat-glass furnace. A region exists of fast-moving gases near the glass, with axial velocity components exceeding 20 m s{sup -1}, and a large recirculation zone near the crown. Temperatures as high as 1985 K in the flame and as low as 1750 K in the recirculation zone are reported. A region of intense reaction is observed near the glass, with large concentration gradients and incomplete combustion even in the tail of the flame. Local incident radiant fluxes on the crown were nearly uniform spatially at a level of 680 kW m{sup -2}. In the portnecks, flat inlet velocity profiles were measured with a magnitude of approximately 11 m s{sup -1}. Significant variations were observed in the exhaust profiles of most measured variables. Large errors in exhaust mass balance suggest a complex, three-dimensional flow with recirculation zones along the side walls of the portnecks. A nominal preheat air temperature of 1420 k and a variation of exhaust temperatures between 1630 K and 1835 K were noted. O{sub 2} concentrations as high as 8.4% were measured at the exit, suggesting a bypass of oxygen-rich flow around the flame. CO{sub 2} concentrations were the highest near the batch, where the glass reactions are the most intense. (Author)

  14. Straw combustion on slow-moving grates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2005-01-01

    Combustion of straw in grate-based boilers is often associated with high emission levels and relatively poor fuel burnout. A numerical grate combustion model was developed to assist in improving the combustion performance of these boilers. The model is based on a one-dimensional ‘‘walking......-column’’ approach and includes the energy equations for both the fuel and the gas accounting for heat transfer between the two phases. The model gives important insight into the combustion process and provides inlet conditions for a computational fluid dynamics analysis of the freeboard. The model predictions...... indicate the existence of two distinct combustion modes. Combustion air temperature and mass flow-rate are the two parameters determining the mode. There is a significant difference in reaction rates (ignition velocity) and temperature levels between the two modes. Model predictions were compared...

  15. Calculation of gas temperature at the outlet of the combustion chamber and in the air-gas channel of a gas-turbine unit by data of acceptance tests in accordance with ISO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyuk, A. G.; Karpunin, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a high accuracy method enabling performance of the calculation of real values of the initial temperature of a gas turbine unit (GTU), i.e., the gas temperature at the outlet of the combustion chamber, in a situation where manufacturers do not disclose this information. The features of the definition of the initial temperature of the GTU according to ISO standards were analyzed. It is noted that the true temperatures for high-temperature GTUs is significantly higher than values determined according to ISO standards. A computational procedure for the determination of gas temperatures in the air-gas channel of the gas turbine and cooling air consumptions over blade rims is proposed. As starting equations, the heat balance equation and the flow mixing equation for the combustion chamber are assumed. Results of acceptance GTU tests according to ISO standards and statistical dependencies of required cooling air consumptions on the gas temperature and the blade metal are also used for calculations. An example of the calculation is given for one of the units. Using a developed computer program, the temperatures in the air-gas channel of certain GTUs are calculated, taking into account their design features. These calculations are performed on the previously published procedure for the detailed calculation of the cooled gas turbine subject to additional losses arising because of the presence of the cooling system. The accuracy of calculations by the computer program is confirmed by conducting verification calculations for the GTU of the Mitsubishi Comp. and comparing results with published data of the company. Calculation data for temperatures were compared with the experimental data and the characteristics of the GTU, and the error of the proposed method is estimated.

  16. A predictive model of natural gas mixture combustion in internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Espinoza

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the development of a predictive natural gas mixture combustion model for conventional com-bustion (ignition engines. The model was based on resolving two areas; one having unburned combustion mixture and another having combustion products. Energy and matter conservation equations were solved for each crankshaft turn angle for each area. Nonlinear differential equations for each phase’s energy (considering compression, combustion and expansion were solved by applying the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The model also enabled studying different natural gas components’ composition and evaluating combustion in the presence of dry and humid air. Validation results are shown with experimental data, demonstrating the software’s precision and accuracy in the results so produced. The results showed cylinder pressure, unburned and burned mixture temperature, burned mass fraction and combustion reaction heat for the engine being modelled using a natural gas mixture.

  17. Stochastic disturbances and dynamics of thermal processes. With application to municipal solid waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kessel, L.B.M.

    2003-06-11

    with the on-line calorific value sensor from chapter 2 and a validated dynamic model of the process is available, the theory from stochastic processes can be applied to MSWC. This new application field of stochastics is discussed in chapter 4. The results obtained in chapter 2 will be used in this analysis. Also new linear transfer functions for thermal processes will be given and applied to MSWC. Finally, applications of the new developed tools will be discussed. As already mentioned, the validation experiments lead to the conclusion that the dynamics of the combustion process can change when the primary air temperature changes. This was a new result, which has never been reported in literature before. For that reason during the research it was decided to start an extensive study into the influence of the primary air temperature on the combustion process. This has been performed by using laboratory experiments. In chapter 5 the results from this search will be presented. The existing theory for combustion of solid fuels is extended with a qualitative as well as a quantitative description of the influence of primary preheating. The new theory is used to explain observations from real plants and the results from system identification. Furthermore, the value of laboratory experiments to simulate the real combustion process on a grate is discussed.

  18. Combustion means for solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, D.

    1987-09-23

    A combustion device for solid fuel, suitable for coal, coke, charcoal, coal-dust briquettes etc., comprising:- a base stand with an opening therein, an imperforate heat resistant holding board locatable to close said opening; a combustion chamber standing on the base stand with the holding board forming the base of the combustion chamber; a wiper arm pivoted for horizontal wiping movement over the upper surface of the holding board; an inlet means at a lower edge of said chamber above the base stand, and/or in a surrounding wall of said chamber, whereby combustion air may enter as exhaust gases leave the combustion chamber; an exhaust pipe for the exhaust gases; generally tubular gas-flow heat-exchange ducting putting the combustion chamber and exhaust pipe into communication; and means capable of moving the holding board into and out of the opening for removal of ash or other residue. The invention can be used for a heating system in a house or in a greenhouse or for a boiler.

  19. Feasibility and economic analysis of solid desiccant wheel used for dehumidification and preheating in blast furnace: A case study of steel plant, Nanjing, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Yipeng; Zhang, Yufeng; Sheng, Ying; Kong, Xiangrui; Du, Song

    2015-01-01

    To overcome the shortcomings of huge energy consumption from conventional dehumidification using lithium bromide adsorption refrigerating (LBARD) system, a novel desiccant wheel dehumidification and preheating (DWDP) system using two-stage desiccant wheel for blast furnace is brought forward. The DWDP system was designed for dehumidification and preheating in blast furnace of steel plant. It takes waste heat in the slag flushing water as desiccant regeneration and preheating energy. To validate the feasibility of the new DWDP system, experimental studies were conducted based on a steel plant in Nanjing, China. The experiment was designed to use DWDP system in humid outdoor climates e.g. summer seasons. The experimental results indicate that the moisture removal capacity of DWDP system can reach 8.7 g/kg which will lead to the improvement of steel production by 0.9% and the coal is saved of about 2100 tons per year. With the DWDP system, the energy consumed by cooling tower of slag flushing water can decrease 7.3%. All of these energy saved equates to 10.3 million CNY annually. A comparison of initial investment and operating cost between DWDP system and LBRAD system was then carried out. The results show that the initial investment and operating cost of DWDP system is 37% and 57% of present LBARD system, and the payback period is shortened 66%. - Highlights: • A novel two-stage desiccant wheel dehumidification system for blast furnace is proposed. • Average moisture removal of 8.7 g/kg is achieved and dehumidification efficiency is 47%. • Outlet humidity ratio is less than 10 g/kg that satisfies the requirement of blast air. • Waste heat in slag flushing water is utilized and 61.4 million kJ is saved annually. • The investment and operating cost is 37% and 57% of former dehumidification system

  20. Development of a Premixed Combustion Capability for Scramjet Combustion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Robert D.; Goyne, Christopher P.; Rice, Brian E.; Chelliah, Harsha; McDaniel, James C.; Edwards, Jack R.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic air-breathing engines rely on scramjet combustion processes, which involve high speed, compressible, and highly turbulent flows. The combustion environment and the turbulent flames at the heart of these engines are difficult to simulate and study in the laboratory under well controlled conditions. Typically, wind-tunnel testing is performed that more closely approximates engine testing rather than a careful investigation of the underlying physics that drives the combustion process. The experiments described in this paper, along with companion data sets being developed separately, aim to isolate the chemical kinetic effects from the fuel-air mixing process in a dual-mode scramjet combustion environment. A unique fuel injection approach is taken that produces a nearly uniform fuel-air mixture at the entrance to the combustor. This approach relies on the precombustion shock train upstream of the dual-mode scramjet combustor. A stable ethylene flame anchored on a cavity flameholder with a uniformly mixed combustor inflow has been achieved in these experiments allowing numerous companion studies involving coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), particle image velocimetry (PIV), and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to be performed.

  1. Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, V. H.; Less, B. D.; Singer, B. C.; Stratton, J. C.; Wray, C. P.

    2015-02-01

    In many residential building retrofit programs, air tightening to increase energy efficiency is often constrained by safety concerns with naturally vented combustion appliances. Tighter residential buildings more readily depressurize when exhaust equipment is operated, making combustion appliances more prone to backdraft or spill combustion exhaust into the living space. Several measures, such as installation guidelines, vent sizing codes, and combustion safety diagnostics, are in place with the intent to prevent backdrafting and combustion spillage, but the diagnostics conflict and the risk mitigation objective is inconsistent. This literature review summarizes the metrics and diagnostics used to assess combustion safety, documents their technical basis, and investigates their risk mitigations. It compiles information from the following: codes for combustion appliance venting and installation; standards and guidelines for combustion safety diagnostics; research evaluating combustion safety diagnostics; research investigating wind effects on building depressurization and venting; and software for simulating vent system performance.

  2. Air/liquid collectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Østergaard; Olesen, Ole; Kristiansen, Finn Harken

    1997-01-01

    this kind of collectors. The modified simulation program has been used for the determination of the surplus in performance which solar heating systems with this type of solar collectors for combined preheating of ventilation air and domestic hot water will have. The simulation program and the efficiency......This report determine efficiency equations for combined air/liquid solar collectors by measurements on to different air/liquid collectors. Equations which contain all relevant informations on the solar collectors. A simulation program (Kviksol) has been modified in order to be able to handle...

  3. Investigation of micro burner performance during porous media combustion for surface and submerged flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvekar, Ayub Ahmed; Abdullah, M. Z.; Ahmad, Z. A.; Abas, Aizat; Hussien, Ahmed A.; Kataraki, Pramod S.; Mohamed, Mazlan; Husin, Azmi; Fadzli, Khairil

    2018-05-01

    Porous media combustion is considered to be one of the popular choice due to its tremendous advantages. Such type of combustion liberates not only super stable flame but also maintains emissions parameters below thresholds level. Present study incorporates reaction and preheat layer with discrete and foam type of materials respectively. Burner was made to run in ultra-lean mode. Optimum equivalence ratio was found out to be 0.7 for surface flame, while 0.6 during submerged flame condition. Maximum thermal efficiency was noted to be 81%. Finally, emissions parameters where recorded continuously to measure NOx and CO, which were under global limits.

  4. Stationary Engineers Apprenticeship. Related Training Modules. 16.1-16.5 Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This learning module, one in a series of 20 related training modules for apprentice stationary engineers, deals with combustion. Addressed in the individual instructional packages included in the module are the following topics: the combustion process, types of fuel, air and flue gases, heat transfer during combustion, and wood combustion. Each…

  5. Reproducibility of LiF:Mg, Cup thermoluminescent dosimeter on kilo voltage and megavoltage photon beam using different preheat rate:A glow curve study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Fahmi Mohd Yusof; Robert, T.S.B.; Puteri Norkhatijah Abdul Hamid; Nor Shazleen Abdul Shukor; Mohd Sazarman Mohd Salleh

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: Post-irradiation annealing or preheat of the LiF based TLD prior readout is commonly practiced for routine dosimetry to eliminate low temperature glow peaks. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of different preheating rate technique prior readout on the reproducibility and glow curve structure of LiF:Mg, Cu, P or TLD-1OOH exposed to low (109kVp) energy and high energy (6MV) photon beam. TLD chips were read after 24 hours of irradiation with three different preheat techniques; no preheat, low preheat rate (100 degree Celsius/ 10 minutes) and high preheat rate (135 degree Celsius/ 10 seconds) and reproducibility of TL signals were assessed in term of Standard Deviation (SD) and glow curve peaks. The high preheat rate technique was the most reproducible method for low energy photon with 1.05 % of mean reproducibility followed by low preheat rate (1.16 %) and no-preheat (1.33 %) techniques. The high preheat rate techniques was also the most reproducible method for high energy photon with 0.767 % of mean reproducibility as compared to low preheat rate (1.281 %). However the high preheat technique record highest TL signal lost with 10.35 % and 6.04 % for 24 and 72 hours of delayed TLD readout with respectively compared to 9.27 % and 4.51 % for 24 and 72 hours by low preheat rate. The low preheat was found to be optimal to eliminate low peaks (peak 1 and 2) but enable to remove peak 3 as it was shifted up word to combine with the main peak 4 of TL glow peak. It can be concluded that the reproducibility and structure of glow curve was strongly influenced by preheat technique prior readout. (author)

  6. A Comparison of Prominent LES Combustion Models for Nonpremixed Supersonic Combustion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The capability of accurately simulating supersonic combustion is a vital topic for designing and advancing hypersonic air-breathing vehicles. As a consequence, there...

  7. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  8. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  9. Heat pipe air preheater for gas-/oil-fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, D.P.

    1993-02-01

    With the rising costs of fuel, utilities are constantly looking for ways to improve the net plant heat rate of new and existing units. Significant heat rate improvements can be obtained by reducing the exit stack flue gas temperature. This project evaluated two technologies to reduce flue gas temperatures: heat pipes and liquid-coupled heat exchangers. The specific unit chosen for evaluating these systems was Pacific Gas ampersand Electric's 750 MW Moss Landing Power Plant, Unit 7. Both natural gas and low sulfur (0.5%) fuel oil are fired at this plant. Accordingly, the heat exchangers were required to operate on both fuels. This study investigated the heat recovery installation through the preliminary engineering level of detail. At the conclusion of this effort, the results indicated that neither concept was economically attractive for the retrofit situation involved. In addition, several major technical questions remained unresolved concerning the design of a single heat-exchange device capable of operating on gas (sulfur-free) and oil (sulfur-containing) environments over the full normal operating load range. While the technologies this study reviewed have been installed in actual power plant applications, the site-specific aspects of Moss Landing Unit 7 significantly influenced the estimated costs and performance of each alternative. Using more cost-effective and corrosion-resistant materials may help reduce costs. The following conditions would further enhance the viability of lowering exit gas temperatures: Higher capacity factors; rising fuel costs; greater use of sulfur-free fuels, such as natural gas; lower manufacturing costs for heat exchanger technologies; or new unit application

  10. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  11. Catalytic combustion for the elimination of methane, BTEX and other VOC : IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, R.E.; Wanke, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    Options for volatile organic compound combustion include homogeneous combustion (flaring) or catalytic combustion involving a flameless combustion process that uses a solid catalyst to promote the combustion reaction. This presentation discussed relative reactivity testing for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over commercial catalysts. Several commercial pad catalysts were tested, as well as other powders. The relative reactivity of methane as well as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) were investigated. The purpose of the project was to evaluate combustion of concentrated methane streams that contained BTEX compounds; evaluate catalytic combustion using a counter diffusive radiant heater; develop mathematical models for the reactor to enhance design and understanding; improve the catalyst for BTEX combustion; and target application-dehydrator units. Topics that were addressed in the presentation included methane and benzene conversion; catalytic radiant heaters; small industrial and commercial units; measured temperature distribution; fuel slippage, methane conversion; the effect of water and hydrocarbons; the effect of water-liquid injection; and water addition as vapour. Several observations were offered, including that high percentages of injected liquid water can reduce reactor operating temperature; combustion of BTEX remained highly efficient, however liquid injection could also cause temperature reductions and ultimately the reactor would extinguish; and pre-heating the feed can eliminate the temperature drop and pad wetness problem. It was concluded that BTEX compounds are reactive, and the technology appears promising. 19 figs

  12. Catalytic combustion for the elimination of methane, BTEX and other VOC : IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, R.E.; Wanke, S.E. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Options for volatile organic compound combustion include homogeneous combustion (flaring) or catalytic combustion involving a flameless combustion process that uses a solid catalyst to promote the combustion reaction. This presentation discussed relative reactivity testing for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over commercial catalysts. Several commercial pad catalysts were tested, as well as other powders. The relative reactivity of methane as well as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) were investigated. The purpose of the project was to evaluate combustion of concentrated methane streams that contained BTEX compounds; evaluate catalytic combustion using a counter diffusive radiant heater; develop mathematical models for the reactor to enhance design and understanding; improve the catalyst for BTEX combustion; and target application-dehydrator units. Topics that were addressed in the presentation included methane and benzene conversion; catalytic radiant heaters; small industrial and commercial units; measured temperature distribution; fuel slippage, methane conversion; the effect of water and hydrocarbons; the effect of water-liquid injection; and water addition as vapour. Several observations were offered, including that high percentages of injected liquid water can reduce reactor operating temperature; combustion of BTEX remained highly efficient, however liquid injection could also cause temperature reductions and ultimately the reactor would extinguish; and pre-heating the feed can eliminate the temperature drop and pad wetness problem. It was concluded that BTEX compounds are reactive, and the technology appears promising. 19 figs.

  13. Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugele, B.; Scheider, J.; Spangl, W.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years several regulations and standards for air quality and limits for air pollution were issued or are in preparation by the European Union, which have severe influence on the environmental monitoring and legislation in Austria. This chapter of the environmental control report of Austria gives an overview about the legal situation of air pollution control in the European Union and in specific the legal situation in Austria. It gives a comprehensive inventory of air pollution measurements for the whole area of Austria of total suspended particulates, ozone, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, heavy metals, benzene, dioxin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and eutrophication. For each of these pollutants the measured emission values throughout Austria are given in tables and geographical charts, the environmental impact is discussed, statistical data and time series of the emission sources are given and legal regulations and measures for an effective environmental pollution control are discussed. In particular the impact of fossil-fuel power plants on the air pollution is analyzed. (a.n.)

  14. Experimental investigation of the catalytic decomposition and combustion characteristics of a non-toxic ammonium dinitramide (ADN)-based monopropellant thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Li, Guoxiu; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Meng; Yu, Yusong

    2016-12-01

    Low toxicity ammonium dinitramide (ADN)-based aerospace propulsion systems currently show promise with regard to applications such as controlling satellite attitude. In the present work, the decomposition and combustion processes of an ADN-based monopropellant thruster were systematically studied, using a thermally stable catalyst to promote the decomposition reaction. The performance of the ADN propulsion system was investigated using a ground test system under vacuum, and the physical properties of the ADN-based propellant were also examined. Using this system, the effects of the preheating temperature and feed pressure on the combustion characteristics and thruster performance during steady state operation were observed. The results indicate that the propellant and catalyst employed during this work, as well as the design and manufacture of the thruster, met performance requirements. Moreover, the 1 N ADN thruster generated a specific impulse of 223 s, demonstrating the efficacy of the new catalyst. The thruster operational parameters (specifically, the preheating temperature and feed pressure) were found to have a significant effect on the decomposition and combustion processes within the thruster, and the performance of the thruster was demonstrated to improve at higher feed pressures and elevated preheating temperatures. A lower temperature of 140 °C was determined to activate the catalytic decomposition and combustion processes more effectively compared with the results obtained using other conditions. The data obtained in this study should be beneficial to future systematic and in-depth investigations of the combustion mechanism and characteristics within an ADN thruster.

  15. Preheating of manure utilizing heat exchanger and flue gas. Forvarmning af gylle ved varmeveksling med roeggas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, J.

    1987-07-15

    It has been shown that preheating of manures in biomass conversion plants to a temperature of 50-60 deg. C, before the anaerobic digestion takes place at a temperature of 35-45 deg. C, results in an increase of methane production. But the method normally involves an increase in energy consumption. The aim of the project was to develope methods of utilizing heat from flue gas emitted from the boiler connected to the plant, with the help of a heat exchanger. The heat thus recovered would be used to preheat the manure. The chosen method was to inject the flue gas directly into the manure mass, following this up with heat exchanging and condensing. In order to mix the flue gas thoroughly into the manure an ejector was used, this was driven by the manure flow. Results were satisfactory. (AB).

  16. A pre-heating method based on sinusoidal alternating current for lithium-ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wentao; Sun, Fengchun; Guo, Shanshan

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a method of low temperature pre-heating of sinusoidal alternating current (SAC) is proposed. Generally, the lower the frequency of the AC current, the higher the heat generation rate. Yet at low frequency, there is a risk of lithium-ion deposition during the half cycle of charging. This study develops a temperature-adaptive, deposition-free AC pre-heating method. a equivalent electric circuit(EEC) model is established to predict the heat generation rate and temperature status, whose parameters are calibrated from the EIS impedance measurements. The effects of current frequency and amplitude on the heating effect are investigated respectively. A multistep temperature-adaptive amplitude strategy is proposed and the cell can be heated from -20°C to 5°C within 509s at 100Hz frequency with this method.

  17. Influence of the Previous Preheating Temperature on the Static Coefficient of Friction with Lubrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Živković

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigations static coefficient of friction in lubricated conditions and pre-heating of the sample pin at high temperatures is discussed in this paper. The static coefficient of friction was measured in the sliding steel copper pins per cylinder of polyvinylchloride. Pins are previously heated in a special chamber from room temperature to a temperature of 800 oC with a step of 50 °C. Tribological changes in the surface layer of the pins caused by pre-heating the pins at high temperatures and cooling systems have very significantly influenced the increase in the coefficient of static friction. The results indicate the possibility of improving the friction characteristics of metal materials based on their thermal treatment at elevated temperatures.

  18. Microshear bond strength of preheated silorane- and methacrylate-based composite resins to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirbuga, Sezer; Ucar, Faruk Izzet; Cayabatmaz, Muhammed; Zorba, Yahya Orcun; Cantekin, Kenan; Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of preheating on microshear bond strength (MSBS) of silorane and methacrylate-based composite resins to human dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into three main groups: (1) composite resins were heated upto 68 °C; (2) cooled to 4 °C; and (3) control [room temperature (RT)]. Each group was then randomly subdivided into four subgroups according to adhesive system used [Solobond M (Voco), All Bond SE (Bisco), Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) (Kuraray), Silorane adhesive system (SAS) (3M ESPE)]. Resin composite cylinders were formed (0.9 mm diameter × 0.7 mm length) and MSBS of each specimen was tested. The preheated groups exhibited the highest MSBS (p composite resins may be an alternative way to increase the MSBS of composites on dentin. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Advanced air/flue gas staging based on CFD modelling for enhanced combustion and burnout in a waste-wood fired boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajh, Boštjan; Yin, Chungen; Samec, Niko

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the impacts of the jet momentum, position and orientation of air and Recycled Flue Gas (RFG) streams on the performance of a grate-fired boiler burning waste wood via a comprehensive CFD-based parametric study. It is found that the air and RFG jets can be optimized to enhance m...

  20. Flow characterization and dilution effects of N2 and CO2 on premixed CH4/air flames in a swirl-stabilized combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Yue; Cai Guo-Biao; Wang Hai-Xing; Bruno Renou; Abdelkrim Boukhalfa

    2014-01-01

    Numerically-aided experimental studies are conducted on a swirl-stabilized combustor to investigate the dilution effects on flame stability, flame structure, and pollutant emissions of premixed CH 4 /air flames. Our goal is to provide a systematic assessment on combustion characteristics in diluted regimes for its application to environmentally-friendly approaches such as biogas combustion and exhaust-gas recirculation technology. Two main diluting species, N 2 and CO 2 , are tested at various dilution rates. The results obtained by means of optical diagnostics show that five main flame regimes can be observed for N 2 -diluted flames by changing excess air and dilution rate. CO 2 -diluted flames follow the same pattern evolution except that all the domains are shifted to lower excess air. Both N 2 and CO 2 dilution affect the lean blowout (LBO) limits negatively. This behavior can be counter-balanced by reactant preheating which is able to broaden the flammability domain of the diluted flames. Flame reactivity is degraded by increasing dilution rate. Meanwhile, flames are thickened in the presence of both diluting species. NO x emissions are significantly reduced with dilution and proved to be relevant to flame stability diagrams: slight augmentation in NO x emission profiles is related to transitional flame states where instability occurs. Although dilution results in increase in CO emissions at certain levels, optimal dilution rates can still be proposed to achieve an ideal compromise

  1. Acid skim milk gels: The gelation process as affected by preheated pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakemond, C.M.M.; Vliet, van T.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of preheating milk (10 min 80 [degree sign]C) at pH values from 6.20 to 6.90 on formation of acid skim milk gels was studied by dynamic oscillation measurements. Up to pH 6.65 a higher pH of heating (pHheating) resulted in a higher G'. Since below pH 4.9 the development of

  2. Energetic, Exergetic, and Economic Analysis of MED-TVC Water Desalination Plant with and without Preheating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Eshoul

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Desalination is the sole proven technique that can provide the necessary fresh water in arid and semi-arid countries in sufficient quantities and meet the modern needs of a growing world population. Multi effect desalination with thermal vapour compression (MED-TVC is one of most common applications of thermal desalination technologies. The present paper presents a comprehensive thermodynamic model of a 24 million litres per day thermal desalination plant, using specialised software packages. The proposed model was validated against a real data set for a large-scale desalination plant, and showed good agreement. The performance of the MED-TVC unit was investigated using different loads, entrained vapour, seawater temperature, salinity and number of effects in two configurations. The first configuration was the MED-TVC unit without preheating system, and the second integrated the MED-TVC unit with a preheating system. The study confirmed that the thermo-compressor and its effects are the main sources of exergy destruction in these desalination plants, at about 40% and 35% respectively. The desalination plant performance with preheating mode performs well due to high feed water temperature leading to the production of more distillate water. The seawater salinity was proportional to the fuel exergy and minimum separation work. High seawater salinity results in high exergy efficiency, which is not the case with membrane technology. The plant performance of the proposed system was enhanced by using a large number of effects due to greater utilisation of energy input and higher generation level. From an economic perspective, both indicators show that using a preheating system is more economically attractive.

  3. Resistive vs. total power depositions by Alfven modes in pre-heated low aspect ratio tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuperman, S.; Bruma, C.; Komoshvili, K.

    2004-01-01

    The power deposition of fast waves launched by a LFS located antenna in a pre-heated, strongly non-uniform low aspect ratio tokamak (START) is investigated. The rigorous computational results indicate a total power deposition by far larger than that predicted for Alfven continuum eigenmodes in cylindrical plasmas. For toroidal wave numbers |N| > 1, the resistive and total power depositions are almost equal. (author)

  4. Effect of preheating and light-curing unit on physicochemical properties of a bulk fill composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theobaldo JD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Jéssica Dias Theobaldo,1 Flávio Henrique Baggio Aguiar,1 Núbia Inocencya Pavesi Pini,2 Débora Alves Nunes Leite Lima,1 Priscila Christiane Suzy Liporoni,3 Anderson Catelan3 1Department of Restorative Dentistry, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Piracicaba, 2Ingá University Center, Maringá, 3Departament of Dentistry, University of Taubaté, Taubaté, Brazil Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of composite preheating and polymerization mode on degree of conversion (DC, microhardness (KHN, plasticization (P, and depth of polymerization (DP of a bulk fill composite.Methods: Forty disc-shaped samples (n = 5 of a bulk fill composite were prepared (5 × 4 mm thick and randomly divided into 4 groups according to light-curing unit (quartz–tungsten–halogen [QTH] or light-emitting diode [LED] and preheating temperature (23 or 54 °C. A control group was prepared with a flowable composite at room temperature. DC was determined using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, KHN was measured with a Knoop indenter, P was evaluated by percentage reduction of hardness after 24 h of ethanol storage, and DP was obtained by bottom/top ratio. Data were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey’s test (α = 0.05.Results: Regardless of light-curing, the highest preheating temperature increased DC compared to room temperature on bottom surface. LED showed a higher DC compared to QTH. Overall, DC was higher on top surface than bottom. KHN, P, and DP were not affected by curing mode and temperature, and flowable composite showed similar KHN, and lower DC and P, compared to bulk fill.Conclusion: Composite preheating increased the polymerization degree of 4-mm-increment bulk fill, but it led to a higher plasticization compared to the conventional flowable composite evaluated. Keywords: composite resins, physicochemical phenomena, polymerization, hardness, heating

  5. Theoretical Adiabatic Temperature and Chemical Composition of Sodium Combustion Flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2003-01-01

    Sodium fire safety analysis requires fundamental combustion properties, e.g., heat of combustion, flame temperature, and composition. We developed the GENESYS code for a theoretical investigation of sodium combustion flame.Our principle conclusions on sodium combustion under atmospheric air conditions are (a) the maximum theoretical flame temperature is 1950 K, and it is not affected by the presence of moisture; the uppermost limiting factor is the chemical instability of the condensed sodium-oxide products under high temperature; (b) the main combustion product is liquid Na 2 O in dry air condition and liquid Na 2 O with gaseous NaOH in moist air; and (c) the chemical equilibrium prediction of the residual gaseous reactants in the flame is indispensable for sodium combustion modeling

  6. Formation of toroidal pre-heat plasma without residual magnetic field for high-beta pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Nagayasu; Tamaru, Ken; Nagata, Akiyoshi.

    1979-01-01

    Formation of toroidal pre-heat plasma was studied. The pre-heat plasma without residual magnetic field was made by chopping the current for pre-heat, A small toroidal-pinch system was used for the experiment. The magnetic field was measured with a magnetic probe. One turn loop was used for the measurement of the toroidal one-turn electric field. A pair of Rogoski coil was used for the measurement of plasma current. The dependence of residual magnetic field on chopping time was measured. By fast chopping of the primary current in the pre-heating circuit, the poloidal magnetic field was reduced to several percent within 5 microsecond. After chopping, no instability was observed in the principal discharge plasma produced within several microsecond. As the conclusion, it can be said that the control of residual field can be made by current chopping. (Kato, T.)

  7. Simulación transitoria de una mezcla no reactiva de aire, combustible y gases de recirculación dentro de una precámara de combustión de un motor

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza Perez, Luis Daniel; Casanova Kindelán, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    El objetivo del presente trabajo fue predecir, en función del tiempo, los campos de velocidad, presión, temperatura y concentración de especies químicas de una mezcla no reactiva de aire, gases de recirculación y combustible (iso-octano), en una pre-cámara de combustión de un motor CFR, mediante la técnica de la simulación numérica de flujo de fluidos. Para ello se revisó el procedimiento de la solución numérica de las ecuaciones de transporte, aplicadas a la pre-cámara de combustión del moto...

  8. Project of multiple controller models for the maintenance of air/fuel ratio in natural gas internal combustion motors; Projeto de controladores multiplos modelos para manutencao da relacao ar/combustivel em motores de combustao interna movidos a gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas Junior, Fernando Sousa e; Fleury, Agenor de Toledo [Sao Paulo Univ. SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mails: ffreitas@usp.br; agfleury@ipt.br

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this work is the study of advanced control techniques for the reduction of pollutant gases generated by internal combustion engines powered by natural gas. In this paper three techniques are applied to control the fuel injection and the ignition timing: the Generalized Predictive Control (GPC), the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and H{infinity} Control by Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMI). To each one of those techniques were developed a multiple model structure seeking to include the vast operation region of the engine. The controller's performance is measured by the efficiency in maintaining the fuel/air ratio around 1% of maximum deviation in relation to the stoichiometric value. The results show the possibility of controlling pollutant emission generated by this kind of engine to conform to international emission standards, improving life quality. (author)

  9. Phase change material thermal storage for biofuel preheating in micro trigeneration application: A numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Dawei; Chen, Junlong; Roskilly, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Engine exhaust heat driven phase change material thermal storage. • Fuel preheating for direct use of straight plant oil on diesel engine. • CFD aided design of the phase change material thermal storage. • Melting and solidification model considering natural convection. - Abstract: A biofuel micro trigeneration prototype has been developed to utilise local energy crop oils as fuel in rural areas and developing countries. Straight plant oils (SPOs) only leave behind very little carbon footprint during its simply production process compared to commercial biodiesels in refineries, but the high viscosity of SPOs causes difficulties at engine cold starts, which further results in poor fuel atomisation, compromised engine performance and fast engine deterioration. In this study, a phase change material (PCM) thermal storage is designed to recover and store engine exhaust heat to preheat SPOs at cold starts. High temperature commercial paraffin is selected as the PCM to meet the optimal preheating temperature range of 70–90 °C, in terms of the SPO property study. A numerical model of the PCM thermal storage is developed and validated by references. The PCM melting and solidification processes with the consideration of natural convection in liquid zone are simulated in ANSYS-FLUENT to verify the feasibility of the PCM thermal storage as a part of the self-contained biofuel micro trigeneration prototype

  10. Delayed coking unit preheat train optimization; Otimizacao do preaquecimento das Unidades de Coque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marins, Edson R; Geraldelli, Washington O; Barros, Francisco C [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    The oil industry has been investing in research and development of new techniques and process improvements with the objective to increase the residual fraction profitability and to fulfill the market demands. The adequacy of the refining scheme has led to the development of bottom of the barrel processes that has the objective to convert heavy fractions into products of higher aggregate value. In this context, the process of Delayed Coking presents a great importance in the production of distillates in the diesel range as well as the processing of heavy residues, mostly in the markets where the fuel oil consumption is being reduced. With the approach to help PETROBRAS decide which route to follow during new designs of Delayed Coking units, this work presents a comparative study of the preheat train performance among the energy recovery to preheat the feed, in contrast with preheating the feed and generating steam, simultaneously. In this study the Pinch Technology methodology was used as a procedure for heat integration with the objective of getting the maximum energy recovery from the process, finding the best trade-off between operational cost and investment cost. The alternative of steam generation aims to provide an appropriate flexibility in Delayed Coking units design and operation. (author)

  11. Pre-HEAT: submillimeter site testing and astronomical spectra from Dome A, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesa, C. A.; Walker, C. K.; Schein, M.; Golish, D.; Tothill, N.; Siegel, P.; Weinreb, S.; Jones, G.; Bardin, J.; Jacobs, K.; Martin, C. L.; Storey, J.; Ashley, M.; Lawrence, J.; Luong-Van, D.; Everett, J.; Wang, L.; Feng, L.; Zhu, Z.; Yan, J.; Yang, J.; Zhang, X.-G.; Cui, X.; Yuan, X.; Hu, J.; Xu, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Yang, H.; Li, Y.; Sun, B.; Qin, W.; Shang, Z.

    2008-07-01

    Pre-HEAT is a 20 cm aperture submillimeter-wave telescope with a 660 GHz (450 micron) Schottky diode heterodyne receiver and digital FFT spectrometer for the Plateau Observatory (PLATO) developed by the University of New South Wales. In January 2008 it was deployed to Dome A, the summit of the Antarctic plateau, as part of a scientific traverse led by the Polar Research Institute of China and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Dome A may be one of the best sites in the world for ground based Terahertz astronomy, based on the exceptionally cold, dry and stable conditions which prevail there. Pre-HEAT is measuring the 450 micron sky opacity at Dome A and mapping the Galactic Plane in the 13CO J=6-5 line, constituting the first submillimeter measurements from Dome A. It is field-testing many of the key technologies for its namesake -- a successor mission called HEAT: the High Elevation Antarctic Terahertz telescope. Exciting prospects for submillimeter astronomy from Dome A and the status of Pre-HEAT will be presented.

  12. Modelling of preheated regenerative chain in Cernavoda NPP using MMS calculation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, M.; Nita, I.; Prisecaru, I.; Dupleac, D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In this work it was studied operation of preheated regenerative chain from NPP Cernavoda. To obtain this analysis coupled analyses of condensate system, water supply system, and drain cooler system were effected. The analysis boundaries are: Upstream: - Steam condensers - Turbine Bleed Steam Downstream: - Steam Generators. The analysis was made in two steps: 1) Getting of hydraulic characteristic of pipe network from steam condensers to steam generators at nominal regime; this step was obtained with hydraulic package called PIPENET. 2) Real thermal hydraulic analyses were done based on hydraulic characteristic of pipe network and supplementary data required for heat transfer calculation in equipment of preheated regenerative chain. Thermal analyses were done using MMS package and refered to normal operating regimes, namely, nominal operating regime required for calibration of calculating model, shutdown regime, start-up regime from zero power hot to nominal power and to abnormal operating regimes, namely, turbine trip, reactor trip and loss of two condensate pumps. The results were compared with already existing analysis and showed the largest differences at interface areas (i.e. 5%). This led us to idea of extending analysis to all secondary circuits in order to reduce the number of boundary conditions which can generate uncertainty in analysis. In this analysis we obtained an advanced model of preheated regenerative chain of secondary circuit in Cernavoda NPP which could be extended up to cover the whole secondary circuit by including the analysis of steam generators, turbine, and steam condenser. (authors)

  13. Modelling of preheated regenerative chain in Cernavoda NPP using MMS calculation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, M.; Nita, I.; Prisecaru, I.; Dupleac, D.

    2005-01-01

    In this work it was studied operation of preheated regenerative chain from NPP Cernavoda. To obtain this analysis coupled analyses of condensate system, water supply system, and drain cooler system were effected. The analysis boundaries are: Upstream: - Steam condensers - Turbine Bleed Steam Downstream: - Steam Generators. The analysis was made in two steps: 1) Getting of hydraulic characteristic of pipe network from steam condensers to steam generators at nominal regime; this step was obtained with hydraulic package called PIPENET. 2) Real thermal hydraulic analyses were done based on hydraulic characteristic of pipe network and supplementary data required for heat transfer calculation in equipment of preheated regenerative chain. Thermal analyses were done using MMS package and referred to normal operating regimes, namely, nominal operating regime required for calibration of calculating model, shutdown regime, start-up regime from zero power hot to nominal power and to abnormal operating regimes, namely, turbine trip, reactor trip and loss of two condensate pumps. The results were compared with already existing analysis and showed the largest differences at interface areas (i.e. 5%). This led US to idea of extending analysis to all secondary circuits in order to reduce the number of boundary conditions which can generate uncertainty in analysis. In this analysis we obtained an advanced model of preheated regenerative chain of secondary circuit in Cernavoda NPP which could be extended up to cover the whole secondary circuit by including the analysis of steam generators, turbine, and steam condenser. (authors)

  14. Plasma formation and target preheating by prepulse of PW laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Iwata, Natsumi; Koga, James; Dover, Nicholas; Nishiuchi, Mamiko

    2017-10-01

    An intense short pulse laser with intensity over 1021 W/cm2 has become available, i.e. J-KAREN-P at QST. Although the contrast of the short pulse is improved to be of the order of 10-11, there is an unavoidable prepulse, which has multiple spikes (ps) on top of an exponential profile with intensity greater than 1014 W/cm2 about 50 ps in front of the main pulse. The prepulse preheats the target and also produces tenuous plasmas in front of a target before the main pulse arrives. It is critical to understand such preheating of the target, where the nonlocal heat transport is essential at intensity >1014 W/cm2, since the target condition might totally change before the interaction with the main pulse. Using a hydro code, FLASH, and a collisional particle-in-cell code, PICLS, we study the preplasma formation and target preheating over tens of picoseconds timescale, and discuss the prepulse effects on the main pulse interaction. Work supported by the JSPS KAKENHI under Grant No. JP15K21767.

  15. Plan for radionuclide tracer studies of the residence time distribution in the Wilsonville dissolver and preheater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, R.L.; Begovich, J.M.; Brashear, H.R.

    1983-12-01

    Stimulus-response measurements using radiotracers to measure residence time distribution (RTD) and hydrodynamic parameters for the preheaters and dissolvers at the Ft. Lewis Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) and the Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal conversion pilot plants are reviewed. A plan is also presented for a series of radioactive tracer studies proposed for the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility at Wilsonville, Alabama, to measure the RTD for the preheater and dissolvers in the SRC-I mode. The tracer for the gas phase will be 133 Xe, and 198 Au (on carbonized resin or as an aqueous colloidal suspension) will be used as the slurry tracer. Four experimental phases are recommended for the RTD tracer studies: (1) preheater; (2) dissolver with 100% takeoff; (3) dissolver with 100% takeoff and solids withdrawal; and (4) dissolver with 50% takeoff. Eighteen gas-tracer and 22 liquid-tracer injections are projected to accomplish the four experimental phases. Two to four tracer injections are projected for preliminary tests to ensure the capability of safe injection of the radiotracers and the collection of statistically significant data. A complete projected cost and time schedule is provided, including procurement of necessary components, preparation of the radiotracers, assembly and testing of tracer injection apparatus and detection systems, onsite work and tracer injections, laboratory experimentation, data analysis, and report writing

  16. Tekken tests in a steel 'ASTM A 514 GR B' to determine the preheating temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada, Hector Juan; Zalazar, Monica; Asta, Eduardo Pablo

    2004-01-01

    Cold fissure tests are used to determine the proper preheating temperature in order to prevent fissures during the steel welding process. Tekken tests were carried out on a quenched and tempered high resistance 25.4 mm thick steel (ASTM A514 Gr.B) used in structural applications. The welding was carried out using a FCAW semiautomatic process with gas protection and low hydrogen tubular electrode E110T5-K4. Similar parameters and splicing design were later applied in production. The microstructures of the base material and the welding were determined by optic and electron microscopy. The thermal cycles of the welding were recorded in order to relate the preheating temperature with the cooling time from 800 o C - 500 o C (t 8/5 ) and from 800 o C - 100 o C (tg/1) and the presence or not of fissures. Preheating at 150 o C and t 8/5 greater than 17 s was found to guarantee fissure free welding (CW)

  17. Tekken testing to determine the preheating temperature on ASTM A514 GR B steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asta, Eduardo; Zalazar, Monica; Quesada, Hector

    2003-01-01

    The cold cracking test methods are used to determine the preheating temperature in order to avoid cracking in steel welding.In this work Tekken tests on high strength quenching and tempering (ASTM A514 GrB) structural steel with a thickness of 25 mm have been made.The welds were done using a FCAW process with gas shielding and basic low hydrogen cored wire E 110T5-K4.The welding parameters and joint design applied in this work are similar to the ones used on site production.The base metal, HAZ and weld metal microstructure have been evaluated by optical and SEM microscopy.Thermal cycles records of each welding have been made to relate preheat temperature with the cooling time on the range of 800-500 degC (t8/5) or 800-100degC (t8/1) and the evidence of crack or no crack condition.Finally, a preheat temperature of 150degC and the cooling time larger than 17 s improve a welding integrity without cracks

  18. Establishment of Combustion Model for Isooctane HCCI Marine Diesel Engine and Research on the Combustion Characteristic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Biao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI combustion mode applied in marine diesel engine is expected to be one of alternative technologies to decrease nitrogen oxide (NOX emission and improve energy utilization rate. Applying the chemical-looping combustion (CLC mechanism inside the cylinder, a numerical study on the HCCI combustion process is performed taking a marine diesel engine as application object. The characteristic feature of combustion process is displayed. On this basis, the formation and emission of NOX are analyzed and discussed. The results indicate that the HCCI combustion mode always exhibit two combustion releasing heats: low-temperature reaction and high-temperature reaction. The combustion phase is divided into low-temperature reaction zone, high-temperature reaction zone and negative temperature coefficient (NTC zone. The operating conditions of the high compression ratio, high intake air temperature, low inlet pressure and small excess air coefficient would cause the high in-cylinder pressure which often leads engine detonation. The low compression ratio, low intake air temperature and big excess air coefficient would cause the low combustor temperature which is conducive to reduce NOX emissions. These technological means and operating conditions are expected to meet the NOX emissions limits in MARPOL73/78 Convention-Annex VI Amendment.

  19. Rotary combustion device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Rotary combustion device (1) with rotary combustion chamber (4). Specific measures are taken to provide ignition of a combustible mixture. It is proposed that a hollow tube be provided coaxially with the axis of rotation (6), so that a small part of the mixture is guided into the combustion chamber.

  20. Solid waste combustion for alpha waste incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orloff, D.I.

    1981-02-01

    Radioactive waste incinerator development at the Savannah River Laboratory has been augmented by fundamental combustion studies at the University of South Carolina. The objective was to measure and model pyrolysis and combustion rates of typical Savannah River Plant waste materials as a function of incinerator operating conditions. The analytical models developed in this work have been incorporated into a waste burning transient code. The code predicts maximum air requirement and heat energy release as a function of waste type, package size, combustion chamber size, and temperature. Historically, relationships have been determined by direct experiments that did not allow an engineering basis for predicting combustion rates in untested incinerators. The computed combustion rates and burning times agree with measured values in the Savannah River Laboratory pilot (1 lb/hr) and full-scale (12 lb/hr) alpha incinerators for a wide variety of typical waste materials